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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE RESPECTING THE POLICE AND PRISONS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1896

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 ANNUAL   REPORT
BUPEEINTENDBNT OF POLICE
RESPECTING   THE
POLICE AND PRISONS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
YEAR ENDING 31st OCTOBER,
1895
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Richard Wolfkndkn, Printer- to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1896. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 879
REPORT.
Provincial Police Department, Superintendent's Office,
Victoria, B.C., February 12th, 1896.
The Honourable
The Attorney-General, Victoria.
Sir,—I have the honour to hand you herewith my Annual  Report upon the Police,
Common Gaols, Prisons, and Reformatories, for the year ending October 31st, 1895.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 881
CHAPTER 45.
An Act respecting Police and Special Constables.
[21st February, 1895.]
HER MAJESTY, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of
the Province of British Columbia, enacts as follows :—
Short Title.
1. This Act may be cited as the " Provincial Police Act, 1895."
Appointment of Superintendent of Police,
2. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may, from time to time, appoint a fit and proper
person to be Superintendent of Police within the Province.
Appointment of Police Constables, their Duties and Powers.
3. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may, from time to time, direct and authorize the
Superintendent of Police to appoint any fit and proper persons to serve as police constables,
under and within the jurisdiction of such Superintendent of Police, and such Superintendent
may remove any such police constable, subject to the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council; and every police constable shall obey all lawful directions and be subject to the
government of such Superintendent of Police, and shall be charged with all the powers, rights
and responsibilities which belong by law to constables, and as such constable shall have
authority to act in any part of the Province.
Duties of Superintendent.
4. The Superintendent of Police shall keep such accounts, make such returns, and collect
such information and perform such other duties as the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, from
time to time, prescribes and requires.
Regulations and Disposition—Remuneration.
5. The Superintendent of Police and every such constable shall be subject to such regulations in respect to the order, management and disposition of the police, and shall receive out
of sums provided therefor by the Legislature such rates of pay or allowance as are, from time
to time, prescribed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
When Special Constables may be Appointed.
6. Any Justice of the Peace may, in the absence of a regular constable, appoint a special
constable for any specific duty, and any Covernment Agent or two Justices of the Peace may,
whenever the ordinary officers appointed for preserving the peace are insufficient for the
preservation of the peace and for tire protection of property, and whenever he or they shall be
satisfied upon the oath of a credible witness that any riot or indictable offence has taken place
or may be apprehended, call upon and appoint so many persons as he or they shall think fit to
act as special constables, and every special constable appointed hereunder shall have the same
powers and immunities as other constables (except that such constables shall not serve or
execute any civil process); and such special constables shall be deemed to have been discharged
when the occasion for their services has passed. The said Government Agent or said Justices,
or one of them, upon appointing such special constables, shall have power to, and shall forthwith, administer to each of thena the following oath :— 882 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
Oath.
" I, , do swear that I will faithfully,  without favour, affection, or ill-will,
discharge the duty  of special  constable,   and   that  I  will  cause  the  peace  to be kept and
preserved to the best of my power while I continue in office.    So help me God."
Repeals C. A. 1888, c. 96.
7. " An Act respecting Police and Special Constables," being Chapter 96 of the " Consolidated Acts, 1888," is hereby repealed.
Comes into force 1st July, 1895.
8. This Act shall come into force on the 1st day of July, A.D. 1895.
Provincial Police Regulations.
Government House, Victoria,
The 17th day of August, 1895.
On the recommendation of the Attorney-General, and under the provisions of the
"Provincial Police Act, 1895,"
His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has been pleased to make and prescribe
the following rules and regulations in respect to the order, management, disposition, and
remuneration of the Provincial Police force :—
Regulations.
1. There shall be a Superintendent of the police force, who shall be paid such salary as
may from time to time be determined by Order in Council.
2. The force shall consist of a sergeant and such number of constables as is directed by
Order in Council in that behalf. The Superintendent shall fill all vacancies in the force as at
present constituted from among duly qualified applicants, and shall station the constables
where required throughout the Province, altering the stations or removing the constables as
the changing circumstances may require.
3. The sergeant and constables shall be paid such salaries as are fixed by Order of the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council upon the report of the Superintendent, who, in recommending
the salaries, shall take into consideration the duties ordinarily to be performed by an officer,
and whether they are continuous or occasional, the ability in performance of the same or
special aptness for detective work displayed by him, the length of time he has been employed
in the service, and the cost of living at the place where he may be stationed, in view of its
remoteness or otherwise, or of the accommodation there provided.
4. The Superintendent, sergeant, and men shall, upon their appointment, take the oath of
allegiance and an oath of office in the following form, which oath of office may be administered
by the Superintendent or a Justice of the Peace, and shall be kept on record by the Superintendent :—
"I, A. B., having been appointed Provincial Police Constable, do solemnly swear that I
will truly, faithfully, and impartially perform the duties appertaining to the said office, according to the best of my skill and ability :    So help me God."
5. Any member of the force as now existing, who has not taken an oath of allegiance and
an oath of office, shall take them in the manner prescribed in the last preceding section.
6. No person will be appointed to serve as a police constable unless—
(a.) He is a subject of Her Majesty by birth or naturalization;
(b.)   He has been a resident of the Province during one year prior to his application for
appointment; 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 883
(c.)   He is able to read and write understanding^ ;
(d.) He is generally intelligent, according to the judgment of the Superintendent;
(e.)   He is over twenty-one and under thirty-five years of age ;
(f.) He is of good health and of sound body and mind, and equal to  the performance of
police duty ;
(g.)  He is of good moral character and habits.
7. A candidate may be considered unfit for service and be rejected without any reason
being assigned, and every candidate may be required to undergo a medical examination, and is
to understand that he attends at his own risk as to trouble and expense connected with the
medical examination.
Superintendent.
8. The Superintendent shall receive his instructions direct from the Attorney-General's
Department, and shall have the general government of the force under his charge, subject to
the order of the Department.
9. He shall in such case be held responsible for the general conduct, good order, and
discipline of the sergeant and men, and for their regularity and efficiency, and he shall give
such personal attention and attendance as will secure this end.
10. The Superintendent shall instruct his officers in all the branches of their duty, and
for that purpose may retain constables newly appointed at headquarters for such time as is
deemed necessary.
11. He must be particular that the standing orders and regulations, and all others, either
emanating from himself or the Department, and given out from time to time, are strictly and
promptly obeyed.
