Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

REPORT OF THE FISHERIES COMMISSIONER FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR 1904, JOHN PEASE BABCOCK, Commissioner. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1905

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0064279.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0064279.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0064279-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0064279-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0064279-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0064279-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0064279-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0064279-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0064279-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0064279.ris

Full Text

 Printed by authority of the Legislative Assembly.
REPORT
—OF   THE	
FISHERIES COMMISSIONER FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR THE YEAR 1904,
JOHN   PEASE   BABCOCK,  Commissioner.  5 Ed. 7 Fisheries Commissioner's Report. F 3
FISHERIES  COMMISSIONER'S  REPORT   FOR 1904.
To the Honourable Charles   Wilson, K. C,
Attorney-General,   Victoria, B. C.
Sir,—I have the honour to report that during the year I made a thorough detailed
inspection of the watershed of the Fraser River, which included every section where in former
years the salmon were known to spawn in numbers. This inspection was made, as was that of
each of the preceding years, to ascertain as accurately as possible the number of adult salmon
which reached and deposited their ova upon the spawning beds. As the future prosperity of
the salmon fishery of the Fraser depends primarily upon the number of breeding fish which
reach and successfully deposit their spawn in its headwaters each year, it is there we must look
to find the best measures for their perpetuation, and test the effectiveness of those now in force.
The weather conditions this year were unusually favourable for observation, yet in only
one section of the entire watershed were fish found in any considerable number. In all other
sections the spawning beds were almost barren of salmon.
For the last two years the scarcity of sockeye salmon on the spawning grounds was
alarming, but this year it was even more so. This condition is matter for grave consideration
and should insure the immediate attention of the authorities in whose hands this great industry
is intrusted.
It is common knowledge to all those who are in anywise interested in the salmon fisheries
of the Fraser River that the catch of sockeye, on both sides of the International Line, was
this year the smallest in many years; though it may not be generally recognised that it was
the smallest in the past twenty years, and probably the smallest in the history of the industry.
There is no doubt that under the present fishing methods, restricted seasons, and the demand
for fish at present existing in the Fraser District, a far greater number of salmon, in proportion
to the total number running, are captured each year now, than was the case even eight years
ago. Hence when we find that the catch—which is fully set forth in the cannery pack—shows
a marked decline, and that the spawning beds are deserted, we must conclude that these conditions are due to a decrease in the number of fish running, and not to any lack of effort to take
them.
Knowing that there was so great a decrease in the number of fish found on the fishing
grounds this year, it is not surprising that the number of breeding sockeye found upon the
spawning grounds was very small. Many extensive and heretofore thickly covered sections
were absolutely barren of sockeye, and, in those sections where any were found there were even
less than were observed in any former year. In the Quesnel Lake District—both this year
and last—no breeding sockeye were observed. In both the Shuswap-Adams Lake and the
Seton-Anderson Lake sections only a few hundred fish were found. In each of the last two
years more were found in the Harrison-Lillooet Lake District than in any other; but even
in that district a noticeable decrease was observed this year over last.
In my report of last year, in reviewing the conditions that existed on the fishing and
spawning grounds, I said : " It is well known that the run of salmon in the Fraser River
during the past season was the poorest in many years. The scarcity was largly confined to the
sockeye (0. nerka) variety, though all varieties showed a marked decline. As the sockeye is
the great commercial salmon of the Fraser its failure to run as abundantly as usual entailed a F 4 Fisheries Commissioner's Report. 1905
great loss upon the fishermen and the canners. But what is of far greater importance to the
Government, the fishermen and the canners, than the remarkable decrease in the catch, is the
fact that the number of sockeye which reached the spawning grounds of the Fraser River this
year was so small as to seriously threaten the destruction of the great industry. For I can
positively state from personal observation that the run of sockeye to the Fraser watershed
above the great canyon (which includes the Quesnel, Shuswap and Seton-Anderson Lakes
section) was a failure, and that virtually no spawn to produce a future run was deposited there
this year, though combined, these lake regions constitute what is believed to be 75 per cent,
of the natural spawning grounds of the sockeye salmon of the entire Fraser River watershed.
This statement, which may reasonably alarm those interested, is made after a most careful
inspection of the spawning grounds during the past three seasons."
