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THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR ENDING… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1920

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Full Text

 TUTRD ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
FOR  THE  YEAR   ENDING
DECEMEEK 31ST, 1919
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY  OF  THE  LEGISLATIVE   ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by William H.  Cullin,  Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1920.  To Colonel the Honourable Edward Gawler Prior,
A Member of the King's Privy Council for Canada,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to submit for your consideration herewith the Annual Report
of the Land Settlement Board for the year 1919.
E. D. BARROW,
Minister of Agriculture.
Department of Agriculture,
Victoria, B.C., March 19th, 1920.
M 57 jand Settlement Board of British Columbia,
Victoria, B.C., March 17th, 1920.
The Honourable E. D. Barrow,
Minister of Agriculture, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to transmit herewith the Third Annual Report of the
Land Settlement Board for the year ending December 31st, 1919.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
W. S. LATTA,
Director.
M 58 Land Settlement Board of British Columbia.
Land Settlement.
During tbe year the Land Settlement Board has succeeded in establishing settlement areas
in the vicinity of Prince George, Martin Lake, Alexandria, Rose Lake, Smithers, Francois Lake,
Tatalaska Lake, Colleymount, and 10-Mile Lake respectively.
The benefits to be derived from the establishing of such areas are manifold. Many of the
owners of land within such areas are now making a serious effort to develop their holdings in
order to comply with the regulations of the Board. Others who find it inconvenient to utilize
their lands are selling same to the Board at their appraised values, the Board in turn disposing
of the lands so acquired to settlers who are in a position to utilize same.
The absentee owner or speculator is being forced into activity, and is now carrying on an
energetic colonization campaign and disposing of his holdings to bona-fi.de settlers at reasonable
prices in order to escape the conditions imposed by the " Land Settlement and Development Act"
and the regulations of the Board.
An energetic educational campaign has been carried on with a view to interesting the settlers
now on the land as to the best means of utilizing their farms.
Realizing that the Cariboo and Central British Columbia is specially adapted for dairying,
and that the future success of the farmer in these districts will depend largely on the dairy cow,
the Board has succeeded in interesting the farmers in this important industry, with the result
that large numbers of them have, with tbe assistance of the Board, already procured tbe nucleus
of dairy herds, and thus the foundation of an important industry has beeD laid.
Arrangements are now under way by which creameries will be established at different points,
and the farmers are taking a lively interest in the construction of silos., several, of which have
already been built, with a view to economic feeding, the Board rendering assistance by distributing educational literature, furnishing plans, etc., and making arrangements whereby the material
necessary for construction may be procured at reasonable prices.
Land Development.
Early in 1919 the attention of the Land Settlement Board was directed to the need for
organized land-clearing to be undertaken in order to provide new areas for cultivation and
production in the heavily timbered lands of Vancouver Island and Southern British Columbia.
It was recognized that adjacent to some of the best agricultural districts in the Province
heavily timbered areas existed on which soil conditions were highly favourable to agricultural
production, but that these were lying idle on account of the heavy initial work required to clear
and make available such areas for cultivation.
Steps were taken to make a selection of typical areas with a view to undertaking land-
clearing on a large scale. At the same time the need for measures to provide land for returned
men who were desirous of taking up farming was so great as to compel immediate action along
the lines indicated above.
Two main areas were selected, one comprising 14,000 acres of logged-over land in the Comox
District, seven miles north of Courtenay; another in the Kootenay, near Creston, the latter
containing 7,000 acres of land partially logged off.
Two smaller areas were acquired, one of 440 acres near Kelowna and one of approximately
1,000 acres near Fernie. These two, however, cannot be taken as typical areas for purposes
of comparison.
In all areas a detailed survey was made and plans for the subdivision into farm units to
suit local conditions were adopted.
The following are the average sizes of farm units in the various areas: Courtenay, 50 acres;
Creston, 20 acres;   Kelowna, 15 acres;   Fernie, 80 acres.
It was decided as a general guide to development-work that the farms would be partially
cleared, a proportionate acreage, varying from 5 to 20 acres, being fully cleared on each and a
further similar acreage partially cleared for pasture. House-construction was undertaken in the
two main areas.
M 59' M 60
Land Settlement Board.
1920
The policy adopted by the Board with regard to the actual settlement of the areas was to
employ in the development-work men who were desirous of obtaining farms ultimately. It was
considered that the fitness of all such men for the work and management of a farm would be
determined to a very great extent by their personal records in tbe development phase. This
has been proved correct, and at the present time it is considered that, while development and
cultivation of farms should be carried forward with all possible speed, the actual turning-over
of such farms to individuals should be delayed until all possible steps have been taken to assure
success.
Thus, while at Courtenay there are 200 acres that will be ready for crop in the coming
season and at Creston approximately 100 acres in a similar state, it is considered desirable if
possible to continue with the further development of the areas, using all available men for this
purpose, while at the same time making full use of the land already available for cultivation.
