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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE RESPECTING THE POLICE, PRISONS, AND REFORMATORIES OF BRITISH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1898

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 ANNUAL   REPORT
OF  THE
SUPERINTENDENT  OF  POLICE
RESPECTING   THE
POLICE, PRISONS AND REFORMATORIES
OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
YEAR ENDING 31st OCTOBER, 1897.
-SJ0#
THEGOVERNMENTOF
THE PRDVJNCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1898.  61 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 667
REPORT.
Provincial Police Department,
Superintendent's Office,
Victoria, B. C, February 25th, 1898.
To The Honourable
The Attorney-General, Victoria.
Sir,—I have  the honour to hand you  herewith my Annual  Report upon  the Police,
Prisons and Reformatories for the year ending 31st October, 1897.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient Servant,
F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent.  61 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 669
REPORT.
Since the presentation of my last Annual Report, many changes have taken place. The
Province has progressed by leaps and bounds into a position of great prominence, owing to the
development of its vast mineral resources, and the recent rich discoveries of gold in the
Omineca, Cassiar, and Yukon Districts. The latter district has attracted the greatest attention, and thousands of persons from all parts of the world have come and are coming to our
coast on their way to the various mining camps.
It is gratifying to note that, notwithstanding this enormous addition to the floating-
population, including as it does a large percentage of an undesirable class, there has been but
a very small increase of crime during the past twelve months, and no increase in the number
of serious offences. During the year ending October 31st, 1896, one thousand eight hundred
and forty-nine persons were convicted and sentenced to imprisonment in the common gaols
and lock-ups of the Province, while for the same period ending October 31st, 1897, one
thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight were convicted, showing an increase of thirty-nine
convictions. This increase consists almost entirely of offences against the bylaws of the
various cities, as will be seen by referring to the table contained in this Report.
Owing to the tremendous influx, which is increasing daily, of miners, prospectors, and
others into the Cassiar District, and the construction of railroads through that portion of the
Province, it will be necessary to materially increase the police force. To provide for this
increase, and also for any emergencies which may arise, and in order that isolated districts
may be afforded proper and adequate police protection, I would respectfully urge that an
appropriation of $80,000.00 be made for the salaries of police constables for the year ending
June 30th, 1899.
The Force.
The force now consists of the Superintendent, one Sergeant, and ninety-eight constables,
besides a number of special police who are employed in various parts of the Province from
time to time as they may be required, The conduct of the men during the past year has, with
a few exceptions, been very creditable. No fines for any infraction of the Regulations have
been imposed. One investigation has been held, resulting in the resignation of the officer
against whom the complaint was made.
During the past summer, in August last, a detachment of Provincial constables was sent
to Tagish Lake, in the North-West Territories, to assist in establishing a Dominion Customs
House at that point, and to protect the Customs officers in the discharge of their duties of
collecting revenue on dutiable goods going into the North-West Territories, until the arrival
of the North-West Mounted Police, who would relieve them. I am pleased to be able to state
that, notwithstanding the threats of many, especially of those from the United States, that
they would forcibly resist any attempt to collect duties, the police, without causing any friction
between themselves and the owners of such goods, were mainly instrumental in collecting for
the Dominion Government revenues to the amount of about $25,000.00. The Sub-Collector of
Customs at Tagish Lake, Mr. John Godson, expressed in the highest terms his appreciation of
the services and conduct of the men while under his control. This in itself is worthy of note,
as shewing the respect in which the police of this Province are held.
It has already been found necessary to establish police posts in the northern part of the
Province, and the number of posts will doubtless have to be largely augmented in the near
future.
Two officers have been stationed at Lake Bennett under the supervision of Captain W. J.
Rant, who has recently been appointed Gold Commissioner and Stipendiary Magistrate for
that District.
This is an important post, and will require additional assistance, owing to its close
proximity to the lawless element now congregated in the towns of Skagway and Dyea, in the
disputed territory, and to the strict surveillance which will have to be exercised over the
movements of this class during the coming summer. 670 Police and Prisons Report. 1897
Six officers, in charge of Mr. W. H. Bullock-Webster, formerly Chief Constable of the
New Westminster District, have been placed on the Stickine River—two at Glenora, two at
Telegraph Creek, and two at Teslin Lake.
This number will likewise have to be increased, as it is absolutely necessary that police
posts be maintained at regular intervals of not more than fifty miles over this, which will in
all probability be the most travelled, route to the Yukon gold-fields.
In consequence of the high wages paid in this northern part of the Province, and the
difficulty in obtaining supplies, the salaries of these officers are higher than in other Districts, viz.,
$100.00 per month.    This accounts for the large increase required for the payment of salaries.
A mounted constable, at a salary of $100.00 per month, has been appointed for the
Chilcotin District, with his headquarters at or near Alexis Creek, in the County of Cariboo.
This appointment was made at the request of numerous residents of that District, who have
complained for some time past of the lawlessness of Indians, culminating recently in a murder
committed in the vicinity of Tatla Lake. It is thought that the presence of an energetic
officer, who will establish a regular patrol throughout the District, will very soon have the
effect of reducing the Indians to a more law-abiding condition.
At Stewart Lake, on the trail from Quesnelle to Omineca, a police post will probably
have to be established, as the Indians in the neighbourhood have been causing considerable
trouble. In a recent case of aggravated assault of a very serious character, committed by a
half breed, the Government was put to considerable expense in bringing the offender to justice,
owing to the absence of a resident constable in the locality.
In the Kootenay District, consequent upon the increasing development of its mineral
resources and the construction of railroads, additional police have been appointed and a
thoroukh patrol system is now being carried on. This patrol extends throughout the southern
portions of the Yale and East and West Kootenay Districts.
The Gaols.
In the past twelve months there have been built two new gaols, as recommended in my
last report.
At Kamloops a building capable of accommodating eighty-six prisoners, with officers'
quarters attached, has been erected to take the place of the old gaol, which was quite inadequate
for the growing requirements of the Yale-Cariboo District. The old gaol has been handed
over to the city authorities for municipal purposes.
At Nelson a new gaol has been established, built from the same plans as the new gaol at
Kamloops. This gaol supplies a long-felt want, as prisoners from all parts of the Kootenay
Districts were formerly taken to Kamloops, and in many cases during the past two years, on
account of the overcrowded state of that gaol, had to be transferred to the Provincial Gaol at
New Westminster, at a great expense to the Government. The staffs of these gaols will be
found in the reports of the Provincial gaols embodied with this report.
It has been suggested, and I would respectfully urge that the matter be favourably considered, that the officials in the Provincial gaols be supplied with uniforms. It would be
advantageous in many ways, chiefly in making the officers more conspicuous while in charge
of prisoners. It is also a well-known fact that a uniformed staff is much more respected by
the usual class of criminals.
The cost of these uniforms, including cap and buttons, would be about $55.00 per man
for two suits per year. There are at present five gaols in establishment, whose officers are
about thirty-six in number, making the yearly cost of this step about $1,980.00.
Juvenile Reformatory, Victoria.
The increase of crime amongst juvenile offenders has necessitated the re-opening of this
Institution.
In the coast cities especially it became apparent that a check must be put upon a certain
class of boys who prowl around the streets by day and night, disturbing and annoying passers-
by and wilfully and maliciously destroying property, and thus eventually becoming involved
in more serious crimes. I feel compelled to remark that this lamentable state of affairs has,
in many cases, been brought about by the laxity of parents or guardians, who, in allowing
their children to thus frequent the streets and drift into criminal courses, are themselves, in a
great measure, guilty of crime, and are equally in need of punishment. 61 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 671
On the 16th of December last the Reformatory was re-opened under the supervision of
Mr. R. E. Hanson, Acting Superintendent, whose report is annexed. Twelve boys, whose
sentences vary from one to twelve months, have been received in the Institution. Their time
is fully occupied in various ways, and the discipline well maintained.