12. He may at discretion suspend from duty any member of the force against whom a
complaint has been made, and the pay of such member shall not be allowed during the period
between his suspension and reinstatement or discharge, unless by order of the Department.
13. When, charges are preferred against constables he will investigate the same, and,
when of sufficient importance, will require witnesses on both sides to attend, and will hear
the evidence of the case.
14. He shall remove any constable who has rendered himself liable to dismissal under
these regulations, at the same time reporting the fact and cause to the Attorney-General's
Department, in order that the pleasure of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may be
expressed.
15. He shall also keep a nominal and descriptive roll of the officers and men of the force,
with the dates of their enrolment, and the salaries received by them.
16. He shall have general charge of the police department, and of all arms and ammunition, and property of every description belonging to the Government in the possession of or
under the charge of the force.
17. His headquarters shall be at Victoria, and he shall require the officers to report
thereat as often as he shall deem requisite, and shall then communicate to them such orders
and instructions as he may deem necessary.
18. He shall make out the pay-lists and prepare the estimates at the commencement of
every year for the expenditure of the police department, for the examination and approval of
the Attorney-General.
19. It is his duty to be thoroughly cognizant of all expenses incurred and moneys paid
out in connection with the department.
General Duties of the Police Force Constables.
20. Constables away from headquarters are to be under the direction of the Government
Agent of the district, to whom they shall report, and who shall consult and co-operate with the
Superintendent in meeting the police requirements of the district. Reports shall also be made
monthly to the Superintendent on forms to be provided. In addition to such reports,
constables shall, in important cases, report immediately to the Superintendent and obtain his
instructions or assistance, taking, however, such steps to apprehend the offender or secure
evidence as the nature of the case demands.
21. Where two or more constables are employed in the same district, either permanently
or casually, the senior in date of appointment shall, unless otherwise directed, take charge.
The Superintendent may give directions from time to time in this regard. 884 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
22. All constables, wherever employed for the time being, shall be auxiliary to each other,
and shall be subject to removal from place to place as the necessities of the service require.
23. It shall be the duty of the constable who was employed upon a case when it first arose
to report to the Superintendent as to further evidence to be procured for the trial, and to
industriously devote himself to the preparation of the case.
24. The men shall, under all circumstances, appear clean in uniform as well as person.
25. Any constable desiring leave of absence shall apply in writing to the Superintendent.
No leave of absence for a period greater than two weeks in one year shall be granted by the
Superintendent without authority from the Attorney-General's Department.
26. A constable is always on duty, whether in uniform or not, and should always assist
citizens legally requiring his services; if not in uniform, show his badge or state that he is a
constable.
27. Constables are strictly forbidden to frequent any tavern or house of ill-fame, unless
required to do so in discharge of their duty.
General Regulations.
28. A constable shall devote his whole time and attention to the police service, and shall
follow no other occupation or calling, directly or indirectly.
29. He shall promptly obey all lawful orders from his superior officers, and conform
himself to all rules and regulations which may be made from time to time for the benefit of
the service.
30. He shall clearly understand what powers are given to him by law and the Department for the efficient discharge of his duties. For this purpose he is recommended to read
carefully the instructions given to him respecting the general duties of a constable, and must
make himself familiar with the provisions of the "Criminal Code" affecting his duties.
31. He must be particularly cautious not to interfere idly or unnecessarily. When
required to act he will do so with decision and boldness. He must remember that there is no
qualification more indispensable than a perfect command of temper ; never allowing himself
to be moved in the slightest degree by any language or threats that may be used. If he does
his duty in a quiet and determined manner, such conduct will induce well disposed bystanders
to assist him, should he require it.
32. Upon no occasion, and under no pretence whatever, shall any officer or man of the
force accept any gratuity, present, or reward from any person for services rendered by him in
the discharge of his duties, without the express permission of the Superintendent.
33. All constables when travelling on duty shall keep themselves supplied with forms,
upon which they shall obtain vouchers for all expenses incurred by him. They shall not,
except under exceptional circumstances, or when duly authorized, issue vouchers in payment
of accounts. Vouchers must show upon the face the duty upon which the constable is
engaged. Vouchers shall be marked as correct by the constable, and certified by the Superintendent or Government Agent upon the report of the constable.
34. No constable shall quit the force without giving two weeks' notice, unless by consent
of the Superintendent. In case he quits without such consent or such notice, or be dismissed
from the force, all arrears of pay then due shall be forfeited.
35. Every officer and man who shall be dismissed, or who shall resign his office, must
forthwith, before he leaves the service, deliver up every article of dress and appointments
supplied to him.
36. Untruthfulness is a grave disqualification. Members of the force must speak the
truth at all times and under all circumstances, except in cases where they are not allowed by
the rules of the service to divulge facts within their knowledge, in which event they must
avoid saying anything.
37. To enable him to speak quite confidently, and to prevent the possibility of his
evidence being shaken, he is to jot down at the time in his memorandum book dates and other
particulars respecting events, accidents, or occurrences, to which he can always refer.
38. If a constable is called upon to act, he must do so with energy, promptness, and
determination, for, if he wavers or doubts, the criminal may escape, or the opportunity to
render assistance may be lost.
39. Every man of the force will be liable to dismissal for the following offences :—
Disobedience of orders, drunkenness, insolence in word or manner, violence, or coarse
language or behaviour. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 885
Neglect of duty.
Absence without leave.
Immoral conduct.
Conduct unbecoming an officer or member of the police.
Conduct injurious to the public service or public welfare.
Incapacity—mental, physical, or educational.
Contracting a debt under false or fraudulent pretences.
Entering houses of ill-fame Or taverns, unless in regular discharge of duty, and various
other offences unnecessary to class—all violations of rules and regulations included under the
general head of any breach of discipline.
40. Repeated complaints against any member of the force for incurring debts, and
evidence of continued and persistent neglect or refusal to pay just debts, or to support his
wife and family, shall be deemed unbecoming conduct, and will be cause for dismissal.
41. For any offence against the provisions of the Act or regulations, or for any neglect of
duty, the Superintendent shall fine any officer or man of the force offending. The fine shall
not exceed ten clays' pay.    Fines shall be deducted from the pay of the offenders.
42. Coolness and firmness will be expected in all cases, and in circumstances of peril all
must be careful to act together and to protect each other in the restoration of peace and order.
Whoever shrinks from danger or responsibility at such a moment is unworthy of a place in the
service, and will be discharged at once.
