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TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 1894-1895. BY… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1896

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 TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
PUBLIC   SCHOOLS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA,
1894-95.
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION.
WITH APPENDICES.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Richard Wolkkndkn, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1896. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 193
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT.
1894-95.
-:o:-
To His Honour Edgar Dewdney,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg herewith respectfully to present the Twenty-fourth Annual Report on the Public
Schools of the Province.
JAMBS BAKER,
Minister of Education.
December, 1895. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 195
PART I.
GENERAL   REPORT. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 197
ANNUAL REPORT
SUPERINTENDENT  OF  EDUCATION.
1894-95.
Education Office,
Victoria, December, 1895.
To Colonel
The Honourable James Baker,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—In accordance with the requirement of the "Public School Act, 1891," I beg to
submit, for the information of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, the Twenty-fourth Annual
Report on the condition and progress of the Public Schools of the Province for the school-year
ended June 30th, 1895.
The number of schools in operation during the past year was 202, as follows :—
4 High Schools, 172 Rural Schools,
20 Graded     .. 6 Ward       n
The total number of teachers and monitors employed was 319, an increase of 24 over that
for the previous year.
The aggregate number of pupils enrolled during the year was 13,482, an increase of 869
over that for the preceding year, and the average actual daily attendance was 8,610.31, an
increase of 824.81 for the same period.
The percentage of average attendance in City Districts was 69.93, in Rural Districts, 57.66,
and for the entire Province 63.86. Each of these percentages shows a marked increase over
that for the previous year, and has not been equalled in any year since the inception of our
Public School system,
The expenditure for Education Proper during the past year was as follows :—
Teachers' Salaries $169,447 83
Incidental Expenses of Rural Districts           7,701  62
Education Office          11,887 80
Total .'..,-, .,,„., $189,037 25 198 Public Schools Report. 1895
The cost of each pupil based on the total enrolment was $14.02, and based on average
actual daily attendance was $22.95. These amounts show an increase of $ .62, and $ .24 respectively over those for the preceding year.
The expenditure by the Lands and Works Department for the construction of school-
houses, furniture, repairs, and improvements to school property, was as follows :—
School-houses in Rural Districts $10,146 55
Furniture, repairs, &c, Rural Districts      3,816 80
In aid of School Building in Nanaimo City      5,000 00
Total $18,963 35
The total expenditure by the Provincial Government for all purposes of education during
the past school-year was as follows :—
Education Proper $189,037 25
Lands and Works Department      18,963 35
Total $208,000 60
During the year, school-houses have been erected, or additions made to  school buildings,
in the following districts :—
Huntingdon, Sidney,
Langley Prairie, South Nanaimo,
Mayne Island, Union,
Nakusp, Waneta,
North Cedar, Wellington,
Westham.
At the present time schools are in operation in the following newly-created districts :-
Boundary Creek, East Vancouver,
Okanagan Mission.
In addition to the above, schools are being maintained in the following localities :—
Aberdeen, Pender,
Bella Coola, Read Island,
Cortez Island, Rossland,
Douglas, Sahtlam,
Field, Savona,
Fort Steele South Aldergrove (additional school),
Goldstream, South Okanagan,
Hernando, Spence's Bridge,
Mara, Squamish,
Maria Slough, Three Forks,
New Denver, Upper Salmon Arm,
Okanagan Landing, Valdez Island,
Pavilion, Waddington. 58 Vict. Public Schools Report. 199
During the present year, schools which had been closed for different periods of time on
account of inability to maintain the average daily attendance required by the School Act, were
re-opened in the following districts :—
Delta, Lac-la-Hache,
Hatzic, Nanoose,
Parksville.
Statistical Abstract of Attendance for 1894-95.
Number of pupils enrolled during the year  13,482
Increase for the year  869
Number of boys enrolled ,  6,848
Increase for the year  464
Number of girls enrolled  6,634
Increase for the year  405
Average actual daily attendance  8,610. 31
Increase for the year  824.81
Number of pupils enrolled in High Schools  515
Increase for the year  81
Average actual daily attendance in High Schools  331.29
Average actual daily attendance in Graded and Ward Schools  5,396 . 30
Average actual daily attendance in Rural Schools  2,882.72
Number of School Districts at the close of the year  183
Increase for the year  5
The School Districts of this Province are divided by the " Public School Act" into City
Districts and Rural Districts, the former including the schools established within the municipal boundaries of each of the four cities of Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, and
Nanaimo, the latter embracing all other public schools maintained. In each of the City
Districts there are, at present, a High School, two or more Graded Schools, and one or more
Ward Schools, while in the Rural Districts there are only Graded Schools and Common Schools.
The cost of education in a City District is met by the City Council, the Provincial Government paying a per capita grant of ten dollars per head per annum, based on the average
actual daily attendance of pupils. In addition to this grant, each Municipal Corporation
receives the amount collected from its Provincial Revenue Tax.
The amount of per capita grant paid to each of the four cities, during the past school
year, was as follows :—
Victoria $17,390 80
Vancouver    15,895 28
New Westminster      5,989 20
Nanaimo    . .     6,129 54
Total $45,404 82 200 Public Schools Report. 1895
The total expenditure for schools in Rural Districts, including construction of school
houses, furniture, repairs, etc., was $145,707.98.
The number of Trustees in City Districts is seven, the nomination and election being held
at the same time, and by the same Returning Officer or Officers, and being conducted in the
same manner as the municipal nomination and election for Mayor are conducted.
Any person qualified to vote at an election of School Trustees in a City District is eligible
to be elected to serve as a Trustee : hence, a female may be elected as School Trustee in a
City District.
In Rural Districts three Trustees are elected at the first annual meeting, one to serve for
three years, another for two years, and the third for one year; and annually thereafter one
Trustee is elected, on the last Saturday in June, to serve for the period of three years.
A Trustee in a Rural District must be a male householder or freeholder in the School
District, and must be qualified to vote at an election of School Trustees : hence, a female cannot be legally elected to serve as a School Trustee in a Rural District.
The Rules and Regulations for the government of the schools, the courses of studies
pursued, the authorization of text-books, the supervision and direction of the schools, and all
matters pertaining to the internal work of the school-room, belong entirely to the Council of
Public Instruction. Teachers are held accountable to the Council for strict compliance with
the Rules and Regulations prescribed for the government of the schools.
Subject to the approval of the Council of Public Instruction, the supervision of the schools
is made by statute the duty of the Superintendent of Education, who is assisted in this work
by two Inspectors. It is an acknowledged fact that no school system can be. effective without
vigilant supervision. Taking into consideration the large extent of territory embraced within
the Province, in the distant parts of which schools are located, and the many instances in
which considerable time is required to travel from one school to another, as many schools were
visited, and as frequently, as was possible during the past school-year. When a school is
visited by an Inspector he is required to make a written report to the Department immediately
on his return to the Education Office, on the internal work of the school-room, methods
employed, and on the condition of the school grounds and buildings ; in short, to report on all
matters connected with the working and welfare of the school. The Department, through the
reports on inspections made, as well as through information furnished by Trustees and Teacher,
is kept fully informed as to the condition of each school.
During the past year there were 202 schools in operation under 319 teachers and monitors. The progress made by the pupils during the year has kept pace with that of preceding
years, and at the present time all of the schools now open are, with a very few exceptions, in
good working order. The staff of teachers employed is, on the whole, composed of faithful,
painstaking, and competent instructors, imbued with a love for the work and appreciative of
the responsibilities of their position.
The records of the past year show that in Rural Districts there were two cases of expulsion, fifteen cases of suspension, and one hundred and ten of truancy, while in the City
Districts there was one case of expulsion, thirty-one cases of suspension, and two hundred and
forty-two cases of truancy. The total number of pupils enrolled in Rural Districts was 6,671,
and in City Districts 6,811. It will thus be seen that the record of the Rural Schools in regard
to the severest punishments—suspension and expulsion—is a better one than that of the City
Districts. That truancy is more prevalent in City Districts than in Rural Districts is the
natural consequence of the difference in home training and modes of life of a considerable
number of the children.
It may be proper to state that, under the Rules and Regulations prescribed, a pupil can
only be expelled when his example is very injurious and there is no apparent prospect of
reformation. For gross misconduct, or a violent or wilful opposition to authority, a pupil may
be suspended from attendance at a school for a specified period, not to exceed one week. It
is enjoined upon the teacher by the Department not to suspend nor expel a pupil until all
other means of correction have failed to bring the child to obedience and good conduct.
The teacher of a Public School derives his authority for the use of the rod mainly from
Article 7, of the Rules and Regulations, of which the following is a portion : "Every teacher
shall practice such discipline as may be exercised by a kind, firm, and judicious parent in his
family, avoiding corporal punishment, except when it shall appear to him to be imperatively 59 Vict.                                 Public Schools Report.                                         201
necessary." It will be noticed from this extract that while the teacher is given authority to
use the rod, he is admonished to avoid corporal punishment except when absolutely necessary.
Too frequent, or too severe use of the rod is indicative of the teacher's incompetency as a
proper trainer of those intrusted to his care. One remedy for the abuse of this power given to
the teacher is vested in the Board of Trustees of each School District. Under Section 50 of
the Public School Act, Trustees have authority to dismiss a teacher by giving him thirty days'
notice of dismissal and stating the cause. It therefore rests with the Trustees whether they
will retain or dismiss the teacher who abuses his authority by the excessive use of corporal
punishment. This is the only way, other than by counsel, in which Trustees are authorized to
interfere with the teacher in regard to the abuse of the rod.
The number of cases of corporal punishment reported for the past school-year does not
show any perceptible decrease. The number of cases reported for all the schools was 2,446.
These figures do not speak well for the teachers of those schools in which the rod would appear
to be the chief means employed to obtain necessary discipline. It is very proper to state, however, that more than half of the cases of corporal punishment reported are credited to less than
twenty schools ; one Graded Rural School reporting 108 cases, and one Common School 91
cases.
It is to be feared that the use of the power of moral suasion in obtaining good government
in the schools is neglected, in great part, by a few of our teachers. Physical force is certainly
not the only nor the best means at the command of the teacher for securing good discipline.
The teacher who uses moral suasion effectively in the government of his school will accomplish
the best results, not only in the moral training of the pupils but in their intellectual advancement.
The following table shows the cost of each pupil on enrolment and average daily attendance during the past fourteen years :—
Year.
Cost of each
pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of each
pupil on average
actual daily
attendance.
1881-82 	
|18 57*
18 88
19 48
17 66
17 78
16 56
15 67
15 92
15 29
14 78
14 91
16 57
13 40
14 02
$36 26*
1882-83	
36 76
1883-84 	
36 85
1884-85	
34 04
1885-86	
32 04
1886-87	
30 80
1887-88	
32 29
1888-89	
29 39
1889-90   	
28 37
1890-91	
26 66
1891-92	
25 79
1892-93      	
26 79
1893-94 	
21 71
1894-95 	
21 95
*Based on cost oPeducation proper. ?02
Public Schools Report.
1895
Schedule of Salaries of Teachers in City Districts on Permanent Staff during
the Year 1894-95.
1 Teacher at $135.00 per month.
1
1
1
1
10
8
5
6
1
8
3
5
9
17
2
32
4
115
Average monthly salary
125.00
115.00
110.00
108.00
100.00
90.00
80.00
75.00
72.00
70.00
67.50
65.00
60.00
55.00
52.50
50.00
40.00
$66.62
Schedule of Salaries of Teachers in Rural  Districts  on  Permanent  Staff   during
the Year 1894-95.
1 Teacher at.    $100.00 per month.
2
2
4
8
52
8
106
183
Average monthly salary    $55.46
ay
80
UU           ii
00
75
00        ,
70
00
60
00        ,
55
00        ,
50
00        i
$55
46
Teachers in City Districts on Permanent Staff for the Year 1894-95.
Grade.
Males.
Females.
1
6
30
26
5
1
2
1
Total.
Highest
Monthly
Salary.
Lowest
Monthly
Salary.
First Class, Grade A	
19
15
5
4
20
21
35
30
5
1
2
1
$135
100
100
75
65
50
65
60
$70
„      B	
50
Second Class,    M     A	
50
M      B	
Third Class,      „     A	
40
40
„                 „      B	
50
55
Temporary    	
60
43
72
115
In addition to the above number of teachers, there were employed eight monitors, three at the rate of
per month, and five at the rate of $30 per month. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
20H
Teachers in Rural Districts on Permanent Staff for the Year 1894-95.
Grade.
Males.
Females.
Total.
Highest
Monthly
Salary.
Lowest
Monthly
Salary.
12
23
]
2
13
25
$ 60
100
$50
ii      B	
50
26
25
51
80
50
n      B	
23
42
65
70
50
Third Class,      „     A	
6
12
18
60
50
„      B	
3
5
8
60
50
1
1
1
2
1
70
50
50
50
94
89
183
In addition to the above number of teachers, there were employed thirteen monitors at the rate of
per month.
The gradual growth of the schools, as well as the cost of maintaining the same,  is fully
shown by the record of attendance and expenditure given in the following exhibit:—
Comparative Statement of Attendance and Cost of Public Schools from
1872-73 to 1894-95.
Year.
Number of
School
Districts.
Aggregate
Enrolment.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Percentage
of
Attendance.
Expenditure
for Education
Proper.
1872-73	
25
37
41
41
42
45
45
47
48
50
59
67
76
86
95
104
109
123
141
154
169
178
185
1,028
1,245
1,403
1,685
1,998
2,198
2,301
2,462
2,571
2,653
2,693
3,420
4,027
4,471
5,345
6,372
6,796
8,042
9,260
10,773
11,496
12,613
13,482
575
767
863
984
1,260
1,395.50
1,315.90
1,293.93
1,366.86
1,358.68
1,383.00
1,808.60
2,089.74
2,481.48
2,873.38
3,093.46
3,681.14
4,333.90
5,134.91
6,227.10
7,111.40
7,785.50
8,610.31
55.93
61.60
61.51
58.39
63.06
63.49
57.19
52.56
53.16
51.21
51.36
52.88
51.89
55.50
53.75
48.54
54.16
53.89
55.45
57.80
61.85
61.72
63.86
$ 36,763 77
1873-74	
35,287 59
1874-75 	
1875-76	
1876-77	
1877-78 	
34,822 28
44,506 11
47,129 63
43,334 01
1878-79	
*22,110 70
1879-80	
47,006 10
1880-81	
46,960 69
1881-82	
49,268 63
1882-83 	
50,850 63
1883-84	
66,655 15
1884-85	
1885-86 	
71,151 52
79,527 56
1886-87 	
88,521 08
1887-S8 	
1888-89 	
99,902 04
108,190 59
1889-90	
122,984 83
136,901 73
1890-91 	
1891-92	
160,627 80
190,558 33
169,050 18
189,037 25
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95	
1 Half-year. 204 Public Schools Report. 1895
PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS' EXAMINATION,  1895.
The annual examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the
Public Schools of the Province commenced on July 3rd, 1895, in the South Park School
Building, Victoria, in the High School Building, Vancouver, and in the Public School
Building, Kamloops.
The Examiners appointed to act with the Superintendent of Education were John
Anderson, Esq., B. A., the Ven. Archdeacon Scriven, M. A. (Oxon), the Rev. W. D. Barber,
M. A, and Edward Ocllum, Esq., M. A., B. Sc.
The list of successful candidates appeared in the British Columbia Gazette of August 1st,
1895, as follows :—
First Class—Grade A—Certificates.
Barron, Thomas John, B. A., McGill University, Montreal, 1895.
First Class—Grade A—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 4,550.) Marks
obtained.
McTaggart, Henry Allen      3037
Edgett, S. Louise    2818
Bennett, Ellen Christine ,    2778
First Class—Grade B—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 3,750.) Marks
obtained.
Sanderson, Mina  2767
Bennett, John Bertram ,  2602
Matthew, Alfred HP  2573
Gordon, Jessie Fisher  2534
Shepard, Frank Elgin  2479
Brown, Frances Ann  2463
Laffere, Henry W. L  2416
Bovyer, George Mason. ,   2382
Trembath, Jennie  2382
Byrn, Edith Louisa  2357
Rowe, John Arthur  2328
Kirkendall, Jessie  2318
Lang, Sarah I  2307
Powell, Lottie M  2291
Munroe, Catherine  2286
Wells, Hulet M   2258
Nickerson, Laura L  2256
Watson, Frederic J  2255
Ravey, Martin James :  2253
King, John William H  2251 59 VicT. Public Schools Report. 205
Second Class—Grade A—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 3,150.) Marks
obtained.
Beattie, Emily  2211
Lawson, Maria  2173
Kirkendall, Lizzie  2142
Furness, Katie  2091
Barnes, Catherine Ann  2084
Hart, Ida  2069
Strople, Norton    2056
Elmsly, Ada Byron '  2051
Noble, Alice Louise  2041
McDowell, Martha  2028
Hopkins, Nicholas R  2027
Le Feuvre, Eva Anne  2024
Shine, Mrs. Alice Grey  2014
Moscrop, John  1974
McTavish, Peter D ,  1958
Mathers, Isaac N  1955
Uren, Fanny  1955
Blackbourn, Maggie S  1915
Maclaren, Louise M  1899
Rhodes, Amy A  1894
Nisbet, Grace Elinor  1893
McLennan, Archibald D  1892
Second Class—Grade B—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 2,550.) Marks
obtained.
Monk, James Hector  1658
Truswell, Sarah B  1636
Shelton, Henry Campbell  1622
Harrison, Frederick            1616
Howard, Bessie  1558
Mulcahy, William  1553
Fraser, Henry Archibald  1552
McPhail, Archibald A  1550
Kendall, Arthur Lehman  1541
Haarer, Mary Paulina  1539
Kendall, George  1533
Walker, Maude MR  1530
Ward, Mary Ellen  1516
Hall, George William     1512
Renwick, Lillian R  1508
Gray, Ethel Mvers  1508
Milligan, Eliza" ,  1507
Murton, Sarah  1506
Burnet, Minnie E  1503
Hartney, Margaret , . .  1498
Melhuish, Hester Ellen  1498
Cairns, Robert H. ;  1487
Lawson, Winnifred C  1483
Dell, Mabel  1482
Godson, Mabel  1479
Winsby, William Norman  1478
DeBou, Edith Sophia  1477
Brechin, Robert  1475
Fletcher, Mary Elizabeth    1473
Moss, Laura Emma  1472 206 Public Schools Report. 1895
Second Class—Grade B—Certificates.—Concluded.
(Maximum Marks, 2,550.) Marks
obtained.
Wright, John  1471
Sharpies, Elizabeth J  1470
Webb, Caroline Louisa    1469
Jesse, Edith Maude  1467
Thornber, Catherine Grace -  1467
Woodman, May  1466
Caspell, Edmund   1464
McCulloch, Jennie Long  1460
Canfield, Francis O  1452
McDiarmid, Peter A  1452
Morrison, John Clarke  1452
Lewis, Edith  1442
Currie, Flora May  1435
Campbell, Leonard A  1430
Millard, Gertrude R  1430
Stevenson, Clarinda E  1430
Tait, David  1427
MeLellan, Mrs. Ella B  1426
Trembath, Agnes  1417
Higginson, Jane Elizabeth  1411
Conway, Edmund John  1404
Wolfenden, Kate C  1399
Robertson, Margaret M  1394
Fraser, Mary Isabel  1393
Loat, Gertrude Jane      1391
Shortreed, Christina  1389
Johnson, Jennie Alice  1388
Abercrombie, Mary Lena  1385
McTaggart, Isabella  1385
Moffat, Maude L    1380
Livingstone, Eliza J  1370
Plaxton, Robert James  1364
Sylvester, Louise M  1349
Dobeson, Mary Gray  1341
Carter, Ethel Jane  1336
MeKinnon, Mary  1331
McDowell, Marcus  1330
MacMillan, Caroline  1318
Nason, Roberta F    1304
Moore, Bibianne  1295
Young, Harriett  1284
Wolfenden, Mabel  1279
Third Class—Grade A—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 1,950.) Marks
obtained.
Taylor, Mrs. Frances E  1213
Barron, Isabel M. F  1080
Wood, Mabel V  1070
Campbell, Ernest  1069
Thomas, Matilda    1065
Robertson, Jennie  1063
Paper, Emily  1039
McGregor, John C  1034
Bowman, Clvtie Lucretia  1008
Worlock,  Ethel Mary  1008 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 207
Third Class—Grade A—Certificates—Concluded.
(Maximum Marks, 1,950.) Marks
obtained.
Sayer, Elizabeth  985
Sweeney, Jennie  979
Marshall, Ila Mabel  976
Eldridge, Julia May  975
Third Class—Grade B—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 1,950.) Marks
obtained.
Beattie, Florence  1166
Henderson, Richard Arthur  1128
Parker, Edith Clara  1120
Grant, Lillian May    1111
Turner, George Duncan  1101
Lee, Eleanor Annie  1093
Austin, Catherine Ellen  1081
Tanner, Rebecca  1080
Norcross, Norman     1071
Eckarclt, Alfred E      1069
Campbell, John Malcolm  1067
Macfarlane, Edith M  1066
Lukey, John Thomas  1064
Richmond, Charles S  1063
Clayton, Walter  1060
Buttimer, Annie L  1052
Nicholas, Minnie Eleanor  1044
Morgan, Arthur David  1040
Wilson, Elizabeth  1032
Brown, William H '.  1026
Green, Constance H. R  1024
Fraser, Margaret  1019
Bergen, E. H. Otto  1012
Lewis, Linnie  1009
Teague, Julia Alexandrienne  1007
McLennan, David  999
Carmichael, Annie E  998
George, Elizabeth L  993
Sutherland, Lilias F      , 991
McGraw, Mary  987
Fraser, Jennie Grant  985
Fawcett, Jessie Louisa  981
Menten, Maud L \  981
Wells, Lilian Edith  979
Beadleston, Maud Estella  976
Harrap, Eva Ellinor  967
Bell, Mary  961
Marshall, Grace H  959
Keay, Maude S ,  ,  955
Bodwell, Louise Harwood  954
McNair, Laura  953
Telford, George  952
Trenholme, Hattie D  945
Furness, Annie  945
Thornber, Charles L  941
Duncan, Rosa  940
Frank, Annie  939 208 Public Schools Report. 1895
Third Class—Grade B—Certificates—Concluded.
(Maximum Marks, 1,950.) Marks
obtained.
Miller, Martha S  937
Gilley, Annie Lee  936
Lauder, Edith M  932
Morrison, Bessie Ellen  927
Ogilvie, William P ■. 917
Corlett, Ada May  912
Northcott, Elizabeth P    911
Matheson, Adeline S  909
Dyker, Jennie  908
Fraser, Marguerite A  907
McDonald, Mrs. Annie C . .  906
Barnes, Willena N  869
Colquhoun, Jessie  868
Robinson, Fanny  859
Dixon,  Mary  853
Bertiaux, Mrs. Kate  834
Bowman, Ida Rose  831
McLeod, Mary Jane  828
Renewal Certificates for Length of  Service.
Bailey, Adelaide S., Caldwell, Mrs. L. M., Clyde, Thomas, Halliday, James A.,
McDougall, Archena J.
S. D. Pope, LL.D.,
Austin Scriven, M.A. (Oxon.),
John Anderson, B.A.,
Wm. Davin Barber, M.A.,
Edward Odlum, M,A , B.Sc,
Board of Examiners.
Certificates have been granted in accordance with the recommendation of the Examiners.
6
JAMES BAKER,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,  Victoria, 27th July, 1895.
The examination was held simultaneously in Victoria, Vancouver, and Kamloops.
The number of candidates was 251, of whom 95 wrote in Victoria, 137 in Vancouver, and
19 in Kamloops.
Of the whole number of candidates, 197 succeeded in obtaining certificates, as follows :—
First Class, Grade A .       4
First Class, Grade B 20
Second Class, Grade A 22
Second Class, Grade B 72
Third Class, Grade A    14
Third Class, Grade B , 65
In addition to the above, five certificates for length of service were issued in accordance
with the provisions of section 59 of the  "Public School Act, 1891."
Of the whole number who wrote at the examination, 54 failed to obtain a certificate of
any kind.
One candidate, a graduate of a Canadian University, and three pupils of Vancouver High
School obtained First Class, Grade A certificates. Of those who obtained First Class, Grade
B certificates, three were pupils of Victoria High School, four of Vancouver High School, and
one was a pupil of New Westminster High School :—therefore, at this examination, eleven
pupils of our High Schools obtained life certificates. One pupil of a Rural School (Mission)
also achieved this honour. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
209
Perhaps the most noticeable feature of the examination was the unusually large number
of candidates who were still in their teens. This may chiefly be attributed to the fact that the
age limit of applicants has been raised from eighteen and sixteen years of age to twenty and
eighteen years of age for male and female candidates, respectively, to take effect at the examination to be held in 1896. Hence the desire on the part of a considerable number of the pupils
attending the High Schools, as well as on the part of pupils of Graded and Common
Schools to obtain certificates before the new regulation as to increase in the age of the applicant
came into force. It certainly speaks well for our schools that a large number of those attending them is each year prepared to become candidates for teachers' certificates, for the reason
applicants for even the lowest class and grade of certificate, if successful, must have carefully
studied those branches which form the foundation of a good common school education.
After obtaining a certificate the inexperienced teacher must, in order to succeed, acquire
a good knowledge of the best methods now used in schools, must study how to apply them to
advantage, and must make himself familiar with the school system under which he is to teach.
In fact, the teacher to become successful in the profession must be a diligent student.
A few years past, the idea seemed to be a prevalent one, that any person who held a
certificate could teach school. This was a very erroneous conclusion. As well might we say
that every man who has studied the art of navigation from books could safely be entrusted
with a ship at sea, or that every woman who has studied painting for a limited time could
produce a masterpiece, as to advance the idea that book learning is all that is required for the
teacher's profession. Teaching power, aptness, and skill are additional qualifications indispen-
sible to success. Aptitude to teach is the result of skill and tact, combined with a thorough
knowledge of the means of obtaining good order and discipline and of properly managing the
work of the school-room. To these must be added as essential to the instructor, the possession of a high moral character and refined manners.
The following table shows the number of applicants and certificates obtained during each
of the past twelve years, and cannot but prove of interest:—
Year.
Number
of
Applicants.
Certificates Obtained.
Failed to
obtain
First Class.
Second Class.
Third Class.
Certificates.
1884	
1885	
1886	
1887	
1888	
1889	
1890	
1891	
1892	
64
67
76
93
100
117
143
154
200
271
305
251
15
15
13
15
10
9
8
14
5
39
26
24
21
12
6
27
41
30
36
54
3
107
157
94
16
27
34
30
36
37
61
64
137
90
90
79
12
13
23
21
13
41
38
22
55
1893   	
1894	
1895	
35
32
54
Under the Rules and regulations to take effect after 1895, male candidates must be of
the full age of twenty years, and female candidates of the full age of eighteen years, before
being permitted to be applicants for certificates of qualification to teach in the Public Schools.
As the number of holders of certificates who are unemployed and looking for positions is
now considerably in excess of the number of schools, the time has arrived when it is necessary,
in the general interest, to demand of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach a
severer test of scholarship for each class and grade of certificate than heretofore required by
papers set for the teachers' examination. 210 Public Schools Report. 1895
REPORT OF INSPECTOR WILSON.
"Victoria, November, 1895.
" Sir,—I have the honour to submit for your information the following general report for
the year 1894-95 :—
" The past school-year has shown increased activity in every class of educational work.
W'hile there is no claim that the schools cannot be further improved, or that the teachers have
always adopted the most approved modes of instruction, yet it must be admitted that educational work in this Province is carried on under very favourable conditions. An advance has
been made, not so great as desired, but still of a substantial character; and a sure foundation
has been laid for still further progress. With proper application to school work, no pupil needs
go out into the world without a fair equipment for life's duties. In regard to the various
studies pursued and the progress therein, such remarks and suggestions as appear helpful and
necessary are herewith presented.
"Reading and Spelling.
" The importance attached to reading is well founded. Being the key that unlocks the
store-house of knowledge, it should be made the central subject of class-study. When interest
in reading has been aroused it is easy to induce pupils to study, and accordingly as they
become expert in this art tlie labour of pursuing their other studies is reduced, and their enjoyment of school work heightened.
" There is always room for improvement in reading, but, as on the last occasion, I can
justly report that in the majority of the schools visited, this subject has been fairly well taught.
It has been necessary, from time to time, to call attention to the proper reading position, and
to the need of phrasing, etc. The cause of the lack of expression, frequently noticeable, was
no doubt due to the want of comprehension by the pupil of the thought contained in the passage
read. Expression is- expression of thought. If the pupil is to give one the thought he finds
hidden in the sentence, it is quite clear that he must himself first get it. Then comes the
desire to give it as well as the realization that he is doing so. When the teacher finds that by
false emphasis or wrong inflection, the pupil does not understand the sentence read, questions
may be used with good effect until the words of the sentence represent ideas.
" With regard to spelling, it is a pleasure to state that our schools still maintain a high
standard of efficiency. The attention given to it is considerable, the exercises being of both an
oral and written character. The measure of success seems largely to depend upon the amount
of exercise given that appeals both to ear and eye.
"Writing.
"- The importance of this subject few will deny. It is one of the " essentials," and by no
means the least of the three. While the general work of our schools in writing compares
favourably with that of similar schools in several of the other Provinces of the Dominion, yet
in some instances it leaves much to be desired. Where poor results were found, there was a
noticeable absence of instruction and vigilant supervision. What good results can be reached
where pupils are apparently allowed to write page after page of their copy-books without a
word of direction or disapproval ? To the details of pen-holding and proper position of the
body it has been necessary, many times, to call attention. In fact, it would almost appear as
if some teachers had tacitly abandoned the attempt to secure even a moderate compliance with
these requirements, regarding them as among the unimportant as well as the unattainable. It
must be clear that the habit of correct position in writing can only be cultivated by insisting
that all work be done correctly, and by not allowing pupils to lapse into bad practices.
" The amount of written work required of pupils in some schools is a sad hindrance to the
formation of a good business hand. The taking down of " notes" on various subjects is always
a hurried exercise, and the result is frequently a lot of illegible stuff.     Not only, therefore, 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 211
should teachers exercise proper judgment as to the amount of written work exacted from clay
to day, but they should not accept any written exercise unless it represents the best effort of
the pupil.
" It is stated on good authority that upwards of one hundred and fifty works, dealing
more or less with the teaching of writing, have been published in the course of the present
century. One would imagine that from this formidable list of text-books the art had reached
its highest degree of perfection, and that the teaching of it was so developed as to leave nothing whatever for the critic to censure. Such, however, is not the case. Anyone who has kept
himself informed on educational matters must have noticed that for some time pasta good deal
of dissatisfaction has existed in the Dominion and elsewhere in regard to the methods of teaching this subject. The promptitude with which the vertical system of writing has been accepted,
with its recommendation of ease in learning, teaching and producing, is proof of the generally
felt want of a cure for the malady of poor penmanship. Last year authority was given to use
this system in our public schools, and it has been very generally introduced. So far very
encouraging reports have been heard of success in its use. I trust that all will keep in mind
a remark made by you in last Annual School Report, viz : ' It is heartily enjoined that each
teacher make himself familiar with the system before attempting to give instruction therein.'
" Arithmetic.
" At the end of my last report under this head, mention was made of three points, to
which special attention should be given through the whole course in arithmetic : 1. Frequent
practice in rapid work in the elementary rules. 2. Daily practice in mental arithmetic.
3. Clear and concise statement of the processes by which 'answers' are obtained. These three
points are worthy of repetition because it did not always appear, during the past year, that the
practice was sufficiently in line with demands of such self-evident' value.
" This branch frequently absorbs more of the teacher's time, than any other in the course
of study. The work done was, in general, marked by intelligence and earnestness of effort.
Arithmetic may fairly be considered one of our strong subjects, particularly in the advanced
classes. On the elementary work, there is a good deal of time spent without as good results as
could be desired. This can, in great measure, be ascribed to the neglect to proceed slowly
and thoroughly in the first stages. Then it is that by injudicious haste to make apparent
progress the wretched habit of ' counting on the fingers' is formed by the pupil, a habit most
difficult to get rid of.
" Grammar.
" The elementary work in this subject has, in general, shown an improvement since the
introduction of the ' Short Grammar.' The invaluable advice on method in the case of
beginners, contained in the preface to this text-book, has apparently produced desirable results.
Much creditable work has also been done in the more advanced classes. The application of
grammar as an instrument of criticism should receive more attention.
"In connection with some of the work in analysis and parsing, it was at times noticed
that while the former was often excellent, the latter was quite inferior. The relations of words
were either not stated, or, when stated, they often proved to be incorrect. This can only be the
result of mechanical teaching, and it is a deliberate sacrifice of the educative value of parsing.
' Parsing should be regarded by the teacher as a test of the thorough knowledge of accidence
and the rules of grammar.'
" Composition.
