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SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF MACHINERY FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31st, 1908. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1909

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 SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OP   THE
CHIEF INSPECTOR OF MACHINERY
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31st, 1908,
P BIN TED   BY
AUTHORITY   OF   THE   LEGISLATIVE   ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Richard WoIiKkndks, I.S.O., V.D., Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1909  REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF MACHINERY.
New Westminster, B. C, January, 1909.
The Hon. the Minister of Public   Works,  Victoria, B. C. :
Sir,—In accordance with section 6 of the " Steam Boilers Inspection Act," I have the
honour to submit to you the Seventh Annual Report of the operations of the steam boiler and
machinery inspection service for the year ending December 31st, 1908.
The personnel of the service at present consists of. the Chief Inspector, six District
Inspectors and one clerk, located as follows :—Chief Inspector; two Inspectors for District A
and clerk in New Westminster; two Inspectors for District B in Victoria; Inspector for
District C at Nelson, and Inspector for District D in Vancouver.
The time of one of the Inspectors in this office is largely devoted to the calculation of new
designs and amendments to designs and assisting at engineers' examinations, the latter mostly
occupying the first two weeks in each month.
The following is a summary in part of the work performed in this office during the year :—
Letters inward    3,682
n       outward    3,215
Telegrams inward         50
n outward         74
Inspectors' monthly reports examined and checked         72
Boiler designs examined, calculated and reported on       129
Amendments to designs examined, calculated and reported on         56
Fees for above    $ 395
Number of miles travelled by Chief Inspector    2,545
Number of prosecutions for infractions of the Act  9
Fines collected $860.90
I am pleased to be again able to report that there have been no boiler explosions during
the year, though there have been several slight accidents, both personal and to machinery, all
of which are fully reported by the District Inspectors.
I have also to report one fatal accident which occurred in District C. The engineer on a
logging railway lost control of his train, which was thrown off the track into a ravine; the
engine was completely ruined, the boiler badly damaged and the engineer killed. The grades
on many of the logging railways are very steep, and at times, when the weather conditions are
unfavourable, it is almost impossible to hold the trains on them, and as a result several locomotives have been badly damaged, but the above is the only fatal accident reported.
Of the boilers found unfit for further use the most dangerous were those reported by Mr.
Kay—three brought to Prince Rupert for construction work and two farm boilers, one of the
latter being so bad that the plate fractured when struck with a light testing hammer.
The results from testing plates for new boilers are a little better than last year, there
being only nine plates rejected.
The number of new boilers inspected during the year was less than in 1907, and the
tabulated statement shows that a larger proportion than usual were built in Eastern Canada
and the United States.
The total number of boilers now on our books, after deducting those taken out of service,
is 2,713. The number inspected during the year was 1,757, of which 178 were partial inspections and 1,579 complete, leaving 956 boilers on which no inspection was made. A large
number of these were not in operation during the year.
The number of defects observed during inspections does not differ materially from that of
other years, but the fact of there being eight safety valves found inoperative and seven overloaded shows that there are still very careless persons operating steam boilers.
The summary of total work done gives a complete detail account of the work performed in
all the districts, while summaries under the heading " District Inspector's Reports " show the
work done in each district.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Peck, Chief Inspector. M 4
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
1909
Summary of Total Work done by District Inspectors in 1908.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers.
n amendments to new designs	
ii boiler plates inspected	
ii boiler plates rejected	
ii boilers built under inspection in British Columbia. . . .
ii boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada	
ii boilers built in Eastern Canada not under inspection. .
ii new boilers inspected built in United States,	
n new boilers inspected (total)	
ii boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second hand). .
ii boilers imported from United States (second hand). . .
ii boilers unclassified	
ii first inspections ,	
ii inspections, external and internal	
ii internal inspections only	
ii external inspections only	
ii special inspections after repairs	
n visits in addition to inspections	
ii boilers subjected to hydrostatic test	
ii boilers on which pressure was reduced	
ii boilers unsafe without extensive repairs	
n boilers repaired under Inspector's directions	
i boilers considered unfit for further use	
n accidents to engines and boilers	
n accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)	
ii investigations	
ii inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary	
Number of defects considered dangerous	
Inspection fees earned	
Inspection fees collected	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Letters inward	
Letters outward	
Telegrams inward	
Telegrams outward	
Boilers taken out of service	
Summary op Defects Observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety valves inoperative	
Boilers with safetev valves overloaded	
Boilers with safety valves defective in construction.
Boilers without pressure gauges. ,	
Pressure gauges inoperative	
Pressure gauges defective	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing	
ii    defective stays	
ii    broken rivets	
ii    defective riveting	
n    broken stays or braces	
ii    loose stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates	
it laminated plates	
fumber.
8
7
27  '
2
17
133
12
25
16
19
3
52
1
74
36
129
56
182
9
63
101
29
66
265
28
11
10
315
1,447
4
174
61
862
1,377
56
23
81
16
36
9
8
1,579
706,820
1,934
98
3,622.81
3,737.36
35,472
3,024
3,203
48
27
24
Dangerous.
1
4 9 Ed. 7
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
M 5
Summary op Defects Observed.—Concluded.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with burned plates	
Cases of sediment on fire sheets	
internal corrosion ,	
scale or incrustation	
internal grooving	
external corrosion	
defective tubes     	
defective feed water arrangement	
broken feed valves	
Serious leakage around tube ends	
Serious leakage in rivet joints	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Water columns without blow-outs ,	
Cases of broken test cocks	
Connections to water columns without valves	
Neutral sheets not stayed ,	
Neutral sheets improperly stayed	
Furnaces out of shape     	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Boilers with fusible plugs partly burned out	
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off
Defects in engines  ,	
Boilers without hand-holes	
Boilers without stop-valves	
Cases of defective steam pipes    	
Unclassified-defects	
Number.
18
91
85
135
5
108
76
60
3
60
18
127
39
12
15
160
13
5
2
■ 5
46
35
32
27
28
37
3
8
28
214
Dangerous.
6
6
3
3
1
12
1
13
3
9
Total
.1,934
98 M 6
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
1909
REPORT   OF   THE   CHIEF   ENGINEER   EXAMINER.
To the Hon. the Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B. C.:
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you the following report with respect to the
examination of candidates for engineers' certificates for the year ending December 31st, 1908.
During the year I received 812 applications for certificates of different grades. On
December 31st, 1907, I had on file 107 applications, making a total of 919. Of these 679
have been examined, 139 applicants have had their fees returned as they had not the practical
qualifications required by the Act, 15 sent in application forms without fees, and there are
still on file 86 applications.
Results of Examinations.
Grade.
No. Examined.
Second        43
Third      272     .
Fourth ., ,      240     .
Fifth        90     .
Temporary        34
Passed.
27
228
184
66
34
Totals      679
539
Failed.
16
44
56
24
0
140
Examination fees collected by the Chief Inspector    $2,675 00
ii n Inspectors District B       137 50
„       C  5 00
Total $2,817_ 50
A large number of the second class candidates were machinists as well as engineers, and
the work done at their examinations was better than usual, but in the lower grades it was not
up to the average.
There have been a number of complaints that many fifth class engineers were not able to
satisfactorily operate logging donkeys, mainly on account of their lack of knowledge in respect
to the haulage by wire cable. I therefore think that logging donkey engineers should be
placed in a special class, instead of being in the same class as farm engineers, as such an
arrangement makes it impossible to set a satisfactory examination for each class of work without including the requirements of both, which would not be fair to the candidates.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Peck,
Chief Engineer Examiner. 9 Ed. 7 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery. M 7
SENIOR   INSPECTOR'S   REPORT,   DISTRICT   "A."