43. Any instance of unnecessary violence in striking a party in charge will be severely
punished. A constable must not use his baton because the party in his custody is violent in
behaviour or language. A constable is not to use language to persons to provoke or offend
them. Such conduct creates resistance in the party and hostile feeling towards the constable
among the bystanders. Every constable will recollect that in executing an arrest he is not
justified in doing more than is absolutely necessary for the safe custody of the person.
44. Members of the force are forbidden to smoke or drink when on duty.
45. All matters relating to the police department shall be strictly kept secret and no
communication, whether in writing, verbally or otherwise, in any way connected with the
force or its operation, shall be made or given to any one without permission, under penalty of
dismissal.
46. The men on and off duty are to consider themselves liable to be called on at all times,
and will prepare themselves, when required, at the shortest notice.
47. No member shall, directly or indirectly, be concerned in making any compromise or
arrangement between thieves or other criminals and persons who have suffered by their acts,
with a view to permitting the criminals to escape the penalties provided by law ; and any
officer or constable who has taken any part in such compromises or arrangements, or has any
knowledge thereof and fails to give information to his superior officer, shall be subject to
immediate dismissal.
48. Members of the force shall abstain from the expressioir of political or religious
opinions which may in the slightest degree be calculated to give offence, and shall not, after
appointment (except as a matter of police duty), attend any political meeting.
49. No certificate of character shall be granted by the Superintendent—
(a.) If the constable is dismissed the service ;
(b.) If the constable has been repeatedly guilty of misconduct, although of a slight nature;
(c.) If the constable has been guilty of any misconduct of a serious nature;
(d.) If the constable leaves the service without giving due notice of his intention so to do.
Complaints.
50. The statement of any person making a complaint against the police at the station is
to be taken down in writing, and submitted to the Superintendent. The complainant must be
requested to sign the statement, and the officer taking down the complaint is to ascertain from
the person complaining whether he is willing to make his charge to the Superintendent,
should it be deemed necessary to send it there.
51. Complaints by police against each other are to be made in writing and signed, and
are to be submitted to the Superintendent.
52. Grievances or causes of complaint by the police can at any time be laid before the
Superintendent, 886 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
Regulations respecting Constables who hold Additional Offices.
53. Constables who hold other appointments, such as those of Mining Recorder or Assessor
and Collector, shall, so far as their duties as constable are concerned, be under the same
regulations as other members of the force.
54. The salaries of such constables, where the same are not provided for by a special
vote, shall be such as are fixed in accordance with these regulations, with such increased
remuneration, if any, as is provided by Order in Council. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 887
REPORT.
On the first of July, 1895, pursuant to the provisions of the "Provincial Police Act,
1895," I assumed full charge of the Provincial Police force.
All existing appointments in connection with the force were continued, and the officers
then employed, together with those subsequently appointed, have since been superintended
and controlled in accordance with said Act, and with the rules and regulations issued thereunder.
It will be observed from the table on page 889, that a large number of those therein
enrolled as constables are required to act in the capacity of Government Agents, assessors,
collectors, recorders, gaolers or guards, as the case may be, as well.
In these cases it has been found that the work incident to the several offices last mentioned, has absorbed so much of the officer's time that but little remained for the performance
of police duty.
Owing to the development and increasing importance of the mining industries of Cariboo
and Kootenay, and the consequent necessity for further police protection in these districts than
can be furnished by the regular force, some extra constables should be appointed and stationed
in these localities.
I would therefore respectfully suggest that the sum of $42,000 be provided for the payment of salaries for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1897, instead of the sum of $37,000 as
appropriated in the last estimates of expenditure.
The Force.
As stated on page 889, the force at present consists of one superintendent, one sergeant
and seventy constables.
In addition to the regular force special constables are employed in various portions of the
Province, as occasion may require. They are usually employed for a specific duty or when a
regular officer is not available, and their duties are not continuous.
My personal attention has been given to the general conduct, good order, regularity and
efficiency of the men. A nominal and descriptive roll of the officers and men, with dates of
their enrolment and salaries has been kept and at the end of each month a monthly report,
showing how the time of each constable was employed throughout the whole month, has been
forwarded to me. By this means a correct record of the movements of the police throughout
the Province, and the crime committed in each district, has been received and filed at police
headquarters at Victoria.
I am pleased to be able to state that the existing force generally fulfil all requirements,
and that standing orders and regulations emanating from the Superintendent's department
have been carried out with promptness and dispatch, and that the efforts of the men, as a
whole, have been effective in preventing crime and maintaining good order and peace in the
neighbourhoods where they are stationed, or where they may have official oversight, with very
good results as compared with previous years.
Leave of absence, varying from one to fourteen days, has been granted in five cases only
during the year. One investigation, under section 13 of the Regulations, has been held with
a result of an acquittal. No suspension, reinstatements or discharges have taken place, and
no fines for neglect of duty, or for any other infraction of the Act or Regulations, have been
imposed.
Secret Service.
There should be attached to the department at headquarters one or two thoroughly
experienced detectives for the investigation of important criminal cases.
At the present time there are no such officers connected with the force and I am
compelled to employ the regular police for work which, in many cases, they are not entirely
competent to perform. 888 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
The administration of justice in this Province is attended with great expense and it is
desirable that the best results should be obtained. In order to accomplish this I would
strongly advise the appointment of suitable men for this service.
Police Protection for the Coast.
Frequent appeals have been made by settlers and others residing on the coast of the
Island and Mainland for a better system of police protection, their property being more or
less a prey to wandering whiskey peddlers and smugglers, who constantly infest our shores and
travel in sloops and boats of all descriptions.
Many of these offenders come from the American side with whiskey and all sorts of
dutiable goods, which they sell to whites and Indians all along the coast, returning to
Washington or Alaska with goods which they have stolen from unprotected settlers, who can
ill afford to suffer such loss.
The effect of this sort of traffic is seriously felt in the logging camps and in Indian villages
visited by these law-breakers, who leave a trail of drunkenness and misery wherever they go,
sometimes being followed by the most fatal results to human life.
I have been asked to urge upon the Government the necessity of providing a police patrol
steamer for coast protection, but I hesitate to press for the appropriation of so large a sum,
since to secure a proper and efficient service at least two steamers would be required ; and
further, the nature of the crimes so far reported do not, in my opinion, warrant such a heavy
expenditure.
I would strongly recommend that proper recommendations be made to the Dominion
Government to induce them to equip a suitable steamer as a revenue cutter, to protect their
customs laws and regulations, now frequently violated. If this were done, the Provincial
Government might co-operate with the Dominion authorities by furnishing police assistance
for such steamer, and in this way better police protection might be afforded, with reasonable
cost to the Province.