I would respectfully suggest that the regulation now in force in the Provincial Gaols, as
to the remission of five days in each month of a prisoner's sentence for good conduct, be extended to the Reformatory. This would be an incentive to good behaviour and, in the hands
of the Superintendent, would be of great assistance in maintaining discipline.
"Juvenile Reformatory, Victoria, Feb. 19th, 1898.
"Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report upon this Institution, covering the
period from the 16th December last, the date upon which it was re-opened, up to this date. I
have annexed to this report a schedule, from which it will be seen that during the period
mentioned twelve boys have been received at this Reformatory, with sentences varying from
one to twelve months, and that six of these have been discharged on the dates mentioned, their
sentences having expired. It will further be seen that, at the present time, there are still six
boys in my charge, whose sentences will expire on the dates given. The rules and regulations
of the Reformatory may be considered to be based on those in force in the adjoining Provincial
Gaol, but modified to suit the dissimilar conditions, such as the youthfulness and unformed
moral characters of the prisoners. My efforts have been directed towards exercising a sound
moral influence over the boys, as well as to the profitable employment of their time in the elementary school studies. Due regard has also been paid to the necessity of daily exercise and
recreation in the open air.
" A reference to the Conduct Book shows that the general behaviour in the Reformatory
has been satisfactory, and that the hours devoted to study have been spent with the exercise
of attention and care. The marked interest taken in the arithmetic class, and the progress
made, demonstrates that the boys are possessed of no mean abilities. The improvement in
spelling, writing and dictation has also been very gratifying.
" Parents or guardians are permitted to visit the Reformatory each Sunday between the
hours of 1:30 and 4 o'clock p.m., and this privilege has been fully taken advantage of by the
parents of boys locally committed.
" It has been deemed advisable to debar any of the former ' chums' or companions of the
boys undergoing sentences access to the Reformatory, and a notice outside the door of the
Institution states that only parents or guardians will be admitted, the intention being to shield
the inmates from harmful influences, and, whilst they are confined with a view to their reformation, to encourage visits only of those who take an interest in their moral welfare.
" Some of the boys have been insufficiently supplied with clothing, especially underwear,
and it has been necessary to provide extra garments so as to ensure a weekly change of underclothing for each boy, who has also his regular weekly hot bath.
" Divine service on Sundays is attended by the boys, services being conducted in the
adjoining Gaol Chapel on alternate Sunday mornings by the Church of England and the Salvation Army.
" Rules and regulations have been drawn up for the guidance of each inmate of the Reformatory, and the first task set each prisoner on his arrival is the learning of these rules, so that
thereafter he cannot plead ignorance.
" The Conduct Book, in which marks are entered against each boy's name every day, and
the hope of obtaining some diminution of sentence as a reward for exemplary conduct, act as
powerful deterrents to insubordination, and the punishment of confinement to cells, or the
harsher measure of confinement to dark cells in the gaol building have only twice had to be
resorted to.
" I am of the opinion that the system now in vogue in the Provincial Gaols of allowing five
days in each month to be deducted from sentences, where good conduct justifies such allowance, could be advantageously applied to the Reformatory, and would be an incentive to
general good behaviour.
" I therefore respectfully beg to submit this suggestion for your consideration.
" I have, etc.,
" Reg. E. Hanson,
" F. S. Hussey, Esq., Supt. of Provincial Police " Acting Superintendent.
" and Warden of Gaols, Victoria, B. C." 672
Police and Prisons Report.
1897
Statement   Shewing   the   Offences   for  which   Juveniles   were   Committed   to   the
Reformatory, and Sentence Awarded.
No.
Age.
District.
Offence.
Sentence.
1
15 years
Nanaimo
Burglary
12 months
2
17      M
Victoria
Possession of stolen property
1
3
15     „
n
ii
1
i
4
16     „
ii
Burglary
2
,
5
16     „
ii
Burglary
2
,
6
13         ,1
ii
Burglary
1
/
7
11    II
„
Burglary
1
,
8
13     „
ii
Stealing
6
,
9
15     „
it
Stealing
6
,
10
14     „
"V anoouver
Attempted theft
3
i
11
14     „
,,
Stealing
3
,
12
10     „
■ I
Stealing
3
■
" Provincial Police Office,
"Nanaimo, B. C, 1st November, 1897.
" Sir,—I have the honour to report on the state of the Provincial Police of the North and
South Nanaimo Districts for the year ending October 31st, 1897.
" I am pleased to be able to report that the past year has been free from any serious crime
throughout the District.
"The following changes have taken place on the force: —
" On the 24th April, Constable D. McKinnon of Wellington resigned, and Mr. Charles W.
Young was appointed to the position; on the 27th July, Constable A. W. McLeod resigned his
position, which is being temporarily filled by Constable M. H. Mclndoo.
" The officers throughout the district appear to be alive to their duties, and no complaints
have been made against any of them during the year.
" I have, etc.,
"W. Stewart, Chief Constable."
List of Constables to whom   Leave   of   Absence   was   Granted   during the year
ending October 31st, 1897.
Burns, L. G	
Batchelor, 0. S	
Do.
Cox, D. G	
Colbick, G. A	
Drummond, A. D
Do.
Drake, S	
Fauquier, F. G	
Gillie, J. D	
Hunter, Hugh	
Hutchison, J. W . ..
Hooson, J. E	
Lister, R. B	
Langley, J. M	
Lowe, ft. R	
Maitland-Dougall, J
Marquette, J. B	
Mclndoo, M. H	
Seeley, J. H	
Do	
Stewart, W	
Scharschmidt, P. F.
Stephenson, D	
Vickers, W. H	
Name.
Duration.
10 days..
7   i,    ...
14    „
3    tt    ...
6 weeks..
2 days..
6 i,    ...
3 ii     ..
3 i,    ...
14    „    ...
7 „    ..
4 ,,    ...
4    ,,
6    i,    ...
14    „    ..
14    ,,    ...
14    „     . .
14    ,,
6 months
10 days.
10    „
3    „     ...
12    „    ..
1 month
6 days..
Date of Application.
October
July
June
October
February
a
September
February
March
October
September
April
February
September
July
June
September
July
April
January
July
June
April
February
April
29th, 1897.
29th,
11th,
18th,
24th,
8th,
19th,
12th,
10th,
28th,
4th,
1st,
24th,
29th,
13th,
16th,
11th,
5th,
8th,
3rd,
1st,
10th,
22nd,
26th,
5th, 61 Vict.
Police and Prisons Report.
673
LIST OF PROVINCIAL CONSTABLES,  WITH STATIONS.
Name.
Hussey, Fred'k S .
Langley, John M..
Cox, C, A	
Seeley, James	
Spain, F. S	
Bullock-Webster, W. H
McKenna, J. J	
Little, Clifford	
McLean, Malcolm	
Greaves, H. B	
Cameron, Colin	
Jackson, S. H   	
Druminond, A. D	
Morten, H. D	
Jones, H. F. M	
Flewin, John	
Kirby, James	
Anderson, D. II 	
Bain, Jas. G	
Pyper, Robert 	
Stage Guard	
Hance, O. T	
McKen, James	
Rose, Fred	
Stephenson, Wm	
Maitland-Dougall, Jas..
(Special Acting-)	
Shaw, E. W	
Campbell, D	
Barnes, H. W  	
Edwards, C. M	
Lang, F. C	
Cox, D. G	
Sterritt, Jas. S 	
Redgrave, Stephen
Mountain, F. A. R.
Devitt, Wm. J  	
Fauquier, F. G	
Sibbald, John D	
Paxton, W. G 	
Shaw, John 	
Hooson, J. E	
Kirkup, John	
(Special Acting)	
Sproat, Alexander	
MacRae, Alex	
Page, Wm. R	
Jarvis, Colborne D	
Christie, H. P	
Forrester, Wm. C	
Smith, Jas. W	
Ince, Robert	
Forbes, L. R	
Burns, L. G    	
Mitchell, George 	
Stewart, William	
Anderson, W. B	
Belyea, John	
Kirkham, Wm	
Stewart, Vernon W	
Cassidy, George	
Drake, Samuel	
Baird, John	
Thomson, John	
Young, C. W	
Mclndoo, M. H	
Stephenson, David	
Woollacott, Phil	
Lister, R. B	
Marquette, J. B	
(Special Acting)	
Campbell, C. S	
Residence.
