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REPORT OF THE FISHERIES COMMISSIONER FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR 1905. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1906

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 Printed by authority of the Legislative Assembly.
REPORT
 OP   THE	
FISHERIES COMMISSIONER FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR THE YEAR 1905.
JOHN   PEASE   BABCOCK,   Commissioner.  FISHERIES COMMISSIONER'S REPORT FOR 1905.
To the Honourable Charles Wilson, K. C,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B. C.
Sir;—I have the honour to report that during the year 1905 I have made a thorough
inspection of the fishing grounds of the Fraser River District on both sides of the International
Line, and of the watershed of the Fraser River. My inspection of the Fraser River watershed included every section where in former years the salmon were known to spawn in numbers,
except the Birkenhead River section at the head of Lillooet Lake, which I was unable to find
time to visit.
This year's inspection, like that of each of the past four years, was made to ascertain as
accurately as possible the number of adult salmon which reached and deposited their ova upon
the spawning grounds. In a previous report I have called attention to the fact that " The
future prosperity of the salmon fishery of the Fraser depends primarily upon the numbers of
breeding fish which reach and successfully deposit their spawn in its headwaters each year.
It is there we must look to find the best measures for their perpetuation, and to test the
effectiveness of the regulations now in force."
It is a matter of common knowledge to all concerned that the run of sockeye salmon to
the Fraser this year was large. The history of the runs of sockeye salmon to the Fraser River
led those interested to anticipate the large run of this season. Every cannery on the river, in
fact every one on both sides of the International Line, had made extensive preparations to
handle the fish, and the pack was fully up to expectations. The catch is set forth in the
cannery pack which is attached to this report. The pack of sockeye salmon in the Fraser
District of the Province was 837,489 cases, and in the Puget Sound District 847,122 cases; a
total of 1,684,611 cases of sockeye salmon which were running to the Fraser. While the pack
of this year does not equal that of four years ago, it should be remembered that the pack of
1901 was by far the largest in the history of the industry.
Beginning with the first appearance of the sockeye in Juan de Fuca Strait, early in July,
I followed the run over the entire fishing grounds, and up through the channels of the Fraser
to the spawning grounds. Knowing that the run of sockeye on the fishing grounds this year
was so abundant during the first fourteen days of August (which included two weekly closed
periods of 36 hours), that the fishermen and canners found difficulty in handling the catch,
and that for four days of that time the fishermen were limited to two hundred to the boat by
the majority of the canners, I was not surprised to find that the number of breeding sockeye
upon the spawning grounds over the entire watershed was very great, and that the five
hatcheries operating there were filled to their utmost capacity with sockeye eggs. Every lake
and tributary stream of the entire Fraser District was abundantly sown with sockeye spawn
this year. Lakes and streams which had been absolutely barren of breeding sockeye in each
of the past two years were thoroughly seeded this year. A comparison of the abundantly
seeded spawning grounds and the well filled hatcheries of this year, with the unsown, unproductive spawning beds and the empty hatcheries of the past two years, should be an impressive
object lesson to the fishermen, the canners, and the general public. H 4 Fisheries Commissioner's Report. 190G
It cannot be said that the number of fish which reached the spawning grounds this year
equals that of four years ago—the last big run—for convincing evidence is available from
several sections to show that the run was not so large. There is also abundant evidence to
prove that the run to Shuswap Lake section this year was greater than four years ago. In no
section except the Shuswap Lake District was the run greater than in 1901.
It is practically impossible to determine accurately whether the number of fish which
reached the spawning grounds this year equalled that of 1901, or not, because the number of
fish distributed over the entire watershed of the Fraser District can only be approximately
determined where the numbers are so great. But even if the run was less, it may reasonably
be claimed that the product of the year's spawning will equal that of 1901, because in addition
to the ninety millions of eggs hatched in the three hatcheries built since that year, the thousands
of miles of the Quesnel Lake section were abundantly sown this year by the countless thousands
of breeding sockeye which for many days passed through the fishway constructed in the race
of the dam at the outlet of Quesnel Lake by this Department last year. This territory in
1901 was rendered barren because the sockeye were denied access to those waters by the
impassable dam above mentioned, and in consequence died in great numbers in the pools
below the dam before spawning.