Indians.
Numerous complaints have been made to me by ministers of religion and others,
concerning the large supply of intoxicating liquor which is furnished to Indians throughout
the Province. These statements are undoubtedly true, and I may say at once that I believe
the Indians succeed in obtaining nearly all the intoxicating liquor that they are able to pay
for. Notwithstanding the fact that the penalties for infractions of the " Indian Liquor Act"
are very heavy, and although the Act is rigorously enforced by the authorities in each of the
coast cities, it is safe to say that in these towns there are always to be found persons who will
take the risk of supplying liquor to Indians. The same may be said of other parts of the
Province; and in many places where spirituous liquor is not easily obtainable, the Indians
manufacture an intoxicant which is freely used by them, with far more injurious effects than
are produced by liquor obtained by purchase.
The police use every effort to suppress this traffic, or at least to keep it within bounds,
but they realize that it is almost impossible to do so, in spite of the large number of convictions
annually obtained.
I am pleased to be able to report that in all other respects our Indians are peaceable and
law-abiding, and that breaches of the criminal law amongst them are of rare occurrence. They
are self supporting and industrious. 59 Vict.
Police and Prisons Report.
889
LIST OF PROVINCIAL  CONSTABLES, WITH STATIONS.
No.
Name.
Residence.
District.
Remarks.
Date op
Appointment.
Monthly
Salary.
Hussey, Fred'k S..
Langley, John M..
Seeley, James	
Donahue, Edvvd	
Kirby, James    .   .
Bain, James G	
Hance, Thomas A 	
McKen, James	
Parker, William	
Stephenson, Wm	
Wollaston, Fred	
St. Laurent, Joseph	
Greaves, Henry B 	
Maitland-Dougall, J. W .
Campbell, John D	
Barnes, H. W	
Victoria	
Si 50 00
110 00
1
2
Kyoquot	
Alberni 	
July  1, 1895
n
ll
60 00
60 00
3
Echo Cove..:	
Fort Simpson	
Port Essington	
Forks Quesnelle	
60 00
4
5
6
7
n      	
Cariboo	
Cowichan 	
East Kootenay..
n
West Kootenay .
n
n
M
Lillooet	
Nanaimo	
u            	
11          	
II         	
It         	
II         	
11        	
11         	
N. Westminster.
Vancouver 	
Victoria	
Yale	
Government Agent, Collector, and
110 00
60 00
75 00
50 00
8
125 00
9
150-Mile Post	
Special, mounted	
Government Agent and Constable
Stage Guard and Special	
125 00
10
50 00
11
12
Forks Quesnelle	
Ashcroft	
Quesnellemouth	
133 33
125 00
14
60 00
15
Chief Constable	
Gaoler and Constable	
70 00
16
17
Esquimalt	
70 00
60 00
18
19
Cullen, James	
Edwards, Charles M	
Lang, F. C	
Stirrett, J. S	
Fauquier, F. D	
French, Wm	
Graham, Jos. D	
Hooson, John E	
Kirkup, John	
Sandilands, E. M 	
Sproat, Alex.	
Hurley, Daniel	
Mitchell, Geo	
Anderson, W. B	
Belyea, J	
Kirkham, Wm	
Cassidy, Geo	
Drake, Samuel	
Hutchison, John
40 00
100 00
20
75 00
21
22
Nakusp	
Kootenay Reclamation
Revelstoke — [Works
60 00
75 00
23
24
25
Government Agent and Constable
Nov. 1, 1895
July 1, 1895
ii
n
Dec. 'l, 1895
July 1, 1895
Oct. 15, 1895
July 1, 1895
ri
n
Sept. 1, 1S95
July 1, 1895
it
ii
n
Dec.   1, 1895
Total	
110 00
75 00
26
Mining Recorder and Constable ..
110 00
27
Nelson	
Three Forks	
75 00
28
29
75 00
100 00
30
31
Lillooet	
Clinton	
50 00
30 00
32
Assessor, Collector, and Constable
90 00
33
30 00
34
60 00
35
Oyster Harbour 	
Nanaimo	
30 00
36
37
Assistant Gaoler and Constable ..
80 00
70 00
38
Wellington	
Nanaimo	
Northfield	
Wellington	
60 00
39
65 00
Special and Nightwatchman	
Constable	
Chief Constable and Gaoler	
41
42
43
44
Stephenson, David	
Woollacott, Philip
Scharschmidt, P	
Marquette, J. B	
Bullock- Yebster, W. H..
Lister, R. B	
Drummond, A. D	
Heal, Fred. G	
McEenna, John	
20 00
80 00
100 00
80 00
45
60 00
46
Mission City	
New Westminster  ....
Plumper's Pass	
Victoria District   	
60 00
47
48
49
50
51
Chief Constable	
Collector and Constable	
90 00
70 00
60 00
30 00
60 00
52
Sidney	
Kamloops	
53
54
Prout, William	
Nightwatchman, Gov't Buildings.
60 00
55
Batcbelor, O. S	
Beattie, Martin	
Burr, Josenh W	
Canceller, Herbert	
70 00
56
Assessor, Collector, and Constable
90 00
57
80 00
58
North Bend	
Government Agent and Constable
60 00
59
60
Deans, R. W	
Dodd, William	
Gillie, James D	
Hunter, Hugh 	
McLaren, James	
McLean, Hugh	
McMynn, Wm. Graham .
Tunstall, James C	
Parke, H. R	
Yale	
Nicola Lake	
Granite Creek	
Kamloops	
60 00
61
62
„       .
110 00
60 00
63
Collector and Constable	
Convict Guard and Constable ....
100 00
04
65
65 00
66
Midway	
75 00
67
68
Assessor, Collector, and Constable
90 00
69
Sutherland, Daniel	
60 00
70
"         	
$5,133 33 890 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
Alberni District.
Clayoquot, West Coast.
Stanley Spain, Senior Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
James Seeley, 2nd Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
These officers were appointed for patrol duty on the West Coast of Vancouver Island.
They have been furnished with a sloop for this purpose, but such means of transport has not
proved satisfactory and the service is not so effective as could be desired.
Cassiar District.
Echo Cove, Naas River.
Edward Donahue, Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
This officer gives the whole of his time to the performance of police duty on the Naas
River.
Fort Simpson.
John Flewin, Government Agent, Collector of Revenue, and Constable; salary, $110 per
month
Mr. Flewin devotes the greater portion of his time to the performance of his duties as
Government Agent and Collector of Revenue. There is very little police duty to be performed
at Port Simpson.
