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ANNUAL REPORT ON THE ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE, NEW WESTMINSTER, FOR THE YEAR 1899. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1900

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 ANNUAL   REPORT
-ON   THE	
ASYLUM  FOR THE INSANE,
NEW   WESTMINSTER,
FOR   THE  YEAR 1899.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1900.  63 Vict.                    Report
on the Asylum for the
Insane.
893
REPORT
ON   THE
ASYLUM
FOR THE
1899.
INSANE,
To His Honour
The Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Medical
Superintendent of the Asylum for the Insane for the year 1899.
j.
D. PRENTICE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
June, 1900  63 Vict.                    Report on the Asylum for the Insane.                          895
REPORT
OF   THE
MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT  OF THE  PROVINCIAL  ASYLUM  FOR  THE
INSANE,  NEW WESTMINSTER,  B, C,
For the Year ending 31st December,  1899.
To the Honourable
The Provincial Secretary:
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you the Annual Report of the twenty-eighth year
of the Asylum, ending 31st December, 1899.
The statistical tables appended contain a record of the progress of the Institution during
the year.
The total number of patients under treatment was 327, of whom 252 were males and 75
females. There were remaining under treatment at the end of the year 243, of whom 184
were males and 59 were females, being an increase since December 31st, 1898, of 17, all
females, the number of male patients remaining being the same as it was at that date.
Admissions.
On referring to Table No. 1, it will be noticed that there is again a large increase in the
number of patients admitted during the year, the numbers being 101, as against 81 during the
year 1898.
Of these 101 patients admitted, 68 were males, as against 62 in 1898, being an increase
of nearly 10 %, and 33 were females, as against 19 in 1898, showing the large increase of
nearly 74 °/o.
Of the new admissions during the year, 1 male was admitted under the Warrant of His
Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, 58 males and 33 females under the usual Legal Order and
Medical Certificates, 4 males under an "Urgency Order," and 5 males were admitted from the
Yukon Territory by the Order of the Commissioner for that District, arrangements having
been made by the Dominion Government with the Government of this Province for such
admissions, this being the nearest and most convenient Asylum for the accommodation of
patients from that Territory.
No admissions of females under an "Urgency Order" have occurred during the year 1899.
It is to be remarked that whereas the increase in numbers has been hitherto in the male
department, the percentage of increase occurred in 1899 amongst the females. There is no
very obvious reason why the preponderance of increase in 1899 should have occurred amongst
the female population, contrary to what has hitherto been the usual current of events, but it
may be conjectured that there is a growing increase in the female population of the Province
at large. 896 Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1899
Discharges.
The number of patients discharged during the year was 61, of whom 47 were males and
14 females. Of these, 23 males and 8 females were discharged recovered, being 30.69 % of
the new admissions. This shows a slight decrease in the proportion of recoveries of 2.64 % as
compared with the year 1898, in which year the recoveries were 33.33 °/0. There is no
accountable cause for this slight decrease in the recoveries, and it is doubtless merely one of
the casual fluctuations which habitually occur in Asylums. It may be remembered that for the
last three years I have called special attention in my Reports to the over-crowding of the
Asylum by patients who are the subject of chronic lunacy, or who are simply feeble in mind,
many of whom might be well taken care of by their relatives and friends at their own homes
in their native countries. I need not now reiterate what I have said upon this question in
previous Reports. I limit myself to a recital of the practical steps that have been taken to
remedy the acknowledged evil. From time to time isolated cases have been transferred, with
the concurrence of the friends of the patients, to their homes, and in the year 1896 five such
cases were sent, in the care of two attendants, to their friends in England. This experiment
was carried out with marked success, and again in 1897 and 1898 several patients of the same
class were sent home. Last year, however, seeing that there was an accumulation of similar
cases in the Asylum, over-crowding the building and creating a serious drain upon the
resources of the Institution and the revenues of the Province, I represented the existing conditions to the Government, and recommended that a number of patients, convalescents, and those
of the quiet, harmless class, some of them actually recovered, should be sent home. The
Government thereupon made the necessary arrangements, and 22 patients were sent away, of
whom 13 went to the United Kingdom, 7 to Eastern Canada, and 2 to the United States, at
the cost, for the most part, of this Province. I, myself, went to England some time beforehand and made arrangements with the friends of those who were landed at Liverpool. There
was comparatively little difficulty in distributing the patients to their respective destinations,
and the success of the undertaking was such as to lead to the belief that it will be desirable to
repeat it when patients of the class described have accumulated so much as to injuriously overcrowd the Asylum. As I have heretofore pointed out, it must be an advantage to the patients
to be within reach of their relatives and friends, instead of thousands of miles away, and a
great relief to the Asylum, which tends so rapidly to become over-crowded, the inmates
increasing at such a rate as to over-run the accommodation. The transfer on the whole was
carried out successfully, with the exception of a few errors and mistakes that may be easily
provided for on any similar future occasion. These errors and consequent inconveniences
arose chiefly from making the passage too late in the year, and from an under-estimate of the
number of attendants required. With a view to economy I sent only one attendant to Liverpool, trusting to the fully recovered patients to help in taking care of the others. I am now
of opinion that no such party ought to have less than two attendants, and that the ocean
passage ought to be made in the height of summer. Another little difficulty, but an unforeseen one, arose from the disarrangement of the sailings of the vessels, owing to the taking up
of so many of them as transports for the war in South Africa. On the whole, the undertaking
was successfully carried out, and the relief to the pressure on our space, and to the daily cost
of maintenance, is well marked
I take the present opportunity of suggesting that steps should be taken for diminishing
the numbers of chronic Chinese lunatics in the Asylum. Incredible almost as it may seem,
yet it is a fact that there are at the present time 25 Chinese patients in the Asylum, many of
whom have been inmates for many years. Two have been here since the year 1875, a period
of 25 years; one since 1876, and others for shorter, but still prolonged periods. 63 Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 897
I append a Table of the numbers existing on December 31st (Table No. 21). None of
these patients pay for their maintenance, and though some of them work in the gardens and
grounds and laundry, yet they are not all able to work at all, being too much broken down in
body and mind, and in the main the cost of their maintenance falls upon the revenues of the
Province, and is a heavy burden upon the taxpayer. When lately in England I took the
opportunity, under the auspices of the Government, of obtaining legal opinion as to the
possibility of returning some at least of these men to China, and it would seem, "prima facie,"
that it is a practicable step. I think the subject ought to be pursued and further enquired
into, and I purpose laying the opinion I procured before the Government shortly. It certainly
seems to be a hardship upon the taxpayers of the Province that they should be compelled to
maintain these decrepit and unprofitable Chinese lunatics for such prolonged periods, some of
them, even as I have pointed out, for nearly a quarter of a century! ! I purpose, with the
assistance of the Government, to proceed further in this matter, for I feel convinced that it is,
on the whole, more by keeping down the numbers of the inmates, than even by the most rigid
economy, that the cost of the Asylum is to be kept within reasonable limits.
