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TENTH ANNUAL REPORT ON THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 1880-81. BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly. 1882

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 Tenth  Annual Report
ON THE
PUBLIC   SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF
British   Columbia.
1880-81.
BY THE
SUPERINTENDENT   OF   EDUCATION.
Wiiik Dtpflwulitta.
19
VICTORIA : Printed by Richard Wolfbndex, Government Printer,
sit the Government Printing Office, James' Bay.
1882.  45 Vio. Public Schools Report. 247
PART  I.
General Report.  45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 249
Annual Report
OF  THE
Superintendent of Education.
1880-81.
Education Office, Victoria.
To the Hon. T. B. Humphreys,
Provincial Secretary.
In accordance with the "Public School Act, 1879," I beg to submit, for the information of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, the Tenth Annual Beport on the condition
of the Public Schools of the Province of British Columbia.
The creation of a School District at Quesnellemouth has increased the number of
School Districts to 48.
The enrollment in all the Schools during the year reached 2571, the highest number
yet attained. A marked and substantial increase is shown in this particular," more
especially as duplicate enrollments in the Schools of Victoria, New Westminster and
Nanaimo have for the first time been eliminated from the returns of those Schools. The
average daily attendance has risen to 1367, an improvement being shown also in this
respect.
The total cost of education for the year, including building, insurance, &c, has been
$49,840.07, a sum larger than that expended in the previous year by $2,839.97 This
increase is principally made up of an increase in the amount expended on buildings
and permanent improvements ($1,444.75), an increase in the amount expended in
teachers' salaries ($954.02), and an increase in the amount expended for the incidental
expenses of Schools, such as heating, cleaning, &c, ($674.25).
The cost of each pupil based on the number enrolled has been $19.38, and that on
the average daily attendance $36.46, advances on the previous year of 29 cents and 13
cents per head respectively. Of the $49,400, so liberally voted by the Legislature for
education during the year ended 30th June, 1881, the sum of $2,438.31 remains unexpended.
The Tables accompanying this Eeport traverse the same ground as do those of
former years, and as considerable pains has been taken in making them as accurate as
possible, I trust they will give as true a representation of the actual state of things as
is possible to be given. Table O (Description and estimated value of School property")
and Table P (Dates and boundaries of School Districts), omitted last year, have been
added to this year's report, the latter Table being found especially convenient for reference
by trustees.
I here present an abstract of the statistical information to be found in the Tables:
Statistical Abstract.
School population of the Province  Not known.
Increase for the year  Not known.
Number of pupils enrolled in all the schools during the year  2,571
Increase for the year  109 250 Public Schools Report. 1881
Number of boys enrolled  1,441
Increase for the year  98
Number of girls enrolled  1,130
Increase for the year    11
Average daily attendance for the year  1,366.86
Increase for the year  72.96
Number of children attending private schools  Not known.
Increase for the year  Not known.
Number of children not attending any school  Not known.
Increase for the year  Not known.
Total enrollment in High School  76
Decrease for the year  6
Number of boys enrolled in High School  37
Decrease for the year  14
Number of girls enrolled in High School  39
Increase for the year  8
Average daily attendance in High School  52.75
Decrease for the year  1.95
Total enrollment in common schools  2,495
Increase for the year  115
Average daily attendance in common schools  1,314.11
Increase for the year  74.88
Percentage of attendance in all the public schools  53.1
Do.                   do.             the High School  69.4
Do.                   do.             in common schools  52.7
Average daily attendance per teacher in all the public schools  23.4
Do.               do.                       do.        in High School   26.4
Do.                do.                       do.       in common schools  23.3
Do. do. do.        in the common  schools  of New
Westminster, Victoria and Nanaimo   38.8
Average daily attendance per teacher in the rest of the common schools... 17.3
Number of School Districts  48
Number of School Houses used  53
Do.                   do.                   for High School  1
Do.                   do.                   for common schools  52
Do.      of brick buildings  1
Do.      of frame or wood buildings  37
Do.      of log buildings  6
Do.      of rented or rent free school houses  9
Do.      of pupils taughtin rented orrent free buildings  244
Amount paid for rent  $170
Number of teachers in all the public schools  58
Do.           do.         inHigh School  2
Do.           do.         in common schools  56
Do.      of male teachers  35
Do.      of female teachers  23
Cost of education for the year  $49,846 07
Increase for the year  2,839 97
Total of teachers' salaries forthe year  41,169 35
Increase for the year  954 02
Total of incidental expenses for the year  3,584 57
Increase for the year  674 25
Total of expenditure for building, repairs, fences, &c, (L. & W. dept.)  2,281 83
Increase forthe year  1,444 75
Total of expenditure for rent  170 00
Decrease  40 00
Total of expenditure for insurance  602 55
Decrease for the year. ,  67 75
Total number of teachers employed during the year  62
Total number of teachers employed on permanent staff.  58 45 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
251
Schedule of Salaries of all Teachers employed during the year:—
1 teacher at  $110
3      do.     at  90
1      do.     at  85
1 do.     at  83i
2 do.     at  80
1      do.    at.  75
6      do.     at  70
18      do.     at  60
5      do.     at  55
23      do.     at  50
1      do.    at  45
Schedule of Salaries of Teachers on
permanent staff'.—
1 teacher at  $110
3      do.     at  90
1      do.     at  85
1 do.    at  83£
2 do.     at  80
1     do.    at  75
6     do.    at  70
17     do.    at  60
5      do.    at  55
20     do.    at  50
1     do.    at  45
Average monthly salary of all teachers employed  $ 60 54
Do.                       do.           do.        on permanent staff  61 10
Highest salary of a teacher  110 00
Lowest    do.                do.     (one only)  45 00
Estimated value of school sites  12,860 00
Do.               do.    buildings  68,500 00
Do.               do.    furniture  3,000 00
Total valuation of school property  84,360 00
Comparative Expenses of the Public Schools and Total Expenses of the Province.
Year.
1871*
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879t
1879-80
1880-81
Total.
Total Expenses of
the Province.
$ 97,691 81
432,082 71
372,618 64
583,355 89
614,658 89
728,310 01
648,783 84
448,835 83
161,715 20
446,575 00
378.77S 69
,913,406 51
Expenses of
School
Department.
$ 2,578 06
25,435 78
39,999 89
38,908 30
38,891 42
44,506 11
47,129 63
43,334 01
22,110 70
47,006 10
46,960 69
$396,861 69
Expenditure on
School Buildings.
$18,043 50
12,123 98
2,884 38
$33,051 86
TotalExpenditure
on
Public Schools.
$ 2,578 06
25,435 78
39,999 89
38,908 30
56,934 92
56,630 09
47,129 63
43,334 01
22,110 70
47,006 10
49,864 07
$429,931 55
Percentage of
Expenses for
School purposes.
2.64
5.9
10.7
6.6
9.2
7.7
7.3
9.7
13.6
10.5
13.2
8.7
*20th July to 31st December.    tHalf year.
Comparative Increase per cent, of Expenses of 1880-81 on those of 1873:—
Percentage of increase of total expenses     1.65
Percentage of increase of school expenses ,     19.6 252
Public Schools Report.
1881
Comparative Statement of the Total Enrolment of Pupils and the Average Daily
Attendance from 1872-73 to 1880-81.
Year.
Number Enrolled.
Average Daily
Attendance.
Percentage of
Attendance.
1872-73
1,028
575
55.93
1873-74
1,245
767
62.48
1874-75
1,403
863
61.58
1875-76
1,685
984
58.39
1876-77
1,998
1,260
63.06
1877-78
2,198
1,395.5
63.5
1878-79
2,301
1,315.9
57.2
1879-80
2,462
1,293.93
52.5
1880-81
2,571
1,366.86
53.2
Eecorded visits of Trustees to Schools ,     419
Do.        do. Superintendent of Education     125
Do.        do. Parents and others  1,704
Total number of visits recorded ,  2,248
The examination of candidates for certificates to teach took place at Victoria at the
usual time in July. Dr. Tolmie and Pobert Williams, Esq., M.A., Cantab, were
appointed to act in conjunction with the Superintendent of Education as Examiners for
the occasion. Of the 45 candidates who presented themselves for examination, three
failed to pass, one withdrew at the close of the first day, and 41 were successful. The
following extract from the Eeport of the Examiners was published in the Government
Gazette of 23rd July, 1881:—
Extract from the Eepokt of the Examiners of Public School Teachers appointed
under the " public school ad, 1879."
List of Certificates, July, 1881.
First Class A.
Thomson, J. W  2557 Marks
Johnston, J.P  2446      „
First Class B.
Smith, Lizzie   1993 ,,
Delaney, James M    1968 „
Carmichael, F. A '.   1957 „
Titchworth, J. C   1924 „
Hamilton, C. J  1880 „
Second Class A.
Sluggett, Geo. H  1297 „
McKenzie, Angus   1182 „
Andrews, Helen  1144 ,,
Berkeley, Mrs. L. A   1131 „
Trenaman, Jane E    1123 ,,
Clarke, C. E  1098 „
Second Class B.
Thain, Joseph  1066 „
Clyde, Thomas   1021 „
Polley, Miss A.J   1015 „
McDougall, Miss Eva E   1006 „
Storey, Marcella Victoria   1006 „ 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 253
Second Class B.—Continued.
Jackson, Miss Hattie  992 Marks.
Phelps, William  946 „
Caldwell, Mrs. L. M  944 „
Third Class A.
Gardiner, Emily Jane      1032 „
Eichardson, Alice  1021 „
Smith, Isabella  1004 „
Bell, Emeline Athelia  992 „
Jones, Florence McNaughton  961 „
Lindsay, A. E  951 „
Eussell, Alice M  930 „
Johnston, Mary Anne  925 „
Holloway, Martha  848 „
Third Class B.
Boag, Joseph  945 „
Herring, Jane Howell  907 ,,
Watson, Lizzie  878 „
Holloway, Mary Jane  864 „
Halliday, Mary Felicia  842 ,.
»
Bell, Mrs. Annette S. M     82c
Shaw, Alexander     819      „
Sweet, Margaret J     817      ,,
Barron, Lizzie A     811      ,,
Suckley, Susan     716      „
Norris, Martha J  JEgrotat.
W. F. Tolmie, ~\
Eobert Williams, M.A., Cantab, V Board of Examiners.
C. C. McKenzie, M.A., Cantab,   J
T. B. Humphreys,
Provincial Secretary's Office, Provincial Secretary.
19th July, 1881.
The number of candidates for certificates from persons educated in this Province is
steadily increasing. Those who presented themselves for examination for the first time
at the late examination formed a great part of the number examined, and were largely
made up of young persons trained at the Victoria High School. This highly useful
institution has now supplied our public schools with so many teachers that nearly half
of the certificated teachers have been educated in the Province. These teachers, I am
happy to say, have all the necessary qualifications in the matter of education, and in
other respects also compare very favourably with the rest of our teachers. Having youth,
they have the enthusiasm of beginners, and are in all probability better capable of doing
the work for which they are destined than would be those normally trained teachers
whom we could attract to our schools from the other Provinces of the Dominion. But,
though the good education given compensates in part for the want of professional
training, the Province will still continue to feel the want of the Normal School until its
resources and population justify the opening of such an institution. At present the
High School supplies, as far as it can, this desideratum, and it has well and worthily
douo so.
Temporary Certificates have almost ceased to be issued, there being but three now
in force, and those held by teachers resident beyond the Cascades.    The following is a
summary of the  Eeturns presented to the  Legislative Assembly in response to the
'Resolution calling for Eeturns of those certificates:—
Teachers holding Temporary Certificates during year ending July, 1878     15
Do. do. do.   ' do. 1879     17
Do. do. do.    . do. 1880     61
(All certificates having been revoked in November, 1879.)
Teachers holding Temporary Certificates during year up to Feb'y, 1881     13 254
Public Schools Report.
1881
The following Eeturns were also presented at the same time:—
"Eeturn to an Order of the Legislative Assembly, dated 31st January, 1881, for a
" Eeturn of all applications for new school districts, with a statement of the number of
" children of school age that accompanied each application; also, for increase of
" teachers or school accommodation, giving (in every case) the name of place and
" electoral district, and the result, whether granted or refused; also, the names of all
" teachers who have temporary certificates, the length of time they have been teaching,
" and the names of places and electoral districts in which they are employed. The
" Eeport to cover the period commencing July, 1878, to present date.
" By Command.    T. Basil Humphreys, Provincial Secretary.
" Provincial Secretary's Office, 9th February, 1881.
" Applications for Increase of Teachers, or for Increase of Accommodation, from
"July, 1878, to 31st January, 1881.
By whom made.
North end Gabriola Island.
New West'r Trustees
Lillooet Trustees	
South Saanich Trustees ..
Do. do.      ..
South Cowichan Trustees.
North Cowichan Trustees.
Victoria Trustees .
Esquimalt Trustees
Nanaimo Trustees .
Nicola Valley Trustees.
Chilliwhack Trustees ..
Wellington Trustees . ..
Electobal
Distbict.
Nanaimo ....
N. West'r city
Lillooet
Victoria
Victoria
Cowichan ...
Cowichan ...
Victoria city.
Esquimalt... .
Nanaimo ....
Yale 	
New Westm'r
Nanaimo	
Application toe.
Half of teacher's time.
Assistant teacher	
to build addition to
building	
for increased accommodation	
Leave to rent a building at
$10 to $15	
to build an addition
or a new school building
A high school	
A new school house	
A new school house.
Assistant teacher ...
Assistant teacher.
$100 for a school house...
Increase of $20 per month
in sum voted for teacher
so that Trustees might
divide the $80 thus voted
between 2 teachers at
$40 each per month.
To place a sum on Estimates for Infant school.
A new school building . , .
2nd storey in Girls' school
to be fitted up for 2nd
division 	
Date.
Dec, 1878 .
Dec, 1878 ..
Feb., 1879
Jan. 1879
April, 1879
April, 1879
Feb., 1880 . .
Jan., 1880
Dec, 1880
Jan., 1879 ..
Dec, 1879 ..
Dec, 1880
March, 1880.
April, 1880..
Another teacher, making
1 for each school	
A new school house	
An addition to building ..
May, 1880..
July, 1880.
Sept., 1880
June, 1880
Sept., 1880
Jan., 1881.
July, 1880.
Result.
Referred to Trustees.
Assistant teacher granted April, 1879.
granted to build an
addition, May, 1880.
School house built, 1879.
District divided, school
house built, and teacher
granted for new district
$100 granted.
Referred to Trustees
(School Act, Sec. 32.)
No sum on Estimates.
Education Office, C. C. McKenzie,
February 8th, 1881. .  Superintendent of Education.
(The application of the Esquimalt, Nanaimo, Chilliwhack, and Wellington Trustees have been granted
since the presentation of this Return.) 45 Vic
Public Schools Report.
255
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. "S 256 Public Schools Report. 1881
la response to the following Eesolution of the Legislative Assembly "That, in the
"opinion of this House, the Eules and Eegulations forthe government of Public Schools
"should be so amended as to provide for permissive power being granted to Trustee-
" Boards to introduce the Lord's Prayer in opening and closing school," the clause
relating to religious exercises in these Eules and Eegulations was amended by
Order in Council, and formal notification of the amendment was given to all Trustee-
Boards.    The consequent action of trustees is reported in Table E.
The Select Committee of the House appointed to visit the Victoria Public Schools
also presented the following Eeport:—
"To the Honourable the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly:
" The majority of your Select Committee appointed to visit the Public Schools of
Victoria, beg most respectfully to report:—
"That, in view of the revenues of the Province not increasing in proportion to the
" expenditures that are required under the present school system, a tuition fee of $5 per
" quarter should be charged each scholar in the High School.
" In regard to the different classes in the main building, we found each depai'tment
"under good order and discipline, and the teachers well qualified for the duties devolving upon them.    Each room was in tolerably good order and cleanliness.
(Signed)       " D. MoGilliveay,
" J. Abrams,
" G. Cowan,
" J. S. Drummond, Chairman,
" Under protest in regard to charging scholars in High School."
I have to report that two school-houses have been built during the year; one at
South Cowichan, to replace the former Bench School-house, and another at West South
Saanich, to be the school-house of the lately-created School District at that place.
Early in the year, the school-house at Yale was accidentally burned down, and
very shortly after the same mishap befell that at the Langley Prairie. Both buildings
were insured and both have since been rebuilt. These buildings are of a superior stylo
to those formerly built, both externally and internally, and are more in accordance with
such buildings elsewhere. The great drawback from which we suffer in our present
school-houses lies in their inferior furniture, and principally in the matter of seats and
desks, these being always of wood throughout, are extremely cumbrous and occupy
too much of the space that might be available for other purposes. Desks made of iron
and wood are now generally used. These, if expensive at first, by their durability and
greater convenience, soon make up for their greater expense, and with our own foundries
at work, even this might be found less than one would at first imagine it to be.
While loud complaints are to be heard in the other Provinces of the Dominion, and
in the different States of the American Union, of the constant changes of teachers with
which their schools are afflicted, we are in the happier condition of having greater permanence in that respect. Changes must of necessity take place, and they occur with us
also, but they are such as are mostly unavoidable, being caused in instances when they
take place, by the marriage of some lady-teacher, by illness, by death, by promotion to
another school, and by similar causes, but seldom by change of employment in consequence of better pay. Dismissals of teachers by their trustees are also very rare. This
power entrusted to trustee-boards by the School Act of 1879, it was feared, would
operate prejudicially to teachers, but, guided by common sense, these boards have used
their power generally well, and I have no doubt that were it to be wrongfully exorcised,
the community in which it was done would come forward to right the wrong.
I would here record the death of Miss Catherine Eussell, who died while assistant-
teacher in the JNew Westminster Public School. Hers is, I believe, the first instance in
which death has overtaken a public school teacher while in active service in this Province.    This sad event took place in December, 1880.
The text-books authorized for use remain substantially the same as they w^rc in
former years. The great majority of these being- on the Ontario Public School series,
it needs but little reflection to bo convinced that no great necessity for change exists.
Some slight changes have, howrcvcr, been made, and 1 have also to refer to the introduction of Outline Maps into our larger schools and into the schools of newly-established
districts. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 257
Upon a calm review of the educational work of the past year, I can safely affirm
that very material progress has been made in almost all our schools. A thorough
grounding in the elementary subjects is aimed at by teachers, and the examinations
held periodically are so framed as to test whether this has taken place or not.