The successful opening up of the great and. almost boundless spawning grounds of
Quesnel Lake section to the breeding sockeye is a matter of great importance to the fisheries
of the Fraser District. With the knowledge that the Quesnel section and all the other
spawning grounds were well seeded, and that each of the five hatcheries located on the watershed were filled with eggs to their full capacity, we may safely assume that the Fraser River-
District was thoroughly stocked this year, and that the run in the future to result from this
year's spawning promises well to all concerned.
As a result of my four yeais' study of the fisheries of the Fraser, I am convinced that the
perpetuation of this great industry can be insured beyond all question only in case such fishing
regulations are enacted and enforced as will permit a sufficient number of adult fish to reach
the spawning grounds each year to carry out their work of procreation.
I wish here, by way of emphasis, to call attention to the fact, as I did in my report of
190'2, that " no regulations that cover every season alike can be made that will adequately
meet the remarkably varying conditions known to exist on the Fraser. There should be
seasons and regulations provided for the river applicable to the years that are known as those
of abundance, and others and more restrictive ones provided for the years of the poor runs.
Our fishermen should be permitted to take only that proportion of the run which is in excess
of the number necessary to the perpetuation of their species."
An abundance of fish reached the spawning grounds this year, because such great
numbers passed from the ocean through the fishing waters that the canners could not handle
all the fishermen could catch. For at least four days of the season the canners were obliged
to place a limit on the number of sockeye they would purchase from each fisherman. The
majority of the canners placed the limit at two hundred. During these days there was hardly
a boat in the district that did not catch its two hundred in one drift. The result was that
very few of the nets were in the water for more than a few hours out of every twenty-four.
Many fish were thus enabled to pass the fishing grounds.
The river was congested with fish on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, August 2nd, 3rd
and 4th. From 6 a. m. of Saturday, August 6th, until 6 p. m. of Sunday, August 7th, fishing
was discontinued, and the salmon had a clear way in our own waters. From 6 p. m. of
Saturday, August 6th, to 6 a. m. of Monday, August 8th, in the contiguous waters in the 6 Ed. 7 Fisheries Commissioner's Report. H 5
State of Washington the same state of affairs prevailed. The vast numbers which passed up
the river during those hours cannot be estimated. Upon resuming operations on Sunday
night, August 7th, our fishermen found the river still filled with fish, their nets catching all
the canners could handle. Under such conditions it is not a violent supposition to suppose
that great numbers passed above the fishing limits and thence to the spawning grounds. I
followed this run up through the great canyon of the Fraser, above Yale, and I have never
seen a salmon river so congested with fish. If these conditions obtained every year it is
evident there would no longer be any difficulty for sufficient fish to pass the fishing grounds
and re ich the spawning beds. I do not, however, deem it fitting or proper for me, in this
report, to enter into a discussion of the matter of regulations, since I am a member of a Commission which was appointed by the Dominion Government to inquire into and report upon
these very matters, together with many others concerning the fisheries of the Province. The
sessions of this Commission are now in progress, and its report will be made to the Dominion
Government within a year, which, it is anticipated, will deal exhaustively with all questions
concerning the fisheries. A similar commission has been appointed by Governor Mead, of
the State of Washington, to confer with the Dominion Commission. As both the Province
and the State of Washington are equally concerned in conserving the fisheries of the Fraser,
it is hoped a satisfactory adjustment may be reached as to the regulations which each shall
enact.
The Quesnel Dam and Fishway.
During the summer of 1904, it will be remembered that this Department constructed a
fishway on the dam built by the Golden River Quesnel Company in 1898 at the outlet of
Quesnel Lake. Drawings and photographs of this fishway were attached to my report of last
year. During the spring floods of this year, when the gates of the race of this dam were
raised, the division wall of the fishway was destroyed. As soon as I was informed of this
fact, Mr. F. C. Gamble, engineer of the Lands and Works Department, and myself, at once
proceeded to the dam.
