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ANNUAL REPORT ON THE ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE, NEW WESTMINSTER, FOR THE YEAR 1896. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1897

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 ANNUAL   REPORT
ASYLUM  FOR THE  INSANE.
NEW   WESTMINSTER,
YEAR  1896.
VICTORIA, b. C :
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1897.  60 Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 843
REPORT
ASYLUM   FOR   THE   INSANE,
1896.
To His Honour Edgar Dewdney,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it Please Your Honour:
The   undersigned   respectfully  submits   herewith   the   Annual   Report   of   the   Medical
Superintendent of the Asylum for the Insane for the year 1896.
JAMES   BAKER,
Provincial, Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
March, 1897.  60 Vict.       Report on thk Asylum for the Insane. 845
REPORT
OF the
MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT OF THE PROVINCIAL ASYLUM FOR  THE
INSANE,
New Westminster, B. C.
For the year ending Slst December, 1896.
To the Honourable
The Provincial Secretary.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you herewith the Annual Report for the twenty-
fifth year of the Asylum, ending 31st December, 1896.
The statistical tables appended contain a full record of the institution for the year.
During the year the total number of patients under treatment was 228, of whom 180 were
males and 48 were females. Remaining in residence at the end of the year were 171, of whom
142 were males, and 29 were females.
Admissions.
In referring to Table 1, the number shown as admitted is 64, this being 2 more than during the previous year. In the number admitted, are included 6 by warrant, and 2 who had
been taken by their friends on probation, but were obliged to be sent back, owing to a return
of their malady. Deducting these 2 on probation, the number of new patients is 62, viz.:—
49 males, and 13 females. This is the largest number of new admissions of male patients since
the opening of the Asylum.
Discharges.
The discharged number 48, of whom 23 had recovered, being 35.94 % of the admissions,
22 were discharged improved, of whom 6 are still on probation, and 3 were discharged unimproved.
On August 6th five patients were sent home to their friends in England, two of them at
their own cost, and three partly at their own cost and partly at the cost of the Provincial Government. Of the five, three of them, young men, were improved, the other two, a brother and
sister, were recovered. They were handed over to their friends who met them at Liverpool,
except the brother and sister who went together, unattended, to their home in the Midland
Counties, and who arrived there safely. All these cases were illustrations of a practice too
much in vogue in Great Britain, of shipping off to the colonies weak-minded young persons
who are unmanageable at home, and unable to make a career for themselves, or earn a livelihood there. " He has continued his wild and reckless conduct, and has now been shipped off
"to the colonies," is a phrase made use of in the Journal of Mental Science, in the description
of a case of the kind now in question. But if a patient of the kind here described is unable,
with the assistance and supervision of his friends and relatives, to steer a straight course and
make a position for himself in the Old Country, still less is he likely, when left to himself, to
be able to cope with the struggles and difficulties of Colonial life. Of the five cases above
mentioned, in one the patient was of feeble intellect, and the insanity strongly hereditary, in
another the patient was obviously weak-minded originally, and a third was a pronounced
epileptic with consequent mania, while the brother and sister suffered from strong family taint.
The brother had been previously for three years in an English County Asylum, and the sister
had suffered from an attack of insanity before coming out here. The brother had only been
four days in the Province when he again became insane, and was sent to the Asylum. He was
two "years and one month in the Province, the whole of which time, except four days, he spent
in the Asylum at the expense of the Government.    When last heard of he was still continuing 846 Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1896
well, but the sister had suffered a relapse, and was again insane at her home in England. I
have dwelt somewhat at length on these five cases, because they are typical examples of the
most undesirable class of immigrants it is possible to conceive. Such persons as these now
mentioned, who are sent out to be got rid of, are totally unfit for the battle of Colonial life,
and they naturally gravitate into the Asylum and swell the ranks of the already too numerous
lunatics, adding, of course, for most of them have lost all the little money they may have had,
to the pecuniary burden of the Province. It is hard upon the Colonies that the mother country
should "ship off" these waifs and strays, these victims of "borderland insanity," to become,
as they almost inevitably must do, when thrown on their own resources out here, confirmed
lunatics, who have to be maintained at the expense of the community. The question of the
feasibility of sending back to their own parishes in the United Kingdom, patients such as
those here described, and other chronic lunatics who are now life pensioners on the Government
of this Province, is one worthy of serious consideration.
Escapes.
As usual there were several escapes during the year ; all the patients, however, were
retaken within one day except one, who returned voluntarily after being absent a few days. I
must again draw your attention to the unsatisfactory state of the boundary fences. It is
impossible, with the present limited staff of attendants and with the incomplete state of the
fences, to prevent occasional escapes.
Deaths.