Escapes.
A few escapes have occurred during the year, of which two were successful, the patients
in the other cases having been found and brought back within a short time after leaving the
Asylum.
One of the two patients (males) who escaped was employed in assisting in the kitchen.
On April 30th, during the dinner hour, he managed to elude observation, and with the aid of
a short ladder climbed over the fence and got away into the bush. As the man was convalescent, and there was a good demand for labourers just then, no doubt he soon found employment. The other patient escaped during the night of June 12th by breaking the fastenings
of the screen of the window of his room, then by tearing his blankets into strips he made a
rope, and with that aid lowered himself down from the window. The nightwatchman going
his rounds at 4 a.m. found the patient's room empty, and the rope of blankets hanging out of
the window by which he had effected bis escape. Nothing more was heard of him, but as he
was recovered, or nearly so, no doubt he managed to obtain a livelihood.
Suicides.
There were no suicides, nor attempts at suicide, during the year, owing, I am pleased
to report, to the vigilance of the attendants in charge of the patients who were suicidally
inclined. As there were during the year many such cases in the Institution, the attendants,
both male and female, who had the supervision of them, deserve great credit for the watchfulness they displayed in their care.
Deaths.
The deaths during the year, as recorded in Table No. 10, were of 19 males and 2 females,
being 6.42 % of the whole number treated, a decrease of 24 % on the year 1898.
Three post-mortem examinations were made.
The new mortuary was used on September 24th for the first time. This long-needed
adjunct to the Institution is a very great improvement upon the dilapidated old wooden shed
which for many years previously had been called a mortuary, and was used as such. The new
building, when its fittings are complete, will enable autopsies to be more successfully made,
and will at the same time be not so objectionable to the feelings of the friends of deceased
patients. Work.
The work on the premises has been this year unusually important, although it has not
comprehended extension of the cultivated ground as much as could be wished. The reason of
this is that the patients have been largely employed in very necessary work connected with
the new buildings. In January and February, they were engaged in digging trenches in the
basement, and in widening the existing ones to the extent of 2 feet 6 inches, for the reception
of the new steam heating pipes, to a depth of about 4 feet from one end of the building to the
other. This involved a large amount of labour, which continued in one shape or other
throughout the year. The great bulk of the general excavation for the foundation of the new
wards was done by the convicts from the Provincial Gaol, and I have to thank Mr. Armstrong,
the Governor, and his superintendent of the convicts, Mr. Burr, for the excellent way in which
this part of the work was carried out, notwithstanding great drawbacks, owing to wet weather.
Our patients, however, supplemented this work most efficiently under the direction of Mr.
Stinchcombe, our agricultural manager. It was a most difficult task, and Mr. Stinchcombe
was obliged to overcome some of the difficulties he encountered by breaking up the hard-pan
with picks and shovels, and by carrying it away in pails, as it was impossible to use wheelbarrows in the contracted space at disposal. This was a tedious task, and its accomplishment
a credit to Mr. Stinchcombe and the patients in his charge. After this work was done, and
the brickwork belonging to it finished by the contractors, a trench was dug for a distance of
500 feet, 4 feet wide, and a plank walk was laid down through the basement to afford access to
the pipes and machinery. I should make this Report too long if I entered into minute details
regarding this labour. I must, therefore, content myself with enumerating the different items
of it. For some time before the deep drain was finished, the water from the new engine-room
had to be kept down by constant pumping with a hand-pump; the basement floors were
graded, and a large quantity of earth was carried out; the rooms in the basement were kept
dry by the construction of proper drains; new piers were built by Mr. Fitzgerald, our bricklayer, assisted by patients. The water, which in some parts was within two feet only of the
joists above, had to be lowered to a depth of 5 feet 6 inches, a width of 8 feet, by a channel
130 feet long. There were many other minor undertakings connected with the work in the
basement, and with the drains, which occupied much time. After these things were accomplished, the patients went on with the work of the new Airing Court, which has been so long
in progress. The fences of this Airing Court were finished by boarding thein all round on
both sides ; the banks were graded, and a great many loads of earth and rock were hauled
outside; the trees were trimmed, and it was made ready for occupation by the male patients.
A considerable piece of land (about an acre) at the back was slashed and burnt, so as to allow
the hogs to run over it, and it was necessarily provided with a suitable fence. During wet
weather, the male patients constructed two trunk-rooms in the basement, one for the male,
one for the female department, and a large store-room for rough storage was also constructed
there and whitewashed. The lamp-room and engine-room were also whitewashed by our men.
Coal bunkers of large size were built in the engine-room. A long ditch, about 600 feet long,
was dug for the water pipes to the drinking places in the Airing Court, and also for conveying
water to the Airing Court water-closets; a long ditch was dug for a gas pipe from the basement to the new kitchen ; a drain at the back of the kitchen was taken up and re-laid ; various
other drains, which had become broken in and blocked, were taken up and re-laid, and a long
drain was dug from the new mortuary and connected with the sewers. In addition, the men
were employed in sawing, splitting, and piling the firewood required, this being done mostly
in wet weather, when the men could only work under cover; and, finally, a very large amount
of work was done in clearing up the premises and hauling away the rubbish and litter left by 63 Vict.                   Report on the Asylum for the Insane.                             899
the contractors.    I think it must be acknowledged, on considering all these numerous details,
that a large amount of labour has been got through during the year, very much to the credit
of Mr. Stinchcombe and the patients in his charge.    The accessory building operations now
enumerated have, of course, taken up much time that would have been otherwise occupied in
extending the area of the agricultural land, but they were works that were absolutely essential,
and the reclaiming of the agricultural land had necessarily to wait.
In addition to the work above mentioned, a large amount has been accomplished by Mr.
House, who for so many years has had charge of the garden and front grounds.    As soon as
possible after the prisoners from the Provincial Gaol had finished the excavations, and the
builders had so far advanced as to allow him room to work, he began clearing away the debris
and levelling and terracing the front gardens.    This work is still progressing, and promises to
make a very handsome and picturesque entrance to the Asylum.    It is planted with elegant
trees and shrubs, and is laid out with grass plots and flower beds.    This work is, as yet, far
from complete, although a large amount of labour has been bestowed on it.    The total number
of clays of labour expended on all these improvements by the patients will be found in Table
No. 16, which table also shows the number of days the patients were employed in the kitchen,
laundry, and wards, and assisting the mechanics at their trades.
The work done by the tailor's, shoemaker's, and female departments during the year will
be found in Table No. 17.
Expenditure.
The cost per capita is $20.63f per month, being an increase of $2.47|- on the previous year.
The following figures will show the expenditure in 1899 as compared with the expenditure in 1898 :—
1898.
1899.
Difference.