New Westminster, B. O, January 1st, 1909.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B. C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report for the year ending December
31st, 1908.
During the year my time has been divided between the various duties connected with this
Department, viz., examining, calculating, registering and reporting on boiler designs, assisting
with engineers' examinations and testing and inspecting boilers.
In July, with yourself, I visited the upper part of this district and assisted you in holding
engineers' examinations at Kamloops, Vernon, Revelstoke and Golden, at the same time
making a number of boiler inspections, including the steam plant in use by Messrs. McDonell,
Gzowski & Co., for cutting the new C. P. R. tunnels at Field.
We also inspected a return tubular boiler and engine which had just been installed at a
brick-field in the Okanagan District, and found same in a very defective condition. The boiler
was placed much too low at back end and the brick-work on sides only came half-way up the
shell (thereby shutting out a considerable part of heating surface^; the gauge glass was set so
high up that when there was half a glass of water very little steam space was left; the steam
for injector was taken from the top connection to water gauge column (so that when in
operation the gauge glass would show a false water level) ; the back arch plates were placed so
that hot gasses could reach the top of the back head and the feed water to be supplied to
the boiler was dirty. This example shows the necessity of the inspection of every new boiler
before it starts up.
The Fraser River Lumber Co., of Millside, have now had their new sawmill running for
some time. This is one of the largest plants of the kind in British Columbia, being designed
to cut 300,000 feet of lumber per day, and has a steam generating plant consisting of sixteen
72" by 18' return tubular boilers.
A number of accidents have taken place in this district during the year, but none of a
very serious nature.
A steel wire rope on loghaul boiler No. 905 caught the dog of one of the hand-hole plates
and shifted the plate, which emptied the contents of the boiler and slightly scalded the
engineer.
The blow-off pipe of boiler No. 400 burst and slightly scalded the engineer.
The blow-off plug of boiler No. 315 blew out, due to defect in plug casting, and also
slightly scalded the engineer.
For infractions of the " Steam Boilers Inspection Act" three persons were prosecuted and
fined $100 each, one case being brought about through the owners operating a boiler without
a certificate of inspection. The other two prosecutions were the result of the owner of a boiler
permitting same to be operated without a certificated engineer being in charge, and the
engineer of the same boiler operating without a certificate.
In addition to work carried out in this district, I also inspected 17 boilers belonging to
District D, tested four new boilers going into District B, and inspected four new boilers in
District C. I also assisted the Inspector of B District in holding engineers' examinations at
Cumberland.
The above, together with the summary appended, will give you a general idea of the
work done by me during the year.
Trusting the above will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Downie,
Senior Inspector, District "A." M 8 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery. 1909
JUNIOR   INSPECTOR'S   REPORT,   DISTRICT   "A."
New Westminster, B. C, January 1st, 1909.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, Neio Westminster, B. C.
Sir,—I beg herewith to hand you my report of the work accomplished during the past
year, in addition to which I have assisted in the work of your office, which may be detailed as
blue prints, examinations and general discussions on topics of interest and matters of
importance to the department.
During the days of January 20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, 25th and 27th the Inspection
Board held their sittings, at which I had the honour to act as secretary, and, though it
entailed extra work, the duties were singularly pleasurable, inasmuch as at these meetings
many important questions were raised and debated upon, and the rules and regulations
governing the inspections of steam boilers will advance with the best practice of the times in
consequence.
During the past year I have endeavoured to inspect the remainder of the boilers in
District A not completed in the year 1907, and, though at the outset I was fairly optimistic,
I regret to record my inability to cover all the ground. You will acknowledge that this is
indeed a difficult matter when one takes into consideration the number of mills which are
being installed on the edges of civilisation in our district.
Notwithstanding this, it gives me pleasure to report that no fatal accident has occurred
in this district, and steam users are daily becoming cognizant of the fact that the proper
maintenance of the steam plant is of paramount importance, not only as a safeguard to life
and property in the immediate vicinity, but as a means of obtaining better results in working
expenses. Many owners, however, seem to consider that if a new boiler is installed an
engine of old design and antiquated build can produce good results, which is equivalent to
putting old clothes on a growing boy, they do not fit and consequently get burst. This was
shown clearly in a mill where the cylinder head blew out, damaging connecting rod, guide and
piston-rod and cracking the bed-plate, thus finishing the engine. The engineer, luckily for
him, had just left the stop valve and walked around the mill a little. I have found it necessary to reduce the boiler pressure in consequence of the design and age of engines, and would
urge upon owners the necessity of having modern engines as well as modern boilers.
You will observe in the tabulated list that quite a number of blow-down pipes have been
found defective. In consequence of its position being awkard to get at, this useful appendix
of the boiler is often neglected and left unexamined by engineers, and as a serious accident
might occur through defective blow-down pipes and cocks, quite a number have been ordered
renewed. I have recommended a valve on the blow-down pipe as well as a cock. As you are
aware, in casting a cock, if the core is not in the centre of the mould, the casting might be
produced with the metal thinner on one side than the other. As these cocks get quite an
amount of rough handling, it certainly would have serious consequences if they failed whilst
the engineer was in the act of blowing off.
You will also observe that there are quite a number of defective settings on the list. One
firm is at present adopting a setting of reinforced concrete, and I await the result with interest.
The unclassified defects are principally man-holes with badly fitting doors, man-holes with
doors without studs, poor hanging, blow-downs not reinforced, insufficient drainage and valves
improperly placed. A number of boilers have been reduced in pressure and a few condemned,
only one owner demurring at this decision. He appealed, but you upheld my decision ; the
mill was sold and the new owner thrust the boiler out and congratulated your department for
handling the matter. The boiler now stands a mute but excellent testimonial to the
Inspection Act.
During the past year three accidents have occurred in which engineers were injured :—
(1.) Due to hook catching bridge of hand-hole door on a logging donkey, blowing out the
door and scalding the man.    (2.) Engineer scalded whilst   blowing  off boiler,  pipe burst. 9 Ed. 7
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
M 9
(3.) Engineer scalded and thrown from ladder by the bursting of a gate valve which acted as
an intermediate valve in main steam line ; this, from an investigation held at the time,
resulted from water hammer caused by sudden opening of the valve.
I have now under consideration the Ferguson heater, which has been installed in one of
the mills in this district, but sufficient details are not at hand to date to enable me to give you
a full report.
Quite a number of new mills are this year being built throughout the upper country, the
largest of which is the Adams River Lumber Co.'s mill at Shuswap Lake.
During the year I have used my best endeavour to work harmoniously with my colleague,
Mr. Downie, with the happiest results, for we have both the one desire, to bring the work in
hand to a successful issue.
You will observe that my receipts are greater than my earnings. This is due to the fact
that I looked up the old accounts for 1907 and collected same.
Trusting that my report will appear favourable to you, and that my efforts to serve will
receive the approval of the Department, I have, etc.,
Geo. C. McGown,
Junior Inspector, District " A."
