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RETURN To an Order of the House for a Return of copies of all correspondence, reports of agents, and… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1905

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 5 Ed. 7 Songhees Reserve. F 61
RETURN
To an Order of the House for a Return of copies of all correspondence, reports of
agents, and all other documents, from January 1st, 1900, to the present time,
relating to the acquirement of a new reservation for the Songhees Indians and
their removal from the present Reserve.
R. F. GREEN,
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
9th March, 1905.
Votes and Proceedings, 25th February, 1899.
Whereas resolutions have at various times been passed by this House for the removal
of the Indians from the Songhees Reserve :
And whereas negotiations in the direction took place between the Dominion Government
and the Provincial Government, but without result:
Be it therefore Resolved, That this House would respectfully urge upon the Government
the desirability of this matter receiving early consideration, so that the removal of the said
Indians from the said Reserve may be effected.
Votes and Proceedings, 8th January, 1900.
1. Has any reply been received from the Dominion Government relative to the Resolution
passed by this Honourable House on the 25th February last, having reference to the removal
of the Indians from the Songhees Reserve?
2. If any, what is the nature of such reply 1
3. Has the Government taken any step, and if so, what step, towards effecting the
removal of the Indians from such Reserve 1
4. Was any notice, and if so, what, given to the Provincial Government by any person
or party relative to the arbitration of the portion of land required for right of way purposes
by the E. & N. Railway Co. ?
The Hon. Mr. Semlin replied as follows :—
" 1 & 2. Yes ; and the purport of such reply will be found in a Minute dated the 9th of
August, a copy of which is presented herewith :—
"1303k.
" Extract from a Report of the Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved by
His Excellency on the 9th August, 1899.
" The Committee of the Privy Council have had under consideration a despatch, hereto
attached, dated 13th March, 1899, from the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia, transmitting an approved Minute of his Executive Council, which embodies a resolution passed at
the recent Session 6f the Legislature of that Province, representing the desirability of early
consideration being given to the removal of the Indians from the Songhees Reserve.
" The Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs, to whom the matter was referred, states
that on the 13th July, 1898, there was transmitted to the Lieutenant-Governor of British
Columbia a copy of an approved Minute of the Privy Council embodying the views of Your
Excellency's Government in regard to the proposed removal of the Indians. That Minute
summarised the negotiations between the Provincial Government and Mr. J. A. J. McKenna,
who was commissioned by Order in Council of the 15th July, 1897, to confer with the Provincial Government on the subject of the removal of the Indians, and referred to the fact that on the 16th December, 1897, the Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs advised the Premier
of British Columbia that he had concluded that the second proposal submitted by Mr.
McKenna was the fairest that could be made, and provided the most effective means of removing the Indians ; for, if accepted, it would admit of a speedy and satisfactory settlement of this
long standing question without the Province being called upon to relinquish any right or give
up any asset, while at the same time properly protecting the rights of the Indians.
" The Minister further states, that the proposal referred to is embodied in a communication
addressed by Mr. McKenna to the Honourable J. H. Turner, and dated at Victoria on the
18th September, 1897.    It is as follows :—
"' On the Provincial Government passing an Order in Council, concurring, without
' prejudice to the claims of either Government to Indian Reserves in the Province, in the
'disposal by the Dominion of the Songhees Reserve, the Dominion Government will agree to
' secure, within two years from the date of the said Order, the removal of the Indians and to
'fund for their benefit, subject to the laws of the Dominion in respect to Indian Trust Funds,
' the proceeds derived from the sale of the land comprised in the Songhees Reserve, less such
' an amount as may be expended in procuring a new location and effecting the removal and
' rehabilitation of the Indians, and in disposing of the land in the present Reserve.'
" And in the same communication Mr. McKenna pointed out that the Provincial
Government's claim to a reversionary right in the land should not stand in the way of acceptance of his proposal, as that Government would have as good a claim to a reversionary right
in the capitalised proceeds of the sale of the land as it could have in the land itself.
" The Minister recommends, as he is convinced that Mr. McKenna's proposal is the fairest
and most feasible that could be made, that the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia be
advised, in reply to his despatch of the 13th March, 1899, that Your Excellency's Government
is prepared to act upon it as soon as the Government of British Columbia signifies its acceptance
of the offer.
" The Committee submit the same for Your Excellency's approval.