" This subject is now receiving some of the attention that its importance demands, but
the quality of the instruction varies a good deal. Heretofore training of this kind had not been
commenced as early as it should, but there is a noticeable improvement in this regard. Oral
instruction in language can be profitably given in junior classes as a preparation for the study
of grammar and composition later on. Better results in form, i. e., use of capital letters,
punctuation marks, etc., have been observed. A proper use of the reading lesson should at an
early stage make pupils acquainted with the use of capitals and the ordinary punctuation
marks. In fact, the scope of the reading 'esson is wider than that of merely teaching the
child to read.
" Composition is not so much a separate subject as it is one that is nearly allied to many
others.    A pupil who writes a composition on an historical subject related to the lesson of the 212 Public Schools Report. 1895
day, deals with the subjects of grammar, penmanship, spelling, punctuation, use of capitals,
and construction of sentences. When the teacher recognizes this, he will find no difficulty in
selecting a suitable field for composition work. It has always been found to be a mistake to
assign subjects for composition that lie outside of the child's range of experience. Suitable
matter is supplied by the class-work in which he is engaged—his history, his geography, his
reading, as well as his personal observations and experiments. In conclusion, this subject can
scarcely be said to belong to any particular part of the day's programme, for numerous are the
opportunities that occur in the course of a single session to teach oral composition.
" Geography.
" This subject is taken up at an early stage, and in the majority of instances receives
appropriate attention. An intelligent acquaintance with the main facts of geography is in
general secured by all who attend our schools. The condition of the maps and globes supplied
to the various schools visited showed that moderately good care had been taken of them. The
former are undoubtedly utilized to the fullest extent, but there is room for concluding that the
latter are often considered to be more for ornament than use. A teacher of moderate ingenuity
could readily supply himself with the necessary means of illustrating and teaching all that for
which a somewhat expensive globe often seems to be required.
"Map-drawing continues to be employed as a means of impressing the outlines of a
country on the pupils' minds. Some of the specimens seen from time to time were very
creditable productions. Many of these were no doubt prepared for exhibition purposes only,
but the manual neatness insisted on has been of value. Practice in drawing and filling in
rough sketch maps, and in reproducing them from memory, should by no means be neglected.
" At the period when the child begins to study geography, his mind demands realities—
real objects—and the question naturally arises as to the means that shall be used to enable
him to grasp, in the imagination, the unseen forms and objects described by geography. The
manner of teaching this subject thus becomes an important factor of the instruction known as
geography. Instead of appealing to the imagination in the first stages, the services of the
memory are at this period too frequently enlisted. This is an error that is by no means
uncommon here as elsewhere. In this Province, with its almost endless variety of physical
features, there is indeed no lack of material for geographical conceptions.
" History.
" Although the formal study of British and Canadian history is not commenced until the
pupil reaches the Fourth Reader Class, yet the initiation into history is really received in the
narratives contained in the previous reading books. The character of the instruction in this
subject is generally commendable, but it is suggested that teachers use greater effort to train
their pupils to express orally, in consecutive form, their knowledge of events. Careful
preparation should be made by the teacher for giving this lesson, as well as all others, and the
facts should be so arranged in his mind that he can see the relation of each fact to the others
and to the whole. It is this thorough mastery by the teacher of the facts and of the principles
underlying them, that will tend to make history yield its best results.
" ' The immediate object of the study, so far as the school is concerned, is to give the pupil
some acquaintance with the history of his own country; so that he may sympathize with its
traditions and its fame, appreciate its laws and institutions, and love its soil and inhabitants.'
According to this view, history, particularly that of one's own country, furnishes the best
training in patriotism. Encouragement should be given to anything that will aid in making
prominent this aspect of a subject that has long been commended as a part of the education of
a good citizen. In some of the other Provinces of the Dominion, it is sought by means of
school flags to be raised over the buildings on the anniversaries of great events in our history,
not only to aid in teaching lessons of loyalty and patriotism, but to cause the children to form
a closer attachment to their school. There is no doubt that the raising of the school flag on
these days also tends to awaken a more lively interest in the history lesson. Suggestions for
the proper use of these flags are also issued by the governing bodies for the guidance of
teachers.
" As far as I know, but one of our schools, and that a Rural School, is supplied with a
flag and staff. For several years it has now enjoyed this distinction, but I trust that its
solitary reign will soon be disturbed, 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 213
" Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene.
" The instruction given in these allied subjects has been generally of a praiseworthy
character, but it is recommended that more attention be given to oral primary lessons. The
Pathfinder Series (introductory) has been in use in some of the schools, and has no doubt been
found of value in dealing with the elementary part of this subject as well as with the branch-
subject of temperance.
" The efforts made to illustrate the various lessons have been, as far as my observation
extended, somewhat meagre. It is the duty of the teacher to give his pupils accurate, vivid
impressions of every truth worth teaching. By means of simple devices, much could be done
to convey clearer ideas on many points that must, without such illustration, remain but little
understood. To make my meaning clearer, I will add a few examples. With elastic bands
and small pieces of wood, apparatus can be devised to illustrate the action of the muscles. A
hollow rubber ball with tube attached, when filled with water and acted upon by pressure, will
serve to illustrate the force that moves the blood from the heart. Apparatus can also, without much trouble, be prepared to show how inhalation and exhalation result from the expansion of the chest cavity. The means for illustrating the somewhat obscure principle of osmose
are also within easy reach.
" There is another point in connection with this subject to which it is desired to draw
attention, namely, that knowledge does not necessarily lead to right doing. If it did, the
training of a child would be an easy matter. The child must be trained to do the right and
healthful thing. This could be done without any knowledge of the body whatever. But
training together with knowledge of the structure of the body will make the task easier than
with training alone. With a basis for intelligent observance of the laws of health, the
aim should be to induce the practice of the valuable precepts taught in order to secure the
formation of healthful  habits.
" Other Subjects (Optional).
" The work in form study and drawing has been taken up by a larger number of pupils
than formerly, but it cannot be said to be more than in the introductory stage. I am
scarcely prepared to say that more than a fair beginning has been made.
" While the value of drawing as a school subject is fully recognized, it is in these days
receiving further recognition as affording the basis of skill in all handicraft. It is useful to
those who go into life with no more than a common school education For those who propose
to take a high school course, it affords the best possible preparation for the study of geometry,
which is usually a difficult subject to the beginner.
" Book-keeping is a subject which on account of its practical value is deserving of attention
—more than it at present often receives. It also affords the opportunity of giving instruction
in penmanship, spelling, arithmetic, and neatness. The returns show that the number of
pupils who study this subject is annually increasing. There is no reason why pupils of rural
schools—both boys and girls—should not begin the study of book-keeping as soon as they
reach the Fifth Reader class. Even a short course, such as would enable them to keep
simple accounts and familiarize them with the ordinary mercantile forms, would be a great
boon to all whose education ends with the common school course.
" While in the Maritime Provinces during the early part of the present year, I utilized
part of my time in visiting some of the schools which were regarded as being among the best.
My object was, of course, to witness school work carried on under the most favourable conditions, and, by comparison, to note in what way our schools differ from those of the older Provinces
of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. The results of my observations lead me to the opinion
that the work of our advanced grades is quite equal to that of corresponding grades of the
schools visited, but that in methods of primary instruction our schools, with some exceptions,
are certainly inferior. This defect I can only ascribe to the absence of a Normal School, where
suitable professional training could be given to those who propose to take up the difficult work
of teaching. The establishment of such an institution has, on more than one occasion, been
strongly advocated by you in the Annual School Report, and I trust that the time is not far
distant when your valuable recommendation will be carried out.
" I have the honour to be, Sir,
" Your obedient servant,
»'& D. Pope., Esq., LL.D., " D. Wilson,
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria," "Inspector of Schools, 214 Public Schools Report. 1895
REPORT OF INSPECTOR BURNS.
" Victoria, November, 1895
" Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you for your information the following general
report in regard to the schools of this Province, based upon observations made while visiting
them during the school-year 1894-95
" There is an evident improvement in matters of discipline ; and this, because, in the
majority of cases, the teachers seem to be alive to the necessity of constant employment,
especially for younger children, as the best means of obtaining good order at all times, as well
as progress in education. It has invariably been observed that those teachers in our ungraded
schools, who have the work of their various classes pre-arranged with the object of providing
this constant employment, are the most successful in every respect, and the skill shown by
many in our rural schools in doing this with their numerous classes, is sometimes surprising.
Our teachers also are doing their utmost to train the pupils in what may be considered the
practical side of school work ; they recognize that neatness, accuracy, and thoroughness can
only be attained by unwearying efforts on their part. When these are observed in all the
work of a school they are evidences that the teacher's work is being efficiently done, although
great advances in study may not be made.
" Irregularity of attendance, although decreasing year by year, still continues to be a
hindrance to progress in many of our rural schools. This is no doubt frequently unavoidable at
certain seasons of the year. By it, not only are those who have been absent unable to keep
up with the class-work, but those who have been present are compelled to go over work,
already known, for the benefit of these absentees, or the teacher is obliged to devote additional
care and attention to them by individual teaching. This is especially evident in the arithmetic
classes, and is in many instances the cause of the lower proficiency in that branch than in
others.
" I have further annexed hereto some special remarks and suggestions in regard to the
various subjects taught in our schools.
" Reading and Spelling.
" Considerable progress has been made in the teaching of this subject. In very few
instances has the lesson set been found either too long or too difficult, and generally when a
lesson has been taken which the class had already gone over with the teacher, I have had
reason to be satisfied with the result.
" Still, as suggested in my last report, this lesson requires very careful preparation, or I
may say more preparation than it often receives, especially for the Primer classes. In these,
the pupils can frequently repeat the whole sentence, but cannot give individual words, when
separated from their context. The best practical remedy adopted by many of our teachers is
to write words on the black-board, and by re-arrangement, or by combinations with others
already learned, to see that the words themselves are known ; additional syllables and sounds
can then be acquired by taking some of these words, and by change of initial or final letters
build up other new ones for the class. This will interest as well as instruct the pupils, and if
the teacher has pre-arranged the lesson, the recitation of it needs occupy only a short time at
the end of the regular lesson.
" In the senior classes, it has been gratifying to observe that many teachers are devoting
increased attention to this lesson, and are endeavoring to make it the most interesting' subject
of the day, by uniting with the mere verbal work, explanations or questions on the meaning
of words or phrases of unusual occurrence, grammatical queries suited to the capacity of the
class, and additional illustrations of the subject read. In the advanced classes in the more
important schools, all the geographical and historical allusions are required to be looked up by
the pupils and are then questioned upon by the teacher, thus adding further usefulness to this
lesson.
" In a few schools, however, the examination in reading has proved very unsatisfactory,
either because the pupils read almost inaudibly, or because the piece read was too difficult,
and evidently not understood.    The first of these faults may not be always entirely under the 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 215
control of the teacher, but may be due to natural diffidence on the part of the pupils ; still it
can be overcome by continuous efforts, and no reading should be allowed that is not clearly
and distinctly uttered. The second fault generally arises from too rapid promotions having
been made, in which the pupils' reading was taken as the chief standard, without reference to
ability to spell, write or understand the subject. Such grading of any school is quite inexcusable on the part of the teacher.
" Spelling is generally carefully taught in connection with the reading lessons, and the
speller is used for more difficult words. In many schools this subject is taught by means of
dictation of sentences. This mode of teaching spelling has the advantage of bringing words in
common use constantly before the notice of the class. Too often it is found that the pupils
can spell correctly a list of difficult words from the speller, but are unable to write, without
errors in spelling, a sentence containing  such words of every-day use as until, there, truly, etc.
" To produce the best results both oral and written lessons should be used, and the words
in the reading lesson, as well as those in the speller, should be learned. Nor should the class
be allowed to know whether the lesson is to be taken orally or by a written exercise, so that
both the orthoepy and the orthography may have attention given to them which they require.
" Writing.
" In this second of the three essential subjects of school instruction much advance has
been made. Many teachers, availing themselves of the permission given by the Department,
have adopted 'Vertical Writing,' considering that the pupils do better work by this system
than by using the sloping style. Others have continued to use the latter style, but in both
cases this competition between the two styles has done much good by directing attention to the
fact that ' writing is meant to be read,' consequently this must be made the first requirement
of good writing, and that this point of excellence can only be attained by accuracy of form and
distinctness of the individual letters.
" In this connection it may be well to remark that it does not seem wise to change the
style of a pupil who has already a formed hand. Legibility, symmetry, ease and rapidity of
production are the characteristics of good writing, and if these have been gained, the mere style
is of minor importance. Nor must the teacher forget that the length of the fingers and the
general shape of the hand are 'personal factors,' which often largely determine the individual
style, and should therefore be taken into account; in other words, there will always be some
who have a natural preference for either the vertical or the sloping style. It must again be
remarked that sufficient care is not always given to the condition of pens and ink used in the
school. Unless these are in proper order, good writing is impossible, and a careless habit of
inattention to such matters is cultivated in the scholars. In a few cases even the teacher's
desk has been found so badly supplied with pen and ink that it was impossible to use them in
signing the visitor's book ; such carelessness requires no further comment.
" Arithmetic.
hrur
" A very considerable share of time is naturally given to the teaching of this important
inch of education. One hour each day should be the maximum time devoted to arithmetic,
and with so large a proportion of the school time given to it, it is not unreasonable to expect
rapid progress in this subject.
" In several schools the work has been admirably done, the answers being not only
correct, but the arrangement and reasoning being all that could be desired. This result can
only be attained by most faithful and painstaking work, and reflects the greatest credit on the
teachers who have obtained it. In other schools, the problems have been worked correctly
according to rule, but either the arrangement has been bad, or the necessary signs have been
omitted, or little knowledge has been shown of the reasons of the various processes employed;
while in very few schools the whole subject is taught in a merely mechanical fashion, from the
simple rules to the more complex ones.
" It is not to be wondered at, therefore, that pupils taught in the latter modes are unable
to pass successfully an examination in arithmetic, when some unusual mode of stating the
problem requires an effort at reasoning on the part of the pupils—an effort to which they have
previously been unaccustomed—or when the examiner requires the work to.be done so that it
can be readily followed out by means of the appropriate signs being used. 216 Public Schools Report. 1895
"Another point requiring more attention is correctness in working. Some teachers
occasionally set a question in one or more of the simple rules to all classes. In these problems
nothing is required of the pupils except care in working to obtain a correct answer. This is
an excellent practice and one productive of good practical results.
"In no subject is the discipline of the class of more influence than in arithmetic. For
successful class-work the learner must be completely occupied with the question in hand. If
his mind is pre-occupied, he will be careless as to success, and this divided attention will inevitably give slip-shod work ; whereas, on the other hand, concentration of thought, neat arrangement of work, and a desire to be accurate, will just as inevitably produce good results. It is
therefore the duty of the teacher to study carefully all means of obtaining this attention, not only
for the actual work in hand but as a training in mental discipline, and that of a kind most
useful in the business of after life.
" For more practice in Mental Arithmetic I would again recommend the use of simple
problems, which can be solved mentally, whenever new work is presented to the class. By
means of these the principles involved can be more readily understood by the pupils, their
attention being directed only to the reasoning involved in the process. In the junior classes a
few questions in oral arithmetic can be asked before the pupils are dismissed to their seats ;
this will not occupy much time, and can also be utilized to fix in their memories the work
already gone over. It will be well also that the formation of the various tables used should
be thoroughly explained before they are memorized by the pupils. All these plans of teaching
mental arithmetic are used in some of our schools, and with good results in the classes thus
taught.
" Grammar and Composition.
"Grammar is generally commenced in the Third Reader classes by giving short oral
lessons on the different kinds of words and their uses—this forms an excellent foundation for
the study of more formal grammar. The divisions of the sentence can then be taught from
short examples before the grammar text is introduced. When these are known the inflections
and conjugations will be more readily understood.
" This plan of commencing the study of grammar should be adopted in all our schools, the
subject being thus relieved of much of its monotony in the earlier stages, as the memorizing of
formal definitions and terms is put off until the pupils a>'e sufficiently advanced to understand
them, and able to interpret them into common language. Definitions can only be of use when
the idea defined is clearly understood—otherwise they are liable only to be mis-usecl or misinterpreted. The fact that a pupil is able to repeat a given number of definitions cannot be
considered a proof of knowledge—and because this is required, we so often hear the remark
from pupils that they ' hate grammar'—and when the lessons are made to consist of mere
words, without interest or explanation, this dislike is not to be wondered at. Grammar is the
first purely abstract study introduced to the pupils' notice, and hence the difficulty so often
experienced in dealing with this subject, and the reason why it is better to delay logical grammar till the reasoning faculties are more fully developed. When pupils have reached the
Fourth Reader, the fuller details of grammatical analysis and inflections can be studied to
advantage.
" Composition is carefully taught in most schools, and the work fairly well graded to suit
the capacity of the pupils. In teaching this branch more previous explanation of the subject,
and more revision of the work done, is desirable to produce results ultimately far more satisfactory. The first requisite for a good composition is that the writer has a clear knowledge of
what is intended to be put in written words, for it is evidently impossible to write about a
subject of which one is ignorant. Do teachers always remember this when a class is told to
write an essay on some abstract subject ? When the work has been done a careful revision of
it in regard to spelling, punctuation, grammar, appropriateness of words, etc., should be taken.
This may seem a slow process, but one lesson thus thoroughly gone over, corrected and rewritten, is worth, educationally, any number of others uncommented on, as by the latter mode
the pupils merely repeat their own errors, until they become fixed in their minds, and are then
all the more difficult to change. There are many devices which can be adopted in classes for
facilitating this work of correction, and thus making the best use of the allotted time.
"In junior classes a great deal may be done orally, by always requiring complete answers
to questions asked ; and finally, when several complete answers have been given, by requiring
these to be combined into one full and complete statement. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 217
" Geography and History.
" Geographical teaching, properly so called, is making some progress in our schools, and
in many instances this lesson seems to be made one of the most interesting in the day's work,
as it is deservedly a very attractive and popular subject of school instruction. A few teachers
still seem to consider that the reciting of definitions and the pointing out of places on a map
constitute the study of geography. Such teachers should keep in mind that although the facts
of geography may be valuable to the pupil, as matters of mere information, yet the development of the intelligence and the rousing of proper curiosity are of more importance.
" Most of our schools with advanced classes are supplied with excellent globes, but these
are not as much used for explanations as they might be. A weekly lesson might well be taken
from the globe instead of from the wall-maps.
" History, in its political and commercial relations, is so closely connected with geography
that it is almost impossible to teach these as separate subjects.
" The earliest lessons in history should consist of simple narratives or stories of an
attractive kind. From these the class may be led to view events as connected with the famous
men of the period. These facts can then be organized into an outline of history; and lastly, a
complete study may be made of the period. Much of the difficulty complained of in teaching
this subject is due to the attempt to obtain a full knowledge of all the details of a limited
period—resulting in a mere memorization of names, dates, and events.
" This subject gives the teacher great opportunities of inculcating true patriotism and
citizenship by means of the illustrations of these virtues found in the lives of the great and
good men of the nation. From it also an ambition to imitate noble actions and to be faithful
in the performance of duty may be inspired in the scholars, and all the principles of true
morality be brought to their notice in the most forcible manner.
" Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene.
" This subject continues to be one of great interest to the senior classes. Evidently this
is because it is a subject capable of practical illustrations, and of being studied by the pupils
themselves from their own observations, thus showing the value of experimental teaching in
order to obtain interest.
"There is great difference to the pupil between the two questions:—'Describe the canine
teeth,' and ' What are your dog's teeth like 1' In other words, if this subject is taken in a
concrete form, interest will certainly be aroused, whereas the mere abstract words become
productive of monotony and dislike, and by the first method of teaching a foundation is laid
for scientific inquiry.
" After the theoretical facts of Physiology and Hygiene have been learned, the teacher
has excellent opportunities of urging upon the pupils the practice of them, more especially in
regard to the hygienic value of temperance. ' Temperance' thus taught will be far more
likely to have a beneficial effect in after life, when the scientific truth of the principles upon
which it is based is understood, than if the instruction is given merely as an ordinary school
lesson learned by rote, and one also consisting too often of words and expressions scarcely
understood by the reader.
" Thus as it is impossible for the class to be instructed from their text-book without the
value of temperance in every way being shown, the subject of Physiology and Hygiene is fully
deserving of the care and attention given to it by the teachers of our schools, and must
evidently be productive of much good in the future life of the scholars.
" Optional   Subjects.
" In most of the schools, one or more optional subjects are taught, varying according to
the individual abilities of the teacher, and the wishes of the parents.
" In several of our schools, and especially in those more remote from the cities, the
subjects of mensuration, geometry and algebra are taught to pupils who are far enough
advanced to profit by this instruction.
" Book-keeping is taught in many others, in accordance with the requirements of the Department. Teachers should be careful not to commence this subject at too early a stage of
the pupil's advancement. If the scholars are previously told that when they have attained to
neatness in writing, correctness in spelling, exactness and rapidity in the use of the ordinary 218 Public Schools Report. 1895
rules of arithmetic, they will then be taught the elements of book-keeping, a new incentive
will be added in the higher work to be accomplished; and that, too, in a branch of such
eminently practical utility in every sphere of life.
"Drawing is taken in some schools, as a change from other subjects, in very few, however,
is it taught properly. The work consists of merely imitating certain copies in the book or on
the blackboard, and thus lacks all originality of thought or design. Something more is
required to put drawing in its proper place as a subject of study. As drawing is the foundation of all technical training, it would be well if more care and interest were shown in the
teaching of this branch; and that not only copying and outline-drawing, but in addition plan-
drawing, use of scales and other practical work in this subject were explained to the classes.
" Music depends so greatly upon the individual ability of the teacher that it must always
remain an optional subject. In many schools the children are taught singing by ear, in a few
by the tonic-sol-fa system, in each case this subject forms an agreeable change from the other
school exercises.
"Needlework is unfortunately taught in only a few of our schools, in these part of Friday
afternoon is devoted to this work. Like music, it makes a variety in the ordinary subjects,
and is certainly a most useful lesson. Some of the sewing done by the younger pupils was
remarkably neat, and showed the interest taken by the teacher and pupils in the work.
"Calisthenics is now taught in many of our city schools by special instructors, and in
most cases with good results. It would be well if a few calisthenic exercises were used in all
schools at any time that the work becomes dull or languid. Perhaps either the closeness of
the room, the wearisomeness of the restrained position at the desk, or the necessary restraints
of discipline in the room, or perhaps all these combined, rather than the mental incapacity of
the pupils, is the cause of the temporary dullness. In either case a few simple calisthenic
exercises, and a little ventilation at the same time, will restore circulation to the blood of the
scholars and healthfulness to the room. In bad weather also, these exercises may be used as
a change when it is impossible for the pupils to be outside the building.
"In conclusion it may be remarked, although it is manifestly impossible that pupils can be
trained in school for all the numerous varieties of employment in after life, yet by the inculcation of habits of careful work and of concentration of thought the acquirement of any special
knowledge afterwards desired will be greatly facilitated. It is with these aims in view that
all studies should be arranged and directed, as well- as to obtain a knowledge of the subject
itself. I have found it requisite in a few instances to request a re-arrangement of the work of
the school, or to ask for more care with its details, in order that the above-named advantages
may be secured.
" I have the honour to be,
"Sir,
"Your obedient servant,
"William Burns,
"Inspector of Schools.
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LI. D.,
"Superintendent of Education,  Victoria." 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 219
REPORTS OF BOARDS OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES OF CITY DISTRICTS.
City of Nanaimo.
Board of School Trustees.
William McGregor, Esq., Chairman, Robert E. McKechnie, Esq., M.D.
Thomas Dobeson, Esq., Thomas Bryant, Esq.,
Edward Quennell, Esq., William K. Leighton, Esq.,
Arthur Wilson, Esq.
S. Gough, Secretary.
" Nanaimo, 21st October, 1895.
" Sir,—The Board of Public School Trustees begs to present its report for the year
ending 30th June, 1895.
"At the end of the year 1894, Trustees W. McGregor, E. Quennell, and John Hilbert,
retired, and at the regular election in January, Robert E. McKechnie, Esq., M. D., was
elected, and W. McGregor and E. Quennell, Esquires, were re-elected. In accordance with
the ' Public School Amendment Act, 1895,' an election to fill the office of an additional Trustee
was held on the 14th March, when W. K. Leighton, Esq., was elected.
" During the year sixteen meetings of the Board have been held, and the various schools
have been visited by the Trustees as often as possible.
" For several years the need of a more suitable building for a Central School has been
felt, and energetic steps have been taken by the Trustees to accomplish this end. An effort
was made by the Municipal Council to gain the consent of the ratepayers to a by-law to
authorize a loan to supplement the grant made by the Provincial Government in aid of the
construction of a new building, but they did not succeed. The Trustees are now inviting
tenders for the erection of a building large enough to accommodate eight or nine divisions, to
be built upon the site of the Girls'Central School. When completed, it will afford ample
room for some time to come, but additional land is required to furnish reasonable recreation
grounds for the pupils.
" During the months of May and June measles were prevalent in our city, and during
that time the attendance was reduced.
" Herewith is enclosed a statement of the estimated values of school properties in this
city. " I have, etc.,
" S. Gough,
" Secretary.
"S. D. Pope, LL. D.,
"Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria. B. C." 220
Public Schools Report.
1895
Statement for the Year ending June 30th,  1895.
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$ 810
14,000
$2,500
17,310
Girls'     do	
1877
4
52,272
810
5,150
1,500
7,460
South Ward   	
1892
„
2
18,612
450
800
2,250
3,500
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1892
2 )
(     450
I 1,400
18,216
i
1     300
2,300
4,450
1893
ii
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$22,720
"Nanaimo, li. C, October 21st, 1895."
" S. Gough,
"Secretary, Board of School Trustees.
City of New Westminster.
Board of School Trustees.
D. S. Curtis, Esq., Chairman,
John MeKenzie, Esq.,
Thomas Turnbull, Esq.,
G. W. Boggs, Esq. M. D.
F. W. Howay, Esq., Secretary.
J. Carter Smith, Esq.,
E. Johnson, Esq.,
George Adams, Esq.,
"New Westminster, B. C, 15th August, 1895.
" Si^—The Board of School Trustees of the City of New Westminster begs leave to
report as follows for the school-year ending 30th June, 1895.
" The Board has held during the past year eighteen meetings—twelve regular and six
special meetings. These meetings have been invariably well attended shewing the interest of
the Board in the schools.
" In accordance with the amendment of the School Act, passed during the Session 1894-5,
an election was held and Mr. George Adams was added to the Board as the seventh Trustee.
" The increase in the attendance at Central School during the year became so great that
at Easter a new room—the 6th Division of the Girl's School—was formed, and Miss Jean
Patterson was selected to take charge of this division.
" The Board has made a start in the way of introducing training in vocal music in the
schools. A small amount was placed on the estimates for last year for the teaching of music,
and the results were so entirely satisfactory that this year the amount was increased and  th e 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
221
tuition extended. The money spent in this way the Board regards as well expended. Mr.
H. C. Chamberlin had charge of this department from the commencement until his departure
from the city, owing to sickness in his family. Upon his resignation, the Board appointed
Mr. J. B. Rushton.
" Since my last report the Board has furnished almost all the rooms in the schools with
patent desks. During the midsummer vacation the schools have been thoroughly cleaned, the
black-boards renewed, all necessary repairs effected and the school grounds put into good
order to receive the children on re-opening.
" Herewith I enclose a statement of the estimated value of the school properties in this
city.
" I have, etc.,
" F. W. Howay,
" Secretary.
" S. D. Pope, Esq., LL. D.,
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C."
Statememt for the Year ending June 30th, 1895.
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Central (two buildings; addi
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1882
Wood
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Central (new school)	
1891
Brick
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Sapperton	
1890
Wood
4
8 lots.
•$5,500
$20,000
$30,000
$55,000
1889
11
2
2 lots—100 x
100 ft.
" New Westminster, B. C,
August 15 th, 1895."
"F. W. Howay,
"Secretary, Board of School Trustees. 222 Public Schools Report. 1895
City of Vancouver.
Board of School Trustees.
A. H. B. Macgowan, Esq., Chairman, C. C. Eldridge, Esq.,
C. W. Murray, Esq., Secretary, Geo. R. Gordon, Esq.,
Wm. Templeton, Esq., W. D. Brydone-Jack, Esq., M. D.
C. F. Foreman, Esq.
"Vancouver, B.C., October 2nd, 1895.
" Sir,—I have the honour herewith to submit the Report of the Board of School Trustees
of Vancouver for the school year ending June 30th, 1895.
"The Board, during the past term, had twenty-three meetings, twelve regular and eleven
special, all of which were well attended.
" Through your kind permission, the Board had the pleasure of making such arrangements that the teachers and scholars could attend the New Westminster Agricultural
Exhibition last fall, which was thoroughly appreciated.
" During the early part of the term, the Board deemed it necessary, owing to the overcrowded state of the West End School, to appoint another teacher. We also found it
necessary, for the same reason as above, to appoint a monitor for the Mount Pleasant School.
" It is with deep regret that we have to record the first death which has occurred among
our teachers. It is that of the late Miss M. Wintemute, who in her capacity of teacher had
won the respect and esteem of not only the Board, but also that of her scholars and associate
teachers.
" The contract has been let for a four-room, two-story school building, to be erected in
Fairview, which we expect to have convpleted early in the coming term.
" On account of necessary repairs, the Mount Pleasant School will not be ready to re-open
at the usual time.
" Enclosed is the statement of the expenditure for the school year, also a memo, of the
values of school properties.
" I have, &c,
"C. W. Murray,
" Secretary, Board of School Trustees.
" To S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D.,
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B.C."
Expenditure for the School Year ending June 30th,  1895.
Name.                             Salaries.                     Sundry Expenses. Total.
High School $7,080 00    $   782 09    .$7,862 09
West End School      6,840 00       1,213 47     8,053 47
Central School    6,240 00       1,022 14     7,262 14
East End School    7,320 00       1,505 76     8,825 76
Mt. Pleasant School ....   6,309 00       1,078 93     7,387 93
Fairview    1,480 00          385 71     1,865 71
Miscellaneous Accounts  426  95
West End School Site (mortgage paid off). . .  1,606 88
Fairview School Building  172 80
,463 73
C. W. Murray,
Secretary, Vancouver Board of School Trustees. 59 Vi
CT.
Public Schools Report.
223
Statement for the Year ending June 30th,  1895.
§
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Mt. Pleasant (new)	
1892
Brick
8
400x264 feet.
$10,000
$30,000
$41,800
Mt. Pleasant (old)	
1888
Wood
3
175x150   »
200
4,000
2,500
6,700
1890
Brick
8
800x264   „
1,600
26,000
27,000
6,000
25,000
52,600
1892
8
950x264   //
1,800
30,000
58,800
West (old)   	
1888
Wood
4
264x122   „
4,000
10,000
High	
1892
Brick
8
200x250    n
2,075
16,000
30,000
48,075
1889
8
250x265   1,
1,800
32,000
25,000
58,800
520x264    „
18,200
18,200
$9,275
$139,200
$146,500
$294,975
" Vancouver, October 22nd, 1895."
"C. W. Murray,
" Secretary, Board of School Trustees.
City of Victoria.
Board of  School Trustees.
C. Hay ward, Esq., Chairman,
Mrs. M. Grant,
George Glover, Esq.,
E. A. Lewis, Esq.
B. Williams, Esq., Secretary.
J. B. Lovell, Esq.,
W. Marchant, Esq.,
H. Saunders, Esq.,
"Victoria, B. C, July 15th, 1895.
" Sir,—I have the honour herewith to submit the report of the Board of School Trustees
of Victoria School District for the year ending 30th June, 1895.
" During the year the Board has been called together for the dispatch of business some
thirty-two times, and on no occasion has an adjournment been taken for lack of a quorum.
" Upon the re-opening of the schools in August it was found necessary to establish school
wards within the city, defining the area from which each of the Central, South Park, and
North Ward should respectively draw their attendance. Considerable care and attention had
to be expended by the Board upon this matter in order to equalize, as well as might be, the
capacity of the school with the area allotted to it. The various sub-divisions are roughly as
follows :—
" North Ward School sub-division includes all that portion of the city lying to the north
of an imaginary line running eastward from the harbour along Johnson, Government, Pandora, 224 Public Schools Report. 1895
Blanchard, Chatham, Cook, and Bay Streets, and Cedar Hill Road to the southern boundary
line of the Oakland Estate, and following that line eastwardly to the city boundary.
"South Park School sub-division includes all that portion of the city lying to the south
of an imaginary line running eastward from the Custom House, along Wharf, Humboldt,
Maclure, Collinson, Vancouver, Franklyn, and Cook Streets to the sea.
" Central School sub-division includes all that portion of the city to the east of the harbour,
and lying between the North Ward and South Park School sub-divisions.
" Victoria West School sub-division includes all that portion of the city lying to the west
of the harbour and Victoria Arm.
" The Principals of the various city schools were instructed to permit no pupil, without
the express sauction of the Board, to attend any other city school than that of the sub-division
in which the pupil might reside.
" Although at first, as might be expected, applications were made to the Board for permits
to attend schools other than that of their sub-divisions, these being met by the Board in a
spirit of conciliation have now ceased almost entirely.