Provisions	
Fuel and light	
Water	
$14,591 93
4,640 29
680 S2
935 14
1,757 22
353 81
3,199 72
23 35
2,769 22
20,310 70
3,753 30
$15,969 33
7,625 90
814 63
709 32
1,612 94
254 99
1,720 36
1,785 18
25,558 15
2,614 45
+ $1,377 40
+  2,985 61
+      133 81
225 82
-      144 28
98 82
-  1,479 36
-        23 35
Salaries	
Lands and Works	
- 984 04
+ 5,247 45
- 1,138 85
Total	
$53,015 50
$58,665 25
+ $5,649 75
It will be noticed by the above table that the
fuel and light, water, and salaries.    In all the oth(
Asylum, the expenditure has been less, notably in t'.
works sections.    The increased expenditure for prov
the number of patients and the additions to the s
fuel and light is owing to the opening of the new w
area required to be heated and lighted, thereby incr
get sufficient power to keep up the circulation of s
engine for the electric light dynamo since the latt
salaries is to be accounted for by the additions to
numbers of the patients.    During the year, the adc
expenditure 1
ir sections of
le furniture, n
isions is cause
taff.    The larj
ards, which ha
;asing the con
team through
er has been u
the staff mac
itions to the s
las increased
the votes for s
liscellaneous, i
1 by the gradi
;e increase of
s considerably
sumption of fi
the pipes, an<
sed.    The lar|
e necessary b
taff have beer
'or provisions,
upplies to the
md lands and
lal increase in
$2,985.61 for
enlarged the
lel in order to
1 to work the
;e increase for
y the growing
an Assistant 900
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1899
Medical Superintendent, two firemen, a night-watchman, and two attendants. There has also
been a re-adjusting of the salaries of the mechanics and tradesmen employed, and sundry small
increases of salary have been made to those members of the staff entitled to the same, which
has also assisted to augment the amount.
Estimates.
The following table shows the amounts expended to the end of the fiscal year, June 30th,
1899, as compared with the amounts voted :—
Vote 1898-9.
Salaries $21,410 001 »„, _„„
supplementary vote         120 00J 9Zl'0iiu w
Provisions    14,000 00
Fuel and light      5,000 00
Water          800 00
Medicines and surgical appliances      1,000 00
Clothing      1,800 00
Shoemaker's fittings         400 00
Furniture       2,500 00
Transport      1,500 00
Miscellaneous      2,200 00
Lands and Works $44,000 001  » 4„., ftfl„ nn
supplementary vote...   18,000 00/     »oz>uuu '""
Expended to June
30th, 1899.
$23,253 73
16,924 27
6,674 52
822 25
1,016 17
1,688 06
339 92
2,749 86
23 35
2,385 63
t 2,738 91
Balance lapsed.
Excess $1,723 73
2,924 27
1,674 52
22 25
16 17
111 94
60 08
249 86
1,476 65
185 63
59,261 09
* New wing, heating apparatus, and sundry alterations in central building,
f This amount is accounted for in the books of the Asylum.
It will be noted in column " Balance lapsed" that the amounts voted in the different
sections of the vote were insufficient to cover the expenditure in the majority of the sections,
the exceptions being only a slight balance left in the sections for clothing and shoemaker's
fittings. As regards transport, as the expenses incurred in that section are generally paid
from Victoria, I have no record of the amount expended excepting for the sum mentioned in
the above table, $23.35. The excess of expenditure above the amount voted is owing entirely
to the many extra calls that have been made on the vote during the past year through the
opening up of the new wings, the increasing number of patients, and the additions that have
been necessarily made to the staff.
The vote for the present financial year ending June 30th, 1900, shows at date (December
31st, 1899,) on the books of the Asylum the following amounts expended :—
Vote 1899-1900.
Expended to 31st December, 1899.
Balance for use to 30th
June, 1900.
. $27,610 00
$13,580 97
7,484 80
3,546 69
374 30
207 52
893 35
100 51
838 88
843 27
883 74
$14,029 03
10,515 20
..  18,000 00
Medicines and surgical appliances .
5,500 00
1,000 00
...    1,200 00
2,000 00
500 00
3,500 00
2,500 00
.    1,000 00
1,953 31
625 70
992 48
1,106 65
399 49
2,661  12
1,656 73
116 26
Divine Service.
Divine service has been conducted, as usual, by the Medical Superintendent, or, during
the last three months when he was absent in England, by  the Assistant Physician.    The 63 Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 901
musical arrangements have been, as heretofore, under the direction of Mr. T. R. Duncan, who
has assiduously carried on practices of the hymns and chants every Saturday afternoon. The
piano accompaniments have been played during the last year by different performers, but for
the most part by Miss Jones, Assistant Matron. A Roman Catholic service, with Confession
and Communion, was held on May 23rd, and on Sunday, November 26th, the Rev. T. Scouler,
the Chaplain of the Penitentiary, New Westminster, visited the Asylum and kindly undertook
the service.
The funeral services have been conducted by the minister of the denomination to which
in each case the deceased has belonged. The sick, and those patients who have wished to see
a clergyman, have also in numerous instances been visited by the ministers of their respective
churches.
Entertainments.
I have nothing particularly new to report under this head. It may be remembered that
some two or three years ago entertainments, which we call "Socials," were substituted for the
larger and more formal concerts and dramatic representations previously in vogue, at which
large audiences were present by invitation. The reasons for this change will be found more
particularly stated in my Report for 1897. The patients like the "Socials" better. They are
more at their ease, and the whole entertainment is more homelike. They join in the dancing,
and the light refreshments, coffee and cake, etc., constitute a great attraction. The "Socials"
have, therefore, been continued fortnightly throughout the year, except in the hottest weather
in summer, and are still very much appreciated. I have sometimes been able to secure the
services of lecturers, who have given amusing and instructive lectures, illustrated by magic
lantern slides. Unfortunately I was not able to meet with such lecturers last year, for which
I feel great regret, as they are sources of great pleasure and enlivenment to the patients, and
are liked, I think, almost more than any other sort of entertainment I have been able to
provide. Perhaps my own very severe illness at the beginning of the year was a hindrance,
preventing me, as it did, from looking up entertainments of the kind. I purpose, however, to
make further efforts during the ensuing autumn and winter to find lecturers with lime light or
magic lantern illustrations, but they are not easily met with. There seems to be a dearth of
of such entertainments in New Westminster, which is a pity, for they afford much pleasure to
every one concerned.
The "Socials" have been, as in former years, under the management of Mr. T. R. Duncan,
who has conducted them most successfully, more especially the musical programmes. We have
now under his guidance a very creditable orchestra. Owing to a variety of circumstances, the
principal one being my own illness, there was no attendants' ball last year, but I purpose
providing social gatherings for the attendants by themselves, as they conduce very much to
lighten the trying and anxious labour of an attendant's life. There is nothing, in my opinion,
so conducive to efficient performance of duties of this kind as a cheerful, light-hearted spirit,
and the maintenance of bodily vigour and activity, both of them promoted by rational and
moderate amusements.