(Signed)        " John J. McGee,
" Clerk of the Privy Council.
" His Honour
" The Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia."
"3. No.
" 4. No notice was received by this Government in respect of the arbitration of the land
in question."
Deputy Superintendent-General to Premier of B. C.
Ottawa, — June, 1901.
The Hon. James Dunsmuir,
Premier of British Columbia, Victoria, B. C. :
Dear Sir,—Referring to your letter of the 2nd February last, with regard to the removal
of the Songhees Indians from their Reserve at Victoria, I beg to state that the Superintendent-
General's understanding of the proposal which was made by you and Mr. Eberts at the time of
of your interview on this subject, was to the effect that the Dominion Government would surrender absolutely to the Province of British Columbia two portions of the Reserve, one marked
on the attached plan by an inclosing line in red, consisting of 25 acres, the other marked by a
green line, consisting of 17\ acres; that the remainder of the Reserve would be sold, and the
proceeds of the sale, together with the moneys already standing to the credit of the band, would
be utilised in removing and rehabilitating the Indians upon the new Reserve, such Reserve to
be furnished by the Provincial Government, free of cost, in return for the land which the latter
would receive, and the Reserve to be satisfactory to the Department. The Dominion Government would under this arrangement absolutely own the new reserve, but if there were any
surplus moneys after rehabilitating the Indians, as proceeds of the old Reserve, the Province
would retain its reversionary right to any such surplus.
I would be glad if you would let me know if the above is a correct statement of the proposal made by your Government in this relation, as submitted to the Superintendent-General
at the time that you discussed this matter with him.    I may add that Mr. Sifton is desirous 5 Ed. 7 Songhees Reserve. F 63
to have the matter settled on the lines suggested, and with that end in view Mr. Vowell, the
Indian Superintendent at Victoria, has been asked to take the necessary steps to have the
arrangement carried out if possible. He will, no doubt, place himself in communication with
you on the subject at once.
Yours truly,
(Signed)        Jas. A. Smart,
Deputy Superintendent-General.
Votes and Proceedings 19th April, 1901.
Mr. Helmcken asked the Hon. the Attorney-General the following questions :—
1. Since your reply April 16th, has the Government received any official communication
from the Dominion Government, or any member thereof, relative to the acceptance of the
terms proposed by the Provincial Government for the Settlement of the Songhees Indian
Reserve question, as set forth at page 581 of the Report of Delegation to Ottawa?
2. What is the purport of such communication ?
The Hon. Mr. Eberts replied as follows :—
" 1. Yes; on the 17th inst.
" 2. I will read the communication."
[Report of Delegation to Ottawa, vide Sessional Papers, 1901.]
The City Clerk to the Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Victoria, October 7th, 1902.
Re Songhees Indian Reserve.
I have the honour to transmit herewith, for the information of the Executive, a copy of
a Report of the Standing Committee on the acquisition of the Indian Reserve, which was
adopted at the last meeting of the City Council.
In accordance with the concluding paragraph of the report I have to request, on behalf of
the Committee, that the Executive will be pleased to appoint a time when the Committee can
have the pleasure of waiting upon the Members, with the object of discussing the several
matters contained in the report.
The favour of an intimation from you as to when it will be convenient for the Executive
to do the Committee the honour of an interview, will oblige.
[Receipt acknowledged 10th October.]
The Deputy Provincial Secretary to the Clerk of the City of Victoria.
15th October, 1902.
In continuation of my letter of the 10th instant, I beg to inform you that the Executive
Council will be glad to meet the Committee on the acquisition of the Songhees Indian Reserve
on Friday next at three o'clock.
Victoria, B. C, October, 6th, 1902.
To His Worship the Mayor and Board of Aldermen :
Gentlemen,—Your Standing Committee on the acquisition of the Indian Reserve beg to
report as follows :—
(1.) They have ascertained that the latest proposal for the settlement of this question is
that two portions of the Reserve, viz., one lying to the north of the Esquimalt Road, containing
some 25 acres, and another lying to the south of the E. & N. Railway track and fronting on the Harbour, containing 17^ acres, should be transferred to the Province in lieu of a satisfactory tract of land to be selected and conveyed absolutely to the Dominion as a Reserve for
the Indians, and that the remainder of the Reserve be sold and the cost of removal and rehabilitation of the Indians be met out of the proceeds of the sale and the moneys now at the credit
of the Indians, and that the Province be recognised as retaining such a reversionary right as it
claims in the present Reserve in any surplus from the proceeds of the sale remaining at the
credit of the Indians after the said expenses have been met.