Victoria
Alberni...,
Kyuquot ..
Clayoquot.
Glenora .   ...
Lake Bennett.
Telegraph Creek .
Teslin Lake	
Echo Cove	
Fort Simpson.
Port Essington
Quesnellemouth .
Quesnelle 	
Alexis Creek	
Ashcroft	
Chilcotin	
Barkerville	
150-Mile Post
Quesnelle Forks ,
Duncans	
Chemainus ...
Thetis Island .
Esquimalt..
Fort Steele .
Golden	
Donald	
Nelson	
Trail	
Nakusp	
Revelstoke .
Rossland .
Three Forks.
New Denver.
Revelstoke ..
Trout Lake..
Goat River ..
Slocan City..
Ymir	
Ainsworth...
Nelson	
Silverton ..   .
Lillooet ..
Clinton.  .
Nanaimo .
Union
Nanoose..
Nanaimo .
Oyster Harbour.
Nanaimo	
Union	
Wellington .
Northfield..
Wellington .
Alert Bay ..
New Westminster
Mission City  	
Thurlow Island ...
Vancouver 	
Alberni
Cariboo .
Esquimalt	
East Kootenay.
West Kootenay .
New Westminster
Monthly
Salary.
tfl50 00
102 00
60 00
60 00
60 00
130 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
65 00
95 00
60 00
73 00
73 00
100 00
116 00
50 00
85 00
50 00
120 00
68 00
60 00
60 00
60 00
68 00
95 00
85 50
68 00
85 50
40 00
90 00
68 00
73 00
102 00
75 00
20 00
73 00
102 00
73 00
100 00
60 00
60 00
65 00
S5 00
65 00
65 00
65 00
65 00
65 00
60 00
95 00
95 00
30 00
60 00
58 50
30 00
76 00
60 00
60 00
60 00
60 00
76 00
76 00
90 00
68 00
60 00
68 00
Superintendent.
Sergeant.
Constable.
Stipendiary Magistrate and Chief Constable,
Constable. [Cassiar District.
Constable.
n
Mounted Constable.
Special (5 months).
Constable.
Collector and Constable.
Constable.
Government Agent and Constable.
Chief Constable.
Constable.
Constable.
Chief Constable and Recorder.
Constable.
Collector, Constable, and Recorder.
Gaoler.
Chief Constable, West Kootenay.
Constable.
K and Recorder.
Government Agent and Constable.
Recorder and Constable.
Nightwatchman (additional to citizens' allow-
Constable. [ance.)
Chief Constable and Recorder.
Constable.
ii and Recorder.
Constable.
Recorder and Constable.
Constable.
Convict Guard and Constable,
Constable.
Constable.
Chief Constable and Gaoler.
Assessor, Collector, and Constable.
Special Constable.
2nd Gaoler and Constable.
3rd      „ „
Special Constable.
Assistant Gaoler and Constable.
Constable.
Acting Chief Constable.
Constable.
i, and Collector. 674
Police and Prisons Report.
1897
List op Provincial Constables, with Stations.—Concluded.
No.
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
(Special Acting) .
Ego, A. M   	
Heal, F. G	
Atkins, W. R.
Murray, Frank ..
(Special Acting) ,
Poole, Walter	
Prout, William ..
Dinsmore, J. A ..
Vickers, John ...
Beattie, Martin ..
McLaren, James .
McLean, Hugh ..
Norfolk, W. J ...
Gancellor, H	
Deans, R. W 	
Gillie, J. D	
Gardom, Reg	
Hunter, Hugh..
Lowe, R. R	
Sutherland, D ...
Simmons, E. C . .
Elkins, Fred	
Burr, Jos. W ....
I Dodd, Wm	
I McMvnn, W. G . .
I Tunstall, J. C
Lawder, A. H , ..
Residence.
Plumper Pass .
Sydney 	
Lake District ..
Victoria   	
I*        	
Metchosin	
Victoria 	
Grand Forks.  .
Kamloops	
ii 	
North Bend	
Osoyoos	
Nicola Lake
Midway	
Granite Creek ..
Kelowna	
Lytton	
Vernon	
Fairview	
Ashcroft	
Yale	
Midway	
Vernon	
Greenwood City
Victoria .
Monthly
Salary.
Remarks.
60 00
Constable.
58 50
„
58 50
,,
60 00
Clerk and Constable.
60 00
2nd Constable.
60 00
3rd         ii
60 00
Constable.
58 50
Nightwatchman, Government Buildings.
65 00
Constable.
100 00
Gaol Warden.
95 00
Assessor, Collector, and Constable.
70 00
Gonvict Guard and Constable.
70 00
Gaoler and Constable.
70 00
ii                      ii
60 00
Constable.
65 00
,,
60 00
,,
60 00
„
90 00
Collector and Constable.
60 00
Constable.
60 00
n
60 00
63 50
n
85 00
Collector and Constable.
102 00
Government Agent and Constable.
100 00
Assessor, Collector, and Constable.
85 50
,,              ,,                         ,,
60 00
Constable.
New Lock-ups Required.
Cowichan District.
Duncans.
The present look-up at this post has been found too small to meet the increasing demands
of the district. Two additional cells are needed, and in order to erect these in a suitable place
adjoining the existing building, the purchase of a small piece of land next to the gaol is
necessary. The ground referred to can be purchased for $40. A total sum of $250 will suffice
for the purchase of the land and the construction of extra cells.
Cassiar District.
Glenora.
A lock-up at this point, consisting of four cells, a police office, and three bedrooms
for the use of constables and gaoler, is needed here. If the Government Agent of the district
is to be stationed at Glenora, a better building will, of course, be required.
Telegraph Creek.
I am informed that a small lock-up was constructed at this point about seven years ago,
and is in good order. The accommodation, however, will be insufficient to meet the requirements of the coming season. I would therefore suggest that a sum of $250 be granted for the
purpose of securing additional accommodation for constables and prisoners.
Lake Bennett.
Captain Rant, recently appointed a Gold Commissioner and Stipendiary Magistrate, and
two Provincial constables left Victoria on the 25th of January for this post. As it was necessary that they should have quarters provided as quickly as possible, on account of the severity
of the climate at this season, Mr. Michael King, who owns and operates a saw-mill at Lake
Bennett, was instructed to erect a suitable log building and send the account to the Government.    The expense of this building will be, 1 am informed, under I 61 Vict.
Police and Prisons Report
675
Teslin Lake.
A lock-up containing four cells, a police office, and three bedrooms, will be required b\
the
police.     I  have  been
informed  that  the  Government
intends
to establish
a Mining Record
Office at this point.
Omineca.
A lock-up, consisting of say three cells and a police
office,
is  likely to
be needed here in
the near future, and
I think should be constructed in
the vicinity of Tom Creek,  where
the
Mining Recorder, Mr
. Wells, is stationed.
Cariboo District
Chilcotin.
A small lock-up,
consisting of say two or three cells
, and a
police office
and kitchen,
will
be required in the nei
ghbourhood of Alexis Creek.    A
log building would
probably  be
the
most suitable to erect
in this district.
West Kootenay.
Revelstoke.
The present lock-
up at Revelstoke  consists of four
small
and  badly  ventilated cells, a
kitchen and police room.    The present cells should be enlarged
and  properly  ventilated.
A
sum of $200 will suffice to do what is necessary to provide adequate lock-up accommodation at
this point.
Goat River.
A small lock-up will most probably be needed at Goat River. The Government are at
present renting premises for the local constable stationed there. I would suggest that a sum
of say $500 be placed on the estimates for a lock up. The amount need not be expended unless
it is found that a permanent building is likely to be required at this post.
