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ANNUAL REPORT ON THE PUBLIC HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, FOR THE YEAR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1905

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 ANNUAL  REPORT
—ON   THE—
PUBLIC HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE
 OP  THE	
PROVINCE OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA,
-FOR  THE—
YEAR   1904.
THEGOVERNMENTOF
THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COIUMBIA
PKINTED   BY
AUTHORITY   OP   THE   IEGISIATIVE   ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, I.S.O., V.D., Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1905.
  5 Ed. 7 Public Hospital for the Insane. I 3
REPORT
PUBLIC HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE.
1904.
To His Honour
The Lieutenant Governor ofi the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the  Annual Report of the Medical
Superintendent of the Public Hospital for the Insane for the year 1901.
FRED. J. FULTON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
March, 1905.
 I 4 Public Hospital for the Insane. 1905
OFFICERS.
Medical Superintendent :
G. H. MANCHESTER, M. D.
Assistant Medical Superintendent: Bursar:
Wm. WORKMAN, M. D. M. J. KNIGHT, ESQ.
Steward and Store-keeper: Engineer:
R. REES, ESQ. HEWISON STOUT, ESQ.
Matron :
MARIA FILLMORE.
Chief Male Attendant: Chief Female Attendant:
GILBERT MATTHEWSON. MARIA FILLMORE (acting).
Carpenter:
J. D. HOPKINS.
Plasterer and Mason : Farmer :
EDWARD FITZGERALD. E. B. STINCHCOMBE.
Gardener:
W. T. L. HOUSE.
Tailor: Shoemaker:
W. F. BEGGS. D. McQUARRIE.
 5 Ed. 7 Public Hospital for the Insane. I 5
REPORT
OF   THE
MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT OF THE PUBLIC HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE,
NEW  WESTMINSTER, B, C,
For the Year Ending 31st December, 1904.
The Honourable
The Provincial Secretary,
Victoria, B. G.
Sir,—I have the honour to present the Thirty-third Annual Report of the Public Hospital
for Insane, at New Westminster, for your perusal.
The statistical tables attached show how successful have been the operations of the
Hospital during the year that is past, and bring to light the fact that the people of the Province, as a whole, enjoyed better health mentally during 1904 than in any previous year of
which we have record.
I refer to the fact that there was a large and unlooked for reduction in the number of
insane admitted, when compared with that of the previous year, and a still greater reduction
when compared with the number it was estimated would be received, judging by the steady
increase that has characterised the admissions year after year.
As the population of the Province increases we must expect a pro rata increase in the
number of the insane, and yet, in spite of the very large influx of settlers to the Province in
1904, the number of new cases of insanity diminished ; a circumstance for which I can offer
no explanation.
We began the year with 349 patients in residence, and 16 on probation. The number
admitted was 115, whereas in 1903 it was 139 : a reduction of 24. From the Yukon only 6
were admitted, as compared with 15 the year previous, showing that the same condition
prevailed there.
The number of discharges and deaths, totalling 98, was almost the same as in 1903, but
yet lacked 17 of balancing the admissions. That means that the operations of the year,
although very gratifying indeed as to results, left an increased responsibility to the Province
of 17 patients.
Since the opening of the year found the institution crowded to the doors, this condition
would have been greatly aggravated had it not been arranged to transfer 48 patients to Vernon
for a time, which transfer enabled the close of the year to find the number in residence
reduced to 321, or 28 less than at the opening.
 I 6 Public Hospital for the Insane. 1905
The daily average number in residence was 351.55, as compared with 332.23 in 1903,
and was the highest on record.
The percentage of recoveries on. admissions was 40, and of deaths to total number under
treatment 5.42, both of which are highly gratifying.
Less than one-fifth of those admitted were able to pay anything toward their maintenance.
Admissions.
Of the 115 admissions, 89 were men and 26 women, which shows that the reduction in
numbers compared with the previous year's record was equally divided, 12 less men and 12
less women.
The number coming from the Yukon fell to 6. In 1899 it was 5 ; in 1900, 10; in 1901,
10 ; in 1902, 13 ; in 1903, 15 ; so that the drop to 6 was quite remarkable.
No patient was admitted twice during the year; but 10 of those received had been
inmates of this institution before, 6 men and 4 women. One had been away over 27 years,
while the briefest absence was for 15 months; the average length of absence for the whole 10
was 7 years, 4 months and 6 days. Eight others gave a history of having been under treatment in some other institution of this nature.
Nearly three-quarters of the total number admitted had never been married ; the proportion of single to married being reversed in the sexes—more single men and more married
women.
In religion, 73 were Protestants, 26 Roman Catholics, 12 heathen, and 4 idiots whose
religion was not stated.
Almost all had received at least a common school education, there being but 11 who could
not read nor write in some language.
Table 7 shows that 41 of those admitted were native-born Canadians or 35.65 %, which
is a greater percentage than in any previous year; while the number of those born in the
United States has not been so low since 1896, namely 4.
There were 84 sent in from the Coast districts against 31 from the Interior, showing that
the reduction in numbers of admission occurred entirely on the Coast, the Interior maintaining
its previous rate.
Of the 89 men, 37 wore unskilled labourers, 13 were farmers, while the remaining 39
claimed 21 different occupations.
Table number 10 shows that while 11 were under the age of 20 years, and 22 were over
the age of 50 years, the vast majority were in the prime of life when attacked by insanity.
In 71 cases the attack was said to have been the first, which is about two-thirds of the
whole number, but it may safely be inferred that the percentage of first attacks was higher
than that.
It was acknowledged by the friends in 35 cases that the disease had been operating for
over a year; consequently, these are very unpromising as to results from the start.
That hereditary predisposition existed in a large proportion of those admitted is amply
shown in table 13. In 32 cases out of the 57, where family history was obtainable, insanity
was admitted to have been present in the relatives. This ought to point the lesson to those
who labour under such a handicap, that they should take special precautions against the evils
of the strenuous life, and never allow themselves to indulge in any excess whatever, on the
peril of their mental integrity.
Intemperance, and its allied evils, maintains itself at the head of the list of causes, a
place it has always held,
 5 Ed. 7 Public Hospital for the Insane. I 7
The majority of those admitted were run down physically, which fact in itself seems to
have had much to do with the induction of the existing psychosis, which may be readily
inferred from the marked advance in weight recorded at the time of discharge in the vast
majority of instances, and in every instance where the patient was discharged recovered.
This record was kept in 46 cases during the past year, and it was found that they increased
on an average 11 Bbs., the greatest gain being one of 49 lbs.
There were 6 idiots admitted during the year and 2 imbeciles. The increase in the
numbers in these classes, that are now being presented for Provincial care, points to the fact
that very soon some specialisation will have to take place in. this service, or much hardship
and injustice will be inflicted upon both the acute insane and these defectives by the present
plan of treating them together.
Four admissions were of the criminal class and were tranfers from the various prisons.
' Discharges.
During the year there were 72 persons discharged, 52 being men and 20 women. This
was 3 less than in the previous year, but the rate of discharge was higher by almost 9 per cent.
The number of those discharged recovered was greater by 8 than in 1903, namely, 46
persons, or a percentage on the admissions of 40.