"It was also found that the lower divisions of both the South Park and North Ward
Schools became overcrowded, and upon consideration the Board deemed it best to relieve the
congestion by re-opeuing the James Bay and Rock Bay Schools for infant classes rather than
interfere with the limits of the sub-divisions, which by this time had become established and
recognized by both teachers and parents.
" In order to prevent disputes as to the amount of remuneration a teacher should pay his
or her substitute, the Board felt called upon to make the following rule by resolution, viz.:—
That in case of absence from all causes, except sickness, the full salary appertaining to the
position shall be paid the ' substitute,' and that in cases of absence occasioned by sickness, of
which a doctor's certificate must be produced, 60 °/o of the full salary appertaining to the
position vacant shall be paid the ' substitute.' One teaching day shall constitute one-twenty-
fifth part of a calendar month.
" With a view to the best interests of education in this city, and there not as yet being a
Provincial Normal School at which young teachers could receive training in the best methods
of educating, the Board in April decided by resolution to appoint to each of the graded schools
a pupil-teacher. No salary is attached to the position thus created, but the appointees have
the prior righfc of engagement as substitutes. By subsequent resolution those pupil-teachers
who had served for six months in that capacity can undergo an examination conducted by the
Principals of the Graded Schools, as an Examining Board, in the practical work of teaching.
Upon the result of this examination, as certified to by the Examining Board, a certificate is
issued by the Board of Trustees under seal, and signed by the Examining Board and the
Chairman and Secretary of the School Board. Judging from the number of applications
received for the position of pupil-teacher in our schools this movement has been an unqualified
success. In January a vote of the parents and teachers of the pupils attending the city schools
was taken under the supervision of Mr. S. B. Netherby, as Returning Officer, upon the
question of whether the extension of the mid-day recess to one and a half hours was desirable
or not. The result of the ballot was that 870 votes were cast against and 206 for such
extension.    It is needless to add that no further action was taken in the matter.
" It being the consensus of opinion of the Board that a uniform system of instruction in
penmanship should prevail in the city schools, the matter was referred to the Victoria
Teachers' Institute for consideration and report. This report stated briefly that of the forty-
four teachers who met to consider the matter twenty-seven were in favour of the Vertical
System and seventeen in favour of the Spencerian System. It was therefore resolved by the
Board that with the approval of the Educational Department the Vertical System of penmanship be adopted for use in all the Public Schools in the city.
"Such approval being accorded, it was further resolved, that all teachers on the City
Teaching Staff be enjoined to see that as far as practicable instruction under this system be
commenced at once, and that it be compulsory on all teachers to use this system in imparting
instruction in penmanship after the Christmas holidays, 1895.
" The personnel of the Board has been affected during the year in the following manner:—
Messrs. C. Hayward, J. B. Lovell and H. Saunders were re-elected at the general election in
January last, and as the result of the election attendant upon the amendment to the School
Act passed at the last Session of the Legislature, Mrs. Maria Grant was added to the number
of those who freely expend their time and energies in the cause of Public School Education. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
225
"The expenditure for the year (30th June, 1894, to 30th June, 1895) was as follows;
the accounts being paid by drafts upon the City Treasurer, signed on behalf of the Board as
heretofore :—
" Ordinary Expenses of Maintenance.
Alterations and repairs to school buildings  $1,660. 81
School furniture and repairs thereto  3,762 58
Janitors' salaries  2,771 00
Fuel  1,298 65
Printing and advertising  154 95
Secretary's office and Board expenses  943 63
Stationery and supplies  148 60
Sundries (including fire insurance)  1,935 00
$12,675 22
" Teachers' Salaries        36,884  10
Total     $49,559 32
" Extraordinary Expenditure.
Amount spent out of the proceeds  of  ' Educational  Loan Bylaw,   1893,' and closing that account    $15,072 53
" I have, &c,        " B   Williams, Secretary.
" S. D. Pope., Esq., LI. I).,
" Superintendent of Education."
Statement for the Year ending June 30th, 1895.
3
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Central   	
1875
Brick
•
High	
Girls' (wing added, 1888)
1882
1885
"
• 22
7J acres ....
$5,500
$90,000
$65,000
$160,500
Pemberton Gymnasium .
1894
II
.
1894
1894
"
8
8
150x213 feet.
2 acres  	
2,000
2,000
9,000
14,000
33,500
33,500
44,500
North Ward     ,,       	
49,500
James Bay        «   (add'n,
89)
1883
Wood
3
120x120 feet.
750
3,000
4,500
8,250
Hillside Ward
1884
II
3
100x133   //
750
2,900
5,000
8,650
Rook Bay Ward        n
1886
II
2
120x120   n
500
2,300
3,200
6,000
Spring Ridge Ward   « '89
'93
1887
n
4
135x119   „
1,000
2,600
5,250
8,850
Victoria West            n
'89
1888
n
4
1 acre   	
1,000
3,000
5,000
9,000
Baptist Mission House
rented
1
250
250
$13,750
$126,800
$154,950
$295,500
" Victoria, June 30th, 1895."
"B. Williams,
"Secretary, Board of School Trustees. 226 Public Schools Report. 1X95
SPECIAL  REPORTS ON SCHOOLS.
In order to give statistical information on the schools in a form that will be most readily
understood, it has been deemed best to furnish special reports in the following order :—
A.—High Schools.
B.—Graded Schools.
C. —Rural Schools.
A
Special Reports on High Schools.
Nanaimo High School.
Principal, Walter Hunter, B.A., B.C.L.
Salary, $115 per month.
Examined, December 3rd, 1894.
June 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 70.
Average monthly attendance, 53.
Average actual daily attendance, 41.56.
Report of the Principal.
"Nanaimo, September 10th, 1895.
« gIR;—I beg to submit the annual report of the Nanaimo High School for the year
ending June 30th, 1895.
" The work has been assisted by the good conduct and application of the pupils, and
encouraged by an increase of salary, freely granted by the Trustees.
" The New Vancouver Coal Company, through the Mauager, S. M. Robins, Esq., gave a
number of prizes, for proficiency in the English subjects, at both the Christmas and Midsummer Examinations.
" Not having any complaints to make, and no advice to offer to any one, I will close this
rather brief report of what has proved to be my most pleasant year in the school-room.
" I have, &c,
" Walter Hunter,
" Principal.
" S. D. Pope, Esq., II. D.,
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C." 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
227
The annexed tabular statement of attendance at this school since its establishment may
be found of interest.
The names of those who stood head of the school at the Midsummer and Christmas
Examinations held since its commencement are also given.
Year.
Males
enrolled.
Females
enrolled.
Total
enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance
Head of School.
Christmas.
Midsummer.
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
6
8
9
13
17
18
16
14
19
36
6
13
16
17
20
19
21
25
29
34
12
21
25
30
37
37
37
39
48
70
11.52
14.15
15.86
17.57
21  99
19.94
20.02
23.37
34.50
41.56
James A. W. Bell 	
James Galloway	
James Galloway	
Herbert D. R. Stewart .
James A. W. Bell.
Herbert D. R. Stewart.
James Galloway.
James Galloway.
Herbert D. R. Stewart.
1891-92
1892-93
Watson Dykes.
1893-94
1894-95
Arthur David Morgan.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895, John T. Lukey, having obtained the highest
number of marks, was awarded the Bronze Medal presented by His Excellency the Governor-
General for competition among the pupils of this school.
New Westminster High School.
Principal, Hector M. Stramberg, B.A.
Salary, $108 per month.
Assistant, Robert Law, B.A., Ph. B.
Salary, $90 per month.
Examined, December 6th, 1894.
June 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th,
Enrolled during the year, 85.
Average monthly attendance, 61.
Average actual daily attendance, 51.01.
1895.
Report of the Principal.
"New Westminster, B. C, July 31st, 1895.
" Sir,—I beg herewith respectfully to submit my report of the New Westminster High
School for the year ending June 30th, 1895.
" Upon the whole, the advancement the pupils have made is quite satisfactory. Some of
them have been very diligent, especially those who have been preparing to become teachers.
Perhaps one of the most hopeful signs of the youth in the Royal City is this desire to turn
knowledge to practical account. Nearly all those attending our school work with an object
in view. Some are preparing for a mercantile life, others to enter on the study of law,
medicine, or divinity, while many aim at the profession of teaching. At the late examination
of teachers, no less than twenty of the candidates for certificates were educated at the New
Westminster High School, and out of this number eighteen have been successful.
" It also gives me pleasure to be able to report moral, as well as intellectual progress ;
and I am fully convinced, both by a careful study of the subject and by experience, that the
highest morality may be attained under our educational system. Indeed, I firmly hold that a
properly trained youth will show, at every stage of his school life, an advance in morality, as
great as that in the development of his intellectual nature ; and for this reason, I am inclined
to believe that no examiner should pass pupils from a lower to a higher grade without taking
their moral status into account, 228
Public Schools Report.
1895
" For the promotion of moral education, I would respectfully recommend that an ethical
catechism be prescribed for use in our schools. Such a text-book, although not dogmatically religious, would be a great help to the conscientious teacher, for it would enable him to
see more clearly how to unfold whatever of latent good there is in the hearts of the young,
and so to develop the virtues and form those ideals that are the groundwork not only of a
moral, but also of a truly religious life.
" The lectures delivered by Dr. Boggs on Physiology and kindred subjects, have been
well attended and highly appreciated by a large number of intelligent young students.
" I have, &c,
"H. M. Stramberg,
•■"S. D. Pope, Esq., II. D., "Principal.
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C."
The annexed tabular statement of attendance at this school since its establishment may
be found of interest.
The names of those who stood at the head of the school at the Midsummer and Christmas
Examinations held since its commencement are also given.
Head of School.
Year.
Males
enrolled.
Females
enrolled.
Total
enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance
Christmas.
Midsummer.
1884-85
21
19
40
21.77
Thomas R. E. Melnnes.
Frederic Wm. Howay.
1885-86
20
25
40
25.00
Bertha Grant  .   	
Richard McBride.
1886-87
16
22
38
19.25
Richard McBride	
James Rankin.
1887-88
20
28
48
22.75
James Rankin	
James Rankin.
1888-89
17
16
33
20.86
James Rankin	
Margaret F. Homer.
1889-90
25
22
47
24.96
Arthur M. Whiteside . .
Margaret F. Homer.
1890-91
27
24
51
27.50
Arthur M. Whiteside.
1891-92
32
29
61
46 51
Mabel Lucy Calhoun.
1892-93
36
49
31
34
67
83
42.62
44.63
Leonora E. Hughes.
Jean Patterson.
1893-94
1894-95
48
37
85
51.01
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895, John Arthur Rowe was awarded the Silver Medal
presented by His Excellency the Governor-General for competition among the pupils of this
school.
Vancouver High School.
Principal, Alexander Robinson, B.A.
Salary, $135 per month.
1st Assistant, James C. Shaw, B.A.
Salary, $100 per month.
2nd Assistant, G. Robinson, B.A.
Salary, $100 per month.
3rd Assistant, J. H Kerr, B.A.
Salary, $100 per month.
4th Assistant, J. K. Henry, B.A.
Salary, $100 per month.
Examined, December 3rd, 1894.
June 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 159.
Average monthly attendance, 122.
Average actual daily attendance, 108.44. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
229
Report of the Principal.
"Vancouver, B. C, August 31st, 1895.
" Sir,—I have the honour of submitting the report of the Vancouver High School for the
year 1894-95.
" No changes in the staff have taken place during the year that has just closed.
Extremely satisfactory work has been done by the several assistants ; in fact, to their hard
work is due the success attained by the Vancouver High School during the year 1894-95.
" I have, &c,
" Alexander Robinson,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., II. D., "Principal.
'' Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C."
The annexed tabular statement of attendance at this school since its establishment may
be found of interest.
The names of those who stood head of the school at the Midsummer Examinations held
since its commencement are also given.
Males
enrolled.
10
13
18
31
52
58
Females
enrolled.
Total
enrolment.
Average
daily
attendance
Head of School.
Year.
Midsummer.
1889-90
1890-91
1891-92
1892-93
1893-94
1894-95
21
29
54
65
92
101
31
42
72
96
144
159
24.67
24.36
42.87
64.34
92.77
108.44
Catherine A. Barnes.
Florence E. Morrison.
Florence E. Morrison.
Ellen C. Bennett.
Henry Percy De Pencier.
Henry Allen McTaggart.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895, Henry Allen McTaggart was awarded the silver
medal presented by His Excellency the Governor-General for competition among the pupils of
this school.
Victoria High School.
Principal, Edward B. Paul, M. A.
Salary, $125 per month.
1st Assistant,  Neil  Heath,  until February, 1895 ; Ernest H. Russell, B. A., until June
30th, 1895 ; present 1st Assistant, Albert J. Pineo, B.A.
Salary, $110 per month.
2nd  Assistant,  John  Simpson,  M. A.,  until June  30th,   1895; present 2nd Assistant,
Ernest H. Russell, B. A.
Salary, $100 per month.
3rd Assistant,  Albert J.   Pineo,  B. A., until June 30th,  1895; present 3rd Assistant,
John N. Muir, B. A.
Salary, $90 per month.
Examined, December 3rd, 1894.
June 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 1895
Enrolled during the year, 201.
Average monthly attendance, 153.
Average actual daily attendance, 130-28. 230 Public Schools Report. 1895
Report of the Principal.
" High School, Victoria, B. C, July 29th, 1895.
" Sir,—I have the honour to enclose, herewith, the reports of the Victoria High School
for the year ended the 30th ultimo.
" The school showed very satisfactory progress for the first part of the term ; but, at a
later period, work was considerably interrupted, owing to the changes in the teaching staff
necessitated by the loss of Mr. Heath's services, and by the frequent leave of absence granted
to Mr. Simpson, whose health was bad.
"A Normal Class was commenced on the 1st of March for the benefit of the many pupils
intending to write for Teachers' Certificates. This class was placed in charge of Mr. E. H.
Russell, who did good work in connection therewith. Its establishment necessitated the
placing of two divisions, the Third and Fourth, under one teacher, Mr. Pineo, who accomplished
the additional work thus imposed on him with much zeal and success. The Normal Room,
although desirable for those pupils aspiring to be teachers, disarranged the ordinary working
of the school to a considerable extent, and will be discontinued in future.
" The High School has made good showing in the last two examinations for Teachers'
Certificates. In 1894, thirty-seven pupils obtained certificates, of which two were for life.
In 1895, twenty-two candidates from the High School were successful, three receiving First
Class, Grade B, Certificates. At other examinations the pupils of the Victoria High School
are equally successful, many of them having passed the Law and the Pharmaceutical Society's
entrance examinations, while one recently passed with much credit the Provincial Land
Surveyors' preliminary examination. Pupils of the High School are admitted without
examination to Leland Stanford, Junr. University, on production of a certificate signed by
me, that they have accomplished a certain amount of work in the school here. Two old pupils
graduated B. A., at Palo Alto this summer, two are there as under-graduates, while one
proceeds thither next September.
" There were no candidates for matriculation at Toronto University from this school this
term, but matriculation work was done in the First Division, and I hope that the Victoria
High School will soon be able to accomplish, not only matriculation, but also more advanced
work. But good results cannot be obtained by too great haste. A thorough grounding in
all subjects is necessary before proficiency can be secured. No solid structure can be built on
a weak or rotten foundation. It is by steady hard work at the rudiments of classics, mathematics, and science that we can lay a foundation for a knowledge of these subjects. This we
have been endeavouring to do in the High School.     Good results are sure to follow.
" As we shall, in future, receive pupils from the Public Schools once a year only, the
High School course will be protracted over four years. This will be of great advantage to
the pupils, because the First and Second Divisions will then contain only pupils who have
been two or three years in school, and will consequently be free to do more advanced work
than they can accomplish at present. The Third and Fourth Divisions will amply suffice for
those pupils who have not time to take a more lengthened course than a two years' course,
and who want a good practical education, higher than can be obtained in the Public Schools.
This change in the time of promotion from the Public Schools necessitates a re-arrangement of
Limits, Time Tables, etc., in the High School.    These, when ready, I shall have the honour of
submitting to you for your approval.
S. D. Pope, Esq., II. D.,
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C."
I have, &c,
" Edward B. Paul,
" Principal. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
231
From the following tabular statement of attendance at this school since its establishment,
an accurate idea of the number of pupils who have therein received instruction in the different
branches of a higher education may be obtained.
The names of those who stood head of the school at the Midsummer and Christmas
Examinations held since its commencement are also given.
Head of School.
Males
enrolled.
Females
enrolled.
Total
enrolment.
Average
daily
Year.
attendance
Christmas.
Midsummer.
1876-77
43
17
60
49.00
John V. Newbury	
John C. Newbury.
1877-78
47
14
61
50.15
Thomas Baker	
No examination.
1878-79
54
22
76
43.62
Thomas Baker	
Herbert C. Carey.
1879-80
51
31
82
54.69
Herbert C. Carey  	
Charles Hayward.
1880-81
37
39
76
52 75
Charles Hayward  	
J. R. Carmichael.
1881-82
39
35
74
45.07
Charles Gardiner	
Wm. W.  Halliday.
1882-83
34
27
61
38.00
R. Clayton Fawcett . . .
Samuel Schultz.
1883-84
45
39
84
56.63
Christina Forrest	
Christina Forrest.
1884-85
37
57
94
56.34
Abbie F. Gardiner  ....
Abbie F. Gardiner.
1885-S6
47
58
105
64.27
W. F. Carey Pope	
John C. Boyd.
1886-87
44
63
107
69.87
Arthur E. Haynes	
Arthur E. Haynes.
1S87-88
49
71
120
67.00
Francis B. Gibbs	
Francis B. Gibbs.
1888-S9
57
67
124
74.08
Jeannette Mebius	
Jeannette Mebius.
1889-90
59
70
129
78.39
Ernest Arthur Powell..
Ernest Arthur Powell.
1890-91
55
71
126
82.67
Francis John Nicholson
1891-92
59
83
142
95.13
Pauline Frank.
1892-93
58
73
131
82.69
Miriam Frank.
1893-94
78
81
159
121.60
Edith M. S. Shrapnel.
1894-95
96
105
201
130.28
The Silver Medal, annually donated by His Excellency the Governor-General for competition among the pupils of this school, was awarded to Miss Frances Ann Brown at the
Midsummer Examination, 1895. 232
Public Schools Report.
1895
B.
Special Reports on Graded Schools.
ATTENDANCE AT GRADED SCHOOLS.
from 1872 to 1895, inclusive.
The following tabular exhibits of attendance at the Public Schools in the Cities of
Nanaimo, New Westminster, Vancouver, and Victoria, as well as at the Graded Schools in
Wellington, Kamloops, Northfield, Vernon, and Union Mines, will doubtless prove of general
interest:—
Nanaimo.
Year.
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average daily
attendance.
1872-73
No returns.
1873-74
125
59
66
81
1874-75
153
75
78
112
1875-76
147
83
64
105
1876-77
184
93
91
112.50
1877-78
248
133
115
154
1878-79
241
135
106
136.89
1879-80
228
121
107
131.87
1880-81
265
148
117
136.95
1881-82
238
131
107
118.73
1882-83
210
131
79
108.03
1883-84
374
224
150
192.53
1884-85
322
175
147
180.54
1885-86
368
187"
181
226.21
1886-87
414
209
205
244.93
1887-88
455
218
237
246.35
1888-89
490
236
254
229.54
1889-90
576
286
290
294.63
1890-91
682
342
340
372.40
1891-92
779
383
396
479.94
1892-93
793
365
428
480.77
1893-94
895
417
478
579.55
1894-95
948
466
4S2
629.36
New Westminster.
Year.
1872-73
1873-74
1874-75
1875-76
1876-77
1877-78
1878-79
1879-80
1880-81
1881-82
1882-83
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
1891-92
1892-93
1893-94
1894-95
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
No returns.
87
65
101
121
132
200
204
202
212
255
287
329
353
444
447
448
673
847
964
934
964
951
Boys.
50
32
63
73
75
102
115
116
131
150
168
184
192
230
235
233
348
426
499
475
490
479
Girls.
37
33
38
48
57
98
89
86
81
105
119
145
161
214
212
215
325
421
465
459
474
472
Average daily
attendance.
73
37
65
67.25
90
99.03
109.53
103.63
97.29
121
129.27
151.19
187.49
212.43
262.27
262.32
348.89
426.28
604.65
670.45
590.54
650.69 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
233
Vancouver.
Year.
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average daily
attenda,nce.
1886-87
248
138
110
168.40
1887-88
642
333
309
238.19
1888-89
1024
533
491
537.69
1889-90
1465
720
745
817.84
1890-91
1748
840
908
1011.09
1891-92
2004
962
1042
1168.34
1892-93
2175
1010
1165
1542.56
1893-94
2247
1096
1151
1575.09
1894-95
2375
1167
1208
1640.44
Victoria.
Year.
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average daily
attendance.
1872-73
No returns.
1873-74
346
176
170
113.50
1874-75
465
Not given.
Not given.
272
1875-76
545
Not given.
Not given.
302
1876-77
617
366
251
374
1877-78
734
455
279
450.15
1878-79
726
395
331
398.99
1879-80
790
436
354
398.78
1880-81
720
391
329
410.09
1881-82
765
440
325
433.45
1882-83
770
423
347
414.55
1883-84
1012
579
433
679.65
1884-85
1343
.   702
641
710.70
1885-86
1427
789
638
807.10
1886-87
1437
794
643
894.29
1887-88
1539
801
738
917.39
1888-89
1623
839
■      784
996.11
1889-90
1896
995
901
1096.23
1890-91
2100
1088
1012
1284.68
1891-92
2449
1246
1203
1528.02
1892-93
2427
1244
1183
1636.27
1893-94
2439
1233
1206
1656.70
1894-95
2537
1310
1227
1842.81
Kamloops.
Year.
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average daily
Attendance.
1887-88
110
61
49
44.27
1888-89
113
70
43
49.92
1889-90
121
75
46
64.39
1890-91
118
70
48
86.29
1891-92
109
59
50
68.79
1892-93
113
62
51
59.35
1893-94
126
67
59
73.82
1894-95
152
76
76
85.32
. 234
Public Schools Report.
1895
Wellington.
Year.
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average daily
attendance.
1874-75
34
14
20
24.75
1875-76
46
13
33
23.33
1876-77
53
19
34
23.78
1877-78
44
18
26
38.00
1878-79
50
25
25
29.82
1879-80
79
40
39
37.14
1880-81
89
52
37
42.50
1881-82
123
66
57
52.61
1882-83
146
90
56
73.70
1883-84
156
87
69
55.85
1884-85
142
76
66
73.26
1885-86
135
79
56
77.66
1886-87
151
78
73
79.34
1887-88
179
87
92
75.43
1888-89
227
103
124
100.38
1889-90
283
135
148
127.61
1890-91
234
118
116
113.86
1891-92
331
172
159
167.56
1892-93
292
148
144
155.14
1893-94
364
186
178
201.43
1894-95
371
189
182
243.72
Northfield.
Year.
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average daily
attendance.
1892-93
1893-94
1894-95
239
250
210
114
124
97
125
126
113
120.39
127.77
116.31
Vernon.
Year.
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average daily
attendance.
1893-94
1894-95
135
155
79
87
56
68
91.37
80.23
Union Mines.
Year.
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average daily
attendance.
1894-95
187
84
103
107.42 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
235
THE   FOLLOWING   GRADED   AND   WARD   SCHOOLS   WERE IN OPERATION
DURING  THE  YEAR.
Schools.
Kamloops ....   	
Njanaimo—Boys' 	
do        Girls'  ,	
do        North Ward	
do        South Ward	
New Westminster—Boys'	
do Girls'	
do Sapperton
do Westside. .
Northfield	
Union Mines	
Vancouver—Central	
do
do
do
do
do
Vernon	
Victoria—Boys
do       Girls
do
East	
East Branch..
West	
Mt. Pleasant.
Fairview	
do
do
do
do
North Ward .
South Park ..
West	
Rock Bay....
Spring Ridge.
Wellington
Number
of grades.
of regular
attendance.
3
56.13
4
67.91
4
67.69
2
64.71
2
65.78
6
70.04
6
73.76
3
63.71
2
62.07
4
55.38
3
57.44
8
71.73
7
70.60
3
65.45
9
67.88
8
71.95
2
51.40
3
51.76
8
70.60
8
73.54
9
77.07
9
72.04
5
75.71
2
77.92
4
67.67
5
65.69
In order to secure greater uniformity in the management of Graded Schools, the
following additional regulations have been prescribed by the Council of Public Instruction : —
The Principal shall prepare the Limit Table for each division of his school, and must
forward a copy of the same to the Education Department for approval.
Semi-annual written examinations for making promotions shall be held in the different
divisions of each Graded School.
The Principal shall prepare the questions for these examinations, and shall fix the time
of holding the same, but the promotion lists must be read on the date on which each public
examination of the school is held. 236 Public Schools Report. 1895
As it is not deemed proper to place too great reliance upon a single written examination,
the Principal shall consult the assistant teacher of each division in preparing the promotion
list. The assistant's recommendation, based upon record kept as to progress and standing of
pupils claimed to be worthy of promotion, should be accorded proper consideration.
A copy of all questions set for each promotion examination, together with a statement of
the results of the examination of each division (on blanks supplied by the Department for
that purpose), must forthwith be forwarded to the Education Department.
In order to secure annual returns as nearly correct as possible, the attention of teachers
is called to the necessity of the careful observance of the following points :—
1. The List of Children returned should contain the names of all pupils who received
instruction in each division during the school-year. A cross (X) should be placed before the
names of the pupils who were promoted at the Christmas Examination, or who are known to
be reckoned as pupils by any other teacher.
2. In making out the Annual Report, the teacher should insert under "Total number of
pupils of all ages who attended the school during the year " (Table A), the number of pupils
who have been attendants in his division only, that is, who are not reckoned as pupils by
any other teacher. Thus in a Graded School of eight divisions the total number of pupils
enrolled, as given in Annual Reports of these eight divisions, will be the total number
of pupils who have attended the school during the school-year. In this way the reckoning of
duplicate enrolments will be avoided. The object aimed at is that the reports of the school
give a correct statement as to the whole number of pupils who have attended the school
during the school-year.    In any case of doubt  consultation with  other teachers  will in  all
probability lead to accuracy.
Kamloops.
-.    Principal, E. Stuart Wood.
Salary, $85 per month.
1st Assistant, R. Landells, B.A.
Salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Deborah E. Matthews.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, March 7th and 8th, 1895 ; present, 46 boys, 41 girls ; total, 87.
Enrolled during the year, 76 boys, 76 girls ; total, 152.
Average monthly attendance, 101.
Average actual daily attendance, 85,32.
Expenditure, $2,460.      •
At examination held March 7th and 8th, 1895, Miss Jeanetta C. Smith and Miss Annie
Lauder, pupils of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
Report of the Principal.
"Kamloops, B. C, July 1st, 1895.
" Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report of Kamloops Public School for the year
ending June 30th, 1895.
"The average attendance has been much higher than previously, and is likely to continue
advancing.
"The Limit Table has been the same as formerly, but it is our intention to raise the
standard on re-opening school, and our new Limit Table will be forwarded for your consideration.
"On the resignation of Mr. J. R. McLeod, in August, Mr. R. Landells, B. A., a teacher
of large experience, was selected to fill his place in the 2nd Division.
"Miss Matthews still teaches in the 3rd Division, with great acceptability and success.
"At the Teachers' Examination, 1894, four pupils of this school obtained certificates, and
at present three others are preparing to write on the forthcoming Teachers' Examination. 59 Vict. Public Schools RepoBt. 237
"During the Inspector's visit last March, three pupils wrote on Entrance Papers, and two of
them, Jeanetta C. Smith and Annie L. Lauder, were successful in obtaining the percentage
required for admission to a High School.
"As in former years, the teachers have received the most generous treatment from
Trustees and parents; and as the greatest harmony prevails the best results should be attained.
-" I have, etc.,
" E. Stuart Wood,
" S. I). Pope, Esq., LL. D., " Principal.
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C."
Nanaimo.
Boys' School.
Principal, John Shaw,
Salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant, James A. Galloway.
Salary, $75 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Flora E. Hartt.
Salary, $60 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss M. G. Dobeson,  until June 30th, 1895 ; present 3rd Assistant, Miss
May Woodman.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 286.
Average monthly attendance, 236.
Average actual daily attendance, 194.24.
At the Christmas Examination,  1894,  the following passed  the standard required for
admission to a High School :—
Wellington McAlpine,
Kenneth McDonald,
Purvis L. Smith,
Wallace D. Stewart,
John D. Galloway.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895,  the following obtained the percentage required
for admission to a High School :—
Henry Bhilo,
John J. Wilkinson,
James Dick,
Malcolm R. Simpson.
Report of the Principal.
"Nanaimo, June 28th,  1895.
" Sir,—In compliance with the Rules and Regulations for the government of Public
Schools in British Columbia, I beg leave to submit the following report:—
" Taking everything into consideration, we have made fair progress, the number of promotions from the lower divisions being about the same as last year.
" I am pleased to state that we are to have a large central school for girls and boys.
This will greatly improve our present system, as the teachers will have fewer classes, although
perhaps more pupils.
" I am sorry to note that, in the future, the examinations for entrance to High Schools
will be held annually, instead of semi-annually. It will probably injure us more than any
other school in the Province, on account of the great inducements held out to young boys to
work in the mines. -> ri » OOfl 238 Public Schools Report. 1895
" I cannot close my remarks without mentioning the great kindness of Mr. S. M. Robins,
who, for the New Vancouver Coal Company, has offered a gold medal for annual competition
between the girls and boys of our Public Schools.
" I have, etc.,
" Jno. Shaw,
"S. D. Pope, II.P., "Principal.
" Superintendent of Education."
Girls' School,
Principal, Miss Maria Lawson.
Salary, $80 per month.
1st Assistant,  Miss Lucy A. Mebius.
Salary, $65 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Mary P. Haarer.
Salary, $55 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Sarah F. Muir.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and Sth, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 292.
Average monthly attendance, 240.
Average actual daily attendance, 197.66.
At the Christmas Examination,  1894,  the  following passed  the standard  required  for
admission to a High School :—
Fanny T. Dick,
Isabella Sinclair,
Nellie T. Donaldson,
Margaret Quennell.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895,  the following obtained the percentage required
for admission to a High School:—
Catherine Manson,
Lillian Webb.
Report of the Principal.
"Nanaimo, July 17th, 1895,
" Sir,—Since making my last report of Nanaimo Girls' School, Miss Haarer has been
promoted to the position of 2nd Assistant, and Miss Muir appointed to fill the vacancy caused
by her promotion.
" A friendly spirit has pervaded the school, and, although their rooms were crowded, my
assistants have all done a good year's work.
"Mr. Robins, the Manager of the New Vancouver Coal Company, has, by his liberality,
afforded us the means of obtaining a much larger number of prizes than we would otherwise
have been able to give.
"The North Ward School has, during the year, been placed under my supervision, and I
have to express my regret at the resignation of Miss Marion Gordon, the intelligent and
conscientious Principal.
" The Trustees have in the past year, as in former years, shown themselves the kind and
considerate friends of the teachers in their employ.
" Thanking you, Sir, and all the officials of the Education Department, for your kindness
and courtesy, " I remain, etc.,
(Signed)        " Maria Lawson,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., IL.D., "Principal.
" Superintendent of Education, Victoria." 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 239
North   Ward School.
Teacher,   Miss  Marion  Gordon,  until  June  30th,   1895;  present teacher,  Miss M. G.
Dobeson.
Salary, $60 per month.
Assistant, Miss Maude C. Edwards.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 24th, 1894.
October 9th, 1894.
June 4th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 135.
Average monthly attendance, 102.
Average actual daily attendance, 87.36.
South Ward School.
Teacher, Miss Christina A. Duncan.
Salary, $60 per month.
Assistant, Miss Sarah Marshall.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 24th, 1894.
October 9th, 1894.
June 7th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 165.
Average monthly attendance, 127.
Average actual daily attendance, 108.54.
New Westminster.
Boys' School.
Principal, William C. Coatham.
Salary, $90 per month.
1st  Assistant,  Robert  G.  Gordon, until June 30th,  1895; present 1st Assistant, J. D.
Buchanan.
Salary, $67.50 per month.
2nd Assistant, J. D. Buchanan, until June 30th,  1895; present 2nd Assistant, Thomas
Leith.
Salary, $60 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Melrose Dockrill.
Salary, $55 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Archena J. McDougall.
Salary, $52.50 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Mary S. Brown.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 309.
Average monthly attendance, 259.
Average actual daily attendance, 216.43.
At the Christmas  Examination,  1894,  the  following  passed the standard  required for
admission to a High School :—
Garnet K. Peele, William J. G. Woods,
William C. Wilson, Hollis A. Young,
Charles R. Major, Alfred H, Johnston,
Lewis F. Hoy. 240
Public Schools Report.
1895
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895, the  following obtained   the percentage required
for admission to a High School:—
Gilbert H. G. Thomson,
Morley L. Smith,
Herbert C. Dunn,
William T. L. Wark.
John V, Cotton,
Ernest Rushton,
Charles N. Hughes,
Report of the Principal.
"New Westminster, July 10th, 1895.