The fishway proper had not been injured. After watching the water pass over it we
determined that there was no necessity of restoring the destroyed wall. We substituted
instead a much lower one, which proved to be entirely adequate. The fishway enabled every
fish which reached the dam this year to pass to the water above. The sockeye reached the
dam in good numbers on August 10th. From that date until the end of August enormous
numbers came up the river and passed, without hindrance, through the fishway. I visited this
district during the last days of August, first going to the Horsefly River, one of the largest
tributary streams of the Quesnel Lake. I found the river filled with spawning fish which
must, necessarily, have passed through this fishway. Residents of the village of Horsefly and
vicinity, along the river, told me that it was the first year since the dam was finished that
they had seen any considerable number of sockeye. Some of these people told me that they
had not seen a single sockeye in the Horsefly River since the dam was closed until this year.
From the Horsefly River I went to the dam and saw the fish freely passing through the fishway. There were no more fish congregated in the big pool at the lower end of the race than
were to be found in any other of the big pools of Quesnel River below the dam, and those
which reached there passed steadily up into the lake. The dam did not obstruct the passage
of any fish.
Mr. Gavin Hamilton, a well-known resident of the District, and at one time a factor of
the Hudson's Bay Company, resided at the dam during the summer, and has furnished me
with an interesting diary kept by him of the run of salmon which entered Quesnel Lake this H 6 Fisheries Commissioner's Report. 1906
year. He describes the run of sockeye from the 10th of August until September 1st as being
truly amazing : " There were days when the fish were two or three feet deep going through
the ladder.    It ran red with them."
Since 1898 the majority of the sockeye which passed up to the Quesnel dam died below it
without spawning, being unable to pass the race.
Among many persons interested in the salmon fishing industry there has grown up a
more or less prevalent theory that only those salmon which are hatched on the spawning beds
of a stream return to the same place at maturity to deposit their eggs, and which theory is, for
the purpose of brevity, often called " the home stream" theory. According to this theory,
there could be no run of sockeye to the Quesnel Lake District this year, because no spawn to
produce a run had been deposited there since 1898, access to the spawning grounds above the
dam having been denied them, and there being no available spawning places below. The
existence of the great run there this year will certainly be a difficult matter for the "home
stream " theorist to explain.
I regard the restoration of the thousands of miles (Mr. J. B. Hobson estimates that there
are two thousand miles of streams tributary to Quesnel Lake) of spawning grounds of the
Quesnel Lake District to the sockeye salmon as of the utmost importance to the fishing
interests. Its effect upon the future of this industry, in the years when the fish are permitted
to reach the lake, must be of incalculable value.
If in the four years of its existence the Fisheries Department of the Province had
accomplished nothing else of benefit to the fisheries of the Fraser than the restoration of the
Quesnel spawning grounds to the sockeye salmon, it had done sufficient to compensate the
Province for all the moneys expended in its maintenance.
The September Run of Sockeye.
One of the most interesting and unusual features of the sockeye run in the Fraser River
District this year was the great number which appeared in the river about the 15th of
September. From that date until the end of that month the run was, in the opinion of many
careful and experienced observers on the lower river, as great as the run in August. The
fishermen and the canners were unable to handle the fish. Comparatively few of the canners
oared to use them, as they claimed they were soft and unfitted for canning. I visited the
lower river during the run and examined the fish. They appeared to me to be unsuited for
canning, being far advanced towards spawning. Their scales were deeply imbedded in the
flesh, and covered with mucus ; their jaws were hooked and distorted, and their outward
colour indicated that they had been in fresh water for a considerable time. As I have above
stated, comparatively few of our canners packed any of these fish. The fishermen sold the
most of their catch to American canners. The great majority of the fishermen with whom I
discussed this feature of the run were of the opinion that while there may always be found a
few sockeye running in the last of September of the big year runs, they had never seen such
fish in the river in such vast numbers in any previous year after the 15th of August. I
followed this September run to the spawning grounds. Notwithstanding their poor condition,
they passed up through the great canyon of the Fraser, above Yale, and on reaching the
confluence of the Fraser and Thompson Rivers almost all passed up the Thompson to Shuswap
Lake. Very few of the run went up the Fraser above this point. So far as I have been able
to learn, this is the first year in which any considerable number of sockeye has been noticed
in the Shuswap Lake section after October 1st. 6 Ed. 7
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
H 7
Mr. David S. Mitchell, the competent and observant superintendent of the Dominion
hatchery at Salmon Arm, assures me that this late run was equal in numbers to the great run
of August of this year. There was no similar run to the Shuswap Lake section in October of
1901. In fact, very few were seen there at that time. In October of 1901 there was a big
run of sockeye to the Seton Lake District, but there was no noticeable run there this year in
that month.