(2.) That inasmuch as the commercial value of the Reserve has been wholly created by the
City of Victoria, your Committee believe that when a final settlement of the Reserve is arrived
at and all rights and claims hereto adjusted, either the land or the surplus of the proceeds of
its sale, after providing for the rehabilitation of the Indians, should belong to the City.
Your Committee gather from the basis of settlement, as it has been stated to them, that it
is intended only to deal at present with the two portions of the Reserve above specified, and
it has been asserted (though not officially confirmed or denied) that the Provincial Government
intends to donate the said 25 acres to the City of Victoria as a park and to sell the 17\ acres
to the E. & N. Railway Co., to be used by them for terminal purposes.
Your Committee are of opinion that this method of dealing with the matter would be
prejudicial to the City's true position and interests, and they would in this connection point out
that, with the exception of the water front on the Reserve, all the water frontage on Victoria
Harbour is owned and controlled by private persons and corporations.
The shipping interests of the City of Vancouver are to-day entirely controlled by one
corporation, owing to the fact that almost all its water frontage is owned by that corporation.
The Reserve, therefore, possessing the only available place for wharves for public use and
for terminal purposes generally should be owned by and under the control of the City for the
benefit of its citizens. If owned by the City it would form one of its most valuable assets, if
only from the fact that it would prevent the water frontage being controlled by one or two
corporations or persons.
Your Committee would recommend : (a) that the said portion of 17\ acres should be
acquired by the City from the Provincial Government; (b) that reasonable and even liberal
terms should be arranged with the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway Company for the use of
such portion thereof as might be required by that Company for terminal facilities, and (c) that
negotiations having the above objects in view should at once be entered into with the Provincial Government.
All of which is respectfully submitted by—
(Signed)        A. G. McCandless,!
ii J. Stuart Yates,   VCommittee.
n W. G. Cameron,     J
A. W. Jones to Minister of Finance.
Hon. R. G. Tatlow,
Finance Minister,
Victoria, B. C.
Victoria, B. C, 11th June, 1903.
Dear Sir,—On the 12th ultimo I received a letter from the Hon. E. G. Prior in connection with the contemplated removal of the Songhees Indians, and which, for your information,
I beg herewith to quote :—
" "Will you please call and see me as soon as possible, as I wish you to do a little business
for the Government, if you can give the time, in respect to the Songhees Indian Reserve.
(Signed)        " Edwd. Gawler Prior,
" Premier."
I may add that, in response to this communication, I waited upon the ex-Premier, who
instructed me to obtain such information and prices of properties as were deemed suitable,
upon the understanding (which, however, was verbal) that when the final selection was made
and the purchase consummated I would receive a remuneration, at the rate of 2£% on the pur- 5 Ed. 7
Songhees Reserve.
F 65
chase price, from the Government for my work. Consequently, I bear respectfully to ask if it
is agreeable to your Government that I continue my negotiations in this direction upon the
same understanding, and, if so, may I ask for any further instructions or orders you may see
fit to give me in the premises.
Your obedient servant,
(Signed)        A. W. Jones.
Minister of Finance to A.  W. Jones.
Treasury Department,
Victoria, B. C, 16th June, 1903.
A. W. Jones, Esq., Victoria, B. C.
Re Songhees Indian Reservation.
Dear Sir,—I have the honoui to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 11th
instant, referring to an arrangement made with the late Premier, Mr. E. G. Prior, relative to
obtaining information of desirable properties for an Indian Reservation on Vancouver Island,
in contemplation of the removal of the Songhees Indians from the Reserve now occupied by
them within the corporate limits of the City of Victoria. I understand from your letter that,
on your report of the various locations which may be submitted by you for the consideration
of the Government, and in the event of the Government deciding to accept any one of such
locations, you are to be allowed 2J °/0 commission on the price agreed to be paid for same.
In reply, I beg to say that this arrangement is satisfactory.
I would only add that, in the event of none of the properties submitted by you being
accepted, no remuneration for your services will be allowed.
I have, etc.,
(Signed)
R. G. Tatlow,
Minister of Finance.