The number of visits paid by trustees, parents, and others, to the different schools
is some indication that appreciation is had of the efforts made in the direction of progress
and that interest in education is at least not diminishing. If our schools are still not so
well filled as could be wished, the fact arises in a great measure not so much from the
neglect of parents as from the actual want of population.
Notwithstanding the number of Petitions for schools, I may safely say, without
exaggeration, that the supply so far has been ahead of what was absolutely needed, and
under no other system would it happen that school districts could be created and
school-houses built only to be abandoned almost as soon as established. British
Columbia is without exception the most liberal in the world in its method of support of
schools, but it would also require to be a very rich country to endure the strain of
putting a school-house at every man's door.
Special Reports on District Schools.
At the different inspections of schools that were held, three or four sets of graded
papers of questions, marked A, B, C, and D, were given, in addition to the oral part of
the examination. The most advanced scholars were examined on the A papers, and
their subjects of examination included reading, writing, arithmetic (written and mental),
dictation, spelling, geography, grammar, history, and composition. The B papers included the same subjects, but were not of so advanced a character. The C papers were
still less difficult, and excluded history. The D papers were for the least advanced
scholars.
Barkerville.—No inspection. Teacher, to 30th June, 1881, G. C. Phinney; present
teacher, J. E. Stirling. Enrolled : Boys, 9 ; girls, 15 ; total, 24; average, 16.55. Four
pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by 7 new names on the register. Expenditure, $1,250 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $52.08 and
$75.53.
Burgoyne Bay.—Inspection, 3rd and 4th May, 1881. Teacher, Geo. Stainburn, B.A.,
Cantab. Enrolled: Boys, 15; girls, 7 ; total, 22 ; average, 12.75 ; present at inspection,
13. Five pupils of 1879-80 have left and there are two new names on the register.
Expenditure, $629.12; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively,
$28.50 and $49.34. The 2 pupils who were examined in the A papers obtained an average of 57i per cent.; 3 examined in B papers, 37 per cent.; and 1 examined in C papers,
24i per cent, of the marks obtainable. There were also examined orally in the various
branches of study, 2 in Third Eeader, 3 in Second Eoader, and 2 in First Eeader. The
senior scholars were also studying the higher subjects of education. John Maxwell
passed the High School entrance examination successfully.
Burrard Inlet.—Inspection, 26th and 27th May, 1881. Teacher, Mrs. Colbeck.
Enrolled: Boys, 24; girls, 18; total, 42; average, 20.11; present at inspection, 24.
16 pupils of 1879-80 have left and there are 11 new names on the register. Expenditure,
$706.25; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $16.81 and
$35.11. The 5 pupils examined in the A papers obtained an average of 37 per cent.;
2 examined in B papers, 20 per cent.; and 5 in the C papers, 34J per cent. There were
also examined orally, 2 in Third Eeader, 7 in Second Eeader, and 5 in First Eeader,
Parts I. and II.
Cache Creek Boarding School.—No inspection. Teacher, Thos. Leduc; Matron,
Mrs. Schubert. Enrolled : Boys, 15; girls, 15; total, SO ; average, 15.75. Ten pupils of
1879-80 have left, and there are six new names on the register. Government expends
ture, $1,981.15 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $66.04
and $125.80. 258 Public Schools Report. 1881
Eeturns of Eeceipts and Expenditures of Boarding School during the year 1880-81,
as reported by the trustee-board :—
Cash, including balance of account for the year ending 30th
June, 1880, received from 1st July, 1880,to 30th June, 1881   $1,111 34
Cash disbursed during same time  $ 951 32
Balance in hand  160 02
Total     1,111 34    1,111 34
Amount due the school by parents and others      1,583 80
Amount due to others (not including indebtedness to the Government)       381 93
Balance in favour of the school      1,201 87
Expense Account.
Butter  $ 147 50
Labour     354 92
Furniture  51 25
Groceries and flour     537 43
Beef  369 14
Vegetables   222 97
Freight and tolls   159 88
Cowfeed  25 90
Wood  42 75
Total $1,911 74
(Signed)       Chas. Pennie, 1 Tr...f...
C A. Semlin,   I irust^-
North Cedar.—Inspection, 25th April, 1881. Teacher, to 30th June, 1881, Thos.
Clyde; present teacher, Miss Eva McDougall. Enrolled: boys, 11; girls, 13; total, 24;
average, 11.82; present at inspection, 12. 6 pupils of 1879-80 have left, and there are
three new names on the register. Expenditure, $644.25 ; cost of each pupil on total and
average attendance respectively, $26.84 and $54.50. One pupil examined in the C papers
obtained 55J per cent, of the marks obtainable; there were also examined orally, 1 in
Third Eeader, 4 in Second Eeader, 6 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II.
South Cedar.—Inspection, 25th April, 1881. Teacher, to 30th June, Miss A. J.
McDougall; present teacher, Miss Bell. Enrolled : Boys, 16 ; girls, 17 ; total, 33 ;
average, 12.41; present at inspection, boys, 1; girls, 4; total, 5. This being a newly-
created district, the 33 were recorded in the register for the first time. Expenditure,
$590 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $17.88 and $47.54.
None of those present were able to take any of the papers, but were examined orally,
viz., 1 in Third Eeader, 1 in Second Eeader, and 3 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II. This
school at the start gave promise of having a good attendance, its daily average for
several months having been 20 and nearly 20. The closing of the Nanaimo Coal Mines
has affected it injuriously.    It is, however, again recovering its lost ground.
Cedar Hill.—Inspections, 1st October, 1880, 20th May, 1884. Teacher, J. W.
Thomson. Enrolled: Boys, 32; girls, 28; total, 60; average, 24.25; present at each
inspection respectively, 24 and 30. 10 pupils of 1879-80 have left, and are replaced by
15 new names on the register. Expenditure, $896.25 ; cost of each pupil on total and
average attendance repectively, $14.95 and $36.95. The 5 examined in May in the A
papers obtained an average of over 58 per cent; 5 examined in B papers, over 32 per
cent.; and 4 in the C papers, 20 per cent. There were also examined orally, 8 in Third
Eeader, 3 in Second Eeader, and 5 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II. Of the 30 present
in May last, but one arrived late. This school had been making steady progress under
the previous teacher, as was shown by the examination held in October, after Mrs.
Chandler had left for the Victoria School. The improvement under the present teacher
may be judged of from knowing that on the October examination one took the A papers, 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 259
2 the B, and 7 the O, and that there were examined orally at the same time, 1 in the
Third Eeader, 10 in Second Eeader, and 3 in First Eeader, Part I. Geo. H. Sluggett,
Margaret Irvine, and Alfred Henry King were declared to have passed an examination
entitling them to enter the Victoria High School.
Cheam.—Inspection, 1st June, 1881. Teacher, to SOth June, D. Armstrong; present
teacher, Miss Trenaman. Enrolled: Boys, 16; girls, 15; total, 31; average, 12.18;
present at inspection, 14. Two pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by 10 new
names on the register. Expenditure, 8618.89; cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance respectively, $19.96 and $50.81. The 2 examined in the C papers obtained
an average of 71J per cent. There were also examined orally, 3 in Third Eeader, 5 in
Second Eeader, and 4 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II.
Chilliwhack.—Inspection, 31st May and 1st and 2nd June. Teacher, J. P. Johnston. Enrolled: Boys, 38; girls, 31; total, 69; average, 37.25; present at inspection, 49.
6 pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by 16 new names on the register. Expenditure, $695.12; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $10.07
and $18.66. The 7 examined in the A papers obtained an average of 48J per cent.; 3
examined in B papers, 36 per cent; and 17 in C papers, 35J per cent. There were also
examined orally, 11 in the Second Eeader, and 11 in the First Eeader, Part I. and II.
This large school continues to make very satisfactory progress. The teacher laboured
under the disadvantage of having a great number of pupils and a very small school-room,
so small in fact that he found it necessary to utilize the porch as a class-room. I am
happy to say the old school-house has been replaced by a new building.
Clinton.—No inspection. Teacher, J. F. Smith. Enrolled: Boys, 13; girls 7;
total, 20; average, 11.37. 7 pupils of 1879-80 have left, and are replaced by 11 new
names on the register. Expenditure, $770 50. Cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance respectively, $38 52 and $67 26.
Colwood.—Inspection, 30th September, 1880, and 16th June, 1881. Teacher, A. E.
Lindsay. Enrolled: Boys, 11; girls, 12; total, 23; average, 9.82; present at inspections
10 and 15. Expenditure, $629 87. Cost of each pupil on total and average attendance
respectively, $27 38 and $64 14. Six pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by 9
new names on the register. None were able to pass a written examination. There
wrere examined orally, 4 in Third Eeader, 5 in Second Eeader, and 6 in First Eeader,
Part I.
Comox.—Inspection, 14th September, 1881. Teacher, Miss E. Holloway. Enrolled:
Boys, 12; girls, 14; total, 26; average, 11.03; present at inspection, 12. Ten pupils of
1879-80 have left, and there are 3 new names on the register. Expenditure, $627. Cost
of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $24 12 and $56 84. The 4
examined in C papers obtained an average of 32 per cent. There were also examined
orally, 3 in Second Eeader, and 5 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II.
North Cowichan (Agricultural Hall Branch and Central School Branch).—
Teacher, A. Dods. Expenditui-e, $740. Total attendance 30; total average attendance,
17.32.   Cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $24.62 and $42.72.
Agricultural Hall Branch.—Inspection 27th April, 1881. Enrolled: Boys, 11;
girls, 6; total, 17; average, 6.03. Present at inspection 2, one of whom was the teacher's
son. Ten pupils of 1879-80 have left, and there are no new names on the register. This
branch of the school is now closed.
Central School Branch.—Inspection, 28th April, 1881. Teacher, A. Dods.
Enrolled: Boys, 18; girls 7; total, 25; average, 11.29; present at inspection 15. Three
pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by 5 new names on the register. The 3
examined in B papers obtained an average of 34 per cent. There were also examined
orally, 5 in Third Eeader, 7 in First Eeader, Parts I and II. Twelve pupils attended
both branches.
South Cowichan (Bench Branch and Kokasailah Branch).—Teacher, to 30th April,
W. H. Lomas; present teacher, Thomas Clyde. Expenditure, $697. Total attendance,
36; average attendance, 18.72. Cost of each pupil on total and average attendance
respectively, $19 36 and $37 23. 260 Public Schools Report. 1881
Bench Branch.—Inspection, 29th April, 1881. Enrolled: Boys, 16, girls, 3; total,
19; average, 10.20; present at inspection 7, Five pupils of 1879-80 have left and are
replaced by 6 new names on the register. There were examined orally, 2 in Third Eeader,
2 in Second Eeader; and 3 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II.
KoKASAiLAn Branch.—Inspection, 28th April, 1881. Enrolled: Boys, 9; girls 12;
total, 21; average, 8.52; present at inspection 10. Two pupils of 1879-80 have left and
are replaced by 3 new names on the register. The one pupil examined in the B papers
obtained 57 per cent.; and 2 pupils examined in the C papers, 24? per cent. There were
also examined orally, 2 in Third Beader,'~3 in Second Eeader, and 2 in First Eeader, Part I.
Four pupils attended both branches.
Craigflower.—Inspections, 29th Sept., 1880, and June 16th, 1881. Teacher, J. C.
Newbury. Enrolled: Boys, 27; girls, 19; total, 46; average, 30.54; present at inspections 30 and 34. Ten pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by 16 new names
on the register. Expenditure, $777 05. Cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $16 89 and $25 44. On the first occasion there were 5 examined in
the A papers, 2 in C, and 11 in D, and orally 2 in Second Eeader, and 10 in First Eeader,
Parts I and II. On the second occasion the 7 examined in A papers obtained an
average of 69 per cent., 1 in B obtained 53J per cent., and 7 in C an average of 57 per
cent. There were also examined orally 1 in Fourth Eeader, 11 in Second Eeader, and 7
in First Eeader, Parts I. and II.
The following is an extract from my journal on the occasion of one of the visits I
paid this school:—" I found everything in this school in a satisfactory state. There
was not one scholar late, and the order was perfect. The school is a credit to the
teacher, and the children seem as happy as they can be. I commended the children on
the progress they had made."
C. W. Newbury, J. H. Ker, and Albert Parker, were declared to have passed an
examination entitling them to enter the Victoria High School.
Denman Island.—Inspection, 15th September, 1881. Teacher, S. F. Crawford.
Enrolled: Boys, 17; girls, 5; total, 22; average, 11.77; present at inspection, 14. Two
pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by 7 new names on the register. Expenditure, $640; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $29 10
and $54 38. The 5 examined in the C papers obtained an average of 38J per cent.,
nearly. There were also examined orally 4 in Third Eeader, 4 in Second Eeader, and
1 in First Eeader.
Esquimalt.—Inspections, 21st January and 19th May, 1881. Teacher, to 30th
June, J. Kaye; present teacher, J M. Delany. Enrolled : Boys, 37; girls, 21; total, 58;
average, 31.13; present at inspections, 32 and 26. Sixteen pupils of 1879-80 have left
and there are 15 new names on the register. Expenditure, $819 75; cost of each pupil
on total and average attendance respectively, $14 13 and $26 33. None were able to
undergo a written examination. There were examined orally 2 in Fifth Keader, 7 in
Third Eeader, 3 in Second Eeader, and 14 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II. The
progress of this school has not been such as its importance would have led one to expect.
Gabriola Island.—This school, after being closed for two years, was re-openeel in
August, 1881. It is reported as having a population of 13 children under school age,
and of 33 of school age.
Granville.—Inspection, 26th May, 1881. Teacher, A. G. Johnston. Enrolled:
Boys, 23; girls, 14; total, 37; average, 20.23; present at inspection, 20. Eleven pupils
of 1879-80 have left and there are 5 now names on the register. Expenditure, $674 41;
cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $18 22 and $33 33.
The 3 examined in A papers obtained an average of 54 per cent., 3 in B papers 36J per
cent., and 7 in C papers 57 per cent. There were also examined orally 2 in Fourth
Eeader, 5 in Third Eeader, 2 in Second Eeader, and 1 in First Eeader, Part I. The
school is making very satisfactory progress. Janey Bryant was declared to have passed
an examination entitling her to enter the High School. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 261
Hope.—Inspection, 30th May. Teacher, to 31st January, E. J. Wood; present
teacher, Miss Suckley. Enrolled: Boys, 10; girls, 9; total, 19; average, 10.02; present
at inspection, 12. Three pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by 10 new names.
Expenditure, $556 13; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively,
$29 27 and $55 52. The 3 examined in C papers obtained an average of 43 per cent.
There were also examined orally 2 in Third Eeader, and 7 in Second Eeader. The
attendance has improved since the last-half of the previous year.
Lac La Hache.—This school has been closed since August, 1879.
Lake.—Inspections, 28th September, 1880, and 23rd May, 1881, Teacher, Miss
Anderson. Enrolled: Boys, 16; girls, 13; total, 29; average, 15.61; present at inspections,
17 and 24. Six pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by 7 new names on the
register. Expenditure, $645 12; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance
respectively, $22 24 and $41 36. None being qualified to pass a written examination in
May, there were examined orally 7 in Third Reader, 5 in Second Eeader, and 5 in First
Eeader, Parts I. and II. On the former occasion 1 was examined in A papers, 3 in B,
5 in C, and 3 in D, and there were also examined orally, 2 in Third Eeader, 3 in Second
Eeader, and 7 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II. The great failing in this school is the
unpunctuality of its pupils; the school was otherwise very orderly.
Langley.—Inspection, 6th June, 1881. Teacher, E. H. Holding. Enrolled: Boys,
21; girls, 15; total, 36; average, 14.80; present at inspection, 18. Seven pupils of 1879-80
have left and there are 4 new names on the register. Expenditure, $709 98; cost of
each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $19 72 and $47 97. The one
examined in A papers obtained 29 per cent., the one in B 61 per cent., and the 6 in C an
average of 48 per cent. There were also examined orally 2 in Third Eeader, 6 in
Second Eeader, and 3 in First Reader.
Lillooet.—No inspection. Teacher, C. Phair. Enrolled: Boys, 13; girls, 10;
total, 23; average, 12.05. Five pupils of 1879-80 have left and there is one new name
on the register. Expenditure, $958 32; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $41 66 and $79 53.
Lytton.—No inspection. Teacher, Miss Bailey. Enrolled: Boys, 16; girls, 15;
total, 31; average, 15.60. Four pupils of 1879-80 have left, and are replaced by 7 new
names on the register. Expenditure, $760; cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance respectively, $24 51 and $48 71.
Maple Eidge.—Inspection, 3rd June, 1881. Teacher, J. W. Sinclair. Enrolled:
Boys, 25; girls, 27; total, 52; average, 22.62; present at inspection, 29. Seven pupils of
1879-80 have loft and are replaced by 15 new names on the register. Expenditure, $765.74;
cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $14 72 and $33 85. The
3 examined in B papers, obtained an average of 40 per cent., and the 5 in C papers 28J
per cent. There were also examined orally 2 in Third Eeader, 8 in Second Eeader, and
11 in First Reader, Parts I. and II.
The school building is in great need of repair or renewal, it being too small to
accommodate the school population of the district.
Matsqui.—This school has been closed since December, 1876.
Metchosin.—Inspection, 21st June, 1881. Teacher, to 30th June, Mrs. Fisher:
present teacher, C. E. Clarke. Enrolled: Boys, 9; girls, 14; total, 23; average, 13.60;
present at inspection, 16. Two pupils of 1S79-80 have died, 1 has left, and there are no
new names on the register. Expenditure, $651 25; cost of each pupil on total and
average attendance respectively, $28 31 and $47 88. The 2 examined in the A papers
obtained an average of nearly 5S per cent., 2 in B papers nearly 51 per cent., and 6 in
C papers nearly 44 per cent. There were also examined orally 2 in Third Reader, 3 in
Second Reader, and 1 in First Eeader, Part I.
Nanaimo—Boys' School.—Inspections, 20th, 21st, and 26th April. Teachers, D.