Seton Lake Hatchery.
I am gratified to report that the season's operations at the Seton Lake hatchery were
entirely satisfactory. During the season we secured and successfully placed in the hatchery
44,150,000 sockeye eggs, and 1,465,000 spring salmon eggs, a total of 45,615,000 eggs. The
sockeye began arriving at the hatchery on July 28th. Approximately four hundred reached
the station on that day, and for the next few days they came irregularly. On August 4th
the run increased, and from that date there was a steady stream passing into the retaining
pond, at the outlet of the lake, until the end of September, when the run slackened.
On August 24th the retaining pond became so crowded with fish that a section of the
upper weir was opened, and upwards of 40,000 fine fish were permitted to pass into Seton
Lake. On August 26th we again opened the weir and permitted 50,000 more fish to pass
through for the same reason. These 90,000 salmon were prevented from leaving Seton Lake
by means of a weir placed in Portage Creek, at the head of the lake, without the use of which
they would have passed on into Anderson Lake and escaped from our control.
The release of this large number of sockeye did not sufficiently relieve the crowded
condition of the retaining pond at the hatchery. The sockeye continued to arrive in large
numbers at the retaining pond, and as we already had as many fish there impounded as were
necessary to fill the hatchery with eggs, we opened the weir in Portage Creek to permit the
fish there congregated to pass into Anderson Lake and its tributaries, where they afterwards
spawned naturally. After these fish had passed out of Seton Lake, we again, on September
5th, opened the weir at the retaining pond, and allowed 70,000 more fish to enter Seton Lake.
More than 200,000 sockeye passed into our retaining pond during the past season,
together with many thousands of humpbacks, and a few hundred large spring salmon in prime
condition.
We secured the bulk of our sockeye eggs, and all the eggs of the spring salmon, from the
fish held in the retaining pond at the hatchery. The balance of our sockeye eggs were taken
at the head of Seton Lake by means of seines drawn below the weir placed near the mouth of
Portage Creek.
The following table gives the dates and number of eggs taken at Seton Lake hatchery
this season :— H 8
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
1906
Recoed of Salmon Eggs Collected at Seton Lake Hatchery Season or 1905.
Date, 1905.
Sockeye
(O. nerka).
Spring
(O. Ischawylscha).
8th	
30,000
110,000
10,000
1,090,000
1,191,000
1,567,000
1,872,000
2,134,000
1,414,000
2,573,000
2,553,000
1,954,000
2,286,000
1,457,000
1,577,000
805,000
4,403,000
2,787,000
2,605,000
2,139,000
1,948,000
1,347,000
894,000
886,000
682,000
848,000
728,000
651,000
530,000
433,000
304,000
212,000
130,000
10th	
12th	
13th	
14th	
15th	
16th	
17th	
18th	
19th	
„   20th	
„   21st     	
22nd	
23rd	
„   24th	
25th	
26th	
„   27th	
32,000
28th	
30th	
16,000
28,000
3rd	
24,000
4th	
44,000
5th	
7th	
28,000
144,000
„    9th	
182,000
11th	
13th	
„   15th	
240,000
198,000
224,000
17th	
20th  	
„   24 th	
105,000
90,000
110,000
Total	
44,150,000
1,465,000
The collection and care of these eggs necessitated the employment of a considerable
number of men. Thirty-three white men and boys, and twenty-six Indian men and women
were on the pay list of October.    Thereafter the force was gradually reduced.