Ymir.
This is a mining town, situated about eighteen miles from Nelson, on the Nelson and
Fort Sheppard Railway. Population, about 400. A constable is stationed at this point, and
a small lock-up, consisting of about three cells and a police office or guard-room, is required. A
suitable building may be erected at Ymir for about $600. The Government is at present paying rent for a very inferior class of building.
Yale District.
Fairview.
A lock-up will be needed at this town, which is the centre of a prosperous mining district.
The local Government Agent, Mr. Norris, informs me that he has written to the Department
of Lands and Works regarding the advisability of erecting at Fairview a Mining Record Office
and lock-up, to cost about $2,500. I quite agree with Mr. Norris in this respect, and think
that the Record Office should be removed from Osoyoos to Fairview. The office and lock-up at
Osoyoos, where the Gold Commissioner, Mr. Lambly, resides, is an old building, and is altogether too small for present requirements
Penticton.
This is a stopping-place for constables with prisoners en route to Kamloops gaol from the
southern part of the district. Officers are usually detained at this place over night, and have
no safe place to keep their prisoners. In addition to this, a lock-up is often needed to meet
the local demands of Penticton, which is the terminus of navigation on Lake Okanagan. Mr.
Norris is of the opinion that a building containing two cells and a guard-room can be built for
$400.    I would recommend that this sum be provided for in the Estimates. ' 676 Police and Prisons Report. 1897
Rules and Regulations.
The following rules for prison discipline are in force throughout the Province, and have
been found sufficient for the order and good conduct of prisons and lock-ups:—
Rules and   Regulations  for  the  government  of  Provincial Gaols and  Lock-ups in
the Province of British Columbia.
1. The Warden shall have full charge at all times of the Gaol and prisoners, and he shall
be responsible for the custody and general care of the prisoners, and for the state and condition
of every part of the Gaol and its surroundings, and for the general administration of its affairs.
2. The Warden shall conform to the Rules and Regulations himself, and shall see that
they are strictly  observed by the prisoners and  by the officers employed in or about the Gaol.
3. The Assistant Gaolers and Guards, while inside the Gaol, shall be under the orders
of the Warden, or, in the event of his absence, of the officer in charge of the Gaol at the time.
And when the chain-gang is on the outside of the Gaol, the Senior Guard shall have control
of the Guards and prisoners.
4. Where there is no Warden, these Rules and Regulations shall apply to the officer in
charge of the Gaol or lock-up, excepting as to punishment.
5. Upon the admission of a prisoner to the Gaol, he must be thoroughly searched in the
presence of a constable, and a list of all articles found on him entered into the Prisoner's
Effects Book, and all prisoners must be searched every evening before being locked up in their
cells, and the cells and beds must also be searched.
6. No visitors shall be allowed in the Gaol, or to speak to prisoners at any time, except
by permission of the officer in charge, and a gaol official must be present at all interviews,
unless otherwise ordered.
7. The cells in use must be scrubbed and whitewashed every week, and the cell buckets
every day, and all other parts of the Gaol must at all times be kept in a perfectly clean
condition. Prisoners shall have clean underclothing and a bath whenever required, and not
less than once a week. All male prisoners while undergoing sentence shall have their hair
cut as close as may be necessary for the purposes of health and cleanliness.
8. The Gaoler may allow such prisoners as he thinks fit to be out in the goal-yard an
hour and a-half in the morning and the same time in the afternoon. On Sundays and holidays
all prisoners, except those in solitary confinement, are to be allowed this privilege. Prisoners
shall not be allowed to promenade in the Gaol corridors without permission, and then only on
condition that strict silence be observed.
9. The Warden, or, if there be no Warden, the officer in charge of any prisoner, other
than a debtor, may place such irons on the prisoner as he may deem necessary for the prevention of escape. And the Senior Guard may refuse to allow any prisoner to go out in the
chain-gang unless he is ironed to his satisfaction. Prisoners' irons must be carefully examined
daily ; those of the chain-gang on leaving for work by the Senior Guard, and on return by the
officer in charge of the Gaol at the time.
10. Any person who, in any way, interferes with the discipline of the Gaol shall be excluded from the Gaol as a visitor.
11. The prisoners shall rise at 6:30 a.m., from April 1st to September 30th, and at 7
o'clock a. m. from October 1st to March 31st, and will be allowed half an hour to wash and
dress themselves. In Victoria, New Westminster and Nanaimo Gaols, a Guard must be on
the balcony before the cells are opened. The prisoners shall leave the Gaol for work at 7:30
a. m. in the summer-time, returning at 5:30 p. m., and in the winter-time at 8 o'clock a. m.,
returning before dark.    One hour shall be allowed at noon for dinner.
12. Strict silence must be observed in the cells, and in all parts of the Gaol. No conversation between prisoners is allowed, except by special permission of the officer under whose
charge they are. Prisoners shall not be permitted to visit from one cell to another. No
marking or scratching the walls nor spitting upon the floor shall be allowed, and no lights
shall be allowed in any of the cells.
13. All prisoners before leaving their cells must fold their bedding, and leave the same
in a tidy condition. Prisoners attending service in the Gaol chapel shall do so in an orderly
manner. Spitting on the floor, shuffling the feet, or any unnecessary noise is strictly
forbidden. 61 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 677
14. Under no condition whatever are prisoners to use oakum, rags, or other material
liable to choke closet or drain pipes; nothing but paper regularly supplied will be allowed.
15. Prisoners not under sentence must in no way interfere with, or otherwise attract the
attention of prisoners under sentence from their work within the Goal.
16. All prisoners must obey the orders of any of the Gaol officers; those in the chain-
gang, while outside the Gaol, must obey the orders of any of the guards.
17. Every prisoner will find it to his interest at all times to conform to the Rules and
Regulations, and to carefully read them over; but if a prisoner is unable to read, they must
be read over or explained by an officer to him, on application at a reasonable time.
18. No punishments or deprivations shall be awarded to any prisoner except by the
Superintendent of Provincial Police, or in his absence by the Warden of the Gaol, or by a
Justice of the Peace, who shall have power to order deprivations for the following offences,
viz. :—
(1.) Disobedience of any of the Rules and Regulations of the Gaol:
(2.) Common assault on one prisoner by another :
(3.) Cursing or using profane language :
(4.) Indecent behaviour or language towards another prisoner or any officer of the Gaol,
or towards a visitor :
(5.) Idleness or negligence at work on the part of a prisoner sentenced to hard labour :
(6.) Refusing or neglect to keep himself or his cell in order:
(7.) Wilfully destroying or defacing the Gaol property :
(8.) Insubordination of any sort.
19. The punishment to be inflicted upon prisoners for any of the foregoing offences shall
not be other than the following :—
(1.) Solitary confinement in dark cells, with or without bedding, not to exceed six days
for any one offence, nor three days at any one time :
(2.) Bread and water diet, full or half rations, combined or not with number one :
(3.) Cold water punishment, with the approval of the visiting physician.
20. The gaoler or officer in charge of the Gaol shall have authority summarily to confine
any prisoner for misconduct in a solitary cell, or to place irons upon his hands and feet should
he find it necessary, such restraint not to extend over a longer period than is necessary to
bring the matter before the Superintendent of Provincial Police or the Warden of the Gaol,
or, in the event of their absence, before any Justice of the Peace.
21. There shall be kept at the Victoria Gaol, and at New Westminster, Nanaimo, and
Kamloops Gaols, a conduct book, in which shall be kept a daily record of the conduct and
industry of every convicted prisoner confined therein, with the view to determining the amount
of remission of sentence to which such convicted prisoner may be entitled for good conduct at
the end of every month.
22. Every convicted prisoner sentenced to any of the above-named gaols may earn a
remission of a portion of the time for which he is sentenced to be confined, viz. : five days for
every month during which he is exemplary in behaviour, industry, and faithfulness, and does
not violate any of the prison rules.