The decrease in the catch, and the absence of fish upon the spawning grounds of the Fraser
River this year and last, is entirely attributable to excessive fishing, past and present. I can
find no other reason for this condition. To continue fishing for salmon under the laws at
present existing will surely cause their extermination in the Fraser River and its tributaries.
I do not believe that any intelligent person on either side of the International Line who is
interested in the salmon industry does not recognise this statement to be true, and does not in
consequence recognise the immediate necessity of restricting the fishing in both our own and
American waters. At present the sockeye have no protection whatever in American waters;
and the protection afforded them in our own waters, though deemed adequate at the time of
its enactment, is seriously inadequate now.
Adequate protection—that is protection that will give the salmon a free and open passage
from the ocean to the river for some period of the time they are running—will never be secured
until the parties on both sides of the line agree to enforce the same regulations. It is therefore
a matter of urgent importance that the Canadian and American authorities recognise this to
to be true, and take measures to stop the excessive fishing, and thus insure an abundance of
fish reaching the breeding grounds each year. The statement that our own regulations are
insufficient, and do not accomplish the object of their enactment—though true in the main,—
is no possible excuse for the failure of the State of Washington to enact laws for the protection
of the fish, for a part of each season, in her waters. Had the State of Washington for the past
ten years given the sockeye the same protection as to closed seasons as has been afforded them
in our own waters, it is reasonable to presume that the Fraser River spawning beds would not
be in the condition they are to-day. However, recognising as we all do now that the sockeye
will be exterminated unless they be given a free-way for a time each season to the headwaters
of the Fraser, any accusation as to who is responsible for the damage already wrought is
useless. Manifestly, as has been already said, the proper thing to do now is for those interested to concur in the enforcement of efficient laws for their protection which will be mutually
binding on all concerned, to the end that they shall perpetuate their species in their wonted
abundance. Just what measures should be adopted it is difficult to determine, because the
sockeye in their passage from the ocean spend a considerable time in the channels of Puget
Sound, through which they pass before entering the river. In all probability whatever
measures shall be adopted will have to be modified after a trial shall have determined their
efficiency or inefficiency, for such is the history of all fishery legislation.
Measures which might have been adequate before the run had become so diminished will
not answer now. In a previous report I advocated that the State of Washington should
establish in her waters a closed season for 36 hours each week, as has been enforced in our
waters for many years, and I am still of the opinion that if that shall be done in the years of
the big run, and any fishing whatever prohibited from August 25th to September 15th in her 5 Ed. 7 Fisheries Commissioner's Report. F 5
waters; and that all fishing in the Fraser above the railway bridge at New Westminster be
prohibited, and our other present regulations enforced, an abundance of socke3'e to seed the
spawning grounds will be insured in " the big years." I do not, however, believe that such
provisions would produce that result in the three following years of the poor runs.
From my familiarity with the present conditions existing on the fishing grounds and my
observations of the barren spawning grounds of the Fraser, I conclude that the sockeye which
run to that river in the off years are perilously near extermination, in fact, so near that I
believe more stringent regulations than above outlined must for a time be enforced. I am so
strongly impressed with this fact that I have no hesitancy in recommending that fishing on
the Fraser River, and its salt water approaches on both sides of the line, be prohibited from
July 10th to September 15th, for the years 1906, 1907 and 1908. It may be said that this is
altogether too radical. It may also be said that such legislation can never be enacted, since
the fishermen and canners would oppose it, for the reason that it would for three years drive
them from the river. I nevertheless submit that for three years the sockeye spawn deposited
in the Fraser watershed has not been sufficient to produce runs of sockeye equal to those of
the past three years, and that, notwithstanding the excessive fishing during that period, the
catch has not been sufficient to yield a profit to either the fishermen or the canners, and that
many of them have lost money. If the business of the fishermen and canners, under the
existing laws as to seasons and methods (which they admit have tended to the extermination
of the fish), has not been profitable for three years, upon what ground can they reasonably
expect to make a profit in the years 1906, 1907 and 1908 under more restrictive regulations'?
For argument's sake let it be assumed that the runs in 1906, 1907 and 1908 will equal in
number those of the years 1902, 1903 and 1904, and that the fishing season be made shorter
in order to permit a reasonable proportion of the fish to reach the spawning grounds, who will
assert that the fishermen and canners will do as well as they did in the latter years ?