There were 13 discharged improved, of whom 7 left the Province and 1 died shortly after
discharge. There were also 11 discharged unimproved, of whom 4 left the Province, 1 died at
home, and 2 were idiots whose friends decided to look after them at home when we explained
that we could do nothing to improve their mental condition.
Discharges  on Probation.
Of the 16 patients who were out on probation when the year began, 6 were eventually
discharged recovered, 4 improved and 4 not improved, while only 2 had to be returned to our
care.
Seventy patients were allowed out on probation during the year, of whom 35, exactly
half, were discharged as recovered at the expiry of their probationary period ; 4 as improved
and 8 as not improved; while 16 were returned to us, and 14 remained out on probation at
the close of the year.
Escapes.
There were 7 elopements during the year, of which 3 were promptly re-taken ; 1 was out
over two nights an,d 1 over one night, while the remaining 2 were not re-taken. One of the
latter was at once located with his friends, who requested that he be left in their care, which
was granted.    The other, a Chinaman, is presumably still amongst his people.
Deaths.
Twenty-six patients died during the year, 23 males and 3 females. The percentage of
deaths to the total number under treatment was 5.42, being the lowest rate in eight years.
As in the past, general paresis figures most conspicuously as the cause of death. During
1904 ten patients died from this cause alone, while the disease was present in other cases which
were carried off by intercurrent affections. General debility, due largely to conditions brought
on by chronic insanity in some of the old-timers, and by senility in some of the more recent
admissions, caused 6 deaths ; while degeneration of the cardiac tissue and valves was responsible for three other deaths.
One death occurred from intestinal obstruction in a patient who was really malingering,
and who had been transferred here for observation from a prison.
 While we were fortunate in escaping contagion from any of the more contagious diseases,
the close of the year witnessed an outbreak of erysipelas amongst the feeble and chronic
patients of the infirm ward, due, no doubt, to overcrowding. In one case it proved too much
of a strain upon the weakened cardiac tissue and caused death. The other cases are doing well
and all will likely recover.
There was but one death from pulmonary tuberculosis, and that was in the case of an
Indian woman who had been an inmate for over ten years.
This fact of our general freedom from tuberculosis is worthy of special remark, inasmuch
as it is a condition of things that ought to be fostered with every assistance.
The death rate from tuberculosis in the great majority of insane hospitals and asylums
ranges from 20 to 35 per cent., and this is what is bound to occur here in time, unless strict
measures are adopted and faithfully carried out, to prevent the entire institution becoming
infected with tubercular bacilli. All cases should be removed from the associate buildings to
places specially prepared for them as soon as they are diagnosed. Most of the better class of
insane hospitals to-day are equipped with special cottages for the treatment of such cases.
It is a source of much gratification to all concerned, at the close of each year, to be able
to present a record free from any death from violence, which is ours for 1904.
Treatment.
The methods of treatment have not been in any way different from those we have adopted
in the past. In this regard I feel that to keep abreast of the times we must advance. New
methods have been introduced by the celebrated German alienist Kraepelin, and these are
being pursued with much success in some of the State hospitals across the line.
The equipment necessary is not costly, but it requires considerable space which is not
available here as things are now.
In an institution of this nature, receiving as it does all classes of the insane, a very
great diversity of appliances for treatment should be provided, as well as sufficient ward
accommodation to allow of classification. For the acute insane to be placed upon a ward
where he meets with chronic dements, epileptics, idiots, paretics and all kinds of disturbed
patients cannot avoid being detrimental to his welfare. Nearly all the modern institutions for
the care of the insane have erected special buildings, devoted to the treatment of the acute
cases, and in these have installed the appliances above referred to.
However, in respect to the vast majority of those who come under our care I can only
reiterate what I said in my last report, namely, that we must depend upon employment,
recreation and amusement to ameliorate their unfortunate condition.
Employment for the men has been provided by us in the past in the improvement of the
plant, clearing land, making and grading roads and paths, farming and gardening in the
summer. To such work there is no end, for as soon as the parent institution is entirely put
in order all the forces can be turned upon Colony Farm, yet in its virgin state.
Other forms of employment for patients besides ward work, which is a form of housekeeping, have been furnished in the kitchen and scullery, in the carpenter and tailor shops, in
the laundry and boiler-room, as well as in feeding the stock and cutting firewood. It is when
winter sets in that difficulty is encountered in affording occupation, and it is to meet this need
that I consider more shops absolutely necessary. Other suitable occupations that should be
introduced include brush and broom making, chair caning, book binding for patients' libraries,
basket making, mat making and stone dressing.
 5 Ed. 7 Public Hospital for the Insane. I 9
For the women a vast variety of plain and ornamental work could be accomplished if a
suitable workroom were provided away from the wards. This allows a little respite for the
patients from the usually hated ward, where so many disturbing influences exist if it be
crowded with unclassified cases as has always been the case here, and never fails to arouse
them to the desired activity meanwhile producing a happier mental attitude.
One has only to visit one of the State hospitals thus equipped to see that this is not a
Utopian dream but a happy reality which points out in no uncertain manner the way to good
results.
In the line of recreation little has been possible with us owing to the undeveloped condition
of the property. One of the chief sources of recreation in asylums is walking in the open air.
The more that patients can be kept off the wards the better the results is an axiom that is well
recognised by every superintendent. Even this form of recreation is only possible to a limited
extent here. The making of pathways upon such land as we have had to deal with here is a
work of time, and has been going on steadily for the past four years.
A campus for such sports as baseball and football is greatly needed, as well as the
introduction of these games. All this will soon be possible now, as the ground has been
cleared but requires grading. Again, the winter has to be thought of, and in this connection a gymnasium is urgently needed for physical culture and basket ball.
The loss of the amusement hall, by its having to be taken for an associate dining room, has
put a stop to all gathering for entertainment or for religious services. No insane hospital can
be considered to have even the first claim to the title of a hospital that does not possess these
things, and it is to be hoped that this need will soon be met here.
During the year a few patients attended the theatre on one occasion, the circus on one
occasion, the Mayday celebration and the usual fall fair.
Farm and Garden.
Much was done during the past year to improve the cultivated grounds. The garden was
extended at the expense of the farm and neatly fenced with wire. The farm grounds were
added to by taking from its primeval state about two acres of land that is of an exceedingly
light nature and but little use. The season was unusually dry, so that the crop of tubers was
not up to expectations. The fruit did very well, however, as conditions are more favourable
for it. The chief difficulty with the soil here is that, being so light in nature, and situated on
a side hill, the rains of the winter season wash out what little richness it may possess.
As might be expected, the taking away of land from the farm to add it to the garden
reduced the revenue from the former and added it to the latter ; the total receipts, however,
were a little ahead of those for the preceding year.
Farm Products.
Quantity. Contract Value.
Chickens  30 $     15 00
Ducks  46 46 00
Eo-ag  366 doz. 91 50
Pork                                    ' ■ • • ■ 12,498 lbs. 1,249 80
Potatoes   56,120 „ 350 75
Wood  75 cords. 262 50
Total    $2,015 55
 I 10
Public Hospital for the Insane.
1905
Garden Products.
Beans, wax . . . .