Summary of Work done in District A in 1908.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers  129
ii          amendments to new designs  56
ii          boiler plates inspected  11
ii          boilers built under inspection in British Columbia  11
ii          boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada  42
ii          boilers built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  5
ii          new boilers inspected built in United States  30
ii          new boilers inspected (total)  88
n          boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  2
ii          boilers imported from United States (second-hand)  4
ii          first inspection      93
ii          inspections, external and internal  478
n          external inspections only       20
ii          special inspections after repairs  10
ii          visits in addition to inspections  38
ii          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  459
ii          boilers on which pressure was reduced  21
ii          boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  7
ii          boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  9
ii          boilers considered unfit for further use  7
ii          accidents to engines and boilers  6
ii          accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)  6
ii          investigations  5
ii          inspections completed  478
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  23,739
Number of defects observed as per summary    741
Number of defects considered dangerous  29
Inspection fees earned    $ 4,519.72
Inspection fees collected        4,767.62
Miles travelled by the Inspector  10,028
Letters inward  1,061
Letters outward  1,020
Telegrams inward  5
Telegrams outward  5
Boilers taken out of service  8
Work done for other Districts.
By Senior Inspector.—Tested four boilers and assisted with engineers' examinations at
Cumberland for District B. Inspected six new boilers for District C. Tested three new
boilers and inspected fourteen others for District D, M 10
Report of Chief Inspector of Machineryt.
1909
By Junior Inspector.—Tested plates for District D and attended at Vancouver office
during Mr. Madigan's trip to logging camps.
Summary of Defects Observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety valves inoperative	
Boilers with safety valves defective in construction
Boilers without pressure gauges	
Pressure gauges inoperative	
Pressure gauges defective    	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing	
ii     defective stays	
ii     broken rivets .	
ii     defective riveting.
Number.
8
18
2
7
22
5
22
3
5
ii     loose stays or braces  10
Defective settings  32
Boilers with fractured plates  4
ii           burned plates  5
Cases of sediment on fire sheets  7
internal corrosion  34
scale or incrustation  42
internal grooving  2
external corrosion  40
defective tubes ,  28
defective feed water. arrangement  37
Serious leakage around tube ends  7
Serious leakage in rivet joints  12
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  100
Defective water-gauges
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Water columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test cocks	
Connections to water columns without valves	
Neutral sheets not stayed	
Neutral sheets improperly stayed   	
Boilers without fusible plugs   	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off.
Defects in engines	
Boilers without hand-holes	
Cases of defective steam pipes	
Unclassified defects	
Total
14
5
1
12
1
1
1
4
13
18
21
2
13
183
741
Dangerous.
1
29
John Downie,.
Geo. C. McGown.
Inspectors of Steam Boilers, District " A." 9 Ed. 7 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery. M 11
SENIOR   INSPECTOR'S   REPORT,   DISTRICT   " B.
Victoria, B. C, January 1st, 1909.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B. C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my annual report of the inspection and testing of
boilers and machinery in this district during 1908.
In the early part of the year I was granted sick leave, necessitated by too close application
to my duties. I took a sea voyage, with beneficial results to my health, and during my absence
my colleague, Inspector Kay, looked after the district. On my return I found everything in
good order and we both worked hard to overtake arrears of work.
During the year I have gone over all parts of my district, with the exception of Atlin and
the West Coast of Vancouver Island, which parts were inspected by Mr. Kay.
When I went to the outlying and more distant parts I always took examination equipment
with me, so as to examine the various candidates, thus adding to their convenience and saving
them the loss of time and the expense of coming to central points for examination. In this
way I made sure that all complied with the Inspection Act, in regard to showing their qualifications to secure the required grades of certificates wherewith to legally operate the steam- plants
entrusted to their care.
Examinations were held at frequent intervals in the Victoria office; also at Port Essington,
Nanaimo, Ladysmith, Bella Coola, Salt Spring Island, Duncans and Rivers Inlet. General
examinations were also held in the Court House at Nanaimo and Cumberland and in the
Parliament Buildings, Victoria. There was only one month in which examinations were not
held in this district, and that was May, when the pressing number of boiler inspections and
the travel involved prevented. I personally examined some 65 engineers for the various
grades, of whom 57 passed and 8 failed. A large number were examined at the general
examinations, the results of which you have at head office.
I made 239 inspections, 192 hydrostatic tests, and, in addition, 157 visits to various steam
plants for the purpose of supervising repairs, consulting with the owners or engineers regarding
the proper maintenance of the steam plants, and to satisfy myself that the engineers were
keeping the machinery in an efficient condition.
I might here repeat that " the price of success is eternal vigilance," and, to give point to
the quotation, would refer to a steam plant that sustained considerable damage from lack of
due vigilance on the part of the chief engineer and his staff. This plant had a closed heater
for the feed-water from which the issuing water was 140 to 150 Fah., and the engineer, anxious
to improve the efficiency of the boilers and effect greater economy of fuel, induced his firm to
secure an open heater. This was installed, and with the same exhaust steam the feed-water
was raised to 210 Fah., which effected a considerable saving of fuel but permitted some oil to
pass into the boilers. As a coincident in the matter, water was somewhat scarce and, to secure
all possible, the superintendent sent men to clean out the supply trench. This caused some
sediment to be carried in suspension in the water supply, which, of course, also got into the
boilers. The particles of sediment attracted the tiny portions of oil, and by their specific
gravity caused them to adhere to the heating portions of the boilers, which, in four or five of
them, caused bulging to a dangerous degree, and I had to order the bulges cut out and the
shell plates patched. The new heater had only been installed one week and the quantity of
oil used in the cylinders was very small, so that this danger was not anticipated. Thus the
engineer, with the best of intentions for his owner's interests but for lack of due vigilance,
caused serious damage and great danger to a very valuable steam plant. He should have tested
his feed-water, under the new conditions, at frequent intervals and have tried for traces of oil.
The past year has not been a very bright one in the manufacturing and industrial branches,
but lately decided signs of improvement are in evidence. As you are aware, Sir, few Government officials (or others, for that matter,) have the same opportunity of " feeling the pulse " of
general industry as your Inspectors of Boilers, for as " coming events cast their shadows before," M 12 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery. 1909
so do we become aware of increased industry by reason of going over the specifications for new
plants, the additions to existing ones, and the inspection of dormant steam plants which are
again to be put into operation. From this point of view I am pleased to think the coming
year will prove a good one, as I see considerable evidence of renewed activity in all around.
There were no accidents to persons, fatal or otherwise, reported to me during the year.
Sundry accidents have taken place to boilers and engines, most of which I have investigated,
and where faults in either installation or care of boilers were found, they have been pointed
out and corrected and the engineers reprimanded and cautioned. In this connection I would
point out the necessity of impressing on all engineers that attention to details is very important,
as minor matters, overlooked and neglected, may lead to serious damage and depreciation to
the valuable steam plants entrusted to their care.
I think it very desirable that when inspections are made the arms and rims of the large
main pulleys and fly-wheels should be sounded, as I have found several that were cracked, but
by being detected in time and repaired, accidents from burst wheels were prevented. In two
cases I also detected unsuspected cracks in crank-discs at the crank-pin holes, so preventing
possible breakdowns-
As a rule, I have found that the owners of steam plants try to comply with the Act in
securing certificated men, but I think we should deal more strictly with those whom we find
infringing the law in this respect. Engineers are also at fault in not notifying us when going
to or leaving a position. Suspending their certificates for certain periods might impress them
with the importance of carrying out this duty, and we could then keep in better touch with
what is going on in our respective districts.