I cannot believe that the run of salmon in the Fraser district in the years 1906, 1907
and 1908 will equal that of the last three years. It certainly will not, if the theory is correct
that the run depends upon the result of propagation in the Fraser in the fourth preceding year.
If sockeye fishing in the Fraser district, on both sides of the line, be prohibited in the years above
specified, the fish which do come in from the sea will reach the spawning grounds; when by-
natural propagation, aided by the hatcheries now in existence (which combined have a capacity
of 90,000,000 eggs), the river will be thoroughly seeded, even though the run should be
materially less than that of the past season. Tf for a period of four years the sockeye be
given free access to the spawning grounds of the river, the fishery will be restored to a condition of profitable proportions. It is equally certain that if the river be not thus seeded the
run of fish will continue to decrease. The fishermen and canners should recognise these facts
now, for sooner or later they must face the fact that the only way the fish can be restored to
the Fraser from fish bred there is to temporarily forego catching them. It naturally follows,
then, that the greater the decrease in the run the longer it will take to restore it to its former
condition. If the fishermen and canners, by their intervention, shall prevent the enactment
of laws which shall prohibit fishing for salmon in the Fraser district for the next three years,
and yet consent to more restrictive measures than those at present in force, they will, nevertheless, face certain loss in 1906, 1907 and 1908, and will postpone the restoration of the runs
to profitable proportions, and the time when salmon fishing and canning shall again become a
lucrative business.
There is one other consideration in this connection that should appeal to those engaged
in this industry. I have shown in my previous reports that the entire spawning beds of the
Fraser watershed, with the exception of the Quesnel Lake section, were abundantly stocked F 6 Fisheries Commissioner's Report. 1'905
with sockeye spawn in the fall of 1901, and that the young fish thereby produced were seen
in countless thousands migrating to salt water as fry in the spring of 1902, and yearlings in
the spring of 1903. Upon these facts, taken in connection with the generally recognised
truth of the statement that the run for a given year depends primarily upon the result of
propagation in the fourth preceding year, I found my belief that the run in 1905 will be large.
If the run in 1905 is not large it will not be due to a failure to seed the grounds in 1901, but
to some unknown and adverse conditions existing upon their feeding grounds in the sea, or
disprove the four-year theory. No fisherman or canner believes that the run next year will
not be a big one. Now, if a law should be enacted prohibiting the catching of sockeye in the
Fraser district for three years following 1905, the canners would undoubtedly make exceptional
efforts to increase their pack in that year. As they have materially increased their canning
capacity they would be enabled to take all the fish offered them by the fishermen, which they
did not do in 1901. Knowing that the river was to be closed to fishing they would not only
take more fish than in 1901, but would pay a higher price for fish, being assured of a brisk
market for the three closed years at largely advanced prices over those of 1901, and would
not be compelled to cut prices as was done in that year. The fishermen and the canners
would strive to make more money out of the run of 1905 if they know the river is to be
closed for the three following years than they otherwise would. I therefore conclude that all
the money they can make out of the sockeye fishing for the next four years will be made from
the pack of 1905.
I submit then that the closing of the Fraser River district to sockeye fishing in 1906,
1907 and 1908 is necessary, because (1) the run of sockeye salmon to the Fraser depends
primarily upon the number of fish propagated in that river's watershed; (2) that the run of a
given year depends upon the number of fish propagated there in the fourth preceding year;
(3) that there were not sufficient fish propagated there in the years 1902, 1903 and 1904 to
produce profitable runs in 1906, 1907 and 1908; (4) only by the means suggested can the
extermination of the sockeye be prevented; (5) if it is not done not only is there grave
danger of the fish being exterminated, but it is almost certain that the canning industry will
be destroyed ; and (6) it will postpone indefinitely their restoration to the river in profitable
numbers.