The accompanying photographs will serve better than words to explain the method of
fishing, and the taking and handling of the eggs.
The eggs began hatching in November.
The hatchery building, though 210 feet long by 40 feet wide, was not sufficiently large to
accommodate all the young fish until they had grown large enough to be safely liberated.
The first thirty millions hatched were transferred to a nursery constructed in the creek bottom
some quarter of a mile below the hatchery building.
A brief description of the nursery at the Seton Lake hatchery is warranted from the
fact that it is quite unlike any other nursery known to me. In order that a clear understanding may be had of its construction, I attach hereto a number of photographs taken for
the purpose of illustration. The waters of Lake Creek, a quarter of a mile below the hatchery,
are divided by an island into two channels. Across the head of the wider of these channels
we constructed a dam which served to shut off all the water and leave its bed dry. The bed
thus exposed was approximately 1,400 feet long by an average width of 70 feet.    It was 6 Ed. 7
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
H 9
covered with boulders and coarse gravel. Every kind of fish remaining in the bed of the
stream was then removed and we built at intervals nineteen cross-walls with the heavy
boulders. At the lower end another dam was constructed through or over which the preda-
ceous fish in the main stream below could not pass. The water was then turned back into the
channel and made to flow through wire screens of mesh sufficiently small to prevent any fish
from entering the nursery. The cross-walls of rocks backed up the water in the channel
leaving twenty large pools of an average depth of two or more feet. Into this nursery the
young sockeye were cs^efully placed. The nursery being free from all forms of predatory fish
the young salmon are fully protected from their greatest enemies. During the day care is
exercised to prevent their destruction by water birds, chiefly the mischievous but very
interesting and tuneful water-ouzel which is so common along the streams of this vicinity
during the winter. We consider the nursery one of the most valuable adjuncts of the Seton
Lake hatchery. Without its aid we could not have successfully handled this year the large
amount of fry hatched there. These young salmon in the waters of the nursery are reared as
nearly in a state of nature as could well be conceived. There exists an abundance of natural
food, and as soon as the fry become free-swimming fish the dams will be removed or opened
and the little salmon will be at liberty to go where they please. All but ten millions of the
fry hatched at the hatchery this year will be reared in the nursery.
Spring Salmon (0. tschawytscha).
The value of the spring salmon is increasing each year, and every effort should be made
to enlarge the run of this fish, as well as to adopt measures for extending their propagation in
the Fraser River district. It is well known that this species of our salmon does not, as a rule,
spawn in the tributaries of the Fraser which head in the larger lakes. The present hatcheries
are all located on lake-fed streams, so that a very limited number of spring salmon spawn is
taken and hatched at them. From investigations which I have made in the past two years I
am satisfied that a suitable site for a spring salmon hatchery exists on a tributary of Bridge
River, which could easily be operated by the force employed at Seton Lake hatchery.
Attached hereto is the pack of the salmon of the Province made at each cannery for the
year 1905.
I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
JOHN PEASE BABCOCK,
Fisheries Commissioner.
Victoria, December Slst, 1905. H 10
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
1906
THE PACK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SALMON, SEASON 1905.
Furnished the Department by the Fraser River Canners' Association.
PACK BY CANNERIES—FRASER RIVER.
Districts and Canneries.
Sockeyes.
Red and White
Springs.
Humpbacks.
Cohoes.
Grand Total.