Jones, principal; A. Flett, assistant teacher. Enrolled: Boys, 148; average, 76.12;
present at inspections, 87 and 83. Nineteen pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced
by 40 new names on the register. The 10 examined in the A papers obtained an average
of 39 per cent., 10 in the B papers 24 per cent., and 15 in the C papers 18 per cent.,
20 262 Public Schools Report. 1881
nearly. These belonged to the senior division of the school. There were also examined
orally, in the junior division, 20 in the Second Eeader, and 34 in the First Eeader, Parts
I. and II.
Nanaimo—Girls' School.—Inspections 20th, 21st and 26th of April. Teachers,
Mrs Berkeley, Principal; Miss Polley, Assistant Teacher. Enrolled: Girls, 117; average
60.83. Present at inspections, 54 and 66. Twenty-three pupils of 1879-80 have loft,
and are replaced by thirty-three new names on the Eegister. The five examined in the
A papers obtained an average of 48i per cent.; the five examined in the B papers obtained an average of 36; and the 13 examined in the C papers obtained an average of
24J. These belonged to the Senior Division of the school. There were also examined,
orally, in the Junior Division, 9 in Third Eeader, 10 in Second Eeader, and 11 in First
Eeader, Parts I and II.
Expenditure on Nanaimo Schools $3,610.05. Total attendance265. Total average
attendance 136 95. Cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively,
$13.62 and 26.36.
New Westminster —Boys' School.—Inspections 25th May and 7th June, 188L-
Teachers to 30th June, J. Boag, Principal; Miss Eussell (died in Dec. 1880); O. D-
Sweet and Miss Herring, Assistant Teachers in succession. Present Teachers, C. D.
Eand, Principal; Miss Herring, Assistant Teacher. Enrolled: boys, 116; girls, 34; total,
150; average, 72.60. Present at inspections, 47 and 71. Sixty-eight pupils of 1879-80
have left, and there are 40 new names on the Eegister. The 10 examined in the A
papers obtained an average of 43i per cent.; the 5 examined in the B papers obtained
an average of 21 per cent., nearly; and the 10 examined in the C papers obtained
an average of 11 per cent., nearly. These belonged to the Senior Division. There
were also examined, orally, in the Junior Division, 14 in Third Eeader, 16 in Second
Eeader, and 14 in First Eeader, Parts I and II. S. F. Maclure passed the High School
entrance examination.
New Westminster—Girls' School.—Inspections 25th and 7th June, 1881.
Teacher, Miss M. Williams, Principal. Enrolled: girls, 52; average, 31.03. Present at
inspections, 29 and 30. Fifteen pupils of 1879-80 have left, and there are 10 new names
on the Register. The 8 examined in the A papers obtained an average of 55J per cent.;
the 4 examined in the B papers obtained an average of 43J per cent.; and the 17 examined in the C papers obtained an average of 28 per cent., nearly.
Expenditure on the New Westminster Schools, $2,910.08. Total attendance, 202.
Total average attendance, 103.63. Cost of each pupil on total and average attendance
respectively, $14.40 and $28 08. Maggie Sweet passed the High School entrance examination.
Nicola Valley (East End Branch and West End Branch).—No inspection.
Teacher to 30th June, A. Irwin; present teacher, Charles J. Hamilton. Expenditure,
$756 80. Total attendance, 33; total average attendance, 18.97; cost of each pupil on
total and average attendance respectively, $22 93 and $34 62.
East End Branch.—Enrolled: Boys, 9; girls, 11; total, 20; average, 11.76. Five
pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by 8 new names on the register.
West End Branch.—Enrolled: Boys, 9; girls, 4; total, 13; average, 7.21. Five
pupils of 1879-80 have left, and there are no new names on the register. None attend
both schools, they being too far apart. The difficulty of finding a convenient boarding-
place is a great hardship to the present teacher. It would be very desirable to have a
teacher's residence of some kind attached to one of the schools.
North Arm.—Inspection 7th June. Teacher, Mrs. Bell. Enrolled: Boys, 7; girls,
12; total, 19; average, 8 ; present at inspection, 13. This school having been closed
during the previous year, all its pupils appear on the register for the first time. Expenditure $566 87; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively $29
83 and $70 86. The three examined in C papers obtained an average of 53J per cent.
There were also examined orally 4 in Second Eeader, and 6 in First Reader, Parts I.
and II. This school has been under the legal average attendance. Having a sufficiently
large school population, it has been kept open from time to time in the apparently vain
expectation that it would reach the required average. The building used as a school-
house has had some share in preventing this consummation as it was scarcely habitable
in bad weather. The teacher's time should, however, be divided between the two most
populous centres. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 263
Okanagan.—No inspection. Teacher, Miss Coughlan. Enrolled: Boys, 9; girls,
13; total, 22; average, 16.76. Four pupils of 1879-80 have left and there are three new
names on the register. Expenditure, $646; cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance respectively, $29 36 and $38 54.
Prairie.—Inspection 6th June, 1881. Teacher to 30th June, W. Gordon; present
teacher, Geo. H. Sluggett. Enrolled: Boys, 14; girls, 13; total, 27; average, 11.09;
present at inspection, 16. Nine pupils of 1S79-80 have left and are replaced by 11 new
names on the register. Expenditure, $631 97; cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance respectively, $23 40 and $56 97. The one examined in the A papers obtained
Mi per cent., and the 4 examined in the C papers obtained an average of 44 per cent.
There were also examined orally one in Third Eeader, 4 in Second Eeader, and 6 in
First Reader, Parts I. and II. Early in the year the school-house was accidentally
burned down, and the school was in consequence kept in a private house, Mr. Innes
having generously given up part of his residence for the purpose.
Quesnellemouth.—This district was erected a school district in May, and school
was opened in September, 1881.
North Saanich (Literary Institute Branch and Central School Branch.)—Teacher,
B. H. Smith, M.A.—Expenditure $748 58. Total attendance, 51; total average attendance, 25.11; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $14 92 and
$29 81.
Literary Institute Branch.—Inspections 10th November, 1880, and f20th June,
1881. Enrolled: Boys, 17; girls, 10; total, 27; average, 14.57; present at inspection, 12
and 11. No pupils of 1879-80 have left, and there are 2 new names on the register.
The 3 examined in the B papers obtained an average of nearly 50 per cent. There
were also examined orally 3 in Third Reader, 1 in Second Eeader, and 4 in First Eeader,
Parts I. and II.    This branch is now closed.
Central School Branch.—Inspections, 10th November, 1880, and 20th June, 1881.
Enrolled: Boys, 13; girls, 12 ; total, 25; average, 10.54; present at inspections, 10 and 18.
Three pupils of 1879-80 have left and there are 8 new names on the register. The 2 examined in C papers obtained an average of nearly 49 per cent. There were also examined
orally 3 in Third Eeader, 7 in Second Eeader, and 6 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II.
East-South Saanich.—Inspections, 11th November, 1880, and 17th June, 1881.
Teacher, S. D. Pope, B. A. Enrolled: Boys, 37; girls, 33; total, 70; average, 41.23;
present at each inspection, 47. Thirteen pupils of 1879-80 have left and are replaced by
18 new names on the register. Expenditure, $889; cost of each pupil on total and
average attendance respectively, $12 70 and $21 56. The 3 examined in the A papers
obtained an average of 64 per cent.; 12 in B papers, 52 per cent.; and 7 in C papers,
45 per cent. There were also examined orally 10 in Third Eeader, 9 in Second Eeader,
and 6 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II.
The same remarks may be made respecting this excellent school as were made last
year. The following were declared to have passed an examination entitling them to
enter the High School:—Eva Eeynard, Mary E. Michell, and Margaret Michel].
West-South Saanich.—Inspections, 9th November, 1880, and 20th June, 1881.
Teacher, Miss McNaughten. Enrolled: Boys, 25; girls, 16; total, 41; average, 21.04;
present at inspections, 19 and 27. Expenditure, $1,095 36; cost of each pupil on total
and average attendance respectively, $26 71 and $52 06. This being a new school, all
names on its register are new, and for the same reason none were qualified to pass a
written examination, but there were examined orally 6 in Fourth Eeader, 3 in Third
Eeader, 5 in Second Eeader, and 13 in First Eeader, Parts I. and II.
Salt Spring Island (Central Settlement Branch and North Settlement Branch).—
Teacher, S. G Lewis. Expenditure, $756 25. Total attendance, 28; total average
attendance, 15.95.    Cost of each pupil on total and average attendance, $27.01 and $47.41.
Central Settlement Branch.—Inspection, 2nd May, 1881. Enrolled: Boys, 14;
girls, 5; total, 19; average, 10.63; present at inspection, 13. Five pupils of 1879-80
have left and there are 3 new names on the register. The 3 examined in the A papers
obtained an average of 35J per cent; the 2 examined in C papers obtained an average
of 42 per cent. There were also examined orally 3 in Second Eeader, 5 in First Eeader,
Parts I. and II. 264 Public Schools Report. 1881
North Settlement Branch.—Inspection, 30th April, 1881. Enrolled: Boys 2;
girls, 7; total, 9; average, 5.32; present at inspection, 5. Ten pupils of 1879-80 have
left, and there are two new names on the register. The 3 examined in the C papers
obtained an average of 42 per cent. There were also examined orally, 1 in Second
Eeader, and 1 in First Eeader, Part II.    None attend both schools.
Sooke.—Inspection, 23rd June, 1881. Teacher, to 30th June, Miss Gowen; present
teacher, Miss Jackson. Enrolled: Boys, 10; girls 11; total 21; average, 11.40; present
at inspection, 12. Two pupils of 1879-80 have left, and are replaced by four new names
on the Eegister. Expenditure, $633.51; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $30.16 and $55.52. The 1 examined in the A papers obtained an
average of 76 per cent., the 3 examined in the B. papers obtained an average of 46J per
cent., and the 2 examined in the C papers obtained an average of 39J per cent. There
were also examined orally, 2 in Second Eeader, 4 in First Eeader, Parts I and II.
Stanley.—No inspection. Teacher to 30th April, 1881, A. Johnston. Enrolled:
Boys, 10; girls, 6; total, 16; average, 10.32. Expenditure, $661; cost of each pupil on
total and average attendance respectively, $36.22 and $64.05. This school closed itself,
trustees, parents and children having left the neighbourhood:
Stuart's Lake.—This school has been closed since April, 1879.
Sumass.—Inspection, 2nd June, 1881. Teacher to 30th June, J. E. Stirling; present
teacher, Miss Pollard. Enrolled: Boys, 12; girls, 14; total, 26; average, 11.70; present
at inspection, 13. Three pupils of 1879-80 have left, and are replaced by five new names
on the Register. Expenditure, $647; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance
respectively, $24.88 and $55.30. The 3 examined in the B papers obtained an average of
40 per cent., and the 2 examined in the C papers obtained an average of 53 per cent.
There were.also examined orally, 4 in Second Reader, 4 in First Eeader, Parts I and II.
Trenant.—Inspection, 8th of June, 1881. Teacher, Miss Norris. Enrolled: Boys,
13; girls, 15; total, 28; average 11.25; present at inspection, 10. This school was reopened this year after being closed since December, 1878. Expenditure, $484.42; cost
of each pupil on total and average attendance, respectively, $17.30 and $43.06. The 2
examined in the C papers obtained an average of 44 per cent. There were also examined orally, 2 in Second Reader, and 6 in First Eeader, Parts I and II. This school
has been again closed.
Victoria Schools (High School, Boys' School, and Girls' School).—Enrolled: Boys,
440; Girls, 325; total attendance, 765; total average attendance, 433.45. Expenditure,
$11,735 95. Cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $15 34 and
$27 07.
High School.—Visits, 25. Teachers: J. H. McLaughlin, Principal; E. Offerhaus,
Second Master. Enrolled: Boys, 37; Girls, 39; total, 76; average, 52.75. Present at
different visits: 54, 53, 46, 49, 57, 59, 55, 52, 51, 50, 54, 54, &c. 22 pupils of 1879-80 have
left, and there are 12 new names on the register. Examinations of the school were held
in August and December, 1880, and in June, 1881. The percentage of those examined
in December, in the senior division, averaged 36 per cent., and of those examined in
June, 54 per cent., Charles Hayward heading the list on the former occasion, and J. B.
Carmichael on the latter. In the junior division these numbers stood respectively 22
per cent, and 47 per cent. The subjects of examination included reading, spelling and
dictation, writing, geography (ancient and modern), English grammar and language,
British history, arithmetic (written and mental), composition, book-keeping, mensuration, natural philosophy, Euclid, algebra, history of Borne, history of Greece, Latin,
French and French dictation. From this it will be seen that the pupils educated in the
school are not trained for any particular calling, and that they in fact only receive such
an education as will presumably fit them to commence the proper studies required of
candidates for any profession or business. A reference to the course of study of some
of the other Provinces of the Dominion will show that there is nothing in the programme of our High School but is included in their common school course.
The Province is in part repaid for its generous expenditure on this school in the
number of teachers it has, through this instrumentality, provided for its public schools. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 265
Boys' School.—Visits, 21. Teachers, to 30th June, 1881, J. McKenzie, Principal;
J. A. Halliday, 1st assistant; C. D. Rand, B.A., 2nd assistant; Miss Holloway, 3rd assistant. Present teachers: J. McKenzie, Principal; J. A. Halliday, 1st assistant; J. Thain,
2nd assistant; Miss Go wen, 3rd assistant; Miss Holloway, 4th assistant. Total attendance, 310; average attendance, 179 65. Present at different visits, 196, 196, 185, 183,
181, 200, 170, 191, &c. 70 pupils of 1879-80 have left, and are replaced by 82 new names
on the register. Examinations of the school were held in August and December, 1880,
and in June, 1881. On the last occasion the 33 examined in the A papers obtained an
average of 50 and l-10th per cent.; 44 examined in B papers obtained an average of 50
and 6-llths per cent.; and 45 examined in C papers obtained an average of over 51 per
cent. There were also 50 examined orally in the 4th Division of the school, or in the
Second Reader. On the result of these examinations, 19 were promoted from the 4th to
the 3rd Division; 12 from the 3rd to the 2nd; 14 from the 2nd to the 1st; and 8 from
the 1st Division to the High School. Those who passed for the High School were—
in December, 1880, E. Elliott; and in June, 1881, H. Hounslow, H. Cathcart, E. C. Douglas, J. Deans, C. E. Dickinson, E. Atwood, and James Reid.
Girls' School.—Visits, 20. Teachers to 30th June, 1881, Miss Williams, Principal;
Mrs. Chandler, 1st Assistant; Mrs. Brown, 2nd Assistant; Miss Richardson, 3rd Assistant; Mrs. Caldwell, 4th Assistant. Present teachers: Miss Williams, Principal; Mrs.
Chandler, 1st Assistant; Mrs. Caldwell, 2nd Assistant; Miss Eichardson, 3rd Assistant;
Miss Smith, 4th Assistant. Enrolled: Boys, 93; girls, 286; total, 379; average, 201.05;
present at different visits, 234, 248, 220. 171, 182, 191, 133, 218, &c. The number of
those who have loft from the previous year and the number of new names cannot be
ascertained owing to last year's imperfect returns, and the loss of some of the Eegisters,
but I have estimated them to be about 80 and 94, respectively. Examinations of the
school were held in August and December, 1880, and in June, 1881. On the last occasion the 31 examined in the A papers obtained an average of 43| per cent.; 30 examined
in the B papers obtained an average of 50 and 9-10ths per cent.; and 38 examined in the C
papers obtained an average of 35 and 4-5ths per cent. There were also examined orally,
29 in the 4th Division, or in the Second Eeader, and about 75 boys and girls in the 5th
Division, or in the First Readers, Parts I and It. On the result of these examinations
36 were promoted from the 5th Division either to the 4th Division of the Boys' School
or to that of the Girls; 20 from the 4th to the 3rd; 8 from the 3rd to the 2nd; 12 from
the 2nd to the 1st; and 10 from the 1st to the High School Those who passed for the
High School were—in December: Lucy Mebius, Maggie Jackson, Katie Teague, Isabel
Barron; and in June: Grace Halliday, Isabel Barlow, Katie Robinson, Sarah Robinson,
Martha Elliott, and Lucy McNeil.
Wellington.—Inspection, 21st and 22nd April, 1881. Teacher to 30th June, J.
Thain; present teachers, F. Carmichael, Principal; Miss Jones, assistant teacher. Enrolled: Boys, 52; girls, 37; total 89; average, 42.50; present at inspection, 46. Twenty-
five pupils of 1879-80 have left, and are replaced by 35 new names on the Eegister.
Expenditure, $768.75; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance, respectively,
$8.64 and $1^.56. The 10 examined in the A papers obtained an average of 42 per cent.,
nearly; and the 16 examined in the C papers obtained an average of 26 per cent., nearly.
There were also examined orally, 9 in the Second Eeader; 14 in the First Eeader,
Parts I and II. This school showed remarkable progress in writing, no other school
equalling if in that respect.
Williams Lake,—No inspection. Teacher, H. Bird. Enrolled: Boys, 17; girls,
3; total-20; average 18.21. Expenditure, $757.81; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $37.80 and $41.61. This being a new school district, the
pupils appear on the Register for the first time. This school shows less irregularity
than any other school in the Province.
Tale.—The school-house having been accidentally burned down, the school remained
closed during the year. 266 Public Schools Report. 1881
York.—This school has been closed since December, 1876.
I have tbe honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
Education Office, C. C. McKenzie,
December 15th, 1881. Superintentent of Education. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 267
PART  II.
Statistical Returns. 268
Public Schools Report.
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TABLE H. >
Education Branch of the Provincial Secretary's Department.
Expenditure for the year ending 30th June, 1881.
Salary of the Superintendent of Education ,  $1,500 00
Travelling expenses of Superintendent of Education       211 76
School Requisites, &c       245 97
Incidental Expenses and Advertising         80 06
 2,037 77
Amount Expended on Public Schools (Education Department)       44,923 92
Amount Expended on Public Schorls (Lands & Works)         2,884 38
Total Expenditure  949,846 07
TABLE I.—Comparative Annual Expenditure in School Districts,
from 1872-3 to 1880-81.
School Districts.
Barkerville	
Burgoyne Bay	
Burrard Inlet	
Cache Creek	
Cedar, North	
Cedar, South	
Cedar Hill	
Cheam	
Chilliwhack	
Clinton	
Colwood	
Comox	
Cowichan, North	
Cowichan, South	
Craigflower	
Denman Island	
Esquimalt	
Gabriola	
Granville	
Hope	
Lake	
Lac La Hache	
Langley	
Lillooet	
Lytton	
Maple Ridge	
Matsqui	
Metchosin	
Nanaimo	
New Westminster....
Nicola Valley	
North Arm	
Okanagan 	
Prairie	
Saanich, North	
Saanich, East-South..
Saanich, West-South.
Salt Spring Island	
Sooke	
Stanley	
Stuart's Lake	
Sumass	
Trenant	
Victoria High School.