The history of the salmon fishery of the Sacramento River may be studied with profit by
all who are interested in the salmon fishery of the Fraser at this time, for it convincingly
discloses that at the beginning of the canning industry the fish ran in its waters in great
abundance, but by excessive fishing they were so reduced in numbers that the canners were
unable to obtain sufficient fish to operate their plants, and so few fish were found on its
spawning-beds, that the hatcheries located upon its headwaters could not obtain eggs sufficient
to warrant their operation. However, by the enactment and enforcement of stringent laws
prohibiting the catching of salmon during the greater part of the fall run, sufficient fish were
again enabled to reach the spawning grounds so that the hatcheries were again operated—
obtaining only a few million eggs at first. Later, new and larger hatcheries were built, and
all filled with eggs. The canneries resumed operations. For the last ten years the run has
steadily increased, notwithstanding the shorter season, and the catch in each of the last two
years was the greatest in the history of the river. Notwithstanding the great catch, the
hatcheries, which now have a capacity of 100,000,000 of eggs, could not hold the eggs taken
from the fish that reached the spawning stations. In addition every section of the headwaters of the river were plentifully covered by spawning fish.
The restoration of the salmon to the Sacramento was accomplished by restricting the
fishing and the establishment of hatcheries. Restrictive measures are as necessary as the
establishment of hatcheries, for without the former the latter cannot be operated, yet it is 5 Ed. 7 Fisheries Commissioner's Report. F 7
constantly asserted that the depletion of the run in the Fraser River is due to the failure to
establish large hatcheries. No hatchery system, no matter how extensive, can save the salmon
from extermination if sufficient fish do not reach the spawning grounds each year from which
to obtain eggs. Last year the hatcheries in existence on the Fraser did not obtain more than
25 % of the eggs they had capacity to handle, and this year they obtained less than 12 %.
The remedy for the trouble on the Fraser must be applied at the place where the injury
has been done and is now being done—on the fishing grounds, and that remedy is to prohibit
fishing for salmon during the years 1906, 1907 and 1908.
Seton Lake Hatchery.
The Provincial salmon hatchery at Seton Lake was again operated this season. The
total number of eggs collected was one hundred and fifty per cent, greater than last year,
though the number of sockeye eggs secured was much less. The gain was made in the
number of spring and cohoe eggs taken. Last spring at low water we removed all the
boulders, rocks and snags from the bed of Lake Creek between the hatchery dam and the
lake (a distance of 1,200 feet and an average width of 225 feet), in order that we might
during the fishing season drag a seine there. In July we placed a weir with large V-shaped
openings on the hatchery dam, through which the ascending salmon readily passed, but which
prevented their return to the creek bed below the dam. At the outlet of the lake above the
dam we placed the same impassable weir we used last year. Between these two weirs we
impounded the salmon which came up Lake Creek seeking to enter Seton Lake, until they
were ripe and we had secured their eggs. After the eggs were taken we killed the fish and
gave them to the Indians. As the fish die naturally after spawning this method of disposing
of them prevented fouling the water, and gave the Indians their usual supply of fish for
smoking. During the fall we added a 20-inch pipe line to the water system of the hatchery,
so that we are now able by gravity to take our water supply 100 feet below the surface of
Seton Lake. This was considered advisable as the temperature of the water in Lake Creek
is subject to considerable fluctuation, and liable during October and early November to be
too high to produce the best results from the eggs taken at that time. The first school of
breeding sockeye reached the station the last week in July and the first week in August.
There were five or six hundred of them. They were large, bright-coloured, " hard " fish, that
displayed little of the red colouring that so distinguished the sockeye when ready to deposit
its ova. They were successfully held in the pound between the weirs until the 20th of
August, when the greater proportion of them escaped to the lake above through an opening
made under the head weir. That this opening was the work of designing hands seems
evident, though not proven. It is certain that it was not there at the evening inspection, and
was at once discovered next morning. The fish escaped that night and passed to the streams
at the head of Seton and Anderson Lakes, and were there captured by the Indians. The loss
of these fish, which should have yielded a million or more sockeye eggs, was a bitter
disappointment to Superintendent Ledgerwood and myself. After the accident (?) a night-
watchman was stationed at the weir and no more fish escaped. Approximately the same
number of sockeye came to the station this year as last. The fish came earlier, fully half of
them in July and August, while last year none reached the station until the end of October.
I am of the opinion that the July and August fish which came into our pound entered the
river previous to July 1st, the beginning of the fishing season in Provincial waters. The
Indians began to catch sockeye in the big canyon above Yale the first week in July, and
caught very few after the 20th of that month. The following table gives the total collection of eggs at Seton Lake :—
Sockeye       827,000
Spring    2,446,000
Cohoe      1,579,000
Total   4,852,000
Field Work.