North Arm District—
72,420
38,239
16,480
133,213
44,522
72,004
28,500
27,407
21,753
12,602
9,100
22,851
76,982
42,130
29,879
45,106
15,940
29,190
12,944
11,079
26,770
18,597
2,732
1,000
26,149
73
72,493
19
242
38,500
16,480
143,429
48,427
79,116
32,500
J. H. Todd & Sons	
Steveston District—
1,337
2,499
594
8,879
1,406
3,768
4,000
53
ABO Packing Co., Ltd	
2,750
4
22
52
12,502
9,100
2',851
Canoe Pass District—
37
88
593
1,057
1,497
77,612
ABC Packing Co., Ltd	
B. C. Canning Co., Ltd	
43,275
31,376
45,349
15.940
Westminster District—
243
664""
ABO Packing Co., Ltd	
St. Mungo Canning Co., Ltd	
5,508
35,362
12,944
11,079
26,770
18,870
2,732
1,000
Outlying Canneries—
260
Northern Canning Co., Ltd   	
13
Victoria District—
J. H. Todd & Sons	
3,989
3,304
837,489
5,507
30,836 6 Ed. 7                          Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
H 11
The Pack of British Columbia Salmon, Season 190&.—Continued.
PACK BY CANNERIES—NORTHERN POINTS.
Districts and Canneries,
Sockeyes.
Red and White
Springs.
Humpbacks.
1,223
3,100
1,769
1,431
Cohoes.
1,428
661
422
899
1,699
579
373
866
320
Grand Total.
Skbena River District—
B. C. Packers' Association	
ABC Packing- Co.. Ltd   	
J. H. Todd & Sons 	
B. 0. Canning- Co., Ltd	
Wallace Bros. P. Co., Ltd	
18,122
12,828
10,601
11,950
13,495
6,745
7,538
2,063
1,375
45,598
10,443
20,730
8,396
7,585
8,481
7,683
12,003
8,654
7,912
8,728
3,020
1,880
1,324
3,354
3,304
1,106
2,241
1,511
3,042
808
1,052
180
80
33
238
2,066
645
629
24,127
16,793
15,229
16,859
18,136
8,366
8,719
3,981
1,875
45,678
16,476
20,968
12,677
10,201
9,847
8,056
13,890
10,029
7,942
8,728
4,596
4,813
2,338
Rivers Inlet District—
ABC Packing- Co., Ltd	
Naas River District—
Federation B, S. C. Co	
Pt. Nelson C. & S. Co., Ltd	
Lowe Inlet District-
733
1,107
1,482
864
737
373
1,639
Dean Channel District—
Bella Coola District—
200
1,375
48
Smith's Inlet District—
Alert Bat District—
Olayoquot District—
Clayoquofc S. C. Co., Ltd	
Alberni District—
73
2,792
123
1,235
20
268
141
871
Quatiiiaska District—
Northern Canneries Totals	
243,184
22,862
10,666
13,622
290,324
T]
IE  TOTAL
PACK.
Sockeyes.
Spring.
Humpbacks.
Cohoes.
Totals.
877,136
290,324
837,489
243,184
5,507
22,952
3,304
10,666
30,836
13,622
Grand Total for 1905	
1,080,673
28,359
13,970
44,458
1,167,460 H 12
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
1906
The Pack of British Columbia Salmon, Season 1908.—Continued.
DESCRIPTION  OF PACK.
Pack by Districts and Shapes.
Districts and Kinds.
North Arm District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and vVhite Springs.
Humpbacks	
Oohoes 	
Steveston District—
Sockeyes    	
Red and White Springs.
Humpbacks	
Cohoes 	
Canoe Pass District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and White Springs.
Cohoes	
Westminster District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and White Springs.
Cohoes 	
Victoria District—
Sockeyes 	
Cohoes	
Outlying Canneries—
Sockeyes 	
Humpbacks	
Cohoes	
Skeena River District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and White Springs.
Humpbacks	
Cohoes	
Rivers Inlet District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and White Springs.
Naas River District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and White Springs.
Humpbacks	
Cohoes 	
Lowe Inlet District—
Sockeyes 	
Cohoes    ...
Dean Channel District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and White Springs.
Humpbacks	
Cohoes 	
Bella Coola District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and White Springs.
Smith's Inlet District—
Sockeyes    	
Alert Bay District—
Sockeyes 	
Clayoquot District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and White Springs.