Port Essington, Skeena River.
James Kirby, Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
The services of an active constable are necessary at this point, particularly during the
fishing season.
Cariboo District.
Forks Quesnelle.
James G. Bain, Constable ; salary, $75 per month.
This subdivision is becoming an important mining district, and it has been found necessary
to appoint an officer with headquarters at this point, owing to a large influx of disorderly
characters.    Mr. Bain assists in the collection of revenue.
Chilcotin.
Thomas A. Hance, Constable ; salary, $50 per month.
This officer performs very little active police duty, but the presence of a constable has had
a good effect in maintaining order amongst the Indians.
Barkerville.
James McKen, Collector of Revenue and Constable; salary, $125 per month.
Mr. McKen performs very little police duty.
150-Mile Post.
William Parker, Mounted Constable; salary, $125 per month.
This constable is actively employed during the summer months on patrol duty between
Soda Creek and Bridge Creek. He is not under salary during the winter. The above
allowance is for salary, hotel expenses, horse hire and stabling.
Frederick Rose, resident constable ; salary, $50 per month.
Constable Rose has charge of the lock-up and performs local police duty.
Quesnelle Forks.
Wm. Stephenson, Mining Recorder, Collector of Revenue, Justice of the Peace and
Constable ; salary, $133.33 per month.
Mr. Stephenson does not perform any police duty, his time being fully occupied in the
collection of revenue and as District Magistrate. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 891
150-Mile Post.
Fred. Wollaston, Stage Guard and Special Constable; salary, $125 per month, which
amount covers all travelling expenses en route between Ashcroft and Barkerville. Mr.
Wollaston is employed during the summer months only and performs no duty other than that
of stage guard.
Cowichan District.
Duncan's.
Jas. Maitland-Dougall, Chief Constable ; salary, $70 per month.
Henry B. Greaves, Constable; salary, $60 per month.
These officers render assistance in the collection of revenue and agricultural statistics, but
the greater part of their time is occupied in the performance of police duty throughout the
district.
Esquimalt District.
Esquimalt  Town.
Jno. D. Campbell, Constable ; salary, $70 per month.
Officer Campbell renders assistance in the collection of revenue. A resident constable is
needed at Esquimalt.
East Kootenay District.
Fort Steele.
Chas. M. Edwards, Collector of Revenue, Mining Recorder and Constable ; salary, $100
per month.
Mr. Edwards is kept busy with his duties as Collector of Revenue, etc., and he has very
little time to devote to police matters.
H. W. Barnes, Constable; salary, $60 per month.
Constable Barnes performs the police work of this subdivision and assists Mr. Edwards
in the collection of revenue.    He also acts as gaoler in charge of the lock-up.
Golden.
F. C. Lang, Mining Recorder and Constable; salary, $75 per month.
This is not an important police station, and there is more work to be done in the collection
of revenue than as constable.
Donald.
J. S. Stirritt, Collector of Revenue and Constable; salary, $60 per month.
This officer is employed in the Government Office at Donald during office hours as  assist
ant to the Government Agent.    There is very little police work to be done at this station.
West Kootenay District.
Nakusp
F. D. Fauquier, Mining Recorder and Constable; salary, $75 per month.
The greater part of this officer's time is taken up in collecting revenue, consisting of
mining fees and licences.
Kootenay Reclamation   Works.
Wm. French, Special Constable; salary, $70 per month.
The appointment of this officer does not take effect until April 1st, 1896. Mr. French
has been appointed to prevent Indian disturbances and settle disputes amongst them. The
Government have heretofore been put to much expense in order to preserve the peace amongst
the Indians who reside in the vicinity of the above works. 892 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
Revelstoke.
Jos. D. Graham, Gold Commissioner, Mining Recorder, Collector of Revenue and Constable ; salary, $110 per month.
Mr. Graham's time is occupied almost entirely in attending to his office duties. He
keeps the town in an orderly condition and furnishes all the police protection which is required.
Rossland.
John Kirkup, Mining Recorder, Collector of Revenue and Constable ; salary, $110 per
month.
This officer is fully employed attending to his office duties.
John E. Hooson, Constable ; salary, $75 per month.
This Constable performs police duty in the town of Rossland and its vicinity, and is of
great assistance to Collector Kirkup in the record office.
Nelson.
John Miles, Constable and Gaoler ; salary, $75 per month.
Constable Miles is the town peace officer and acts as gaoler in charge of the lock-up.
Three   Forks.
E. M. Sandilands, Constable; salary, $75 per month.
This officer is kept pretty well employed in attending to police matters at Three Forks
and Sandon.
New Denver.
Alex. Sproat, Mining Recorder and Constable ; salary, $100 per month.
The duties of Mining Recorder occupy the principal portion of the time of this officer.
Lillooet   District.
Clinton.
Geo. Mitchell, Constable; salary, $30 per month.
This officer has been appointed for the town of Clinton, vice Mr. Thomas Barton, whose
appointment as constable has been cancelled.
Lillooet.
Daniel Hurley, Constable; salary, $50 per month.
Constable Hurley performs the police duty requisite for the town of Lillooet and vicinity,
under the direction of Mr. C. Phair, resident Stipendiary Magistrate.
Nanaimo City.
Wm. Stewart, Chief Constable and gaoler; salary, $100 per month.
Mr. Stewart is head gaoler at Nanaimo County Gaol, and Chief of District Police.
Samuel Drake, Assistant Gaoler, Sheriff for the County of Nanaimo, and Constable ;
salary, $80 per month.
This officer does not perform any police duty. In addition to the above salary, he is paid
sheriff's fees. The office of sheriff has been found to interfere with the performance of Mr.
Drake's duties as assistant gaoler. The position of sheriff should be separated from that of
assistant gaoler, as it has been found that one officer cannot fill both positions and give satisfaction in each.
William Kirkham, acting 3rd Gaoler and Constable; salary, $60 per month.
This officer does not perform any police duty.
Neil McLean, Constable; salary, $65 per month.
Constable McLean has charge of police duty outside of the city limits, and attends all
sittings of Provincial Courts at Nanaimo. Nanaimo District.
Wellington.
David Stephenson, Senior Constable; salary, $80 per month.
Officer Stephenson has charge of the police at Wellington and Northfield, under the
direction and control of Chief Constable Stewart.
Daniel MeKinnon, Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
Constable MeKinnon performs night duty at Wellington and assists the senior constable.
Northfield.
Angus W. McLeod, Constable ; salary, $70 per month.