Visitors.
Our official visitors have again been few in number. The Grand Juries paid the usual
visits during the Assizes. On March 10th, the Hon. J. F. Hume inspected the Institution.
On April 5th, the Hon. C. A. Semlin, Premier, with the Hon. J. Martin, Attorney-General,
and the Hon. Dr. McKechnie, President of the Council, made a visit of inspection. On
August 4th, the Hon. C. A. Semlin paid us another visit. On April 19th, the Chinese reformer,
Hwang Yee Wei, and retinue, inspected the Asylum. He took a great interest in everything
connected with the Institution, especially the accommodation provided for his co-patriots, and 902 Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1899
was much surprised to hear of the great length of time that some of them had been inmates.
He remarked to me also that the Chinese were far more comfortably housed and taken care of
here than they would be in their own country.
On May 15th, Dr. A. J. Grant, of Haddington, Scotland, and Dr. H. A. Grant, of New
York, visited the Institution.
The other visitors have been principally relatives or friends of patients, or the ministers of
the different denominations to which the patients have belonged, and whom they desired to see.
Changes in the Staff.
The following changes have occurred in the staff during the year. On February 16th, C.
E. Shawl, attendant, resigned, and G. Farrant was appointed as attendant in his place. On
February 28th, Mr. J. Phillips, the steward, after 24 years of faithful service in the Asylum,
resigned, owing to severe illness, to which, I regret to state, he eventually succumbed. He
died on October 19th. On March 10th, Mr. R. Rees, the supervisor, was promoted to the
position of steward, and T. Mayes, charge attendant of the hospital ward, was promoted to be
supervisor. On March 15th, G. H. Manchester, M.D., joined the staff as assistant medical
superintendent. On March 28th, E. Derville was appointed attendant vice T. Mayes,
promoted. On April 15th, the new heating apparatus being completed, W. McMurphy and
W. F. Johnson were appointed as firemen. The former resigned on April 30th, and N. Brown
was appointed fireman in his place. Also, on April 30th, C. A. Campbell and J. McN.
Wright resigned, their places as attendants being filled by E. B. Jones and C. Oddy. On
May 31st, Miss Ethel Cunningham resigned, and Miss Fanny Hewett took her place as
attendant. On June 14th, it was found expedient to discharge the cook, W. E. Mortimer.
The position was filled for a short time by Mrs. F. Bennett.
On July 1st, the commencement of the fiscal year 1899-1900, the staff was reorganised,
as it was found, owing to the increasing calls on those tradesmen who were doing duty as
attendants as well, that their time was required entirely at their trades. This change affected
the gardener, carpenter, plumber, plasterer, tailor, shoemaker, and the teamster of the Asylum,
who now work only at their respective callings. Also, over each ward in the male department of the Institution, was placed a charge attendant, with one attendant under him,
excepting the refractory and sick wards, where there are two under-attendants. This system
was submitted to and approved of by the Honourable the Provincial Secretary, and it appears
to be working satisfactorily, and also more economically than formerly. This change was
much needed, owing to the constantly increasing number of the patients and the enlarged area
of the Institution. Also, on July 1st, G. Mathewson, assistant cook, having been made 2nd
night-watchman, W. G. Armour was appointed to the position of assistant cook, and an
addition was made to the male staff by the appointment of A. Rowan as attendant. Mary
Reid, jr., also joined the staff as housemaid and attendant. On July 15th, Mrs. Bennett,
finding the duty of cook too arduous for a woman, resigned, and O. H. Petterson was appointed
cook. He is, so far, giving general satisfaction. On August 31st, R. Chance, attendant,
resigned, and W. H. Goldsack was placed on the staff as attendant in bis place. On September 8th, Miss F. Hewett resigned, her place being taken by Miss Annie Carlyon, a former
attendant in this Asylum, on September llth. On September 30th, Miss Ruth Gamble,
assistant matron, resigned, and Miss Henrietta S. T. Jones, 1st attendant, was promoted to
her position, the place of the latter as attendant being given to Mrs. V. Werden. Also, on
September 30th, E. Derville resigned, and was succeeded by C. Stanford. On October 13th,
it was found necessary to appoint T. Johnson as attendant temporarily, as the supervisor and
one  male  attendant  were sent to Eastern Canada and England in charge of some twenty 63 Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 903
patients who were being sent to their respective homes, as mentioned in a previous part of
this Report. On October 21st, O. Wilkie and A. O. Lohman resigned, they having joined
the Royal Canadian Contingent for service in South Africa, and T. Johnson was placed on
the permanent staff.
Requirements.
The requirements for this year embrace, along with minor matters, the furniture and
fittings for the new operating room, together with numerous articles of furniture made
necessary by the erection of the new wards. They comprise also the equipment of the new
mortuary to make it fit for its purposes, for which at present it is not yet by any means
complete.
In the agricultural and gardening department, amongst numerous other minor implements,
there are also required a one-horse cultivator, and a double-mould-board plough. These articles
are very much wanted. The new fences around the grounds, and especially around the new
Airing Court, require completion by double boarding, single boarding only being as yet finished.
A very pressing want is the erection of tradesmen's shops, without which the stores
cannot be safely housed, nor can the work be by any means efficiently or economically carried
on. The old sheds, most imperfect places, having been now pulled down to make way for the
alterations and new buildings, I have been over and over again requested to have proper shops
provided, and I trust the Government will see their way to the erection of these most urgently
necessary buildings, together with the providing of the tools and implements required for
carrying on the work. I need not stay to point out the economy of having capacious and
well-provided shops, with all the necessary implements and equipments. For so large an
establishment as this, such shops, with their fittings, are essentially necessary. The mechanics
for whom shops are necessary, with the requisite tools, implements, and materials, are the
carpenter, bricklayer, and plasterer (one shop); plumber, glazier, and blacksmith (one shop) ;
and the tailor and gardener. All these mechanics and tradesmen must be accommodated if
the work of the establishment is to be carried on economically and efficiently, and if the
business is to be carried on so as to avoid frequent resort to the tradesmen in the town, a
most expensive way of getting the work carried out. There are other minor matters to be
considered, but these now enumerated are the principal items, and I trust the Government,
now that the bulk of the building is finished, will get these matters carried into effect as
speedily as possible.
Acknowledgements.