Beets	
Cabbage	
Carrots   	
Cauliflower ....
Celery	
Corn   	
Cucumbers   	
Leeks	
Lettuce	
Onions	
Parsnips	
Peas	
Radishes	
Rhubarb	
Spinach	
Squash	
Tomatoes, ripe  .
ii green
Turnips, early . .
n        late   ..
Apples	
Blackberries  . . .
Currants, red. . .
ii       black.
Cherries	
Gooseberries .. .
Peaches	
Pears	
Plums   	
Raspberries ....
Strawberries . . .
Walnuts   	
383 lbs.
2,928   M
8,687   „
27,574   i,
709   „
200 bunches
197 doz. ears
30 doz.
461 lbs.
281 doz.
4,664 lbs.
14,441   n
3,514   ,i
684 bunches
1,555 lbs.
1,418
461
145
691
715
15,420
9,000
91
632
184
407
368
20
614
709
29
404
. 8
9 57
14 64
130 30
137 87
28 36
10 00
29 55
6 00
16 50
42 30
69 96
72 20
145 42
20 52
77 75
70 90
13 83
11 60
34 55
21 45
130 60
135 00
4
31
7
55
60
36
24 42
18 40
2
18
21
2
00
42
27
32
40 40
4 10
Total   $1,403 71
Colony Farm.
During the year the Government, in answer to the pressing demand for more land in
connection with the operations of the Hospital, secured a thousand acres at the junction of
the Coquitlam with the Fraser River, on the west bank of the former and extending up it for
about two miles.. About half of the area is composed of alluvial soil of great depth and richness, being level and not difficult to clear, the only serious problem in connection with its
development being the matter of drainage, which, I believe, can be satisfactorily arranged.
The other half of the area is upland and covered with timber, which will prove very valuable
to the institution in one way or another. The soil is lighter in nature and will be very productive if put to the right use. There are also several excellent building sites on this part of
the property, but no buildings whatever as yet. The whole area is in its virgin state, in fact,
and has never been used for any purpose except as pasturage.
Colony Farm is just six miles from the parent institution and is approachable by a good
road, by railway and by steamboat, so that in the matter of transportation of supplies and
patients it is excellently located. Besides that, the main water supply pipe for the City of
New Westminster passes through the property and could, no doubt, be made use of for fire
protection by arrangement with the civic authorities,
 5 Ed. 7 Public Hospital for the Insane. I 11
Having given a good deal of consideration to the subject, I am convinced that in view of
the antiquated nature of the present institution, and the great need for considerable extension
to meet future requirements as to accommodation, it would be a wise policy for the Government to lay out plans for the erection of a complete modern hospital for the insane upon that
property, and convert the present institution into an idiot and chronic asylum. There is
nothing to prevent these institutions being managed by the one head, as it has been satisfactorily demonstrated in several places in the United States, where colonising has become a
common practice in connection with the state hospitals. The colony attached to the Rochester
State Hospital, in New York State, is 15 miles from the main institution.
The uses to which the Colony Farm should be put at once are the production of all
necessary vegetables for the Hospital, fodder for the horses and hogs, all dairy products by
the maintenance of a large dairy herd and the supply of fuel for the bakery and for the boilers
in summer. By so doing a vast saving can be effected in the general economy of the institu-
tution, as well as much healthy and pleasant occupation secured to the patients.
Improvements and Repairs.
A good deal of valuable work has been performed during the year by the staff of mechanics,
assisted by the patients, in connection with the general improvement of the institution, both
within and without, although fewer new works were undertaken than in any one of the three
previous years and less money expended on these improvements.
The plasterer and his men continued the work of pulling out the wooden floors, which had
rotted in the octagon of K ward, and substituted cement; the carpenter afterwards putting
in strong wooden ceilings to replace the tattered remains of the lath and plaster ones.
The stable barn was moved from its previous site and placed in proximity to the other
farm buildings.
The farm and garden grounds were re-divided and the latter fenced with a wire fence.
Separating them a road was laid out and graded, with a rubble drain on the upper side to
protect it from washing out.
Additional land was cleared of stumps and rocks and placed under crop. The rock was
gathered together for use in various ways in the future, some of it being good enough for
foundation purposes.
The new cinder path for the patients, which it is designed to have encircle the boundary
fence, was pushed further along toward completion, while the ground on each side of it was
boulevarded.
The building used as a temporary laundry in 1903 was vacated and arranged for its
original purpose as a steward's storehouse. Since the bakery was brought into operation this
house has been constantly in use as a store-room for flour, which we receive now in carloads.
The old chicken-bouse and the adjoining closets were torn away and the ground cleared
of the debris preparatory to fencing the laundry green. A new chicken-house, 12 x 20 feet,
was erected further in the rear.
A new woodshed was built in proximity to the elevator leading to the bakery, so that a
ready supply of wood for that department would be always on hand.
The farmer laid new tile drains about the farm buildings and made many improvements
in the quarters used by the stock.
A new walk was laid across the boulevard to the rear entrance of these premises for the
convenience of the employes who enter that way.
 I 12 Public Hospital for the Insane. 1905
Six hundred feet of 6-inch cast-iron pipe has been secured, and is now upon the ground,
for the purpose of laying another pipe line as an additional protection against fire. It is
expected to install 4 hydrants on this new line in the rear of the buildings, the front being
already supplied with two hydrants.
Within the buildings themselves much fine work has been achieved by the plasterer and the
painter. The great improvement in the appearance of the entrance hall is a fair sample of the
work and appeals to all who have witnessed the transformation. A defect in the matter of
connection between this building and the one immediately to the rear, which was left as a
result of the last contract, was remedied by altering the run of the upper flight of stairs, so as
to reduce to two flights what was previously three, and afford a landing opposite the top floor
of the rear building. This was arranged by the carpenter, assisted by skilful patients. The
plaster in the building was then renewed and decorated, and finally a burlap of canvas was
placed on the wall, reaching up four feet from the baseboard and taking the place of wains-
cotting, being cheaper, handsomer and more durable, as well as more sanitary. Mouldings
were used to secure the upper and lower edges and the whole well painted by our painters,
with a very rich effect. Ward " G " received the same treatment. A portion of the floor in
the administration building was renewed.
The plaster in wards " G " and " H," which was originally of the poorest quality, was all
gone over by our men and finished up in proper manner, making the wards altogether brighter
and cleaner.
New balconies have been attached to the 1897 and 1898 buildings, in order to permit of
freer access by the patients to the open air on days when the weather will not permit of walking out. Every ward in the institution should have one of these balconies, and some could
afford two.
A new stairway was placed in position between the boiler-room and the engine-room by a
skilled patient, while a new header was placed on the boilers by contract, which allows of
better control of the steam supply.
An entrance porch was attached to the rear connecting corridor, and many other smaller
works were carried out during the year whose number is legion, but which were of slight
individual importance.
The canvas camp was put into commission during the year and about 25 of the paroled
patients were sent there to sleep. They all seem to have enjoyed the outing and express the
hope that the same thing will be arranged again. The pleasure of the occasion was much
marred, however, by the fact that the tents leaked during each heavy rain-storm, the cause of
this being, in my opinion, that the manufacturer allowed of too little slope to the roof. I
have since discovered that there is a preparation, however, which can be applied to the canvas
and which will make it absolutely water-proof, and proof against mildew at the same time, so
that there need be no repetition of past experiences.