Humpbacks	
Cohoes 	
Alberni District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and White Springs.
Cohoes 	
Quatiiiaska District—
Sockeyes 	
Red and White Springs.
Humpbacks	
Cohoes 	
Total.
1 -lb.
Tails.
1,251
'•242
108.
3,
5,687
61
!,135
i,937
(,989
f,004
260
13
3,148
2,774
7,523
7,087
3,387
306
1,539
S,340
1,840
i,083
r,6S3
373
,003
200
48
,639
,654
,375
i,020
73
.,235
268
,880
!,792
141
604
123
20
871
i-lb.
falls.
1-tb.
Flats.
:,133
2
45
154,256
112
2,750
821
76,407
95
1,838
71,448
77
941
10,313
2:1,502
59
11,805
45
432,654
£-ib.
Flats.
29,755
17
72,819
53
4,544
50,185
30
341
35,059
769
2,432
20,051
11,017
2,923
lib.
Ovals.
i-lb.
Ovals.
2,921
522
2,678
8,186
Squats.
4,272
371
4
2,
18
148,
3;
114
5
26.
3,
49.
,139
19
242
73
,852
,456
,802
,106
991
125
,147
,259
907
84/
14,!
',523
',247
!,771
351
1,462
1,340
1,840
i,0S3
',683
373
!,003
200
48
1,639
,654
375
942
,728
,020
73
,235
268
.,880
!,792
141
1,324
123
20
871
District
Total.
127,473
152,263
120,674
30,138
40,372
114,085
83,122
32,725
8,056
13,890
10,029
7,912
8,728
4,596
4,813
Grand Total 1,167,460 6 Ed. 1
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
H 13
The  Pack  of British  Columbia  Salmon, Season  190S.—Continued.
PACK BY DISTRICTS, PREVIOUS YEARS.
1904
1903
237,125
98,669
12,100
10,196
1902
327,095
154,875
23,218
7,583
3,608
70,298
4.867
4,966
10,806
5,604
7,907
5,200
1901
1900
1899
1898
1897
1896
356,984
100,140
14,640
10,395
1895
128,903
154,869
19,085
10,731
990,252
126,092
14,790
6,451
5,500
66,840
4,158
11,460
4,629
5,984
316,522
128,529
18,238
10,834
4,138
76,413
4,849
10,106
9,182
7,602
510,383
108,026
19,443
10,142
256,101
81,234
18,953
10,312
860,469
65,905
20,847
10,666
400,368
67,797
19,550
8,681
94,292
8,894
14,000
6,130
8,758
69,390
9,733
11,937
3,542
8,818
71,079
104,711
40,207
107,468
58,579
7,200
3,470
2,694
8,500
4,350
4,357
8,602
4,434
3,987
2,840
5,107
3,000
5,100
West Coast V. I	
3,320
7,680
10,502
2,050
465,894
6,140
6,994
732,437
484,161
601,570
Total	
473,674
625,982
1,236,150
585,413
1,015,471
566,395
DISPOSITION OF PACK, 1905, IN DETAIL.
a
o  .
a co
3 2.
Q
oH
H
38,873
20,850
8,349
11,599
7,704
o
o
p. .
r.41
CO  O
>  CO
a-I
Q
H
84,111
39,475
34,983
23,585
14,969
29,393
17,952
° 1 5 a
o_5 o P
ffgj
o f- °
H
9,893
500
346
a
M|
o°
H
1],590
20,138
13,850
19,736
12,205
4,800
e  .
's 4
<3
iii
<, __ aj
o «N
H
o.S
_H
h
uo
CO
_j_
uo
13
B
o
c   .
a _j
co 3
CIO
Total.
Anglo-Brit. Col. Pkg. Co., Ltd ..
55,500
25,581
23,188
17,650
32,200
11,305
266
2,000
958
136,982
7,900
1,777
2,286
76,245
5,769
47,658
12,462
13,431
26,082
9,193
32
296
1,437
327
2,960
390
915
5,419
3,981
1,087
252
442
1,256
1,618
211,252
445,501
140,911
280
105,886
94,347
69,203
60,275
40,193
2,732
J. H. Todd & Sons	
British Columbia Can. Co., Lid .