23. Every such prisoner who commits any breach of the above Regulations shall, besides
any other penalty to which he is liable, be liable to forfeit the whole or any part of any
remission which he has earned under Rule 22 of these Regulations. 678 Police and Prisons Report. 1897
Prison's Regulations Act.
Scale of Dietaries for Use in Provincial Gaols.
1. No beer or wine, or fermented or spirituous liquors of any kind shall be allowed to
prisoners, or permitted within the Gaol, unless specially ordered by the Gaol Surgeon, such
order to be recorded in his Journal, together with the name of the prisoner for whom the
article is ordered.
2. No smoking shall be allowed, nor shall any tobacco be permitted in the Gaol, except
by the order of the Gaol Surgeon, such order to be recorded in his Journal, together with the
name of the prisoner to whom the privilege is allowed.
3. No food of any kind shall be sold by any Gaol Officer to a prisoner, or by one prisoner
to another ; nor shall any Gaol Officer have any pecuniary interest, direct or indirect, in any
food, clothing or other articles supplied to the prisoners ; nor shall any Gaol Officer, or any
member of his family, use any of the Gaol stores except for heating, lighting or cleaning the
house or quarters allotted to them.
4. The Gaol dietaries shall be divided into two scales, viz :—
1. For prisoners awaiting trial, or under sentence with hard labour for a term of
thirty days or under, where the labour is done in ordinary Gaol work ;
2. For prisoners sentenced with hard labour for a term of over thirty days, and the
labour consists of cutting wood, breaking stones or is extra-mural.
5. The dietary under the foregoing scale shall be as follows :—
Scale No.  1.
Breakfast.
One pint of gruel (made from oatmeal or Indian corn meal), and eight ounces of bread every
morning.
Dinner.
Five ounces of cooked meat (without bone), eight ounces of bread and eight ounces of potatoes
on three days of the week. Eight ounces of bread, one pound of potatoes and one pint
of gruel on two days of the week. One pint of soup and eight ounces of bread on two
days in the week.
Supper.
One pint of gruel and eight ounces of bread every night.
Scale No.  2.
Breakfast.
One pint of gruel, eight ounces of bread, and one pint of pea coffee, sweetened with molasses or
brown sugar, every morning.
Dinner.
Six ounces of cooked meat (without bone), eight ounces of bread and eight ounces of potatoes
on each day that hard labour is performed ; otherwise Scale No. 1 to be followed.
Supper.
One pint of gruel and eight ounces of bread every night.
6. The oatmeal gruel shall contain two ounces of oatmeal to every pint of water, and the
Indian cornmeal gruel two and a-quarter ounces to the pint; the soup shall contain three
ounces of cooked meat to the pint, and the usual quantity of vegetables, with pepper and salt.
Pork may be used once a week instead of beef, but one ounce less in weight must be given
than is named in the different scales ; fish may also be substituted for beef once a week, in 61 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 679
which case four ounces more must be given than is named in the different scales; and all
prisoners shall be allowed at their meals as much good water and salt as they desire.
7. Prisoners under the care of the Gaol Surgeon shall be allowed such diet as he may
direct, his instructions in this respect to be entered in his Journal for the guidance of the
Gaoler.
8. The food supplies shall be carefully weighed or measured when delivered out for use,
and the Gaoler shall enter the weight or quantity in the Account Book, and he shall exercise
the greatest care, so as to insure that all food supplied to the prisoners shall be of good quality
and of the proper weight or measure.
9. The Gaoler shall receive and examine all articles of food and other supplies, and shall
carefully weigh or measure the same, and enter the weight or measurement and the price in
the Account Book.
10. The cooking of the food and the washing of clothes and bedding shall be done by a
prisoner or prisoners, under the supervision of the Gaoler.
Regulations Regarding Visitors.
1. Visitors may be allowed to see prisoners under sentence on Saturdays, between the
hours of 1 and 4:30 p.m.
2. On Sundays, from 1 to 2:30 p.m., and from 4 to 4:30 p.m.
3. Visitors may be allowed to see prisoners awaiting "trial" at any hour between 10 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. (excepting on Sundays, when rule 2 must be followed), provided that the business to be transacted is of such importance.
. 4. No visitor shall be allowed in the Gaol or to speak with prisoners at any time except
by permission of the officer in charge, and a Gaol official must be present at all interviews unless otherwise ordered.
5. No visitor shall be allowed to enter or remain in the Gaol at any other hours than
those specified without the written permission of the Warden of the Gaol or the Superintendent of Provincial Police.
6. All visitors are requested to make their visits as brief as possible. 680
Police and Prisons Report.
1897
STATEMENT
SHOWING the offences for which prisoners were sentenced to terms of imprisonment in
Provincial Gaols during the years 1894-5-6 and 7, each year ending 31st October.
Offences.
Victoria.
New   WESTMINSTER.
Nanaimo.
Kamloops.
1894
1895
1S96
1
2
10
1
8
1897
1
6
5
13
1894
""l
3
1895
1
1896
3
3
1897
1894
1895
1896
1
'2
1897
1S94
1895
1896
1
1897
3
16
6
10
1
2(1
1
15
7
5
Aiding prisoners to escape	
14
1
3
1
2
10
2
1
8
1
8
3
1
8
1
5
6
1
7
14
16
2
.r        Naval Discipline Act	
31
1
1
26
27
23
1
2
5
2
"   '
...
1
4
4
i
2
3
0
4
2
1
3
1
6
7
6
2
1
2
3
6
6
1
1
1
2
4
3
1
'29
1
37
1
1
1
0
16
1
31
1
4
4
S
....
2
3
2
3
13
1
1
3
1
4
7
1
13
1
"e
3
2
6
2
"92
"27
2
"26
2
42
2
1
1
1
2
1
3
3
3
10
4
1
1
6
27
1
2
1
1
"h
4
21
1
48
2
2
4
28
4
59
1
2
2
3
6
21
11
13
218
2
1
9
2
3
8
1
30
"77
2
4
r,
1
21
5
22
229
"2
3
4
5
1
Forgery	
Fraud, or obtaining money and goods by false
3
1
9
1
1
1
4
2
3
1
79
4
2
1
24
"69
4
3
8
6
1
is
10
18
189
2
1
1
20
"
1
1
13
3
5
"ii
5
151
2
40
1
23
"67
10
1
2
45
7
'55
9
1
3
'42
11
1
-2
8
"30
27
3
1
1
17
22
2
2
3
4
67
51
60
1
45
37
2
33
1
4
1
"i
1
1
2
13
3
12
2
5
3
4
2
Threatening and seditious language ..  	
2
1
15
6
29
294
4
6
2
20
264
"i
12
10
3
188
2
2
4
10
178
1
3
12
3
202
1
15
2
132
8
8
1
117
3
8
114
3
8
6
116
8
12
5
123
2
6
6
127
21
4
195
The Cities of Victoria, Vancouver and New Westminster are each provided with a city
lock-up, which is maintained by the Municipal Government, and during the above years a
large number of prisoners sentenced to short terms of imprisonment for drunkenness or nonpayment of fines served their terms of imprisonment in the lock-ups. The above statement
does not include such prisoners. The Cities of Nanaimo and Kamloops do not use a lock-up
for such purposes, but send all their prisoners to the County Gaol as soon as they have been
convicted. 61 Vict.
Police and Prisons Report.
681
STATEMENT
Showing the offences for which prisoners were convicted and sentenced to imprisonment in
the City Lock-ups during the years 1896 and 1897, each year ending October 31st.
Offences.
Victoria.
Vancouver.
New
Westminster.
Nanaimo.
Wellington.
1896
30
89
2
25
7
12
9
3
1897
1896
1897
55
153
1896
1897
1896
1897
1896
1897
Assaults  	
Breach of City By-Laws	
26
75
41
50
12
7
15
8
2
16
9
1
4
2
1
5
10
1
6
7
2
1
6
1
4
1
39
4
17
4
1
91
12
29
19
6
90
5
15
7
2
5
8
2
5
ii         Merchant Shipping . . .
it        Public Morals Bj'-Law.