The number of deaths was 9, 7 males and 2 females, being 3 94% of the whole number
treated, the smallest percentage of deaths since the year 1889.
Post-mortem examinations were made in four cases under very disadvantageous circumstances owing to the inadequate state of the mortuary. The mortuary is a mere wooden shed
of the rudest description.  It has no water laid on, no drains, and none of the usual appliances.
In cold, frosty weather it is almost impossible to work in it owing to the absence of all
means of heating the building. One of the most urgent needs of this institution is a new and
properly constructed mortuary.
There were no suicides during the year. There was, however, one attempt at suicide by
strangulation which was prevented by the vigilance of the attendants in charge, viz.: J. D.
Hopkins and Jos. McNeely, the night-watchman.
Work.
The ordinary work of the farm and garden has been done by the attendants, assisted by
some of the patients as usual. The number of days of work of the male patients will be found
stated in Table 15. A new boundary fence has been begun upon the west and southern sides
of the grounds, and new entrance gates have been erected. This work has been under the
superintendence of Mr. E. B. Stinchcombe who, with the aid of some of the patients, has done
it so far as it goes very efficiently. It is hoped to continue it during the ensuing summer and,
eventually, to carry the new fence entirely round the grounds. Until this is done the grounds,
as mentioned in the Report of last year, cannot be made available for exercising grounds for
the patients owing to the extreme facility for escape afforded by their present unguarded condition. Ornamental walks and walks for exercise are in progress, and when these are
completed, and the fence above mentioned finished, the facilities for out-door exercise will be
much enhanced and the treatment of the patients thereby greatly improved. Nothing
contributes more to the recovery of insane patients, and also to their happiness and contentment, than plenty of exercise in the open air. The dull monotony of the wards is depressing
and detrimental. Cheerful surroundings and open-air life are essential in the successful
treatment of insanity, but these cannot be had to the desirable extent in the present unfinished
and unfenced state of the grounds of this Asylum.
The farm, gardens and orchards have been cultivated as usual. A team of horses and a
waggon was purchased on October 5th for $100.00, a purchase necessitated by the death of
one of the old horses and the break-down of the other. The new team is working well and
proving a great success. They are powerful horses capable of much more work than the old
ones. We are now enabled to haul a quantity of manure purchased at various places, an
article very much wanted in the gardens and fields, the land around the Asylum being very 60 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
847
poor.    The purchase of this team with repairs and additions to the waggon, and the necessary
new harness, swelled the expenditure under the head of miscellaneous items considerably.
A padded room is now almost completed. It has been constructed entirely by our own
artisans at comparatively small cost chiefly, of course, by the carpenter, J. D. Hopkins, who
has carried out the plans furnished to him in a very creditable manner. The room seems
likely to answer the purpose for which it is intended, and to be a useful addition to the means
of treatment of violent cases.
The rest of the work on the male side has been the ordinary routine, and calls for no
especial remark. The female side has contributed its usual share of work as will be seen by
referring to Table 16.
Expenditure.
The cost per head.shown in Table 18 includes all the expenditure of the Asylum, namely,
salaries, provisions, fuel, lighting, drugs and surgical instruments, furniture and miscellaneous
items, in fact everything except what belongs to the Public Works Department and the
Transport of Lunatics.
The monthly cost per head this year is $15.80, being 87 cents less than that of last year,
and less than the average for the last seven years, which is $16.16.
Estimates.
The following table shows the amounts expended up to the end of the fiscal year June
30th, 1896, as compared with the amounts voted :—
Vote 1895-6.
Expended to June 30th, 1896.
Balance lapsed.
Salaries $14,800.00)  *,.. alR nn
Supplementary vote. .     1,016.00/ »10>810-w
Provisions       9,000.00
Fuel and light       3,200.00
Water $600.00/         79n nn
Supplementary vote....   120.00/         < *»•**>
Medicines, instruments and surgical appliances          400.00
Clothing $900.00)      , 9nn nn
Supplementary vote           300.00 f      1>**>-w
Furniture, &c $   800.00/     ,mnm
Supplementary vote.. .   1,200.00/      ->uuu-uu
Transport         600.00
Miscellaneous         700.00
Lands and Works $1,000.00/     9 9nn nn
Supplementary vote.. .   1,200.00/      A^JU.UU
$15,537.03
8,913.51
3,562.24
647.75
533.75
1,112.01
1,998.51
815.86
2,318.04
$278.97
86.49
Excess 362.24
72.25
Excess 133.75
87.99
1.49
600.00
Excess 115.86
118.04
The excess of expenditure over the amounts voted for the fiscal year 1895-96, is accounted
for partly by the increase in the number of patients, and partly by the many needs of the institution in order to bring it into a state of efficiency. The excess on the vote for fuel and light,
is owing to the requirements of the new building for the Medical Superintendent's residence,
the extra fuel now needed for increased work in the laundry and the new bathing arrangements as described in last year's report. Each patient now has clean water, whereas under
the old system several were bathed one after the other in the same water, a practice never
customary in well-regulated Asylums. The excess on the vote for medicines and surgical instruments was caused by the great need of instruments of various kinds, of which the stock was
exceedingly scanty, and is not now by any means adequate to the wants of so large an establishment. The excess on the vote for miscellaneous expenses has been chiefly caused by the
expenditure made necessary by the installation of the shoemaker's workshop with its various
machines, implements, and stock of leather. These things alone during the fiscal year ending
June 30th 1896, cost $154.10, an addition to the expenditure for miscellaneous expenses, which
more than accounts for the excess of $115.86. I suggest the advisability of a separate vote in
future for the expenditure on the materials and tools required for the shoemaker's department.