Federation B. S. Can. Co., Ltd..
St. Mungo Canning Co., Ltd... .
4,780
4,496
1,000
1,960
4,035
200
1,500
3,226
200
62
75
22J8si
18
1,000
1,342
891
3,300
2,850
2,201
2,882
1,250
22,748
3,754
4,791
7,363
200
9,979
7,446
1,000
35,362
12,502
1,100
100
9,100
18,870
22,851
12,944
Northern Canning Co., Ltd .
6,165
6,050
5,311
1,100
1,947
450
C. S. Windsor	
11,079
1,000
18,136
8,366
Bu
1,376
rned
Wallace Bros. Packing Co., Ltd .
3,000
3,971
6,560
5,911
2,088
58
8,719
3,981
1,875
3,620
581
600
4,813
720
1,875
10,201
750
5,151
6,519
4,535
680
1,050
9,103
500
3,340
110
6,500
Ft. Nelson Can. & Salt. Co., Ltd.
500
9,847
13,890
7,942
4,596
4,813
2,338
105,088
Total	
320,039
16,904
109,637
152,118
53,847
4,556
136,982
57,037
1,167,460 H14
Fisheries Commissioner's Report.
1906
The  Pack of British  Columbia  Salmon, Season 1905.— Concluded.
SHIPMENTS IN DETAIL, PREVIOUS YEARS.
1904
1903
1902
1901
1900
1899
1898
1897
1896
1895
England-
60,844
3,070
101,885
24,590
461
162,649
33,358
95,711
1,700
290,913
206,314
19,236
576,065
46,831
'3,350
131,875
38,022
13,538
19,956
180,939
51,095
10,143
357,848
60,090
3,802
79,171
25,903
56,237
20,309
20,815
150,670
5,733
365,151
26,128
114,736
41,518
4,246
11,945
12,079
231
79,598
5,687
242,437
8,050
19,862
87,881
9,644
439
1,183
29,380
325,966
4,967
407,738
38,373
182,253
9,076
322,364
11,405
96,469
'256,301
London overland 	
Overland previous years	
Australia and New Zealand 	
05,647
29,590
15,315
160,258
37,050
3,278
15,919
68,275
18,750
152,498
35,463
1,472
10,344
34,089
6,000
135,806
10,355
627
5,156
79,714
130,815
28,579
226
4,823
74,000
51,041
11,609
2,128
3,844
7,850
79,288
8,832
4,326
25,952
405,894
473,674
625,982
1,236,156
585,413
732,437
484,161
1,015,477
601,570
566,395
BRITISH COLUMBIA SALMON FLEET, 1905.
Name of Vessels.
To London
direct.
To Liverpool
direct.
With Option
to London,
Liverpool, or
Glasgow.
Total.
29,682
4,369
10,280
17,806
10,078
22.S73
72,041
34,125
79,518
64,816
62,118
17,421
101,723
38,494
6,165
500
5,346
4,S93
105,963
„   "Tydeus"	
83,122
67,542
45,187
105,088
320,039
16,904
442,031
PACK IN STATE OF WASHINGTON OF SALMON CAUGHT IN THE WATERS OF PUGET
SOUND DURING LAST EIGHT YEARS.
1905
1904
1903
1902
1901
1900
1899
1898
847,122
89,636
71,490
49,047
123,419
106,856
167,211
103,476
181,326
12,001
339,556
99,713
95,322
1,105,096
136,823
49,437
71,941
1,363,297
228,704
118,174
55,170
402,048
497,700
90,400
245,400
17,800
244,000
80,000
Humpbacks	
56,355
25,000
Total   	
1,057,295
286,630
464,014
534,591
851,300
355,000
VICTORIA, B. C.:
Printed by Richard Wolpenden, V.D., I.S.O., Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1906. 

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