8
1
1
3
Carrying concealed weapon	
1
4
221
1
1
27
1
Destroying and injuring property
Fraud or false pretences	
Frequenters, inmates and keepers
4
202
1
3
8
160
1
1
174
2
57
1
14
4
37
1
18
2
17
14
6
2
27
29
5
1
7
2
1
2
2
1
7
24
1
2
5
18
Indecent assault and exposure . . .
2
2
1
2
2
1
9
3
1
Pointing revolver unlawfully....
Possession of stolen property....
1
3
4
1
4
5
53
12
2
3
1
1
80
7
Threatening & seditious language.
Unsound mind	
5
9
5
9
1
11
4
3
9
12
1
6
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
'
433
365
620 1
704
93
122
51
42
31
17 682
Police and Prisons Report.
1897
STATEMENT
Showing the offences for which prisoners were convicted and sentenced to imprisonment in
the Provincial Gaols and City Lock-ups during the year ending October 31st, 1897.
Victoria.
Vancouver
New
West'r.
Nanaimo.
Kamloops.
Wel-
lingt'n
Totals
Offences.
3
"o -A
J a
Ph
1
6
>>?
og
ft
Hi
3
'O rJ
.a a
go
u
Ph
ft
■"■£ a
°§
Is
.9   c3
Ph
ft
£a
i-l
1 Provincial
Gaol.
ft
.•Sa
°§
Totals of
each
offence.
1
26
55
10
15
1
5
18
4
140
a      aggravated and felonious	
3
'75'
153
2
s'
5
10
10
1
'247
2
16
2
21
39
4
90
5
15
20
5
1
55
6
1
6
51
2
5
298
22
a        Merchant Shipping Act	
//        Naval Discipline Act	
it        Post Office Act	
13
27
35
27
17
4
7
2
24
3
3
9
3
]
1
5
6
1
4
1
3
1
1
1
2
16
2
Cutting, wounding, and attempts	
1
3
4
7
1
2
1
1
5
4
Destroying and injuring property	
Drunk and disorderly	
Escape from prison and attempts   	
Fraud, obtaining money or goods by false pre-
Frequenters, etc., of houses of ill-fame	
8
160
4
221
2
(i
3
4
5
1
2
17
14
2
42
4
1
2
24
485
8
6
1
27
29
59
1
0
24
18
45
1
3
4
1
2
4
1
40
1
1
1
5
6
48
13
Indecent assault and exposure	
1
7
1
2
3
9
1
2
10
33
142
1
2
4
7
1
1
3
1
1
Possession of stolen property	
3
13
2
18
3
1
1
80
7
704
3
4
7
Smuggling	
2
4
10
3
178
1
11
4
3
365
3
14
5
151
1
6
1
122
3
8
114
1
2'
42
6
21
4
3
2
19
148
25
195
17
1888 61 Vict.
Police and Prisons Report.
683
The movements of prisoners in the Gaols of the Province during the year ending October
31st, 1897, is summarised as follows :—
Victoria.
New
Westminster.
Nanaimo.
Kamloops.
Prisoners confined, October 31st, 1896 ....
n        received,            n                //....
43
17S
47
231
19
125
25
275
Discharged since               n                n    ..   .
221
180
278
215
1
144
122
300
273
41
62
22
27
The increase in the number of prisoners on 31st October, 1897, as compared with the
number registered 31st October, 1896, was eighteen.
VICTORIA GAOL.
Report of the Warden.
Victoria, B. C, November 26th, 1897.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the annual statistical report of the Victoria
Gaol for the prison year ending 31st October, 1897. During the year 178 prisoners were
brought to Gaol, as follows :—
Prom the City Police Court        103
From Her Majesty's ships          27
By the Provincial Police       45
By the Sheriff      3
178
The discipline of the Gaol has been well maintained, and the conduct of prisoners
generally has been good. One prisoner escaped from the chain-gang, but was recaptured several weeks afterwards, and an additional sentence of six months' imprisonment was awarded
him.
The Gaol building is kept in a good state of repair, but the front of the building is very
much in need of a coat of paint. All prisoners sentenced to hard labour have been kept well
employed in blasting and breaking rock, gardening, and other work to be done. There is a
large quantity of well-broken rock on hand for road making. One gang of prisoners has been
employed improving Government House grounds and such other work as required.
The health of the prisoners generally has been good, no deaths having occurred.
Religious services have been held on each Sunday throughout the year by the Rev. Canon
Paddon, the Salvation Army, and by members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union.
The prisoners have been supplied with magazines and other reading matter by Miss Goward
and others who take an interest in their welfare.
I have, etc.,
R. F. John,
F. S. Hussey, Esq., Warden.
Superintendent of Provincial Police, etc., Victoria. 684
Police and Prisons Report.
1897
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT VICTORIA, B. C.
Report for the Year ending 31st October, 1897.
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salary per Annum.
1st Gaoler	
R. F. John 	
E. J. Parsons	
Robert Liddell   	
$1,224 00
912 00
816 00
816 00
Almond Thomas	
J. H. Mason	
Hon. J. S. Helmcken, M. D	
912 00
816 00
762 00
400 00
2.—Statement " A."
Number of prisoners remaining in custody 31st October, 1896  43
it                  ii         received during the year      178
Total  221
3.—Statement "B."
A return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes of prisoners who died in the Gaol during the
year ending 31st October, 1897.—Nil.
4.—Statement "C."
A return of offenders pardoned during the year—one, Peter Sayers.
5.—Statement " D."
Discharged from prison on expiration of sentence  155
ii    Supreme Court  1
ii    Provincial Police Court, no conviction  3
ii    on payment of fine       8
conviction quashed  1
by pardon  1
temporarily insane  4
Transferred to B. C. Penitentiary  6
n                  Insane Asylum  1
Remaining in custody October 31st, 1897  41 61 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 685
6.—Statement " E."
Number of prisoners in custody October 31st, 1896    43
1897    41
ii received during the year 178
Daily average number of prisoners    321
Cost of keep of each prisoner, food and clothing per diem    12 cents.
ii ii including salaries and all expenses, per diem    79 cents.
Number of cells in the Gaol, 75, and solitary cells, 5.
Number of prisoners Gaol can accommodate 127
Greatest number of prisoners confined in Gaol on any one day during the year    50
Lowest number    13
7.—Statement "F."—Tenders accepted for supplies.
Bread   L. Dickinson.
Meat  John Parker.
Groceries, soap, brooms and brushes Erskine, Wall & Co.
Clothing, shoes and blankets    Gilmore &, McCandless.
Coal Walter Walker.
8.—Statement " G."—Receipts and expenditures.
Receipts.
Amount received for keep of prisoners, Victoria City...    $1,230 60
n Naval       994 75
ii Provincial         96 50
Credit for 290 yards broken stone for district roads       507 50
Total receipts $2,829 35
Provincial fines collected and paid to Supt. Hussey             $ 150 00
City Police Court fines collected and paid to clerk C. P. C  63 00
Expenditure.
Bread $ 425 09
Meat  362 69
Groceries, soap, brooms and brushes  355  56
Clothing and shoes  287  15
Fuel  369 80
Light (gas)  275 20
Water  11125
Lumber, lime, paint, oil and repairs  164 60
Powder, fuse and tools  104 74
Miscellaneous accounts  216 34
$2,672 42
Salaries    6,738 00
,410 42
9.—Statement "H."
Real estate and buildings, estimated value of       $60,000 00
Stores, tools, etc       1,500 00 Crimes.