Since his appointment good order and respect for law has been maintained.
Nanoose.
James Belyea, Special Constable ; salary, $30 per month.
Mr. Belyea was appointed to prevent cattle-stealing in this neighbourhood, and to enforce
the " Game Act."
Mr. Mark Bate, Assessor and Collector at Nanaimo, has applied for the assistance of the
district police to aid him in collecting Provincial Revenue Tax, and I have consented to their
being so employed.
Comox.
Walter B. Anderson, Assessor, Collector and Constable; salary, $90 per month.
This officer is kept busy attending to the duties of his office as Collector of Revenue. In
addition to which he has charge of the police work of his district.
His headquarters are at Comox, but the official business of the district could be better
transacted at the town of Union, which is an important mining centre, with a population of
about 2,500 persons. I would respectfully suggest that Mr. Anderson be removed to Union,
and that the local police of the district be placed under his control as Government Agent.
Union.
John W. Hutchison, Senior Constable ; salary, $70 per month.
P. Scharschmidt, 2nd Constable; salary, $60 per month.
Elijah Smithurst, Special Constable. An allowance of $20 per month is paid to this
officer for his services as nightwatchman at the town of Union.
The necessity for a proper Court House for the use of the resident Stipendiary Magistrate and the local Justices of the Peace is very badly felt in this town. The room at present
used for this purpose, which is the only one available, is the police office in the lock-up, which
is too small and altogether unsuitable for such purposes
I would respectfully urge that a building be erected at this place at an early date, available
also for sittings of the County and Small Debts Courts, and of sufficient size for all of such
purposes.
New Westminster District.
W. H. Bullock-Webster, Acting Chief Constable ; salary, $90 per month.
This officer is stationed at the City of New Westminster, and has charge of the police of
the district since the resignation of Mr. Wm. Moresby, which took effect on 31st July last.
Vancouver.
Richard B. Lister, Collector and Constable; salary, $70 per month.
This officer attends to the. police work of Moodyville, Port Moody, and other points outside of the city limits; he also renders assistance in the collection of revenue.
Mission City.
J. B. Marquette, Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
As Mission City is close to the International Boundary Line, it has been found necessary
to station a constable at this point. 894 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
Victoria City.
John McKenna, Senior Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
William Wallis, 2nd Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
Both of the above officers are employed in Provincial and local district work. They are
stationed at the Provincial Police Station at Bastion Square.
Wm. Prout, Nightwatchman at Government Buildings ; salary, $60 per month.
This officer does not perform any duty other than the above.
Victoria District.
Fred G. Heal, Special Constable ; salary, $30 per month.
This officer furnishes his own horse and buggy, and makes a daily patrol of various parts
of the district, visiting Tolmie Avenue, Porter's, Burnside and Carey Road, Gordon Head,
Strawberry Vale, Cedar Hill, and the Willows.
Sidney.
Hugh Moore, Constable; salary, $60 per month.
This constable patrols North and South Saanich, and makes his headquarters at Sidney.
Yale District.
Kamloops.
Owen Batchelor, Gaoler and Constable ; salary, $70 per month.
This officer's time is fully occupied in the performance of his duties as gaoler in charge of
Kamloops Gaol.
Martin Beattie, Assessor, Collector, and Constable; salary, $90 per month.
This constable performs very little police duty.
James McLaren, Convict Guard and Constable ; salary, $65 per month.
The time of this officer is occupied as convict guard, in charge of prisoners engaged in
road work and in improving Government property.
Hugh McLean, Assistant Gaoler and Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
The time of this officer is occupied in attending to his duties as gaoler.
Ashcroft.
Joseph W. Burr, Collector of Revenue and Constable; salary, $80 per month.
The presence of a constable is necessary at this point as it is the terminus of the Cariboo
Waggon Road and is an important freight depot for the Lillooet and Cariboo Districts.
Mr. Burr assists in the collection of taxes along the line of railway.
Yale.
Wm. Dodd, Government Agent, Assessor, Collector of Revenue and Constable; salary,
$110 per month.
Most of Mr. Dodd's time is occupied in the performance of his duties as Government
Agent and Collector, there being very little police duty to be performed at Yale.
North   Bend.
Herbert Cancellor, Constable; salary, $60 per month.
This Constable aids in the collection of revenue and performs police duty at North Bend
and along the line of C. P. Railway as far east as Keefer's Station.
Osoyoos.
Louis Cuppage, Constable and Collector; salary, $60 per month.
This officer is stationed at Osoyoos, and has charge of the police affairs of the district
under the direction of the resident Stipendiary Magistrate, Mr. Lambly.
Mr. Cuppage also assists in the collection of revenue. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 895
Midway.
Wm. G. McMynn, Recorder, Collector of Revenue and Constable; salary, $75 per month.
The greatest part of the time of this officer is devoted to his duties as Mining Recorder
and Collector of Revenue.
Ralph W. Deans, Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
The headquarters of this officer are at Midway. He assists Collector McMynn in the
collection of revenue and looks after the peace and good order of the district.
Vernon.
Jas. Chas. Tunstall, Assessor, Collector and Constable ; salary, $90 per month.
Mr. Tunstall's duties as assessor and collector occupy the greater portion of his time.
H. R. Parke, Corrstable; salary, $60 per month.
This officer aids in the collection of revenue and has charge of the Vernon lock-up.
Nicola Lake.
James D. Gillie, Constable; salary, $60 per month.
This officer aids in the collection of revenue and has charge of the lock-up.
Granite Creek.
Hugh Hunter, Assessor, Collector, Mining Recorder and Constable ; salary, $100 per
month.
Mr. Hunter attends to the police duty of this section of the district and has charge of
the lock-up.
Kelowna.
R. R. Lowe, Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
This is an important farming and cattle-raising district. This officer performs police
duty throughout the district and has charge of the lock-up.
Lytton.
Dan'l. Sutherland, Constable ; salary, $60 per month.
It is necessary to maintain a constable at this point. There is a large Indian population
and the resident constable has charge of the lock-up and other Government buildings. He
also aids in the collection of revenue. 896 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
PROVINCIAL PRISONS.
Victoria Gaol.
Mr. R. F. John, Warden.
This gaol is a substantial brick building, containing 78 cells, which will accommodate
127 prisoners, in addition to which there are offices and private quarters for the Warden and
guards. Prison discipline has been well maintained throughout the year, and the gaol and
grounds are well kept and in good order at all times.
New Westminster Gaol.
Mr. W. G. Armstrong, Warden.