This plan of putting patients out in camp is not by any means a new one, but has been
in vogue in some of the New York State hospitals for years. They not only camp them out
in summer, but all through their long, cold winters, when snow lies upon the ground almost
up to the eaves of the tents. Of course, in such camps stoves are used and the tents kept
moderately warm. This measure has not been carried out so much for the robust patients as
for the consumptive and sickly. It is now being tried for the acute and noisy patients ; also
for those who are dirty in habits. On making personal inquiries I found that all the superintendents agree as to the benefits to be derived by such treatment.
 5 Ed. 7 Public Hospital for the Insane. I 13
As the summer approached an end it was easily seen that the present buildings would
not be adequate to accommodate the total number of patients who would be on hand for the
winter, so it was arranged that a sufficient number should be transferred to the gaol at Vernon,
to afford the necessary relief from overcrowding here.
All preparations having been completed for the furnishing of the gaol in a suitable
manner, and the patients having been selected and prepared, September 20th witnessed the
departure of 48 male patients, accompanied by 5 attendants and the superintendent, in two
tourist cars, for Vernon. The trip was uneventful, and about noon of the following day all
had safely reached their destination, and by night had installed most of the fittings and begun
life in their new quarters.
While this relief is very welcome and the change will be appreciated to some extent by
those affected, yet a gaol is a gaol and bears no similitude to a hospital for the insane; and
while it is well for these people in their present condition to have such comfortable quarters, it
can only be at best a very temporary arrangement, and the time spent thus ought to be cut as
short as possible by the provision of additional wards to this institution or the beginning of a
new hospital at Colony Farm.
Expenditure.
During the year 1904 the current expenditure for maintenance reached the sum of
$66,052.76, which is in excess of that for 1903 by $6,699.19. In addition to that, $6,165.78
was disbursed on capital account, making a grand total of $72,218.54, or $2,572.04 greater
than the grand total of the preceding year. There was also an emergency expenditure of
$1,010.22 for the transportation of patients and staff to the Vernon Gaol, an item not included
in maintenance. The total mentioned above is subject, however, to a reduction of about
$1,400 for the supplies of furniture and clothing sent to Vernon with the patients, and which
were paid for out of our appropriations.
The increase in expenditure of $6,700 in round figures when analysed in Table C below is
shown to have occurred as follows:—Salaries, $3,400; provisions, $1,800; fuel and light,
$1,300 ; and furniture, $500, all of which is partly offset by the reduction of $300 for clothing;
the other items showing slight increases and decreases which balance one another.
The increase for salaries was partly due to additions to staff and partly to advances in
salaries according to schedule. The increase for provisions was due to increase of prices
mostly, as it is well known there has been a steady advance in the prices of all food supplies
for the past year. The addition to our power plant, which was installed at the beginning of
the year, called for a considerable increase in steam production, with its consequent increase
of fuel consumption. This was due to the running of the remodelled laundry. The increase
of expenditure for furniture was for fitting up the Vernon institution.
The per capita cost, which is the pith of the whole matter, is obtained by dividing the
total expenditure for maintenance by the daily average number in residence throughout the
year, which was 351.55. This gives us a per capita of $187.89, an increase over that for the
preceding year of $9.24. The analysis of this increase, as shown in Table B below, exposes
the fact that $5 was in salaries, $3 in provisions, and the balance may be charged to fuel and
light.
Of the $6,165.78 disbursed on capital account, $1,463.48 was for new and additional
furniture, part of which was also for Vernon; $91.47 for additions to the medical library,
$16.95 for additional surgical equipment, and $4,953.88 for improvements to plant; that is for
the things mentioned in the section above on improvements and repairs.
 I 14
Public Hospital for the Insane.
1905
The following tables will be found well worth perusal in connection with this section on
expenditure:—
Table A.
Showing the average number of patients in residence each year, the total amounts spent for
maintenance and the per capita cost.
Year.
Average number
in residence.
Maintenance
expenditure.
Per capita
cost.
1872 (81 days)	
16.57
16.07
16.76
27.42
36.41
34.61
36.52
38.17
45.42
47.18
47.86
48.73
48.70
54.67
59.11
73.55
79.43
71.30
78.78
119.87
125.24
133 92
148.64
162.97
171.43
188.91
216.53
226.44
243.24
269.56
296.62
332.23
351.55
$ 2,265 25
7,841 94
8,232 41
9,892 38
12,558 18
12,917 17
13,985 05
10,253 72
10,552 18
10,691 76
11,343 65
11,829 11
11,843 94
15,555 87
15,334 43
15,945 22
16,261 06
15,657 79
17,577 80
21,757 03
23,518 37
25,904 98
26,495 83
31,587 89
32,001 40
36,224 76
46,420 25
54,917 45
59,349 20
55,406 08
55,345 65
59,353 57
66,052 76
$616 00
1873	
1874	
487 98
491 20
1875	
360 77
1876..              	
344 91
1877     	
373 26
1878	
382 93
1879	
268 63
1880	
232 32
1881	
226 62
1882	
237 02
1883	
242 75
1884	
243 20
1885	
284 54
1886	
259 42
1887  	
216 70
1888	
204 72
1890	
219 60
223 13
1891	
181 50
1892	
1893 ,	
187 80
193 36
1894	
178 25
1895	
193 83
1896	
186 67
1897	
191 75
1898	
214 38
1899	
242 52
1900	
244 00
1901	
205 54
1902	
186 59
1903    ....
178 65
1904	
187 89
 5 Ed. 7
Public Hospital for the Insane.
I 15
Table B.
Showing analysis of the per capita cost.
Year.
Salaries.
Provisions.
Clothing.
Fuel and
Light.
Furniture.
Medicines.
Miscellaneous.
Total.
1872	
$279 38
$184 03
$55 81
$22 44
$15 55
$10 18
$49 30
$616 69
1873	
221 48
166 81
14 55
23 65
21 59
7 74
32 16
487 9S
1874	
231 10
152 10
22 07
23 98
28 36
7 78
25 81
491 20
1875	
153 82
113 40
13 98
16 88
25 45
6 73
30 51
360 77
1876	
143 34
114 45
18 68
22 75
17 90
2 86
24 93
344 91
1877	
177 15
126 75
20 69
4 66
20 75
3 74
19 52
373 26
1878	
L76 16
124 23
30 4.3
13 94
7 20
9 16
21 82
382 93
1879	
134 27
95 10
3 25
15 91
6 39
6 31
7 40
268 63
1880	
111 84
87 71
5 74
14 06
6 00
3 63
3 34
332 32
1881	
112 44
81 14
6 86
12 73
5 55
2 56
5 34
226 62
1882	
121 51
84 52
7 05
12 30
4 54
3 49
3 61
237 02
1883 .