Arson  -..-...  . 1
Assault  6
n          aggravated  3
ii          indecent  1
Attempted murder ,  2
Attempted rape  1
Attempted sodomy  1
Attempted suicide...........     2
Breach Merchant Shipping Act  13
ii        Naval Discipline Act  27
Breaking gaol  1
Burglary  3
Debtors    3
Deserting  1
Destroying and injuring property  4
Drunk and disorderly  7
Forgery 	
Frequenting houses of ill-fame ....
Gambling	
House-breaking	
Indecent exposure	
Infraction Indian Act	
Larceny	
Obtaining goods by false pretences
Possession of stolen property	
Threatening to do bodily harm .    .
Unsound mind	
Vagrancy   	
Wounding	
Total.
. 2
. 1
. 1
. 5
. 3
. 21
. 48
. 1
. 3
2
.     4
.   10
1
.178
Peddler.
Porter. .
Plumber
Occupations.
Agent '."..'.'.  1    Miner   ......
Bartender  1    No occupation
Blacksmith  1    Painter....
Bricklayer  1
Butcher  2
Carpenter     5
Caulker  1    Printer . .
Clerk   ;......  2    Prostitute
Cook  5
Deckhand •  2
Domestic    5
Expressman  1
Farmer  2
Farm-hand  3    Steward
Fisherman  11     Stoker. .
Labourer  48    Tailor . .
Longshoreman     2    Teamster
Lumberman         1    Waiter .
Machinist  1
Marine, L. 1  6
Sealer   	
Seamen, A. B. and O .
Sailmaker	
Signalman	
Shop-keeper	
Total.
3
9
.     1
.     1
1
1
3
2
4
39
1
1
. 1
1
6
1
1
1
178
Nationalities.
British Columbia, Whites  6
ii                 Coloured.  1
ii                 Half-breed  5
ii                 Indian    15
England  46
Ireland  10
Scotland  15
Wales  5
Canada  12
United States	
China	
Norway and Sweden.
Dutch	
Italy	
Other countries	
23
20
5
5
2
Total.
178
Religious Denominations.
Church of England  52
Presbyterian  23
Lutheran  9
Mohammedan , .  . .,  1.
Protestant  7
Roman Catholics  37
Methodists	
Baptists	
Greek Church	
Religion not defined
Total	
16
2
1
30
178 61 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 687
Educational.
Read and write  ,  ...... . 126
Read only ... .v      6
No education     46
Total . 178
Social Conditions.
Married    38
Single 135
Widowers      5
Total 178
Habits.
Temperate    37
Intemperate 141
Total 178
From 12 to 20 years  23    From 50 to 60 years      9
„    20 to 30    i,        80        ,,    60 to 70    n           3
„    30 to 40    i,        39 —
„    40 to 50    ,,        24 Total 178
Return showing the period of sentence passed on the convicted prisoners received in the
Victoria Gaol during the year ending 31st October, 1897.
One month and under  46
Over one month and under two months  9
Two months and under three months    31
3 months  38
  5
  11
  2
  6
  4
2 years, transferred to B. C. Penitentiary  3
3 ii                                  ii                                2
4 m                                   ,,                                 2
6    ,,                                „                              1
4
6
9
12
18
Return showing the remission time earned by prisoners in Victoria Gaol during the year
ending 31st October, 1897.
29 prisoners earned  5 days each.
27 ii  10        „
24 „   15        „
5 „   20
1 „   25
5 „   30
2 „   40
1 i,  45
3 „   60
3 n  No remission. 688
Police and Prisons Report.
1897
Return showing the town or place from which prisoners were recevied.
Victoria City    103
H. M. Ships    27
Sea-going vessels         14
Victoria District    10
Esquimalt District,      9
The Islands  5
West Coast, V.I  2
Cowichan  1
Comox  1
Cassiar District  6
Certified correct,
R.  F. John, Warden. 61 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 689
NEW   WESTMINSTER   GAOL.
 o	
Report of the Warden.
Provincial Gaol, New Westminster, B.C.,
November 17th, 1897.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the annual statistical report of the New
Westminster Gaol for the prison year ending October 31st, 1897, giving an itemized account
of all expenditures, together with a record of the number of prisoners received into the Gaol,
and of what disposition was made of them ; also showing how prisoners were employed during
the year.
We received during the year two hundred and thirty-one prisoners from the following
places :—
From Vancouver  64
New Westminster  61
Yale  20
Kootenay  35
Cariboo  16
Kamloops  30
Chilliwhack  2
Victoria  3
Two prisoners escaped during the year, one from the Gaol-yard and one from the Warden's
residence. Neither were re-captured. The Gaol and other buildings are in a good state of
repair. The sanitary conditions are good, and are carefully looked after at all times. The
general health of the prisoners has been very good, no deaths having occurred during the year.
All prisoners sentenced to hard labour have been kept actively employed breaking stone and
doing such other work in and about the Gaol and grounds as was necessary. One gang has
been continuously employed doing necessary work upon Government grounds. This year they
were employed much of the time at the Asylum, where they excavated and moved 3,469 cubic
yards of hard-pan, such material having been taken out in order to construct the foundation
of the new addition to the Asylum. The average cost of removing such would be 60 cents
per yard, making a total of $2,081.40. There was also 2,000 feet of ditching for water pipe,
averaging four feet in depth and two feet in width, done in order to remove old pipes and lay
new mains in their stead.
Religious services have been held once each week and twice upon each Sunday during the
year, conducted by Mrs. Robinson and different clergy for the Protestant portion, and the
Rev. Father Fayard for the Roman Catholics, all of whom I desire to thank on behalf of the
prisoners, not only for the sacred services but also for the magazines, religious papers, and
other good reading matter, all of which doubtless have done much good.
This report, when compared with those of previous years, will, I feel sure, be found to
represent an administration of economy in all outlays, and a deep interest in the management.
All contracts for food, clothing, and general supplies have been filled to entire satisfaction.
I have, etc.,
W. G. Armstrong,
Warden.
F. S. Hussey, Esq.,
Superintendent of Provincial Police, etc.,
Victoria. 690
Police and Prisons Report.
1897
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT NEW WESTMINSTER.
Report for the year ending October 31st, 1897.
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salary pee Annum.
Warden	
2nd     /;       	
W. 6. Armstrong	
G. A. Calbick	
M. Lavell	
$1,140 00
912 00
816 00
3rd     n      	
1st Convict Guard	
2nd             „            	
Matron	
Surgeon 	
B. Marshall 	
Joseph Burr	
A. O'Connor	
Mrs. Beattie	
R. G. Walker, M.D	
762 00
912 00
762 00
240 00
400 00
2.—Statement " A."
Number of prisoners remaining in custody 31st October, 1896         47
ii received during the year    231
3.—Statement " B."
A return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes of prisoners who died in Gaol during the
year ending 31st October, 1897.—None.
4.—Statement "0."
Discharged from prison on expiration of sentence  107
ii             ii     Supreme Court  19
ii             ii     County Court Judge's Criminal Court  14
ii             ii     Provincial Police Court    15
n           on payment of fine, 3 ; on bail, 5  8
Escaped ,  2
Transferred to Penitentiary  33
ii               Lunatic Asylum  14
ii               Old Men's Home, Kamloops  1
Temporarily insane, 2; hanged, 1    3
Remaining in custody 31st October, 1897  62
5.—Statement "D."
Offenders pardoned during the year (W. H. Falding)    1 61 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 691
6.—Statement "E."
Average number of prisoners per month      61
ii ii ii day      514/
Number of prisoners confined on October, 1896       47
„ „ ii „        1897.... ,     62
Total number received during the year  231
7.—Statement "F."
Receipts.
Amount received for keep of prisoners, New Westminster  $437 50
Amount of  fines, forfeitures and cash received, paid to Chief Constable Bullock-
Webster, and Chief of Police \  375 00
Cash on hand, 31st October, 1897  Nil.
$ 812 50
Expenditure.