Though the expenditure for the last fiscal year was considerably in excess of the original
vote, it will be seen by reference to the following table that for the first half of the present 848
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1896
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1897, this has not been the case, except with regard to medicines
and surgical instruments, upon which item there has already been a slight excess of expenditure. This arises from causes previously mentioned. The vote is too small, and I hope it may
be increased next year. In every other instance, except one, viz.:—" Miscellaneous," the
amount expended up to December 31st, has not reached so much as one-half the vote, and the
total expenditure for the half-year ending December 31st, 1896, has not been so much as one-
half of the total vote by $2,933.02 so that there is a fair prospect that by the end of the present
fiscal year the expediture will be found to have been kept well within the amount of the appropriation voted :—
Vote 1896-97.
Expended to
31st December, 1896.
Balance for use
to June 30th, 1897.
Salaries   $15,748.00
$7,487.41
4,695.29
1,488.76
256.56
434.32
484.16
368.43
86.45
669.63
953.64
$8,260.59
Provisions    10,500.00
Fuel and light     3,000.00
Water         600.00
Medicines, instruments and surgical appliances         400.00
Clothing      1,500.00
Furniture, &c      1,000.00
5,804.71
1,511.24
343.44
Expended.
1,015.84
631,57
Transport      1,000.00
Miscellaneous      1,000.00
Lands and Works       2,000.00
913.55
330.37
1,046.36
$36,748.00
$16,924.65
$19,857.67
Requirements.
The requirements remain very much the same as described in the last Report, and I beg
leave to refer you again to the wants of the Institution as mentioned in the Report for 1895,
pages 1065-6-7.
Divine Service.
The Rev. Mr. Shildrick continued his services at the Asylum up to September 6th, after
which date he was unable any longer to continue them owing to pressing demands upon his
time in other directions. Since then the services have been conducted by the Medical Superintendent, the musical parts being under the direction of Mr. T. R. Duncan, who has brought
the singing up to a much greater state of efficiency than it was in a year ago. Many of the
patients now take part in it. A hymn and chant practice is held every Saturday afternoon,
and the singing has become quite congregational and very effective. The patients evidently
enter into the singing with much enjoyment. The accompaniments are played now by Miss
W. B. Bodington.
Entertainments.
Concerts and dramatic entertainments were given during the year to which many of the
inhabitants of the city were invited. On January 23rd two pieces were represented by
amateurs of the city and neighbourhood entitled "My Turn Next" and "A Family Fix."
Seventy-five patients were present and very much enjoyed the farces. A number of visitors
were present by invitation, the recreation room being quite full. On February 15th Mr.
Herbert Lister, who has been for some time a missionary in Zanzibar, was good enough to,
exhibit a number of photographs of various interesting scenes in that country. The photographs were thrown, enlarged, on a screen by the aid of a magic lantern, and created great
interest and enjoyment. The patients listened with much attention to Mr Lister's explanatory lecture. After the lecture, which lasted an hour, there was a concert given by officials
of the Asylum. Sixty-six patients were present. On February 29th Mr. Victor Austin, of
Vancouver, was so kind as to come over and give a concert. A number of visitors were
present as well as seventy-two patients. The recreation room was quite full. Some vocal and
instrumental music was given by various amateurs, but the main feature of the concert was,
of course, Mr. Austin's exquisite violin playing, which was a great treat very much enjoyed
by every one of the crowded audience.      On April 21st an entertainment of a very pleasing 60 Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 84!)
kind was given by twenty-six young girls of St. Barnabas parish, under the auspices of the
Rev. H. H. and Mrs. Gowen, consisting of a floral drill in appropriate costume with piano
accompaniments. The little girls had been admirably trained in the drill by Mrs. Geo. Wolfenden. Sixty-seven patients were present and numerous visitors. " A Dead Shot" was then
represented, and there was also some singing. The whole entertainment was a great success.