Apart from the above plan, it will be advisable to allow a number of men who are well
qualified to take up loans under the Soldier Settlement Board and to operate their own farms
in the coming year. Arrangements are now complete with the Soldier Settlement Board to
enable this to be done in a manner satisfactory to this Board.
Agricultural representatives are at work in both areas giving instruction to settlers and
supervising cultivation of available land.
In addition to clearing operations, approximately 1,600 acres at Courtenay were seeded
down last autumn for pasture. This area is being fenced and will provide adequate grazing
for the community needs.
Owing to the increased cost of lumber, steps have been taken at Courtenay and Creston to
secure a permanent supply at a cost uniform with that obtaining at the commencement of the
work. At Creston a valuable timber limit is being acquired lying immediately adjacent to the
area.    A sawmill plant having a capacity of 20,000 feet per day will be installed.
It is considered that the manufactured lumber available by this means will be ample for
all future requirements and that the requirements of the sawmill and logging-work will give
additional employment to the settlers.
It is of interest to note that the land on which the timber referred to is located is of very
good value for agricultural purposes and will be available ultimately for settlement.
In summarizing work completed in the development areas up to the end of the year, returns
for land-clearing show that over 300 acres have been fully cleared, 350 acres blasted ready for
grubbing, and 700 additional acres rough cleared; 1,600 acres have been seeded down for common
pasturage.    Eighty temporary and thirty-five permanent houses have been erected.
Over 300 returned soldiers have received constant employment at wages ranging from $4
per day upwards. Of the above, 100 married men with families have been accommodated in
the areas, and schools at Creston and Courtenay have been erected to accommodate over 120
children who are of school age.
Stores are operated at Courtenay and Creston to supply the needs of the settlers, all profits
being divided amongst the people in the settlements in proportion to the amount of purchases.
A community centre has been laid out at Courtenay, with provision also for a number of
small tracts of land for workmen.
Agbicultubal Loans.
The lending of money on agricultural lands during the past season's operations has been of
very material benefit to the farmers of British Columbia in enabling them to increase agricultural
production by the purchase of stock, implements, machinery, etc., and to clear and bring under
cultivation more land. The fact that only a very small percentage of the borrowers are in
arrears and that no foreclosures were necessary points to a very healthy state of affairs in this
branch of the Board's work.
Dyking Commissioners.
The Board has also acted during 1919 as Dyking and Drainage Commissioners for the Suinas
Dyking District, West Kicomen Dyking District, and Cameron Drainage District. 10 Geo. 5
Third Annual Report.
AGRICULTURAL CREDIT COMMISSION.
Report of Loan Applications foe the Year ending December 31st, 1919.
On Hand at January 1st, 1919.
11 appraised    $25,250 00
Disposed of  as  follows:— Applied for. Granted.
1 granted      8 6,000 00 $0,000 00
2 rejected         6,000 00
8 pending        13,250 00
$25,250 00
26 unappraised  $22,150 00
Disposed of as follows:—
7  withdrawn      $ 7,950 00
19 awaiting appraisal     14,200 00
$22,150 00
Report of Applications during 1919.
11 appraised (as at January 1st, 1919)    $25,250 00
Disposed of as follows:— Applied for. Granted.
1 granted     $ 6,000 0O $6,000 00
2 rejected         6,000 00
8 pending        13,250 00
$25,250 00
Eight Applications pending Action as at January 1st, 1919.
Application No.
Amount.
Remarks.
36  	
$     500 00
850 00
3.000 00
500 00
1,000 00
4.400 00
2,000 00
1,000 00
79  	
Enemy alien.
193  	
270  	
539  	
725 	
757  	
1233    	
8   	
$13,250 00
26 unappraised    $22,150 00
Disposed of as follows':—
7 withdrawn  $ 7,950 00
19 awaiting appraisal       14.200 00
$22,150 00 M 62
Land Settlement Board.
1920
Nineteen Applications awaiting Appraisal as at January 1st, 1919.
Application No.
Amount.
Remarks.
Fees.
600 	
$ 1,000 00
$ 5 00
631	
1,000 00
5 00
749 	
500 00
2 50
755 	
350 00
2 50
827 	
500 00
2 50
864 	
600 00
5 00
974 	
500 00
2 50
1019 	
500 00
2 50
1024  	
1,000 00
;»                        j
5 00
1154	
250 00
2 50
1180  	
1,000 00
5 00
1194 	
500 00
,,                        ,
2 50
1202 	
2,000 00
„                       ,
7 50
1358 	
500 00
„                        ,
2 50
1377  	
500 00
500 00
»
5 00
1385 	
2 50
1401  	
1,000 00
„                        ,
7 00
597  	
1,500 00
500 00
7 50
1355 	
2 50
19 	
$14,200 00
$77 00
Status of Agricultural Credit Commission Loans as at December 31st, 1910.