F. Temple Cornwall to Minister of Finance.
Hon. R. G. Tatlow,
Minister of Finance,
Victoria, B. C.
Victoria, B. C, June 10th, 1903.
Dear Sir,—I am informed that the Provincial Government are on the look-out for a
suitable piece of land, in order to purchase same for the use of the Songhees Indians in the
place of the reserve now occupied by them.
Acting for the owner, I beg to draw to your attention that place known as Glengarry
Farm, being section 4, Metchosin District, fronting on Parry Bay, Vancouver Island, which
property consists of 250 acres, more or less, 160 of which is suitable for and under cultivation,
the balance being covered with an assortment of timber.
The water front affords good landing for canoes, etc., at any time.
I shall be much obliged for any support that you may give me in this matter.
Yours respectfully,
(Signed)
F. Temple Cornwall. F 66 Songhees Reserve. 1905
Deputy Minister of Finance to F. Temple Cornwall.
F. Temple Cornwall, Esq., Barrister,
Victoria, B. C.
Re Songhees Indian Reservation.
Dear Sir,—I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th
instant, drawing attention to the suitability of the Glengarry Farm, Metchosin District, for a
reservation for the Songhees Indians, in the event of their removal from the reserve at present
occupied. In reply, I beg to inform you that arrangements have been entered into with Mr.
A. W. Jones, of Victoria, to obtain information in regard to properties deemed suitable. You
will, therefore, please submit your offer to him, who, no doubt will give it due attention in his
report to the Government on the various properties that may be submitted for the consideration of the Executive.
I have, etc.,
(Signed)        J. McB. Smith,
Deputy Minister of Finance.
Votes and Proceedings, 11th January, 1904-
Mr. Cameron asked the Hon. the Minister of Finance the following questions : —
1. What steps have been taken by the Government to facilitate the removal of the Indians
from the Songhees Indian Reserve 1
2. What steps do the Government contemplate taking in obtaining the removal ?
The Hon. Mr. Tatlow replied as follows :—
" 1. An agent was appointed to examine and report upon suitable locations to which to
remove the Indians. The removal of the Indians is dependent upon their consent. I am
informed that every effort is being made by the Indian Department to induce them to remove
from the City of Victoria to a more suitable locality. The recent efforts made, however, have
been retarded by the absence of the Indians from the Reserve at various times, and by the
death of two of their Chief Councillors, men of weight in the band. There are also other
difficulties in the way, which it is hoped will be overcome during the present year. Should
the Indians not be amenable to reason, in all probability a recommendation will be made to
the Dominion Government for special legislation enabling the Department to deal summarily."
victoria, b. c. :
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, I.S.O., V.D., Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1905. 5 Ed. 7
Songhees Reserve.
F 67
FURTHER   RETURN
To an Order of the House for a Return of copies of all correspondence, reports of
agents, and all other documents, from January 1st, 1900, to the present time,
relating to the acquirement of a new reservation for the Songhees Indians and
their removal from the present reserve.
Lands and Works Department,
ISth March 1905.
R. F. GREEN,
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.
REPORT ON AVAILABLE SITES BY MR. A. W. JONES.
INDEX.
Location.
Section.
District.
Owner.
Acres.
No.    1
„     2
,,     3	
„     4	
31	
25	
Victoria District  	
Lake District	
James Island   )
Hudson's Bay Co ....
Mr. Mason	
Several owners	
350
100
2,500
„     5	
800
„     6	
1 and 2	
South i 3	
North 4 3	
7, 66, 11..	
52 and 53	
220
„     7a	
R. E. Jackson	
John Parker	
Mr. Vine	
Mr. Reid	
Late Dr. Duncan ....
168
i,    7b	
„     8	
	
200
400
a     9
320
,,   10
„   11 	
58	
40, 41, 42	
261
500
„   12	
4	
74	
8, 9, 10	
22, 23, 24	
22, 23, 24	
19, 20, 21, 22, 23 ....
250
„   13	
Range 1 W.,  North Saanich	
//      IE.,              n             ....
„ 11 „
274
a    14
„   15 .... -
„   16	
Bradley Dyne .   	
Joseph Loewen....  )
250
950
1,440
Total.
9,283 F 68 Songhees Reserve. 1905
Location Eo. 1.—Cadboro Bay, Victoria District.