I have now to offer my feeling of obligation to the Government for the uniform courtesy
with which they have treated me and met my numerous demands. They have not always
been able to comply with my, perhaps, importunate requests, but I have always felt that they
have had the interests and claims of the Asylum at heart, and that they have done their best
to meet the claims I have made, so far as circumstances and the funds at their disposal have
enabled them to go. For myself, I may sincerely say that my only aim in making such
requests has been the promotion of the interests of the Institution and the welfare of the
much-to-be-pitied, unfortunate inmates. I cannot conclude these thanks without again making
special mention of the steps taken for transferring so many patients to their homes, as
mentioned in a previous part of this Report. The Government cordially supported me in my
proposals, with results which have been of much benefit to the Asylum and to many of its
suffering inmates, results also which, I am strongly of opinion, may be continued systematically
with great advantage in future years, fortified, as such proceedings must be, by the experience
gained in this present initiatory action. 904 Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1899
In conclusion, I have to offer my best thanks to the proprietors of the Vancouver " Daily
News-Advertiser" and the Vancouver " Semi-Weekly World " for their kindness in presenting
us with their respective papers gratuitously throughout the year. Finally, I must offer my
best thanks to Dr. Manchester, who, as already stated, was appointed as Assistant Physician
in the early part of the year, and who has worked most diligently at the duties of his office
since his entering upon office, as well as to all the other officials, without exception. I feel all
the more grateful to them inasmuch as the year was one of very severe illness for me, illness
from which I cannot yet say that I am thoroughly recovered, and which must account largely
for the late period of the year of the sending in of this Report.
I can only here repeat most sincerely what I said in my last year's Report, namely, that
" I have to thank all the members of the staff, as in former years, for the cordial good-will
" with which they have worked with me, and used their best exertions towards the harmonious
" and efficient working of the Institution at large."
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your most obedient servant,
G.   F.   BODINGTON,
Medical Superintendent.
June 1st, 1900.
- 63 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
905
ANNUAL  STATISTICAL  REPORT
of thl! operations of the asylum for the insane, new westminster, for the year
ending 31st December, 1899.
Table No. 1.
Showing movements of patients in the Asylum for the year ending 31st December, 1899.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
184
68
252
68
184
798
614
184
42
33
75
16
59
247
188
59
226
Admitted during the year :—
By Lieutenant-Governor's Warrant	
By Order and Medical Certificate	
By Urgency Order and one Med. Certificate
From Yukon Territory, by order of Com-
1
58
4
5
33
1
91
4
5
101
327
Diseharged during the year :—
23
12
12
8
4
2
31
16
14
As improved	
As unimproved	
47
19
2
Total number of discharges during the year....
Died	
14
2
61
21
2
84
243
1045
n            discharged          n                        n
a            died                     //                        a
it             escaped                it                         n
387
216
11
160
28
547
244
11
802
243
Table No. 2.
Showing the maximum and minimum number of patients actually resident in the Asylum, the
total number of days' stay of patients, and the daily average number of patients in the
Asylum (exclusive of those absent on probation), during the year ending 31st December,
1899.
Maximum number of patients (on the 13th October).
Minimum n n (on the 17th February)
Collective days' stay of all patients during the year .
Daily average of population	
Male.
195
182
67,339
184.49
Female.
46
37
15,314
41.95
Total.
241
219
82,653
226.44 906
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1899
Table No. 3.
Showing absences on probation for the year 1899.
Reg.
No.
Sex.
Initials.
Date of probational
discharge.
Time allowed.
Remarks.
789
F.
P. M.
March
14th,     1899.
Twelve months
Returned December 19th.
890
M.
J. A.
„
19th,
One month.
Discharged.
S93
F.
A. S.
„
25th,
One month.
//
715
M.
M. McP.
April
6th,
Two months.
//
894
F.
A. N.
//
22nd,
Two months.
//
623
M.
J. T.
„
25th,
Six months.
n
783
M.
E. G.
a
28th,
Three months.
Returned May 17th.
801
M.
M. H. L.
a
28th,
One month.
Discharged.
811
M.
J. C.
Mav
10th,
Three months.
//
896
M.
E. H. T.
//
31st,
One month.
„
912
M.
J. K.
July
7th,
Three months.
//
232
M.
J. M.
//
7th,        ,i
Four months.
„
916
M.
E. M.
//
24th,
Three months.
//
923
M.
J. P. B.
August
10th,
Two months.
'/
927
M.
W. B. B.
„
llth,
Six months.
Still on probation.
925
F.
A. R.
„
12th,
Three months.
Returned September 4th.
742
M.
J. D.
„
21st,
Three months.
Discharged.
937
F.
A. D. VV.
„
22nd,
Three months.
it
921
F.
M. L.
Septembei
9th,
Six months.
Still on probation.
934
F.
H. L. T.
n
9th,
Three months.
Discharged.
929
F.
A. B. S.
V
18th,
Two months.
//
943
F.
H. M.
tf
24th,
Two months.
Returned November 7th.
848
F.
J. V.
November
15th,
Three months.
Still on probation.
957
M.
F. J. C.
//
29th,
Two months.
Returned December Sth.
929
F.
E. F.
December
5th,        »
One mouth.
Still on probation.
966
F.
E. T.
tr
llth,
Three months.
Returned December 28th.
431
F.
S. E.
„
16th,
Two months.
Still on probation.
856
M.
D. D.
a
20th,
Three months.
it                tt
935
F.
L. S. S.
tt
24th,
Three months.
it                a
965
P.
E. V.
n
29th,        //
One month.
it                a
879
M.
S. P.
ti
29th,
One month.
it                a
Summary of probational discharges.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
16
15
31
9
2
3
1
1
4
12
3
1
6
2
Absent on probation 31st December, 1899	
3
6
9
Table No. 4.
Showing the social state of the patients received during the year 1899, and also of the total
number received since the opening of the Asylum.
Admissions of
year.
Admissions since opening.
Social State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
17
45
6
22
11
39
56
6
101
189
439
170
179
68
368
507
170
Total 	
68
33
798
247
1,045 63 Vict.                     Report on the Asylum for the Insane.                             907
Table No. 5.
Showing the religious denominations of the patients received during the year 1899, and also
of the total number received since the opening of the Asylum.
Denomination of Religion.
Admissions of year.
Admissions since opening.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
73
47
36
44
5
9
11
18
4
Total.
Church of England	
Roman Catholic	
Methodist	
20
9
8
7
9
10
5
7
4
2
3
2
30
14
15
11
11
3
1
14
2
172
123
91
60
41
16
44
200
51
245
170
127
104
46
25
1
12
2
55
218
55
Total	
68
33
101
798
247
1,045
3.
uring the year 1899, and also of the total
ling of the Asylum.
Tab
Showing the place of birth of the patients r<
number received since
LE   No.
^ceived c
the opei
Place of Birth.
Admissions of year.
Admissions since opening.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
England	
Scotland	
10
5
7
4
3
17
9
3
167
49
52
6
32
10
46
57
4
3
31
90
20
1
38
4
84
4
1
1
1
96
1
50
20
25
2
2
2
8
17
21
43
19
4
15
5
14
247
217
69
77
Wales	
8
8
2
3
9
1
1
1
2
9
3
4
11
34
Other European countries	
12
54
74
4
3
4
10
2
1
5
3
2
3
7
2
1
7
17
4
1
6
.3
2
52
//            Quebec	
it           Manitoba	
Maritime Provinces (N. B., N. S., P. E. I.)	