382 loans In force as at end of 1918 for  $773,350 00
1 loan cancelled during 1919  $      750 00
40 loans have been paid off during 1919      79,350 00
41 loans disposed of as at December 31st, 1919 $ S0.100 00
3S2 loans in force    $773,350 00
41 loans disposed of        80,100 00
341 loans .in force as at January 1st, 1920, for $693,250 00
4 loans granted, principal not yet paid $   4,300 00
Amount still due to borrowers  $    4,238 00
Balance of loans as at December 31st, 1919—
Principal    $639,086 58
Interest    ,        6,405 62
645,582 20
Accrued Interest on Victory Loan Bonds.
Amount.
Due Date.
No. of Days.
Rate.
Interest.
$ 53,250 00
110,150 00
Less amount now
31
01
Per Cent.
51/2
51/2
$   248 74
1,012 48
$163,400 00
$1,261 22
379 72
$   8S1 50 10 Geo. 5
Third Annual Report.
M 63
Revenue and Expenditube Accounts for Tear ending December 31st, 1919.
A.C.C. Accounts.
Expenditure.
Revenue.
$ 7,857 65
157 '85
54 60
32 75'
20'0 00
45,000, 00
240 95
116 00
13 96
1,582 20
6,112 00
Balance, being deficit for year
   $ 1,314
      46,964
        5,249
              15
carried
        7,744
93
05
Depreciation,  furniture  and  equipment
70
00
•'(>
m
Interest on deferred payments, Victory
U.S. premium on coupons  	
Discount on debentures, 1/25 written off
$61,367 96
$61,367
00
Statement of Assets and Liabilities as at December 31st, 1919.
A.C.C. Accounts.
Assets.
Cash in bank—
Canadian Bank of Commerce—
Current Account    $      20,075  77
Coupon   Account     1,327 50
Discount on debenture sales         130,389 34
Furniture and equipment     500 00
Loans on security of first mortgage         639,086 58
Iuterest outstanding on loans        6,495 62
Accrued interest on loans           10,305 63
Sinking Funds        104,CS3  00
Victory Loan bonds   $163,400 00
Canadian Bank of Commerce.. 21 78
Accrued   interest    on    Victory
Loan bonds          1,261 22 .
Balance—■
Deficit as at Dee. 31st, 1918..$ 47,261 81
Deficit for year ended December 31st, 1919           7,744 93
         55,006 74
$1,034,770 18
Liabilities.
Debentures, due May 1st, 1941   $1,000,000 00
Appraisal fees   (unearned)     77 00
Coupons unpaid  1,327  50
Accrued interest ou debentures     7,500 00
Accounts payable   j        25,83e 11
$1,034,770 18
Deficit,   1916   $19,015 32
1917    22,200 92
1918    6,045 57
1919    7,744 93
Total   deficit     $55,006 74
LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD.
Report of Loan Applications for the Year ending December 31st, 1919.
1918 Applications.
9 appraised  $ 16,100 00
Disposed of as follows:— Applied for. Granted.
1 granted     $ 2,000 00 $1,400 00
2 rejected        6,500 00
6 pending        7,600 00
$10,100 00 M 64
Land Settlement Board.
1920
24 unappraised $ 34,850 00
Disposed of as follows:—
7 granted    $12,250 00 $11,150 00
11 rejected      12,900 00
6 awaiting appraisal       9,700 00
$34,850 00
1919 Applications.
180 applications $452,650 00
Disposed of as follows :—
85 granted     $178,250 00 $151,650 00
62 rejected     207,800 00
33 awaiting action       66,600 00
180
$452,650 00
Status of Land Settlement Board Loans as at December 31st, 1919.
217 loans in force as at end of 1918 for $468,850 00
100 loans granted during 1919 for    183,700 00
317 loans granted for   $652,550 00
19 loans cancelled during 1919 for   $30,650 00
21 loans have been paid off      37,700 00
40 loans have been disposed of for       68,350 00
277 loans in force $584,200 00
36 loans granted, principal not yet paid     $88,100 00
Amount still due to borrowers       86,487 49
Balance of loans as at December 31st, 1919—
Principal $472,885 76
Interest .*        3,755 30
 476,641 06
Statement of Assets and Liabilities as at December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
Cash and advances—
Cash in hand  $      604 51
Cash in bank   260 73
Advances to Directors and sub-offices for expenses        1,200 OO
Loans—
Loans granted  $621,900 00
Less amounts due to borrowers      145.25S 94
Accrued interest—
On loans $ 7,496 88
On live-stock sales    506 74
On land-sales   1,327 68
Accounts receivable—
Live-stock sales  $ 40,028 17
Agricultural Credit Commission       24,603 86
Sundry accounts   299 95
Carried forward
$      2,065 24
476,641 06
9,331 30
64,931 98
552,969 58 10 Geo. 5
Third Annual Report.