The field work of the Department in the study of the life of the young salmon in fresh
water was not as fruitful of results as had been hoped for on the Fraser, but was most
successful at Rivers Inlet.
By the use of fyke nets placed in the Fraser and Thompson Rivers in 1903, and by
observations along the banks at night, we were able to demonstrate a seaward movement that
year of sockeye of two distinct sizes. This past season we were unable to detect the presence
of either of these schools in the Fraser or Thompson rivers, and therefore conclude that had
there been such a migration we would have found some evidence of it. At the outlet of
Tenas Lillooet Lake, some thirty miles above Harrison Lake, there appeared to be a scattered
movement of two distinct sizes, each averaging smaller in size and number than those observed
in the Fraser and Thompson last year, though the number caught by the fyke nets was too
small from which to make any reliable deductions. The failure of the fyke nets to catch any
young sockeye in the Fraser and Thompson may be regarded as additional proof that there
were few or no ova deposited in those rivers in 1902 and 1903, and certainly not enough to
produce any appreciable effect in maintaining future runs. By the use of the fyke net in the
Wannach River, at the outlet of Oweekayno Lake at the head of Rivers Inlet, its efficiency
and reliability for detecting the seaward movement of young salmon in a river was clearly
demonstrated. A fyke net was placed in Wannach River, a short distance below the Indian
village at the lower end of Oweekayno Lake on April 13th, and until July 1st it was set for
a part of each day. During the remaining seventeen days in April, 1,066 fry were taken, an
average of more than sixty per day. In May the average per day was 1,223, or 38,014 for
the month, and in June we caught 34,257, a daily average of 1,142. The net was so quickly
filled some days in May and June that it was only set for a short time. Two distinct sizes
were here observed, as noticed in the Fraser in 1903. The fry averaged 1^ inches in length.
The yearlings, or larger sized specimens, varied in length from 2J to 3 inches in length, and
some specimens of 5 and 6 inches in length were observed. The greater part of the catch
consisted of fry, the smaller size, due no doubt to the fact that the yearlings were stronger
swimmers than the fry and kept farther from the shore, and thus more easily avoided being
swept into the wings of the net. All the specimens, with the exception of those retained for
examination, were liberated alive, and continued their movement to the sea. Our season's
work at this point fully demonstrated that there was a vast and continuous movement to the
sea of young sockeye from Wannach River from April to July 1st. The record of the catch
shows that the movement was greater from May 22nd to June 16th. The migration had
begun before we had anchored the net, and was pronounced when we closed operations on
July 1st.
The Fishway at Quesnel Dam.
In September last I completed the construction of a large and efficient fishway on the
dam in the south fork of the Quesnel River, at the outlet of Quesnel Lake. This dam has,
since its construction by the Golden River Quesnel Company in 1898, excluded the sockeye
salmon from this great watershed, which annually sought its extensive spawning grounds up  H
ff
a
il
0
0
•4-
0
c+
o
in
M
$
0
"n
n>
0
V
n
c
m
M
it
rn
U.
%
H
M
C
r
3
CQ
d
>>
0
0
s
3
m
^
C
0 0)
I
.p
C8
i
CO
<
<0
Q
Si
0
J
•G
W
%
oi
ID
S*
w
St
3
£
a
fc
fc
0
0
+4
r*
4)
<
0
as
2.
X
c
(fl
w
E
4)"
0
D
si
Z
e
<
0
w
■P
0
0
0
<
a.
a
ta
£
>
0
i
CO  5 Ed. 7 Fisheries Commissioner's Report. F 9
to the time the dam was built. As has been stated in a previous report this dam was constructed for the purpose of shutting off the waters of Quesnel Lake in the fall of the year, in
order that mining operations could be carried on in the bed of the Quesnel River. After
conducting operations for two seasons the company became insolvent, and the dam is now the
property of the Consolidated Cariboo Hydraulic Mining Co.