" Sir,—In accordance with the Rules and Regulations, I forward you my annual report
as Principal of the Boys' School of this city.
" Until Easter, the Sixth Division had been a mixed school, but at that time my Fifth
Assistant was relieved of the girls, and at the same time each assistant received the junior
class of the next division. Thus a partial change of limit was provided for each teacher.
The First Division will henceforward have fifth class pupils only, a consummation that has
long been desired.
" In the early part of the year a play-shed was erected for the accommodation of the
pupils in wet weather. In the matter of school supplies the Board has always been very
liberal; ink is now supplied free to all the city pupils. From time to time the old seats have
been replaced by patent ones, which add much to the convenience and comfort of the pupils.
" During the year 16 pupils were promoted to the High School, two of whom were
favoured with a special examination.
" The late Chairman of the Board presented the boys with a flag, and a suitable pole will
soon be erected for it.    Considerable enthusiasm has thus been aroused.
" Throughout the year the pupils have received regular instruction in the theory and
practice of vocal music, and a keen interest has been awakened and much progress made as
was shown by the closing exercises. We are glad to report that the attention paid to this
subject is no longer a matter of experiment, and that Prof. Rushton's services are not only
much appreciated but permanently secured. The subject of temperance and hygeine has been
thoroughly taught in each division ; in the primary divisions oral instruction and examination
only are given ; in the four senior divisions the subject is on the same basis as the others and
percentages are duly exacted.
" Of all my assistants I can speak in the highest terms ; they are teachers of considerable experience and have shown unusual courtesy and interest throughout the year, and the
returns forwarded to your office each half-year clearly prove that their year's work has been
very creditable.
" The kind forethought of previous Boards has provided us with a number of large and
beautiful trees which produce excellent shade and render a pleasing effect to the grounds.
The play-ground has been improved twice during the year and all the other property and
premises are kept in good order.
" I have, &c.,
" W. C. Coatham,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., II. D., .      " Principal.
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C." 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 241
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss Ellen Rogers.
Salary, $72 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss Edith E. Robinson.
Salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Blanche Millard.
Salary, $55 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Margaret F. Homer.
Salary, $52.50 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Mary S Homer.
Salary, $50 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Jean Patterson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 301.
Average monthly attendance, 265.
Average actual daily attendance, 222.02.
At the Christmas Examination,  1894,  the following passed the standard required for
admission to a High School :—
Eva C. Lennie,
Jennie Coots,
Esther K. Clarke,
Emily J. Gardiner,
Annie Rushton,
Edna F. Darcy.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895,   the following obtained  the percentage required
for admission to a High School:—
Ethel G. Gardiner.
Barbara Anderson,
Emma M. Jackson,
Maggie Parsons,
Edith A Williams,
Jennie Woods,
Margaret V. Rankin.
Report of the Principal.
"New Westminster, July 2nd, 1895.
"Sir,—In accordance with the rules and regulations, I submit to you my annual report of
the New Westminster Girls' School.
" During the first part of the year the attendance increased so much that it was found
necessary, on the 1st of April, to form another division. This Sixth Division was placed
under the care of Miss Jean Patterson, who has done very satisfactory work. The formation
of this division necessitated a re-arrangement of classes all through the school, and several
pupils were then promoted to equalize, as far as possible, the attendance in the different
divisions. This made the percentage promoted at the end of the year much smaller than usual.
In spite of the disadvantages under which my assistants have thus laboured, much good work
has been done. Good progress has also been made in vocal music, under the able instruction
of Mr. J. B. Rushton.
" Thirteen pupils were successful in obtaining entrance to a High School.
" The attendance during the last month or two was much lessened by sickness among
the children. " I have, etc.,
" Ellen Rogers,
"S. D. Pope, LL.D., "Principal.
" Superintendent of Education, Victoria, B. C," 242 Public Schools Report. 1895
Sapperton School.
Teacher, Norton Strople.
Salary, $67.50 per month.
Assistant, Miss Janet I. Miller.
Salary, $50 per month.
Monitor, Miss Belle Dixon.
Salary, $40 per month.
Inspected, October 3rd, 1894.
Enrolled during the year, 142.
Average monthly attendance, 109.
Average actual daily attendance, 90.47.
At the Christmas Examination, 1894, Master Cyril Gillanders passed the standard
required for admission to a High School.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895, Miss Mabel Wells obtained the percentage
required for admission to a High School.
Westside School.
Teacher, Robert J. Hall.
Salary, $67.50 per month.
Assistant, Mrs. Annie C. McDonald.
Salary $50 per month.
Inspected, October 4th, 1894.
Enrolled during the year, 114.
Average monthly attendance, 87.
Average actual daily attendance, 70.76.
Northfield.
Principal, James E. Norcross.
Salary, $80 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss R.  Tanner,  until  August  31st,   1895 ; present   1st  Assistant,  Miss
Maud R. Walker.
Salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Maud R. Walker,  until  August  31st, 1895; present 2nd Assistant,
Miss Kate C. Smith.
Salary, $50 per month.
Monitor,  Miss Kate  C.   Smith,  until  August  31st,   1895;   present   Monitor,   Mrs.   K.
Bertiaux.
Salary, $40 per month.
Inspected, October Sth, 1894; present, 53 boys, 66 girls; total, 119.
Enrolled during the year, 97 boys, 113 girls ; total, 210.
Average monthly attendance, 156.
Average actual daily attendance, 116.31.
Expenditure, $2,960.
Report of the Principal.
"Northfield, B. C, July 2nd, 1895.
" Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report on the work of the Northfield Public
School for the past school-year.
"The unsettled state of the mining industry has caused a constant movement of population to and from this district, and, consequently, the children now attending the school have,
in a large number of instances, taken the places of others whose parents have removed. We
have therefore missed much of the encouragement which is derived from seeing visible results
after patient effort. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 243
" Nevertheless, the promotion examinations show a distinct improvement in the quality
of the work done upon that of previous terms, and this, 1 think, is largely owing to the fact
that the staff of teachers has remained without change for eighteen months. The continuity
of purpose and method thus rendered possible have enabled us to make our work far more
effective than when each half-year saw one or more new appointments.
"The state of the school-building is unsatisfactory. *Repairs are needed for the preservation of the fabric itself, as well as for the health and well-being of pupils and teachers.
" I have, etc.,
"J. E. Norcross,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., "Principal.
" Super intern lent of Education, Victoria, B. C."
* Necessary repairs have been made.
Union Mines.
Principal, Robert Watkin.
Salary, $80 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss Lottie M. Powell.
Salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss L. L. Nickerson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, February 20th and 21st, 1895; present, 65 boys, 56 girls; total, 121.
Enrolled during the year, 84 boys, 103 girls; total, 187.
Average monthly attendance, 139.
Average actual daily attendance, 107.42.
Expenditure, $2,380.
At the semi-annual examination, held in Nanaimo on June 4th and 5th, 1895, Miss Laura
A. Abrams, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High
School.
Report of the Principal.
"Union, B. C, June 30th, 1895.
" Sir,—I herewith submit my report of the Union Mines Public School for the school-
year ending June 30th, 1895.
"This school was raised to the status of a graded school on July 1st, 1894. An addition
was then built to the school-house and a third teacher was added to the staff.
" Heretofore the principal occupation of the people of Union has been mining; consequently, the population has fluctuated considerably. Pupils come in from many different
places, thus rendering a proper grading of classes a somewhat difficult matter. Notwithstanding this, however, I am pleased to report a substantial progress in the various studies.
" Promotion examinations were held in December and June, in which a good average
percentage was made. In no other way can the benefit of a regular attendance be better
demonstrated than in the result of such examinations.
"We had to contend with tardiness at first, but have managed to lessen it to a very
great extent.
" The out-buildings in connection with the school are not sufficiently large for the number
of pupils, and the playground is also too small. We are greatly in need of some kind of
shelter for the pupils during the wet weather.
"In conclusion, I must speak in the highest terms of the hearty co-operation of the
Trustees. They have always shown themselves ready to assist in anything for the improvement of the school.
"I am, etc.,
" Robert Watkin,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., "Principal.
" Superintendent of Education, Victoria, B.C." 244 Public Schools Report. 1895
Vancouver.
Central School.
Principal, Frederick M. Cowperthwaite, B. A.
Salary, $90 per month.
1st  Assistant,   W.   B.   Burnett,   B. A.,  until  June  30th,   1895; present 1st Assistant,
Robert G. Gordon.
Salary, $75 per month.
2nd Assistant,  David M. Robinson, B.A.
Salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Emily C. Agnew.
Salary, $50 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Rachel Macfarlane.
Salary, $50 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Annie L. Buttimer.
Salary, $55 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Marion B. Johnstone.
Salary, $50 per month.
7th Assistant, Miss M. Hartney.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 460.
Average monthly attendance, 369.
Average actual daily attendance, 329 99.
At the Christinas Examination,   1894,  the following passed  the  standard  required  for
admission to a High School :—
Blanche M. Corey, Lena B. Tierney,
Cecil Purvis, Annie McK. Nelson,
Annie M. Southcott, Charles H. Mason,
Ethel V. K. Barnes, Joseph H. Clarkson,
Lue A. Bodwell.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895, the following obtained the  percentage  required
for admission to a High School:—
Edith M. Gordon, Joseph E. Rose,
Roy L. Anderson, Annie G. Revely,
Samuel A. Rose, Thomas J. Browne,
Florence L. Holmes.
Report of the Principal.
"Vancouver, B. C, July 16th, 1895.
"Sir,—I have the honour to lay before you my report of the Central School for the year
ended June 30th, 1895. Owing to the prevailing hard times our Board of Trustees, at
Christmas, felt compelled to reduce the salaries of the teachers. It is greatly to the credit of
my staff (and I believe the same to be true of all the other schools in the city) that the
reduction did not, to any extent, lessen the efficiency of the work. With the exception of the
clergy, I doubt if under similar circumstances the same could have been said of any other
body of workers in the world.
At the end of June the school had the misfortune to lose the services of Mr. W. B.
Burnett, B. A., who has, with entire satisfaction to me, filled the position of First Assistant
for the past year and a half.
I have, &c,
" F. M. Cowperthwaite,
"S. D. Pope., Esq., II.D., "Principal.
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria." 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 245
East School.
Principal, Gregory H. Tom.
Salary, $90 per month.
1st Assistant, James J. Dougan.
Salary, $70 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Catherine A. Barnes.
Salary, $55 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Bessie Johnston.
Salary, $55 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Minna G. McKay.
Salary, $55 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Marie L. Fletcher.
Salary, $50 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Mary A. Wintemute, until June 30th, 1895; present 6th Assistant,
J. P. Lawson, B.A.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895,
Enrolled during the year, 404.
Average monthly attendance, 322.
Average actual daily attendance, 285.26.
At the Christmas Examination, 1894, the following passed the standard required for
admission to a High School :—
Myrtie Hamilton,
Tena Urquhart,
Oscar E. Ridley,
Harry Ford,
John Slagg,
Albert T. Janes.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895, the  following obtained the percentage required
for admission to a High School :—
.    Maud L. McGirr,
Edwin A. McDonald,
Clara McNair,
Frederic J. Sanders,
James A. McConaghy,
Elizabeth Cooke, .
Sarah E. Gordon,
Agnes Cooke.
East Branch School.
Teacher, Miss Anna E. Fraser.
Salary, $50 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss Jean W. Black.
Salary, $50 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss H. Wintemute.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 2nd, 1894.
January 11th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 185.
Average monthly attendance, 146.
Average actual daily attendance, 121.09. 246 Public Schools Report. 1895
"Report of the Principal.
"Vancouver, B. C, November 13th, 1895.
" Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you my report of the Vancouver East School for
the school-year ending June 30th, 1895.
" I am pleased to say that most of the work and its results for the year have been very
satisfactory. The attendance of the whole school, particularly of the senior classes, has
gradually increased. The parents have shown much interest in the school-work, and the large
attendance at the public examinations has been very noticeable.
"Nothing very striking has happened during the year, except the death of the teacher
of Seventh Division, Miss Mary Wintemute. It came very suddenly, and was keenly felt by
teachers and pupils. Through her death the pupils have lost a devoted teacher, and the
teachers a cheerful companion and esteemed friend.
" I have, etc.,
"Gregory H. Tom,
'' Principal.
"S. D. Pope, Esq., II.D.,
"Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B.C."
West School.
Principal, Thomas A. McGarrigle, B.A.
Salary, $90 per month.
1st Assistant, Robert Fraser.
Salary, $75 per month.
2nd Assistant,  Miss Mary M.  Chambers, B.A.,  until June  30th,   1895 ; present 2nd
Assistant, J. D. Fraser.
Salary, $50 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Mary L. Harding.
Salary, $55 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Lena M. Ferguson.
Salary, $50 per month.
5th Assistant Miss E. Murray.
Salary, $50 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Mary E. Speirs.
Salary, $50 per month.
7th Assistant, Miss Minnie M. Macfarlane.
Salary, $55 per month.
8th Assistant, Thomas E. Knapp.
Salary, $55 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 562.
Average monthly attendance, 456.
Average actual daily attendance, 381.50.
At the  Christmas Examination,  1894, the following passed the standard required for
admission to a High School :—
Jean Tilley,
Rosa Campion,
Kate McLachlan,
Harry Earle,
Elizabeth Moffatt,
William Mace. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 247
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895, the following obtained the percentage required for
admission to a High School:—
Stanley McKay,
Wilson Wintemute,
Constance Matthews,
Thomas A. LeCappelain,
William Anstie.
Report of the  Principal.
"Vancouver, July, 1895.
" Sir,—I have the pleasure of submitting to you the following report of the West
Vancouver School for 1894-95.
" The past year has witnessed the usual overcrowding in our school. The pressure will
be relieved in some degree by the opening of the Tenth Division as soon as possible.
" Mr. J. D. Fraser has been appointed to the vacancy caused by the resignation of one of
our most esteemed and skilled teachers, Miss M. M. Chambers, B. A.
" Special attention has been given, during the year, to reading, writing and number,
especially in the lower divisions. The vertical system of writing has been introduced and has
proved a marked advance on the old style.
" Because of the. excellent relations between teachers and pupils, no call for severe discipline has arisen during the year. This pleasant condition of affairs is doubtless due to the
fact that there has been no change of teachers in our school for several years. The health of
the school has been admirable, no case of serious illness having occurred during the year.
The pupils have been diligent and punctual.
" We have to thank the Department of Education for its courtesy during the past year.
No inconsiderable degree of the efficiency of the school has been owing to the assistance and
supervision of Wm. Templeton, Esq., school trustee.
" I have, &c,
"T. A. McGarrigle,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., IL.D., "Principal.
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B.C."
Mount Pleasant  School.
Principal, George W. Jamieson.
Salary, $90 per month.
1st Assistant, Allan C. Stewart.
Salary, $75 per month.
2nd Assistant, Truman S. Baxter.
Salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Robert H. Carscadden.
Salary, $50 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Florence Morrison.
Salary, $55 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Jessie A. Black.
Salary, $50 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Una M. Stitt.
Salary, $50 per month.
7th Assistant, Miss Lizzie Fletcher.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 502.
Average monthly attendance, 414.
Average actual daily attendance, 361.21. 248 Public Schools Report. 1895
At  the Christmas  Examination, 1894, the  following  passed the  standard required for
admission of a High School :—
Matilda Baxter, Lena Hoffar,
Clara Wood, Maud Mills,
May Woodward, Hilda Matthews,
Jessie McGuire.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895, the following  obtained   the  percentage  required
for admission to a High School :—
Frances Murray, James McMillan,
Gertrude Whitman, Theodora M. McCleery;
Hope A. Lawson, Anna Burritt,
. Anna Marstrand.
Report, of the Principal.
" Vancouver, June 29th, 1895.
" Sir,—I beg respectfully to submit to you the second annual report of the Mount Pleasant
Public School of Vancouver City.
"During the past year, 1894-95, the attendance at this school has increased over 100
pupils, and on account of Eighth Division being overcrowded, Miss Ada McCallum was
appointed Monitor.
" The teachers have worked faithfully and cheerfully, and I am pleased to tell you that in
no part of Vancouver do the parents take more interest in their children's progress than in
Mount Pleasant, Vancouver City.
" I have, etc.,
" G. W. Jamieson,
" Principal.
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D.,
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C."
Fairview School.
Teacher, George W. McRae.
Salary, $60 per month.
Monitor, Miss Ethel L. Le Page.
Salary, $40 per month.
Inspected October 2nd, 1894.
January 11th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 103.
Average monthly attendance, 62.
Average actual daily attendance, 52.95.
At the Midsummer Examination,  1895,  Master John   Elliott,   a   pupil   of this school,
obtained the percentage required for admission to a High School. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 249
Vernon.
Principal, Henry J. Hoidge, until June 30th, 1895 ; T. Henderson, M. A.,  until October
15th, 1895 ; present acting Principal, Angus C. Buchanan.
Salary, $75 per month.
Acting 1st Assistant, Miss Mary Bell.
Salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Ella Coghlan.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, March 26th and 27th, 1895; present, 55 boys, 48 girls ; total, 103.
Enrolled during the year, 87 boys, 68 girls; total, 155.
Average monthly attendance, 99.
Average actual daily attendance, 80.23.
Expenditure, $2,340.
At Examination held on March 26th and 27th,  1895, Miss Lillie B. Glover, a pupil of
this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
" Report of the Principal.
"Vernon, July 16th, 1895.
" Sir,—I beg respectfully to submit the following report of Vernon Public School for the
year ending June 30th, 1895 :—
" During the year the attendance has considerably increased, especially in the lower rooms,
while the progress in all three divisions has been quite satisfactory. The irregularity and
tardiness complained of in my report last year have not yet entirely disappeared.
" On October 25th the school was honoured by a visit from His Excellency the Governor-
General and Lady Aberdeen, accompanied by two of their children, an event long to be
remembered by pupils and teachers.
" Last November a diphtheria scare took place in Vernon, which had a serious effect on
the attendance for the rest of the term.
" The Christmas Examination was rather a tame affair, owing to the slim attendance,
but the recent examination in June was a decided success in all respects. The attendance of
visitors was the largest we have ever had, and the pupils did their part well.
" The most serious cause for complaint on the part of the teachers during the year has been
with regard to the care of the school building. No janitor has been employed since November,
and the teachers, occasionally assisted by an obliging pupil, have been under the necessity of
doing the sweeping, lighting fires, &c. In the Principal's room either the pipe or the chimney
is defective, and great inconvenience and discomfort have had to be endured, owing to smoke
and liquid nastiness falling from the pipes on the seats, desks, and floor.
" During the year Miss Lillie Glover succeeded in passing the Entrance Examination,
and several were promoted from the lower divisions.
" As to my assistants, Mr. A. C. Buchanan and Miss Ella Coghlan, I can only repeat and
emphasize what I said in my report last year in regard to their efficiency and genial companionship in work.
" I am, &c,
" Henry J. Hoidge,
" Principal.
" S. D. Pope, II. D.,
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria." 250 Public Schools Report. 1895
Victoria.
Boys' School.
Principal, Stephen B. Netherby.
Salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant,  Edward F.  Doran,  until  June 30th,   1895; present   1st  Assistant,   T.
Nicholson.
Salary, $80 per month.
2nd Assistant, Joseph F. Sallaway.
Salary, $75 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Elizabeth E. Sylvester.
Salary, $65 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Gertrude H. Withrow, until August 31st, 1895 ; present 4th Assistant,
Miss Grace H. Fawcett.
Salary, $60 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Sarah Kermode, until June 30th, 1895; present  5th Assistant, Miss
Caroline C. Christie.
Salary, $55 per month.
6th Assistant,  Miss Grace H. Fawcett,  until June  30th,   1895;  present  6th Assistant,
Miss Edith M. Jesse.
Salary, $50 per month.
7th Assistant, Miss Caroline C. Christie,  until June 30th,   1895 ; present 7th Assistant,
William N. Winsby.
Salary. $40 per month.
Examined, December 4th and Sth, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 421.
Average monthly attendance, 345.
Average actual daily attendance, 297.26.
At the  Christmas  Examination,  1894,  the following passed the standard required for
admission to a High School:—
Lome G. McHaffie, "William C. Kelly,
James H. Johnston, Robert S. Dalby,
Harold B. Marchant, William H. King,
Alfred D. McPhaden, Stewart M. Robertson.
At the Midsummer Examination,   1895,  the following obtained  the percentage required
for admission to a High School:—
Claude L. Wales, Ithiel B. Nason,
Ernest E. Cleaver, Jesse P. Sylvester,
Noel W. Barker, Robert P. Knott,
John A. V. Dalby, Norman W. Jackson,
Walter J. Duncan. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 251
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, July Sth, 1895.
"Sir,—I have the honour to submit the report of the Boys' School for the school-year
ending 30th June, 18 95.
" The teachers in this school have worked very zealously during the year just ended, and
the results of the promotion examinations show that their labours have been crowned with a
fair degree of success.
" No changes have been made in the staff of teachers during the year. This fact has
added to the well-working of the different classes
" The pupils have been regularly instructed in physical culture by an able and experienced
teacher, Mr  St. Clair.
" The Education Department and Board of Trustees have, by their careful oversight,
contributed greatly to the efficiency of the school.
" I have, etc.,
" S. B. Netherby,
Principal.
"S. D. Pope, II.D.,
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria."
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss Mary Williams.
Salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss Lizzie A. Barron.
Salary, $80 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Ada Keast.
Salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Mrs. L. M. Caldwell.
Salary, $65 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Frances E. Arrowsmith.
Salary, $60 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Alexandrina Russell.
Salary, $55 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Isabel R. Christie.
Salary, $50 per month.
7th Assistant, Miss Edith M. Jesse, until June 30th, 1895; present 7th Assistant, Miss
Edith M. S. Shrapnel.
Salary, $40 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 384.
Average monthly attendance, 336.
Average actual daily attendance, 282.43.
At   the Christmas Examination,  1894, the following passed the standard required for
admission to a High School :—
Jane Moore, Olive L. Chambers,
Genevieve L. Grant, Elsie S. Shrapnel,
Ada Askew, Ada Macdonald,
Mabel E. Knott, Gertrude L Arthur,
Minnie McDonald, Cassie J. Sutherland,
Edna A. Meredith, Elizabeth S. Lovell,
Lulu D, Sherritt. 252 Public Schools Report. 1895
At the Midsummer Examination,  1895, the following obtained  the percentage required
for admission to a High School:—
Flora B. Rolfe, May B. Hiscocks,
Margaret A. Johnson, Sarah Breidfjord,
Florence E. Creedon, Maud A. Atkinson,
Clara Janes, Dorothy Berridge,
Margaret Lowe.
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, July 3rd, 1895.
" Sir,—I beg herewith to submit my report of the Girls' School for the school-year ending
June 30th, 1895.
" Notwithstanding the erection of two new school houses, our divisions are well filled,
particularly the middle grades. The usual number of new pupils has been received into the
school this year, a large proportion being from private schools of this city.
" Noticeable improvement has been made in writing since the introduction last term of
the vertical system of penmanship.    The results in the primary classes are most gratifying.
" The carriage and general physique of our pupils have been much benefited by regular
instruction in drill and calisthenics.
" I cannot close this report without expressing my hearty appreciation of the thorough
work done by my assistants in their various divisions, and my thanks to the Department of
Education and Trustees for their ready co-operation in any scheme for the well-being of
teachers and pupils. " I have, <&c,
"M. Williams,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., " Principal.
" Superintendent oj Education,
" Victoria, B. C"
North   Ward School.
Principal, Angus B. McNeill.
Salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant, Leonard Tait, until June 30th, 1895 ;    present   1st  Assistant,   Miss  Mina
Sanderson.
Salary, $80 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Annie J. Monro.
Salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Mina Sanderson, until June 30th, 1895 ; present 3rd Assistant, Miss
Caroline A. Dowler.
Salary, $65 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Caroline A. Dowler, until June 30th, 1895 ;   present 4th Assistant,
Miss Sarah J. Murton.
Salary, $60 per month.
5th  Assistant, Miss Sarah J. Murton,  until June  30th,   1895 ;   present  5th  Assistant,
Miss Eliza J. King.
Salary, $55 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Amy Spragge.
Salary, $50 per month.
7th Assistant, Miss Frances G. Walker.
Salary, $40 per month.
8th Assistant, Miss Edith M. S. Shrapnel, until June 30th, 1895.
Salary, $30 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 518.
Average monthly attendance, 450.
Average actual daily attendance, 399.27. 58 Vict.
Public Schools
Report.
253
At the
admission to
Christmas Examination,
a High School :—
1894,
the
following passed  the standard req
uired for
Lilian Nisbet,
Sarah E. Sherriff,
Harriet Williams,
Franklin Sherk,
Frederick William Waller,
Richard J. Maynard.
At the Midsummer Examination,
for admission to a High School:—
1895,
the
following  obtained  the percentage
required
George W. Turnbull,
Percy Winnett,
Elizabeth Cartmel,
Isabel Cartmel,
Alexander Thomson,
Fanny Devereux,
Elmore
Dier
Robert M. Knox,
Nelson J. W. Shepherd,
Clara Chapman,
Evis E. Nicholson,
Ernest Lane,
Frederic J. N. White,
Report of the Principal.
" Victoria, B. C, July 15th, 1895.
"Sir,—Incompliance with the Rules and Regulations, I herewith submit the Annual
Report of North Ward School, for the last school-year.
" This school was opened August 13th, 1894, with a staff of eight teachers. Three of the
rooms being over-crowded, a class was at once organized and placed in the assembly room
in charge of a Monitor. In January, 1895, this class was closed and the Rock Bay School
opened with two teachers, under my supervision. A little later to relieve the Sixth and
Eighth Divisions, a class was transferred to the Hillside School, under the tuition of a Monitor.
These changes relieved the pressure and gave each teacher an opportunity to do good work.
" When the school was organized I received pupils from nine different schools. The
standard in nearly all being different I found the classification very difficult, and though
grading very carefully, yet the standing of the various classes was very low. Since then, by
efficient work and careful, examination the various divisions compare favourably with the
other graded schools in the city, as evinced by the recent promotion examinations.
"It gives me much pleasure to state that my assistants have in every manner shown an
earnest desire to promote the welfare of the school, and have, without exception, been most
diligent and remarkably successful with their pupils.
" The large attendance at the closing exercises and the interest generally shown are
strong evidences that the Public Schools are becoming very popular.
" I have to thank the Board of Trustees for fitting up so well our large and commodious
building, and for so promptly attending to all our supplies.
" I must also thank the Education Department for their valuable suggestions, and
courtesy on all occasions. " I have, etc.,
" Angus B. McNeill,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., IL.D., "Principal.
" Superintendent of Education, City."
South Park School.
Principal, Miss Agnes D. Cameron.
Salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant,   Ernest H.  Russell,  B. A.,  until February, 1895; present 1st Assistant,
P^Miss Ellen G. Lawson.
Salary, $80 per month. 254 Public Schools Report. 1895
2nd Assistant,  Miss  Lucretia  Horton, until  April  30th,   1895 ; present 2nd Assistant,
Miss Sarah A. Robinson.
Salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Sarah A. Robinson,  until  June  30th, 1895; present  3rd Assistant,
Miss Lizzie M. Speers.
Salary, $65 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Lizzie M. Speers, until June 30th, 1895; present 4th Assistant, Miss
Flora C. Fraser.
Salary, $60 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Flora C. Fraser, until June  30th, 1895; present 5th Assistant, Miss
Christina T. Lorimer.
Salary, $55 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Christina T. Lorimer, until June 30th, 1895; present 6th Assistant,
Miss Pauline Frank.
Salary, $50 per month.
7th Assistant, Miss Pauline Frank, until June 30th, 1895; present 7th Assistant, Miss
Ida M. Carmichael.
Salary, $40 per month.
8th Assistant, Miss Margaret O. Maclean.
Salary, $30 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 495.
Average monthly attendance, 409.
Average actual daily attendance, 356.64.
At the Christmas Examination,  1894, the  following passed  the  standard required  for
admission to a High School:—
Ross McDowell, Lily A. Haynes,
Fanny F. Whyte, Ethel L. Browne,
Stella H. Meyer, Ella V. Whitelaw,
Harry G. Walker, Archibald M. Lowe.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895,  the following obtained the percentage required
for admission to a High School:—
Roberta B. Devlin, Mabel A. Witmer,
Charles Maclean, Millicent A. Newby,
Louis S. York, Hugh H. Wilmot,
Mary E. Stamford, James R. Rome.
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, June 30th, 1895.
" Sir,—I here submit the first annual report of the Victoria South Park Public School.
" The school was organized on the 13th August, 1894, and started work in the new brick
building facing Beacon Hill Park. The South Park School from the standpoint of the teacher
is a model of convenience. Its lighting, heating and sanitary arrangements could scarcely be
improved. Tasteful surroundings must exert a refining influence on all, and especially so upon
children. If we, as teachers, have failed in our work, the fault must be ours alone, for we
have been given by the Trustee Board all needed accessories.
" During the year the parents of this district have strengthened our hands by their kindly
sympathy and hearty co-operation.
" We have by subscriptions and from the proceeds of school entertainments acquired as
school property an excellent piano (Mason & Risch), and have in contemplation the forming
of a school-library.
" The Ninth Division of the school holds session in the old James Bay Ward School
building ; the class is under the able direction of Miss M. 0. Maclean. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 255
" Upon the promotion of my First Assistant, Mr. Russell, to the High School, Miss
Lawson received the vacant position, and our staff now is composed wholly of women.
" I desire to put upon record the loss which the school sustained by the resignation of
Miss Horton. Miss Horton during her ten years' service in the city schools won the respect
of pupils, parents and her fellow teachers ; her place will not be easily filled.
" In conclusion, I may say, that my work for the past year has been most pleasant.
Throughout the school, on the part of the pupils and Assistant Teachers, I have met with
that loyal co-operation which engenders kindliness and mutual respect.
" I have, &c.,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., IL. D., " Agnes Deans Cameron,
" Superintendent of Education, " Principal South Park School.
" Victoria, B. C."
West School.
Principal, Thomas Nicholson, until June 30th, 1895; present Principal, Leonard Tait.
Salary, $90 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss Ellen G. Lawson, until  February, 1895 ;   Duncan Ross,  until  June
30th, 1895 ; present 1st Assistant, Miss Sarah Kermode.
Salary, $70 per month.
2nd Assistant,  Duncan Ross,  until February,   1895 ;   present   2nd  Assistant,  John J.
Stephenson.
Salary, $55 per month.
3rd Assistant, John J.  Stephenson, until February, 1895 ;   present 3rd  Assistant, Miss
Mabel A. Gaudin.
Salary, $50 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Mabel A. Gaudin, until February, 1895 ; present 4th Assistant, Miss
Jean C. Strachan.
Salary, $30 per month.
Examined, December 4th and 5th, 1894.
June 4th and 5th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 231.
Average monthly attendance, 202.
Average actual daily attendance, 174.91.
At the Christmas  Examination, 1894, the following passed  the  standard  required for
admission to a High School :—
Hjalmar Jacobson,
Frederick S. Okell.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1895, the following  obtained  the  percentage  required
for admission to a High School:—
Arthur M. Nicholson,
William Peddle.
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, B. C, July 23rd, 1895.
" Sir,—In accordance with the requirement of the Rules and Regulations, I beg to submit
the annual report of Victoria West School for the year ending June 30th, 1895.
" With regard to progress, attendance, promotions, etc., it is unnecessary for me to make
any statement here, as you are made acquainted with them in detail through the regular
monthly, annual, and other reports sent to the Department.
"During the past school-year several changes, as usual, were made in the teaching staff of
this school. These changes are, in my opinion, chiefly caused by the fact that the teachers of
this school are paid less for their services than those holding corresponding positions in other
schools of this city. 256 Public Schools Report. 1895
" Owing to the want of sufficient accommodation, the Baptist Chapel, in the neighbourhood, was rented as a school-room, and, at first, the Third and Fourth Divisions were transferred to it; afterwards it was found that one of the rooms (Seventh Division) was not large
enough to seat the pupils belonging to it, so that the Fourth Division was also sent to the
school in the Baptist Chapel, thus placing three Divisions under the charge of but one teacher.
"An additional room is being built, and will be completed before the close of the holidays,
so that when the school re-opens there will be ample accommodation provided for the pupils.
" I have, etc.,
" Thomas Nicholson,
" iS". D. Pope, Esq., II.D., "Principal.
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria."
Rock Bay   Ward School.
Teacher, Donald Dallas.
Salary, $50 per month.
Monitor, William N. Winsby, until June 30th, 1895 ; present Monitor, Miss Mary Lucas.
Salary, $30 per month.
Inspected, January 31st, 1895.
May 21st, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 76.
Average monthly attendance, 69.
Average actual daily attendance, 59.22.
Spring Ridge   Ward School,
Teacher, Richard J. Hawkey, until October 31st, 1894 ; John N. Muir, B.A., until June
30th, 1895 ; present teacher, Edward F. Doran.
Salary, $70 per month.
Monitor, Miss Eliza J. King, until June 30th, 1895 ; present Monitor, Miss Isabel M. F.