On May 28th a representation of the operetta called "A Gipsy Camp" was given by a number
of ladies and gentlemen amateurs, under the leadership of Mr. H. Morey, to the great delight
of a numerous audience.    Sixty-eight patients were present.
Besides these concerts and dramatic entertainments numerous social gatherings have been
held. At these "socials" the patients amuse themselves by dancing. Some of them also sing,
and vocal and instrumental music is provided by a number of the Asylum officials. These
" socials" or " family gatherings" end up with light refreshments and are enjoyed quite as
much as, possibly more than, the more formal concerts and dramatic representations. These
"socials" have been continued once a fortnight during the autumn and winter season up to
the end of the year.
Changes in the Staff.
The following changes have occurred in the staff of the Institution during the year :
Duncan McCowan, attendant, resigned, and left on February 29th. He was replaced on
March 1st by E. B. Stinchcombe. James Chambers, the cook, also resigned and his place was
filled up on March 1st by W. E. Mortimer. On May 18th Mrs. Janet Crawford left to attend
her husband who was ill. Her place, as assistant matron in charge of the lawn house, was
filled by Miss Maria Fillmore, who has been in the service of the Asylum as attendant since
April 1st, 1893. Mrs. Edith McCowan, who had been for some time doing duty as night
nurse, left on May 31st, and her place was filled by Miss Lucy Whitley. On June 30th John
McLeod left, and his place was filled on July 9th by Otway J. Wilkie. Miss Anna Oarlyon left
on August 31st, her.place being filled on September 1st by Miss Lena McGibbon. On September 30th J. Sullivan, attendant and tailor, left. His duties, as attendant, were temporarily
performed until October 16th by Finlay McFarlane, when the tailor's situation was filled up
by the appointment of William F. Beggs. On October 5th Miss Lillian Welch commenced
duties as attendant in the female ward, thereby filling up the gap caused by the promotion of
Miss Fillmore. In every one of the above cases the resignations of the different officials were
at their own request, and all the newly appointed officials have been fulfilling their duties up
to the end of the year in a very satisfactory manner.
Acknowledgments.
I have again to offer my best thanks on behalf of the Institution and its inmates for
many kindnesses received during the past year. To the Rev. A. Shildrick, who conducted
divine service gratuitously during the greater part of the year, especial thanks are due.
Many thanks are also due, and are most heartily given, to the numerous ladies and
gentlemen who contributed so much, by entertainments of one kind or other, to the amusement and benefit of the patients.    They include :
Miss Inglis, Mrs. Moresby,
Mrs. Gowen, Miss Webster,
Miss Dockrill, Mrs. E. M. N. Woods,
Miss Burnett, Mrs. Charles Woods,
Mr. Bernard Hill, Mrs. Ainsworth,
Mr. H. Morey, Miss Lister,
Mr. W. L.  Keary, Miss Keay,
Mr. Wilfrid Jones, Miss Maud Keay,
Mr. Herbert Lister, Miss Jones,
Mr. Victor Austin, Miss Jennie Jones,
Mr. Waterman, Miss Turner,
Mrs. Coulthard, Miss Gertrude Millard,
Mr. A. Jacobs, Miss Clarke,
The Rev. H. H. Gowen, Miss — Clarke,
Mrs. George Wolfenden, Miss Cudlip, 850 Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1896
and the 26 little girls of St. Barnabas Parish who so kindly gave the Floral Drill performance, also
Miss Green, Mrs. Jenns,
Mr. Henry Edmonds, Mr. Walter Phillips,
Mr. Brookes, Mr. W. Blood,
Mr. Lewis, Mr. Wallace C. Duncan,
Mr. Thomas, Mr. Carter,
and Mr. Kabury Wolfenden.
I have again to thank my colleagues, Mr. Phillips, the steward ; Mr. Knight, clerk of the
Asylum ; Mrs. Ross, the matron, and the whole staff of attendants for their invaluable help.
Their work has been done most efficiently and pleasantly, and I accord to them my grateful
and ungrudging praise.
The proprietors of the Daily News-Advertiser, and the Daily aud Semi-Weekly World, of
Vancouver, are again warmly thanked for their papers, which are generously given to the Institution, and are much appreciated by the patients.