123 81
124 02
92 56
90 64
6 03
7 03
11 04
12 43
4 26
4 14
2 24
2 77
2 82
2 18
242 75
1884	
243 20
1885	
169 05
84 33
6 33
15 05
3 90
2 93
2 95
284 54
1886	
159 03
69 35
5 49
16 20
3 72
1 59
4 04
259 42
1887	
127 80
59 10
5 88
15 38
3 88
93
3 81
216 78
1888	
118 34
60 47
4 41
13 90
3 11
2 09
2 40
204 72
1889	
131 70
59 11
7 20
12 93
4 13
2 07
2 46
219 60
1890	
121 54
62 77
9 02
17 31
4 00
1 29
7 19
223 12
1891	
88 35
54 79
3 83
20 43
3 40
1 89
8 81
181 50
1892	
94 25
56 74
4 69
20 53
3 35
1 80
6 42
187 80
1893	
95 50
53 55
5 43
22 60
3 39
2 69
10 20
193 36
1894	
87 76
57 07
5 25
18 83
2 98
1 43
4 93
178 25
1895	
90 83
61 15
9 90
20 41
2 51
3 10
5 93
193 83
1896	
89 13
55 93
6 30
20 29
2 56
3 63
8 83
186 67
1897	
89 09
58 18
8 36
19 11
2 95
3 86
10 20
191 75
1898	
94 68
69 43
9 94
21 82
2 76
5 12
10 62
214 37
1899	
113-31
72 91
8 31
33 96
2 50
2 73
8 80
242 52
1900	
116 04
72 62
9 06
32 10
2 15
1 71
10 32
244 00
1901	
99 16
66 65
10 12
18 52
3 25
1 07
6 77
205 54
1902	
87 47
61 13
7 95
15 25
4 13
1 20
9 46
186 59
1903	
82 36
57 86
8 58
14 77
3 24
1 91
9 93
178 65
1904	
87 43
60 01
6 85
17 84
4 48
2 10
9 18
187 89
 I 16
Public Hospital for the Insane.
1905
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 5 Ed. 7 Public Hospital for the Insane. I 17
Revenue.
The amount of revenue collected at this office during the year that is just closed, and
which was handed in to the Government Agent, came to $15,004.22, which was $1,364.58
more than was ever collected here in any previous year. The table submitted below shows
what the collections have been year by year since the institution was founded, and is worthy
of more than a passing glance.
1873   $1,440 99 1889   $     220 00
1874         680 00 1890         599 24
1875      1,342 50 1891          761  15
1876   730 31 1892   2,418 43
1877   799 91 1893   1,585 40
1878   479 42 1894  2,709 53
1879   867 38 1895   4,409 23
1880      1,433 04 1896       3,74171
1881          614 99 1897       3,816 80
1882    ,      505 18 1898       4,003 79
1883        298 24 1899       4,769 04
1884          98 35 1900      6,893 33
1885  1901      12,800 76
1886          50 00 1902      10,926 23
1887      720 59 1903      13,639 64
1888        750 00 1904      15,004 22
Requirements.
Under this head I can only repeat my remarks of last year. The same conditions of need
exist, there having been no attempt made during the year to provide anything additional in
the way of accommodation or facilities, except the securing of water pipe for fire protection,
and the beginnings of a series of ward balconies which we are erecting with our own help.
There are now, however, additional urgent requirements that were not mentioned in the last
report, and these I beg to submit.
The present administration building has become entirely inadequate. The Assistant
Superintendent's office had to be located on the second floor, which is very inconvenient. There
are only two little rooms set apart for the purposes of visitation, which is altogether too few.
It is getting to be a common experience to have groups of visitors scattered about the main
entrance hall, attempting to carry on a quiet visit with their afflicted friends under varying
degrees of discomfort and inconvenience.    Privacy is simply impossible.
Administration buildings of insane hospitals usually contain such facilities as clinical
laboratories, eye and ear and dental rooms.    These are lacking here and are greatly needed.
Besides this, the present building is very inconveniently situated from the standpoint of
the general public who may have hospital business to transact with the officials, and who at
present have to encounter varying numbers of patients in passing through the grounds to and
from the offices, which is unpleasant to all concerned.
A much better site is afforded where the lodge now stands at the main entrance. The
portion of the present building that would be thus vacated could be used to relieve the demands
of visitation, to furnish the needed laboratories and allow of club-rooms for the employees.
The cost of such a building would be about $30,000. For the amusement hall with
gymnasium in the basement, and women's industrial room on the top floor, which was asked
for last year, $35,000. For a three-story building for patients to accommodate 150, $100,000.
An engineer's residence, $2,000.    A fire hall with additional fire-fighting apparatus, $2,000.
 I 18 Public Hospital for the Insane. 1905
A new conservatory, $1,500. Wood working machinery for carpenter shop, and a lathe and
motor for engineer's department, $1,500. These are all urgent and should be provided for
this year.    The total amounts to $172,000.
This expenditure would put the institution in shape to do its work fairly well, but still
leaves the building of a cottage for the acute insane, and another for the tuberculous insane,
for the future. If, however, these provisions are not made the institution can scarcely avoid
degenerating into a common house of detention with all its objectionable features such as
existed a hundred years ago. Yet before any of these expenditures are undertaken I would
strongly recommend for serious consideration the idea of withdrawing from these unsuitable
premises in favour of Colony Farm.
Prominent amongst the requirements of this institution is some assistance to the management in the shape of an advisory committee, such as exists in some of the other Provinces, in
most of the States in the Union, as well as in most European countries to-day.
These committees, which in some places are called " inspectors," in others a " board of
control," or a " board of managers," or a " commission in. lunacy," are constituted for the
purpose of aiding the superintendent in his multifarious and onerous duties by their counsel
and encouragement.
The superintendent of a hospital for the insane, let it be understood, occupies a very
unique and trying position.
In the first place he is the custodian of a class of people who are his wards against their
will, and to some extent at his discretion. They are essentially an unreasonable (insane) lot
of people, and in many instances they see only this far, that the superintendent stands between
them and liberty—the only thing they know enough to prize—and he naturally comes in for
their displeasure, even for their hatred at times ; all the while he is really doing what he can
for their alleviation.
Secondly, he bears to his employes the relationship of a critic, his duty being that of
constant inspection and supervision of their work, so that where attendants are careless or
unsuited to the work (and what insane hospital can be said to be entirely free from such 1),
this relationship leads to frequent reprovals which in the end generate resentment and a spirit
of antagonism. Unless the superintendent has the power to remove such antagonists nothing
but undesirable results can accrue.
In the third and last place the superintendent has to contend against that popular prejudice still existing in the minds of many, which has been handed down from generation to
generation for centuries, regarding the insane and asylums in general. This prejudice causes
the general and ready acceptance of untruthful rumors regarding the treatment of the patients,
or of the employes, without arousing sufficient real interest in any quarter to call for an expose
of the genuine facts of the case.
It also lends encouragement to those designing persons connected with the service, who
happen to be dissatisfied, and who are looking for an open field in which to sow widespread
misrepresentation. Such persons are not slow to take advantage of this prejudice to embarrass
the management; nor are some others, who are not in any way connected with the service,
but who see a means by which they may steal political support by the sacrifice of an official
scapegoat.