Victoria Public  do.
Wellington	
Williams Lake	
Yale	
York	
1872-73
9 602 50
340 00
1,112 50
2,173 25
395 00
1,514 75
1,171 62
1,190 00
805 50
1,889 50
1,278 75
320 00
530 00
660 52
597 50
920 84
379 00
714 44
1,032 00
3,811 76
2,576 38
500 00
1,386 37
617 50
1,361 12
833 50
7,199 00
"eso'so
1873-74.
$ 625 00
597 63
695 00
7,065 73
430 00
; 26
630 00
60 50
620 00
787 00
709 25
400 00
780 00
913 00
672 63
697 50
670 00
600 00
645 00
670 00
727 50
690 00
2,063 75
1,870 00
649
1,000 00
650 00
675 00
772 60
475 00
5,624 50
1.033'66
1874-76.
9 434 63
550 00
660 00
2,227 52
574 00
1,115 75
450 00
650 00
10 50
37 00
710 10
710 00
660 00
780 00
608 00
555 25
660 00
530 00
317 00
30 00
770 00
730 00
570 00
500 00
735 25
600 00
2,677 16
2,301 55
810 00
560 00
700 00
280 00
900 00
620 00
610 00
522 50
180 00
1,409 17
760 00
917 00
400 00
1875-76.
$ 720 00
560 25
010 50
6,871 33
718 75
940 75
764 25
929 00
682 75
7 00
657 00
457 00
607 00
797 50
698 00
560 00
650 00
710 00
580 00
1,180 00
791 00
660 00
510 00
645 25
620 25
648 75
2,373 75
2,465 50
778 00
546 63
645 25
175 00
1,034 00
498 75
661 25
357 00
757 00
1,814 48
976 25
908 75
546 25
1876-77.
9 815 00
540 00
650 00
1,616 60
640 00
855 00
647 50
960 00
780 00
699 68
640 00
390 00
640 00
770 00
717 00
520 00
640 00
1,430 00
610 50
770 00
827 50
650 00
695 00
640 00
250 00
640 00
2,940 00
2,130 00
770 00
820 00
448 32
427 00
1,360 00
414 16
640 00
602 50
700 00
2,390 25
6,936 00
700 00
780 00
250 00
1877-78.
9892 25
452 50
660 00
1,700 00
436 43
910 53
640 75
768 62
545 91
625 50
619 75
749 37
711 00
776 60
297 25
780 50
643 00
718 13
739 22
885 25
748 62
748 75
841 13
754 74
773 38
598 50
3,216 12
2,133 78
830 75
65 00
755 00
655 00
691 75
900 00
759 50
608 25
740 26
600 00
632 50
614 25
2,437 75
7,905 19
771 85
808 12
1878-79.
9 725 05
556 87
615 50
1,450 00
544 57
829 22
582 75
708 81
640 50
464 50
576 00
687 75
635 75
677 50
620 55
618 50
539 25
633 50
413 00
523 10
459 10
662 00
715 00
676 13
670 69
5 25
575 00
6,486 64
2,121 63
713 75
513 46
598 97
615 25
779 00
691 75
584 08
646 25
540 00
607 00
227 97
2,470 50
7,260 14
672 75
6S9 78
5 25
1879-80.
81,249 20
687 62
746 04
1,676 00
630 00
876 75
669 15
785 87
708 50
484 00
647 87
795 00
690 00
785 12
626 73
710 05
55 25
711 50
553 25
649 50
300 00
711 29
1,637 57
762 25
761 25
5 25
668 25
3,741 18
2,585 39
781 75
251 62
664 50
615 65
786 75
909 00
736 25
630 04
832 00
74 75
638 29
75 00
2,583 54
8,035 06
775 25
739 50
5 25
1880-81.
$1,250 00
629 12
206 25
1,981 15
644 25
590 00
896 25
618 89
696 12
770 50
629 87
627 00
740 00
697 00
777 05
640 00
819 75
5 25
674 41
566 13
645 12
709 98
958 32
760 00
765 74
5 25
651 25
3,610 05
2,910 08
756 80
566 87
646 06
631 97
748 58
889 00
1,095 36
756 25
533 51
661 00
647 00
484 42
11,735 95
768 75
757 81
60 09
5 25
Total.
9 7,313 63
4,814 00
6,455 79
24,487 33
4,618 00
590 00
9,485 75
4,373 29
6,522 42
5,713 91
3,567 65
6,436 24
6,428 37
5,846 25
8,033 17
2,184 53
7,143 55
3,870 63
5,915 04
6,162 12
5,407 97
3,487 62
6,786 36
7,241 02
6,170 06
4,756 31
1,621 25
6,103 75
29,920 41
21,094 31
5,441 05
883 49
4,605 59
4,295 16
4,874 18
9,157 37
1,095 36
6,744 16
6,403 25
2,879 51
1,214 75
5,512 79
3,613 64
100,807 53
5,424 85
757 81
6,616 65
1,211 00 280
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1881
TABLE O.—Description and Estimated Value of School Property.
Districts.
Barkerville...
Burgoyne Bay
Burrard Inlet.
Cache Creek..
Cedar, North.
Cedar, South.
Cedar Hill....
Cheam	
Chilliwhack	
Clinton	
Colwood	
Comox ,
Cowichan, North .
Cowichan, South
Craigflower.
Description of Lands.
School-house rented from B. C. Express Co., at
$10 per month	
One acre given by Mr. Sparrow for school purposes. School-house built by Government,
with some aid from settlers, in 1873	
School-house erected by Government in 1873.  Th
site belongs to the mill proprietors, and is not
yet conveyed to the school Trustees	
Twenty acres donated by Messrs. Campbell &
Parke for boarding school purposes. School-
house built by Government in 1873; was enlarged in 1875    	
Four acres Government land. School-house and
teacher's residence built by the Government,
aided by settlers, in 1874, are on Mr. Stove's land
School-house built on Railway reserve	
Two acres—one donated by Dr. Tolmie, and
the other purchased by the residents from
the Bishop of Columbia. School-house built by
Government in 1872. Teacher's residence
erected in 1876, for which the teacher pays
$7.50 per month rent	
One acre given by Mr.   Nelmes.
built by Government in 1875	
School-house
Half-acre given by Mr. J. Kipp, in exchange for old
school site, also given by him. New school-
house built in 1881	
Two town lots—School  Reserve,
built by Government in 1873	
School-house
One acre donated by Mr. A. Peatt for public
school purposes. School-house built by Government in 1875	
One acre given by the Bishop of Columbia for a
school site. School-house erected by Government in 1873	
One hundred acres of Government land on which
school-house was erected in 1872.	
Half-section of land was applied for by Trustees,
but not granted on account of Railroad Belt
Reservation. One school-house built in 1881.
The other school-house is built on the Nanaimo
road, near the junction of Kelvin creek with
the Kokasailah river	
Five acres granted by the Puget Sound Company
marked on the official map as a "School Reserve." School-house and teacher's residence
built by the Hudson Bay Company in 1854.
Cost afterwards refunded by Colonial Government. The building was thoroughly repaired
in 1872 by the Government	
Carried foriuard.
Approximate
value of
Land.
50
100
750
900
Approximate
value of
Buildings.
500
750
7,400
500
125
1,500
500
700
800
750
1,500
16,625
Total value.
500
750
7,400
500
125
1,500
500
750
800
750
600
600
600
700
150
150
250
250
2,250
17,525 45 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
285
TABLE O.—Description and Estimated Value of School Property.—Continued.
Districts.
Description of Lands.
Approximate
value of
Land.
Approximate
value of
Building's.
Total value.
$
900
160
$
16,625
250
800
500
$
17,525
410
School-house built by Government on unsurveyed
land in 1878	
School-house built in July, 1881, on Government
800
Two acres donated by Mr. John Kemp.    School-
house and teacher's residence erected by Gov-
500
School building and site the property of Hastings
Mill Company.      Used for school purposes free
School-house built by Government on part of lot
750
600
400
600
700
750
One-fourth   acre given by the late   Mr. Bailey.
School-house built by the Vancouver Island
600
School-house built on unsurveyed land by Gov-
400
Langley	
Half-acre given by the H. B. Co.    School-house
built  by the British Columbian Government,
600
700
Half-acre given by Mr. H. Dawson.    School-house
500
400
1,000
3,750
3,000
3,500
800
500
School-house built by Government on unsurveyed
400
Metchosin	
One acre given for public school purposes by the
late Mr. John Whittey.      School-house erected
1,000
Boys' school—Two town lots given by Vancouver
Coal  Company;  school-house  erected by Gov-
250
650
2,500
4,000
Girls' school—Five town lots purchased from the
Vancouver Coal Company.     School erected by
Government in 1878-79	
3,650
New Westminster... .
Six acres of ground—School reserve.      School-
house built in   1865 by the   Government of
Two school-houses—one near the junction of Cold-
water with the Nicola, and the other about a
6,000
800
One acre donated by Mr. W. Smithson.     School-
house purchased by Government in 1874	
750
750
4,460
34,925
39,385 286
Public Schools Report.
1881
TABLE 0.—Description and Estimated Value of School Property.—Concluded.
Districts.
Description of Lands.
Approximate
value of
Land.
Approximate
value of
Buildings.
Total value.
4,460
$
34,925
500
$
39,385
School-house burnt down in 1880; re-built in 1881.
500
One acre given by Mr. Richard Johns for a public
school site.    School-house erected by Government in 1873	
500
1,750
750
300
300
750
500
South Saanich, East..
Two acres donated by Mr. Turgoose for public
school purposes.     School-house built by Government in 1873,   and  teacher's  residence  removed from old school site and rebuilt in 1876.
1,750
750
South Saanich, West.
One acre given by Mr. George Stelly, and one by
Mr. J. Sluggett.     School-house built by Government in 1880.    Teacher's residence built by
Salt Spring Island... .
One hundred acres granted by the Government of
the day for public buildings.     School-house
erected on this land by the Government, aided
by the settlers, in 1863 or 1864	
300
The other school-house built in the same way, on
an  acre of ground given by Mr.   G. Baker for
300
One acre given for a public school site by Mr. J.
Muir, sen.     School-house erected by Govern-
750
Assembly hall of Welsh   Mining Co.   used as a
Half-acre donated by Mr. Geo. Chadsey.    School-
house built by Government, aided by the setters, in 1872	
750
500
25,000
1,500
750
One  hundred and  sixty  acres—School  Reserve.
School-house built by Government in 1874	
Ten acres at the head of Yates street, granted by
the  Honourable   the  Hudson Bay   Company,
marked on the official map as a " School Reserve."    High School building erected by the
Hudson Bay Company in 1851 or 1852, the cost
afterwards defrayed   by the Colonial  Government.    Public School (brick) erected in 1875 ..
Two town lots given by the Coal Co.     School-
house erected by the Government in 1874.    En-
800
7,500
1,300
32,500
1,500
Building belonging to Mr. Hamilton; rent free.
Yale	
Two town lots—School Reserve.      School-house
100
700
400
800
York	
School-house built by Government, on unsurveyed
400
12,860
1    68,625
81,485 45 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
28T
TABLE P.—Districts ; dates of creation ; boundaries.
Districts.
Date of creation,
Boundaries.
Barkerville ...
Burgoyne Bay
28th June, 1871 ..
3rd October, 1873.
Burrard Inlet
27th June, 1870.
Cache Creek
Cedar and Cranberry,
South
27th May, 1880.
Cedar and Cranberry,
North
11th February, 1874 . . .
Name changed from Cedar and re-defined, 27th
May, 1880.
Cedar Hill
25th June, 1869
Boundaries altered 1st
June, 1878.
Re-defined 27th May,
1880.
Cheam.
26th November, 1874...
Circle within radius of 3 miles from Court House, Richfield.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at a point
about midway between the head of Ganges Bay and
Beaver Point, on the south side; thence running Westerly, along the summit of the Otter Range, to the seashore; thence following the shore line, Southerly, to the
point of commencement, and including Moresby, Russell, and Portland Islands.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference
of a circle whose centre shall be the school-house on the
North side of the said Inlet, and whose radius shall be
a distance of three miles from such school-house; excepting always any of the land on the south side of the Inlet.
Not defined.
Commencing at the South-west corner of Cranberry District; thence east, along the Southern boundary of
Cranberry and Cedar District, to the coast line, thence
North-west, along the coast line, to the North-east
corner of Section 12, Range 5, Cedar District;
thence West, along the Section line, to the North-west
corner of Section 12, Range 1, Cranberry District; thence
South, along the Western boundary of Cranberry District, to the point of commencement.
Commencing at the North-west corner of South Cedar
and Cranberry School District; thence east, along the
Northern boundary of said District, to the shore line;
thence North-west, along the shore line, to the mouth
of Chase River; thence South to the North-east corner
of Section 20, Range 4, Cranberry District; thence
West along the Northern boundary of Cranberry District,
to its North-west corner; thence South, along the
Western boundary of Cranberry District, to the point
of commencement.
Commencing at the South-east corner of Section 10,
Victoria District; thence Northerly, along the Eastern
boundaries of Sections 10, 81, 14, and 50, to the Southern
boundary of Section 82; thence Easterly, along the
Northern boundaries of Sections 49 and 64, to the
Saanich Road; thence in a Northerly direction, along
said Road, to the boundary line between Victoria and
Lake Districts; thence following said boundary, in a
North-easterly direction, to the sea shore at Cordova
Bay; thence following the shore line, in a Southerly and
South-easterly direction, to the South-east corner of
Section 11; thence in a Westerly direction, following
the Northern boundary of Victoria School District, to
the point of commencement.
Commencing at a point at the North-east corner of Chilliwhack School District on the Fraser River; thence in a
Southerly direction along said boundary, passing Elk
Creek Bridge, to the Mountain Range; thence in an
Easterly direction along said Mountain Range, about
seven miles, to a point due South of the Indian village
at Cheam; thence in a Northerly direction to the Fraser
River at Cheam; thence in a Westerly direction down
said River to the point of commencement. 288
Public Schools'Report.
1881
TABLE P.—Districts ; dates of creation ; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
Chilliwhack ,
Clinton   ,
Colwood ,
25th June, 1869 . .
3rd October, 1873.
Comox	
Cowichan, North
Cowichan, South
Craigflower	
Denman Island ,
Esquimalt  	
Date of creation.
10th August, 1874
30th July, 1870	
16th June, 1870	
16th June, 1869	
23rd July, 1870	
Boundaries altered 1st
June, 1878.
17th August, 1877 .
22nd October, 1870
Boundaries.
All that tract of land within the lines commencing at a
point at the North-eastern boundary of Sumass School
District; thence Southerly, following said boundary, to
base of the Sumass Range of Mountains; thence Northeasterly along the said Range, for a distance of about
six miles; thence in a Northerly direction, crossing Elk
Creek Bridge, to the Fraser River; thence Westerly to
the point of commencement.
Not defined.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the
North end of Parson's Bridge; thence following Rowe
Stream to the boundary line between Sections 97 and
98; thence in a Northerly direction, along the Eastern
boundary of Section 98, to the boundary between Highland and Esquimalt Districts; thence Westerly, along
said boundary line to the North-west corner of Section
14; thence South-westerly, to the South-east corner of
Section 100; thence in a South-easterly direction, to
South-west corner of Section 51; thence along the section
line, between Sections 50 and 51, to the shore at Royal
Bay; thence North-easterly, along the shore line to the
Southern end of Parson's Bridge; thence along the said
bridge to the point of commencement.
All that piece of land known on the Official Map as the
District of Comox.
The Districts of Somenos and Comiaken and those portions
of the Quainichan and Cowichan Districts which are
situated North of the Cowichan River.
The District of Shawnigan, and those portions of the
Cowichan and Quainichan Districts which are situate to
the South of the Cowichan River.
Commencing at the South-west extremity of Cedar Hill
School District and following the Western boundary of
said District to where it strikes the Southern boundary
of Lake School District; thence along the boundary of
said District to the North-west corner of Section 116;
thence along section line, between 116 and 117, West,
to the line between R. 1 W. and R. 0 W., South, to the
boundary line between Lake and Esquimalt Districts;
thence West, to the North-east corner of Section 98,
marked on the Official Map as "Government Reserve;"
thence along the East line of said Reserve and Mill
River to Parson's Bridge; thence along the water line
of Esquimalt Harbour, South-easterly, to the Southwestern corner of Section 26, Esquimalt District; thence
in a straight line to the South-western extremity of
Section 10; thence along the Southern boundary line of
said Section to Victoria Arm; thence North to the
point of commencement.
All that tract of land known as Denman Island.
All that piece of land included within the following limits,
viz. : Commencing at the western extremity of the south
boundary line of the Craigflower School District; then
southerly and easterly along the shore line of Esquimalt
Harbour and Fuca Straits, and northerly along the water
line of Victoria Harbour to the south-eastern extremity
of the said Craigflower School District; then along the
southern boundary line of the said district to the point
of commencement. 45 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
TABLE P.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
Date of creation.
Boundaries.
Gabriola .
Granville
Hope .
Lake .
Lake La Hache.
Langley
Lillooet  	
Lytton	
Maple Ridge
10th August, 1872 ..
12th February, 1873
25th February, 1871
25th June, 1869.
Boundaries altered 1st
June, 1878.
Re-defined 27th May,
1880.
30th July, 1875.
30th April, 1871.
22nd October, 1870...
20th November, 1869.
31st July, 1874	
The Islands of Gabriola and Mudge.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference
of a circle whose centre shall be the school-house on
the South side of Burrard Inlet, and whose radius shall
be a distance of three miles from such school-house;
excepting always any land on the North side of the
said Inlet.
All that piece of land comprised within a circle having a
radius of three miles from the Court House.
Commencing at the north-east corner of Cedar Hill School
District, being a point where the boundary line between
Victoria and Late Districts intersect the sea shore at
Cordova Bay; thence in a south-westerly direction, following the northern boundary of Cedar Hill School
District, to the north-east corner of Section 50, Victoria
District; thence westerly, along the southern boundary
of Section 82, to Colquitz stream; thence following said
stream, in a northerly direction, to its intersection with
the northern boundary of Section 1, Lake District;
thence westerly, along the northern boundary of Section
1, to its north-west corner, being a point on the eastern
boundary of Section 22; thence in a north-westerly direction, across Section 22, to the north-east boundary of
Section 116; thence westerly, along the northern boundary of Section 116, to the western boundary of Lake
District; thence north, along said boundary, to the
south-west corner of Section 127; thence east, along the
southern boundary of Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the
south-west corner of Section 53; thence north, along the
western boundary of Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the
southern boundary of South Saanich District; thence
east, along said boundary, to the sea shore; thence following the sea shore, in a south-easterly direction, to
the point of commencement.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of six miles in length from the
school-house, situate at the 114 mile-post, on the Cariboo
Road as the centre of such circle.