Section 31, Cadboro Bay, property of Hudson's Bay Company. The portion of this
property examined extends from the slaughter-house along the shore to the boundary of
Section No. 2, fronting on Oak Bay and extending back 800 yards. This land is all first-class
agricultural and pastural, with most of it at present under cultivation. There is no timber
other than a few scrub oaks on the land. The foreshore has ample beach suitable for the
hauling out of canoes or small boats. A large number of people could secure fuel from the
drift-wood on the shore. Fresh water can be obtained from numerous springs on the property,
or by sinking wells to moderate depths. The harbour is well sheltered and close to good fishing. The property and location is a desirable one for the purpose intended. Number of acres
examined approximate 350.
Location No. 2.—Cordova Bay.
Section 25, Lake District, at the foot of Mount Douglas ; Mr. Mason's property. This
land is all virgin forest, soil of poor quality and timber of no commercial value. The land
rises in high bluffs from the sea-shore, with an open, exposed expanse of water and subject to
heavy seas, caused by the south-east gales. In fact, the location is not suitable for the purpose intended.    I, therefore, cannot recommend it for your consideration.
Location No. 3.
Sallas or Sidney Island, property of Bryce Bros. This island contains 2,800 acres,
approximate, of which 800 or 900 acres through the centre would be agricultural and pasture,
if cleared of the timber. There are now about 40 or 50 acres partly cleared and in grass.
The soil is a light, gravelly loam, more suitable for fruit-growing than farming. The remainder
of the land is rocky and covered with timber of no value for other than cordwood. There is
no water on the island other than what can be obtained by sinking wells, and I am of the
opinion the supply would be very limited in the summer. There is a good harbour on the
upper end of the island, and well protected by a sandspit which forms a lagoon. The beach
is level and suitable for the hauling out of small boats or canoes. The improvements consist
of one small house of four rooms, one barn and three outhouses. Value of the same I estimate
at f 1,200.    The location does not appear to me as a suitable one for the purpose intended.
Location No. 4.—Jambs Island.
Section 1, belonging to Mr. Munro. This section contains 201 acres, of which 25 acres
are now under cultivation, including an orchard of 265 trees of various kinds, in good condition ; 100 acres slashed and partly cleared, and 20 acres broken up; 55 acres in virgin forest.
The soil is a sandy loam, capable of producing good crops. There is no running water on the
island, but there are many excellent springs, and the property has two large reservoirs which
are fed from the springs, the water being used for irrigating in dry weather. The improvements on the property consist of one dwelling-house of five rooms, situated on the hill; one
barn, 24 x 80 feet, and 14 feet height of walls ; one poultry house, one feed and root-house,
and four miles of fencing. Besides the above-mentioned, there is one three-roomed house and
one out-house at the lagoon, which is formed by a sand-spit, thus making a safe and convenient
harbour for vessels of light draft. The beach is level and suitable for the haulage of canoes or
small boats. The adjacent waters are known to be good fishing ground, and the vicinity is
recognised to be one of the best for wild fowl. I will here mention for your guidance the
value of improvements on this farm, in my opinion, is from $2,500 to $3,000, not including
stock or farm implements.    I regard the location as a suitable one for the purpose intended.
Location No. 5.—James Island.
Section 2 ; owner not known to me. This section contains 145 acres, approximate, of
which there are 20 acres under cultivation, including an orchard of about 5 acres. The
remainder of the land has been cleared of timber for cordwood, thus leaving the land of little
value, as the soil is a dry, gravelly hill, not capable of producing crops or making good pasture
land. Besides, the small portion of good land on the section is gradually but surely being
destroyed by the ever and constant sand-drift from the bluffs on the south-east end of the
island.    So great is this destruction going on, I am informed that there are eight feet of sand 5 Ed. 7 Songhees Reserve. F 69
on what was twenty years ago one of the finest fields in the district, and I am of the opinion
my information is correct, for at the time of my visit to the location it was blowing a moderate
gale from the south-east, thus giving me an opportunity of witnessing the actual destruction
of the small portion left of the once fertile field. This feature of my report you can readily
understand from your own knowledge of sand bluffs and a glance of the position on the map
or chart.
Section 3 of the same island is all virgin forest; timber of little value for other than
cordwood, and the soil is of poor quality.
Section 4 is much the same as section 3, with evidence of former residence on the upper
end, I should think by natives, but now uninhabited.