It will thus be seen that the superintendent stands in a crossfire of disapproval, 1st, from
his patients who are unable to discriminate ; 2ndly, from undesirable and inefficient employes ;
and 3rdly, from an uncomprehending public. It will, at any rate, be easily understood that
from none of the above sources does he get the aid and encouragement which he as a human
 5 Ed. 7 Public Hospital for the Insane. I 19
being requires. Such a committee as I have suggested stands ever ready to receive all complaints from patients and employes alike, and to see that each and all are given the treatment
which is their due.
By their frequent visitation to the wards of the institution as well as by their constant
intercourse with the officers, these persons become thoroughly seized of every situation and
detail of the work, and are thus in a position to offer disinterested advice, and to set matters
straight without prejudice and in a manner which could never be achieved by a parliamentary
committee.
Such committees usually consist of three members, one of which is a medical man. The
visits are as a rule fortnightly but are often made unexpectedly.
I feel certain that it would not be difficult for the Government to find three worthy
citizens in this district, who could and would give the kind of service necessary and that without increasing the expense of the institution.
Staff Changes.
Dr. C. E. Doherty, who had been assistant medical superintendent from June 1st, 1902,
resigned to re-enter upon private practice and left this service on May 31st, much to the regret
of all connected with the staff, whose good wishes he bore with him to his new field of labour.
Dr. Wm. Workman, a grandson of the late Dr. Joseph Workman who made for himself
a world-wide reputation in alienism while filling the post of medical superintendent of Toronto
Asylum, took up the position vacated by Dr. Doherty, and has successfully carried out his
duties while winning the general good-will of all under his charge.
Thomas Mayes, who had come to be regarded as an official of very exceptional ability in
this work and of general acceptance with both staff and patients alike, vacated the post of
chief male attendant on May 16th, after nine years of continuous service on the staff. He
had not for some time been enjoying satisfactory health, and it was evident that the strain of
this work was too much for him. It was with general regret that such a valuable officer has
been lost to the service.
G. H. Mathewson, who occupied various positions upon the staff since June, 1897,
succeeded Mr. Mayes and is proving himself worthy of every praise and confidence.
F. H. Green was added to the staff at the beginning of the current fiscal year in the
capacity of baker, to which post he brought many years of experience and an excellent reputation as a bread maker, to which he has here established the best of claims. This was a new
position, now filled for the first time, the new bakery having been installed only a year ago.
Visitors.
The number of visitors to the institution steadily increases each year owing to the fact,
that, whereas in years gone by the majority of those admitted were friendless patients, to-day
but few indeed of the admissions but have some friends to come and visit them. Then too,
I think, there is an increasing interest being taken in the place.
The official visits for the year were as follows :—Dr. Fagan on January 16th, March 22nd,
and March 30th. Hon. R. McBride and Hon. R. F. Green, February 27th • Hon. R. G.
Tatlow on July 15th, and Hon. F. J. Fulton on December 2nd, 3rd, 22nd, and 23rd. The
three latter visitors all being Provincial Secretary at the time of their visits.
Acknowledgments.
The following publications have been gratuitously contributed by the publishers during
the past year :—" Daily Colonist" and " Daily Times," of Victoria, two copies each ; " Daily
 I 20 Public Hospital for the Insane. 1905
World," of Vancouver, two copies of the daily and two of the weekly; " Daily News-Advertiser" and "Daily Province," of Vancouver, one copy each; " Daily Columbian," of New
Westminster, two copies ; Kamloops " Sentinel " and Similkameen " Star," one copy each; for
all of which on behalf of the patients I extend our best thanks.
I am most happy to be able to testify to the very efficient services rendered by the great
majority of the persons on the staff, and to them I wish to extend my most sincere thanks and
to state my deep appreciation of their faithfulness and loyal support.
I feel that to the utmost degree we are indebted to an ever-watchful Providence for the
immunity from serious accidents which we have enjoyed during the year that is gone.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant.
G. H. MANCHESTER, M. D.,
Medical Superintendent.
 5 Ed. 7
Public Hospital for the Insane.
I 21
STATISTICAL   TABLES.
Table No. 1.
Showing the operations of the Hospital for the year 1904, in summary form.
Movement of Population.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Remaining in residence January 1st, 1904	
Out on probation on            n                    it   	
269
6
80
10
349
16
275
89
90
26
365
Admitted during the year :—
78
1
4
6
25
1
103
2
4
6
By Lieutenant-Governor's Warrant	
115
364
132
116
27
480
Discharged during the year :—
32
9
9
2
14
4
2
46
13
11
2
As improved	
Total    	
52
10
23
47
20
4
3
72
14
26
47
Discharged on probation and still out Dec. 31st, '04
Died	
159
232
89
321
•
1,229
357
1,586
n                       /;     discharged        n             ....
n                        tt     died                   it             	
613
327
216
48
829
375
940
264
1,204
Remaining under treatment January 1st, 1905
289
93
382
Daily average population during the year    ....  351.55
Maximum number present on any one day, July 21st   374
Minimum u n December 7th   315
Percentage of discharges on admissions (deaths excluded)     62.61
a recoveries //     ....    40.00
,/ deaths on whole number under treatment        5.42
Number of "paying patients" admitted      18
n '' free patients" n      97
 I 22
Public Hospital for the Insane.
1905
Table No. 2.
Showing in summary form the operations of the Hospital since its inception.
cc
O
tn
m
3
TS
Discharges.
CD
«
Number resident at
the close of each
year.
00
cc
n
00
eo
a
rH
CD
cc
g
3
CD
fl
Whole number
5£                treated.
Percentage of recoveries to admissions.
Percentage   of  discharges to admissions  (deaths excluded).
deaths
lumber
tment.
Year.
T3
CD
u
00
>
a
o
CD
tS
no
HH    U
O   00
<H   o
O
00
u
Percentage o:
to whole
under trea
1872	
18
1
0
1
16
0
0
5.55
5.55
5.55
1873	
15
10
2
5
14
2
31
66.66
80.00
16.12
1874	
12
4
3
19
5
26
33.33
33.33
11.53
1875	
29
3
3
10
32
13
48
10.34
26.89
20.83
1876	
22
11
3
5
35
3
54
50.00
63.63
9.35
1877	
14
16
18
17
4
7
4
5
4
3
1
0
3
8
8
5
38
36
41
48
3
5
7
2
49
54
54
58
28.57
43.75
22.22
29.41
78.57
62.50
27.77
29.41
6.12
1878	
16.16
1879	
14.81
1880	
8.62
1881	
13
7
8
10
20
27
36
5
3
4
2
5
10
15
3
1
1
4
0
6
5
5
2
3
2
5
6
5
48
49
49
51
61
66
77
....