Food  $1,563 31
Water,  65 87
Clothing  232 33
Hospital stores      100 89
Salaries of officers  5,784 00
Fuel and light ,  910 71
For the erection of new buildings and repairs  310  13
Miscellaneous accounts  76 43
Total   $9,043 67
Keep of each prisoner for food and clothing per day      11| cents.
ii ii      including salaries and all expenses      50J     m
Return shewing how prisoners have been employed during the year:—The chain-gangs
have been employed in filling in the cribbing in front of the Gaol building, and in general
work about the grounds and gaol, and in excavating for the foundations of the new addition
to the Provincial Asylum.
8.—Statement "G."—Tenders accepted for supplies.
Clothing , J. Phillips.
Livery Highland & Devoy.
Coal, wood and lime    Gillie & Rodgers.
Funerals D. Murchie.
Drugs ... Curtis & Co.
Fish      Western Fish Company.
Meat Reichenback & Co.
Milk J. A. Fliger.
Boots and shoes William Johnson.
Bread , La very.
Groceries ....    E. J. Rae.
9.—Statement " H."—Value of Prison property.
Real estate and building $50,000 00
Stores, tools, etc         500 00
Certified correct.
W. G. Armstrong,
Warden. 692 Police and Prisons Report. 1897
NANAIMO GAOL.
Report of Gaoler.
Provincial Gaol, Nanaimo,
1st November, 1897.
Sir,—I have the honour to report on the Provincial Gaol at Nanaimo for the year ending
31st October, 1897. During the year twenty-two prisoners were received from Cowichan; nine,
including two insane, from Comox ; four from Wellington; two, including one temporarily
insane, from Alberni; one from Thurlow Island; five from Alert Bay; nineteen from Nanaimo
City, two transient; and sixty one from the District. The conduct of the prisoners, with a few
exceptions, has been good. The principal work done by the prisoners during the year was on
the Gaol property, such as preparing ground, planting crops, harvesting, stumping and clearing
land, and also removing and repairing house for constables' residence. The ground in front of
the Court House has also been graded. The crops, particularly the hay and potatoes, turned
out well. Divine service was held every Sunday morning, when all prisoners who so desired
had the opportunity of attending. The Young Men's Christian Association kindly furnished
the prisoners (weekly) with a supply of literature. The officers have attended to their duties
faithfully and to my satisfaction.
I have, etc.,
W. Stewart,
Chief Constable and Gaoler.
F. S. Hussey, Esq.,
Superintendent Provincial Police, Victoria. 61  Vict.
Police a^d Prisons Report.
693
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT NANAIMO.
Report for the Year ending October 31st, 1897.
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salaky pek Annum.
$1,140 00
912 00
702 00
Constable and Assistant Gaoler	
Samuel Drake  	
762 00
Moses H. Mclndoo	
L. T. Davis, M.D	
762 00
393 33
2.—Statement " A."
Number of prisoners remaining in custody, 31st October, 1896    19
ii ii received during the year 125
3.—Statement "B."
A return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes of prisoners who died during the year ending
October, 31st, 1897.— Nil.
4.—Statement " C."
Discharged from prison on expiration of sentence 56
ii    Supreme Court    4
ii     County Court Judges Criminal Court    2
ii     Provincial Police Court 10
on payment of fine 34
temporarily insane    10
Transferred to Penitentiary    3
ii Lunatic Asylum    3
Remaining in custody 31st October, 1897 , 22
5.—Statement "D."
Offenders pardoned during the year None.
6.—Statement " E."
Average number of prisoners per month    29
n ii day    11|
Number of prisoners confined 31st October, 1896    19
„ 1897    22
Total number received during the year , 125 694 Police and Prisons Report. 1897
7.—Statement " F."—Receipts and expenditure.
Receipts.
Amount received for keep of prisoners $ 34 50
Amount of fines, forfeitures and cash received (paid to Government Agent)    369 50
Cash on hand 31st October, 1897    Nil.
Expenditure.
Food $   449 63
Bedding	
Clothing  78 00
Water  67 43
Hospital stores  12 25
Sundries ,  106  12
Salaries of officers ,  4,147 82
Fuel and light  210 02
Tools and repairs ,  45 95
For the erection of new buildings and repairs   21 50
$5,138 72
Keep of each prisoner for food and clothing, per day   $    12^
ii including salaries and all expenses    1  19|
Return showing how prisoners have been employed.
The prisoners have been employed working in the garden, stumping and clearing land,
cutting firewood, and grading Court House grounds.
8.—Statement " G."—Tenders accepted for supplies.
Bread   J. C. Thompson.
Beef Hemans & Walmsley.
Groceries A. R. Johnstone & Co.
Boots and shoes Hughes.
Dry Goods James Hirst.
Coal Thompson & Scovile.
Teaming, per day Joseph Ganner.
9.—Statement " H."—Value of Prison property.
Real estate and building $22,000 00
Stores and tools      1,400 00
Certified correct,
William Stewart,
Chief Constable and Gaoler. 61 Vict.
Police and Prisons Report.
695
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT KAMLOOPS.
Report for the Year ending 31st October, 1897.
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salary per Annum.
0. S. Batehelor	
W. J. Norfolk	
J. C. McLaren	
A. G. Brown	
E. Furrer, M.D	
$816 00
762 00
702 00
762 00
2nd Convict Guard	
762 00
240 00
.... ,      2.—Statement "A."
Number of prisoners remaining in custody October 31st, 1896      25
ii ii received during the year    275
3.—Statement " B."
A return of the names, ages, callings and crimes of prisoners who died in gaol during
the year ending 31st October, 1897    None.
4.—Statement " C."
Discharged from prison on expiration of sentence  152
ii             ii     Supreme Court  2
it             ii     County Court Judges' Criminal Court  1
ii             ii     Provincial Police Court  12
ii             on payment of fines  22
ii               temporarily insane  2
Transferred to Penitentiary  7
ii                 Lunatic Asylum ,  1
ii                New Westminster Gaol  74
Remaining in custody, 31st October, 1897  27
5.—Statement " D."
Offenders pardoned during the year None.
6.—Statement " E."
Average number of prisoners per month    46|-
ii n ii day ,    24
Number of prisoners confined 31st October, 1896      25
1897    27
Total number received during the year 275
7.—Statement " F."—Receipts and Expenditures.
Amount received for keep of prisoners Nil.
Amount of fines, forfeitures, and cash received (paid to Government Agent)    $385 00
Cash on hand on 31st October, 1897 Nil. 696
Police and Prisons Report.
1897
Expenditure.
Food $1,415 11
Clothing ,       428 13
Hospital stores       106 05
Salaries of officers    2,616 00
Fuel and light       461 80
For the erection of new buildings and repairs       171 96
Total $5,199 05
Keep of each prisoner for food and clothing, per day    21   cents.
ii including salaries and all expenses    59J     n
Return showing how prisoners have been employed during the year ending 31st October,
1897 :—The prisoners have been chiefly employed at work on the Government grounds, around
the Provincial Home, making necessary improvements, grading, etc., and in putting in and
cultivating crops. They have also been employed in cutting wood for the Gaol, the Government and Registry Offices, and School.
8.—Statement " G."—Tenders accepted for Supplies.
Clothing   , Hudson's Bay Co.
Meat Hull & Co.
Groceries J. S. Smith.
Vegetables A. Noble.
Fuel , T. Hornby.
Bread       McLughan & Johnson.
Drugs R. G. McPherson.
9.—Statement " H."—Value of Prison Property.
Real estate and building $4,500 00
Stores, tools, etc       480 00
Certified correct.
W. J. Norfolk, Acting Gaoler.
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT NELSON.
This Gaol was opened at the beginning of the present year, as previously mentioned in
the Report. The staff at present is as follows. As the necessity arises, the two additional
guards, not yet appointed, will have to be engaged.
Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salary pee Month.
Napoleon Fitzstubbs    	
Robert Liddell	
$1,200 00
960 00
2nd     //        	
840 00
3rd     »      	
840 00
840 00
2nd            a            .          	
780 00
780 00
VICTORIA, B. C:
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1898.

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