Finally I have to thank the Departments under which I work, the Provincial Secretary's
and the Public Works', for the uniform courtesy and consideration shewn in responding to my
views and recommendations as far as possible. In an institution having, as this one has, and
must have in the future, a tendency to rapid increase concurrently with the increase of population, the demands upon the accommodation and resources necessarily outgrow the supplies,
and the strain upon the annual appropriations inevitably grows greater year by year. I fully
recognise the necessity for economy in all branches of the Public Service, and as far as lies in
my power I practice all the economy I can consistently with efficiency.
I feel that the Government supports me in aiming at efficiency in the management of the
Asylum, and is truly desirous of bettering the lot, and promoting the recovery of those of the
community who have the misfortune to become insane, and I offer them my best thanks accordingly.
I have, etc.,
G. F. Bodington, M. D.,
Medical Superintendent.
March 1st, 1897. 60 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
851
ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT
Of the operations of the Asylum for the Insane, New Westminster, for the Year
ending 31st December,  1896.
Table No. 1.
Showing movements of patients in the Asylum for the year ending 31st December, 1896.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
130
50
Female.
34
14
Total.
164
Admitted during the year ;—
By Lientenant-Governor's Warrant . . .
5
44
1
1
12
1
6
56
2
Re-admitted	
64
Discharged during the year :—
17
12
2
180
38
142
615
473
142
48
19
228
6
10
1
23
22
3
As unimproved	
31
7
Total number of discharges during the year..
Died	
17
2
48 I
57
29
173
144
171
Total number admitted since opening the Asylum
ii               discharged           n                     n
a              died                     n                    n
a             escaped              n                  n
788
297
168
8
122
22
419 1
190 I
8 J
617
29
171
Table No. 2.
Showing the maximum and minimum number of patients resident in the Asylum, the total
number of days' stay of patients, and the daily average number of patients in the Asylum
during the year ending 31st December, 1896.
Maximum number of patients (on the 25th July).. .
Minimum » » (on the 1st January)
Collective days' stay of all patients during the year
Daily average of population  	
Male.
143
130
50,855
138.94
Female.
36
34
11,892
32.49
Total.
179
164
62,747
171.43 852
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1896
Table No. 3.
Showing the social state of the patients received during the year 1896, and also of the total
number received since the opening of the Asylum.
Social State.
Admissions of
year.
Admissions since opening.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
12
38
10
4
22
42
136
331
148
129
44
265
375
148
Total	
14
50
64
615
173
788
Table No. 4.
Showing the religious denomination of the patients received during the year  1896, and also
of the total number received since the opening of the Asylum.
Admissions of
year.
Admissions since
opening.
Denomination of Religion.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Church of England	
Roman Catholic	
Presbyterian	
Methodist	
18
8
7
3
4
2
1
5
2
1
3
2
"2
22
11
10
5
4
2
3
5
2
64
127
98
64
43
24
14
39
171
35
53
33
21
30
2
6
9
15
4
173
180
131
85
73
26
20
48
186
39
Total	
50
14
615
788 60 Viot.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
853
Table No. 5.
Showing the place of birth of  the patients received  during the year,  and  also of the total
number received since the opening of the Asylum.
Admissions of
year.
Admissions since
opening.
Place of Birth.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
England  	
Scotland	
Ireland  	
Wales  	
18
3
2
3
2
2
2
1
20
5
1
2
3
2
133
37
45
6
22
2
39
42
2
2
19
66
18
27
68
4
1
1
81
35
10
20
7
12
15
26
14
14
2
5
13
168
47
65
0
22
Germany	
2
46
4
4
54
2
2
1
9
3
2
1
2
2
3
1
2
11
5
5
1
2
1
34
//             Ontario	
a            Quebec	
Maritime (N.B., N.S., P.E.I.)	
92
32
41
2
2
1
73
4
1
Japan	
1
94
Total	
50
14
64
615
173
788
Table No. 6.
Showing the place of residence from which patients were received during the year 1896.
Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
9
4
11
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
3
2
1
15
13
4
Port Moody	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
150-Mile House	
Mud Bay	
42
14
56 854
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1896
Table No.  6.—Concluded.
Showing the place of residence from which patients were received during the year 1896.
Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
42
14
56
Port Hammond	
Total    	
50
14
64
n                                a               Island	
34
16
7
7
41
23
Total	
50
14
64
Table No. 7.
Showing length of residence in the Asylum of those discharged during the year 1896.
Reg.
No.
Initials.
Sex.
When admitted.
When discharged.
Remarks.
362
M. L. B.
F.
May 1st,
1892...
January
18th,   1896....
Recovered.
660
R. J. B.
M.
November 11th,
1895...
„
24th,       „    	
Unimproved.
591
E. B. B.
F.
October 19th,
«     ..
. February
24th,      „   ....
Improved.
265
P. M.
F.
November 7th,
//   ...
//
25th,      „   ....
Improved.