M 05
Brought forward     $   552,969 58
Land purchases and development—
Area. Purchase Price.
Courtenay  $ 64,89S 86
Creston         S2,834 85
Kelowna         33,070 50
Fernie     12 50
Telkwa         27,668 35
Vanderhoof         64,600 66
Marten Lake
Lot 341, R. 5, CD.
Cranbrook   	
Smithers  	
Rose Lake  	
6-Mile Lake 	
Alexandria   	
Francois Lake ....
4,007 32
Prince George       42,117 29
3,215 35
4,741 99
Development Costs.
$255,059 09
115,657 61
17,9€0 21
20,055 22
2,022 10
4,720 84
1,251 56
1,176 42
539 90
917 24
750 20
274 CO
490 60
1,031 49
$327,317 67 $422,807 68
327,317 67
Investigations— • 	
10-Mile Lake   (lands)     $      422 81
Barrett Ranch  (lands)           1,380 64
Sayward District  (lands)     235 40
Pritchard  (lands)    777 89
Beaver Valley  (lands)     308 90
Elk Creek  (drainage)    '.  60 SO
Dyking and drainage projects—
Capital Account—
Cameron drainage .' $    6,570 03
Sumas Dyke      26,216 94
Cherry Creek         1,490 85
Maintenance Account—
West Nicomen Dyke        3,317 68
Office furniture and equipment  (less depreciation)   	
Office alterations 	
Motor-car  (less depreciation)   	
Stationery   	
Balance—
Deficit as at December 31st, 1918 $ 16,731 67
Deficit for year ending December 31st, 1919      51,856 52
750,125
3,166 44
37,596 10
2,355 00
700 00
GOO 00
400 00
  68,588 19
$1,416,500 66
Liabilities.
Loans—
Provincial Treasury    $1,315,897 92
Accounts payable—
Sundry    $    1,971 38
Development areas       57,277 55
         59,248 93
Carried forward   $1,375,146 85 M 66
Land Settlement Board.
1920
Brought forward    $1,375,146 85
Land-sales receipts—
Part Lot 341, R. 5, CD $      550 00
Telkwa Area      16,094 81
Vanderhoof Area         22,948 66
Courtenay Area   64 24
Marten Lake Area        1,447 60
 41,105 31
Appraisal fees unearned   248 50
$1,416,500 66
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year ending December 31st, 1919.
Expenditure.
Salaries—
Directors    $ 7,987 25
. Office staff    13,118 14
 $21,
Travelling expenses—
Directors    $  7,759  10
Office staff         296 14
 8,
Office expenses—
Stationery    $     690 28
Postage  375  00
Telegrams and telephone            160 00
 1,
Sub-offices—■
Vancouver (salaries and expenses).? 1,054 47
Kelowna   (expenses)     84 60
Cranbrook   (expenses)            210 55
      1,
Interest on Treasury loans       47,
Rebates on returned soldiers' land purchases..    14
Publicity, pamphlets, etc	
Expenses re  live-stock purchases   	
Depreciation—
Furniture and equipment    $270 29
Alterations      542 81
Costs of investigations written off—
Palling lands    $194 70
ftippou  lands     67 6S
Leistikow lauds     141 60
Kitwanga lands     28 00
Fort St. James lands    32 75
Burns Lake lands     56 95
Gold Creek lands  13 00
Nazko  Elver  lauds     33 50
General lands  80 00
" Empress of Asia " scheme  178 00
Directors' removal expenses  	
225  28
949
(12
T72
72
919
10
544
75
350
19
813
10
S20  18
446 43
S.014  00
Appraisal fees  	
Exchange, discount, and commission
Legal fees   	
Interest—
On  loans    $33,445  72
Less  rebates         1,321  54
885 00
24  81
725 20
Live-stock sales	
Bank deposits   	
Land-sales    	
Dyking and drainage projects
$32,124  IS
1,527  56
200  73
1,549  60
1,202  75
30,064  82
Agricultural   Credit   Commission,   proportion   of
operating expenses           7,857  05
Balance,    being   deficit   for   year,    carried   to
balance-sheet        51,856  52
$9S,014  00
I hereby certify that the accompanying balance-sheets and revenue and expenditure statements are in agreement with the books of the Land Settlement Board (including the separate
books of the Agricultural Credit Commission), and exhibit a true and fair statement of the
financial position of the Board as at December 31st, 1919, and the result of the operations for
the year ended that date.
A. N. Mouat, C.A.,
Comptroller-General.
Victoria, B.C., March 11th, 1920.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by  William H.  Cullin,  Printer  to the King's  Most Excellent  Majesty.
1920.

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