I cannot recommend these sections as suitable for the purpose intended.
Location No. 6.—West Sooke.
Sections 1 and 2, property of John Muir; 220 acres, of which there are 60 acres under
cultivation, 50 acres open prairie or pasture, and 110 acres timber. The soil is of good quality
and capable of producing good crops. There is plenty of good water running througli the
land, besides numerous springs. The property has a frontage on the water of half a mile, a
splendid beach, but somewhat exposed. The improvements consist of five miles of fencing;
one large dwelling-house, containing 11 rooms; one hay barn ; one sheep barn ; one cow-house,
40x26 feet; one dairy, 30x24 feet, and three other out-houses. I estimate the value of
improvements on this farm at $8,000, not including stock or farm implements. I could not
recommend this site as a suitable one for an Indian Reserve, on account of the exposed
location of the beach ; it would not be a safe place for their canoes or boats, which is their
principal means of travelling and procuring food.
Location No. 7a.—West Sooke.
Section 3, south half, property of Arthur Peatt. This section contains 168 acres, of
which there has been at some time about 50 acres under cultivation, but now has grown up in
wild broom and brush ; the remainder of the land is timbered, with the merchantable quality
long since removed. The soil is of good quality, and when cultivated would yield good crops.
There is good water on the property for domestic purposes. There is about one-quarter of a
mile frontage on Sooke Harbour, which is well sheltered, safe, and has a good beach. Fishing
and hunting in this vicinity are good. The improvements on this location consist of three
miles of fencing, one large dwelling-house of eleven rooms, one barn and two out-houses.
Value of improvements, from $5,000 to $6,000. I should consider this location a suitable one
for an Indian Reserve; however, the labour required to be expended before the land could be
made productive would be more than the average Indian would care to perform.
Location No. 7b.—West Sooke.
North half of Section 3, property of Robert Muir, containing 200 acres, approximate.
On this property there are 60 acres under cultivation, 20 acres in pasture, and 120 acres timber, minus the merchantable quality, which has been removed for commercial purposes. The
soil is good, and when cultivated would yield good crops. The improvements on this site consist of four miles of fencing, one dwelling-house of twelve rooms, one new barn, 30x90, and
16 feet height of walls; one dairy or milk-house and three out-houses, including stable. There
is good water for domestic use. The frontage on Sooke Harbour is good and extends about a
quarter of a mile. The location is a suitable one for an Indian Beserve. Value of improvements estimated at $10,000.
Location No. 8.—West Sooke.
Section 7, of R. E. Jackson's estate, contains 10 to 15 acres of land under cultivation,
one dwelling-house, barn and two out-houses. On Section 66 there are from 10 to 15 acres
under cultivation. On Section 11 there has been considerable slashing done and a few small
fields of pasture, not exceeding 10 acres in all. The balance of this estate is forest, hundreds
of acres in extent. There appears to be considerable good land on the estate, if cleared of the
timber. The property is well supplied with two good streams of water; the harbour is good
and well protected. The acres in these sections examined number 400, approximate, of which
not more than 40 are under cultivation, the balance being timber, through which there is con- F 70 Songhees Reserve. 1905
siderable natural pasture. I could not form an estimate of the value of improvements, not
having access to the buildings. The location is well situated for the purpose intended, but
the labour of clearing the land would be slow and toilsome, and perha.ps never be accomplished
by the tribe, as their dislike for such labour is very apparent, and for which they are not to be
blamed, when there are so many other places where their wants can be secured with much
less toil. There is another unfavourable feature in connection with this site, it joins a reservation of a different tribe of Indians, which at times would not be conducive to their multiplication and happiness.
Location No. 9.—Rocky Point, Metchosin.
Sections 52 and 53, property of John Parker, Metchosin; 220 acres, approximate. On
Section 52 there are about 20 acres under cultivation and 100 acres pasture and timber, the
land being well cleared of the underbrush through the timber, thus making good shelter for
stock. The land is all level and soil of good quality. At the present time, January 24th,
there is plenty of running water on the site, but the locality being level, with no high mountains near by, I am of the opinion that running water may cease in warm weather. However,
I am informed, and I see evidences of the truth of the information, that good water is obtainable by sinking wells to moderate depths, 30 to 40 feet.