Starting on the left bank of the Fraser, at the extreme
north-west corner of the town site of Derby; thence a
right line southerly, 4J miles; thence easterly, parallel
with the river, 6 miles; thence in a right line back to
the river and across the Fraser, and also extending a
distance inward of half a mile; thence down the right
bank of, and parallel with, the river, as far as Kanaka
Creek; thence down said creek to its confluence with
the Fraser at a point directly opposite the old Government buildings at Derby.
A radius of three miles from the Court House.
A radius of two miles from the Court House.
All that tract of land included within the lines commencing at the South west corner of Section 3, Township No.
9, New Westminster District; thence in a northerly
direction to the north-west corner of Section 34, Township No. 9, aforesaid; thence in an Easterly direction
to the North-east corner of Section 32, Township No.
12, New Westminster District; thence in a Southerly
direction to the point of intersection with the Langley 290
Public Schools Report.
1881
TABLE P.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.— Continued.
Districts
Matsqui...
Metchosin.
Nanaimo	
New Westminster
Nicola Valley	
North Arm.
Okanagan.
Prairie
Date of creation.
8th April, 1871.
30th July, 1870
4th June, 1870.
31st July, 1874
17th August, 1877 ,
31st July, 1874 .
26th November, 1874.
Quesnellemouth...
14th April, 1881.
Boundaries
School District; thence following the Western boundary
of the Langley School District to the Northern boundary line of Townships 8 and 11, New Westminster
District; thence Westerly to the point of commencement.
Not defined.
The whole of the District of Metchosin according to the
Official Map, together with that portion of Esquimalt
District adjoining thereto which lies outside of the
boundary of the Craigflower School District.
All that piece of land included within a circle having a
radius of three miles from the Court House.
A radius of two miles from Lytton Square, New Westminster.
Bounded on the East by a line drawn North and South
from the residence of William Charters in Nicola Valley,
and extending on each side of the Nicola River to the
natural boundaries of Nicola Valley; on the West by a
line drawn North and South from the residence of Byron
Earnshaw, and extending on each side of the Nicola
River to the natural boundaries of Nicola Valley aforesaid, said Western boundary being about nine miles distant from the Eastern boundary; and on the North and
South by the natural boundaries of the Nicola Valley.
Commencing at North-west corner of Lot 314, Group 1;
thence due North to Southern boundary of Lot 320;
thence North-westerly along the Northern boundary of
Musquiam Indian Reserve to Western boundary of Lot
320, Group 1, thence due North to North-west corner of
Lot 320; thence following Southern boundary of the
Hastings Saw Mill timber lease to North-west corner of
Lot 336, Group 1; thence due West along the Northern
boundary of Lots 336 and 337 to the North-east corner
of 337; thence due South to the Northern boundary of
Lot 330; thence due West to the North-east corner of
Lot 258, Group 1; thence due South along Eastern
boundary of Lot 258 to North Arm of Fraser River,
Then commencing at North-east corner of Section 15,
Block 5, North, Range 5, West, due South, to Range
line between Blocks 4 and 5 North; thence following the
said Range line, due West to North Arm, Fraser River,
including Sea Island.
Commencing at at a point at the mouth of Mfssion Creek;
thence Northerly along the shore of Okanagan Lake a
distance of five miles; thence Easterly a distance of five
miles; thence Southerly to Mission Creek; thence westerly to the point of commencement.
Commencing at a point on the North-east corner of Section
13, Township 8, New Westminster District; thence in a
Westerly direction, three miles; thence in a Southerly
direction to the 49th parallel; thence in an Easterly
direction six tmiles along said parallel; thence in a
Northerly direction, about nine miles; thence in a
Westerly direction, three miles, to the point of com
mencement.
Commencing at the junction of the left banks of the
Fraser and Quesnelle Rivers and running thence due
West a distance of one mile; thence due North six miles; 45 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
291
TABLE P.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.— Continued.
Districts.
Date of creation.
Boundaries.
Saanich, North .
Saanich, East-South.
30th August, 1872	
Boundaries altered 3rd
October, 1873.
Re-defined 27th May,'80
30th August, 1872	
Boundaries altered 3rd
October, 1873.
Re-defined 27th May,'80
Name changed from
South Saanich.
Saanich, West-South.
27th May, 1880.
Salt Spring Island
Sooke	
Stanley	
Stuart's Lake	
Sumass	
Trenant	
30th July, 1870...
23rd May, 1872.. .
17th August, 1877.
17th August, 1877
13th October, 1871
3rd October, 1873.
thence due East three miles; thence due South six miles;
thence due West 2 miles to the point of commencement.
All that portion of the Saanich Peninsula, lying to the
North of South Saanich District, as shown on the
official map and known as the ' North Saanich District."
Commencing at the North-east corner of the Lake School
District; thence west, along the Southern boundary of
South Saanich District, to the South-west corner of
Section 18, Range 3 E.; thence North, along the said
range line, to the South-east corner of Section 12, Range
2 E.; thence west, along the Southern boundary of
Section 12, R 2 E, to its South-west corner; thence North
along the Range line, to the South-west corner of Section
4, Range 2 E.; thence West, along the Southern boundary of Section 4, Range 1 E., to its South-west corner;
thence North, along the Range line, to the North-west
corner of Section 1, Range 1 E.; thence East, along the
Southern boundary of North Saanich, to the seashore;
thence following the sea shore, in a South-easterly
direction, to the point of commencement.
Commencing at the North-west corner of the Lake School
District; thence East, along the Southern boundary of
Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the South-west corner of
Section 53, Lake District; thence North, along the
Western boundaries of Sections 53, 54 and 55, to the
Southern boundary of the East-South Saanich School
District; thence west, to the North-west corner of Section
56, Lake District; thence North, following the Western
boundary of the East South Saanich School District, to
its intersection with the Southern boundary of North
Saanich District; thence West, along said Southern
boundary, to the sea shore at Saanich Inlet; thence
Southerly, along the shore line of Saanich Inlet and Tod
Creek, to the South-west corner of South Saanich District; thence South, along the Western boundary of
Sections 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, Lake District, to
the point of commencement.
All that piece of land known on the Official Map as Salt
Spring or Admiral Island.
The same as those defined on the Official Map of the
District of Sooke.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of three miles in length from
the Court House, Stanley.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of six miles in length from Fort
St. James on Stuart's Lake.
On the North, the Fraser River and Atchelitz Reserve; on
the West, the North-eastern boundary line of the
Sumass Lake and the Sumass River, to its confluence with
the Fraser; on the South and East, the base of the
Sumass Mountain Range.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the
Southern bank of Fraser River, opposite Tilbury Island;
thence running due South in prolongation of the dividing
line of Ranges 4 and 5 West, Blocks 4 and 5 North,
New Westminster District, to the sea shore at Boundary 292
Public Schools Report.
1881
TABLE P.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.— Concluded.
Districts-
Date of creation.
Boundaries.
Victoria.
25th June, 1869.
Boundaries altered 1st
June, 1878.
Re-defined 27th May,'80
Wellington.
2nd May, 1874.
Williams Lake.
Yale..
York.
27th May, 1880.
25th June, 1869.
31st July, 1874.
Bay; thence South-westerly, along the shore line to the
49th parallel of latitude; thence along said 49th parallel
to the sea shore at Robert's Bay; thence along the shore
line, Northerly, to Pelly Point, at the mouth of Fraser
River; thence along the said Southern bank of the
Fraser River to the point of commencement.
Commencing at the South-east corner of Section 10, Victoria District; thence Easterly, along the shore line, to
the North-west corner of Section 5; thence east, along
the Northern boundary of Section 5, to the North-east
corner of said Section; thence South-easterly, in a direct
line, to the North-west corner of Section 75; thence
easterly, along the Northern boundary of Sections 75
and 76, to the North-east corner of Section 76; thence
North, along the Eastern boundary of Sections 25 and
26, to the North-west corner of Section 28; thence east,
along the Northern boundary of Sections 28 and 11, to
the North-east corner of Section 11; thence Southeasterly, along the Eastern boundary of Section 11, to
the sea shore at Qak Bay; thence following the shore
line, in a Southerly, Westerly, and Northerly direction,
to the North-west corner of Section 5.
All that tract of land included within the lines, commencing at a point at the North-west corner of Wellington
District, on the shore line; thence in a Southerly direction, along the Western boundaries of Wellington and
Mountain Districts, to the Section post between Sections
8 and 9, Range 1, Mountain District; thence easterly
along said Section line, to South-east corner of Section
9, Range 7; thence Northerly to the boundary line of
Mountain District; thence Easterly, along the Northern
boundary of Mountain District, to the sea shore at
Departure Bay; thence Northerly and Westerly, along
the shore line, to the point of commencement.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference
of a circle whose centre shall be the 150-Mile Post on
the Cariboo Road, and whose radius shall be a distance
of seven miles from such mile post.
Not defined.
Township No. 19, New Westminster District. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 293
PART  III.
Appendices.
22  45 Vic Public Schools Report. 295
APPENDIX  A.
Eules and Eegulations for the Government op Public Schools in the
Province of British Columbia.
1. The hours of teaching shall be from 9 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.,
from April to September, inclusive; and from 9.30 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. from October to March, inclusive.
2. There shall be a recess of fifteen minutes in the middle of each morning's work
during the whole year, and a recess of ten minutes in the middle of each afternoon's
work in the six months from April to September, inclusive.
3. Every Saturday, Sunday, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Queen's Birthday,
Dominion Day, and Thanksgiving Day shall be a holiday.
4. There shall be two vacations in each year. The Summer Vacation shall include
the time from the last Saturday in June to the first Sunday in August; and the Winter
Vacation shall continue for the two weeks preceding the first Monday in January after
the new year.
5. Teachers shall be paid their usual salaries during the vacations and holidays
ordered in Clauses 3 and 4 only.
6. Young children, not being of school age, shall not be allowed to accompany
teachers or pupils.
7. It shall be the duty of every teacher—
1. To keep the school register with care and to call the roll previously to beginning
the regular school work each morning and each afternoon.
2. To inquire into and record all cases of tardiness and absence of pupils.
3. To send to each pupil's parent or guardian a monthly report stating the number of times he was absent, the number of times he was late, his deportment,
his progress in each branch of study, and his rank in his class.
4. To be present in the school-room at least fifteen minutes in the morning, and
five minutes in the afternoon, before the time prescribed for commencing school,
to observe punctually the hours for opening and closing school, and not to allow
recesses to exceed the specified time—that is, from the time study ceases and
commences again.
5. To keep a Visitors' Book (which he shall ask the trustees to provide), and to
enter therein the visits made to his school, and to allow any visitor who so
chooses to make therein any remarks suggested by his visit.
6. To receive visitors courteously and to afford them every information.
7. At all times to give to the trustees access to the registers and visitors' book,
and to deliver up the same to their order upon his ceasing to be employed by
them.
8. At the end of each half-year to hold a public examination of his school, of which
notice shall be given to the trustees, and to the parents through the pupils.
9. To furnish to the Superintendent of Education, monthly or when desired, any
information which it may be in his power to give respecting anything connected
with the operations of his school or in anywise affecting its interest or character.
10. To teach diligently and faithfully.
11. To classify the pupils according to their respective abilities.
12. To practice such discipline as may be exercised by a kind, firm, and judicious
parent in his family, avoiding corporal punishment, except when it shall appear
to him to be imperatively necessary; and then a record of the offence and the
punishment shall be made in the school register for the inspection of trustees
and visitors. 296 Public Schools Report. 1881
13. No teacher shall compel the services of pupils for his own private benefit or
convenience.
14. For gross misconduct, or a violent or wilful opposition to authority, the teacher
may suspend a pupil from attending school, forthwith informing the parent or
guardian of the fact and the reason of it; but no pupil shall be expelled without
the authority of the trustees.
15. When the example of any pupil is very hurtful, and reformation appears hopeless, it shall be the duty of the teacher, with the approbation of the trustees, to
expel such pupil from the school; but any pupil under public censure who shall
express to the teacher his regret for such a course of conduct, as openly and
explicitly as the case may require, shall, with the approbation of the trustees
and teacher, be re-admitted to the school.
16. Subject to the arrangements of the Board of Trustees, to see that the school-
house is kept in proper order in respect of cleanliness, heating and ventilation,
and especially that the school-room is ready for the reception of pupils at least
fifteen minutes before the time for opening the school.
17. To have a care that the yards and outhouses are kept in order, and that the
school-house and premises are locked at all proper times, and to exercise
vigilance over the school property, the buildings, outhouses, fences, apparatus,
books, etc., so that they may not receive unnecessary injury, and to give prompt
notice in writing to the Secretary of the Trustees of any such injury.
18. To keep in a conspicuous place in the school-room a Time-Table, showing the
order of exercises for each day in the week, and the time devoted to each per
day.
19. Not to be absent from the school without the permission of the Board of
Trustees, unless in case of sickness, in which case the absence is to be immediately reported to the Secretary. N. B.—All absences, with reasons for the
same, shall be reported monthly to the Superintendent of Education.
20. In schools where more than one teacher is employed, to attend all meetings of
the teachers called by the Principal. It shall be the duty of the Principal of a
school to convene a meeting of the teachers associated with him at least once
a month, for conference respecting all the departments of the school.
21. To assist the Superintendent of Education in examining and classifying pupils.
22. To make an affidavit, when required, as to the correctness of the statistical
and other information given by him to the Superintendent of Education.
23. Not to detain any pupil in school during the hour's intermission at noon.
24. To require all pupils, except those detained for punishment, to pass out of the
school-room at recesses and at dismission, and to dismiss pupils so detained
previous to leaving the school.
25. To make himself familiar with the Eules that relate to his school duties.
8. The Principal of a school shall have a responsible supervision over the timetables, exercises, methods, and general discipline pursued in all its lower grades.
9. No pupil shall be admitted to any public school who has been expelled from any
school, unless by the written authority of the Trustees.
10- No person shall be admitted into, or continue in, any school as a pupil, if he is
afflicted with, or has been exposed to, any contagious disease, until all danger of contagion shall have passed away, as certified in writing by a medical man.
11. Any school property that may be wilfully injured or destroyed by any pupil is
to be made good forthwith by his parent or guardian.
12. It is required of each and every pupil:—
1. That he come to school clean and tidy in his person and clothes ; that he avoid
idleness, profanity, falsehood, deceit, and quarrelling and fighting; that be be
kind and courteous to his fellows, obedient to his instructors, diligent in his
studies; and that he conform to the rules of the school. 45 Vic
Public Schools Report.
297
2. That he present to the teacher an excuse from bis parent or guardian for
tardiness or absence from school.
3. That he be present at each examination of his school, or present a satisfactory
excuse for absence.
4. That he do not depart, without the teacher's consent, before the time appointed
for closing the school.
5. That he be amenable to the teacher for any misconduct on the school premises,
or in going to and returning from school.
6. That he come to school with the prescribed school books and school requisites;
but, in case of his inability to comply with this rule, the teacher may, under
special circumstances, supply the necessary books free of cost; but every such
case must be forthwith reported to the Superintendent of Education.
18. The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no religious dogmas or creed shall
be taught. No exercise of a religious character in opening and closing school is allowed,
except the Lord's Prayer upon the permission of the Board of Trustees.
C. C. McKenzie,
23rd December, 1881. Superintendent of Education.
APPENDIX B.
Eegulations for the Examination of Public School Teachers in the Province
of British Columbia for the Year 1882.
 o	
[Approved by His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, 6th January, 1882.]
1.—Time and Places of Examination.
1. The examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the
Public Schools shall commence on Wednesday, the 5th July, 1882, at 1 p. m.
2. The examination shall be conducted according to the following schedule:—
Date.
July   5, Wednesday
„ 6, Thursday -j
,,     7, Friday 	
„ 8, Saturday ...
,,     9, Monday	
„   11, Tuesday	
„ 12, Wednesday
,, 13, Thursday...
,,   14, Friday	
,, 15, Saturday...
Subject.
Spelling ,
Writing ,
Arithmetic ,
Grammar	
English History 	
Natural Philosophy	
Algebra  ,
Ancient History	
Practical Mathematics.,
Optional Subjects ,
Morning.
10 to 10 30
10.30 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30*
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30 {
Subject.
Seating, &c, and Reading
Mental Arithmetic.
Composition 	
Geography.,
Education & Art of Teaches
Mensuration	
Book-keeping	
Euclid	
English Literature
Latin 	
Afternoon.
1 to —
2 to 2.20
2.30 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 5
2 to 4.30 j-
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
* The examination of 2nd and 3rd Class Candidates ceases,
f The examination of 1st Class B Candidates ceases.
{ The examination of 1st Class A Candidates ceases. 298 Public Schools Report. 1881
3. The examination shall take place at Victoria, and such other place or places as
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall appoint.
II.—Notice and Testimonials.
1. Every candidate for examination shall send in to the Superintendent of Education,
on or before the 1st of June, 1882, a notice stating the class and grade of certificate for
which he is a candidate (and if necessary his selection of one of the subjects of examination numbered 20, 21, 22), and the description of any certificate he may already possess.
2. Every candidate's notice of intention to be examined must be accompanied by
testimonials certifying to the temperate habits and good moral character of the candidate.
III.—Eules to be Observed by Candidates during Examination.
1. Candidates must be in their allotted places before the hour appointed for the
commencement of the examination.
2. No candidate shall be allowed to leave the examination room within one hour of
the issue of the examination paper in any subject; and, if he then leave, he shall not be
permitted to return during the examination of the subject then in hand.
3. No candidate shall be permitted, on any pretence whatever, to enter the examination room after the expiration of an hour from the commencement of the examination.
4. The order to stop writing must be obeyed immediately.
5. ;No candidate shall give or receive assistance of any kind in answering the
examination questions. He shall neither copy from another himself, nor allow
another to copy from him. Ho shall not take into the examination room anything from which he might derive assistance in the examination. He shall not talk
or whisper. Detection in the breach of these Rules will render the candidate liable not
only to the loss of the whole examination then in progress, but also to the withdrawal
or forfeiture of his certificate at any time afterward, should the discovery be then made
that these Eules have been broken by him.