133
39
5
53
4
89
4
1
1
Manilla	
1
3
1
1
~~33~
4
1
110
1
Total 	
68
101
798
1,045 908
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1899
Table No. 7.
Showing the place of residence from which patients were received during the year 1899.
Residence.
Male.
7
17
4
5
1
3
2
Port Moody	
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Bella Bella	
1
5
I
Port Haney.
Bella Coola	
Albert Canyon..
Somenos	
Parson's Bridge.
Quatsino	
Wellington	
Sooke   	
Sea Island ....
Lytton	
Total
Female.
68
33
Total.
15
26
10
5
101
Table No. 8.
Showing trades, callings and occupations of patients admitted during the year 1899.
Occupations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
2
1
5
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
5
Clerks                                                 	
3
Convicts	
1
1
Domestic servants  	
1
Dressmakers	
~
1
1
1
15
2
17 63 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
909
Table No. 8.—Concluded.
Showing trades, callings and occupations of patients admitted during the year 1899.
Occupations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
15
5
2
3
1
12
4
1
11
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
19
10
1
17
5
0
Gardeners  	
House-keepers     	
Housewives	
Knife grinders	
3
1
19
1
12
4
Master mariners    	
1
11
1
14
Painters 	
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
Total	
68
33
101
Table No. 9.
Showing length of residence in the Asylum of those discharged during the year 1899.
Reg.
No.
Initials.
Sex.
Date of Admission.
Date of Discharge.
Remarks.
843
J. C.
F.
June 22nd,
1898 ....
January
1st,   1899....
Recovered.
367
A. C.
F.
June 15th,
1890 .
v
26th,     „    ....
Improved.
870
G. F.
M.
November 7th,
1898 .
February
1st,      „    .   ..
Recovered.
881
J. H.
M.
December 26th,
//
//
3rd,     /,   ....
Recovered.
837
A. B.
F.
June 4th,
„
„
6th,     „    	
Recovered.
849
F. E. S.
M.
July 13th,
»
„
15th,     „    ....
Recovered.
776
N. L.
M.
September Sth,
1S97 .
/'
17th,      „    ....
Recovered.
652
S. L.
M.
August 30th,
1895 .
March
7th,      ,,   ....
Recovered.
760
E. A. L.
F.
June Sth,
1897 .
a
9th,      „    	
Recovered.
210
D. McL.
M.
June 26th,
1886 .
„
29th,     „    ....
Recovered.
414
S. F.
M.
April 4th,
1891 .
April
4th,      „    	
Unimproved.
866
A. McG.
M.
October 14th,
1898 .
//
4th,     „    ....
Recovered.
868
E. A. B.
F.
October 17th,
//
„
12th,      „   ....
Recovered.
890
J. A.
M.
February 5th,
1899 .
tr
13th,     „    ....
Recovered.
882
J. C. Y.
M.
January 6th,
'/
„
25th,      „   	
Recovered.
893
A. S.
F.
March 10th,
ft
„
25th,     ,i   	
Recovered.
895
M. A. R.
F.
March 13th,
If
„
29th,      „    ....
Improved.
863
M. E. Y.
F.
October 7th,
1898 .
May
24th,      „    ....
Unimproved.
875
M. F. M.
F.
December 1st,
a
it
31st,      „    	
Recovered.
715
M. McP.
M.
September 10th
1896 .
June
6th,      „    ....
Recovered.
894
A. N.
F.
March llth,
1899 .
it
22nd,     „   ....
Recovered.
801
M. H. L.
M.
January 7th,
1898 .
ti
28th,     „    ....
Improved.
896
E. H. T.
M.
March 15th,
1899 .
it
30th,     „    ....
Recovered.
886
J. W.
M.
January 25th,
//
July
17th,     „   ....
Unimproved.
918
W. F.
M.
June 4th,
It
//
23rd.      „    ....
Recovered.
924
H. Y.
M.
July 1st,
It
August
22nd,     „    ....
Unimproved.
811
J. C.
M.
February 4th,
1898 .
September
10th,      „    ....
Recovered.
779
G. N.
M.
October 4th,
1897 .
//
19th,      „    ....
Improved. 910
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1899
Table No. 9.—Concluded.
Showing length of residence in the Asylum of those discharged during the year 1899.
Reg.
No.
Initials.
Sex.
Date of Admission.
Date of Discharge.
Remarks.
912
J. K.
M.
May 6th,
1899 ...
. October       7th,  1899....
Recovered.
923
J. P. B.
M.
June 30th,
„
10th,     „   .
Recovered.
323
A. M.
M.
May 21st,
//    ...
13th,     n   .
Improved.
32S
H. R.
M.
May 21st,
a
13th,      „   .
Improved.
448
T. P.
M.
December Sth,
1891 . ..
13th,     a   .
Unimproved.
514
W.B.
M.
March 26th,
1893 ...
13th,     „   .
Improved.
596
E. K.
M.
September 25th
1894 ...
13th,     n   .
Recovered.
692
B. W. H.
M.
June 1st,
1S96 ...
13th,     ,i   .
Unimproved.
638
J. B.
M.
June 27th,
1895 ...
13th,     „    .
Unimproved.
649
W. D.
M.
August 19th,
,t
13th,      „    .
Improved.
711
J. E.
M.
August llth,
1896 ...
13th,      „    .
Improved.
674
VV. A.
M.
February 19tb,
„
13th,     n   .
Recovered.
822
P. A. V.
M.
March 16th,
1898 ...
13th,     „    .
Unimproved.
258
M. S.
M.
August 9th,
1887 ...
13th,      „    .
Improved.
919
R. M.
M.
June 6th,
1899 ...
13th,      „    .
Unimproved.
871
D. B.
M.
December 7th,
1898 ...
13th,     „    .
Improved.
503
R. S.
M.
January 9th,
1893 ...
13th,      „    .
Recovered.
784
J. G. A. D.
M.
October 27th,
1897 ...
13th,      „    .
Improved.
938
T. J. L.
M.
August 17th,
1899 ...
13th,      »    .
Unimproved.
872
J. H.
M.
March 13th,
1898 ...
„             13th,     „    .
Unimproved.
903
L. B.
M.
March 29th,
1899 ...
13th,      „    .
Recovered.
950
A. T.
M.
October 2nd,
it    ...
13th,      .,    .
Unimproved.
916
E. M.
M.
June 2nd,
/;
24th,     „    .
Improved.
623
J. T.
M.
April 22nd,
1895 ...
,i            25th,      „    .
Recovered.
942
M. S.
F.
August 31st,
1899 ...
.  November    Sth,     n   .
Improved.
232
J. M.
M.
December Sth,
1886 ...
Sth,      „   .
Recovered.
865
B. H. R.
M.
October 7th,
1898 ...
22nd,     «    .
Unimproved.
722
J. M.
M.
November 24th,
1896 ...
22nd,     „   .
Improved.
742
J. D.
M.
April 7th,
1897 ...