This is also a brick structure, in all respects similar to the Victoria Gaol. It contains 77
cells, and will accommodate 150 prisoners. Adjoining the gaol, and in the same building,
there are offices and private apartments for the Warden and guards.
Mr. William Moresby, who for many years so ably conducted the affairs of this gaol, was,
on the 1st August last, appointed to a better position under the Dominion Government, which
I am sure he will fill with the same satisfaction as marked his service under this department.
His extensive experience in police work, his energy and intelligence, together with a thorough
knowledge of the Indian character, were particularly valuable in the detection and prevention
of crime in New Westminster District, which includes within its borders a great deal of
sparsely settled and densely wooded country, offering, frequently, considerable difficulty to the
successful pursuit and capture of offenders striving to escape from justice. Hence this department appreciated very much the skilful, painstaking, and efficient services rendered by Mr.
Moresby as Chief Constable of this District, and it is with very much regret (while we congratulate him upon his promotion) that we are compelled to lose his valuable assistance.
Nanaimo Gaol.
Mr. Wm. Stewart, Chief Gaoler.
This is a new brick building, erected in the year 1894. It contains 46 cells, and will
accommodate 100 prisoners.
There are comfortable quarters within the gaol for the gaoler and guards.
The building and grounds are a model of neatness, and the sanitary arrangements are all
that could be desired.
Kamloops Gaol.
Mr. 0. Batchelor, Gaoler.
This prison is built of heavy scantling and lumber. There are 11 cells, which are capable
of holding 22 prisoners.
A detailed description of this gaol is given on page 899. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 897
Suitable lock-ups have been established at the undermentioned points :—
1. Ainsworth. 25. Midway.
2. Alberni. 26. Moodyville.
3. Alert Bay. 27. Nakusp.
4. Ashcroft. 28. Nanaimo.
5. Barkerville. 29. Nelson.
6. Clinton. 30. New Denver.
7. Comox. 31. Nicola Lake.
8. Departure Bay. 32. North Bend.
9. Donald. 33. Northfield.
10. Duncan. 34. Osoyoos.
11. Echo Cove. 35. Port Essington.
12. Esquimalt. 36. Quesnelle Forks.
13. Fort Simpson. 37. Quesnellemouth.
14. Fort Steele. 38. Revelstoke.
15. Glenora. 39.  Rossland.
16. Golden. 40.  Spence's Bridge.
17. Granite Creek. 41. Three Forks.
18. Hazleton. 42. Union.
19. Hope. 43.  Vancouver.
20. Kamloops. 44. Vernon.
21. Kaslo. 45. Wellington.
22. Lake Town. 46. Yale.
23. Lillooet. 47.  150-Mile House.
24. Lytton.
A description of the above lock-ups is given hereunder :—
Ainsworth Lock-up.
Lock-up and Recorder's office; cost $1,290; built in 1892. There are 3 cells, a hall and
a kitchen, all furnished, which form the base of the building.
Alberni Lock-up.
Special Constable Cox in charge.
This lock-up was built in January, 1889, at a cost of $360. It is constructed of hewn
logs, the bottom ones of which are in a very rotten state, the mortar having fallen out between
the logs making the building very cold. The building is 22 feet 6 inches by 14 feet 6 inches,
and contains 2 cells, each 14 feet by 7 feet; also a guard-room in front of cells in which there
is a heating stove.    There are no out-buildings.    This lock-up is badly in need of repairs.
Alert Bay Lock-up.
Constable Woollacott in charge.
This building, which is 37 feet long and 20 feet wide, is boarded and battened, 10 feet to
the eaves and whitewashed. It consists of 2 cells, each being 8 feet long and 5 feet 6 inches
wide. There is also 1 kitchen, 1 living room, 1 bedroom, 1 cell room and a room used as
office and Court room. An expenditure of $100 is needed to repair this building and render
it suitable for present requirements.
Ashcroft Lock-up.
Constable Burr in charge.
This lock-up is 24 feet in length and 22 feet wide, containing 3 cells, each 8 feet by 7
feet. The gaoler's room has been partitioned off to make a bedroom for the officer in charge.
These rooms (with one a lean-to) are the only rooms in the building. The floor in the main
room needs repairing, otherwise the building is in good order. 898 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
Barkerville Lock-up.
Constable McKen in charge.
This is a log building, 20 feet long and 18 feet wide, consisting of 4 cells, each 7 feet 3
inches by 5 feet, and a room 20 feet by 10J feet, which is used for general purposes. The
walls of the lock-up are built of logs and boarded, and the building is in good condition.
Clinton Lock-up.
Constable Mitchell in charge.
This building, which is 32 feet square, is built of logs with five walls set on a stone foundation, all over 18 inches deep; flooring joists, logs laid close together, and log ceiling. It
contains 4 cells, each 10 feet by 12 feet and 10 feet high ; wide hall running through centre
of building, with a heating stove in centre of hall. WTas erected in 1885, at a cost of $1,560,
and is in a perfect state of preservation and kept at all times in first-class order.
Comox Lock-up.
Constable Anderson in charge.
This building is built of squared, 10-inch logs and weather boarded, 24 feet long and 12^
feet wide ; containing 2 cells, each 1\ feet by 6 feet, and a guard-room used in day time by-
prisoners. The water closet in this room is in a very poor condition and badly arranged,
otherwise the building is in good repair.
Departure Bay Lock-up.
Constable McLeod in charge.
Built of hewn logs, lined with 2-inch plank on inside and weather boarded outside. The
floor is of hewn logs, square roof with ornamental top. The building is 12J feet square, containing 3 cells, 7 feet by 7 feet, 7 feet by 5| feet, and b\ feet by 4J feet respectively. Is in
good repair and merely requires a little painting and whitewashing. This lock-up was built
in the winter of 1880 by the prisoners of Nanaimo gaol, under the superintendence of
Convict Guard Drake, and has been found a great convenience to the police.
Donald Lock-up.
James Cullen, Gaoler.
This building is 36| feet long and 25J feet wide, containing 4 cells, each 8 feet by 6 feet.
Dimensions of rooms as follows :—Entry, 10 feet 8 inches by 1\ feet; gaoler's room, 12^ feet
by 13 feet; kitchen, 13| feet by 12|- feet; pantry, 8 feet by 4 feet; cellar under entry, 10
feet by 12 feet.    All in good repair.
Duncan's Lock-up.
Chief Constable Maitland-Dougall in charge.