6. Every candidate shall use the distinguishing number assigned him by the
Examiners in place of his name, and shall write this number distinctly at the top of
each page of his answer papers. He shall not write his name or initials, or any particular sign or mark of identification other than this distinguishing number.
7. Candidates, in preparing their answers, will write on one side only of each sheet.
8. Every candidate, preparatorily to his surrendering his answer papers to the
Examiners, shall arrange them in the order of the questions; shall fold them twice,
neatly and evenly, in the direction of the ruled lines; and shall write his number and
the subject of the examination paper on the outside sheet.
9. After the answer papers are once handed in, no candidate shall be allowed to
make any alteration of any kind in them.
IV.—General Conditions.
1.—Candidates must furnish satisfactory proofs of temperate habits and good moral
character.
2. No male candidate shall be less than eighteen years of age, and no female candidate less than sixteen.
V.—Certificates of Qualification.
The following shall be the classes and grades of certificates:—
1.
Temporary
certificate.
2.
Third Class
Grade B,
certificate.
3.
Third Class
Grade A,
4.
Second Class, Grade B,
5.
Second Class, Grade A,
6.
First Class,
Grade B,
/
7.
First Class,
Grade A,
?) VI.—Value and Duration of Certificates.
1. A temporary certificate, valid till the next examination of teachers, shall entitle
the holder to teach temporarily in any school.
2. A Third Class Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to teach in
any Public School in which one teacher is employed, or as an assistant in one in which
more than one is employed.
3. A Second Class Certificate, valid for three years, shall entitle the holder to hold
any position in any Public School.
4. A First Class, Grade B, certificate, valid for four years, shall entitle the holder
to hold any position in any Public School, or to act as an Assistant in a High School.
5. A First Class, Grade A, certificate, valid for four years, shall entitle the holder
to hold any position in any Public or High School.
VII.—Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1. Reading.    To read intelligently and expressively,
2. Writing. To write legibly and neatly, and to understand the principles of
writing as given in Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's copy-books.
3. Spelling.    To be able to spell correctly.
4. Arithmetic. To be thoroughly familiar with arithmetic, and to be able to work
problems in the various rules.
5. Mental Arithmetic. To show readiness and accuracy in solving problems in
mental arithmetic.
6. Geography. To have a good knowledge of geography as contained in the
authorized text-book.
7. Grammar. To answer any question in Morell's Grammar; and to analyze and
parse any English sentence.
8. History.    To have a good knowledge of English history.
9. Composition. To be familiar with the forms of letter-writing, and to be able to
write a prose composition on any simple subject, correctly as to expression, spelling,
and punctuation.
10. Education. To have a thorough knowledge of the approved modes of teaching
the various subjects of the school curriculum, and to be well acquainted with school
management—including school buildings and arrangements, classification of pupils,
formation of time-tables, and modes of discipline, and to be familiar with the School Act
and Regulations, especially respecting the office of teacher.
VIII.—First Class, Grade B, Certificate.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class certificates.
11. Book-keeping.    To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration.   To be familiar with the principal rules for the mensuration of
surfaces.
13. Algebra. To understand the principles relating to simple and quadratic
equations, and the solution of problems giving rise to such equations.
14. Euclid.   Books I. and II., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy. To be acquainted with the properties of matter, and with
the elementary principles of statics. 300 Public Schools Report. 1881
IX.—First Class, Grade A, Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class certificates.
11. Book-keeping.    To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration.    To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
13. Algebra.    To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
14. Euclid.    Books L, IL, III., IV., Defs. of V., and Book VI., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy. To have a good knowledge of Statics, Dynamics, and
Hydrostatics.
16. English Literature.
17. Ancient History. To have a general knowledge of Roman History, more
especially from the formation of the first triumvirate to the death of Domitian ; and of
Grecian History, more especially from the invasion of Greece by Darius to the death
of Alexander the Great.
18. Practical Mathematics. To be versed in right and oblique angled trigonometry,
and to have a fair knowledge of land surveying and navigation.
19. Latin. To be able to translate and parse the following: Caasar, DeBello Gallico,
Books I., II., and III.; Horace, Odes, Book 1., and Ars Poetica; Virgil, iEneid, Books
I., IL, and III.
20. Greek. To be able to translate and parse the following: Xenophon, Anabasis,
Books I., IL, and III.; Homer, Iliad, I., IL, and III.
21. French. To be able to translate and parse the following: Voltaire, Histoire de
Charles XII., Books I., IL, and III.; Corneille, Le Cid.
22. Natural Sciences.   To have a fair knowledge of one of the natural sciences.
Candidates shall be allowed to select one of the subjects numbered 20, 21, 22, in
which to be examined.
X.—Conditions of Obtaining Certificates.
1. For a temporary Certificate. A candidate for a temporary certificate must give
satisfactory information as to his character and scholastic qualifications, and must forward an application from a Board of School Trustees desiring his services as teacher.
2. For a Third Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and 25 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
3. For a Third Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 50 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
4. For a Second Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
5. For a Second Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 70 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
6. For a First Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and
grade, 50 per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for
second and third class certificates, and not less than 30 per cent, of the total number of
marks attached to the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 301
7. For a First Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and
grade, 50 per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for
second and third class certificates, and not less than 30 per cent, of the total number of
marks attached to all the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade.
XL—Fixed Standard Marks of Value attached to Subjects of Examination.
Marks.
1. Beading     50
2. Writing  100
3. Spelling   100
4. Arithmetic  200
5. Mental Arithmetic   100
6. Geography  200
7. Grammar  200
8. History (English)  200
9. Composition  200
10. Education  .....'  200
11. Book-keeping  200
12. Mensuration  200
13. Algebra  200
14. Euclid  200
15. Natural Philosophy  200
16. English Literature     ,  200
17. Ancient History  200
18. Practical Mathematics  200
19. Latin  200
20. 21, 22.    Greek or French, or one of the Natural Sciences   200
APPENDIX C.
Chapter I.
School Meetings in School Districts.
I.—Notice of Meetings.
1. The notice, calling an annual or special meeting, may be signed by school Meetings.
the  Secretary   by direction of the trustees, or by a majority of the
trustees themselves.    Copies of such notices shall be put up in at least
three of the most public places in the district, at least ten days before
the time of holding the meeting.
II.—Proceedings at Annual Meetings.
1. The senior or other trustee present shall, at the proper hour (12 Annual school Meetings,
o'clock), call the meeting to order, and request the voters present to  0W01ffanlze •
appoint a chairman and secretary from among themselves.
The chairman, on election, shall at once take the chair, and shall
preserve order and decorum, and shall decide questions of order, subject
to an appeal to the meeting. The chairman's power of voting shall be
limited to the casting vote. In case of an equality of votes, the chairman must give the casting vote.
The secretary shall record in writing all the votes and proceedings
of the meeting.
2. The following shall be the order of business at the meeting:—       Order of business at
. , Annual Meetings.
(1.) Calling the meeting to order. 302 Public Schools Report. 1881
(2.) Election of chairman and secretary.
(3.) Eeading of trustees'   annual report,  including  statement  of
receipts and expenditure.
(4.) Eeceiving and deciding upon trustees' report.
(5.) Election of trustee to fill the vacancy at the end of the past
year.
(6.) Election of trustee or trustees to fill any other vacancy.
(7.) Any other business of which due notice has been given.
Rules of order to be 3, The following rules of order should be observed at the meetings:
observed at Annual ° °
Meetmg8, (1.) Addressing Chairman.—Every voter shall rise previously to
speaking, and address himself to the chairman.
(2.) Order of Speaking.—When two or more voters rise at once, the
chairman shall name the voter who shall speak first, when the
other voter or voters shall next have the right to address the
meeting in the order named by the chairman.
(3.) Motion to be read.—A voter may require the question or motion
under discussion to be read for his information at any time,
but not so as to interrupt a voter who may be speaking.
(4.) Speaking twice.—No voter shall speak more than twice on the
same question or amendment without leave of the meeting,
except in explanation of something which may have been misunderstood, or until every one choosing to speak shall have
spoken.
(5.) Voting.—The chairman shall take the votes by poll; and the
names of all voters who may present themselves shall be
recorded; such poll to remain open till four o'clock, when the
chairman shall declare the result.
(6.) Voters.—In case objection is made to the right of a person to
vote, the chairman shall require the person whose vote is
questioned to make the declaration provided by law; after
making it, the vote must be received and recorded without
further question; but if such person refuses to make such
declaration, his vote is to be rejected.
(7.) Protests.—No protest against an election or other proceedings
of the meeting shall be received by the chairman. All protests
must be sent to the Superintendent of Education within twenty
days at least after the meeting.
(8.) Adjournment.—A motion to adjourn a school meeting shall
always be in order, provided that no second motion to the
same effect shall bo made until some intermediate proceedings
shall have been had.
(9.) Motion to be made in writing (if required) and seconded.—A
motion cannot be put from the chair, or debated, unless the
same be in writing (if required by the chairman), and seconded.
(10.) Withdrawal of Motion.—After a motion has been announced or
read by the chairman, it shall be deemed to be in possession of
the meeting; but may be withdrawn at any time before
decision by the consent of the meeting.
(11.) Kind of motion to be received.—When a motion is under debate
no other motion shall bo received, unless to amend it, or to
postpone it, or for adjournment.
(12.) Order of patting motion.—All questions shall be put in the
order in which they are moved. Amendments shall all be put
before the main motion, the last amendment first, and so on. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 303
(13.) Reconsidering motion.—A motion to reconsider a vote may be
made by any voter at the same meeting; but no vote of reconsideration shall be taken more than once at the same meeting.
4. The poll of every election of a trustee shall not be kept open after close of Meeting.
four o'clock in the afternoon.
5. At the close of the proceedings, the chairman and secretary should Transmission of Minutes,
sign the minutes, as entered by the secretary in the minute  book, and
the secretary of the board of trustees must forthwith transmit a correct
copy of such minutes, signed by himself, to the Superintendent of
Education.
6. As far as possible, special school meetings shall be conducted in sPecial school Meetings
the same way as annual school meetings.
Chapter II.
Powers and Duties of Trustees.
(These are defined in the " Public School Act, 1879.")
The following regulations are further prescribed for the guidance of
trustees:—
1. Notice of the appointment of a teacher to a school should be given Appointment of Teacher,
him in writing, such notice specifying the day on which his duties as
teacher commence.
2. Notice of intention to dismiss a teacher should be given him in Dismissal of Teacher,
writing, at least thirty days before such dismissal is to take place.
3. Notice of the appointment or dismissal of a teacher should be superintendent of Edu-
forthwith transmitted to the Superintendent of Education, with the appototmenCr msmtesai
date on which the appointment or dismissal takes effect. of Teacher.
4. Trustees should appoint one of their number whose duty it should care of School-house,
be to see that the school-house is kept in good repair.    He should see
that the windows are properly filled with glass; that, at the proper
season, the stove and pipe or fireplace are in good condition, and that
suitable wood or coal is provided; that the desks and seats are in good
repair; that the outhouses are properly provided with doors and kept
clean; that the blackboards are kept painted, the water supply abundant, and that everything is provided necessary for the comfort of the
pupils and the success of the school.
5. No public school-house or school plot, or any building, furniture, use of School-house.
or other thing pertaining thereto should be used or occupied for any
other purpose than for the use or accommodation of the public school
of the district, without the express permission of the trustees as a corporation, and then only after school hours and on condition that all
damages be made good, and cleaning and sweejjing properly done.
(The teacher has charge ol the school house on behalf of the trustees.
He has no authority to use the school house other than as directod by
them; or to make use of it at any other time than during school hours
without their sanction. At the request of the trustees he must at once
deliver up the school house key to them.)
6. It is the duty of the trustees to decide what incidental expenses Expenses of School,
they shall incur for their school, but they are required to submit such
matters (Public School Act, 1879, Sec. 7, Sub-sec. 3; Revenue Act, 1879,
Sec. 36.) to the Government for approval.
Extract from " Revenue Act, 1879."
"36. Before an account is paid by the Deputy-Treasurer, or finally placed to the credit
of a Sub-Accountant or any other person in repayment of an advance, or in accounting
for any portion of Kevenue by charging the amount to the head of service, the Auditor
must examine the account and endorse thereon the head of service, number of vote, or
authority te which the sum or sums is chargeable, marking his initials against the total
amount to certify to its correctness and that a warrant has been issued."
June, 1879. 304 Public Schools Report. 1881
APPENDIX D.
Chapter I.
Subjects of Examination for Admission to the High School.
1. Spelling and Punctuation.—To be able to spell and punctuate°correctly any passage
in the Fourth Eeader or Spelling Book.
2. Writing.—To write neatly and legibly.
3. ^Arithmetic.—To be able to answer questions in numeration, notation, the four
simple and compound rules, reduction, vulgar and decimal fractions, proportion, simple
interest and percentage, and in mental arithmetic.
4. Grammar.—To know the principal grammatical forms and definitions; to be
able to analyze and parse any ordinary sentence, and to be able to write a short narrative, description, or familiar letter in proper form.
5. Geography.—To have a good knowledge of the earth's planetary relations, of the
general principles of physical geography, and of the outlines of the maps of Europe,
Asia, Africa, America, Oceanica, and of the British Empire, and more particularly of
that of the Dominion of Canada.
6. History.—To know the different periods and the outlines of English History, as
contained in Collier's History of the British Empire (Junior Class Book.)
Chapter II.
Course of Study in the High School.—Junior Division.
1. English Language.—Eeview of elementary work in orthography, etymology,
syntax, and analysis of sentences; derivation of words; rendering of poetry into prose;
composition, including the framing of sentences, familiar and business letters, and
abstracts of passages in readers, themes, and generally the formation of a good English
style; reading; dictation; and elocution, including the learning by heart and recitation
of selected passages from standard authors.
2. Mathematics.—(a.) Arithmetic, including simple and compound rules, vulgar and
decimal fractions, proportion, interest, percentage in its various applications, and square
root.
(b.) Algebra, including elementary rules, factoring, greatest common measure, least
common multiple, square root, fractions, and simple equations of one, two, and three
unknown quantities.
(c.) Euclid, Books I., IL, with easy exercises.
(d.) Mensuration, including lengths of lines, and areas of plane figures.
(e.) Natural Philosophy, including proportions of matter, composition and resolution
of forces, centre of gravity, mechanical powers, pressure of liquids, specific gravity and
modes of determining it, the thermometer, barometer, siphon, common pump, forcing
pump, air pump.
3. Modern Languages.—French—grammar and exercises.
4. Ancient Languages.—(a.) Latin—grammar and exercises.
(b.) Greek—grammar and exorcises (optional.)
5. History.—(a.) Leading events of English History,
(p.) Eoman History to the death of Augustus.
6. Geography.—A fair course of elementary geography, mathematical, physical, and
political. Map geography generally—that ot Canada and that of the British Empire
more particularly. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 305
7. Book-keeping and Writing.—(a.)    Single entry and principles of Double Entry.
(6.) Practice in writing according to the principles contained in Payson, Dunton,
and Scribner's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of Music.
9. Natural Science.—(a.) Elementary Botany,    (b.) Elementary Physiology.
Senior Division.
1. English Language.—The subject generally, including derivation of words, composition, rendering of poetry into prose, abstract of selected passages, critical reading of
portions of the works of standard authors, themes, and generally the formation of a good
English style.
2. Mathematics.—(a.) Arithmetic generally, with duodecimals and metrical system.
(p.) Algebra, quadratics, equations, surds, proportion, progressions, permutations, and
combinations, Binomial theorem, cube root and properties of numbers, (c.) Euclid,
Books I., IL, III, IV., definitions of Book V. and Book VI., with exercises, (d.)
Trigonometery, plane trigonometry, (e.) Mensuration, volumes and areas of surfaces of
solids and surveying.    (/.) Natural philosophy, statics, hydrostatics, and dynamics.
3. Modern Languages.—French—grammar and exercises.
4. Ancient Languages.—(a.) Latin—Csesar, Book I.; Virgil, Book I.
(b.) Greek—Grammar; Xenophon, Book I. (optional.)
5. History.—(a.) English History—the special study of the Stuart and Brunswick
periods, (b.) Eoman History, especially from the death of Augustus to the close of the
reign of Eomulus Augustulus. (c.) Grecian History—especially from the Persian War
to the death of Alexander the Great, both inclusive.
6. Geography.—Ancient and modern.
7. Book-keeping and Writing.—[a.) Single and double entry, (b.) Practice in writing
according to the principles contained in Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of Music.
9. Natural Science.—(a.) Geology,    (b.) Astronomy.
Chapter III.
Eegulations for Admission, &c, into High School.
1. Teachers of the Public Schools, who have already obtained certificates as
teachers, may be admitted to enter the High School as pupils without being required to
pass the usual entrance examination.
2. In order that a candidate may obtain admission to the High School, the aggregate of his marks must amount to at least 60 per cent, of the total marks assigned for
all the subjects of examination, and at least 30 per cent, must bo obtained in each subject.
Candidates will not be admitted who fail to gain 50 per cent, of the parsing and analyzing
questions in the grammar paper.
3. The examination shall be conducted on paper, but candidates may be subjected
to additional viva voce examination in such subjects as shall be thought proper.
4. Pupils of Public Schools in a School District having a High School, after passing a
satisfactory examination and being declared eligible for promotion from the Public to the High
School, shall not be received as pupils in the Public Schools of such District.
5. Pupils entering the High School must take the prescribed course of studies. 306 Public Schools Report. 1881
6. Pupils shall be arranged in classes corresponding to their respective degrees of
proficiency, and each pupil shall be advanced from one class or division to another with
reference to attainments as shown by examination, without regard to the time he may
have been in such class or division.
7. The regulations respecting the duties of pupils in Public Schools apply to pupils
in the High School, and must be obeyed by the latter.
8. Any pupil absenting himself from the Superintendent's examination, or any
portion of such examination, shall not thereafter be admitted into the High School
except by the authority of the Trustees, given in writing; and the names of all such
absentees shall be forwarded by the Principal to the Superintendent of Education.
This rule shall be read to the school at a suitable time just before the examination
at the close of each half-year.
APPENDIX E.
Books Authorized for Use in Public and High Schools.—[1872, 1876-77.]
Fixed Price.
$ cts.