Trusting that the work and conditions generally in this district continue to give you
complete satisfaction, and that this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
S. Baxter,
Senior Inspector, District " B." 9 Ed. 7 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery. M 13
JUNIOR   INSPECTOR'S   REPORT,   DISTRICT   " B.'
Victoria, B. C, January 1st, 1909.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New   Westminster, B. C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report for the year ending December
31st, 1908 :—
During the year I inspected 246 boilers, situated in various parts of the district, from
Sooke in the south to Discovery and Atlin in the north.
In January and February, during Mr. Baxter's absence, I confined my inspections to
boilers in the Victoria District, so as to keep as much as possible in touch with the office. On
January 19th to 28th I was absent from the district attending the meeting of the Board of
Inspectors at New Westminster.
From March to June I inspected boilers along the E. & N. Railway belt, on the Gulf
Islands and as far north as Comox.
In July I went north to Atlin, inspecting en route the boilers on the Queen Charlotte
Islands. Business, from an inspection point of view, was very slack in Atlin, not more than
half the usual number of boilers being in use.
On the West Coast of Vancouver Island, which I visited in September, there were fewer
than the usual number of boilers in operation, on account of the reduction in logging and
lumber operations. The Nootka Marble Quarries had installed an extensive steam plant, and
at Sidney Inlet the Tyee Copper Co. was installing a boiler and air compressor, which had been
transferred from Mount Sicker, with the apparent intention of working the copper mine there
on a large scale. At Alberni all the steam plants were in operation and business seemed to be
fairly brisk, the saw-mills working to their full capacity.
I had to make a special trip to Prince Rupert in November, as a large number of boilers
had gone into that district for use in construction work. As there will probably be many
boilers in operation there, in the near future, which will be distributed over an extended
territory, it will entail a considerable amount of travelling and time to properly supervise them
from this office.
In the months of April and October I assisted at general examinations at Victoria and
Nanaimo, and I, personally, held examinations at Queen Charlotte Islands and Prince
Rupert.
The defects tabulated on the attached summary of the year's work were mostly of minor
importance. Of those marked dangerous, three were boilers that had been brought in to
Prince Rupert for construction work. They we found to be badly corroded around the water
legs, as they were unsafe as steam generators I condemned them. Two farm boilers were in
such a bad condition that they also had to be condemned. One, a small vertical portable
boiler, was so corroded around the wheel brackets, due to leakage at the studs, that I made
holes in two different places with my testing hammer. In the other, an old locomotive type
boiler of poor design, the plate had cracked for a considerable distance along the longitudinal
seam, but the owner of this boiler was very much disappointed and considered himself hardly
used when I refused to allow him to finish the chopping of his feed with it. Two old return
flue boilers were showing such signs of fatigue that the owner was only allowed to use them six
months, after which he was to put them out of commission. Boiler No. 223B was cracked at
the back head flanging for a distance of 36 inches. This was due to a badly designed and
badly reinforced man-hole allowing a breathing action to take place, the plate ultimately
cracking. In Atlin I found a small vertical boiler with eight inches of solid scale on the
crown sheet.
In all parts of the district visited, with the exception of Atlin, an honest effort is being
made by the steam users to comply with the spirit of the law if not with the letter of it. In
Atlin, owing to the short season and the intermittent work, it seems hard for the owners to M 14 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery. 1909
get certificated men to go in there, but in some cases the owners were making no effort to
comply with the Act, either in spirit or in letter, using their isolated position as an excuse for
doing as they please.
A large number of engineers are very lax in their compliance with the sections of the Act
concerning them, but are very prompt in making complaints when they think that their
interests are being neglected. Those with the lower grade certificates seldom pay any attention
to section 42 of the Act, which requires them to notify us when they take charge of or vacate
a plant, and I think that if an example were made of a few of them by enforcing the penalty
attached to this section, it would have a wholesome effect.
Inspections have been facilitated and hardships, incidental to poor transportation and
accommodation, have been pleasantly overcome, through the courtesy and consideration extended
to me on all occasions by the steam plant owners and engineers.
I have, etc.,
John D. Day,
Junior Inspector, District "B."
Summary of Work done in District B in 1908.
Number of boiler plates inspected . .     31
ii          boiler plates rejected  1
ii          boilers built under inspection in British Columbia  17
ii          boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada  10
ii          new boilers inspected built in United States .,  5
ii          new boilers inspected (total)  32
ii          boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  18
ii          boilers imported from United States (second-hand)  5
ii          boilers unclassified  4
ii          first inspections  55
n          inspections, external and internal  461
n          external inspections only  46
ii          special inspections after repairs  23
ii          visits in addition to inspections  343
ii          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test ,  397
ii          boilers on which pressure was reduced  28
ii          boilers unsafe without extensive repairs       22
ii          boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  40
ii          boilers considered unfit for further use  8
ii          accidents to engines and boilers  8
ii          accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)  1
ii          investigations  3
ii          inspections completed  480
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  22,198
Number of defects observed as per summary  563
Number of defects considered dangerous  42
Inspection fees earned    $ 3,757 .54
Inspection fees collected       3,601.69
Miles travelled by the Inspector  15,279
Letters inward  921
Letters outward  1,182
Telegrams inward  ^6
Telegrams outward  *■"
Boilers taken out of service      *«
Work done for other Districts.
One boiler inspected for District D.
Mr. Madigan inspected twenty-two boilers. 9 Ed. 7
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
M 15
laminated plates  3
,i burned plates  8
Cases of sediment on fire sheets            26
internal corrosion        34
scale or incrustation        45
internal grooving , 3
external corrosion        39
defective tubes        25
defective feed water arrangement
broken feed valves	
Serious leakage around tube ends	
Serious leakage in rivet joints  	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks        14
Defective water-gauges        18
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Water columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test cocks	
Connections to water columns without valves
Neutral sheets not stayed	
Neutral sheets improperly stayed.	
Furnaces out of shape
3
26
4
1
10
60
6
2
1
3
Boilers without fusible plugs ,       26
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off	
Defects in engines	
Boilers without hand-holes	
Boilers without stop-valves	
Cases of defective steam pipes	
Unclassified defects	
15
2
6
3
1
2
1
15
Total
563
Dangerous.
1
Summary of Defects Observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.
Boilers with safety valves overloaded ,  2
Boilers with safety valves defective in construction  5
Pressure gauges inoperative  6
Pressure gauges defective ,  51
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing ,  1
ii     defective stays  8
ii     broken rivets  2
ii      broken stays or braces  1
ii      loose stays or braces.  23
Defective settings  28
Boilers with fractured plates  26
42
S. Baxter,
John D.  Kay.
Inspectors of Steam Boilers, District
<£." M 16 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery. 1909
INSPECTOR'S   REPORT,   DISTRICT   "Go
 :o:	
Nelson, B. O, January 1st, 1909.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B. C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report for the year ending December
31st, 1908:—
During the year 216 boilers have been inspected. Fifty were inspected for the first time,
some of these being new and imported from the United States or shipped in from Eastern
Canada, and others came in from Alberta second-hand and were used in building operations
around the coal mines. These latter were all of the locomotive type and were shipped back to
Alberta as soon as the building operations were finished. A few of the smaller boilers, formerly
used in the quartz mines, have been purchased by persons only requiring a small amount of
power, such as in breweries, steam laundries, etc., and as these had not been previously inspected
the number of first inspections is thereby increased.