On Section 53 there are 75 acres under cultivation; the land is all level and soil of good
quality ; water conditions the same as on the adjoining land. The shore is well protected by
Bentinck Island, which lies in front of Section 53, on which section there are many sandy
beaches and safe harbours for small boats or canoes. The beach or shore line could supply
many people with fuel, as a large quantity of driftwood is lodged on the shore. The waters
in this locality are known to be the best fishing ground, as many Indians from the West Coast
congregate here in the summer to procure their winter food. The climatic conditions in this
section are very favourable to the raising of sheep. At the present I notice hundreds of
young lambs with the flocks, and the pasture appears to be of good quality. There are no
buildings of value on these lands, but the whole of the land is well fenced, and cross-fencing
subdividing the land into fields for pastural purposes and cultivation. On the whole, I regard
this location an ideal one for the purpose intended, as there is ample cleared land for the
number of people in the tribe, and should more land be required, Section 60, belonging to the
same owner, might be procured, the soil being very good and nearly all under tillage. There
is on Section 60 a good dwelling-house, large barn and other out-houses I should consider
the value of improvements, buildings, fencing, etc., at $4,000. I will here mention, from
my knowledge of the Indians, their requirements, habits, and dislike to the labour of clearing
land, that the ease with which food can be procured in this section surpasses any locality I
have examined. I, therefore, recommend it as a suitable place for an Indian Reserve.
Further, the means of access to the City of Victoria from this location is very convenient,
being eight miles by water or three hours drive by land, thus affording an easy approach to
the market for their fish and products of their farm.
Location No.  10.
Section 58, Mr. Vine owner, containing 261 acres, of which there are 6 acres in orchard
and garden, and about 30 acres slashed and in process of clearing. The rest of the property
is timbered ; the soil, average quality. There is no running water, but water can be obtained
in some locations on the land by sinking wells. For instance, on the lower portion, where the
cleared land and houses now stand, there is a well, but the flow of water is not great, and this
may be from the shallowness of the well, as it is not more than 15 feet deep ; in my opinion,
the present supply is the surface drainage, The harbour and foreshore are exceptionally good.
However, this feature is the only favourable one on the site, having in mind the many requirements needed to be appreciated by the Indians. The labour of clearing the land in order to
make it productive would not be an inviting proposition to the average Indian. The value of
improvements I estimate at $3,000. The fishing ground in this vicinity is very good, but the
amount of cultivable land is not sufficient to warrant me in recommending it for the reception
of the Songhees tribe.
Location No. 11.—Metchosin.
Sections 40, 41 and 42, the property of Mr. Reid, containing 500 acres, approximate. On
section 40 there are 30 acres under cultivation, 170 acres mountain land.    On sections 41 and 5 Ed. 7 Songhees Reserve. F 71
42 there are between 40 and 50 acres under tillage and pasture, and 265 acres mountain timber
land of little value. On the first section there is a dwelling-house, barn, chicken-house, windmill and pump for raising water for domestic use, this being the only means of obtaining water
on the property, and I am of the opinion the supply would be very limited. The location has
a safe harbour and is close to good fishing ground. On the whole, I am of the opinion the site
would not be a suitable one for so many people as are in the tribe, on account of the limited
water supply. The value of improvements on this property I estimate at $4,500. I could not
recommend it as a suitable place for the Songhees tribe of Indians.
Location No. 12.—Metchosin.
Section 4, Metchosin, property of the late Dr. Duncan, containing 250 acres, of which
there are about 120 acres under cultivation and pasture, and 130 acres of timber. The land
appears of good quality and capable of producing good crops. The remaining timber has little
value for other than farm use. There is no running water on the land, but good water can be
had by sinking wells. The property has a frontage on the sea-shore of half a mile, but somewhat exposed to south-east winds, and the lagoons do not afford protection, as they are both
closed by sand-spits on the shore-line, this feature being very detrimental to the location as an
Indian Reserve. The Indians would not have protection for their canoes or boats, a very
essential feature to their happiness; otherwise, the location would be a very favourable one
for the purpose intended.
Location No. 13.—Metchosin District.