509
S. L.
M.
March 12th,
1893...
.  March
2nd,      ,,   ....
Recovered.
673
J. F. H.
M.
February 17th,
1896...
„
4th,      a   	
Unimproved.
671
A. H.
M.
February 4th,
n   ...
ii
16th,      „   ....
Recovered.
678
J. C.
M.
March 6th,
a   .
,i
19th,      ii   	
Recovered.
633
A. S. J.
M.
July 6th,
1895...
a
28th,      „   	
Improved.
585
G. E.
M.
August 10th,
1894...
. April
1st,        „    	
Improved.
680
E. F.
F.
March 11th,
1896...
//
Sth,      „   ....
Unimproved.
645
J. H.
M.
July 30th,
1S95...
n
18th,      a   	
Recovered.
675
J. W. R.
M.
February 19th,
1896...
„
18th,      „   	
Recovered.
668
J. N.
M.
January 14th,
»   .
a
24th,      „   ....
Recovered.
622
E. A. C.
F.
April 11th,
1895...
. May
1st,       „   ....
Improved.
683
E. B.
F.
April 9th,
1896...
a
15th,      i,   ....
Improved.
658
M. L.
M.
October 10th,
1895...
I,
22nd,      i,   ....
Recovered.
666
B. W. H.
M.
January Sth,
1896...
n
23rd,      „   ....
Recovered.
360
J. B.
F.
July 9th,
1895...
n
23rd,      -,   ....
Improved.
679
P. M.
M.
March 6th,
1896...
. June
9th,      „   ....
Recovered.
693
P. S.
M.
Juno 4th,
;/     . . .
«
13th,      „   ....
Improved.
677
H. O. B.
M.
February 28th,
//
a
18th,      ii   ....
Improved.
694
J. O.
M.
June 9th,
ii     ■
. July
3rd,      „   ...
Recovered.
676
J. H.
M.
February 21st,
ii
13th,      „   ....
Recovered.
661
J. G. W.
F.
November 22nd,
1895...
,
21st,       „   	
Recovered.
703
T. C.
M.
July 10th,
1896...
„
27th,      ,,   ....
Recovered.
686
0. S.
M.
April 30th,
a
„
Slst,      „   ....
Recovered.
652
S. L.
M.
August 30th,
1895...
. August
4th,      „   ....
Improved.
664
A. R.
F.
December 23rd,
»   .
»
6th,      „   ....
Improved.
640
F. F.
F.
July 13th,
»   .
//
6th,      „   ....
Recovered.
684
E. A. C. B.
M.
April 17th,
1896...
a
6th,      „   ....
Improved.
665
T. W.
M.
January 3rd,
//       .  .  .
a
6th,      „   ....
Improved.
663
E. G.
M.
November 27th,
1895...
.
6th,      /,   ....
Improved. 60 Viot.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
855
Tarle No.  7. - Concluded.
Showing length of residence in the Asylum of those discharged during the year 1896.
Reg.
No.
Initials.
Sex.
When admitted.
When discharged.
Remarks.
580
T. F.
M.
July 6th,
1894....
August         6th,   1896....
Recovered.
315
R. A. C.
F.
August 28th,
1890.
12th.      „   ..
Improved.
698
J. McM.
M.
June 26th,
1896.
18th,
/   ..
Improved.
611
C. McD.
F.
January 3rd,
1895.
September 13th,
/    ..
Recovered.
695
J. A. C.
M.
June 12th,
1896.
14th,
,   .
Recovered.
682
J. B.
M.
March 25th,
//   .
24th,
/    ..
Improved.
710
J. R.
M.
August 10th,
/;     .
25th,
,
Recovered.
685
C. P.
F.
April 29th,
il     .
28th,
/    ..
Improved.
265
P. M.
F.
June 11th,
il     .
October     23rd,
i   ..
Improved.
706
B. J.
M.
July 25th,
il     .
23rd,
i   ..
Improved.
667
J. T. M.
M.
January 10th,
tl
31st,
i   ..
Improved.
548
L. b.
F.
January 11th,
1894.
November   2nd,
i   ..
Recovered.
699
A. F.
F.
June 26th,
1896.
19th,
i   .
Improved.
4S4
1. M. J.
F.
September 13th,
1892.
December 19th,
i   .
Recovered.
713
E. H. T.
M.
September 7th,
1896.
30th,
,   ..
Improved.
Table No. 8.
Showing age, length of residence, and proximate cause of death of those who died during the
year 1896.
Reg.
No.
656
246
139
539
583
687
721
598
525
Initials.
R. T.
H. W. H.
J. F.
H. H.
A. H.
W. B. J.
L. F.
C. D.
T. M. R.
Sex.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
41
49
63
68
36
70
22
Not known.