Barron.
Salary, $50 per month.
Monitor, Miss Isabel M. F. Barron, until June 30th, 1895 ; present Monitor,  Mra.  F. E.
Taylor.
Salary, $40 per month.
Monitor, Miss Ida M. Carmichael, until June 30th, 1895 ; present Monitor, Miss Elsie M.
Arthur.
Salary, $30 per month.
Inspected, September 20th, 1894.
October 25th, 1894.
November 29th, 1894.
February 1st, 1895.
May 13th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 211.
Average monthly attendance, 173.
Average actual daily attendance, 142.80. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 257
Wellington.
Principal, John L. McKay, until June 30th, 1895 ; present Principal, John D. Gillis.
Salary, $85 per month.
1st  Assistant,   Miss  Jennie  Ramsay,   until  June  30th,   1895 ;   present   1st   Assistant,
Leonard A. Campbell.
Salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Margaret M. Burns.
Salary, $55 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Lilias M. Edwards.
Salary, $50 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Alice John.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 8th, 1894 ; present, 125 boys, 126 girls ; total, 251.
Enrolled during the year, 189 boys, 182 girls ; total, 371.
Average monthly attendance, 304.
Average actual daily attendance, 243.72.
Expenditure $3,700.
A 4th Assistant was appointed in September, 1894, and owing to the increased attendance it was found necessary during the present school-year to add a 5th Assistant to the staff.
At the semi-annual examination, held in Nanaimo on December 4th and Sth, 1894, Miss
Kate Fisher and Master Edwin J. Rutherford, pupils of this school, passed the standard
required for admission to a High School.
At the semi-annual examination, held in Nanaimo on June 4th and 5th, 1895, Miss
Mary Ellen Sloan and Master Austin Hugo, pupils of this school, obtained the percentage
required for admission to a High School.
Report of the Principal.
" Wellington, B. C, October 5th, 1895.
"Sir,—In accordance with Art. 10 of the Rules and Regulations, I beg to report as
follows on the condition and progress of the Wellington Public School for the year just ended.
" An additional assistant was added to the staff at the beginning of the school-year, but
the Fifth Division is at present so overcrowded that the appointment of a fifth assistant will
be necessary at the beginning of the next term. The new building is very suitable in every
respect, but the seats provided are rather ancient in design.
" A complete set of new maps is required, and specially I would mention a good map of
our Province. The total average daily attendance for the year is 243.72, which is an increase
of 42.29 over the previous year.
" During the year four pupils obtained certificates of entrance to a High School, and
one was successful in obtaining a Third Class Teacher's Certificate.
" The Trustees have been attentive to the wants of the school, but report a scarcity of
funds for incidentals. I would suggest that a recommendation be made for an increased grant
at next session of Parliament, as this grant has not been increased in late years proportionately
with the necessary increased expenditure. I would also beg to make a similar suggestion
regarding the salary of my successor and his first assistant.
" I have, &c,
"J. L. McKay,
" Principal.
" S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D.,
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C."
<0- 258
Public Schools Report.
1895
0.
Special Reports on Rural Schools.
Abbotsford.
Teacher,  Miss Eliza J. Blair, until November 30th,  1894 ; present teacher, Miss C. C.
Warren.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 7th, 1894; present, 7 boys, 3 girls; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 13 girls ; total, 28.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.14.
Expenditure, $513.21.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92 	
33
25
34
28
15.85
12.66
14.60
11.14
$10 30
25 60
18 82
18 32
$21 45
1892-93	
1893-94	
50 55
43 83
1894-95 	
46 06
Aberdeen.
Monitor,  Miss' Alice  M.  Lewis, until June   30th,   1895 ; present Monitor, Miss Jennie
Dyker.
Salary, $40 per month.
Inspected, September 10th, 1894; present, 6 boys, 6 girls ; total, 12.
Visited, April 24th, 1895 ; present, 3 boys, 3 girls ; total, 6.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 8 girls ; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, l5.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.92.
Expenditure, $520.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94	
21
21
10.88
9.92
$15 84
24 76
$30 57
52 41
1894-95	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
259
Agassiz.
Teacher, Miss L. E. Hughes, until June 30th, 1895; present teacher, Miss S Moscrop.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 22nd, 1894 ; present, 7 boys, 12 girls ; total, 19.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 16 girls; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.09.
Expenditure,
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91 	
20
19
27
22
29
12.11
10.58
11.12
10.14
14.09
$14 50
31 05
23 70
29 09
22 06
$23 94
1891-92 	
55 76
1892-93                             	
57 55
1893-94	
63 11
1894-95	
45 42
Alberni.
Teacher, John Howitt.
Salary, $50 per month.
Monitor, Miss Ethel Dunkerley.
Salary, $40 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 32 boys, 19 girls; total, 51.
Average monthly attendance, 38.
Average actual daily attendance, 32.77.
Expenditure, $1,160.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90 	
51
55
49
41
44
51
1890-91   	
1891-92 	
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95	
Average
attendance.
24.66
25.53
22.97
24.29
30.19
32.77
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$20 78
18 01
21 44
27 31
26 36
22 74
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$42 98
38 80
45 75
46 10
38 42
35 39 260                                         Public Schools Report.                                        1895
Aldergrove.
Teacher, William Blair.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 4th and 10th, 1894 ; present, 2 boys, 7 girls ; total, 9.
Visited, April 24th, 1895; present, 3 boys, 10 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 16 girls ; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.47.
Expenditure, $640.'
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
31
39
'27
25
34
26
13.50
13.50
11.06
10.25
12.37
11.47
$20 64
16 41
22 27
23 60
17 35
24 61
$47 40
47 40
54 36
57 56
47 69
55 79
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95	
Aldergrove, South.
Teacher, A. J. Gordon.
Salary, $50 per month.
Monitor, Miss Dorathea M. Thomson, until October 21st, 1894; Alfred Blair, until June
30th, 1895 ; present monitor, W. P. Ogilvie.
Salary, $40 per month.
Inspected, September 5th, 1894; present, 18 boys, 13 girls; total, 31.
Enrolled during the year, 26 boys, 17 girls; total, 43.
Average monthly attendance, 32.
Average actual daily attendance, 26.00.
Expenditure, $1,160.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92   	
1892-93 	
24
26
43
43
11.74
13.83
24.52
26.00
$19 47
24 61
24 18
26 97
$39 81
46 27
42 41
44 61
1893-94	
1894-95	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
261
Anniedale.
Teacher, Miss Elizabeth Sayer.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 23rd, 1895 ; present, 7 boys, 5 girls ; total, 12.
Visited, May 31st, 1895 ; present, 9 boys, 4 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 15 girls ; total 31.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.78.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
1891-92
1892-93 (closed)
1893-94	
1894-95 	
Enrolment.
13
24
31
Average
attendance.
.55
11.23
11.78
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$14 61
16 25
20 64
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$22 22
34 72
54 32
Armstrong.
Teacher, O. McPherson.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 15th, 1895; present, 12 boys, 8 girls; total, 20.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 13 girls ; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.30.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93 	
19
25
30
17.43
16.79
17.30
$ 8 52
30 40
25 33
$ 9 29
1893-94	
45 26
1894-95 	
43 93 262                                          Public Schools Report.                                           1895
ASHCROFT.
Teacher, John W. H. King, until December 31st, 1894; J. P. Lawson, B. A., until June
30th, 1895 ; present teacher, David Anderson, M. A.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, April 22nd and 23rd, 1895 ; present, 12 boys, 19 girls; total, 31.
Enrolled during the year, 24 boys, 24 girls ; total, 48.
Average monthly attendance, 31.
Average actual daily attendance, 24.01.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
24
26
31
34
43
48
14.31
14.16
19.75
17.97
25.75
24.01
$29 16
29 23
24 51
22 35
17 67
15 83
$48 91
53 67
38 48
42 29
29 51
31 65
1890-91	
1891-92 	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
At examination held April 22nd and 23rd, 1895, Miss Catherine A.  Newland, a pupil of
this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
Atchelitz.
Teacher, Henry B. Turner, B. A,
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September, 13th, 1894 ; present, 8 boys, 10 girls ; total, 18.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 16 girls ; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.86.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93	
25
26
26
13.72
18.33
17.86
$23 60
24 61
24 61
$43 00
34 91
35 83
1893-94 .                      	
1894-95	 59 Vict.                                 Public Schools Report.                                          263
Barkerville.
Teacher, William H. Phelps.
Salary, $100 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 9 girls; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.11.
Expenditure, $1,420.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and  cost  of each  pupil  during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
33
26
21
22
19
20
22.44
22.07
19.48
19.06
13.67
13.11
$43 03
54 61
67 61
64 54
74 73
71 00
$63 28
64 34
72 89
74 50
103 87
108 31
1890-91 	
1891-92 	
1892-93                      	
1893-94	
1894-95	
Beaver.
Teacher, Miss Elsie M. Smith.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 10th, 1894; present, 5 boys, 8 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 15 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.40.
Expenditure, $640.
The  following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93	
20
22
22
12.95
11.50
12.40
$15 95
29 09
29 09
$24 63
55 65
51 61
1893-94	
1894-95 	
' 264                                         Public Schools Report.                                        1895
Beaver Point.
Teacher, George Kirkendall.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, February 28th, 1895; present, 8 boys, 4 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 8 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11,22.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a  list  of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90   	
1890-91 	
1891-92	
14
18
16
20
25
20
11.23
13.61
12.07
12.35
11.92
11.22
$45 71
35 55
40 00
32 00
25 60
32 00
$56 99
47 02
53 02
51  82
53 69
57 04
1892-93 	
1893-94             	
1894-95	
Belmont.
Teacher, W. J. Cunningham, until October 31st, 189
Salary, $50 per month.
Visited, September 3rd, 1894 ; school not in session.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 9 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.51.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attenda
establishment of the school:—
5; present teacher, John Wright,
nee, and cost of each pupil since the
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91 	
36
40
38
22
24
17.67
19.23
22.80
13.42
12.51
$15 00
16 00
16 29
29 09
26 66
$30 56
33 28
27 15
47 69
51 15
1891-92 ..            	
1892-93 ..                               	
1893-94	
1894-95 ..                                              	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
265
Boundary Creek.
Teacher, Mrs. I. M. Macdonald, until  June  30th,   1895;   present  teacher,   Miss A.   M.
Lewis.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 7 girls ; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 12.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.24.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $35.55.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $56.93.
The school in this newly-created district was opened in September, 1894.
Bowen Island.
Teacher, William C. Acheson, until June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, A. A. McPhail.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 10 girls ; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.39.
Expenditure, $628.95.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94 	
16
23
11.60
11.39
$26 87
27 34
$37 06
1894-95	
55 21
Brownsville.
Teacher, Miss Maud S. Keay.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 26th, 1895; present, 5 boys, 7 girls; total,  12.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 13 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.34.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil-on
average
attendance.
1891-92 	
20
18
24
24
11.29
10.69
10.64
10.34
$15 62
35 55
26 66
26 66
$27 68
59 86
1892-93 	
1893-94	
60 15
1894-95	
61 89 266                                         Public Schools Report.                                        1895
Burgoyne Bay.
Teacher, Alfred W. Cooke.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, February 28th, 1895 ; present, 13 boys, 13 girls ; total, 26.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 14 girls; total, 33.
Average monthly attendance, 27.
Average actual daily attendance, 24.38.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-93	
31
30
28
28
30
33
19.59
17.90
17.70
19.76
24.52
24.38
$19 59
21 33
22 85
25 00
23 33
21 21
$31 02
35 75
36 15
35 42
28 54
28 71
1890-91 	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95	
Burnaby.
Teacher, Miss Ellen Lister.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 26th, 1895 ;  present, 10 boys, 11 gi
Enrolled during the year, 24 boys, 19 girls ;  total, 43
Average monthly attendance, 27.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.12.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendai
establishment of the school:—
rls ;  total, 21.
ice, and cost of each pupil  since the
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
• average
attendance.
1893-94   	
41
43
27.91
22.12
$ 7 46
14 88
$10 96
28 93
1894-95	 59 Vict.                                    Public Schools Report.                                           267
Burton.
Teacher, Miss Carrie E. Ogle.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 24th, 1894; present, 13 boys, 6 girls; total, 19.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 17 girls ; total, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.91.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
39
37
36
32
38
36
19.39
20.06
17.09
15 67
15.80
13.91
$16 41
16 69
17 77
20 00
16 84
17 77
$33 00
1890-91 	
30 79
1891-92 	
37 44
1892-93	
40 84
]893-94 	
40 50
1894-95	
46 01
Cache Creek.
Teacher, William R. Ellenwood, B.A.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, April 20th, 1895; present, 5 boys, 6 girls; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 5 boys, 10 girls; total, 15.
Average monthly attendance, 12.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.22.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
25
12
20
17
15
19.81
9.82
13.07
10.95
10.22
$54 40
15 00
35 00
41 51
50 66
$68 65
1890-91	
18 32
1891-92 (closed)	
1892-93	
1893-94 	
53 55
64 45
1894-95        	
74 36 268
Public Schools Report.
1895
Cadboro.
Teacher, Leonard A. Campbell, until June 30th, 1895; present teacher, J. M. Campbell.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 16th, 1894; present, 8 boys, 11 girls; total, 19.
February 11th, 1895; present, 8 boys, 13 girls; total, 21.
May 22nd, 1895 ; present, 9 boys, 13 girls; total,- 22!
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 18 girls; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 21.
Expenditure,  $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
21
25
37
30
36
30
12.00
13.78
15.84
15.52
23.26
21.00
$29 29
24 56
17 29
21 33
17 77
21 33
$51 26
1890-91 ■	
44 55
1891-92 	
40 40
1892-93	
41 23
1893-94	
27 51
1894-95	
30 47
Camp Slough.
Monitor, Miss Edith M. Lewis.
Salary, $40 per month.
Inspected, September 19th, 1894; present, 8 boys, 11 girls; total, 19.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 13 girls; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average actual daily attendance, 18.82.
Expenditure, $480.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93	
27
24
29
16.56
13.80
18.82
$ 7 40
18 87
16 55
$12 07
1893-94 	
32 81
1894-95	
25 50 59 Vict.                                   Public Schools Report.                                            269
Cedar Hill.
Teacher, Oliver H. Cogswell, B. A.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, October 30th, 1894; present, 23 boys, 19 girls; total, 42.
May 21st, 1895; present, 20 boys, 15 girls; total, 35.
Enrolled during the year, 29 boys, 25 girls; total, 54.
Average monthly attendance, 44.
Average actual daily attendance, 38.76.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a  list  of enrolment, average  attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
41
57
44
54
43
54
24.09
26.84
17.77
27.72
24.04
38.76
$18 53
13 33
17 27
14 07
17 67
14 07
$31 54
28 31
42 76
27 41
31 61
19 60
1890-91 	
1891-92 	
1892-93 	
1893-94   	
1894-95 	
Cedar, North.
Teacher, John C. McGregor.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 10th, 1894; present, 14 boys, 10
Enrolled during the year, 26 boys, 21 girls; total, 47
Average monthly attendance, 32.
Average actual daily attendance, 25.55.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is  a list  of enrolment, average atten
the past six years :—
girls; total, 24.
dance, and cost of each pupil during
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
39
43
48
45
42
47
22.88
21.40
27.88
23.29
25.65
25.55
$16 20
14 65
13 33
14 22
15 23
13 61
$27 62
29 45
22 95
27 48
24 95
25 04
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93 	
1893-94 	
1894-95       	 270                                           Public Schools Report.                                          1895
Cedar, South.
Teacher, Miss Anna L. Stewart.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 10th, 1894; present, 9 boys, 5 girls; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 7 girls; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.48.
Expenditure, $640.
The  following is  a list  of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
25
23
23
22
19
21
14.09
12.50
12.68
11.67
11.51
12.48
$24 76
26 95
27 82
29 09
33 68
30 47
$43 93
49 58
50 47
54 84
55 60
51 28
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
Cheam.
Teacher, Miss Jennie Robertson.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, September 14th, 1894; present, 9 boys, 3 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 12 girls ; total, 32.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average actual daily attendance, 18.42.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
73
59
53
42
51
32
35.36
26.98
25.31
17.62
26.88
18.42
$ 9 59
11 86
13 20
16 66
12 64
21 87
$19 76
25 94
27 65
39 72
23 99
38 00
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95 	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
271
Chemainus.
Teacher, Robert H. Allan.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 11th, 1894; present, 9 boys; 6 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 10 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.43.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each  pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
21
21
18
16
22
25
11.34
11.26
11.22
10.97
11.26
12.43
$28 09
29 30
35 55
40 00
29 09
25 60
$52 02
1890-91	
54 66
1891-92 	
57 04
1892-93 	
58 34
1893-94	
56 83
1894-95 	
51 48
Chilliwhack.
Teacher,   William  M.   Wood, until  June 30th,   1895;   present  Principal,  Robert  H.
Cairns.
Salary, $75 per month.
Monitor, Miss Ada M. Templer.
Salary, $40 per month.
Examined, September 15th and 17th, 1894; present, 31 boys, 30 girls; total, 61.
Enrolled during the year, 48 boys, 57 girls; total, 105.
Average monthly attendance, 76.
Average actual daily attendance, 62.94.
Expenditure, $1,440.
The following is a list  of enrolment,  average  attendance,  and cost of  each pupil  during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
107
102
123
101
115
105
53.00
52.96
56.81
56.38
56.17
62.94
$11 21
12 94
11 70
14 25
12 52
13 71
$22 64
1890-91	
24 92
1891-92	
25 34
1892-93   	
25 54
1893-94	
25 63
1894-95 	
22 87
At examination held on September  15th and  17th, 1894, the following pupils of this
school passed the standard required for entrance to a High School: —
Wallace Prowse,
William D. H. Ladner,
Emily M. Graham.
At the semi-annual examination held in Vancouver City, June 4th and 5th,  1895, Miss
Olive Henderson obtained the percentage required for admission to a High School. 272                                          Public Schools Report.                                          1895
Chilliwhack, East.
Teacher, Miss Mary E. Mercer.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 20th, 1894; present, 11 boys, 21 girls; total, 32.
Enrolled during the year, 24 boys, 26 girls; total, 50.
Average monthly attendance, 37.
Average actual daily attendance, 31.28.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil  since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91	
36
43
46
34
50
22.81
29.27
20.45
15.97
31.28
$15 00
14 88
13 91
18 82
12 80
$23 67
21 86
31 29
40 07
20 46
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95 	
Chilliwhack,   South.
Teacher, Mrs. J. Templer.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, September 21st, 1894 ; present, 20 boys, 23 girls ; total, 43.
Enrolled during the year, 35 boys, 38 girls; total, 73.
Average monthly attendance, 55.
Average actual daily attendance, 48.44.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
33
38
48
47
60
73
19.99
26.26
29.02
30.80
38.58
48.44
$19 39
18 42
14 58
14 89
11 66
9 58
$32 01
26 65
24 12
22 72
18 14
14 45
1890-91 	
1891-92 	
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
The attendance at this school became so
present school-year to give authority for th<
Webb is now filling this position.
At the semi-annual examination, held in
1894, Master Thomas Mercer passed the stan
At the semi-annual examinations, held ii
4th and 5th, 1895, the following pupils of tin
entrance to a High School:—
John Telford,
Anson Knight,
large  that
i appointme
New West)
dard require
i Vancouver
s school  obt
Era
Joh
it  was foun
nt of a mo
ninster City
d for admiss
and New "V
ained  the p
nklin Tempi
n E. Steven
d necessary
nitor.    Miss
December <
ion to a Hig
Westminster
ercentage n
ex,
son,
during the
Caroline L.
:th and 5th,
i School.
Cities, June
ecessary for 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
273
Clayton.
Teacher, David McLennan.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 3rd, 1894; present, 5 boys, 10 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 17 girls; total, 35.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.63.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91 	
23
25
30
39
35
11.76
12.21
12.50
14.29
13.63
$25 65
23 60
21 33
16 41
18 28
$50 17
48 32
1891-92	
1892-93	
51 20
1893-94 	
44 78
1894-95	
46 95
Clinton.
Teacher, Mrs. Ella B. McLellan, until September 17th, 1894; Miss Eva E. Harrap, until
June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, Miss Alice L. Noble.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, April 19th, 1895; present, 11 boys, 9 girls; total, 20.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 11 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.95.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance,  and  cost  of  each  pupil  during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
16
17
22
23
34
24
10.60
10.62
10.52
10.87
12.21
15.95
$47 50
44 70
34 54
33 04
21 92
31 66
$71 69
1890-91	
71 56
1891-92 	
72 24
1892-93	
69 91
1893-94 	
61 04
1894-95	
47 64 274                                           Public Schools Report.                                          1895
Cloverdale.
Teacher, A. H. P. Matthew, until June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, J. W. H. King.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 30th, 1894; present, 11 boys, 25 girls; total, 36.
Enrolled during the year, 33 boys, 33 girls; total, 66.
Average monthly attendance, 50.
Average actual daily attendance, 44.17.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90   	
37
27
33
49
61
66
11.28
10.50
16.03
27.52
36.56
44.17
$17 29
.   23 70
19 39
13 06
10 49
9 69
$56 73
60 95
39 92
23 25
17 50
14 48
1890-91 	
1891-92 	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95	
At semi-annual  examination,  held  in V
Master   Frederick W.  McElmon,  a pupil  o:
admission to a High School.
ancouver Ci
this schoo
,y,. on December 4th and 5th, 1894,
, passed  the standard  required for
Coldstream.
Teacher, William Sivewright.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 25th, 1895; present, 5 boys, 5 girls; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 6 girls; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.46.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since  the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92	
12
18
19
17
10.66
10.85
10.69
10.46
$15 83
42 22
40 00
44 70
$17 82
70 04
71 09
72 65
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95	 59 Vic*.
Public Schools Report.
275
Colwood.
Teacher, Miss Edith A King.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, November 14th, 1894; present, 5 boys, 10 girls; total, 15.
February 20th, 1895 ; present, 11 boys, 13 girls; total, 24.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 17 girls; total, 35.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.32.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment,
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
31
23
24
32
32
35
12.47
12.94
10.44
11.63
15.38
17.32
$20 64
27 23
26 66
20 00
20 00
18 28
$51 32
1890-91 	
48 40
1891-92	
61 30
1892-93 	
1893-94 	
55 03
41 61
1894-95 	
36 95
At semi-annual examination, held in Victoria City, June 4th and 5th, 1895, Miss Alice
Wale, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
Comox.
Teacher, Miss Isabel Cathcart.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, February 15th, 1895 ; present, 12 boys, 10 girls; total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 16 girls; total, 35.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average actual daily attendance, 18.96.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90	
35
34
36
29
31
35
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94                  	
1894-95 	
Average
attendance.
24.28
20.17
21.33
16.26
17.95
18.96
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$18 28
20 58
19 44
12 76
21 05
20 00
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$26 35
34 70
32 81
22 75
36 36
36 91 276
Public Schools Report.
1895
Courtenay.
Teacher, Miss Annie McLennan.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, February 18th and 19th, 1895; present, 16 boys, 18 girls; total, 34.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 27 girls; total, 48.
Average monthly attendance, 33.
Average actual daily attendance, 26.48.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90 	
60
63
46
35
42
48
1890-91 	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95	
Average
attendance.
27.81
34.17
21.02
19.72
23.47
26.48
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$10 66
11  11
16 52
21 71
18 09
15 83
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$23 01
20 48
36 15
38 54
32 38
28 70
Cowichan (McPherson).
Monitor, Miss M. W. Smith, until June 30th, 1895; present monitor, Miss E. M. Worlock.
Salary, $40 per month.
1 boy, 5 girls ; total, 6.
5 girls ; total, 6.
total, 7.
Inspected, October 12th, 1894; present,
Visited, May 9th, 1895 ; present, 1 boy,
Enrolled during the year, 2 boys, 5 girls
Average monthly attendance, 7.
Average actual daily attendance, 6.07.
Expenditure, $440.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $62.85.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $72.48.
The school in this district, after having been closed in January, 1891, was re-opened in
September, 1894.
As it was found that the average daily attendance demanded by Statute could not be
maintained in the school-house of the district, the boundaries of the same were altered and
re-defined, and the school removed to McPherson's Station. The present number of pupils
enrolled is twenty-seven. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
277
Cowichan, South.
Teacher, Miss Mary C. Mclntyre.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, May 9th and 10th, 1895; present, 8 boys, 4 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 6 girls; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.42.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and  cost of each pupil during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90   	
25
15
12
12
12
18
1890-91 	
1891-92	
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95	
Average
attendance.
10.23
10.80
10.52
10.59
10.99
11.42
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$25 60
41 39
32 50
53 33
42 66
35 55
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$62 56
57 49
37 07
60 43
46 58
56 04
At examination held May 9th and 10th, 1895, Miss Pauline Nelson, a pupil of this school,
passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
Craigflower.
Teacher, Samuel Shepherd.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, October 18th, 1894; present, 12 boys, 21 girls; total, 33.
February 26th, 1895; present, 13 boys, 19 girls; total, 32.
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 31 girls; total 53.
Average monthly attendance, 37.
Average actual daily attendance, 29.33.
Expenditure,
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance,
the past six years:—
and  cost of  each  pupil during
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
40
44
45
49
52
53
24.18
20.01
23.64
26.51
29.40
29.33
$19 00
17 27
16 88
14 28
14 61
14 33
$31 43
1890-91 	
37 98
1891-92	
1892-93	
32 14
26 40
1893-94 	
25 85
1894-95 	
25 91 278
Public Schools Report.
1895
Deep Creek.
Teacher, Miss K. B. Schwengers.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 18th, 1895; present, 8 boys, 5 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 6 girls; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.51.
Expenditure, $580.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $29.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $50.39.
The school in this new district was opened in October, 1894.
Delta.
Teacher, Miss H. D. Trenholme.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 5 girls; total, 14.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.50.
Expenditure, $330.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.57.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance,
626.40.
This school which was closed in June, 1889, owing to inability to maintain the required
average daily attendance was re-opened in January, 1895.
It has thus far kept up the average attendance required by the School Act.
Denman Island.
Teacher, Fenwick W. Robbins.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected February 13th, 1895; present, 5 boys, 6 girls; total, 11.
Visited, February 14th, 1895; present, 6 boys, 6 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 11 girls; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.91.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost  of  each  pupil during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
1890-91	
19
21
22
19
20
21
12.86
13.11
10.87
10.43
11.89
10.91
$33 6S
30 47
26 81
33 68
32 00
30 47
$49 76
48 81
1892-93   	
54 27
61 36
1893-94	
53 82
1894-95 •	
58 66 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
279
. • Departure Bay.
Teacher, Mrs. L. B. Mackenzie, until June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, W. H. M. May.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 8th, 1894 ; present, 11 boys, 8 girls ; total, 19.
Enrolled during the year, 23 boys, 24 girls; total, 47.
Average monthly attendance, 32.
Average actual daily attendance, 23.60.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
46
48
40
48
48
47
18.95
17.70
21.48
25.36
22.87
23.60
$13 91
11 42
17 25
13 33
13 33
13 61
$33 77
1890-91 	
30 97
1892-93 	
32 12
25 23
1893-94	
1894-95	
27 98
27 11
Donald.
Teacher, Samuel Moore, B.A., until October 31st, 1894; present teacher, J. J. Miller, B.Sc.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, March 29th and 30th, 1895; present, 12 boys, 10 girls; total 22.
Enrolled during the year, 23 boys, 25 girls; total, 48.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average actual daily attendance, 23.43.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90 	
28
25
28
34
37
48
] 890-91	
1891-92 	
1892-93
1893-94	
] 894-95 	
Ave]
•age
attendance.
11
01
14
74
13
17
16
56
21
45
23.43
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$30 38
30 40
27 14
21 83
20 54
15 83
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$77 26
51 56
57 70
44 83
35 43
32 43
At examination held March 29th and 30th, 1895, Miss Ida F. Hobbs, a pupil of this
school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
The school in this district was visited in May, 1895, by Colonel the Honourable James
Baker, Minister of Education, who expressed himself as highly pleased with the discipline and
management of the same. 280
Public Schools Report.
1895
Ducks.
Teacher, Miss M. D. Skinner.
Salary, $60 per month.
Assistant, Miss Emily Beattie, until September 28th, 1895.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, April 10th, 1895; present, 12 boys, 8 girls; total, 20.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 15 girls ; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average actual daily attendance, 19.20.
Expenditure, $974.31.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $33.59.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $50.74.
Authority has been given to re-open the school at Campbell's Creek after the Christmas
holidays.
At examination held at Campbell's Creek School, April 10th and 11th, 1895, Miss
Florence Beattie, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for entrance to a High
School.
The school at Ducks Station was opened in January, 1895, and has thus far maintained
the average daily attendance required by the School Act.
Dunach.
Teacher, Matthew Beattie.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 11th, 1894 ; present, 8 boys, 9 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 8 girls ; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.69.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, an    cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
En olment,
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92	
26
28
25
23
18.48
14.17
15.17
16.69
$15 00
22 85
25 60
27 82
$21  10
1892-93 	
45 16
1893-94 	
42 18
1894-95 	
38 34 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report,
281
Duncan.
Teacher, J. Gr. Hands, until December 31st, 1894; present teacher, Miss A. E. Carmichael.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 12th, 1894 ; present, 9 boys, 14 girls ; total, 23.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 28 girls ; total, 49.
Average monthly attendance, 33.
Average actual daily attendance, 28.87.
Expenditure, $640.'
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of  each pupil since  the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$14 75
15 61
13 99
13 06
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92	
40
41
44
49
23.01
22.17
26.32
28.87
$25 64
1892-93	
1893 94	
28 86
23 39
1894-95	
22 16
Enderby.
Teacher, Miss Jennie Caldwell.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 13th, 1895; present, 10 boys, 9 girls; total, 19.
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 20 girls ; total, 42.
Average monthly attendance, 30.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and  cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
27
34
33
36
44
42
15.45
20.28
20.02
17.82
18.94
22.00
$28 14
22 35
23 03
20 09
17 27
18 09
$42 71
1890-91 	
37 47
1891-92	
37 96
1892-93 	
40 58
1893-94	
40 12
1894-95 	
34 54 282
Public Schools Report.
1895
English.
Teacher, Miss A. Ketcheson, until December  31st, 1894 ;   S.  Moore,  B. A.,   until  June
30th, 1895 ; present teacher, I. N. Mathers.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 30th, 1895 ; present, 10 boys, 5 girls ; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 9 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.54.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost  of each  pupil  during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1S89-90 :	
31
21
33
11
18
19
13.38
9.97
10.16
7.87
11.89
11.54
$16 83
IS 25
17 87
21 81
26 20
33 68
$38 99
1890-91 	
38 44
1891-92                      	
58 07
1892-93     	
30 49
1893-94 	
39 66
1894-95 	
55 45
Esquimalt.
Teacher, Miss Jessie Kirkendall.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, October, 18th, 1894 ; present, 16 boys, 20 girls ; total, 36.
May 21st, 1895; present, 16 boys, 20 girls; total, 36.
Enrolled during the year, 23 boys, 29 girls ;  total, 52.
Average monthly attendance, 4L
Average actual daily attendance, 34.74.
Expenditure, $880.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years:
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
18S9-90	
1890-91 	
1891-92	
42
59
48
42
50
52
23.99
37.27
26.92
27.53
34.24
34.74
$20 95
14 91
18 33
20 95
26 20
16 92
$36 68
23 61
32 68
1892-93 	
31 96
1893-94	
39 66
1894-95 	
25 33 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
283
6 "iris; total, 16.
Fairfield.
Teacher, Miss Isabella Lyons.
Salary $50 per month.
Inspected, September 18th, 1894; present, 10 boys,
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 7 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.58.
Expenditure, $620.62.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
commencement of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93 	
20
23
22
12.10
11.83
14.58
$16 66
27 82
28 21
$27 54
1893-94	
54 09
1894-95	
42 56
At examination held in Chilliwhack School-house September 15th and 17th, 1894, Miss
Maude Menton, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High
School.
At semi-annual examination held in New Westminster City June 4th and 5th, 1895,
Master Peter D. McSween, a pupil of this school, obtained the percentage required for
entrance to a High School.
Ferndale.
Teacher, Miss Margaret Abercrombie.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 20th, 1894; present, 11 boys, 8 girls; total, 19.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 10 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.63.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94 	
19
24
12.34
15.63
$23 15
26 66
$35 65
1894-95	
40 94
Field.
Teacher, Miss Evelyn Frank, until June 30th, 1895; present teacher, J. G. Hands,
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 5 boys, 10 girls; total, 15,
Average monthly attendance, 9.
Average, actual daily^attendance, 7.56.
Expenditure, 284
Public Schools Report.
1895
This school received a visit in May, 1895, from the Honourable the Minister of Education,
who stated that he was well pleased with what he saw and heard.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1S93-94   	
12
15
8.41
7.56
$49 33
50 66
$ 70 39
1894-95 	
100 52
Fort Steele.
Teacher, Miss A. S. Bailey.
Salary, $70 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 6 boys, 6 girls; total, 12.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.30.
Expenditure, $810.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $67.50,
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $87.09.