Boilers in the outlying districts of Cariboo were inspected, but only a few plants were in
operation. With one exception, all the deep workings were closed down, and in one case
electric power is to be substituted for steam before the mine starts up. On the whole trip
only ten boilers were inspected and four of them belonged to the Provincial Government, being
used on their road-making plant, which consists of one road roller, one large traction engine
(which at time of inspection was being used to operate the rock crushing plant), and two other
boilers for use in place of the traction engine, the latter to be used for traction purposes. One
new boiler, inspected in Vancouver before being shipped, was being installed in a new sawmill at Quesnel.
In the Crow's Nest District the lumber mills have been rather slack, some only operating
a month or six weeks and others not starting at all. As a result, the number of inspections
in this district have been fewer than usual, several of the mills having operated on their last
year's boiler certificates, which had not expired.
The fire which destroyed the town of Fernie burned up four saw-mill plants, one brewery,
one steam laundry and one foundry, the total number of boilers involved being 24. Most of
these boilers were protected, so that the fire did not touch them above the water line and the
damage was slight. Three of the lumber companies are building, so as to be ready for operation in the spring.
In the quartz mining districts in West Kootenay steam is very little used except for
heating purposes, electric and water power being substituted. A few small boilers are still in
use at the outlying mines in course of development, but these are used intermittently and are
hard to get at for inspection, as they only operate a very short time during the year.
There has only been one fatal accident in my district during the past year, which was on
a logging railway. The engineer (who was killed) lost control, with the result that the whole
train was thrown into a ravine, the engine was reduced to scrap iron and the boiler was badly
damaged.
Several slight accidents to boilers have occurred :—In boiler plant No. 374 water and mud
had been left in the bottom of the water leg, and several stays were pulled part way through
the sheet on account of the sediment freezing. The damaged part was underneath and could
not be got at without digging away the earth from below it. As a result, the stays pulled out
under hydrostatic pressure long before the working pressure was reached, and had steam been
raised on the boiler a serious accident would have happened.
The superheaters in two water tube boilers were damaged and one of the tubes drew out
of the header into which it was expanded. These heaters consist of a number of U-shaped
tubes, both ends being expanded into a header and the bend carried by a cast-iron support
built in the brick-work. This support sagged in the middle and the tubes were also bent, the
boilers were being forced and the support was placed above the tubes and over the first pass of 9 En. 7 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery. M 17
the products of combustion. These boilers had been in use six years and were apparently in
good condition. No one was hurt when the tube pulled out and no injury was done to the
boiler setting.
A number of engineers have been examined in this office and examinations were held in
Fernie, Cranbrook and twice in Grand Forks. All candidates within reasonable distance of
Nelson are notified to attend here, while those around Fernie prefer to wait for the examinations there.
The above, together with the tabulated report attached, will give a general idea of the
work done in this district for the past year.
I have, etc.,
Andrew Sutherland,
Inspector, District " C."
Engineer's Examinations.
Number of applications for examinations    1
ii approved    1
Examination fees $5
Results of Examinations.
Class. No. Examined. Passed. Failed.
Second  1       0  , 1
Third  7       6   1
Fourth           10       9   1
Totals       18                      15 3
Remarks.
In June engineers' examinations were held in Cranbrook,  Fernie and Grand Forks.
Seventy-five per cent, of the candidates who were notified attended.
There are in my office at the present time the following accepted applications :—
Second class,   3 applications, none notified.
Third       „     15 „ 7
Fourth    ii      6 n none       n
Summary of Work done in District C in 1908.
Number of boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada  15
ii                        n           in Eastern Canada not under inspection    5
n          new boilers inspected built in United States  12
ii                 ii            inspected (total)  36
ii          boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  4
ii                 ii   unclassified  4
ii          first inspections  50
n          inspections, external and internal  198
ii          external inspections only  18
ii          special inspections after repairs  4
ii          visits in addition to inspections  160
ii          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  211
ii              n      on which pressure was reduced  5
n              ii      unsafe without extensive repairs  1
ii              ii      repaired under Inspector's directions  8
n          accidents to engines and boilers  3
ii         inspections completed  216
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  15,590
Number of defects observed, as per summary  336
ii               ii      considered dangerous  9
Inspection fees earned ,  $2,458 60
,i       collected  $2,409 95 M 18
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
190
Summary of Work done in District C in 1908.—Concluded.
Miles travelled by the Inspector.
Letters inward   	
ii      outward	
Telegrams inward	
ii outward	
Summary of Defects Observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety valves overloaded   	
Boilers with safety valves defective in construction ,
Pressure gauges defective	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing	
ii     defective stays	
ii     broken rivets	
Number.
1
3
48
4
2
3
loose'stays or braces          10
Defective settings.
ii        burned plates	
Cases of sediment on fire sheets	
ii     internal corrosion   	
ii     scale or incrustation	
ii     external corrosion	
ii     defective tubes	
ii     defective feed water arrangement . . .
Serious leakage around tube ends	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges  . .
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Water columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test cocks	
Connections to water columns without valves.
Neutral sheets not stayed	
Furnaces out of shape
10
4
46
1
48
8
11
6
6
4
4
2
2
56
5
2
2
Boilers without fusible plugs        16
Boilers low at front end ,	
Defects in engines	
Boilers without stop-valves	
Cases of defective steam pipes    	
Unclassified defects ,	
17
1
6
5
3
336
7,665
255
263
14
9
Dangerous.
1
9
Andrew Sutherland,
Inspector of Steam Boilers, District " C." 9 Ed. 7 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery. M 19
INSPECTOR'S   REPORT,   DISTRICT   " D."
Vancouver, B. O, January 1st, 1909.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, Neiv Westminster, B. C:
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report for the year ending December
31st, 1908 (see tabulated report) :—
In addition to work mentioned in same, I assisted at engineers' examinations in New
Westminster, and also gathered evidence re infraction of Inspection Act in seven cases and
conducted the prosecution, resulting in fines of $100 and costs in each case.
The only serious accident reported during the year occurred on January Sth, when
Engineer McPherson, while engaged in loading a logging donkey on to a scow, had his arm
crushed between the engine and a stanchion on the scow. He was removed to the hospital,
where his arm was amputated above the elbow.
Another accident that might have had fatal results, but for the presence of mind of
Engineer Stromberg, happened to the Cornell Mine hoist on Texada Island. The steam pipe
to the hoist burst just above the engineer's head, while he was hoisting a cage full of men
coming off shift. Although scalded by the escaping steam he immediately dropped to the
floor, caught the brake lever and lowered the cage to the bottom of the shaft before the steam
drove him from his post.
The following plants had accidents to either boilers or engines:—Woods & Spicer's shingle
mill, broken crank pin. Rat Portage Lumber Co., engine wrecked, caused by breaking of
connecting rod. Excelsior Laundry, engine broke holding down bolts through racing, which
was caused by waste becoming caught in the governor while the engineer was cleaning same.
Dominion Laundry, engine broke piston and cylinder head. The boiler in Robertson &
Hackett's sash and door factory was damaged by tire so badly that it had to be condemned.
Another fire destroyed the main engines at the Royal City Mills. The engine and boiler room
of the Columbia Brewery became flooded, as the result of the outlet of a creek, which flowed
past the building, being blocked up. This loosened the foundations to such an extent that the
boiler had to be re-set entirely. Several logging boilers were found with plates badly damaged
from being struck by logs jumping out of the chute. Several of the log-haul engines were also
found with broken discs and frames.