22nd,     -,    .
Recovered.
937
A. D. W.
F.
August 15th,
1899 ...
22nd,     „    .
Improved.
929
A. B. S.
F.
July 13th,
ti
22nd,     n    .
Recovered.
955
F. S.
M.
October 12th,
it    ...
30th,      //    .
Recovered.
934
H. l. t.
F.
July 31st,
i,
. December    9th,     n   .
Unimproved.
Table No.   10.
Showing age, length of residence, and proximate cause of death of those patients who died
during the year 1899.
Reg.
No.
880
876
350
795
833
662
734
156
852
756
914
821
906
838
545
755
900
Initials.
Sex.
E. McN.
M.
J. S.
M.
J. A.
M.
E. G.
M.
A. W. C.
M.
J. P. J.
M.
G. B.
M.
I. M. J.
F.
A.E. M. E.
F.
F. S.
M.
D. McD.
M.
J. H.
M.
W. H.
M.
T. B.
M.
J. M.
M.
J. O'N.
M.
J. W.
M.
W. A. J.
M.
J. H.
M.
S. H.
M.
J. McC.
M.
Age.
44
77
Not known.
Not known.
34
73
66
53
25
30
36
72
44
42
45
51
53
40
45
65
Date of Death.
January 4th ..
January 7th ..
January 31st ..
February 4th. .
February Sth. .
February 9th..
February 14th.
March 21st	
April 3rd	
April 14th	
April 24th	
May 7th	
May 7th	
August 9th . . .
August 28th . .
September Sth.
September 24th
October 20th. .
October 22nd..
November 23rd
December 4th .
Residence in Asylum.
Years.    Mos.    Days
18
2
1
13
30
19
30
3
20
26
1
1
19
8
2
17
10
29
7
14
27
2
13
Proximate cause of death.
General paralysis of insane.
Blight's disease.
Pneumonia.
Fitroid phthisis.
Bronchiactasis.
Carcinoma of lungs.
Heart disease.
Pneumonia and heart failure.
Phthisis.
Marasmus.
Cerebral hoemorrhage.
Chronic Bright's disease.
General paralysis of insane.
General paresis.
Tumour of the brain,    [esis.
Apoplexy, follow'g gen'l par-
Chronic Blight's disease.
General paralysis of insane.
Phthisis.
General paralysis of insane.
General   debility,   following
on stone in the bladder. 63 Vict.                    Report
on the Asylum for the Insane.                           911
Table No.  11.
o ^ +=>
cci   co
CD   P -1
^►,
CD  &D£>
3.S d
m  t>   p
5-1    ©    3
■HH     03  ^
o u
rr; lt: r- o
aSaS
CD -°   H ^
I-l
11
11
10
7
5
8
4
4
4
7
2
3
31
24
14
6
16
12
9
8
10
18
7
12
Periods of treatment of
those who were  discharged       recovered
during the year.
Periods of treatment of
those who were  discharged       improved
during the year.
Periods of treatment of
those who were discharged   unimproved
during the year.
Under 1 month	
From   1   to   2   months	
„      2    a    3        a                                    	
1
5
1
5
1
2
3
I
1
1
1
1
1
2
„      3    „    4        „       	
„      4    a    5        it       	
2
„      5    n    6        -/       	
1
„      6    n    7       it      	
7    „    8       a      	
1
„      8    //    9        a       	
ii      9    a JO       a
a     10    a 11        «
„     11     „  12        a       	
1
3
1
1
1
//      1    a    2    years   	
3
2
2
1
1
1
3
„      3    „    i        „       	
1
1
6    ,,    7        -t      	
I
1
„      8    n    9       »      	
1
2
1
1
„      9    „ 10       a      	
„    10    ,/ 15       «      	
2
„     1fi    „ 90        „       ...                         	
//    20 years and upwards	
Total	
243
31
16
14
Showing patients
12.
eatment 1st January, 1900.
Table No.
remaining under tr
Males.
Females.
Total.
Whites   	
155
3
25
1
58
1
213
4
25
1
Total	
184
59
243 912
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1899
Table No. 13.
Showing admissions, discharges, deaths, escapes; number resident at close of each year;
increase or decrease each year; percentage of recoveries; percentage of deaths, from the
opening of the Asylum to the present date, 31st December, 1899.
CD
o
nS
en
03
o
T3
ID
03
ID
+>
o
cS
03
+3
O
CS T3
CD   S
Years.
4^
o
rS    1
U
03
rO.
■s!
'CJ   -4-.
en
r->
B
CD   |
CD •»
b0"3
be !-,
W
en
CD
>
bo
CO
Si
T3
ID
Pd
ll
CD
CO
cS
03
en
c3
03
C3   g
5 ce
ii   CD
CD    M
s
<
O
ID
ID
in
P
c3
CD
o
cS
o
CO
to
fc
ID
r-i
O
03
fi
1
" °
CD ^
Ph
O   0
CD   ^
to
1872	
18
1
1
16
2
18
5.55
5.55
1873	
15
10
2
5
14
2
31
66.66
16.12
1874	
12
4
3
19
5
26
33.33
11.53
1875	
29
22
14
3
11
6
3
3
3
10
5
3
32
35
37
13
3
2
48
54
49
10.34
50.00
43.85
20.83
1876	
9.35
1877	
6.12
1878	
17
18
9
5
8
8
1
36
41
5
1
54
54
47.05
27.27
16.16
1879	
14.81
1880	
17
4
5
1
48
7
58
23.52
8.62
1881	
13
5
3
5
48
61
38.46
8.19
1882	
i
3
1
2
49
1
55
42.85
3.63
1883	
8
11
21
4
5
5
1
2
1
3
2
5
49
51
61
o
10
57
60
72
50.00
45.45
23.80
5.26
1884	
3.33
1885	
6.94
18S6	
27
16
1
6
65
4
88
62.96
6.81
1887	
39
21
5
1
77
12
104
53.84
4.80
1888	
29
19
2
3
82
5
106
65.51
2.87
1889	
41
19
4
100
18
123
46.34
3.25
1890	
57
22
5
12
1
117
17
157
38.59
7.64
1891	
54
20
7
20
1
123
6
171
37.37
11.69
1892	
64
18
21
13
135
12
187
28.12
6.95
1893	
49
21
15
14
I
133
2
184
42.85
7.60
1894	
80
13
19
19
162
29
213
16.24
8.92
1895	
62
29
10
20
1
164
2
224
46.77
8.92
1896	
64
23
25
9
171
7
228
35.93
3.94
1897	
74
20
7
14
1
204
33
246
27.03
5.69
1898	
81
27
13
19
226
22
285
33.33
6.66
1899	
101
31
30
21
2
243
17
327
30.69
6.42 63 Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 913
Table No.  14.
Showing expenditure for the year 1899.