The dam is constructed on the segment of a circle having a radius of 460 feet, is 18 feet
high, and from abutment to abutment is 763 feet long. At the north end of the dam is
constructed a race 124 feet wide by 382 feet long, with a gradient of only six inches. At the
head of this race are nine 12-foot discharge gates through which the ordinary overflow of the
lake is carried off. The water in the race varies in depth according to the season, but at the
time of the sockeye run it averages four or five feet in depth, and has a velocity of 12 to 14
feet per second. This fishway was built in the race by constructing a wall of hewn timbers
running parallel with and 26 feet from its eastern wall On the floor of the race between
these walls, at each 25 feet of the entire length of the race were placed hewn timbers two feet
high extending from each wall upward, and at an angle of 45 degrees and meeting in the
centre, constituting a cross-wall or riffle which retards the flow of the water and causes a
series of counter-currents so as to permit the fish to easily pass through it. At the head of
the fishway are placed two nine-foot gates. During the time the sockeye are running, only
one of these gates is opened, so that but twelve feet of water will enter the 26 feet wide
fishway. The annexed sketches and photographs fully illustrate the construction and working
of this model fishway, and from which a better understanding of the plan can be formed than
from words. The work was done by local men employed by the day at a total cost of $4,140.
Mr. J. B. Hobson, the well-known engineer and manager of the Consolidated Cariboo
Hydraulic Mining Co., rendered me valuable assistance in its construction.
No breeding sockeye were at Quesnel dam this year, but in the big pool at the lower end
of the race there were a few spring salmon, charr and trout, which were seen to enter the fishway shortly after the water was turned on for the first time, and by passing to the lake above,
demonstrated that the fishway will enable any kind of fish to enter the lake.
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
JOHN PEASE BABCOCK,
Fisheries Commissioner.
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1901/.. F 10
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
1905
THE PACK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SALMON, SEASON 1904,
Furnished the Department by the Fraser River Canners' Association.
PACK BY CANNERIES—FRASER RIVER.
Cannery.
Sockeyes.
Red and White
Springs.
Humpbacks.
Cohoes.
Grand Total.
British Columbia Packers' Association—
2,090
1,624
2,667
1,521
1,564
1,258
6,881
5,540
2,006
3,717
3,522
5,811
3,842
3,067
8,748
1,412
2,632
3,326
2,992
3,185
1,550
2,057
2,166
2,090
1,728
104
43
98
260
33
2,228
1,400
79
S3
2,753
1,019
1,824
1,291
10,679
23,885
2,085
Celtic                            ..    .
1,570
16,945
841
4,558
3,522
13,233
5,729
Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co., Ltd.—
543
7,379
821
Malcolm, Cannon & Co.—
1,066
3,067    -
15,248
1,582
J. H. Todd & Sons-
1,150
170
197
272
98
2,178
428
42
159
5,350
British Columbia Canning Co., Ltd. —
14
2 843
Canadian Canning Co., Ltd.—
3,598
3,090
11,851
St. Mungo Canning Co.—
St. Mungo	
National Packing Co.—
6,488
2,575
3,065
596
Great Northern Cannery—
C. S. Windsor—
2,911
72,688
9,482
1,066
45,067 5 Ed. 7
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
F 11
The Pack of British Columbia Salmon, Season 1904. — Continued.
PACK BY CANNERIES—NORTHERN POINTS.
Skeena River-
British Columbia Packers' Association—
Balmoral—  	
Cunningham's	
Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co., Ltd.—
B. A. & N. Pacific	
J. H. Todd & Sons-
Inverness	
British Columbia Canning Co., Ltd.—
Oceanic	
Wallace Bros., Ltd.—
Claxton   	
Carlisle Canning Co., Ltd.—
Carlisle	
Skeena River Co., Ltd.—
Skeena River Co	
Cassiar Packing Co.—
Cassiar	
Alexandria Canning Co. —
Alexandria    ,.
Philip Jacobsen—
Ladysmith	
Rivers Inlet—
British Columbia Packers' Association-
Brunswick    	
Wadhams	
A. B. C. Packing Co., Ltd.—
Good Hope	
British Columbia Canning Co., Ltd.—
R. I. and Victoria	
Naas River—
Federation Brand Salmon Canning
Mill Bay	
Naas Harbour	
Lowe Inlet—
British Columbia Packers' Association-
Lowe Inlet 	
Dean Channel-
R. Draney—
Namu	
Kimsquit ..