The Honourable the Minister of Education visited this school in May, 1895, and found it
in excellent condition.
Gabriola, North.
Teacher, Miss Jean Armstrong, until June 30th, 1895; present teacher, M. McKinnon,M. A.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 23rd, 1894; present, 7 boys, 8 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 13 girls ; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.46.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil for the
past two years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94	
18
22
13.25
10.46
' $30 00
29 09
$40 75
1894-95	
61 18 59 Vict.                                 Public Schools Report.                                          285
Gabriola,   South.
Teacher, Michael MeKinnon, M.A., until October 31st, 1894; present teacher, Miss C. J.
Thomas.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 23rd, 1894; present, 10 boys, 4 girls ; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 8 girls ; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, l7.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.56.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is  a list  of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
24
27
23
25
21
26
14.05
12.94
13.37
14.55
13.40
13.56
$26 66
23 70
27 82
25 60
30 47
24 61
$45 55
49 45
47 86
43 98
47 76
47 19
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95   	
Galiano.
Teacher, Domitian Gallant, until October 31st, 1894; present teacher, Miss E. J. Crockford.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, February 26th, 1895 ; present, 13 boys, 5 girls ; total, 18.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 11 girls; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 19.04.
Expenditure, $490.
The  following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93	
20
18
26
12.30
14.33
19.04
$22 00
35 55
18 84
$35 77
44 66
25 73
1893-94	
1894-95	
• 286
Public Schools Report.
1895
Glenvally.
Teacher, Mrs. A. J. McLennan, until September 30th, 1894; present teacher, Miss Emily
Parkinson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 22nd, 1895 ; present, 5 boys, 12 girls ; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 16 girls ; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.16.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94   	
20
25
11.90
12.66
$15 87
25 60
$26 67
1894-95 	
50 55
Golden.
Teacher, Miss S. Preston.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 28th and 29th, 1895 ; present, 19 boys, 21 girls; total, 40.
Enrolled during the year, 24 boys, 24 girls ; total, 48.
Average monthly attendance, 36.
Average actual daily attendance, 29.76.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each  pupil during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90	
14
19
23
34
35
48
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93             	
1893-94    	
1894-95     	
Average
attendance.
9.24
12.02
11.43
19.12
23.22
29.76
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$45 20
40 00
30 43
22 35
21 71
15 83
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$68 49
63 22
61 24   g
39 74 PH
32 73 j
25 53   J
This school was visited in May, 1895, by Colonel the Honourable James Baker, Minister
of Education, who stated that he was well pleased, not only with the deportment of the pupils,
but with the proficiency shown in their studies. 59 V
ICT.
Public Schools Report.
287
Gordon Head.
Teacher, Miss A. M. Haldon, until   June  30th,   1895; R.   J.   Hawkey,  until  November
30th, 1895; present teacher, Walter Clayton.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected October 30th, 1894; present, 5 boys, 8 girls; total, 13.
May 21st, 1895; present, 6 boys, 6 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 11 girls ; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.02.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average
establishment of the school :—
attendance,  and cost of each pupil since the
Grand Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Alice Hay, until December Slst, 1894 ;  Miss C. A. Noble, until June 30th,
1895 ; present teacher, S. Moore, B.A.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, April 11th, 1895; present, 6 boys, 6 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 11 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.75.
Expenditure, $740.65
The following is a  list  of enrolment, average  attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90	
20
23
24
20
24
22
1890-91	
1891-92 	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
Average
attendance.
15.81
18.26
17.59
14.63
15.46
16.75
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$38 00
33 04
31 66
36 83
31 66
33 66
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$48 07
41 62
43 20
50 36
49 15
44 21 288
Public Schools Report.
1895
Grantham.
Teacher, James A. Halliday.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, February 18th, 1895; present, 14 boys, 8 girls; total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 11 girls ;  total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.14.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a  list  of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
18
19
22
27
24
23
10.62
12.26
15.29
15.10
13.73
15.14
$35 55
33 68
27 62
23 70
26 66
27 82
$60 26
1890-91	
52 20
1891-92	
39 74
1892-93 	
42 3S
1893-94     	
46 61
1894-95 	
42 27
GULFSIDE.
Teacher, Miss M. S. Miller, until August 31st, 1895 ; present teacher, A. L. Kendall.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 28th, 1894; present, 8 boys, 2 girls; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 25 boys, 15 girls; total, 40.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.70.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93 	
27
22
40
11.60
11.46
12.70
$19 13
29 09
16 00
$44 54
1893-94 	
55 84
1894-95	
50 39 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report,
28§
Hall's Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Annie G. Waller.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 19 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.82.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is  a list  of  enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
27
25
25
28
38
31
11.64
11.03
10.26
10.41
12.44
12.82
$23 70
24 42
24 00
18 47
16 84
20 64
$54 98
1890-91	
55 36
1891-92	
58 47
1892-93 	
49 70
1893-94 	
51 44
1894-95 	
49 92
At semi-annual examination, held in New Westminster City, December 4th and 5th,
1894, Miss Mary G. Johnson, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission
to a High School.
Haney.
Teacher, Francis J. MeKenzie.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, August 22nd, 1895; present, 13 boys, 12 girls; total, 25.
Enrolled during the year, 32 boys, 18 girls ; total, 50.
Average monthly attendance, 33.
Average actual daily attendance, 26.54.
Expenditure, $755.
The following is a list of
past six years :—
enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90	
42
1890-91	
46
1891-92 	
46
1892-93 	
41
1893-94	
50
1894-95	
50
Average
attendance.
22.06
22.81
21.80
18.65
20.23
26.54
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$15 23
13 91
15 21
15 73
14 00
15 10
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$29 01
28 05
32 11
34 58
34 60
28 44 290
Public Schools Report.
1895
Harewood.
Teacher,  Miss  Mabel  Bryant,  until December 31st,   1894; present teacher, Miss E. J.
Sharpies.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 9th, 1894 ; present, 21 boys, 21 girls ; total, 42.
Enrolled during the year, 33 boys, 30 girls ; total 63.
Average monthly attendance, 49.
Average actual daily attendance, 41.05.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93	
1893-94 	
61
74
63
37.38
47.18
41.05
$ 8 03
8 64
10 15
$13 10
13 56
1894-95 	
15 59
During the present school-year, owing to the largely  increased  attendance, the appointment of a monitor was found to be necessary.    Miss Julia Teague is now filling this position.
Hatzic.
Teacher, Miss A. Ketcheson.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 6 boys, 7 girls; total, 13.
Average monthly attendance, 12.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.18.
Expenditure, $300.97.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.15.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $26.92.
This school was re-opened in January, 1895,  after  remaining  closed from  October 31st,
1891.    It has thus far maintained the average daily attendance required by Statute. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
291
Hernando.
Teacher, Miss Jennie  Dyker,   until   December 31st,  1894; present teacher, Miss K M.
MeKenzie.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 6 boys, 6 girls; total, 12.
Average monthly attendance, 9.
Average actual daily attendance, 7.93.
Expenditure, $515.80.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil  since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94 	
12
12
7.50
7.93
$44 16
42 98
$70 66
1894-95   	
65 04
Highland.
Teacher,   Miss  Margaret  McDowell,   until  December  31st,  1894; present teacher, Miss
Frances A. Way.  '
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 7 girls; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school: —
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94 	
24
21
11.08
11.00
$21 80
30 47
$47 23
1894-95	
58 18 292                                           Public Schools Report.                                         1895
Hope.
Teacher, William T. Kinney.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 30th, 1895 ; present, 12 boys, 13 girls ; total, 25.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 17 girls ; total, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 28.
Average actual daily attendance, 23.78.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
37
31
26
24
34
36
17.27
16.63
15.76
18.30
18.85
23.78
$17 29
20 64
24 61
25 95
18 82
17 77
$37 05
38 48
40 60
34 03
33 95
26 91
1890-91 	
1891-92	
1892-93 	
1893-94 	
1894-95 	
Hornby.
Teacher, Miss Nellie G. Wilson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, February 14th, 1895; present, 9 boys, 7 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 10 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.84.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92	
20
17
20
22
14.16
11.33
13.12
15.84
$10 11
20 00
29 50
29 09
$14 28
30 00
44 96
40 40
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
293
Howe Sound.
Teacher, William A. Graham.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 15 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.64.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91 	
23
26
28
26
27
14.77
14.21
16.97
16.40
15.64
$13 73
22 01
22 85
24 61
23 70
$21 38
1891-92 	
40 28
1892-93	
37 71
1893-94	
39 02
1894-95   	
40 92
Huntingdon.
Teacher, T. Henderson, M.A., until June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, Miss Cora Tingley.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 5 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.73.
Expenditure, $559.35.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.31.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $43.93.
The school in this newly-created district was opened in August, 1894.
It has thus far maintained the average daily attendance required by the School Act. 1
294                                          Public Schools Report.                                          1895
Junction.
Teacher, Robert D. Irvine.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 29th, 1895; present, 10 boys, 5 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 8 girls ; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.50
Expenditure,  $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost'of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92 	
14
23
21
23
9.87
10.87
11.93
12.50
$38 57
25 65
30 47
27 82
$54 71
54 27
53 64
51 20
1892-93    	
1893-94 	
1894-95   ...   	
Kaslo.
Teacher, Miss Stella Kane.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined, April 4th and 5th, 1894; present, 15 boys, 10 girls; total, 25.
Enrolled during the year, 32 boys, 27 girls ; total, 59.
Average monthly attendance, 33.
Average actual daily attendance, 27.24.
Expenditure, $880.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93
46
62
59
18.94
26.30
27.24
$12 60
14 19
14 91
$30 62
33 46
32 30
1893-94	
1894-95 	
At examination, held April 4th  and 5th,   1895,   Ms
school, passed the standard required for admission to a H
The Honourable the Minister of Education paid a vi
expressed himself as highly pleased with the management
the pupils.
ister Daniel  Kane,   a  pupil of this
igh School.
sit to this school in May, 1895.    He
of the school and advancement of 58 Vict.                                    Public Schools Report.                                          295
Kelowna.
Teacher, Daniel W. Sutherland.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, ISlareh 20th and 22nd, 1895 ; present, 11 boys, 20 girls ; total, 31.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 25 girls; total, 39.
Average monthly attendance, 30.
Average actual daily attendance, 23.47.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil  since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93	
1893-94	
28
37
39
22.82
21.65
23.47
$12 67
20 54
19 48
$15 55
35 10
32 38
1894-95 	
Kensington.
Teacher, Nicholas R. Hopkins.
Salary, $50 per month.
Visited, August 31st, 1894 ; school not in session.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 13 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.11.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and  cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment,
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
16
28
24
28
25
27
10.81
11.57
11.46
14.12
11.66
15.11
$40 00
22 85
26 66
22 85
25 60
23 70
$59 20
55 31
55 84
45 32
54 88
42 35
1890-91	
1891-92 	
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95	
At the semi-annual examination, held in New Westt
1894, Miss Marion Carncross, a pupil of this school, passe
to a High School,
ninster City, December 4th and 5th,
d the standard required for admission 296                                           Public Schools Report.                                          1895
Kettle River.
Teacher, Robert C. Johnston, until June 30th, 1895; present teacher, J. Sutherland.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 18 girls; total, 40.
Average monthly attendance, 27.
Average actual daily attendance, 21.59.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93	
1893-94              	
19
26
40
11.75
17.68
21.59
$27 36
29 23
19 00
$44 25
42 98
35 20
1894-95	
Ladner.
Teacher, Miss Alice  V.  Harrison,  until June 30th,   1895; present teacher,  Mrs.  I.  M.
Macdonald.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 28th, 1894; present, 12 boys, 22 girls; total, 34.
Enrolled during the year, 29 boys, 32 girls; total, 61.
Average monthly attendance, 48.
Average actual daily attendance, 39.14.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94 	
63
61
31.33
39.14
$ 9 36
10 49
$18 83
16 35
1894-95 	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
297
Lake.
Teacher, William Tomlinson.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, May 16th, 1895 ; present, 5 boys, 12 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 26 girls; total, 43.
Average monthly attendance, 25.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.05.
Expenditure, $760.
The. following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
1889-90
1890-91
1891-92
1892-93
1893-94
1894-95
Enrolment.
33
38
34
47
41
43
Average
attendance.
21.95
23.89
22.00
26.49
24.04
20.05
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$19 39
20 00
22 35
16 17
18 53
17 67
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$29 15
31 81
34 54
28 69
31 61
37 90
At   semi-annual   examination,   held in  Victoria  Cit
Margaret A. Paul, a pupil of this school, passed the stand
School.
y,   June 4th and  5th,   1895,   Miss
ard required for admission to a High
nt teacher, A. H. P. Matthew.
s ; total, 17.
nice, and cost of each pupil during
Langley.
Teacher. John Wright, until June 30th, 1895 ; prese
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 22nd, 1895 ; present, 7 boys, 10 gir
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 19 girls ; total, 3i
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 19.79.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attend;
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
32
32
35
43
44
32
15.70
15.18
17.04
25.18
26.10
19.79
$20 00
20 00
18 28
14 88
14 54
20 00
$40 76
1890-91	
42 16
1891-92 1	
37 55
1892-93 	
25 41
1893-94	
24 52
1894-95 	
32 33 298
Public Schools Report.
1895
Langley, East.
Teacher, William F. Smeeton.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 22nd, 1895; present, 6 boys, 9 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 12 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, l7.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.85.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since  the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90	
16
20
17
26
27
23
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95      	
Average
attendance.
11.18
11.41
10.98
11.06
13.76
12.85
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$17 98
27 40
29 29
22 69
23 70
27 82
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$25 73
48 03
45 36
53 34
46 51
49 80
Lansdowne.
Teacher, Robert J. Armstrong.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 14th, 1895; present, 6 boys, 13 girls; total,  19.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 19 girls ; total, 34.
Average monthly attendance,  19.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.44.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment,
establishment of the school :—
average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92	
23
34
25
34
14.98
15.60
17.21
16.44
$30 43
21 15
30 40
22 35
$46 72
1892-93                            	
46 11
1893-94                                   	
44 16
1894-95 	
46 22 59 Vict.                                Public Schools Report1.                                          299
Lillooet.
Teacher, Mrs. A. J. Colbeck, until June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, J. 0. Morrison.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, April 16th and 17th, 1895; present, 8 boys, 11 girls; total 19.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 15 girls ; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average actual daily attendance, 19.73.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
18
29
24
28
34
30
8.85
15.32
15.25
16.66
16.93
19.73
$35 55
24 13
31  66
27 14
22 35
25 33
$72 31
1890-91 . .                             	
45 69
1891-92	
49 83
1892-93	
45 61
1893-94 	
44 89
1894-95 	
38 52
[iris; total, 12.
ice, and cost of  each pupil since  the
Lochiel.
Teacher, Richard J. Trembath.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 6th, 1894 : present, 6 boys, 6 r.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 8 girls ; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.94.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendar
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91	
25
22
27
17
19
12.16
9.52
11.68
11.41
12.94
$23 60
24 54
21 85
37 64
33 68
$48 51
1891-92	
56 72
50 51
1893-94	
56 09
1894-95 	
49 45 300                                         Public Schools Report.                                       1895
Lulu.
Teacher, Miss Susie E. Walker, until June 30tb, 1895 ; present teacher, W. C. Acheson.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, August 24th, 1894; present, 11 boys, 14 girls; total, 25.
April 30th, 1895 ; present, 12 boys, 19 girls; total, 31.
Enrolled during the year, 23 boys, 28 girls ; total, 51.
Average monthly attendance, 40.
Average actual daily attendance, 23.23.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
28
34
38
54
55
51
11.71
10.86
20.00
26.16
27.57
23.23
$22 85
18 82
16 84
11 85
12 72
13 72
$54 65
58 93
32 00
24 46
25 38
30 13
1890-91 	
1891-92 	
1892-93                         	
1893-94 	
1894-95 	
At  semi-annual examination,  held in Vancouver City, June 4th and Sth, 1895,  Master
Walter Green,  a pupil of this school, obtained the percentage required for admission to a
High School.
Lytton.
Teacher, Miss Millie|Pickard, until December 31st, 1894 ; Miss Emily Raper, until June
30th, 1895 ; present teacher, H. A. McTaggart.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, April 27th, 1895 ; present, 3 boys, 9 girls ; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 14 girls ; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.12.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90   .               	
27
27
28
23
24
30
16.11
14.42
14.46
11.49
14.20
15.12
$28 14
28 14
27 14
33 04
31 66
25 33
$47 17
52 70
52 55
66 14
53 52
50 26
1890-91 ..                                 	
1891-92 ..                           	
1892-93 .              	
1893-94	
1894-95	 59 VicT.
Public Schools Report.
301
Malahat.
Teacher, Miss Mabel Wolfenden.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected March 10th, 1895; present, 7 boys, 8 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 14 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.80.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94   	
19
24
15.02
13.80
$23  15
26 66
$ 29 29
1894-95 	
46 37
Maple Bay.
Teacher,   Miss  M.   A.   Hadwen,   until   March   31st,   1895;   present   teacher,   Miss   L.
Kirkendall.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 8th, 1895; present, 8 boys, 7 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 9 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.59.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90	
23
23
20
18
21
19
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95     	
Average
attendance.
11.11
10.31
10.72
10.40
11.20
12.59
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$27 82
27 82
32 00
35 55
30 47
33 68
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
|57 60
62 07
59 70
61 53
57 14
50 83 302                                           Public Schools Report.                                          1895
Maple Ridge.
Teacher, Paul Murray.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, August 23rd, 1895; present, 18 boys, 14 girls; total, 32.
Enrolled during the year, 33 boys, 24 girls ; total, 57.
Average monthly attendance, 43.
Average actual daily attendance, 36.55.
Expenditure, $880.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each  pupil during
the past six years : —
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
57
60
46
46
59
57
31.39
29.90
27.86
27.50
34.62
36.55
$15 44
14 66
19 13
19 13
14 91
15 43
$2S 03
29 43
1890-91 	
1891-92	
1892-93             	
31 58
32 00
1893-94	
25 41
1894-95	
24 07
At semi-annual examination, held in  New  Westmin
Miss Henrietta Mclver and Master Frank Armstrong, pu]
required for admission to a High School.
ster  City, June 4th and 5th, 1895,
)ils of this school, passed the standard
Mayne Island.
Teacher, James W. Sinclair.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, February 25th and 26th, 1895 ; present, S
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 14 girls; total, 25
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average actual daily attendance, 19.75.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attend
the past six years :—
boys, 14 girls ; total, 23.
ance, and cost of each pupil during
Year.
Enrolment,
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
23
20
28
23
25
25
14.95
10.88
13.33
12.90
17.89
19.75
$30 43
18 05
22 85
22 28
24 60
25 60
$46 82
33 19
48 01
39 73
35 77
32 40
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95 	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
303
Metchosin.
Teacher, Dawson H. Elliott.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, November 14th, 1894 ; present, 11 hoys, 3 girls:
February 20th, 1895 ; present, 11 boys, 2 girls;
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 3 girls ; total, 16.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.78.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance
the past six years :—
total,
total,
14.
13.
and cost of each pupil during
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
19
17
18
19
21
16
10.69
11.65
11.40
10.86
12.27
11.78
$33 68
32 02
31 07
33 68
30 47
40 00
$59 87
1890 91 	
46 72
1891-92 	
49 06
1892-93	
58 91
1893-94	
52 15
1894-95	
54 32
Mission.
Teacher, John D. Gillis, until June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, W. M. Wood.
Salary, $70 per month.
Monitor, Miss M. Ackerman.
Salary, $40 per month.
Visited, August 20th, 1894; present, 27 boys, 42 girls; total, 69.
Inspected, September 25th, 1894; present, 36 boys, 34 girls; total, 70.
Examined, May 1st and 2nd, 1895; present, 34 boys, 42 girls; total, 76.
Enrolled during the year, 51 boys, 64 girls; total, 115.
Average monthly attendance, 84.
Average actual daily attendance, 66.25.
Expenditure, $1,380.
The following is  a list  of  enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90 	
39
1890-91 	
62
1891-92 	
83
1892-93	
98
1893-94   	
126
1894-95	
115
Average
attendance.
19.59
26.89
46.79
56.05
59.37
66.25
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$16 41
10 32
11 90
12 85
10 47
12 00
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$32 67
23 80
21 12
22 48
22 23
20 83
At examination held May 1st and 2nd,  1895,  the following pupils of this school passed
the standard required for admission to a High School :—
Mary L. Abercrombie, Allan C. Wells,
Essie T. Forrest, I, Owen Solloway,
Hartley E. Abercrombie, 304                                          Public Schools Report.                                           1895
Moodyville.
Teacher, Miss E.   M.   Macfarlane,   until June  30th,   1895 ; present teacher, Mrs. A. J.
Colbeck.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, May 1st, 1895; present, 12 boys, 5 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 11 girls; total, 28.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.38.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and  cost of each pupil during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
34
36
44
37
37
28
16.63
20.18
21.92
22.41
21.07
17.38
$20 59
19 44
15 90
18 91
18 91
25 00
$42 09
34 68
31 93
31 25
33 22
40 27
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93   	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
Mountain.
Teacher, Alfred J. Pearsall.
Salary, $60 per month.
Monitor, Miss Emily F. Roberts.
Salary, $40 per month.
Visited, October Sth, 1894 ; school not in session.
Enrolled during the year, 52 boys, 47 girls; total, 99.
Average monthly attendance, 63.
Average actual daily attendance, 43.20.
Expenditure, $1,280.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
81
187
146
98
115
99
39.36
57.67
51.11
45.08
52.96
43.20
$ 7 90
4 09
8 76
13 16
10 55
12 93
$16 26
13 26
25 04
28 61
22 92
29 62
1890-91	
1891-92 	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95 	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
305
Mount Lehman.
Teacher, John D. McLean.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 11th and 12th, 1894 ;
Enrolled during the year, 24 boys, 22 girls :
Average monthly attendance, 35.
Average actual daily attendance, 28.70.
Expenditure,
present, 16 boys, 17 girls; total, 33.
total, 46.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90   	
1890-91 	
33
34
44
37
39
46
1891-92 	
1892-93	
1893-94       	
1894-95
Average
attendance.
15.35
20.05
20.49
20.86
22.63
28.70
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$19 39
18 82
14 54
17 29
16 41
13 91
1
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$41 69
31 92
31 23
30 68
28 28
22 29
Mud Bay.
Teacher, John A. Tolmie.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August, 29th, 1894 ; present, 10 boys, 13 girls ; total, 23.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 23 girls; total, 38.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.39.
Expenditure, 1640.
The following
the past six years
is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost  of each  pupil  during
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90
31
39
33
35
35
38
11.33
12.79
15.60
14.21
13.07
17.39
$18 92
15 12
19 39
18 28
18 28
16 84
$51 77
1890-91 	
46 13
1891-92	
41 02
1892-93 	
45 03
1893-94 	
48 96
1894-95 	
36 80 306
Public Schools Report.
1895
Nakusp.
Teacher, Miss Eleanor B. Caldwell.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 15 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.85.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94	
17
31
13.64
16.85
$28 82
24 51
$35 92
1894-95	
45 10
Nanaimo, North.
Teacher, Miss Alice L. Johnston.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 9th, 1894 ; present, 17 boys, 12 girls ; total, 29.
Enrolled during the year, 28 boys, 23 girls ; total, 51.
Average monthly attendance, 33.
Average actual daily attendance, 27.31.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school: —
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93	
37
39
51
20.78
22.76
27.31
$14 59
16 41
12 54
$25 98
1893-94	
28 11
1894-95               	
23 43
At semi-annual examination held in Nanaimo City, June 4th and 5th, 1895, Miss
Elizabeth H. Teague, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a
High School. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
307
Nanaimo   South.
15 boys, 12 girls
rls ; total, 38.
total, 27.
Teacher, Alexander Shaw.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 10th, 1894 ; present,
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 20 gi
Average monthly attendance, 27.
Average actual daily attendance, 24.37.
Expenditure, $525.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.81.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $21.54.
The school in this newly-created  district  was opened   in September, 1894.
far maintained a good average daily attendance.
It has thus
Nanoose.
Teacher, Miss K. MeKinnon.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 10 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.64.
Expenditure, $235.71.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.40.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $20.25.
The school in this district was closed in January, 1893, on account of inability to maintain
the average daily attendance demanded by the School Act. It was re-opened in February of
the present year.
Nelson.
Teacher, Miss Nellie Delmage.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined, April 3rd and 5th, 1895 ; present, 21 boys, 14 girls ; total, 35.
Enrolled during the year, 30 boys, 28 girls ; total, 58.
Average monthly attendance, 42.
Average actual daily attendance, 34.92.
Expenditure, $880.'
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92 	
37
43
57
58
15.75
19.08
27.19
34.92
$15 67
20 23
15 43
15 17
$36 82
1892-93 	
45 59
1893-94	
32 36
1894-95 	
25 20
In May, 1895, Colonel the Honourable James Baker, Minister of Education, visited this
school, and stated that he was very much pleased with the manner in which it was being
conducted. 808
Public Schools Report.
1895
Nicola.
Teacher, Samuel B. Campbell.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, April 24th and 25th, 1895; present, 11 boys, 7 girls; total, 18.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 12 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.32.
Expenditure,
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and  cost of  each  pupil during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
26
28
25
23
26
23
17.59
19.50
15.03
12.95
13.96
15.32
$29 23
27  14
29 08
33 04
29 23
33 04
$43 20
1890-91	
38 97
1891-92	
189 '-93	
46 51
58 68
1893-94	
1894-95	
54 44
49 60
At examination held April 24th and 25th, 1895, Miss Jessie McD. Murray, and Master
William G-. Murray, pupils of this school, obtained the percentage required for admission to
a High School.
Nicola Valley.
Teacher, Hiram H. Schuyler, B.A.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, April 23rd and 25th, 1895; present, 8 boys, 8 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 13 girls; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.88.
Expenditure, $741.
The following is
the past six years:—
list of enrolment, average attendance, and  cost  of each  pupil  during
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
1890-91	
20
17
18
28
22
26
10.22
10.22
12.33
10.41
10.52
13.88
$38 00
42 35
41 18
27 14
30 22
28 50
$74 36
70 45
1891-92	
60 11
1892-93
73 00
1893-94	
1894-95	
63 21
53 38 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
309
NlCOMIN.
Teacher, Timothy W. Shine, until December 31st, 1894; present teacher, J. P. Cade.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 24th, 1894; present, 9 boys, 3 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 9 girls; total 31.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.48.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since  the
establishment of the, school :-—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91 	
25
34
28
33
31
10.44
15.48
11.69
14.87
13.48
$17 00
17 35
22 85
19 39
20 64
$40 70
1891-92 	
1892-93	
38 11
54 74
1893-94 	
43 03
1894-95 	
47 47
Nicomin, North.
Teacher, Norman McLeod.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 24th, 1894 ; present, 7 boys, 8 girls ; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 10 girls; total,  19.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.17.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Oost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94   	
25
19
11.03
13.17
$19 60
33 68
$44 42
1894-95 	
48 59 310                                        Public Schools Report.                                         1895
North Arm.
Teacher, Miss Amy Rhodes.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected August 23rd, 1894 ; present, 3 boys, 12 girls; total, 15.
Visited, April 30th, 1895 ; present, 4 boys, il girls ; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 23 girls ; total, 37.
Average monthly attendance, 25.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.52.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
23
25
21
26
28
37
11.40
13.50
12.27
10.26
10.64
16.52
$26 71
25 60
22 33
26 54
22 85
17 29
$53 90
1890-91	
47 40
1891-92 	
1892-93 	
38 22
67 25
60 15
38 74
1893-94 	
1894-95	
North Thompson.
Teacher, Archibald D. McLennan.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March Sth, 1895; present, 7 boys, 2 girls; total, 9.
Enrolled durin«i the year, 12 boys, 3 girls ; total, 15.
Average monthly attendance, 12.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.50.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91	
24
26
25
21
15
15
12.80
11.03
11.02
10.35
10.25
10.50
$31 12
29 23
30 40
35 41
50 66
50 66
$58 35
68 90
68 96
71 85
74 14
72 38
1891-92	
1892-93 ..                                   	
1893-94	
1894-95	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
311
Oak Bay.
Teacher, Miss Josephine Colquhoun.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 16th, 1894; present, 10 boys, 8 girls ; total, 18.
February 4th, 1895 ; present, 18 boys, 10 girls ; total, 28.
May 22nd, 1895 ; present, 11 boys, 13 girls; total, 24.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 22 girls ; total, 41.
Average monthly attendance, 31.
Average actual daily attendance, 24.51.
Expenditure, $535.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.04.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $21.82.
The school in this newly-created district was opened in October, 1894.
daily attendance has thus far been maintained.
A good average
Okanagan.
Teacher, Frederick J. Watson.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 21st and 22nd, 1895; present, 12 boys, 10 girls; total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 14 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.05.
Expenditure, $760.'
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
25
26
23
33
30
31
11.23
10.90
12.26
14.09
15.76
17.05
$30 19
29 23
33 04
23 04
25 33
24 51
$67 21
1890-91 ..                                   	
69 72
1891-92 	
61 99
1892-93 	
1893-94 	
53 93
48 22
1894-95	
44 57
Okanagan Mission.
Teacher, Miss D. M. Thomson.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 21st, 1895; present, 7 boys; 6 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 9 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, l7.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.84.
Expenditure, $539.35.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.51.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $36.34.
The school  in  this  newly-created district  was  opened in  October, 1894.    The average
daily attendance maintained during the past school-year was satisfactory. 312
Public Schools Report.
1895
Otter.
Teacher, William McDonough, until August 31st, 1894 ; present teacher, Robert Brechin.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 4th, 1894 ; present, 9 boys, 7 girls; total, 16.
Visited, April 24th, 1895; present, 12 boys, 5 girls; total,   17.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 17 girls; total, 38.
Average monthly attendance, 26
Average actual daily attendance, 18.80.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
24
29
26
29
22
38
10.90
10.61
11.95
13.55
13.83
18.80
$24 58
19 17
23 12
22 06
29 09
16 84
$54 12
1890-91 	
52 41
1891-92   	
1892-93	
1893-94	
50 31
47 23
46 27
1894-95	
34 04
Otter Lake.
Teacher, M. McMillan.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 19th, 1895; present, 6 boys, 6 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 11 girls; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 13,
Average actual daily attendance, 11.73.
Expenditure, $598.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $29.90.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $50.98.
The school in this newly created district was opened in September, 1894.
daily attendance required by the School Act has thus far been maintained.
The average 59 Vict.                                 Public Schools Report.                                         318
Oyster.
Teacher, Robert Telford, until August 31st, 1894; Miss Lizzie Kirkendall,  until March
31st, 1895.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 11th, 1894;  present, 10 boys, 2 girls ; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 5 girls; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.42.
Expenditure, $490.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance,  and cost of  each  pupil  during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
17
16
15
13
12
18
13.37
12.44
10.41
10.40
10.06
11.42
$37 64
39 00
41 80
49 23
53 33
27 22
$47 86
50 17
60 23
61 53
63 61
42 90
1890-91 	
1891-92 	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95	
Owing to  inability to maintain the average daily attendance demanded by Statute, the
school in this district was closed on March 31st, 1895.    The school is not now in operation.
Ovster, North.
Teacher, Miss Marjorie Sloan, until March 31st, 1895; Miss May Woodman, until June
30th, 1895 ; present teacher, Miss Eva LeFeuvre.
Salary $50 per month.
Inspected, October 10th, 1894; present, 10 boys, 4 girls; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 9 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.67.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92	
18
20
18
22
10.46
11.14
13.84
12.67
$13 33
32 00
35 55
29 09
$22 94 n
57 45 U
46 24 • j
50 51 U
1892-93	
1893 94	
1894-95 	 314
Public Schools Report.
1895
Pavilion.
Teacher, Miss May I. Magee, until June 30th,  1895; present teacher, Mrs. E. B. Mc-
Lellan.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, April 18th, 1895; present, 5 boys, 7 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 6 boys-, 9 girls; total, 15.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average actual daily attendance, 9 84.
Expenditure,
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94 	
13
15
11.16
9.84
$49 23
50 56
$62 99
1S94-95	
77 23
Pender.
Monitor, Miss F. Lawson.
Salary, $40 per month.
Inspected, February 25th, 1895 ; present, 6 boys, 5 girls ; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 5 girls; total, 12.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.53.
Expenditure, $480.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $40.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $45.58.
This school was opened in August, 1894.
At semi-annual examination, held in Victoria City, December 4th and 5th, 1894, Miss
Christina J. McDonald, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a
High School.
Pilot Bay.
Teacher, Miss M. J. Munsie.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, April 5th, 1895 ; present, 5 boys, 5 girls; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 5 girls ; total, 15.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.72.
Expenditure, $580
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $38.66.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, 59.67.
A school was opened at this point in October, 1894, which continued in operation during
the remainder of the school-year.
It has not been re-opened during the present school-year. 59 Vict.                                  Public Schools Report.                                            315
Port Kells.