Provisions :—
Apples, evaporated $   110 06
a       green  11 00
Bacon  235 41
Barley, pearl  17 23
Beans  7140
Beef, mutton, &c  4,965 93
Bird seed  21 96
Bread  2,837 82
Brooms  31  13
Brushes  14 36
Butter  1,893 67
Cheese  35 09
Coffee  144 00
Cocoa  29 70
Currants  36 64
Eggs  294 75
Fish  450 80
Flour  67 27
Fruit, canned  9 85
Groceries, small  65 67
Ham  102 92
Lard  18 30
Lemons, essence of  7 09
Maccaroni  8 54
Matches    11 75
Meal, corn   193 28
a     oat  168 50
Milk  1,369 77
Mustard  14 10
Oil, coal  11 60
„    nut  12 60
Peaches, evaporated  21  12
Pepper  6 60
Pearline  84 00
Peas, split  16 89
Pickles  9 83
Prunes  99 38
Raisins  18 50
Rice.,  95 50
Sago  13 40
Salt  34 13
Sauces  65 60
Soap, castile  11  59
n      laundry              44 01
Soda, sal  29 27
Sugar  587 16
Spices  7 75
Syrup  71 03
Tapioca  11 22
Tartar, cream of      7 44
Tea  167 31
Tobacco  634 20
Vegetables  562 81
Vinegar  3 45
Wheat, cracked  85 00
Yeast powde.r  19 95
 15,969 33
Fuel and Light :—Coal, firewood, gas and electric light      7,625 90
Water        814 63
Medicines :—Drugs and surgical instruments         709 32
Clothing :—Wearing apparel and tailor's fittings          1,612 94
Shoemaker's Fittings :—Leather, &c         254 99
Furniture :— Bedding, &c      1,720 36
Miscellaneous:—Funerals, P. 0. box, fodder, and sundries      1,785 18
Salaries.    25,558 15
56,050 80
Lands and Works      2,614 45
Total $58,665 25 914                            Report
ON
the Asylum for the
Insane.
1899
Showing the amount of money rec
From all sources for the quarter endi
it                                             a
II                                                                                                  I!
Total	
Showing the number of days' work
Table No. 15.
eived from paying patients
year 1899.
and other sources during the
866 31
.  1,027 83
.  1,514 82
during the year 1
$4,769 04
Table No.  16.
done by the male patients
they were employed.
899, and how
How employed.
No. of days.
372
1,647
4
198
3,651
94
2,528
2,618
22,514
365
390
365
Total	
34,746
Showing the articles made
l during the year
Table No.  17.
and repaired in the Asyluu
1899.
Articles.
Made.
Repaired.
Tailor's Department:—
33
73
66
68
15
10
2
39
32
6
3
88
63
210
6
]1
6
8
27
Sundry miscellaneous work.
Shoemaker's Department:—
32
121
1
2
105
83
Mitts,        a    	
Sundry miscellaneous work. 63 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
915
Table No.  17.—Concluded.
Showing the articles made and repaired in the Asylum during the year 1899.
Articles.
Made.
Repaired.
Female Ward :—
56
10
60
50
28
9
40
35
125
206
15
1,195
32
52
77
16
721
22
12
12
38
323
188
11
192
2
15
70
Shirts                       	
1,087
Tablecloths	
7
44
120
47
41
56
15
18
16
12
1,242
Table No.  18.
Showing the average number of patients per day and the average cost per day and per month
for the year 1899.
-1
Average
number of
patients.
Average
daily
expenses.
Average
cost per capita
per day.
Average
cost per capita
per month.
222
220
223
223
221
224
231
232
232
228
228
232
226
154.22
165.00
147.18
158.33
150.28
159.04
138.60
143.84
143.84
155.04
161.88
167.04
.69
.75
.66
.71
.68
.71
.60
.62
.62
.68
.71
.72
$21 39
March	
April	
21 00
20 46
21 30
21 08
21 30
July	
September	
18 60
19 22
18 60
21 08
21 30
22 32
153.69T\
67ii
•u'l2
|20 63J 916
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1899
Table No. 19.
Showing the average cost per patient per month and per day for the past ten years, ending
December 31st, 1899.
Year.
Average
cost per capita
per month.
Average
cost per capita
per day.
1890	
$19 72J
14 81
15 454.
15 85|
14 791
16 68£
15 80i|
16 48J
18 61J
20 63|
.648
1891      	
48J
50J
1892	
1893	
51s
1894	
48§
1895	
54 5
1896	
1897	
7*6
513
014
54i
1898	
61J
67AA
1899 	
Average for ten years	
$16 SSyc^Q-
55 7
■ ,J02 ¥
Table No.  20.
Showing the return of garden produce for the year 1899.
Apples      4,779
Asparagus  18
Artichokes  158
Beans  200
Beets.  140
Blackberries  112
Cabbage  7,113
Carrots       23,610
Cauliflower  189
Celery   416
Cherries  6
Corn  1,116
Cucumbers  58
Currants  664
Gooseberries  339
Grapes  65
Hay  3
Leeks  607
Lettuce  1,740
Onions  531
Parsnips  3,824
Peaches  153
Pears  411
Peas  381
Plums  370
Potatoes   15,326
Radishes  490
Rhubarb  648
Sprouts, Brussels  40
Tomatoes  55
Turnips  3,938
Vegetable marrows  60
pounds.
bunches.
pounds.
ears,
pounds.
tons,
pounds 63 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
917
Table No. 21.
Showing the date of admission and length of residence of the Chinese patients in the Asylum
on January 1st, 1900.
Reg. No.
54
58
79
292
293
305
330
331
334
336
338
407
586
632
732
747
787
806
813
824
840
851
864
883
975
Initials.
A. C.
A. F.
A. B.
C.
G.
A. H.
C.
S. G.
A. F.
J.
H.
S.
. F.
L.
A. 0.
C. H.
Y. A. S.
A. L.
W. A. W.
S.
L. D.
A. C.
Y. T. H.
c. s.
L. S.
Sex.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
Date of Admission.
April 24th,
June 3rd,
March 15th,
February 14th,
February 16th,
August 15th,
May 21st,
May 21st,
May 21st,
June 10th,
June 22nd,
February 7th,
August 10th,
May 31st,
February 15th,
April 9th,
November 2nd,
January 28th,
February llth,
March 24th,
June 14th,
August 6th,
October 7th,
January 10th,
December 6th,
1875.
1876
1888
1889.
1891.
1894.
1895.
1897.
1898.
1899.
Length of Residence.
Years.  Months.  Days
24
24
23
11
11
11
10
10
10
10
10
9
5
4
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
6
9
10
10
4
7
7
7
6
6
10
4
7
10
8
1
11
10
9
6
4
2
11
29
17
18
16
17
11
11
11
22
10
25
22
1
17
23
30
4
21
8
18
26
25
22
26
I-
G. R  BODINGTON,
Medical Superintendent.
VICTORIA, b. 0.:
Printed by Richard Wolfendkn, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1000. 

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