Bella Coola—
British Columbia Packers' Association-
Bella Coola	
Smith's Inlet—
Wm. Hickey Canning Co., Ltd.-
Hickey 	
Alert Bay—
British Columbia Packers' Association-
Alert Bay	
West Coast Vancouver Island—
Clayoquot Sound Canning Co., Ltd.-
Clayoquot 	
Alberni Packing Co.—
Alberni 	
Observatory Inlet—
Pacific Northern Packing Co.
Per J. Wallace—
Pacific Northern 	
CJiiathiaska Oove-
Pidcock Bros.—
Quathiaska
Total
Sockeyes.
i,218
5,824
003
884
717
225
797
367
384
415
570
25,914
28,287
18,573
21,088
6,194
8,806
10,120
3,400
7,096
3,740
2,905
3,430
8,095
487
250,538
Red and White
Springs.
4,122
1,342
2,384
870
2,630
3,635
770
1,456
452
1,704
1,356
2,105
252
1,336
50
25,939
Humpbacks.
3,132
3,279
7,248
2,801
3,630
1,957
621
577
530
35,030
Cohoes.
701
495
1,205
4,800
889
185
332
360
486
595
317
104
109
145
667
1,030
2,482
773
1,557
1,050
37
1,242
983
Grand Total.
20,173
11,940
30,840
15,554
21,541
17,924
10,700
10,813
7,229
4,335
3,820
26,018
28,298
18,743
21,233
8,966
10,119
5,882
8,118
6,130
3,955
4,803
10,502
2,050 F 12
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
1905
The Pack of British Columbia Salmon, Season 1904.—Continued.
THE TOTAL PACK.
Sockeyes.
72,688
250,538
Spring.
9,482
25,939
Humpbacks.
Cohoes.
Grand Total.
1,066
35,030
45,667
26,484
128,903
336,991
Grand Total for 1904 	
323,226
35,421
36,096
71,151
465,894
DESCRIPTION OF PACK.
Pack by Shapes and Districts.
l-lt>.
Tails.
12,817
5,449
J-ft.
Tails.
1-lb.
Flats.
12,543
1,449
1,066
10,862
30,109
1,487*
375
4,762
11
i-lb.
Flats.
1-lb.
Ovals.
J-lb.
Ovals.
Squats.
220
98
Total.
Grand
Total
Districts.
Fraser River—
39,616
2,486
9,558
15,862
112
7,492
72,688
9,482
1,066
45,667
93,404
20,621
30,529
10,315
93,862
11
61
358
15,000
2,357
31
1,697
10,120
23,746
41,075
19,575
29,042
9,940
76,014
1,051
1,706
3,076
4,652
934
128,903
Skeena River—
154,869
Rivers Inlet—
10,015
61
358
10,464
2,197
81
1,697
10,120
Cohoes	
94,292
Naas River-
4,536
160
19,085
Lowe Inlet—
611
10,496
249
3,255
3,740
775
4,379
5,704
1,319
8,254
1,557
8,005
540
625
1,242
6,335
1,336
1,087
287
50
630
928
611
10,496
249
3,255
3,740
775
4,379
7,680
1,319
3,254
1,557
8,095
540
625
1,242
6,335
1,336
1,087
487
50
530
983
10,731
Dean Channel-
14,000
Bella Coola—
8,894
Smith's Inlet—
1,976
Alert Bay—
6,130
Observatory Inlet—
10,502
West Coast Vancouver Island—
8,758
Quathiaska Cove—
200
6,283
55
2,050
7,492
Total	
298,980
67,200
79,875
5,746
318
465,894
465,894 5 Ed. 7
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
F 13
The Pack of British Columbia Salmon, Season 1904.— Continued.
PACKED BY DISTRICTS, PREVIOUS YEARS.