61
55
57
59
71
88
102
38.46
42.85
50.00
20.00
25.00
37.03
41.66
61.54
57.14
62.50
60.00
25.00
59.25
55.55
8.19
1882	
3.63
1883	
5.26
1884	
2
10
5
11
3.33
1885	
6.94
1886	
6.81
1887	
4.80
1888	
26
12
6
3
82
5
103
46.15
69.23
2.87
1889	
41
14
5
4
100
18
123
34.15
46.34
3.25
1890	
52
17
6
12
117
17
152
32.69
44.23
7.64
1891	
49
19
4
20
123
6
166
38.77
46.94
11.69
1892	
52
17
10
13
135
12
175
32.69
51.92
6.95
1893	
44
14
18
14
133
2
179
31.81
72.72
7.60
1894	
80
62
13
29
19
11
19
20
162
164
29
2
213
224
16.25
46.77
40.00
64.51
.8.92
1895	
8.92
1896	
64
23
25
9
171
7
228
35.93
75.00
3.94
1897	
74
20
8
14
203
32
246
27.03
37.83
5.69
1898	
81
27
13
19
221
18
285
33.33
49.38
6.66
1899	
101
31
32
21
234
13
327
30.69
62.37
6.42
1900	
113
38
27
29
258
24
356
33.63
57.52
8.14
1901	
115
40
20
25
284
26
377
34.78
52.17
6.63
1902	
121
30
31
25
311
27
413
24.79
50.41
6.06
1903	
139
38
37
26
349
38
466
27.34
53.96
5.57
1904	
115
46
26
26
321
28
480
40.00
62.61
5 42
Table No. 3.
Showing the number of admissions, discharges and deaths for each month during 1904.
Months
January .
February
March . ..
April   . ..
May	
June	
July ....
August ..
September
October ..
November
December
Admissions.
Male.     Female.    Total
7
11
6
7
10
7
7
6
6
7
4
11
89
1
6
2
1
1
0
0
3
1
2
26
10
17
7
13
12
8
8
6
6
10
5
13
115
Discharges.
Male.     Female.    Total.
0
4
2
7
2
3
1
1
11
4
0
17
52
4
0
3
2
0
2
0
2
3
0
2
20
2
8
2
10
4
3
3
1
13
7
0
19
72
Deaths.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
2
2
0
2
2
0
2
1
2
3
3
0
3
2
0
2
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
1
4
0
4
4
0
4
23
3
26
 5 Ed. 7
Public Hospital for the Insane.
I 23
Table No. 4.
Showing the civil state of the patients admitted during 1904.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
74
10
5
7
17
2
81
27
7
Total
89
26
115
Table No 5.
Showing the religious denominations of those admitted during the year.
Religious Denomination.
Anglican 	
Baptist	
Heathen   	
Lutheran	
Methodist	
Presbyterian	
Protestant 	
Roman Catholic	
None	
Total
Male.
Female.
17
7
1
2
11
1
4
0
5
4
13
8
10
2
24
2
4
0
89
26
24
3
12
4
9
21
12
26
4
115
Table No.  6.
Showing the degree of education of those admitted during the year.
Degree of Education.
Superior	
Common school	
Can read only	
Cannot read nor write . .
Total
Male.
Female.
2
0
76
25
1
0
10
1
89
26
2
101
1
11
115
 I 24
Public Hospital for the Insane.
1905
Table No. 7.
Showing the nationality of those admitted during the year.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
3
11
6
3
3
11
1
15
1
4
11
3
1
0
4
10
0
1
0
0
0
5
0
1
1
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
2
1
Canada:
7
21
6
4
3
11
1
20
1
5
12
3
1
1
7
2
4
1
1
9
2
4
1
Total	
89
26
115
Table No. 8.
Showing what districts contributed patients during the year.
Place of Residence at time of committal.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Yukon District:
5
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
9
21
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
7
8
0
1
3
1
0
0
0
0
1
5
1
Vancouver Island District:
1
2
o
1
3
1
16
Lower Mainland District:
29
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
2
12
2
1
1
1
2
1
61
23
84
 5 Ed. 7
Public Hospital for the Insane.
I 25
Table No. 8.—Concluded.
Place of Residence at time of committal.
Male.
Female.
Total.
61
1
23
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
84
Cariboo District:
1
150-Mile House	
1
Kamloops District:
6
1
1
6
1
Kootenay District:
1
1
1
1
7
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
8
1
3
Boundary District:
3
2
1
Total	
89
26
115
Table No. 9.
Showing the occupations of those admitted during the year.
Occupation.
Baker	
Bank clerk	
Blacksmith
Boiler-maker .. .
Brewer	
Carpenter	
Cook	
Domestic ......
Engineer	
Farmer	
Glass-blower ..
Hotel-keeper . .
House-keeper . .
Labourer 	
Logger 	
Medicine man.
Miner	
Musician	
None. .   	
Prospector	
Sailor	
Smelter-man ...
Stone-mason ...
Teacher	
Tinsmith	
Total.
Male.
1
13
1
1
'37'
2
1
6
1
4
2
2
1
2
1
1
89
Female.
Total.
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
6
4
4
0
1
0
13
0
1
0
1
20
20
0
37
0
2
0
1
0
6
0
1
2
6
0
2
0
2
0
1
0
2
0
1
0
1
26
115
 I 26
Public Hospital for the Insane.
1905
Table No. 10.
Showing the ages of those admitted during the year.
Age.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
8
11
9
11
17
9
6
6
4
5
1
89
0
1
1
1
6
4
5
2
4
1
1
0
26
2
9
n     20 a 25     n            	
12
i,     25 a  30     //     	
10
„     30 a  35     it     	
17
a     35 „  40     n     	
21
14
n     45 n  50     n         	
it     50 a 60     ,i     	
8
10
«     60 n 70    n     	
5
»     70 it 80     »     	
6
1
Total    	
115
Table No.  11.
Showing the number of the attack in those admitted during the year.
Number of attack.
Male.
Female.
Total.
First	
49
7
1
8
23
1
89
22
3
1
0
0
0
71
10
Fifth	
2
8
23
1
To
26
115
Table No. 12.
Showing the alleged duration of the attack prior to admission.
Duration of attack.
Male.
Female.
Total.
0
22
10
3
2
o
5
6
5
2
1
0
8
22
1
89
1
4
4
4
3
1
2
2
0
2
1
1
0
1
0
1
26
14
7
5
„     9 n  12      n       	
3
7
8
„     5 //  10     //   	
4
„   10 a 20     i,   	
2
1
8
23
1
Total	
26
115
 5 Ed. 7
Public Hospital for the Insane.
I 27
Table No. 13.
Showing statistics of heredity in those admitted during the year.
Heredity.
Male.
Female.
Total.
3
5
2
7
0
17
55
89
1
3
1
4
6
8
3
26
4
8
3
11
6
25
58
Total	
115
Table No. 14.
Showing the alleged exciting causes of the attack of insanity.
Alleged cause.
Abuse of opium	
Childbirth	
Domestic worry	
Epilepsy	
Financial worry	
Grief	
Heart disease	
Heredity	
Ill health	
Injury and shook	
Intemperance	
Lactation	
Measles	
Not insane	
Old age 	
Onanism	
Overwork	
Syphilis	
Unstated	
Total
Male.
1
0
0
4
4
1
1
10
2
1
18
0
1
1
7
15
1
6
16
Female.     Total
26
1
1
5
4
6
2
1
18
5
1
20
1
1
1
7
15
1
6
19
115
Table No.  15.
Showing the state of bodily health on admission.
Bodily Condition.
In average bodily health  . ..
In reduced health	
In greatly reduced condition
Total. ..
Male.
Female.
34
49
6
13
10
3
26
89
Total.