Through the courtesy of Mr. Collister, Manager of the Albion Iron Works, who kindly
placed his launch at the disposal of the Government, I was enabled to inspect 102 logging
engines between Howe Sound and Broughton Island, travelling more than 1,000 miles in a
little over six weeks ; and from the condition in which I found some of these plants I think
that more attention should be given them than I have time for, owing to the amount of work
to be done in Vancouver. I found a number of these engines being operated by men without
certificates, and have warned the owners for the last time that if certificated engineers are not
employed the law will be enforced.
Only about one-third of the logging engine boilers were inspected through lack of time.
Trusting that the work of the year has been satisfactory,
I have, etc.,
George O. Madigan,
Inspector, District D.
Summary of Work done in District D in 1908.
Number of boiler plates inspected     ,  140
ii           boiler plates rejected  8
ii          boilers built under inspection in British Columbia  35
ii           built under inspection in Eastern Canada  34
ii           boilers built in Eastern Canada not under inspection    19 M 20
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
1909
Summary of Work done in District D in 1908.—Concluded.
Number of new boilers inspected built in United States	
new boilers inspected (total)	
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)
boilers imported from United States (second-hand) . .
boilers unclassified	
first inspections	
inspections, external and internal	
internal inspections only ,	
external inspections only	
special inspections after repairs	
visits in addition to inspections	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test	
boilers on which pressure was reduced	
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs	
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions	
boilers considered unfit for further use  	
accidents to engines and boilers	
accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)
inspections completed   	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary	
Number of defects considered dangerous	
Inspection fees earned	
Inspection fees collected	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Letters inward	
Letters outward	
Telegrams inward    	
Telegrams outward	
Boilers taken out of service	
19
109
4
2
2
117
310
4
90
24
321
310
2
3
24
1
19
2
400
15,293
294
18
£2,886 95
$2,958 10
2,500
784
738
3
3
1
Work done for other Districts.
Twenty boilers inspected for District A.
Twenty-two boilers inspected for District B.
Assisted at examinations in New Westminster.
Summary of Defects Observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.
Boilers with safety valves overloaded     4
Boilers with safety valves defective in construction  1
Pressure gauges inoperative  4
Pressure gauges defective  12
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing  2
defective stays  3
broken rivets  8
defective riveting  14
Dangerous.
2
1
2
3
broken stays or braces
loose stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates   	
ii burned plates	
Cases of sediment on fire sheets	
ii     internal corrosion ,	
ii     external corrosion	
ii     defective tubes	
ii     defective feed water arrangement
2
9
1
4
6
1
12
16
21
12
9 9 Ed. 7
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
M 21
Summary of Defects Observed.—Concluded.
Nature of Defects.
Number.        Dangerous.
Serious leakage around tube ends  21
Serious leakage in rivet joints  2
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks    9
Defective water-gauges  3
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks   4
Water columns without blow-outs  2
Cases of broken test cocks  26
Connections to water columns without valves  1
Boilers with fusible plugs partly melted out  35
Cases of serious leakage of fittings  12
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off  4
Defects in engines .. ,  12
Cases of defective steam pipes    9
Unclassified defects ,  13
Total
294
18
George O. Madigan,
Inspector of Steam Boilers, District "D," M 22
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
1909
ENGINEERS 'WHO OBTAINED CERTIFICATES  IN 1908.
Second Class.
Alexander, Albert   2,749
Anderson, G. H     3,150
Birrell, A. D  2,865
Ballantine, Wm   2,887
Bentall, Chas   3,307
Crowe, E. A  2,729
Dowman, Thas   2,766
Dick, A. W  2,768
Edgar, Archibald  2,723
Edwards, Wm   3,155
Garbutt, J. G. S  2,731
Guthrie, D. L  2,776
Geake, H. J., Jr   3,208
Hellyer, J. F  2,870
Jessop, J. C   2,847
Lees, Archibald   2,725
Lister, J. L  2,726
Latta, Jno  2,793
Langworthy, W. H .   3,216
McKnight, Robt ...     2,873
Northcott, H. B  2,716
Peck, J. H.  2,730
Phillips, P. G  2,923
Rivers, Wm  3,073
Stewart, J. A  3,322
Taylor, M. B  2,695
Werry, S. A  2,727
Third Class.
Armstrong, Robert  2,746
Allan, Jas  2,747
Atkins, Wm  2,837
Alderson, R. D  2,946
Atkinson, G. A  2,969
Adams, W. G  3,149
Antill, H. W  3,181
Ashcroft, E V  3,251
Anderson, J. S  3,252
Abbott, R. C   3,290
Brinkman, R. J .*  2,666
Bell, H. U  2,718
Barr, Ralph      2,750
Baidaeoff, Boris  2,751
Bowie, H. M  2,753
Barringer, L. M  2,755
Blackburn, Edwin      2,840
Bowlsby, Z. L     2,868
Bayliff, Frank  2,948
Brown, Jno  2,949
Booth, W. M  2,971
Begg, Alex  2,974
Booth, G. H  3,058
Barnes, Reginald  3,059
Brown, J. S  3,060
Bealey, W. R  3,097
Buchan, W. F  3,110
Britton, Harry  3,119
Broder, R. R  3,187
Brown, A. T  3,284
Bray, R. N  3,285
Boddie, J. E ,  3,313
Collinson, H. H  2,667
Campbell, Neil  2,689
Crawford, David  2,757
Campbell, C. G  2,760
Cunningham, G.  D  2,761
Collard, A. N  2,762
Campbell, E.  F  2,763
Cadwell, Theophilus  2,843
Chambers, T. W   2,869
Cuthbert, Wm  2,892
Constantinesco, Vasile  2,894
Cox, E. A  2,950
Campbell, P. C  3,028
Connor, Jno  3,081
Clark, Wm   3,142
Carey, T. H  3,165
Cochrane, J. A  3,193
Carter, R. E   3,194
Cook, H. Y  3,242
Connell, Hugh   3,291
Crute, Ebenezer   3,303
Daly, Robt  2,764
DesBrisay, Jas   2,769
Donaldson, W. C  2,895
Drummond, T. L  2,952
Duke, A. E  3,104
Drinkwater, J.   E        3,154
Dingwall, Wm  3,204
Dean, E. H. M     3,316
Etter, M. M '   3,231
Ellis, Jas  3,293
Fitzgibbon, P.  J  2,703
Ferguson,  A. J   2,772
Farmer, R. G   2,773
Fortune, J.  R   2,899
Fraser, Alex   3,268
Gill, J. A  2,704
Gray, Thos 2,724
Graham, C. B ,   2,902
Graves, G. A  2,903
Gurnell, J. E  2,983
Gibson, A.  E  3,033
Godwin, E. B  3,063
Gugin, Robt  3,195
Gilbert, J.  E  3,295
Garnett, F. L  3,318
Hading, Jos  2,699
Hill, T. A  2,777
Henley, J.  T  2,781
Haddon, J. L 2,783
Harvey, G. B      2,908
Henderson, Jno  2,984
Hume, W. IR   2,985
Hogan, A. H  3,019
Hennessy, C. L      3,064
Houston, W. H  3,112
Hogg, W. L  3,209
Hamilton, Jno  3,210 9 Ed. 7
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
M 23
Third Class. — Concluded.
Hygh, E. C	
Huntley, C. D	
Highmoor, G. W....
Inns, W. E	
Jones, W. H	
Judd, D. H	
Jenkinson,  Robt....
Johnson, G. H	
Jacobson, Erie	
Knowdell, C. L	
Knowler, K. E. L...