33
Date of death.
January 12th
January 25th
April 3rd ....
July 29th ....
October 12th.
October 19th.
November 13th.
November 19th.
November 23rd.
Residence in Asylum.
Years
8
16
2
2
Mos.
Days.
24
19
23
6
19
14
3
15
8
Proximate cause of death.
General paralysis.
Epilepsy.
Aneurism of aorta.
Cancer on face and neck.
Syphilitic disease of the
brain.
Bright's disease of the kidneys.
Acute delirious mania.
Chronic mania.
General paralysis. 856
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1896
Table No. 9.
Showing trades, callings, and occupations of patients admitted during the year 1896.
Occupations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
11
3
1
11
3
10
1
10
13
1
3
8
1
2
1
1
1
13
1
3
No occupation	
Painters	
2
10
1
2
1
1
1
50
14
04
Table No.  10.
Showing the prohational discharges for the year 1896. 60 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
857
Summary of prohational discharges.
Number to whom prohational leave was granted.
Discharged recovered    	
a improved	
n unimproved	
Returned to the Asylum	
Died before expiration-of leave	
Absent on probation, 31st December, 1896 .
Male.    ! Female.     Total.       Male.     Female.      Total
11
19
Table No.  11.
Periods.
Length of residence of
those  remaining  in
oi -t a, io oi Oi i- **         Asylum on December 31st, 1896.
Periods of treatment of
those who were dis-
01 'c         charged    recovered
during the year.
Periods of treatmentof
those who were discharged     improved
during the year.
Periods of treatmentof
those who were discharged uni mproved
during the year.
9
2
1
4
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
„      2    //   3        ii        	
1
3    n   4        »        	
4
2
»      4    v   5        „
„      5    //   6        a          	
6   „   7       „       	
„     7   „   8       a       	
1
2
„      8    n   9        a	
9    a 10        »
1
2
2
18
23
16
10
12
9
8
6
5
10
11
9
»    10    a 11        a
„    11    „ 12       a               	
2
3
1
1
i,     2    a   3      a
3      il     4         /;
a      5    ,i   6      a      ...
1
a      6    //   7     «
7    „   8     a      	
8    //   9      n
,;         9      //   10         II
i,    10   « 15     a
a    15    » 20      a      ....
//    20 years and upwards	
Total	
171
23
22
3
Patients remaining in Asylum 31st December, 1896.
Males.
Females.
Total.
Whites	
127
16
27
1
154
Indians	
1
16
Total	
143
28
171 858
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1896
Table No.  12.
Showing admissions, discharges, deaths, escapes; number resident at close of each year;
increase or decrease each year; percentage of recoveries; percentage of deaths, from the
opening of the Asylum to the present date, 31st December, 1896.
Years
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
18
15
12
29
22
14
17
18
17
13
7
8
11
21
27
39
29
41
57
54
64
49
80
62
64
1
10
4
3
11
6
9
5
4
5
3
4
5
5
16
21
19
19
22
20
18
21
13
29
23
21
15
19
10
25
1
5
3
10
5
3
8
8
3
4
12
20
13
14
19
20
9
16
14
19
32
35
37
36
41
4S
48
49
49
51
61
65
77
82
100
117
123
135
133
162
164
171
13
3
2
7
1
2
10
4
12
5
18
17
0
12
29
ti
SD-7
+^ .2
CD
ti £
O r&
fe
Pm
18
31
26
48
54
49
54
54
58
61
55
57
60
72
88
104
106
123
157
171
187
184
213
224
228
o.ou
66.60
33.33
10.34
50.00
43.85
47.05
27.77
23.52
38.46
42.85
50.00
45.45
23.80
62.96
53.84
65.51
46.34
38.59
37.37
28.12
42.85
16.24
46.77
35.93
Ph
u.oo
16.12
11.53
20.83
9 35
6.12
16.10
14.81
8.62
8.19
3.63
5.26
3.33
6.94
6.81
4.80
2.87
3.25
7.64
11.1.9
6.95
7.60
8.92
8.92
3.94
Table No.  13.
Expenditure for the year 1896.
Provisions :—
Butter _ $1,127 10
Oatmeal and cornmeal  367 43
Sugar  233 51
Cracked wheat and rice  113 20
Eggs  112 20
Ham and baeon  244 28
Tea  130 32
Salt and pepper  28 88
Beef and mutton  2,419 34
Vegetables  443 04
Fish  316 90
Milk  742 65
Bread  1,620 32
Tapioca and sago  16 03
Vinegar  2 75
Beans  57 50
Carried forward  7,975 45 60 Vict. Report on thi-: Asylum for the Insane. 859
Brought forward.