Teacher, Miss Mary E. Norris.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 23rd, 1895 ; present, 7 boys, 5 girls ; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 7 girls ; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.11.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment,
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92	
21
25
22
18
10.96
9.53
12.37
12.11
$28 09
25 60
26 81
35 55
$53 83
67 15
47 69
52 84
1892-93 ..                                   	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
Port Moody.
Teacher, Thomas Leith, until June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, R. S. Sherman.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, April 29th, 1895 ; present, 17 boys, 9 girls ; total, 26.
Enrolled during the year, 28 boys, 17 girls ; total, 45.
Average monthly attendance, 30.
Average actual daily attendance, 24.38.
Expenditure, $700.'
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
48
47
47
38
37
45
23.58
23.04
23.25
18.27
17.85
24.38
$14 58
14 89
14 89
15 42
18 24
15 55
$29 68
30 38
30 10
38 31
37 82
28 71
1890-91 	
1891-92	
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
At semi-annual examination, held  in  New Westmin
the following pupils of this school passed the standard
School:—
Winnifred'H. Gibbon
■
Evelyn H.^Gibbon,
Edward H. Gibbon.
ster City, June 4th and 5th, 1895,
required for admission to a  High 316                                            Public Schools Report.                                          1895
Prairie.
Teacher, Robert J. Plaxton.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 3rd, 1894; present, 17 boys, 20 girls; total, 37.
Visited, April 25th, 1895; present, 17 boys, 23 girls; total, 40.
Enrolled during the year, 25 boys, 27 girls; total, 52.
Average monthly attendance, 43.
Average actual daily attendance, 37.32.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance,  and cost  of each  pupil  during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolmen t.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
35
43
46
47
55
52
15.52
18.03
22.51
28.19
31.31
37.32
$18 23
14 88
13 91
13 61
11 63
12 30
$41  13
35 49
28 43
22 70
20 44
17  14
1S90-91	
1891-92 ..            	
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95 	
Prospect.
Teacher, Miss Sara Williams.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 16th, 1895; present, 11 boys, 6 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 9 girls; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.96.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil  since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94 	
22
29
11.32
13.96
$26 81
23 06
$52 12
45 84
1894-95 	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
317
PUNTLEDGE.
Teacher, John B. Bennett.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, February 18th and 19th, 1895; present, 18 boys, 18 girls; total, 36.
Enrolled during the year, 27 boys, 28 girls; total, 55.
Average monthly attendance, 43.
Average actual daily attendance, 33.20.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school: —
Year.
1891-92
1892-93
1893-94
1894-95
Enrolment.
52
48
45
Average
attendance.
25.16
29.80
31.34
33.20
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$11 34
14 58
16 88
13 81
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$23 44
23 48
24 25
22 89
At examination held February 18th and 19th, 1895, Miss Rose Ann Milligan and
Master George Carwithen, pupils of this school, obtained the percentage required for admission
to a High School.
QUAMICHAN.
Teacher, Miss Annie Robotham.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, May 8th and 9th, 1895; present, 5 boys, 8 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 12 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.61.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of  each   pupil during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90 	
28
38
28
26
32
25
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95  	
Average
attendance.
15.21
16.99
14.51
11.88
12.48
13.61
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$22 85
16 84
22 85
24 61
20 00
25 60
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$42 07
37 66
44 10
53 87
51 28
47 02
At examination held May 8th and 9th, 1895, Miss Amy Lindsay Dickson, a pupil of this
school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School, 318
Public Schools Report.
189c
Quesnelle.
Teacher, Frank E. Morrison, until June 30th, 1895; present teacher, John F. Smith.
Salary, $70 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 14 girls ; total, 33.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.6
Expenditure,
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90	
18
18
25
23
23
33
1890-91 	
1891-92	
1892-93 	
1893-94   .                               	
1894-95        ...   .    ...
Average
attendance.
12.10
10.02
11.33
12.09
15.29
15.88
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$48
88
48
88
33
48
38
26
38
26
26 66
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
872 72
87 82
73 88
72 78
57 55
55 41
Read Island.
Teacher, Miss E. M. Carter.
Salary $50 per  month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 4 boys, 6 girls; total, 10.
Average monthly attendance, 10.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.14.
Expenditure, $490.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $49.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $53.61.
This school was opened in October, 1894, and is now in operation. 59 Vict.                                    Public Schools Report.                                           319
Revelstoke.
Teacher, Frederick W. Laing, B.A.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, April Sth and 9th, 1895 ; present, 14 boys, 15 girls ; total, 29.
Enrolled during the year, 27 boys, 33 girls ;   total, 60.
Average monthly attendance, 37.
Average actual daily attendance, 30.24.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
44
38
44
51
56
60
18.08
16.07
18.76
22.40
25.44
30.24
$15 64
18 42
17 27
13 50
13 57
12 66
$38 07
1890-91 	
43 55
1891-92 	
40 51
1892-93 	
30 75
1893-94 	
29 87
1894-95 	
25 13
At examination held on April 8th  and 9th,  1895,  1
this school, obtained the percentage required for admissioj
liss Ruth L.  Valentine,  a pupil of
i to a High School.
Dresent teacher, H. C. Shelton.
girls; total, 10.
nrls ; total, 10.
mce, and  cost of each pupil during
Rocky Point.
Teacher, James Sutherland, until June 30th, 1895 ;
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, November 16th, 1894 ; present, 6 boys, 4
February 22nd, 1895; present, 6 boys, 4
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 5 girls ; total, 14.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.17.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attends
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
21
17
13
13
12
14
12.34
11.99
10.83
10.80
10.84
10.17
$30 47
37 64
49 23
49 23
53 33
45 71
$51 86
1890-91 	
53 37
1891-92 	
59 09
1892-93 	
59 26
1893-94	
59 04
1894-95 	
62 93 320                                          Public Schools Report.                                          1895
Rosedale.
Teacher, Miss Louise Harris, until June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, Miss E. J. Blair.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 19th, 1894; present, 9 boys, 8 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 11 girls ; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 15,
Average actual daily attendance, 13.37.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil  since  the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91 	
31
37
38
29
24
19.03
20.20
17.69
17.18
13.37
$17 41
17 29
16 84
20 91
26 66
$28 37
1891-92	
31 68
36 17
35 31
47 86
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95 	
iris; total, 21.
ce, and cost of each pupil during the
Round Prairie.
Teacher, Henry A. Fraser.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 18th, 1895 ; present, 11 boys, 10 g
Enrolled, during the year, 21 boys, 14 girls; total, 3.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.89.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendan
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
18
22
29
27
32
35
11.00
11.10
11.44
11.47
17.32
13.89
$42 22
34 54
26 20
28 14
23 08
21 71
$69 09
68 46
66 43
66 25
42 65
54 71
1890-91 	
1891-92 	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95	 59 Vict.                                  Public Schools Report.                                           321
Saanich,  North.
Teacher, Angus Galbraith.
Salary, $75 per month.
Examined, May 14th and 15th, 1895; present, 14 boys, 16 girls; total, 30.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 24 girls ; total 45.
Average monthly attendance, 36.
Average actual daily attendance, 29.82.
Expenditure, $940.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
61
50
59
53
59
45
39.46
38.47
38.85
32.91
35.94
29.82
$14 42
17 60
14 91
17 73
15 93
20 88
$22 30
22 87
22 65
28 56
26 15
31 52
1890-91	
1891-92 	
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95 	
Saanich, South.
Teacher, George H. Sluggett.
Salary, $75 per month.
Examined, May 15th and 16th, 1895 ; present, 10 boys, 18 girls; total, 28.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 30 girls; total, 49.
Average monthly attendance, 37.
Average actual daily attendance, 31.04.
Expenditure, $940.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and  cost of each  pupil  during
the past six years : —
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
39
52
63
60
48
49
26.33
32.04
36.86
33.17
36.23
31.04
$25 64
16 92
13 96
15 66
19 58
19 18
$37 97
27 46
23 87
28 33
25 94
30 28
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
At examination, held May 15th and 16th, 1895, Mis
school, passed the standard required for admission to a H
s Lottie L. Turgoose, a pupil of this
lgh School, 322                                        Public Schools Report.                                         1895
Saanich, West.
Teacher, Edmund Caspell.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, May 15th and 16th, 1895; present, 12 boys, 17 girls; total, 29.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 21 girls; total, 39.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average actual daily attendance, 24.13.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
32
24
21
31
30
39
16.61
17.30
13.91
18.47
18.29
24.13
$23 43
31 66
36 19
24 51
25 33
19 48
$45 15
43 93
1890-91 	
1891-92	
54 63
1892-93 	
41 14
1893-94	
41 55
31 49
1894-95	
At examination, held May 15th and 16th, 1895,  Master Claud H. Butler, a pupil of this
school, obtained the percentage required for entrance to a High School.
Sahtlam.
Monitor, Miss Clara C. Warren, until December 31st
J. Blake.
Salary, $40 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 5 girls; total, 12.
Average monthly attendance, 9.
Average actual daily attendance, 7.73.
Expenditure, $480.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendai
establishment of the school:—
, 1894; present monitor, Miss Mary
ice, and cost of each pupil  since the
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91 	
10
9
11
11
12
6.37
7.23
6.07
7.19
7.73
$30 67
40 00
43 63
43 63
40 00
$48 15
1891-92 	
49 79
79 09
66 75
62 09
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
323
Salmon Arm.
Teacher, Joseph Irwin, until June 30th, 1895; present teacher, Miss B. Dolan.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 12th, 1895 ; present, 17 boys, 9 girls; total, 26.
Enrolled during the year, 25 boys, 24 girls; total, 49.
Average monthly attendance, 33,
Average actual daily attendance, 27.16.
Expenditure, $760.'
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school •—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91	
18
25
31
40
49
10.59
17.99
21.08
24.45
27.16
$36 66
30 40
24 51
19 00
15 51
$62 32
1891-92 	
1892-93 '
1893-94	
42 24
36 05
31 08
1894-95   .                                                       	
27 98
Savona.
Teacher, Miss H. Young.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 8 girls ; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.15.
Expenditure, $550.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $28.94.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance,
.3.32.
This school was opened in August, 1894, and is still in operation. 324                                           Public Schools Report.                                         1895
Sea Island.
Teacher, Heber B. Barton.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 24th, 1894; present, 17 boys, 17 girls ; total, 34.
Enrolled during the year, 34 boys, 31 girls;   total, 65. .
Average monthly attendance, 42.
Average actual daily attendance, 30.62.
Expenditure, $640.'
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1890-91	
22
31
40
48
65
12.23
12.58
20.94
19.50
30.62
$18 78
20 64
14 72
12 29
9 84
$33 79
50 87
28 12
30 25
20 90
1891-92 	
1892-93 	
1893-94 	
1894-95   	
Serpentine.
Teacher, James D. Fraser, until June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, John A. Rowe.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 23rd, 1895; present, 2 boys, 9 girls; total, 11.
Visited, May 31st, 1895; present, 2 boys, 9 girls; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 15 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.09.
Expenditure,  $640.
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92	
23
24
21
25
13.06
11.88
10.11
11.09
$25 65
26 66
30 47
25 60
$45 17
53 87
63 30
57 70
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
At the semi-annual examination, held in New Westn
1894, Miss Jessie M. Inglis, a pupil of this school, passed
to a High School.
linster City, December 4th and 5th,
the standard required for admission 59 Vict.                                 Public Schools Report.                                          325
Shawnigan.
Teacher, James A. Hoy.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 10th, 1895; present, 7 boys, 6 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 11 girls ; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.08.
Expenditure, $609.35
The following is a list of enrolment,  average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90   	
25
27
32
35
26
23
12.18
13.28
15.90
14.92
10.90
12.08
$25 60
23 70
20 00
18 28
24 61
26 49
$52 54
1890-91                          	
48 19
1891-92       	
40 25
1892-93	
42 89
1893-94	
58 71
1894-95 	
50 44
1895;   present teacher, Miss Mary
total, 12.
dance, and cost of each pupil during
Shuswap.
Teacher, Miss Martha McDowell, until June  30th,
McDowell.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, April 9th, 1895 ; present, 5 boys, 7 girls ;
Enrolled during the year, 6 boys, 13 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.83.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average atten
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90   	
23
22
18
20
19
19
12.56
12.66
11.80
11.86
12.50
12.83
$30 94
34 54
42 22
38 00
40 00
40 00
$56 65
1890-91	
1891-92	
60 03
64 40
1892-93	
64 08
1893-94	
60 80
1894-95	
59 23 326
Public Schools Report.
1895
Sidney.
Teacher, A. W. Curry.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, May 14th and 15th, 1895 ; present, 14 boys, 17 girls ; total, 31.
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 23 girls ; total, 43.
Average monthly attendance, 35.
Average actual daily attendance, 30.86.
Expenditure, $649.67.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.10.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance,  $21.04.
This school was opened in August, 1894, and has thus far maintained a very good average
daily attendance.
At examination held May 14th and 15th, 1895,  Misses Ethel Robertson and  Margaret
Brethour, pupils of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
Silverdale.
Teacher, Miss Bessie Howard.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 10 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.30.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of  each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93	
18
19
27
10.94
10.87
15.30
$27 22
33 68
23 70
$44 78
1893-94 	
58 87
1894-95 	
41 83 59 Vict.                                 Public Schools Report.                                         327
Similkameen.
Teacher, Miss Sarah B. Truswell.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 6 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.56.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance,  and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93 	
28
18
22
9.58
10.01
12.56
$25 00
42 22
34 54
$73 06
1893-94	
75 92
1894-95 	
60 50
ice, and cost of each pupil since the
Simpson.
Teacher, Miss Caroline M. Hall.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, June 19th and 20th, 1895.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 13 girls ; total, 28
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 19.43.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendai
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93 	
24
21s
28
18.41
17.97
19.43
$25 66
38 09
27 14
$33 46
1893-94 	
44 51
1894-95    	
39 11
At examination held June 19th and 20th, 1895, Miss
this school, passed the standard required for admission to
> Gertrude Louise Crosby, a pupil of
a High School. 3 28                                          Public Schools Report.                                         1895
Somenos.
Teacher, Miss Jeannette Mebius.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May Sth, 1895; present, 11 boys, 9 girls; total, 20.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 9 girls ; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.27.
Expenditure, $640.'
The following is a list of enrolment, average  attendance, and  cost of  each pupil during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
22
23
25
21
23
21
11.49
12.32
15.10
13.03
12.56
11.27
$29 09
27 82
24 50
30 47
27 82
30 47
$55 70
1890-91	
51 94
40 56
49 11
1891-92 	
1892-93	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
50 95
56 78
Sooke.
Teacher, Magnus Henderson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, November 15th, 1894; present, 12 boys, '.
February 21st, 1895; present, 7 boys, 4 g
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 7 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.82.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of_.enrolment, average  attenda
the past six years:—
girls; total, 16.
iris; total, 11.
ace, and  cost of  each pupil during
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
31
44
30
21
26
23
19.42
24.02
14.82
11.10
12.79
12.82
$30 28
21 88
21 33
20 95
22 69
27 82
$48 34
40 09
43 18
39 64
46 12
49 92
1890-91 	
1891-92 	
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95	 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
329
Sooke, East.
Teacher, Annesley A. Woods, until June 30th, 1895; present teacher, P. A. McDiarmid.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, February 21st, 1895 ; present, 6 boys, 5 girls; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 8 girls; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.02.
Expenditure,
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92 	
15
20
24
18
9.29
9.97
12.25
10.02
$17 88
25 58
23 84
35 55
$28 88
1892-93	
51 32
1893-94 ..             	
46 71
1894-95 ..           	
63 87
Southfield.
Teacher, Miss Kate Cairns.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 10th, 1894; present, 12 boys, 15 girls; total, 27.
Enrolled during the year, 24 boys, 22 girls; total, 46.
Average monthly attendance, 32.
Average actual daily attendance, 24.19.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92	
38
40
42
46
18.55
17.64
20.66
24.19
$11 57
16 00
15 23
13 91
$23 71
36 28
1892-93	
1893-94 	
30 97
1894-95	
26 45 330
Public Schools Report.
1895
Spallumcheen.
Teacher, Miss Mary Babcock.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 14th, 1895; present, 9 boys, 7 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 13 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.16.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
1889-90	
1890-91 (closed)
1891-92 (closed)
1892-93 	
1893-94	
1894-95 	
Enrolment.
16
28
30
27
. Cost of
,,     ,  °       each pupil on
attendance. i       +
enrolment.
9.95
11.48
13.40
17.16
$47 50
24 28
25 33
28 14
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$76 38
59 24
56 71
44 28
Spence's Bridge.
Teacher, Thomas Clyde.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 26th, 1895; present, 6 boys, 7 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 13 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average actual daily attendance, 8.39.
Expenditure,
The following  is a  list  of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
12
14
13
12
12
20
8.30
11.16
10.06
7.48
8.50
8.39
$50 00
39 28
42 69
50 00
50 00
30 00
$72 29
1890-91 	
49 28
1891-92	
55 16
1892-93	
80 21
1893-94	
69 84
1894-95 	
71 51 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
331
Squamish.
Teacher, Miss Edith G. Magee, until June 30th,   1895;   present teacher,  Miss  May  I.
Magee.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 6 boys, 6 girls; total, 12.
Average monthly attendance, 9.
Average actual daily attendance, 8.09.
Expenditure, $467.41.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $38.95.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $57.77.
This school was opened in October, 1894, and is still in operation.
Steveston.
Teacher, Ruyter S. Sherman, until June 30th, 1895; present teacher, R. L. Laffere, B.A.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 30th, 1895; present, 9 boys, 7 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 23 boys, 18 girls; total, 41.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.72.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93 	
33
44
41
11.70
12.21
14.72
$17 87
14 54
15 60
$50 04
1893-94	
52 41
1894-95 	
43 47 332
Public Schools Report.
1895
Strawberry Vale.
Teacher, James H. Monk.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, February 26th, 1895 ; present, 17 boys, 15 girls : total, 32.
Enrolled during the year, 30 boys, 21 girls ; total, 51.
Average monthly attendance, 37.
Average actual daily attendance, 31.02.
Expenditure, $622 50.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94	
37
51
22.87
31.02
$ 9 18
12 20
$14 86
1894-95	
20 06
At semi-annual examination held in Victoria, December 4th and 5th, 1894, Master Louis
Duval, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
Sumas.
Teacher, Malcolm McLeod.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, September 13th, 1894 ; present, 10 boys, 11 girls; total, 21.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 12 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.85.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90 	
34
33
47
26
26
24
1890-91 	
1891-92 	
1893-94  	
1894-95 	
Average
attendance.
15.70
16.17
20.92
13.87
17.62
15.85
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$17
84
21
21
14
89
26 92
26
92
26
66
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$38 64
43 29
33 46
50 46
39 72
40 37
At examination held in Chilliwhack school-house, September 15th and 17th, 1894, Miss
Mary Jane McLeod, a pupil of this school, obtained the percentage required for entrance to a
High School. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
333
Sumas, South.
Teacher,   R.   L.   Laffere,   B.A.,   until   December   31st,   1894;   present   teacher,   D.  E.
Stevenson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 17th, 1894; present, 9 boys, 7 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 8 girls ; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.12.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1892-93    	
19
27
21
13.46
13.26
11.12
$25 79
23 70
30 47
$36 40
1893-94	
48 26
1894-95 	
Surrey Centre.
Teacher, Henri W. Laffere.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 30th, 1894; present, 5 boys, 10 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 13 girls ; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.59.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school: —
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1891-92 	
26
29
34
30
15.69
17.99
18.38
15.59
$22 69
21 01
18 82
21 33
$37 60
33 87
1892-93	
1893-94	
34 82
1894-95 	
41 05 334
Public Schools Report.
1895
Tolmie.
Teacher, Miss Mabel Godson.
Salary, $60 per month.
Monitor, Miss Grace Godson.
Salary, $40 per month.
Monitor, Miss Eva I. Miller.
Salary, $40 per month.
Inspected, October 17th, 1894 ; present, 38 boys, 42 girls; total, 80.
November 28th, 1894 ; present, 33 boys, 45 girls ; total, 78.
May 15th, 1895; present, 30 boys, 40 girls; total, 70.
Enrolled during the year, 55 boys, 63 girls ; total, 118.
Average monthly attendance, 92.
Average actual daily attendance, 77.39.
Expenditure, $1,695.48.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1889-90 	
27
47
72
99
123
118
1890-91	
1891-92	
1892-93	
1893-94 	
1894-95       	
Average
attendance.
11.82
21.68
29.78
51.33
70.19
77.39
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
123 70
13 61
10 40
14 36
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$54 14
29 52
21 49
17 14
18 23
21 90
At semi-annual examination, held in Victoria City, June 4th and 5th, 1895, Miss
Mary H. Holmes, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High
School.
Trenant.
Teacher, Alexander Gilchrist.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined, August 27th and 28th, 1894; present, 9 boys, 14 girls; total, 23.
Enrolled during the year, 27 boys, 22 girls ; total, 49.
Average monthly attendance, 32.
Average actual daily attendance, 25.26.
Expenditure, $880.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90    	
68
69
68
75
59
49
32.27
35.02
32.50
41.17
29.59
25.26
$10 29
11 01
12 94
11 73
14 91
17 95
$21 69
1890-91	
21 70
1891-92	
27 07
1892-93	
21 37
1893-94	
29 73
1894-95   	
34 83
At examination, held August 27th and 28th, 1894, Miss Nellie Watson, a pupil of this
school, obtained the percentage required for entrance to a High School. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
33c
Vancouver,   South.
Teacher, Albert E. Phoenix.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 30th, 1895; present, 10 boys, 11 girls;
Enrolled during the year, 25 boys, 24 girls; total, 49.
Average monthly attendance, 28.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.33.
Expenditure, $624.10.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance,
establishment of the school:—
total, 21.
and cost of each pupil since the
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94	
53
32.75
$ 6 41
12 73
$10 38
1894-95 	
49                   20.33
30 69
Vesuvius.
Teacher, Raffles A. R. Purdy.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, March 1st and 4th, 1895; present, 14 boys, 7 girls; total, 21.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 13 girls; total, 32.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.99.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is  a list  of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
25
38
52
29
35
32
9.83
24.78
27.61
15.94
16.97
15.99
$25 60
18 68
20 25
22 06
18 28
20 00
$65 10
1890-91 	
1891-92*	
1892-93	
28 65
38 14
40 15
1893-94 	
37 71
1894-95 	
40 02
*Including North Vesuvius.
At examination held March 1st and 4th, 1895, Miss Margaret Mouat and Master
Albert Norton, pupils of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High
School. 336
Public Schools Report.
1895
Vesuvius, North.
Teacher,   Miss  Kate  M.  MeKinnon,   until  December 31st,  1894;  Domitian  Gallant,
until June 30th, 1895 ; present teacher, Miss K. Furness.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 1st, 1895 ; present, 7 boys, 5 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 12 girls ; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance,  16.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.29.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
189-^-93	
22
21
22
1893-94 	
1894-95 	
Average
attendance.
12.66
15.48
14.29
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$29 09
30 47
29 09
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$50 55
41 34
44 78
Waneta.
Teacher, Donald J. Dewar.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 12 girls ; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.37.
Expenditure,
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94 	
25
21
11.08
11.37
$24 96
33 33
$56 31
1894-95	
61 56 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
337
Westham.
until October 17th, 1894; present teacher, MissLinnieLewis.
total, 10.
Teacher, Duncan J. Welsh
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 27th, 1894 ; present, 9 boys, 1 girl
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 8 girls; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.26.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 !	
29
27
20
22
IS
21
12.39
13.06
13.98
12.91
11.17
11.26
$22 07
21 70
32 00
29 09
35 55
30 47
$51 65
1S90-91	
44 87
1891-92	
45 77
1892-93 	
1893-94	
49 57
57 29
1894-95 	
56 83
White Valley.
Teacher, Thomas A. Norris.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 25th, 1895 ; present, 7 boys, 8 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 17 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 2l.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.76.
Expenditure, $760
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1893-94   	
32
31
16.66
17.76
$21 87
24 51
$42 01
1894-95	
42 79 338
Public Schools Report.
1895
Whonnock.
Teacher, Miss May E. Moss.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 21st, 1894; present, 4 boys, 8 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 14 girls; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.42.
Expenditure,
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
36
28
24
34
26
24
13.32
11.81
12.02
12.07
11.80
12.42
$17 77
22 85
26 66
17 92
24 61
26 66
$48 04
1890-91	
54 19
1891-92 	
53 24
1892-93 	
50 48
1893-94 	
54 23
1894-95   	
51 52
Windermere.
Teacher, Miss Mary K. Smith.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 3 girls; total, 10.
Average monthly attendance, 6.
Average actual daily attendance, 5.32.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $70,
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance,
131.57.
This school was opened in August, 1894, and was closed on June 30th,  1895, on account
of the very low average daily attendance maintained.    The school is not now in operation. 59 Vict.                                  Public Schools Report.                                           339
Yale.
Teacher, Wesley A. Blair.
Salary, $60 per month.
Examined, April 29th and 30th, 1895 ; present, 13 boys, 11 girls ; total, 24.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 16 girls; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 21.18.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
37
39
31
35
28
30
20.74
20.82
IS.09
18.35
18.29
21.18
$17 29
18 99
24 51
21 71
27 14
25 33
$30 85
1890-91	
35 57
1891-92 	
42 01
1892-93 	
41 41
1893-94 	
41 55
1894-95 	
35 88
At examination held April 29th and   30th, 1895, Masters Ernest W. Dodd and Morton
P. Revsbech, pupils of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
York.
Teacher, Miss Mary Truswell.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected September 7th, 1894 ; present, 6 boys, 11 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 14 girls ; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.72.
Expenditure, $613.20,
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
32
28
25
34
28
27
13.28
13.68
11.64
15.49
15.24
15.72
$20 00
22 85
25 00
18 82
22 85
22 71
$48 19
1890-91 	
46 78
1891-92 	
53 69
1892-93	
41 31
1893-94	
41 99
1894-95 	
39 00 340 Public Schools Report. 1895
SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The Council of Public Instruction has made changes in the boundaries of the following
existing School Districts, and has also created School Districts with limits as herein stated :—
Belmont—12th June, 1890.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 19th April, 1894, and 10th
September, 1895:
Commencing at the middle point of the northern boundary line of Section 31, Township 10, Westminster District; thence due south two miles; thence in a direct line west
to the south-west corner of Section 27, Township 7 ; thence true north to the north-west
corner of Section 34; thence in a direct line east to the point of commencement.
Boundary Creek—2nd April, 1895 :
All that tract of land known as Township 69, Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
Camp Slough—2nd April, 1895 :
Commencing at the north-east corner of Lot 469, Township 30, Westminster
District; thence in a direct line south to Hope Slough; thence westerly along said
slough to the south-east corner of Lot 435; thence due west to the south-west corner of
said lot; thence south to the north-east corner of the north-west quarter of Section 6 ;
thence true west to the south-west corner of Lot 432, Township 27 ; thence north to the
south-east corner of Lot 431 ; thence west to the south-west corner of said lot; thence
due north to the Fraser River; thence easterly up said river to the point of commencement.
Cheam—26th November  1874.    Boundaries altered and re-defined  19th July, 1883; 14th
April, 1890; 11th May, 1892, and 2nd April, 1895:
Commencing at the middle point of the eastern boundary line of Section 36, Township 26, Westminster District; thence in a direct line west to the eastern boundary line
of Section 32; thence due north to Hope Slough; thence up said slough to its junction
with Gravelly Slough ; thence crossing narrow neck of land on Lot 396, Group 2, to
Camp Slough ; thence following said slough easterly to the section line bisecting Lot 419,
Group 2 ; thence due north to Fraser River; thence up said river to the point at which
the western boundary line of Lot 431 extended northward touches said river; thence due
south to the south-west corner of said lot; thence due east to the south-east corner of
said lot; thence south to the south-west corner of Lot 432 ; thence due east to the northwest corner of Section 6, Township 30; thenee directly south to the point of commencement.
Colwood—3rd October, 1873.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 17th April, 1895:
Commencing at the northern end of Parson's Bridge, Esquimalt District; thence
following Rowe Stream to the boundary line between Sections 97 and 98; thence in a
northerly direction along the eastern boundary line of Section 98 to the southern
boundary line of Highland District; thence westerly along said boundary line to its
termination ; thence southerly following the eastern boundary line of Goldstream District
to the north-west corner of Section 87, Metchosin District; thence easterly following the
southern boundary lines of Sections 90, 84, and 78 to the south-east corner of Section 78,
Esquimalt District; thence southerly along the western boundary line of Esquimalt
District to the south-west corner of Section 59; thence easterly following the southern
boundary lines of Sections 59 and 42 to the south-east corner of Section 42 ; thence
northerly to the south-west corner of Section 52 ; thence easterly along the southern
boundary of said section to the sea-shore; thence northerly following the shore line to the
point of commencement, 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 341
Cowichan, South—3rd November, 1885. Boundaries altered and re-defined 8th April, 1891,
and 20th August, 1895 :
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 15, Range IX., Shawnigan District;
thence due west to the north-west corner of Section 15, Range III.; thence in a direct
line north to Cowichan Harbour; thence southerly following the shore line to the point
of commencement.
Goldstream—17th April, 1895:
Commencing at the north-west corner of Section 87, Metchosin District; thence east
to the north-east corner of Section 73 of said district; thence southerly to the south-east
corner of Section 67a ; thence due north-west to the eastern boundary line of Goldstream
District; thence in a direct line north-west to the western boundary line of said Gold-
stream District; thence north, following the western, northern, and eastern boundary
lines of said district to the point of commencement.
Malahat—18th April, 1893.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 20th August, 1895 :
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 1, Range I., Shawnigan District;
thence clue north to the south-west corner of Section 11 of said range; thence due east to
the south-east corner of Section 11, Range III.; thence due north to the north-west
corner of Section 15, Range IV. ; thence due east to the north-east corner of Section 15,
Range V.; thence in a direct line south to the southern boundary line of Shawnigan
District; together with all that tract of land known as Malahat District.
McPherson—16th June, 1869. Boundaries altered and re-defined 24th April, 1884; name
changed 27th October, 1884, from " South Cowichan" to "Cowichan"; re-defined Sth
April, 1891, and 20th August, 1895; name changed 20th August, 1895, from "Cowichan"
to "McPherson":
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 13, Range IV., Quamichan District;
thence due south to the southern boundary of said district; thence due east to the southwest corner of Section 1, Range VII. ; thence due south for two and a half miles, meeting
the southern boundary line of Section 11, Range IV, Shawnigan District, produced
westerly; thence due east to the south-east corner of Section 11, B.ange III., Shawnigan
District; thence in a direct line north to Cowichan Harbour; thence northerly following
the shore line to the north-east corner of Section 12, Range III., Cowichan District;
thence in a direct line westward to the point of commencement.
Metchosin—8th April, 1871. Boundaries altered and re-defined 16th May, 1888, and 17th
April, 1895 :
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 52, Esquimalt District, being a point
on the sea-shore; thence westerly to the south-west corner of said section; thence
southerly to the south-east corner of Section 42 ; thence westerly, following the southern
boundary lines of Sections 42 and 59, to the western boundary line of Esquimalt District;
thence south to the south-east corner of Section 67a, Metchosin District; thence due
north-west to the eastern boundary line of Goldstream District; thence southerly, following the eastern boundary lines of Goldstream and Sooke Districts, to the north-east
corner of Section 76, Sooke District; thence easterly to the north-east corner of Section
43, Metchosin District; thence north-easterly to the north-west corner of Section 27 ;
thence easterly, following the southern boundary lines of Sections 25, 24, and 33, to the
sea-shore; thence north-easterly, following the shore line, to the point of commencement.
North Arm—11th May, 1886. Boundaries altered and re-defined 18th October, 1893, and
20th August, 1895 :
Commencing at the south-west corner of Lot 311, Group 1, Westminster District;
thence north to the north-west corner of said lot; thence east to the southern point of
the western boundary line of Lot 322 ; thence north to the north=west corner of said lot;
thence east to the south-west corner of Lot 656; thence north to the north-west corner
of Lot 643 ; thence due east to the western boundary line of Lot 50 ; thence southerly, 342 Public Schools Report. 1895
following the eastern boundary lines of Lots 394, 336, and 332, to the south-east corner
of said lot; thence in a direct line southward to the North Arm of Fraser River ; thence
up said Arm, and crossing same, to the north-east corner of Section 36, Block 5 North,
Range IV. West; thence south to the First Correction Line; thence west along said line
to the south-west corner of Section 36, Block 5 North, Range VI. West; thence north
to the north-west corner of Section 24, Block 5 North, Range VI. West; thence crossing
the Arm to the point of commencement.
Okanagan Mission—2nd April, 1895 ;
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 27, Township 23, Osoyoos Division
of Yale District; thence east to the north-east corner of Section 28, Township 24 ;
thence south to the south-east corner of Section 33, Township 27 ; thence west to the
south-west corner of Section 34, Township 26 ; thence north to the point of commencement.