Knapp, A.   E	
Kemp, Louis	
Kent, W. H	
Kittelson, Harold...
Lumley, Mark	
Langworthy, W. H.
Lougheed, H. W....
Lehman, Harrison...
Lyman, J. C	
Lewis, G. M  	
Livingstone, Jas....
Langille, E. D	
Leidy, Wesley	
Lawes, F. R	
Mowat, Robt	
Moore, W.  I)	
Maitland, W. A.  M.
Masson, Thos	
Mogge, H. M	
Morel, E. V	
Mardell, G. W.  M ...
Morrison, Kenneth..,
Mileson, F. H   	
Martin, Albert	
Morrison, J. Y	
Miller, E.  J	
Morinan, E. T	
Moser, G. R	
Medley, Chas	
McDonald, D. J.....
McKenzie, Jas  	
Macdonald, A. C	
McKinnon, W. B . ..
McDonald, Morrison
Mclntyre, N. J	
McDonald, Jas	
McPhalen, W. A	
McLeod, Donald  	
McBryan, Philip	
McLeod, Wm	
McLeod, Duncan
McEachern, J. A	
McLean, J. A	
Neilson, T. J	
Newnham, J. J. .
Nicolson, J. M	
Nicol, Jno	
Patrick, H. R	
Pugh, Victor	
Price, J. F	
Palmer, B. H	
Piatt, E. A	
Potts, Jno	
Paul, A. T. W	
Quinn, J. G	
Ryan, Denis	
Richards, Garfield ...
Robinson, Frank	
3,211 Rutan, F. A	
3,255 Ralston, Peter	
3,296 Richards, Alfred....
3.213 Reilly, T. G	
2.669 Renfrew, Thos	
2.705 Renfrew, Jas	
2,846 Rait, H. W	
3,137 Rommelaere, Albert.
3.214 Ray, A. L	
2.670 Ray, R. R	
2.881 Robinson, Robt	
3.066 Ratcliffe, A. J	
3.067 Simmons, Herbert ..
3,082 Stanley, C. H	
3,120 Stern, S. L	
2.660 Shillito, B. C	
2.700 Scaplin, Edward....
2.706 Smiley, Levi	
2.794 Stillman, A. J	
2.795 Sefton, Robt	
2,958 Sangstad, T. P	
3.038 Sawyer, Harry	
3.039 Slater, Frederick	
3.068 Smith, Alex	
3.189 St. George, Wm	
2.707 Smith, M. E	
2.708 Scott, Wm	
2.798 Stokes, Wm	
2.799 Traill, Robt	
2,850 Thomas, L. P	
2.882 Tuyttens, Robt	
2,912 Thompson, Thos	
2.914 Taylor, H. S	
2.915 Todd, David	
2.916 Tully, W. H	
2,960 Turner, G. H	
2,990 Tucker, H. V	
3.069 Towery, R. W	
3,237 Talbot, A. G	
3,319 Tanner, W. G	
2.661 Thornton, L. A	
2,715 Vest, J. F	
2.804 Vivian, Leopold	
2.805 Vallance, Wyverne..
2.807 Vannett, D. A	
2.808 Wilkie, Peter	
2.810 Winch, Jas	
2.874 Weiler, A. J	
2,918 Williams, T.F	
3,041 Wilkes, C. J	
3,071 Waddell, J. F	
3,173 Walker, T. C	
3.190 Ward, Harold	
3,305 Wrightson, F. G....
2.811 Wilson, H. E	
2,852 Westerlund, Olof . . .
3.220 Willis, C. F	
3.221 Wells, Walter	
2.701 Watt, J. W	
2.812 Willits, Fred	
2.813 Wilson, Wm	
2.814 Wirtanen, G. W....
2.855 Welbourne, G. A....
3,259 Warren, Frederick..
3,310 Watkins, N. R	
2.875 Wells, W. S	
2.702 Whyte, Jas., Jr	
2.856 Wilcox, E. 0. C.. .
2,927 Yarwood, E. T	
2,929
3,002
3,003
3,004
3,086
3,095
3,140
3,160
3,174
3,175
3,280
3,331
2,686
2,720
2,742
2,859
2,876
3,008
3,009
3,010
3,020
3,049
3,074
3,075
3,089
3,116
3,227
3,274
2,673
2,710
2,721
2,826
2,827
2,862
2,934
2,961
3,011
3,023
3,051
3,077
3,148
2,678
2,863
3,117
3,323
■2,665
2,679
2,687
2,696
2,711
2,722
2,830
2,832
2,835
2,878
2,941
2,964
3,012
3,013
3.078
3,079
3,124
3,127
3,236
3,144
3,162
3,179
3,270
3,230 Fourth Class.
Angle, Roy	
Abbott, N. S .....'...
Armstrong, J. B	
Andrews, T. G	
Armour, Robt	
Abercrombie, J. A ...
Anderton, J. E	
Aymour, D. L	
Allan, Robt	
Bradbury, Wm	
Bailey, F. M	
Byron, J. A	
Botterill, C. H	
Bax, Cyril	
Booth, G. H	
Batemen, Wm	
Barkhausen, Wm	
Blakely, Thos	
Buck, VV. F	
Brace, W. H	
Bain, Hugh	
Bell, Edward	
Barker, A. H	
Burnet, Harold	
Buckton, H. J	
Baker, Edward	
Brunvold, Louis	
Campbell, D. J	
Cotton, H. J  	
Carson, Harry	
Crockett, V. V	
Campbell, Daniel	
Collard, G. L	
Carmody, Patrick....
Collins, M. J	
Campbell, J. A	
Clark, Jno	
Crawford, Chas	
Carleton, C. N	
Cowie, Jno	
Cornwall, I. E	
Caling, Jno	
Donohoe, G. W	
Doy, G. W	
Dickinson, Chas	
Dion, David	
Dixon, F. L	
Da vies, Evan	
Dixon, Isaiah	
Donaldson, H. F	
Dowse, H. A	
Eaton, R. B 	
Evans, H. E	
Estabrook, C. L	
Erlandson, J. A	
Falkema, R. M	
Fenley, W. E	
Fordyce, T. R	
Fitzmaurice, W. G. S.
Fraser, Malcolm	
Flynn, S. W	
Fulcher, Jno	
Fraser, J. D	
Forsbeck, Chas	
Gillis, J. D	
Graves, J. H	
Grant, R. H	
Grant, A. F	
Gorst, F. B	
Groat, Frank	
Gosse, Bartholomew. .
2.697 Gaskill, S. H	
2,717 Hill, T. A	
2,748 Heaslip, T. F	
2,886 Harris, E. A	
2,967 Hasenfratz, August .
2,970 Howell, J. S	
3,056 Hall, Ambrose	
3,118 Hickey, T. S	
3,311 Higgs, T. L	
2.655 Hanoox, J. W	
2.656 Haines, R.J	
2.681 Hicklenton, W. M ..
2.698 Healey, M. 0	
2,879 Hickman, J. A	
2,890 Irvine, J. A   	
2,947 Johnson, T. S	
2,973 Jaynes, J. N	
2.975 Judd, J. H	
3,024 Jackson, W. A	
3,153 Johnson, G. H	
3,186 Jenkins, David	
3,199 Johnson, C. 0	
3.201 Johnson, D. E	
3,241 Jones, H. F	
3,245 Johnson, Andrew ...