Canadian First Reader, Part 1  0 05
Canadian First Reader, Part II  0 10
Canadian Second Reader  0 25
Canadian Third Reader   0 40
Canadian Fourth Reader      0 50
Canadian Fifth Reader  0 60
Canadian Advanced Reader  0 60
Swinton's New Language Lessons  0 25
The World (J. B. Calkin)  0 50
Modern Geography and Atlas (Campbell)  0 75
Elementary Arithmetic (Smith & McMurchy)  0 25
Advanced Arithmetic (Smith & McMurchy)  0 50
Outlines of General History (Collier)  0 75
British Empire (Collier)  1 00
British History (Collier)  0 50
Algebra (Part I.) (Colenso)  0 50
Euclid, Book I. (Young)  0 12J
Euclid, Book II. (Young)  0 12J
Book-keeping (Fulton & Eastman)  0 40
Canadian Spelling Book ,  0 25
Morell's Essentials, English Grammar, with Exercises  0 25
Pott's Euclid, six Books  0 75
Todhunter's Mensuration  0 60
Tyndall's Natural Philosophy  0 62J
Bain's English Composition and Rhetoric  1 10
Science Primers—Introductory,  Chemistry,   Physics,  Physical   Geography,  Geology,   Astronomy,
Physiology, and Botany, each  0 25
Ancient Geography (Pillans)  0 50
Ancient History (Schmidt)  1 00
White's Grammar School Texts, Latin, each  0 25
White's Grammar School Texts, Greek  0 30
Bryce's First Latin Book  0 75
Bryce's First Greek Book  0 75
Liddell & Scott's Greek Lexicon  2 00
Riddle's Latin Dictionary  0 75
Smith's smaller Latin Grammar  0 87J
Curtis' Greek Grammar  0 87J
Initia Grsaca (Smith)  0 87J
Principia Latina, Part I. (Smith)  0 87J
Latin Prose Composition (Arnold)  0 87J
Greek Prose Composition (Arnold)  0 87i
The Chemistry of Common Things (Dr. Macadam). 45 Vic.                                Public Schools Report.                                      307
Books Authorized for Use
in the High School, 1878-9.
Trigonometry for Beginners, by Todhunter.
Elementary Statics, by J. Hamblin Smith
Elementary Hydrostatics, by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Dynamics, Wormell.
School Geography of the World, by J. B.
Calkin.
Collier's History of Rome.
Collier's History of Greece.
DeFivas' Grammarire des Grammaires,
DeFivas' Elementary French Reader.
Chambers' Practical Mathematics.
APPENDIX F.
List of Duly Qualified Teachers.
First Class, Grade A.
Pope, S. D., A.B., Queen's College, Kings-
Band, C. D., B.A.,     „
ston, Ontario, July, 1880.
McKenzie, John,       „
Smith, B. H., M.A.,  University of New
Williams, Miss E. A., July, 1880.
Brunswick, July, 1880.
Struthers, A. W.,                  „
Stainburn, Geo., B.A., Cantab, July, 1880.
Thomson, J. W., July, 1881.
McLaughlin, J. H., July, 1880.
Johnston, J. P., 1881.
Newbury, J. C, July, 1880.
First Clas
s, Grade B.
Kaye, James, July, 1880.
Irwin, A., July, 1880,
Halliday, J. A.,      „
Smith, Miss Lizzie, July, 1881.
Leduc, Thos.,         „
Delany, J. M.,                    „
Offerhaus, R.,         „
Carmichael, F. A.,            ,,
Chandler, Mrs. L. D., July, 1880.
Titchworth, J. C,             „
Stirling, J. R.,                „
Hamilton, C. J.,                „
Lewis, S. G.,                 „
Second Clas
3s, Grade A.
Cameron, Miss Agnes D., July, 1880.
Smith, J. F., July, 1880.
McDougall, Miss Archena J.,   „
Anderson, Miss Millie, July, 1880.
Johnston, A. G.,                         „
Sinclair, J. W.,                       „
Gowen, Miss A. O,                    „
Sluggett, G. H., July, 1881.
Dods, Archibald,                        „
McKenzie, A.,             „
Crawford, S. F.,                         „
Andrews, Helen,        „
Williams, Miss Mary,                „
Berkeley, Mrs. L. A., July, 1881.
Holding, E. H.,                          „
Trenaman, Miss J. E.,         „
Flett, Alfred,                             „
Clarke, C. E.,                       „
Second Clae
s, Grade B.
McNaughten, Miss C, July, 1880.
Thain, J. H., July, 1881.
Jones, David,                        „
Clyde, Thos.,          „
Irvine, Miss Christina,         „
Polley, Miss A. J., July, 1881.
Gordon, W.,                           „
McDougall, Miss E. E.,   „
Col beck, Mrs.,                       „
Storey, Miss M. V.,        „
Pollard, Miss Annie,            „
Jackson, Miss H.,           „
Bailey, Miss A. S.,               „
Phelps. W.,                      „
Holloway, Miss Emily,       „
Caldwell, Mrs. L. M.,     „ 308
Public Schools Report.
1881
Third Class, Grade A.
Gardiner, Miss E. J., July, 1881.
Eichardson, Miss A. O,     „
Smith, Miss Isabella, „
Bell, Miss E. A., „
Jones, Miss F. M., „
Lindsay, A. E., July, 1881.
Russell, Miss A. M., July, 1881.
Johnston, Miss M. A.,       „
Holloway, Miss Martha,   „
Third Class, Grade B.
Boag, J., July, 1881.
Herring, Miss J. H., July, 1881.
Watson, Miss L., „
Holloway, Miss M. J., „
Halliday, Miss M. F., „
Bell, Mrs. Annette S. M.,   „
Shaw, Alex., July, 1881.
Sweet, Miss M. J., July, 1881.
Barron, Miss Lizzie A., July, 1881.
Suckley, Miss S., „
Norris, Miss M. J., „
APPENDIX G.
List of Successful Candidates for Entrance to the High School.
December, 1880.
Victobia Boys' School.—Richard Elliott, Jr.
Victoria Girls' School—Lucy Mebius, Isabella F. Barron, Maggie Jackson, Lizzie
Katie S. Teague, A. F. Barron (Private School).
June, 1881.
New Westminster—Boys' School.—F. McClure.
New Westminster—Girls' School.—Maggie Sweet.
Granville.—Janey Bryant.
Burgoyne Bay.—John Maxwell.
Craigflower.—Cowper W. Newbury, Thomas Arnot Ker, Albert Parker.
Cedar Hill.—Geo. H. Sluggett, Margaret Irvine, Alfred Henry King.
East South Saanich—Eva Reynard, Mary Michell, Margaret Michell.
Victoria Boys' School.—James Reid, Herbert Hounslow, Wm. Robert Atwood,
Henry Cathcart, John Deans, Charles E. Dickinson, Ernest E. Douglas.
Victoria Girls' School.—Lucy McNeil, Sarah Ann Robinson, Katie Robinson,
Martha Elliott, Grace Halliday, Isabella Barlow. 45 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
309
APPENDIX H.
Programme of Teacher's Examination held in July, 1881.
Date.
July   5, Tuesday	
„    6, Wedn'dayj
, 1, Thursday...
,,     8, Friday 	
,, 9, Saturday ...
,,   11, Monday	
,,   12, Tuesday	
„ 13, Wednesday
,, 14, Thursday...
,,  15, Friday	
Subject.
Spelling ,
Writing ,
Arithmetic	
Grammar	
English History	
Natural Philosophy....
Algebra 	
Ancient History	
Practical Mathematics.
Optional Subjects	
Morning.
10 to 10.30
10.30 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30*
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30 J
Subject.
Seating, &c, and Reading
Mental Arithmetic.
Composition 	
Geography.
Education & Art of Teaching
Mensuration 	
Book-keeping ,
Euclid	
English Literature
Latin  	
Aftebnoon.
1 to —
2 to 2.20
2.30 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 5
2 to 4.30 f
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
* The examination of 2nd and 3rd Class Candidates ceases.
t The examination of let Class B Candidates ceases.
t The examination of 1st Class A Candidates ceases.
Eules to be Observed by Candidates during Examination.
1. Candidates must be in their allotted places before the hour appointed for the
commencement of the examination.
2. No candidate shall be allowed to leave the examination room within one hour of
the issue of the examination paper in any subject; and, if he then leave, he shall not be
permitted to return during the examination of the subject then in hand.
3. No candidate shall be permitted, on any pretence whatever, to enter the examination room after the expiration of an hour from the commencement of the examination.
4. The order to stop writing must be obeyed immediately.
5. No candidate shall give or receive assistance of any kind in answering the examination questions. He shall neither copy from another himself, nor allow another to
copy from him. He shall not take into the examination room any books, or notes, or
anything from which he might derive assistance in the examination. He shall not talk
or whisper. Detection in the breach of these Rules will render the candidate liable not
only to the loss of the whole examination then in progress, but also to the withdrawal
or forfeiture of his certificate at any time afterward, should the discovery be then made
that these Rules have been broken by him.
6. Every candidate shall use the distinguishing number assigned him by the
Examiners in place of his name, and shall write this number distinctly at the top of
each page of his answer papers. He shall not write his name or initials, or any particular sign or mark of identification other than this distinguishing number.
7. Candidates, in preparing their answers, will write on one side only of each sheet.
23 310 Public Schools Report. 1881
8. Every candidate, preparatorily to his surrendering his answer papers to the
Examiners, shall arrange them in the order of the questions; shall fold them twice,
neatly and evenly, in the direction of the ruled lines; and shall write his number and
the subject of the examination paper on the outside sheet.
9. After the answer papers are once handed in, no candidate shall be allowed to
make any alteration of any kind in them.
By order of Board of Examiners.
C. C. McKenzie,
Superintendent of Education.
QUESTIONS SET AT THE TEACHERS' EXAMINATION, JULY, 1881.
Reading.   (For all classes and grades.)
Tuesday, Uh July, 1 p.m. Total marks, 50.
(For all classes and grades.)
Spelling.
Wednesday, 6th July; 10 to 10.30 a.m.    lotal marks, 100.
Spell correctly the following words:—Dilemma, koo de grass, aggreived, abbommee-
nayshon, posseeshon, remeenissence, kultivayshon, partikler, drawring, development,
domeessileeary, apothem, appopleksy, appostrophy, apeel, arraynment, derrivayshon,
dudjon, focilifei'ous, gradation, Anno dominie.
(For all classes and grades.)
Writing.
Wednesday, 6th July; 10.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 100.
1. Name, number and describe with a diagram of each the five elements as contained
in Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's system of penmanship.
2. Name, number and describe with a diagram of each the three principles of the
capital letters.
3. Define the terms spacing, shading, and slant, and give general directions for each.
4. What position do you assume at the desk when writing?
5. Describe the correct manner of holding the pen.
6. Do you use copies ready set, or do you set them yourself?    Give your reasons
for your preference.
7. Write a specimen of copy-setting, using the following sentence for the purpose
and analyzing the first line:—
Nine times the space that measures day and night
To mortal men, he with his horrid crew
Lay vanquished, rolling in the fiery gulf.
(For all classes and grades.)
Mental Arithmetic.
Wednesday, 6th July; 2 to 2.20 p.m.    Total marks, 100
1. Multiply the sum of 6, 7, and 8 by 12.
2. Twelve is three-fourths of what number?
3. What part of f is ! ? 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 311
4. Twelve is 8i per cent, of what number ?
5. What is the interest of $12 for 21 months at J per cent, per month?
6. What is the price of 13 books at 371 cents each ?
7. How much is 7 l-7th per cent, of 98?
8. Divide 20 by li.
9. Eeduce |S to a decimal.
10. How many 6\ cent pieces must be given in exchange for $3 62} ?
(For all classes and grades,)
Composition.
Wednesday, 6th July; 2.30 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
Give briefly, in a letter to the Superintendent of Education, your ideas as to practicable improvement of the course of study now pursued in the public schools of British
Columbia; or write a theme on one only of the following subjects:—
1. The preservation of health.
2. On manners—good and bad.
(For all classes and grades.)
Arithmetic.   Mr. B. Williams.
Thursday, 7th July; 10 a.m. to 12,30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Eeduce to lowest terms — and ^
2. Find value of 16^ + 7£ — 3l| — 9|
nt 2§ X 6y   +   *r X 31
n-— 4-
7 21
and
3. Eeduce 20 sq. poles 10 sq. yds. 2 sq. ft. to the fraction of 2 acres; and find the
value of .00775 of 2% tons.
5
4. Divide .09916 by 3700, and 9916000 by .037.
• • 7
5. Find the vulgar fraction equivalent to 4.0149, and reduce a to a decimal.
6. A beam which is 10 in. wide, 8 in. deep, and 5 ft. 6 in. long, weighs 8 cwt. 1 qr.;
find length of another beam the end of which is a sq. ft. which shall weigh a ton.
7. Find interest of $168 for 2 years 7 months 20 days at 6 per cent, per annum.
8. In what time will $350 amount to $448 at 7 per cent, per annum?
9. Work by cross-multiplication:— 1 yd.    2 ft.    2\ in.  X 3 ft.    Of in.
10. Find true discount on $633,075 due 2} years hence without grace, at 6 per cent,
per annum, simple interest.
11. A person invests $18,150 in the 3 per cents at 90J, and on their rising to 91
transfers it to the 3} per cents at 97} : find the increase in his annual income.
12. Find the cube root of 17173512,   and  the square root of 1.7 to 4 places of
decimals. 812 Public Schools Report. 1881
(For all classes and grades.)
Geography.—Mr. E. Williams.
Thursday, 1th July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total Marks, 200.
1. Explain fully what is meant by the Latitude and Longitude of a place;   where
must a place be situated so as to have the greatest Longitude possible?
2. Name the principal circles of the Sphere, and state their exact positions.    What
is meant by the Ecliptic?
3. Give the positions of the following Towns:   Varna, Kelat, Aleppo, Ajaccio, Lou-
vain; and of the Lakes: Titicaca, Como, Van, Maracaybo, and Lake of the Woods.
4. Give the positions of the following Straits:—Ormuz, Otranto, Bosporus, Sunda,
Bass; and of the Gulfs and Bays: Salerno, Arta, Finland, Persian, Guinea.
5. Give the boundaries of the following Countries and Provinces: Beloochistan,
Bulgaria, Chili, Texas, N. S. Wales.
6. Through what countries and into what seas do the following rivers flow: Lena,
Orontes, Orinoco, Ehone, Parana?    Name the rivers which fall into the Baltic Sea.
7. Name those N. American States which border respectively on the right and left
bank of the Mississippi, with their relative positions.
8. In what States are the following towns: Mobile, St. Paul, St. Louis, Philadelphia,
Chicago, Atlanta, Baltimore.
9. Name, in order, the principal Capes of Europe, with the Countries to which they
belong.
10. Where are the greater and lesser Antilles?    What are the names of the islands
of the former group?
11. Name the Countries of S. America, with their relative positions and capitals.
(For all classes and grades.)
Grammar.—Dr. Tolmie.
Friday, 8th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total Marks, 200.
1. Name, as in Morell's Grammar, the divisions of grammar, giving the meaning of
each term.
2. Write out the parts of speech.
3. Mention the different kinds of nouns.
4. Explain the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs, giving, in a
simple sentence, an example of each.
5. Give the perfect tense and the past participle of the following verbs:—swear,
freeze, see, choose, smite, spread.
6. Give an example of a compound sentence, and parse it.
7. Give an example of a complex sentence, and analyse it.
8. Analyse and parse fully the following sentence:—"Pleased with my admiration,
and the fire his speech struck from me, the old man would shake his years away."
9. Correct mistakes in the following sentences, giving the reasons for your corrections:—"Many of the advantages we now possess dies with us, but virtue is immortal."
"Her and I comes to school every day." "She gave it to Sophy and I." "Neither of
them were aware of it." "I do not know as 1 will go." "The children's dinner is ready."
10. Give the primary and secondary meanings, with derivations, of the subjoined
words:—Bishop, cupboard, prevent, sympathy, paradox, wit. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 313
(For all classes and grades.)
Education and the Art op Teaching.—Superintendent of Education.
Friday, 8th July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total Marks, 200.
1. How long have you been engaged in teaching? What works on teaching have
you studied, and to what educational journal do you subscribe?
2. Give some distinguishing marks of good discipline.
3. What means would you use to promote punctuality?
4. Give some of the qualities of good reading. What peculiarities of pronunciation
may be observed among pupils?
5. How would you endeavour to secure the co-operation of parents in the management of your school?
6. Shew how "copying" tends to produce general demoralization in a school.
7. On which of the senses would you rely in teaching spelling, and why?
8. What faults in teacher or parent cause truancy in schools? What steps would
you take to acquaint parents with their children's irregularity of attendance?
9. State the respective advantages and disadvantages of using Outline Maps and of
using those in common use.
10. Compare the respective values of written questions and answers, and of oral
questioning and answering.
11. Describe in detail, the dimensions, structure, furniture, &c, &c, appropriate to
a well-equipped school having an enrolment of 70, and an average attendance of 50
scholars.
12. Who was Froebel? What special advantage did he seek to gain by his system?
How would you turn to good account the habit children have of making dirt-pies?
13. Discuss the question of rewards and punishments in schools.
14. What would you call "a good education" ?
(For all Classes and Grades.)
British History.
Saturday, 9th July; 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.    Total marks 200.
1. Mention the length of  the Wall of Antonine in Britain; what estuaries it connected, and what Eoman ruled in Britain when it was completed.
2. Between what seas was the Wall of Hadrian built?
3. How far north in Britain did the Emperor Septimius Severus accompany his army,
and what was the result of the expedition?
4. When and where in Britain  did  this Severus die, and what was he about to
undertake at the time?
5. In what year did the Northern Britons sack London; and in whose reign at
Rome was the tie between Britain and Eome finally severed?
6. Name the reforms passed in  1258 by the "Mad Parliament," and state what
these were collectively called.
7. Under whose reign was the " Tallage Act " passed? What was its tendency and
where was the King when it became law?
8. Mention the year and place of Edward the First's death, and his object in being
then in that locality. 314 Public Schools Report. 1881
9. Name some of the great men of Queen Elizabeth's time.
10. How long had James VI. of Scotland reigned before he succeeded Elizabeth?
Give the year of his accession to the throne of England, and bis relationship to the
Queen whom he succeeded.
11. On what occasion was the name of Great Britain used to designate the largest
of the British Isles, and when did the term United Kingdom come into use?
12. In what year was West India Slavery abolished?
13. In what year of this century did a great secession occur of some of the clergy
and laity of the established Church of Scotland; what caused it, and by what name is it
known?
14. When in the nineteenth century were innovations, partly concerning rites and
vestments, originated by certain members of the Church of England? What was the
movement at first termed, and by what name is it now known?
15. In what year was the Church of Ireland disestablished and disendowed, and
under the administration of what Premier?