Section 74; owner, Mr. Munro; containing 274 acres, approximate. On this section
there are about 35 acres under cultivation and 240 acres timber. The land, where cleared, is
of good quality, and portions of the timbered land would produce crops if brought under cultivation. Some of this land reaches to the summit of Mount Metchosin, and is of little value
for other than pasture for sheep, as the mountain portion is rocky and broken. The timber on
the land could not be taken into account as a source of value for other than farm use. There
is a small stream of water running through the land, which, I think, would continue throughout the year. There is a lagoon at the bottom of the land opening to the sea, which offers a
safe harbour for small boats or canoes. This location offers some advantages in the way of
harbour protection and fresh water, yet it has the disadvantage of poor land, as the greater-
portion of the section is not agricultural land. I do not think there are more than 80 acres
in all that could be brought under tillage. I cannot recommend this location as a suitable
one for the purpose intended, on account of the small amount of tillable land contained in the
section.
Location No. 14.—North Saanich.
Sections 8, 9 and 10, Range One West. Property of Bradley Dyne, containing 240 acres,
approximate. On this estate there are about 50 acres under cultivation and from 10 to 20
acres slashed and in process of clearing, the remainder being timbered. The soil is good and
where brought under tillage capable of producing good crops. The property has a good frontage on the water and a smooth, sandy beach in front of the present clearing, with other suitable places for hauling out of canoes or small boats. There is no running water, but good
water is obtained from springs, which appear to be numerous, and by sinking wells to moderate
depths. There is one dwelling-house in good condition, one large barn and several small
houses on the estate. The land is all fenced and cross-fenced where cultivated, except at the
shore line. The value of improvements on this farm I estimate at $4,000, exclusive of agricultural implements. The location would be a very desiarble one for the purpose intended, if
it were not for the presence of two other reserves in the immediate locality ; one a large reserve
fronting on Coal Bay, a quarter of a mile distant, on one side, and another on Union Bay, one
mile distant, on the other side. The Indians of those reserves, being of different tribes to the
Songhees, might not be tolerated by the former if placed in their immediate territory. However, that is a matter for your consideration.    I merely bring the fact to your notice.
Location No. 15.—North Saanich.
Sections 22, 23 and 24, Range One West, property of Joseph Loewen. These sections are
all virgin forest covered with timber of little value for other than cordwood,   The land is of F 72 Songhees Reserve. 1905
poor quality, having much rock and somewhat mountainous in character. The foreshore on
section 24 has a good beach, but somewhat exposed to the north wind. The location is not a
suitable one.    I, therefore, cannot recommend it for your consideration.
Sections 22, 23 and 24, Range One Bast. These sections are much the same as the former,
but more mountainous in character and of less value as agricultural land. The foreshore is
rough and affords little shelter. In my opinion, the location is not suitable for an Indian
reserve.
Sections 19, 20, 21, 22 and 23, Range Two East. These sections possess some advantages
in the way of harbour and beach. On section 23 there are several places suitable for the
hauling out of small boats or canoes. On sections 19 and 20, which front on a slough in Shoal
Harbour, there is good shelter, but this slough goes dry at low tides, an objection which cannot
be overcome. The land is more favourable on these sections than the adjoining land of the
same owner, yet it could not be considered agricultural nor pasture land, as there is a large
amount of rock, somewhat mountainous in nature and all covered with timber, which is of
little value other than for fuel. There is no evidence of running water that would maintain
in dry weather; there are numerous springs on the estate that could supply water to many
people for domestic purposes. On the whole, I cannot recommend these sections as a suitable
location for the reception of the Songhees Indians, should your Government see fit to remove
them from their present location in the City of Victoria.
Location No.  16.—Moresby Island.
This island contains 1,440 acres, approximate, and on it there is a highly cultivated farm
of 200 acres and about 125 more of good soil in various places, but not yet cleared. The
remainder of the land is forest, rocky and mountainous, not fit for other than sheep pasture.
The improvements consist of one new house of seven rooms, one twin residence of twelve rooms,
one new barn of large demensions, and five out-houses, including dairy, stables, blacksmith
shop, piggery, etc., and about eight miles of fencing, all in good condition. The value of improvements I estimate at $12,000, not including farm implements, stock or land. There is no
running water on the island, but good water can be obtained by sinking wells to moderate
depths; two or more now exist on the farm. There is one very fine harbour where the wharf
now stands, and several good shelters on other parts of the island. The fishing in the adjacent
waters is very good.    The location is suitable for the purpose intended.
victoria, b. c. :
Printed by Richard Wolfendbn, I.S.O., V.D., Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1905.

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