3,282 Kirkwood, Wm	
3,306 Kendrick, G. G	
2.682 Kendrick, D. W....
2,756 Kelly, J. A	
2,841 Kelman, Wm	
2,943 Kirby, H. G. R	
2.976 Klausman, Nicholas.
2.977 Low, Wm	
2.978 Lowe, G. S	
3.029 Lacey, Gilbert	
3.030 Lang, H. S   	
3,062 Laird, Fred	
3,080 Little, A. E	
3,129 Larmer,  1. H	
3,166 Medley, Chas	
3.202 Marshall, Jos	
3,328 Moid ton, Frank 	
2,765 Midgley, Frank	
2.897 Molyneux, W. H	
2,938 Mars, Peter	
2,980 Morrison, Geo	
3,134 Maddams, C. E	
3.205 Markland, A, E	
3.206 Michie, Jno	
3,315 Martell, Robert	
3,324 Moyes, Jno	
2,688 McKenzie, Lyon	
2,770 McCann, W. D	
2.953 Mclntyre, E. J. G.   .
2.954 McBryan, Alex.,  Sr.
2,684 McGnire, Jno	
2.774 McCallum, Johnnie..
2.775 McGarvey, Edward .
2.898 McCallum, Wm	
2.900 McCaugan, A. J	
2,982 Noble, J. H	
3.168 Nahinee, Wm	
3,188 North, Geo	
3.207 Newby, Edmund
2.901 Newcombe, E. B	
3,093 Norton, F. H A....
3.169 Owen, W. G	
3.170 Pooley, G. O	
3,183 Pearl, H. D	
3,253 Pratt, Geo	
3,294 Pleas, A. B	
3,329
2,657
2,782
2,845
2,871
2,904
2,905
2,906
2,955
3,035
3,184
3,196
3,212
3,254
3,233
2,658
2,741
2,784
2,785
2.909
2,956
3,036
3,065
3,277
3,304
2,787
2,788
2,789
2,790
3,101
3,215
3,266
2,654
2,849
2,957
3,217
3,235
3,308
3,309
2,801
2,917
2,988
2,989
3,040
3,070
3,102
3,121
3,138
3,218
3,236
3,287
2,685
3,042
3,044
3,045
3,158
3,159
3,238
3,248
3,256
2,920
2,921
2,997
3,046
05,113
3,257
3,288
2,854
3,000
3,001
3,139 9 Ed. 7
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery.
M 25
Fourth Class.—Concluded.
Pickering, Thos	
Parsons, C. E	
Rintoul, Wm	
Roach, Chas	
Russell, H. J	
Richardson, M. H.. .
Ritchie, H. V	
Russell, F. A	
Richardson, Geo	
Robinson, J. R	
Robertson, D. L	
Richards,  Thos	
Rexford, G. B	
Ryan, Peter	
Ralston,  Robt	
Stalls, L. J	
Slater, Alfred	
Sloan, Jno	
Simpson, Stanley
Scott, W. M	
Stenner, C. A	
Sallaway, P. T	
Springer, J. W	
Smith, Russell	
Somerville, Robt. ...
Smith, Wellington ..
Taylor, W. M	
Thomas, S. J	
Thomas, D. R	
Taylor, Jas	
Talcott, P. B	
Temblett, Walter ...
Warren, Jas	
Waters, Fred	
Wrightmen, T. S ...
Willard, R. J	
White, C. J	
Westwood, W. T. P
Work, W. L	
Wood, B. J	
Zimer, N.  W	
Anderson, Olof	
Aitken, A. C	
Albee, E. E	
Abbott, S. L	
Benfield, R. W	
Bradburn, W. E	
Bishop, H. C	
Bell, Edward	
Burchard, C. A	
Braithwaite, W. R...
Brown, J. T	
Bradshaw, Nathaniel.
Ball, Herbert	
Conley, Jno	
Cosford, Thos	
Carey, J. C	
Dulmage, Richard....
Epperson, J. J	
Edmondson, J. C	
Embree, L. W	
Ford, Walter	
Green, Michael	
Grant, Jno	
Gillis, Jno	
Harris, P. E	
Higgins, J. A	
Knudson, Lewis ...   .
Lanstrom, Oscar	
Lindsay, E. P	
Lamont, Daniel	
Lesar, C. C	
Libby, Forest	
Lemon, Wm	
3,249
3,279
2,818
2,819
2,857
2,925
2,926
2,928
3,005
3,047
3,088
3,176
3,226
3,240
3,298
2,931
2,940
2,945
3,007
3,017
3,048
Fifth Class.
2.712 Mole, Jno	
2,740 Matson, Wm	
2,838 Mahoney, Thos	
2,885 Martell, Robt	
2,867 Mansfield, Patrick ..
2,891 Mulkey, C. R	
3.098 McCallum, Duncan..
3.099 McMillan, A. H	
3,128 McCallum, A. W....
3,151 McCallum, Ernest...
3,182 McKay, J. W	
3,198 McGary, D. V	
3,200 Norrell, 0. N	
2,893 North, Geo	
3,026 Oliver, W. A	
3.090 Prentiss, M. L	
2.713 Price, H. J	
2,683 Potter, J. C	
3,018 Phelps, E. M	
3,167 Ramsey, W. F	
3,317 Robertson, W. A.. ..
2,668 Roberts, W. H	
3.091 Simpson, Wm	
3.100 Springer, Thos	
2,939 Thomson, Lewis	
3,034 Van Winkle, Martin
2,910 Vaughan, W. B	
2,659 Wilson, D. K	
2,672 Wade, J. D	
2,791 Wilson, A. F	
2,796 Worth, F. J	
3,107 Whitman, T. W ....
3,297 Youmans, A. W ....
3,050
3,126
3,141
3,177
3,272
2,877
2,933
2,963
3,178
3,185
3,300
2,664
2,735
2,833
2,834
2,965
3,180
3,229
3,302
2,937
2,677
2,797
2,802
2,872
2,944
3,085
2,919
2,993
2,994
3,092
3,197
3,276
2,662
2,692
3,258
2,815
3,108
3,115
3,143
2,820
2,821
3,109
3,096
3,122
2,935
2,674
3,123
2,831
3,052
3,053
3,250
3,261
3,014
Temporary Certificates.
Artus, W. C	
Allison, G. W ....
Barrow, E. D	
Baldwin, Wm ....
Bilsland, Alex ....
Campbell, E. F ...
Cook, David. ......
Cade, J. B	
Dodge, David	
Disdero, Fred ....
Francis, Frederick
2,737
3,021
3,083
3,152
3,325
2,732
2,743
2,864
2,966
3,031
3,286
Gunn, David	
Hills, Amos	
Hamilton, Robt. .
Irvine, J. A	
Jensen, A	
Jackson, Andrew
Kilby, J. H	
Lamberg, A. R ..
Larmer, I. H ... .
Leonard, Chas . .
Moulton, FranK  .
3,265
3,015
3,330
2,739
2,734
3,326
2,736
2,733
2,744
3,327
2.942 M 26 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery. 1909
Temporary Certificates.—Concluded.
Murphy, Jos  3,332 Sharp, J. W  3,163
Pearson, T. R   3,145 Waddell, J. F  2,680
Rivera, Wm  2,745 Wade, M. S  2,836
Schultze, Edward  2,738 Walker, T. W  3,164
Steele, Geo   3,022 Wilkerson, G. E  3,278
Stacks, J. W  3,084
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, I.S.O., V.D., Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1909.

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