1903
1902
327,095
154,875 -
28,218
7,538
3,608
70,298
4,867
4,966
10,806
6,604
7,907
5,200
1901
990,252
126,092
14,790
6,451
5,500
66,840
4,158
11,460
4,629
5,984
1900
1899
1898
1897
1896
1895
Fraser River	
Skeena River	
237,125
98,669
12,100
10,196
316,522
128,529
18,238
10,834
4,138
75,413
4,849
10,106
9,182
7,602
510,383
10S.026
19,443
10,142
256,101
81,234
18,953
10,312
860,459
65,905
20,847
10,666
356,984
100,140
14,649
10,395
400,368
67,797
19,550
S,681
Rivers Inlet	
69,390
9,733
11,967
3,542
8,818
71,079
104,711
40,207
107,468
58,579
Namu and Kimsquit	
7,200
3,470
2,694
4,357
8,602
4,434
3,987
2,840
5,107
3,000
5,100
8,500
4,350
3,320
6,140
5,994
473,674
Observatory Inlet   	
1,236,156
585,413
732,437
Total	
625,982
484,161
1,015,477
601,570
566,395
SHIPMENTS IN DETAIL—1904.
o   .
g £
H
•ri
a
«!
&£
H
To Liverpool
Direct.
fl   .
o.S =
O 4^   O
cS ° fl
.  *- -5
o*^
H
c
•eg
O.S o
H
U
H
78,421
11,158
5
s>5 c
5"3"3
o "i
H
Ij
cj C
■^■^
o
"5
CQ
"ci
O
fl
Jfl
fl
O
M
o
o
c3
4=
C
H
•e
G
o
British Columbia Packers' Association	
Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co., Ltd ...
' 4,292
2,000
2,055
14,946
2,070
38,502
1,367
3,301
3,915
7,824
6,688
13,853
1,812
7,034
1,913
2,166
i5|315
22,755
10,687
1,500
1,302
923
320
4,250
614
587
850
1,283
17,775
23,105
2,588
1,814
164,696
66,338
8,796
J. H. Todd & Sons	
22,250
20,262
1,925
916
1,220
32,384
6,688
Federation B. S. C. Co., Ltd	
3,159
148
1,825
546
3,251
159
940
2,801
4,385
1,957
1,100
455
672
2,050
1,000
1,704
19,085
4,563
1,000
2,051
11,851
5,164
C. S. Windsor	
546
3,650
18;
40
1,995
1,010
1,102
2,911
17,924
10,700
10,144
6,797
5,273
1,155
888
7,626
10,813
7,229
4,384
4.500
7,180
Robert Draney       	
William Hickey Canning Co	
674
100
14,000
500
7,680
3,500
1,000
2,326
2,820
595
3,955
Alberni Packing Co., Ltd	
3,13i
613
4,803
•10,502
7,563
621
2,050
3,820
4,385
1,415
Total    	
60,844
3,070
101,885
15,315
160,258
37,050
8,278
15,919
68,275
465,894
SHIPMENTS IN DETAIL, PREVIOUS YEARS.
1903
1902
95,711
1,700
290,913
1901
206,344
19,236
676,065
46,831
1900
51,095
10,143
357,848
60,090
1899
1898
1897
1896
1895
England—
24,590
461
162,649
33,358
150,670
6,733
365,151
26,128
79,598
5,687
242,437
8,050
326,966
4,957
407,738
38,373
182,253
9,076
322,364
11,405
96,459
Liverpool direct	
Liverpool overland	
256,301
65,647
18,750
152,498
35,463
1,472
10,344
34,089
6,000
135,806
10,355
627
5,156
79,714
3,350
131,875
38,022
13,538
19,966
180,939
3,802
79,171
25,903
56,237
20,309
20,815
19,862
87,881
9,644
439
1,183
29,380
130,815
28,579
226
4,823
74,000
29,590
114,736
41,518
4,246
11,945
12,079
231
51,041
11,600
2,128
3,844
7,850
79,288
8,832
4,326
25,962
473,674
625,982
1,236,156
585,413
601,570
Total	
732,437
484,161
1,015,477
566,395 F 14
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
1905
The Pack of British Columbia Salmon, Season 1904.—Concluded.
BRITISH COLUMBIA SALMON FLEET, SEASON 1904.
Names op Vessels.
By Steamer
to
London
Direct.
By Steamer
to
Liverpool
Direct.
By Steamer
with Option
London or
Liverpool.
Total.
34,524
20,641
5,679
33,539
40,908
6,054
19,118
2,266
5,975
9,340
74,038
70,889
11,733
19,118
2,266
Total   .  .
60,844
101,885
15,315
178,044
VICTORIA, B. C.
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, I.S.O., V.D., Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0064279/manifest

Comment

Related Items