47
59
9
115
 I 28
Public Hospital for the Insane.
1905
Table No. 16.
Showing the form of mental disorder present in those admitted.
Form of Disorder.
Acute mania	
Melancholia     	
Dementia, precox	
n senile	
it terminal (secondary)
Alcoholic insanity	
Epileptic insanity	
Manic depressive insanity	
Paranoia    	
General paresis	
Idiocy 	
Imbecility	
Malingering (not insane)	
Not decided  	
Total.
Male.
2
7
25
8
11
10
4
2
10
6
2
I
1
89
Female.     Total
26
5
12
31
10
17
10
4
4
2
10
6
2
1
1
115
Table No. 17.
Showing the number allowed out on probation during the year and the results.
Results.
Discharged recovered ...
n improved ...
it unimproved
Returned to the Hospital
Still out at close of year.
Total.
Male.
Female.
28
8
3
1
7
1
8
1
10
4
56
14
36
4
8
9
14
70
Table No. 18.
Showing the alleged duration of insanity prior to admission in those discharged recovered
during the year.
Duration of Insanity.
Less than 1 month   ....
From 1 to   2 months. ..
n     2 „    3     /,
/;        3   it     6        // ...
„       6   ;   12        „
//     1 ii   2 years ....
Unknown  	
Total
Male.
Female.
16
5
4
3
3"
1
2
0
2
1
1
1
4
3
32
14
Total.
21
7
4
2
3
2
7
46
 5 Ed. 7
•Public Hospital for the Insane.
I 29
Table No.  19.
Showing length of residence of those remaining under treatment January 1st 1905, and
of those who were discharged during the year 1904.
Length of Residence.
Of those
under
treatment
January 1st,
1905.
Of those
discharged
recovered
during the
year 1904.
Of those
discharged
improved
during the
year 1904.
Of those
discharged
unimproved
during the
year 1904.
From 1 to   2 months  	
13
5
10
5
6
6
23
15
65
40
23
30
20
17
16
10
4
36
18
4
12
2
2
9
5
1
8
2
9
4
4
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
1
1
1
4
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
„      4 //     5     n          	
2
1
1
,/       9  n   12     rt	
0
3
tt     2 //    3    //
1
3 „    4
0
0
0
1
n     7 »    8    „         	
„     9 a 10    it	
n   10 a 15    /,        	
a   15 »/ 20   '/                   	
//   20 « 25   n        	
Totals	
382
46
14
12
Table No. 20.
Record of deaths for the year 1904.
Register
No.
Time in Hospital.
Initals.
Sex.
Age.
Certified cause.
"Years.
Months.
Days.
1,439
A. B.
M.
43
2
25
General paresis.
543
N. T. A.
F.
40
10
1
19
Phthisis.
1,408
J. J. McD.
M.
49
6
11
General paresis.
1,127
W. M.
M.
65
2
9
2
Uraemia.
1,378
J. S.
M.
64
10
17
General paresis.
1,475
W. L.
M.
30
2
14
Intestinal obstruction.
1,195
H. S.
M.
38
2
4
27
General paresis.
1,496
M. McM.
F.
43
1
28
Peritonitis.
738
A. S.
F.
67
7
1
1
General debility.
1,267
T. F.
M.
48
1
10
8
General paresis.
1,295
W. II. J.
M.
48
1
9
10
General paresis.
1,278
C. D.
M.
65
1
7
20
Broncho-pneumonia.
1,481
J. W.
M.
71
4
12
Morbus cordis.
1,373
E. W. R.
M.
41
1
2
5
General paresis.
1,145
J. W. M.
M.
46
3
0
21
General paresis.
1,458
B. C.
M.
65
8
2
General debility.
1,454
J. E.
M.
74
9
27
General debility.
1,299
E. L.
M.
38
2
0
1
General paresis.
1,407
C. S. K.
M.
78
10
7
General debility.
630
J. L.
M.
55 -
9
5
27
Bright's disease.
1,152
A. S.
M.
27
3
4
10
Morbus cordis.
467
J. B.
M.
73
12
6
4
General debility.
1,307
E. C. S.
M.
62
2
1
20
General paresis.
691
J. F. J.
M.
70
8
6
6
Morbus cordis.
478
J. L.
M.
55
12
4
3
General debility.
606
A. W.
M.
54
10
0
25
Erysipelas.
 I 30
Public Hospital for the Insane.
1905
Table No. 21.
Showing race classification of those remaining in residence on January 1st, 1905.
Class.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Whites
197
3
30
2
88
285
3
30
2
1
89
1
Total
232
321
Table No. 22.
Showing the forms of employment engaged in by the patients during the year and the
number of days' work performed by them.
Employment.
Assisting the carpenter . ..
a farmer	
ti gardener ....
// painter 	
// engineer	
a plasterer ....
u tailor	
// cooks	
// laundry man .
// porter	
» baker	
tt on the wards ..
Total
No. of days.
1,362
7,087
2,054
706
1,101
661
198
4,383
2,663
363
171
35,631
56,380
Table No. 23.
Showing the articles made and repaired on the Wards during the year.
Name of Article.
Made.
Repaired.
136
426
630
7
21
76
5
325
8
17
293
Caps for nurses    	
Chemises	
534
12
Candy bags for Xmas '.	
Covers for bureaus	
Cushions	
210
26
40
18
8
Dresses, gingham	
134
//       serge  	
616
»        uniform    	
82
329
Drawers, pairs          	
20
229
2,484
Dusters	
 5 Ed. 7
Public Hospital for the Insane.
I 31
Table No. 23.—Concluded.
Handkerchiefs .
Hose, pairs	
Mats, floor	
Napkins, table . .
Neckties	
Pillow slips	
Sheets 	
Shirts, outside . .
a     inside . ..
Skirts	
Socks, pairs
Tea bags	
Table covers
Tray covers
Ticks for beds...
Towels	
Trousers	
Undervests
Name of Article.
Work of Tailor-shop.
Coats	
Conbination suits and camisoles	
Shirts to order	
Suits for patients  	
Suits of uniform for attendants
Trousers ,	
Vests ....   	
Blanket lined with convas  	
Lounges covered	
Drawers for patient	
Felt mattresses for Vernon Branch .
Work of Shoe-shop.
Shoes, pairs	
Slippers	
Harness repaired, key straps made, and other miscellaneous work.
Made.
130
21
24
144
266
343
180
23
66
480
25
50
24
7
1
4
3
55
25
50
Repaired.
2,244
474
588
2,206
2,332
758
3,380
95
138
276
161
473
185
26
435
105
275
131
Table No. 24.
Quantities of Fruit from our Garden preserved.
Apricots	
Blackberries  	
Currants, red	
a        black
Cherries	
Gooseberries	
Peaches	
Pears	
Plums	
Raspberries	
Raspberry vinegar .
Rhubarb	
Strawberries	
Jelly    	
Cucumber pickles.
Tomato pickles
10 quarts.
7     a
36     „
13     a
55     //
3 ,i
4 ,,
23 „
83 «
33     „
13 bottles.
21 quarts.
55 „
17 glasses.
28 quarts.
70      „
VICTORIA, B. C.:
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1906.
 

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