Lard   	
Currants and raisins	
Sal soda	
Brooms and brushes	
Laundry and Castile soaps	
Tobacco	
Cheese	
Worcestershire sauce	
Coffee	
Evaporated apples       109 00
Pearl barley	
Mustard	
Syrup    	
Flour	
Matches	
Coal oil	
Yeast powder	
Prunes	
Pearline	
Small groceries	
Cream of tartar	
Maccaroni	
Split peas	
Bicarbonate of soda	
Capers	
Cocoa	
Bird seed	
Bath brick	
Biscuit	
Loaf sugar	
Allspice and nutmegs	
Blacking    	
Clay pipes	
Fuel asii Light :—Coal, firewood, gas and electric light  3,336 81
Water  518 32
Medicines :—Drugs and surgical instruments  712 75
Clothing :—Wearing apparel and tailor's fittings  915 65
Furniture :—Furniture, bedding, etc  1,071 25
Transport of Lunatics and Attendants      86 45
Miscellaneous :—Funerals, P. 0. box, shoemaker's fittings, etc  1,340 51
Salaries     15,280 62
7,975 45
6 80
41 38
14 47
28 95
64 00
349 71
17 53
16 20
125 00
109 00
13 56
14 70
115 50
50 30
24 30
2 90
7 50
127 26
33 60
23 80
9 75
8 52
12 40
1 75
3 30
20 60
6 25
1 50
2 00
3 60
4 49
1 65
3 25
9,240 97
32,503 33
Lands and Works     1,562 47
Total $34,065 80
Table No.  14.
Showing the amount of money received from paying patients and other sources during the
year 1896.
From all sources for the half-year ending June 30th, 1896     $2,319 91
M quarter-year ending September 30th, 1896        648 66
„ „ "      December 31st, 1896       773 14
Total $3,741 71 860
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1896
Table No.  15.
Showing the number of days' work done by the male patients during the year 1896 and how
they were employed.
Assisting carpenter	
«        gardener 	
n        plumber	
n        plasterer 	
ii        cook	
a        shoemaker	
»        tailor	
ii        in the laundry .
n        on the grounds .
//        ward-work
Doorkeeper	
Stoker	
Porter	
How employed.
Total.
No. of days.
3
505
527
238
60
,023
32
252
,364
,849
,085
366
366
366
23,033
Table No.  16.
Showing- the articles made and repaired in the female ward during the year 1896.
Articles.
Made.
Repaired.
Aprons	
48
9
9
107
24
29
868
48
21
4
17
40
100
112
Pillow ticks	
//     slips	
162
Shirts                                  	
940
117
Tea cloths	
15
14
100
Tapes          	
Towels          	
795
Neckties	
24 60 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
861
Table No. 17.
Showing the average number of patients per day, and the average cost per day and per month
for the year 1896.
Months.
January  	
February  	
March	
April	
May	
June      	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November-	
December	
Total
Average number of patients.
166
167
171
169
169
173
177
174
174
172
170
171
Average daily
expenses.
171
92.15
99.39
90.04
93.82
83.97
81.99
74.88
78.28
83.88
90.83
96.10
98.56
86.65
Average cost
per capita
per day.
59
53
55
50
47
42
45
48
53
56
58
51f
Average cost
per- capita
per month.
17.17
17.25
16.32
16.65
15.40
14.22
13.11
13.94
14.47
16.37
16.95
17.86
15.8011/12
Table No.  18.
Showing the average cost per patient per month and per day for the past seven years, ending-
December 31st, 1896.
Year.
Average cost per
capita per month.
Average cost per
capita per day.
1S90	
19.724
14.81
15.454.
15.85 5/6
14.79J
16.68|
15.80 11/12
16.16 3/28
64|
1891	
48J
m
51|
1892	
1893 .                 	
1S94	
48|
1895	
1896	
54 5/6
51|
Average for seven years     -
52 37/42 862 Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1896
Table No. 19.
Showing the return of garden produce for the year 1896.
Apples  8 bushels.
Beans      ....     48 gallons.
Black and red currants      174 pounds.
Corn  198 ears.
Cabbage  1,363 pounds.
Cauliflower  7      »
Carrots 12,914
Celery  300
Gooseberries  92      u
Hay 12,000
Lettuce  730 head.
Onions      321 pounds.
Potatoes 17,444
Peas  53 gallons.
Plums  45 pounds.
Rhubarb   247
Raspberries      112      //
Radishes  306       M
Turnips  2,801       n
Parsnips  6,432       n
G. F. BODINGTON, M. D.,
Medical Superintendent.
VICTORIA, B. C. :
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1897.

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