(For First Class Grade B.)
Mensuration.—Mr. Williams.
Saturday 9th July; 2 to 4.30p.m.    Total marks 200.
1. Each of the equal sides of an isosceles triangle is 15 and the base is 18; find the
altitude.
2. The radius of a circle is 6 feet; find the side of a square inscribed in the circle.
3. The height of a circular arc = 4 in. and the chord of half the arc = 12 in.; find the
diameter of the circle.
4. The difference between the diameter and circumference of a circle is ten feet;
find the diameter.
5. The sides of three squares  being 5, 6, and 7 feet; find the side of the square
which is equal to the sum of the three.
6. How many yards of carpet 25 in. wide, will it take to cover a floor that is 19 ft.
7 in. long by 18 feet 9. in. wide?
7. There is a plantation in the form of a hollow square, length externally 252 yds.,
depth 16 yds.; find area ot plantation, and of the inner square in acres.
8. What is the height of a steeple whose shadow is 150 feet at the same time that
the shadow of a staff 6 feet 4 inches long, is 4 feet 2 inches.
9. The area of a rhombus is 180 square feet, and each side is 15 feet long; find its
height.
10. The sides of a triangle are 11, 24, and 31, show that its area = 66|/3.
(First Class Grade A.)
Mensuration.—Mr. Williams.
Saturday, 9th of July; 2 to 4 p.m.    Total marks 200.
[1 to 10 as for First Class Grade B.]
11. Find the height of prism whose vol. = 28 cubic feet, 500 cubic inches, and whose
base = 7 square feet, 103 square inches.
12. The outer diameter of a spherical shell = 9 inches, and the thickness of shells
1 inch; find vol. of shell. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 315
13. Find in cubic feet the volume of a cone whose radius of base = 2 feet, and height
= 4 feet.
14. The diameter of base of a right circular cylinder is 16 inches and the height is
25 inches; find area of its surface.
15. A sphere and a cone are inscribed in a cylinder; what ratio exists between their
volumes?
What ratio exists between the surface of a sphere and the curved surface of its
circumscribing cylinder?    In each case the cylinders are right circular cylinders.
Natural Philosophy.    (For First Class, Grade B.)
Monday, 11th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Enunciate the Principle of the Triangle of Forces. Three forces, P, Q, E, acting
on a particle keep it at rest; P acts towards the North, Q towards the East, and E
towards the South-West: find the ratio between the forces.
2. Enunciate the Principle of the Parallelogram of Forces. P and Q are two forces
applied to a particle in directions at right angles to one another; P is 90 lbs., Q is 120
lbs.: find the magnitude of their resultant.
3. Distinguish between the different kinds of levers, giving examples of each. A
lever with a fulcrum at one end is 3 feet long; a weight of 14 lbs. is suspended from
the other end. How far from the fulcrum will an upward force of 25 lbs. preserve
equilibrium?
4. Two balls of weights 4 lbs. and 1 lb. are a foot apart; another ball of weight 2
lbs. is placed in the middle between them: find the centre of gravity of the three.
5. Find the conditions of equilibrium in the Wheel and Axle. If radius of axle is 3
feet, and radius of wheel 9 feet, what power will keep a weight of 12 lbs. in equilibrium?
6. Find the resultant of two forces of 13 lbs. each, represented by AB and AC,
BC representing a force of 10 lbs.
Natural Philosophy.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Monday, 11th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
[1 to 6 as for First Class, Grade B.]
7. If a body start from rest under a uniform accelerating force, show that space
described in the nth second = ^  X  nth odd No.
When is accelerated or retarded motion said to be uniform ?
8. Show that the velocity acquired  down an inclined plane — velocity acquired
down the vertical height of the plane.
9. A body is projected upwards with a velocity of 150 feet per second;   how high
will it have ascended in 6} seconds?
10. An inelastic body with vel. v. impinges on another of twice its mass at rest; find
vel. after impact.
11. If 1 cubic ft. = unit of volume, find volume of substance whose specific gravity
= 9.6 and weight = 4200 lbs.
12. Show how to compare the specific gravities of two fluids by weighing the same
solid in each.
13. Explain the action of the common pump.
14. Find what degree Centigrade corresponds to 68 Fah. 316 Public Schools Report. 1881
(For First Class Grades A and B.)
Book-keeping (Double Entry.)
Monday, 11th July; 2 to 5 p.m.    Total marks. 200.
1. In a set of accounts properly kept and balanced, which accounts of the set will
shew the net capital?
2. From the following details make appropriate entries in Cash Book, Journal, and
Ledger, shewing the profit or loss in your business, and a Balance Sheet exhibiting the
true state of your affairs:—
Began business with a capital of $20,000, viz.: Cash, $8,500; goods, $10,000; Dr.
Balance of Account due by Andrew Barclay, $1000; by Charles Davidson, $500.
Owed Edward Forbes, $450.
Eeceived from Charles Davidson, cash, $500.
Sold for cash, goods amounting to $6,750.
Sold to Edward Forbes, goods amounting to $1,750.
Bought of Andrew Barclay, goods amounting to $1,500.
Sold him, do. do. $900.
Paid him, do. cash, $100.
Gave in barter one description of goods amounting to $3,000 for another description
amounting to $2,500; received in cash the difference of $500.
Bought of Charles Davidson sundry goods amounting to $1,600.
Bought sundry goods amounting to $7,000; and at same time paid on account cash
$2,000; an order by yourself on Edward Forbes, $1,000; your Promissory Note @ two
months to Andrew Barclay, $3,000; the balance of $1,000 to stand at credit of Andrew
Barclay in account.
Sold on credit to George Hardy goods amounting to $6,500.
Bought of James Jardine goods payable in 3 months, $500.
Received from Edward Forbes, cash, $100.
Eeceived from George Hardy, cash, $3,500; his promissory note @ 2 months, $2,500;
gave an order on him to Andrew Barclay for $500.
Paid Charles Davidson, cash, $1,600.
Edward Forbes having sold his business to John Abbott, who assumes all outstanding liabilities, agreed to transfer accordingly the Dr. Balance now standing against
Edward Forbes, say $200.
Eeceived in cash full payment of George Hardy's note $2,500.
Paid by Cash, your Promissory Note to Andrew Barclay, $3,000.
Paid all expenses of conducting your business, $1,U00.
After making a fair allowance for damage sustained by certain articles, the value
of your stock of goods on hand is found to be $6,700, as per inventory.
(For First Class, Grade B.)
Algebra.—Mr. E. Williams.
Tuesday, 12th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
s 2 11
1. Divide a2 4- 2a$ 4- 63 by a? 4- 2aHf-\- b.
2. Simplify   f(i+f   ) 6/
5
H-  f(i-|)
3. Eeduce to lowest terms    xs+ \ \ x2 -j- 30a;
and »V.      l/.2 T/3/b
9.x3+53x2-9x—18
4. Find Square Root of   (a;-|-l)3 —4 i/~(x — iA+1 ) 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 317
5. Find the L. C. M. of 6x2 — 13#4-6, 6a;2 4- 5a; — 6, and 9a;2 — 4.
6. Solve the Equations 3 5 4
 + + = o
1—3x     1—5a;    2x—1
x2 + a;-2    =2, "1
x2 + y2 + x + y = 922) x  4- y 4- z = 21   !
VTy      -   20 J , *2 + 2/2 + * = 273 f
a;0 = j/2   J
7. In a concert room 800 persons are seated on benches of equal length. If there
were 20 fewer benches, two persons more would have to sit on each bench. Find
number of benches.
8. A walks at rate of 3 miles an hour, B starts 2 hours after him at 4 miles an
hour:  how many miles will A have walked before B overtakes him ?
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Algebra.   Mr. E. Williams.
Tuesday, 12th July;  10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
[1 to 8 as for First Class, Grade B.]
9. Find the least number which is divisible by 7 and 11 with remainders 6 and 10
respectively.
10. Transform 1828 into the Septenary scale and square it. In what scale will 567
express the value of the common number 678?
11. The sum of n terms of the series 21 4- 19 4- 17 4- &c, is 120; find the nth terra
and n.
12. Expand (3 — 2a;)i to 5 terms.
13. From a company of 50 men, 4 are taken every night on guard. On how many
nights can a different selection be made, and on how many of these will the same man
be engaged?
14. If a : b :: b : c :: c : d show that
8/— 3/—
a : b :: \/   a        :      -j/   d
and express (a 4- b) (c 4- d) in terms of b and e.
(For First Class, Grade B.)
Euclid.
Tuesday, 12th July; 2 to 4:30 p.m.    Total marks 200.
1. If two triangles, A B C, D E F, have two sides of the one equal to two sides of
the other, each to each, and have likewise the angles contained by those sides equal to
each other; they shall have their bases equal and the triangles shall be equal in every
respect.
A line drawn bisecting the angle contained by the two equal sides of an isosceles
triangle, bisects the third side at right angles.
2. Any two angles of a triangle ABC are together less than two right angles.
Show that the angles ABC and A C B are together less than two right angles by joining A to any point in B C. 318 Public Schools Report. 1881
3. At the given point A in the given straight line A B make an angle that shall be
equal to the given rectilineal angle D C E. Given the base, one of the angles at the
base, and the sum of the sides—construct the triangle.
4. If the parallelogram A B C D and the triangle E B C be upon the same base B C
and between the same parallels B C, A E, the parallelogram shall be double of the triangle.
D F G is drawn meeting B C in F and A B produced in G, join A F and C G; then
will the triangles A B F and C F G be equal to one another.
5. In every triangle ABC, the square on the side subtending either of the acute
angles is less than the squares on the sides containing that angle, by twice the rectangle
contained by either of these sides and the straight line intercepted between the acute
angle and the perpendicular let fall upon it from the opposite angle.
If A D be the perpendicular let fall upon the side B C of the triangle ABC, then
the square on A C together with the rectangle contained by B C, B D is equal to the
square on A B together with the rectangle contained by C B and C D.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Euclid.
Tuesday, 12th July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
[1 to 5 as for First Class, Grade B.]
6. The angles in the same segment of a circle A B C D are equal to one another. A
regular pentagon is inscribed in a circle and every second angular point joined by a
straight line. Prove that these lines will form by their intersections an equiangular
pentagon.
7. Let D be any point without the circle ABC and let D C E A, D B, be two
straight lines drawn from it, of which D C E A cuts the circle passing through the
centre E, and D 15 touches the same; then the rectangle A D, D C, shall be equal to the
square on D B.
If A D, C E be drawn perpendicular to the sides B C, A B of the triangle ABC,
prove that the rectangle contained by B C and B D is equal to the rectangle contained
by B A and B E.
8. Describe a square about a given circle A B C D.
Show that nine equal circles may be placed in contact so that a square whose side
is three times the diameter of one of them will circumscribe them.
9. In a right-angled triangle A B C, if a perpendicular be drawn from the right
angle B A C to the base; the triangles on each side of it are similar to the whole
triangle and to one another.
Prove also that C D : D B :: C A2 : A B2.
10. Find a mean proportional between two given straight lines A B, B C.
Find, by a geometrical construction, an arithmetic, geometric, and harmonic mean
between two given lines. 45 Vic. Public Schools Report. 319
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Ancient History.
Wednesday, 13th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
Grecian.
1. State what you know about Lycurgus and his work in Sparta.
2. Mention the principal acts of the early lawgivers of Athens.
3. What portions of Asia Minor did the Greeks colonise?
4. Give what you know about Aristides, Socrates, and Eschylus.
5. Sketch the career of Pericles, mentioning his greatest teacher's name.
6. Give some account of the " Retreat of the Ten Thousand," stating the leader's
name, with that of the historian of the expedition.
7. What first led to Roman interference in the affairs of Greece?
Roman.
1. Name some of the principal tribes of the Italian peninsula, or prehistoric dwellers
in Latium, who were subdued by and incorporated with the Romans.
2. Name the military leaders in the first Triumvirate associated with Julius Casar.
3. What reforms did Caesar effect at Rome the winter preceding his assassination?
4. What great Roman authors lived during the reign of the Emperor Augustus ?
5. Where in Germany, in the time of Augustus, did the Romans sustain a crushing
defeat ?    Name the defeated Roman, and the victorious German, generals.
6. In the reign of Domitian what great victory was obtained in Northern Britain?
Name the respective leaders in this encounter, and state the important geographical
question settled by the Roman conqueror during his stay in Albion,
(For First Class, Grade A.)
British Literature.
Wednesday, 13th July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
Name some of the most admired of Shakespeare's tragedies and comedies.
What has been deemed the happiest portrayal of character in.his comedies?
In what city did Shakespeare pass his best years, and who were there his known
companions and friends?
What is the title and subject of Milton's greatest prose work? Name the subject
of one of his greatest sonnets, it being one of historical interest.
What essay of Macaulay's, when he was a law-student, first brought him into note?
In how many ways as an author did Macaulay earn distinction?
Name some of his much admired ballads, with a few of his greatest prose works.
Sketch the career of Alfred Tennyson, naming some of his best works, and write
out a few of your favorite lines from his poems.
Name Bnlwer Lytton's best novels, giving, if you can, the plot of any of them.
Mention, also, by what poetical production and by what plays he is remembered, How,
outside of authorship, and irrespective of his rank, was he distinguished? 320
Public Schools Report.
1881
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Practical Mathematics.
Thursday, liih July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Express tan - in terms of sine A.
2. The sine of an angle is ^; find its secant and tangent.
3. Find the values of cos 30° and tan 15°.
4. Prove geometrically that cos (A + B) = cos2 A — cos2 B.
5. Define the characteristic of a logarithm and show how the characteristic of a
logarithm to the base 10 is determined.
6. The angles of elevation of the top of a tower are observed from two points A and
B respectively due North and due West of the tower, and are found to be A° and B°.
A and B are on the same level with the base of the tower and their distance apart is d.
Find the height of the tower.
7. Plan a field and find its area from the following notes :—
C50
From
Links.
O B
874
730
44 D
374
250
136 B
O A
go North
8. Find the number of cubic inches of metal in a hollow right circular iron pipe,
height 10 ft. 4 in., outer radius 9 in., and thickness If in.: assuming J = 3.1416, obtain
your result accurate to a cubic inch.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Latin—Virgil.   Mr. R. Williams.
Thursday, lith July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Translate:
Veniet lustris labentibus setas,
Quum domus Assaraci Phthiam clarasque Mycsenas
Servitio premet, ac victis dominabitur Argis.
Nascetur pulchrd Trojanus origine Csesur,
Imperium Oceano, famam qui terminet astris,
Julius a magno demissum nomen Iiilo.
Hunc tu olim caalo, spoliis Orientis onustum,
Accipies secura: vocabitur hie quoqne votis
Aspera turn positis mitescent sajcula bellis,
Cana Fides et Vesta, Remo cum fratre Qnirinus,
Jura dabunt; diraj ferro et compagibus arctis
Claudentur belli portee. 45 Vic Public Schools Report. 321
Scan three lines beginning at imperium. Who were lulus and Quirinus? give their
other names. Where were Phthia and Mycsense. Explain fully the allusions in these
words, and also in the words belli portce.
2, Translate:—
Cui Pyrrhus: Referes ergo hsec, et nuntius ibis
Pelidse genitori: illi mea tristia facta,
Degeneremque Neoptolcmum narrare memento.
Scan the first two lines. To whom is the speech addressed? Who were the persons
whose names occur in these lines ?
HORACE.
1. Translate:—
Teucer Salamina patremque
Quum fugeret, tamen uda Lyaao
Tempora populea fertur vinxisse corona,
Sic tristes affatus amicos:
Quo nos cunque feret melior Fortuna parente,
Ibimus, 0 socii comitesque!
Nil desperandum Teucro duce et auspice Teucro,
Certus enim promisit Apollo,
Ambiguam tellure nova Salamina futuram.
By what figure of speech is quo separated from cunque ? Explain fully the allusions
in Lyceo, ambiguam, Salamina. How was Apollo's prediction fulfilled? Who is meant
by parente ?    Give a full narrative of the whole subject alluded to.
2'. Translate:—
Aut agitur res in scenis, aut acta refertur.
Segnius irritant animos demissa per aurem,
Quam quae sunt oeulis subjecta fidelibus, et quas
Ipse sibi tradit spectator: non tamen intus
Digna geri promes in scenam; multaque tolles
Ex oeulis, quse mox n arret facundia praesens.
Ne pueros coram populo Medea trucidet,
Aut humana palam coquat exta nefarius Atreus.
Explain the allusions in the last two lines.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
French.    (Optional subject chosen.)
Friday, 15th July; 10 a.m to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
Write out the preterite indicative of the verb Partir, the present subjunctive of the
verb Tenir, and the imperfect subjunctive of (he verb S'asseoir.
Render into French the following sentences:—
I have a pain in my head.    I have hurt my hand.    I wash my hands.   My head
ache has returned.   How is the plural formed of nouns ending in s, x, or z ? 322 Public Schools Report. 1881
Translate from the Cid the following, and parse the words in italics:—
Qu'aux volontes du roi ce grand courage cede:
11 y prend grande part; et son coeur irrite
Agira contre vous de pleine autorite
Aussi vous n' avez point de valable defense,
Le rang de l'offense, la grandeur de l'offense,
Demandent des devoirs et des soumissions
Qui passent le commun des satisfactions.
After translating the following from Voltaire's Charles XII., parse the words in
italics:—
Je prefere infiniment a l'un et a l'autre un prince qui regarde l'humanite comme la
premiere des vertus, qui ne se prepare a la guerre que par necessite, qui aime la paix
parcequ'il aime les hommes, qui encourage tous les arts, et qui veut etre en un mot un
sage sur le trone; voila mon heros, monsieur.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Physiology.   (Optional subject chosen.)
Friday, lbth July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Explain why the inside of the mouth is moist and red, giving at the same time
the names of the skin there with description.
2. Why does the blood coagulate, and what is meant by serum?
3. Describe a sweat gland and the process of perspiration.
4. State the difference between motor and sensory nerves, with the several functions
performed by the latter.
5. Why does the blood circulate in one direction only, and why does it circulate at
all?
6. What are the intercostal muscles, and what office do they perform?
7. Give a brief description of the human ear.
8. Distinguish between gastric juice and intestinal juice.
9. Describe the parotid gland.     What is the inflammation called to which it is
liable?
10. How is carbonic acid generated in the body?    How is it eliminated from the
system ?
11. Of what practical value is a knowledge of Physiology ?
12. Why is mental health a physiological question?

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