Rosedale—14th April, 1890.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 2nd April, 1895 :
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 30, Township 29, Westminster
District; thence due north to the north-west corner of the north-west quarter of Section
6, Township 30; thence east to the north-east corner of said quarter section; thence
north to the south-west corner of Lot 435 ; thence east, on southern line of said lot, to
Hope Slough ; thence following said slough to Indian Reserve; thence following the
western, southern, and eastern boundaries of said reserve to Fraser River; thence up
said river to the eastern boundary of Lot 446, Township 30; thence south-east to the
eastern boundary of Section 1, Township 30 ; thence due south to the south-east corner
of Section 25, Township 29 ; thence due west six (6) miles to the point of commencement.
Vancouver, East—20th August, 1895 :
Commencing at the south-east corner of South Vancouver Municipality; thence in a
direct line northward to the south-east corner of Hastings Townsite; thence due west to
the eastern boundary line of Lot 393 ; thence in a southerly direction, following the
eastern boundary lines of Lots 393, 394, 336, and 332, to the south-east corner of said
lot; thence due south to the North Arm of Fraser River; thence easterly, following the
shore line, to the point of commencement. 59 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
343
TEACHERS' EXAMINATION.
Time and Place op Examination.
1. The examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the Public
Schools shall commence on Friday, July 3rd, 1896, at 9 a.m.
2. The examination shall be conducted according to the following schedule :—
Schedule—Teachers' Examination, 1896.
Date.
July 3, Friday ....
,, 4, Saturday.. , .
,, 6, Monday
" 7, Tuesday ....
,, 8, Wednesday .
,, 9, Thursday ...
„  10, Friday  ....
,,  11, Saturday. ..
,, 13, Monday	
,, 14, Tuesday . . .
,,15. Wednesday.
„ 16, Thursday...
Subject.
British History	
Arithmetic	
Education	
Canadian History	
Composition	
Mensuration   	
Algebra 	
Geometry	
Natural Philosophy.
Practical Mathematics .
Latin	
Forenoon.
Oral examination in classics,
&c ;
9   to 11.30
9   to 11.30
9 to 11
9 to 11
9 to 11
9 to   11.30
9 to   11.30
9 to  11.30
9 to  11.30
9 to  11.30
9 to  11.30
10 to  	
Subject.
English Grammar
* Reading ....
Geography  .
* Reading
Writing ....
* Reading
Anatomy, Physiology, & Hygiene
* Reading	
Mental Arithmetic
Spelling	
Book-keeping	
Optional Subjects (2 B.^
Optional Subjects (2 A.) .
* Reading	
Optional Subjects (IB.)
English Literature  ...
Ancient History...
Greek and French.
Afternoon.
1.30 to 4
4   to   5
1.30 to 4
4    to   5
1.30 to 3.30
3.30 to 5
1.30 to 3.30
3.30 to 5
1.30 to 2.15
2.30 to 3.30
1.30 to 3.30
3.30 to 5.30
1.30 to 3.30
3.30 to 5
1.30 to 3.30
3.30 to 5.30
1.30 to 3
1.30 to 4
* As many of the candidates examined as time will permit.
3. The examination shall take place simultaneously in Victoria, Vancouver, and
Kamloops.
4. Each candidate for a First Class, Grade A, Certificate is required to undergo the
written and oral examinations in Victoria in the subjects peculiar to that class and grade of
certificate. 344 Public Schools Report. 1895
The following   are   extracts  from   the  Rules   and  Regulations prescribed for the
examination of candidates for certificates of qualific-ition to teach
in the Public Schools of the Province.
SUBJECTS OF EXAMINATION.
Third Class Certificates.
1. Reading.—To read intelligently and expressively.
2. Writing.—To write legibly and neatly, and to understand the principles of writing as
given in any standard text-book.
3. Spelling.—To have a good knowledge of orthography and orthoepy.
4. Written Arithmetic.—To be thoroughly familiar with the subject.
5. Mental Arithmetic.—To show readiness and accuracy in solving problems.
6. Geography.—To have a good knowledge of the subject.
7. English Grammar.—To have a thorough knowledge of the subject, and to be able to
analyze and parse any sentence.
8. Canadian History.—To have a good knowledge of the subject.
9. English History—To have a good knowledge of the subject.
10. Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene.—To have a good general knowledge of the
subject.
11. Composition.—To be familiar with the forms of correspondence, and to be able to
write a composition on any simple subject, correct as to spelling, punctuation, and expression.
12. Education.—To have a thorough knowledge of the approved methods of teaching the
various subjects prescribed for Common Schools; to be well acquainted with formation of timetables, classification of pupils, and modes of discipline; to be familiar wdth the School Act,
and rules and regulations prescribed for the government of the Public Schools.
Second Class, Grade B, Certificates.   '
1 to 12, as for Third Class Certificates.
13. Mensuration.—To know the rules for the measurement of surfaces.
14. Book-keeping.—To understand the keeping of accounts by single entry.
15. Music (Theory)       \
Drawing (Linear)    J- To have a fair knowledge of one of these subjects.
Botany 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 345
Second Class, Grade A, Certificates.
1 to 15, as for Second Class, Grade B, Certificates.
16. Algebra.—To know the rules preceding and including simple equations.
17. Geometry.—Book I.
18. Zoology \
Astronomy    V To have a fair knowledge of one of these subjects.
Rhetoric       J
First Class, Grade B, Certificates.
1 to 18, as for Second Class, Grade A, Certificates.
13. Mensuration.—To know the rules for the measurement of volumes.
14. Book-keeping.—To understand the keeping of accounts by double-entry.
16. Algebra.—To know the subject.
17. Geometry.—Books II., III., and IV., with problems.
19. Natural Philosophy.—To know the  subject,  and  to  be able to work problems in
Statics, Dynamics, and Hydrostatics.
20. English literature.—To have a good general knowledge of the subject.
21. General History   ]
Chemistry V To have a good knowledge of one of these subjects.
Geology
First Class, Grade A, Certificates.
1 to 21, as for First Class, Grade B, Certificates.
17.  Geometry.—Books V. (Definitions) and VI.
22. Practical   Mathematics.—To   be   familiar   with  plane  trigonometr}',   including land
surveying and navigation.
23.—Ancient History.—To have a general knowledge of the subject to the Fall of Rome.
24.—latin.—To have a good knowledge of Prose Composition, and to be able to translate
and parse the following:—
Csesar, De Bello Gallico, Books I. and II.
Virgil, .cEneid, Books I. and II.
Horace, Odes, Books I. and III.
25. Greek or French :
Greek.—To have a good knowledge of Prose Composition,  and  to be able to
translate and parse the following:—
Xenophon, Anabasis, Books I. and II.
Homer, Iliad, Books I. and II.
French.—To have a good knowledge  of  Prose  Composition,   and  to  be able to
translate and parse the following: —
La Fontaine, Les Fables, Livres I. et II.
Voltaire, Histoire de Charles XII., Livres I. et II.
Corneille, Le Cid. 346  - Public Schools Report. 1895
Conditions of obtaining Certificates.
No Certificate shall be given to any person as a Teacher who does not furnish satisfactory
proof of good moral character, and satisfy the Board of Examiners that he or she is a fit and
proper person to be granted a certificate.
Certificates of qualification shall be granted according to the following regulations:—
For a Temporary Certificate. A candidate for a Temporary Certificate must give
satisfactory information as to his character and scholastic qualifications, and must forward an
application from a Board of School Trustees desiring his services as teacher; and the Trustees
must satisfy the Superintendent of Education that they are unable to secure the services of a
person properly qualified, suitable as a teacher for their school.
For a Third Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 30 per cent, of the marks
attached to each of the subjects of examination for that class and grade, and 40 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for that class and grade.
For a Third Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the marks
attached to each of the subjects of examination for that class and grade, and 50 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for that class and grade.
For a Second Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for Third Class Certificates, and not
less than 30 per cent, of the marks attached to each of the subjects of examination peculiar to
that class and grade, and 50 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the subjects
of examination for that class and grade.
For a Second Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
marks attached to each of the subjects of examination for Second Class, Grade B Certificates,
and not less than 40 per cent, of the marks attached to each of the subjects of examination
peculiar to that class and grade, and 60 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to
the subjects of examination for that class and grade.
For a First Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the marks
attached to each of the subjects of examination for Second Class, Grade A, Certificates, and
not less than 40 per cent, in each of the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and
grade, and 60 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination
for that class and grade.
For a First Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the marks
attached to each of the subjects of examination for First Class, Grade B, Certificates, and not
less than 40 per cent, in each of the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade,
and 60 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for that
class and grade; or he must be a graduate in Arts of some recognized British or Canadian
University, who has proceeded regularly to his degree, and must satisfy the Examiners as to
his knowledge of the art of teaching and school discipline and management, and the School
Law of the Province, and may be further required to undergo an oral examination on these
subjects.
Duration of Certificates.
Certificates shall be valid as follows:—
Third Class, Grade B, for one year.
n ii      A, for two years.
Second Class,    n      B, for three years.
ii ii      A, for five years.
First Class,       n      B.
ii ii     A,
'  I for life, or during good behaviour. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. 347
The following Regulation in regard to attendance at an assisted school has been made and
established by the Honourable the Council of Public Instruction.
" In a school established in a locality not having the requisite number of children of
school age to be created a school district, the number of pupils enrolled must be at least ten,
and the average daily attendance maintained each month must not be less than eight."
The following additions have been made to the   Rules  and   Regulations   already  prescribed
for the government of the Public Schools.
Article I.—Trustees of a District in which a High School is maintained may require
such school to be kept in session half an hour longer each day than the prescribed times for
closing.
Article II.—Labour Day is inserted.
Article IV.—Clause III.—When a school is closed for one or more of the prescribed
teaching days in a month without authority having been first obtained from the Council of
Public Instruction, salary will not be paid to the teacher for the time that the school is closed.
Note.—In case of the prevalence of an epidemic, illness of teacher, or other cause equally satisfactory
to the Council of Public Instruction, Trustees may forthwith temporarily close the school, but immediate
notification must be given the Department, with the reason therefor.
Article V.—A substitute cannot serve for a longer period than ten consecutive teaching
days in the school-year, except in the event of sickness of teacher.
The Jollowing additional   text-books  have been  authorized  for use in the Public Schools of
the Province.
Bannister's Text-book on Music—Deighton, Bell & Co., Cambridge.
British Columbia Series of Vertical Writing Books—Gage & Co., Toronto.
Todhunter's Euclid for Schools and Colleges.
Recommended for the use of Teachers:—
" How Canada is Governed "—Dr. Bourinot.
"History of British Columbia"—Alexander Begg.
During the present school-year  Scaife's Synoptical  Chart of English   History  is being
furnished to all Rural Schools in which it can be used to advantage in teaching this subject.
A new map of this Province is also being supplied to the Rural Schools. 248 Public Schools Report. 1895
TEACHERS' INSTITUTES.
The annual meeting of the Mainland Teachers' Institute is called for January 6th and
7th, 1896.
We understand that Colonel the Honourable James Baker, Minister of Education, has
accepted an invitation to deliver an address on the occasion.
The officers of the Institute for the present year are as follows :—
Mr. J. H. Kerr, B.A President.
Mr. J. I). Gillis 1st Vice-President.
Mr. G. H. Tom 2nd Vice-President.
Miss M. Harding Treasurer.
Mr. J. D. Buchanan Recording Secretary.
Miss Anna Fraser Corresponding Secretary.
In addition to the above officers, the following constitute the Committee of Management:—
Miss E. Murray, Mr. J. D. Fraser,
Miss B. Johnston, Mr. W. C. Coatham,
Mr. R. J. Hall.
The Victoria Teachers' Institute  holds monthly meetings  for  the  discussion of topics
connected with school work.
Its officers for the present year are as follows:—
Miss E. G. Lawson President.
Mr. L. Tait   Vice-President.
Mr. E. F. Doran Secretary.
The Executive Committee consists of the above officers together with —
Miss A. D. Cameron,
Miss C. A. Dowler,
Miss F. E. Arrowsmith,
Mr. D. Dallas.
In the last Annual School Report the attention of teachers was called to the necessity of
giving more careful instruction in the subject of writing, and it is a pleasure to be able to
state that very noticeable improvement was made in this subject during the past year. We
again specially request teachers to encourage their pupils to vie with each other in attaining
more than mediocrity, if not excellence, in this practical study. The writing of a passably
good hand must be demanded of all candidates who undergo the examination for entrance to
a High School.
There is another subject to which it is deemed proper to call special attention, not because
it is imperfectly taught by the majority of our teachers, but for the reason that in some of
the schools the character of the instruction given is not commensurate with its importance.
This subject is reading. Of the different systems of teaching reading, such as the Look-and-
Say, the Phonic, &c, none will be specially recommended, for the reason that, under existing
circumstances, each teacher should use that method by which he can obtain the best results. 58 Vict. Public Schools Report, 249
Reading affords the pupil the means of acquiring knowledge, and his success as a student
will largely depend on the degree of ability attained in this art. The teaching of this subject
is both a mechanical and an intellectual exercise. In mechanical reading, a child is taught
proper tone, distinctness of articulation, to observe the pauses, inflections, and proper
pronunciation, and not to read too slowly nor too fast. These qualities being acquired
principally by imitation, it is of paramount importance that the teacher be a good reader.
There are instances of teachers of our schools whose incorrect pronunciation is quite noticeable
to official visitors. This is a fault which the teacher should seek to find out for himself, in
order to correct his errors, by the daily use of some standard dictionary. It should not be
overlooked by trustees and parents that a provincialism, or wrong pronunciation of even small
words, acquired by the pupils while in the primary reading books, is very difficult, and
frequently impossible, to eradicate in the more advanced stages of their education.
By intellectual reading is meant, in addition to the instruction given in mechanical
reading, the teaching of the pupils to thoroughly understand what they read, or, so to speak,
to imbibe the feelings and to enter into the spirit of the author. It is too often the case that
children, parrot-like, read without properly understanding what they are reading about.
To read intelligently, the pupil must gather the thoughts presented in the selection read,
and in so doing is very likely to preserve them in his mind. Teachers should not fail to make
their pupils thoroughly understand the meaning of that which they read in their primers. If
pupils are thus early taught to have a clear understanding of what is intended to be conveyed
to their minds by each lesson, they will the more naturally apply this method as they advance
through the different readers. By giving special attention to this system of instruction, the
teacher can make the reading lesson not only attractive, but a most valuable exercise. It is
not to be expected that everyone can become an excellent reader, but it is true that, with
proper instruction, all may learn to read intelligently and become good readers, except in cases
of physical defects. Our teachers are, therefore, specially called upon to give more attention
to the teaching of this all-important subject.
Medals.
His Excellency the Governor-General has been pleased to donate a Silver Medal for competition in the High School of each of the cities of Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster,
and Nanaimo. His Excellency has also donated a Bronze Medal to be competed for by the
pupils of the Graded Schools in each of these cities. These medals will be awarded annually
on the result of the midsummer examinations held by the Education Department.
Doubtless the most interesting event to the teachers and pupils of Victoria City, thus far
during the present school-year, was the recent visit made to the schools by Their Excellencies,
Lord and Lacly Aberdeen.
For convenience, and to provide suitable accommodation for the occasion, the pupils were
assembled in the City Hall. After most impressive and eloquent addresses had been delivered
by Their Excellencies, the medals awarded for 1894 and 1895 were presented to the winners
by Lady Aberdeen, who warmly congratulated each recipient on the honour achieved.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. D. POPE,
Superintendent of Education. c. Public Schools Report. 1895
Zoology.
1. (a.) What is Zoology ?
(b.) Distinguish between an animal and a plant.
2. Give the characteristics of the four great groups into which animals are arranged.
3. (a.) Briefly describe a radiate.
(b.) Give the general anatomy of a salmon.
4. What are the leading differences and resemblances between a crab and a grasshopper i
State the class and order to which each belongs.
5. What are infusoria, tunicata, brachiopoda, and diptera ?
6. Classify the polyp, common oyster, leech, beetle, and frog.    Give reasons for answers.
Education.
1. (a.) What is education 1
(b.)  Show the value of attention in connection with education.
2. Point out the practical value of History.    Also of Grammar.
3. (a.) What is method ?    Upon what are its principles based ?
(b.)  Illustrate one of the principles of method.
4. To what extent would you employ written examinations 1    Why ?
5. (a.) What objects should be aimed at in school discipline 1
(b.)  Distinguish between instruction and drill.
6. (a.)  When does the school-year begin and end ?
(b.)  What holidays are granted by the Rules and Regulations ?
7. Under what circumstances is the teacher responsible for the progress of his pupils'
Drawing.
(Drawings must be large enough to show a firm, smooth line.)
1. What is symmetry 1    Symmetrical repetition on an axis 1    Radial symmetry ?    Illus
trate.
2. State five elementary principles of design.
3. Draw a pitcher, vase, or jar, illustrating the use of reversed curves.
4. Draw a design based on a conventionalized leaf.
5. Draw an example of symmetrical arrangement about the centre of a circle or quatrefoil.
6. (a.) Give directions for " Object Drawing."
(6.) Draw a cube, showing three faces. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. ei.
Music.
1. Name the three departments into which music is divided.
2. What is Syncopation ?
3. Is the value of a note relative or absolute?
4. What is meant by transposition by fifths?
5. What note is the relative minor of G ?
6. How would you determine whether a key is major or minor ?
7. (a.) In the transposition by sharps from A to E, what intermediate tone is introduced?
(b.) Answer the same in transposing from E to B.
8. What is the invariable rule in transposing from one key to another ?
Latin.
1. (a.) Decline os, bos, effigies.
(b.) Write the numeral adverbs from 1 to 10.
2. (a.) How are adjectives of the first and second declensions declined ?
(b.) Decline, in full, aliquis.
3. (a.) State the difference in the meaning of the conjunctions sed, autem, verum.
(b.)  Distinguish between the gerund and supine.    Give examples of each,
4. (a.) Give the pluperfect subjunctive, active, and passive, of tango.
(b.)  Aves quam possunt mollissime nidos substernunt, ut quam facillime ova serventur.
Translate and analyze.
*5.  Translate—
(a.)  Care is swifter than wind.
(b.)   You cannot be happy without virtue.
(c.)   There is no doubt that Csesar is able to make himself master of all Gaul.
(r/.) Ariovistus said that Csesar ought to come to him.
(e.)   Write in Latin the first sentence of the Lord's Prayer.
6.  Translate one of the following extracts :—
(a.) Quod improviso unum pagum adortus esset, cum ii, qui flumen transissent, suis
auxilium ferre non possent, ne ob earn rem aut sua; magno opere virtuti tribueret aut ipsos
despiceret: se ita a patribus majoribusque suis didicisse, ut magis virtute, quam dolo aut
insidiis, niterentur. Quare ne committeret, ut is locus, ubi constitissent, ex calamitate Populi
Bomani et internecione exercitus nomen caperet, aut memoriam proderet.
(b.) Quisquis es, haud, credo, invisus ccelestibus auras
Vitales carpis, Tyriam qui adveneris urbem.
Perge modo, atque hinc te regime ad limina perfer.
Namque tibi reduces socios, classemque relatam
Nuntio, et in tutum versis aquilonibus actam.
Ni frustra augurium vani docuere parentes.
Aspice bis senos lastantes agmine cycnos,
^Btheria quos lapsa plaga Jovis ales aperto
Turbabat ccelo ; nunc terras ordine longo
Aut capere, aut captas jam despectare videntur : cii. Public Schools Report. 1895
(c.)   Integer vita? scelerisque purus
Non eget Mauris jaculis, neque arcu.
Nee venenatis gravida sagittis,
Fusee, pharetra;
Sive per Syrtes iter sestuosas,
Sive facturus per inhospitalem
Caucasum, vel quse loca fabulosus
Lambit Hydaspes.
* This question must be attempted.
French.
1. (a.) How are adjectives compared?    Give three exceptions to the general rule.
(b.) Give the plural of cheval, bijou, and bal; the feminine of doux, quel, and facile.
2. [a.) Write the ordinal numbers from one to twenty.
(b.) Translate : It is twelve o'clock.    It is half-past three.    It is a  quarter  to nine.
It is twenty minutes past ten.    I had eighty pupils on the first of May.
3. {a.) Write out the present indicative of : Faire, etre, savoir, and dorniir.
(b.) Give the principal parts of: Aller, prendre, venir, and recevoir.
4. (a.) Distinguish between the use of dont and de qui ; qui and que.
(b.) What is a reflective verb?    Write out the present indicative of s'en aller.
*5.  Translate—
(a.) I was at your father's house yesterday.
(b.) The child has as many pears as apples.
(c.)  You speak of her and of her sister.
(d.) Why do you not lend it to them ?
(e.)  There is the man to whom I have lent my book.
6. Translate one of the following passages :—
(a.) Dans le cours de notre navigation, nous abordames a plusieurs lies, et nous y
vendimes ou echangeames nos marchandises. Un jour, le calme nous prit vis-a-vis une petite
lie. Le capitaine permit de prendre terre aux personnes qui vpulurent. Je fus du numbre
de ceux qui y debarquerent; mais dans le temps que nous nous divertissions a boire et a
manger, autour d'un bon feu que nous avions allume, Pile trembla tout a coup, et nous donna
une rude secousse.
(6.) La Livonie, la plus belle et la plus fertile province du nord, avait appartenu autrefois aux chevaliers de 1'ordre Teutonique : les Russes, les Polonais et les Suedois s'en etaient
dispute la possession. La Suede l'avait enlevee depuis pres de cent annees, et elle lui avait
ete cedee solennellement par la paix d'Oliva.
7. Parse five verbs of the extract selected.
* This question must be attempted.
Greek.
[Questions omitted from this Report for want of Greek type in Government Printing
Office.]
-:o:- 59 Vicf.
Public Schools Report.
cm
APPENDIX F.
TEACHERS' EXAMINATION, JULY, 1895.
Spelling.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Monday, July 8th; 2:SO p.m. to 3:30 p.m.     Toted marks, 100.
1. wristlet
2. mucilage
3. farina
4. Pharisee
5. thoracic
6. insatiable
7. accommodation
8. veterinary
9. obsequies
10. extempore
11. valetudinarian
12. irreconcilable
13. polyglot
14. pneumonia
15. logarithm
16. enamel
17. pharmaceutics
18. zoophyte
19. cotyledonous
20. bdellium
21. synchronous
22. hypothecator
23. sarcophagus
24. zither
25. Jews'-harp
26. dreadnaught
27. iniquitous
28. rhapsodical
29. blanc-mange
30. bilious
31. schottische
32. separation
33. incision
34. pharyngal
35. reconnoitre
36. oriflamme
37. surveillance
38. euphemism
39. kleptomaniac
40. iconoclast
41. sinister
42. Buddhist
43. cicely
44. cicerone
45. numismatics
46. phosphorus
47. quintain
48. ineffervescibility
49. challis
50. Doge
Writing.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Friday, July 5th; 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.    Total marks, 100.
1. (a.) In what respects does writing differ from other branches of Education?
(6.) Which do you consider the better system and style of writing, the vertical or the
slanting ?    Give reasons.
2. (a.) State the principal objections to the use of copy-books without engraved head-lines.
(b.) What means would you adopt to  make  the  writing lesson interesting as well as
profitable ? 3. (a.) On what lines would you organize writing classes in an ungraded school ?
(b.) Define the arm-rest and the hand-rest, and show their uses.
4. (a.) Discuss the advantages of counting.
(b.) What ought to be the governing principle in combining letters ?
5. Define the following terms : —
(a.) right curve, (c.)  base line,
(b.)  wave line, (d.) oval,
(«.) stem letters.
6. (a.) Show clearly what is the object of shading.
(b.) On which side should the shade be formed on the capital letters O and W ?
7. Analyze the following letters :—
(a.) K, S, L. (6.) c, r, t.
8. Write as a specimen of penmanship :—
" Rome lives but in. the tale of other times;
Her proud pavilions are the hermit's home,
And her long colonnades, her public walks,
Now faintly echo to the pilgrim's feet,
Who comes to muse in solitude, and trace,
Through the rank moss revealed, her honour'd dust.
But not to Rome alone has fate confined
The doom of ruin ; cities numberless,
Tyre, Sidon, Carthage, Babylon and Troy,
And rich Phoenicia— -they are blotted out."
Geography.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Thursday, July Ipth ; 1:30 p. m. to J/, p. m.     Total, marks, 200.
1. (a.) Describe the annual and diurnal motions of the earth, accounting for the changes
and the number of the seasons in each of the zones.
(b.) If the earth's axis were perpendicular to the plane of its orbit, what would follow?
2. (a.) Describe the following winds, locating and accounting for each:—'Trade winds,
periodical winds, cyclones, tornadoes, monsoons.
(b.) Define meridian, circle of illumination, equinoxes, zodiac, isothermal lines.
3. State through what countries the following rivers flow,  naming the  chief towns  and
settlements on each :—
(a.) Peace, (d.) Loire,
(b.) Euphrates, (e.)  Trent,
(c.)  Murray, (f) Vistula,
(g.) Douro.
4. (a.) Arrange the Governments of eight of the chief powers in the Eastern Hemisphere
under the following heads :—Republics, limited monarchies, absolute monarchies.
(b.) Name the capitals and population (approx.) of these countries.
5. Locate and define the following :—
(a.) Manilla, (e.)  Antananarivo,
(6.)  Pietermaritzburg, (f) Skidegate,
(c.)  Irrawady, (g.) Nancy,
(d.) Pilot Bay, (i.)  Chitral. 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxix.
Mental Arithmetic.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Monday, Jidy Sth; 1:30 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.     Total marks, 100.
1. To what must you add 2.4 to produce 5.2 ? Ans	
2 What  is  the  commission  on   selling  5,000  sheep, worth $2.50
each, @ 4 % ? Ans. $	
3. What is the difference in weight  between  a  ton of  hay and a
tun of wine, a gallon of wine weighing 8 lbs. ? Ans	
4. What is the cost of 9 oz. 19 dwt. 24 gr. of gold dust @ $16.372
per oz. ? Ans. $	
5. A debt after a reduction of 3 % becomes $194; what wrould it
have been after a reduction of 4 °/o ? Ans. $	
6. I sold a house for $3,410, by which I gained f of what it cost
me : find the cost. Ans. $	
7. A grocer bought  100 geese and turkeys for $65 ; for the geese
he paid 30 cents each, and for the turkeys 80 cents each :
find the number of each kind. Ans	
8. A person sold  two houses for $3,960 each, making 10 % on one
and   losing   10 %  on   the  other:    taking   both   sales   into
account, what was his gain or loss ?
Ans. $ gain.    Ans. $ loss.
9. Lead weighs 1 If times and platinum 21 times an equal bulk of
water : find the weight of a piece  of platinum equal to a
piece of lead weighing 190 lbs. Ans ,
10. Find, in dollars and cents, the cost in London, England, of a
piece of cotton containing 72 yards @ 5^d. a yard, the
shilling sterling being worth 24* cents. Ans. $	
Anatomy,  Physiology and Hygiene.    (For all  Classes and Grades )
Saturday, July 6th ; 1:30 p. m. to 3:30 p. m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) Describe the cerebrum, defining and locating the three membranes within which
the whole brain is enclosed.
(b.) Show that the brain reaches the highest state of development in man.
(c.)  What is its average weight in human beings?
2. (a.) Describe the diaphragm, and state its use in respiration.
(b.) Locate the hyoid bone, and give reason for its being so named.
(c.) State the process by means of which nature repairs bones that are broken.
3. (a.)  Classify the nerves, with regard to their functions.
(6.) State what is meant by reflex action, and give illustrations.
(c.)  What part of the nervous system controls the peristaltic action of the muscles of
the alimentary canal ? 59 Vict. Public Schools Report. cv.
6. (a.)  From   what   countries   do   we   obtain   the   following :—Tin,   nitre,   aluminium,
diamonds, furs, mahogany, amber, petroleum, opals, camphor.
(b.)  Name the chief imports of Great Britain, France, and Germany.
7. (a.) Describe the physical characteristics and climate of—
(1.) The North-West Territories ;
(2.) British Columbia.
(6.) Account for variations in climate in the same latitude in Canada.
8. Draw a map of Great Britain, or of the Eastern Provinces of Canada, marking—
(a.) The chief mountain and river systems ;
(b.) The most populous cities, with populations ;
9. Name the form of government and the religion predominant in each of the following-
countries :—Russia,  Scotland,  Bavaria, Bulgaria, Persia, Japan, Siam, Abyssinia,
Venezuela, Afghanistan.
10.  Through what waters would you pass,  and  at what ports would you call, in a voyage
from Odessa to Vancouver via Port Said 1
English History.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Wednesday, July 3rd; 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) Who were the original inhabitants of the British Isles ?
(6.) Of what races does the population now consist ?
2. Give some account of—
(a.) King Arthur, (b.) Columba.
3. Describe the condition of Ireland during the Anglo-Saxon period.
4. Name, in order, the favourites of Edward II., and describe the fate of each.
5. What events gave Henry V. the ascendancy in Scotland and France.
6. Describe the successive steps of the rise and fall of Wolsey.
7. (a.) For what was the foreign policy of Cromwell remarkable ?
(&.) Name the chief successes of the English arms abroad at this period.
8. (a.) What was the origin of the National Debt ?
(b.)  What was its amount  (1) after  the  Seven Years'  W"ar,  (2)  after the American
War, (3) after the Peninsular War, and (4) at the present time ?
9. What causes led to the Peninsular War ?    Name, with dates, the chief battles of this
war.
10. Give historical reference of—
(a.) Sininel, (e.)   Strongbow, (h.) Flora Macdonald,
(b.) Frobisher, (/) The Bridal of Norwich, (*.)   Blondel,
(c.)  Claverhouse,     (</.) "The King's Quhair,"   (j.) Thistlewood.
(d.) Walcheren, cvi.
Public Schools Report. 1895
Canadian History.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Saturday, July 6th ; 9 a. m. to 11 a. m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) Of what is the Dominion of Canada composed?
(b.) Name some of the Monarchs of England, France and Spain  who took  an active
interest in the affairs of the "New World" prior to 1763.
2. Write short notes on Champlain,  Count de Frontenac,  Montcalm, Wolfe,  Hon. John
Molson, Mrs. Secord, Tecumseh, and U. E. Loyalists.
3. Explain Feudal Tenure, Seignorial Tenure, Alien Bill, Company of Merchants, Clergy
Reserves, Crown Lands, Municipal System, and Rebellion Losses Bill.
4. Connected  with  what   events   were   the   following   treaties:—St.   Germain-en-Laye,
Ryswick,   Utrecht,   Aix-La-Chapelle,   Paris,   Versailles,   British  North   America
Act, and Ashburton Treaty ?
5. Sketch the war of  1812.
6. (a.) Name and give location of Canada's chief canals.
(b.) Mention the railway systems of Canada, showing their main courses.
7. (a.) Who have held the office of Governor-General of Canada since Confederation?
(/;.) Name the last four Lieutenant-Governors of British Columbia.
(c.) Who were the last four Premiers of British Columbia?
8. Explain what is meant by the Parliamentary System, including the functions of the
Governor-General,  House of Commons,  Cabinet,  Senate,  and Provincial Government.
9. Outline the Educational System of Canada, as fairly illustrated in British Columbia,
Ontaria, or Nova Scotia.
10.  (a.) Contrast the policies of Sir John Macdonald and Hon. Alexander Mackenzie.
(/>.) What is meant by the National Policy?
English Grammar.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Wednesday, July 3rd; 1:30 p. rn. to 4 p- m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) Classify the letters, diphthongs, and consonants.
(b.) Explain the force of the following terminations : ship, let, rie, ling, dom, most.
2. (a.) Account for the peculiarities in the following expressions :—lord's-day and lady-
day, Thurs-day and Fri-day, Wedn-esday and Mon-day, and for the possessive
Witenagemot.
(b.) Define the reflexive, cognate and factitive objects.    Give examples.
3. (a.) Classify abstract nouns, giving an example in each class.
(6.) What is an ethical dative ?    Give an example.
4. (a.) Explain the terms cardinal, ordinal, and indefinite numerals,  and  give examples
of each.
(b.) Give the derivations oifive, thirteen, twenty, score, second.
5. («.) Explain how an adjective both limits and enlarges the sense of a noun.
(b.) Give three uses of the relative pronoun, illustrating each. >9 Vict. Public Schools Report. cvii.
6. (a.) "Every transitive verb is an incomplete verb."     Explain and   illustrate  this
statement.
(b.) State the uses of the infinitive, giving examples in each case.
7. Correct or justify the following :—
(a.) He has fell in to the ditch.
(6.) I found him better than I expected to have found him.
(c.)  Each day and each hour bring their portion of duty.
(d.) They from my boyhood, have I known,
(e.)  The family with whom I boarded has gone away.
8. Name the languages from which the following are severally derived :—Algebra, cherub,
pyjama, beck, royal, ugly, crock, rule, bishop, clan.
9. Give detailed analysis of the first four lines of the following extract:—
Come, let us go, while we are in our prime,
And take the harmless folly of the time.
We shall grow old apace and die
Before we know our liberty.
Our life is short, and our days run
As fast away as does the sun,
And as a vapour, or a drop of rain
Once lost, can ne'er be found again,
So when or you or I are made
A fable, song, or fleeting shade,
All love, all liking, all delight
Lies drowned with us in endless night.
Then while tim