This lock-up is 23 feet long and 12 feet wide, containing 2 cells, each 1\ feet by 5J feet,
and forms a part of the Court House building. The Court House contains Government
Agent's Office, Police Office, Court Room, Judge's Room, and Jury Room.    In good repair.
Echo Cove Lock-up.
Constable Donahue in charge.
Building, 20 feet long, 15 feet wide, containing 3 cells, each 7 feet by 4 feet 7 inches,
with 2 windows, 1 outside door, 3 doors on cells, all locked with bars and " Yale " locks;
cottage roof; sides are made of 2-inch by 4-inch on edge ; floor, 2-inch by 12-inch plank, and
sides and ends boarded with 1-inch by 12-inch cedar, whitewashed inside; front room, which
is 13 feet by 15 feet, is used as Court room ; size of lot, 40 feet square, not cleared and not
enclosed, 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 899
Esquimalt Lock-up.
Constable Campbell in charge.
This building is 19 feet long and 12 feet wide, containing 2 cells, one of which is 11 feet
by 10 feet and the other 11 feet by 8 feet, whitewashed ; building diagonally sheathed and
vertically planked outside. In front of lock-up there is a yard, 14 feet wide, built with a fence
of 1-inch boards, 10 feet high. The floor of the building is 3 feet from the ground, with a
brow approach to the entrance of cells. The brow is completely rotten and dangerous, and
requires to be renewed. The building also requires to be whitewashed. An expenditure of
$25 is required to make necessary repairs.
Fort Simpson Lock-up.
Constable Flewin in charge.
A building, 15 feet square, with 3 cells, each 6| by 5 feet. There is an outside room, 10
feet by 14 feet, used as a kitchen.
Fort Steele Lock-up.
Constable Barnes in charge.
This lock-up, which is 33 feet long and 23 feet wide, is a log building with 2 rooms, one
16 feet by 23 feet, and the other 17 feet by 23 feet. One room (the outer) is used as a tool-
house for public works use, the inner has 3 cells in it, and is used as a kitchen, etc. An
adjoining room is used by Constable Barnes and family. The lock-up is in a bad state,
the logs being very rotten, and it is also exceedingly cold in the winter. I would recommend
that a new and substantial lock-up be erected at this post without delay.
Glenora Lock-up.
At this station 2 cells were put into a log cabin, built and owned by the late W. Evans,
constable, who received rent therefor from the Government.
Golden Lock-up.
Constable Lang in charge.
This is a one-story log building, 33 feet long and 26 feet wide, containing 4 cells, each 8
feet by .6 feet. The front of the building is divided into three rooms, one for the Mining
Recorder, which is 16^ feet by 15| feet; this is also used as a Court room, The second room,
which is 9 feet by 6 feet, is used by the Gold Commissioner, and the remaining room, 9 feet
by 8J feet, is used by the constable.    Built in 1892, at a cost of $840.
Granite Creek Lock-up.
Constable Hunter in charge.
This building, which is 24 feet long and 22 feet wide, is built of hewn logs, dove-tailed
together. There are two cells, each 8| feet by 6f feet; hewn logs form partition. The other
portion of the building comprises one room, which is used as an office.   Cells open into office.
Hazleton Lock-up.
This building is situated on left bank of Skeena, and is an ordinary log cabin of about 18
feet by 14 feet.    Three cells were erected, with doors, staples, and iron bars.
Hope Lock-up.
The lock-up at this point is a very old building, almost unfit for use. It is seldom
required, as prisoners are transferred to the lock-up at Yale, 15 miles distant, where the
district officer resides, 900 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
Kamloops Gaol.
Owen Batchelor, Gaoler.
This gaol and lock-up is a two-story building, measuring 41 feet long and 27-J- feet wide.
There are 11 cells in the building, 8 of which are 8 feet by 6 feet 8 inches; one extra strong
cell for condemned prisoners, 9 feet by 6 feet 5 inches, and 2 detached cells 8 feet by 6 feet 8
inches. The gaoler's room, which is 20 feet by 12 feet, is used as office and general room for
officers on duty. The private sitting room, 13 feet 7 inches by 13 feet, is used as a reception
room for friends of prisoners, also a gaoler's dining room. There is a cellar 10 feet square,
wash-house 15 feet by 10 feet, and bath-house 10 feet square. There are 3 rooms upstairs,
used by head gaoler and family. The foundations of the building need repairing ; a larger
cellar is required, the wood-work in the drains to be renewed, and water-closets to be made as
soon as possible. The bath-room is also inadequate. A sum of five hundred dollars should
be appropriated for repairs to this building.
Kaslo Lock-up.
The Government building, consisting of record office, officer's quarters and lock-up, was
destroyed by the flood of 3rd June, 1894. The present lock-up is the property of the corporation.
Kelowna Lock-up.
Constable Lowe in charge.
This lock-up is situate at Brent's Ranch, four miles from Kelowna. It was erected in the
year 1890, and is built of 2-inch by 4-inch scantling laid horizontally and spiked together. It
is 22 feet by 16 feet in size, and contains 2 cells 9 feet by 7\ feet, and a guard-room 15 feet by
13 feet.    Cost $600.
Lake Town Lock-up.
This building is of logs, and was first built with constable's room only. An addition was
since made, which contains 3 cells and a hall opening at the rear into a stockade yard.
Lillooet Lock-up.
Constable Hurley in charge.
This lock-up, which was erected in 1887 at a cost of $810, is built of 2-inch by 4-inch
scantling laid flat, one over the other, and well spiked together. Afterwards it was lined on
the inside with 6-inch tongue and groved timber, which was painted, with the exception of the
cells, which were whitewashed. The size of the building, inside measurement, is 24|- feet by
14J feet. Each cell has an iron grating, and the two windows in the room have iron bars.
The room, which was formerly used as a Court room, is therefore 16 feet by 14J feet. The
ceiling is 10 feet high, made of the same sized scantlings as the walls, laid edgeways and well
spiked. It is whitewashed on the outside, and the roof painted with mineral red paint. It is
in good repair, and there is a suitable picket fence around the building and grounds.
Lytton Lock-up.
Constable Sutherland in charge.
A substantial log building, 24 feet long and 17 feet wide, containing 3 cells, each 7\ by
5J feet. The room, which is 17 feet by 12 feet, is used by constable as bedroom and office;
width of hallway, 3 feet 9 inches ; height of ceiling, 9J feet. There is also a yard and water-
closet enclosed by a 12-foot board fence.
Midway Lock-up.
Constable Deans in charge.
This building is 44 feet long and 30 feet wide, with 6 rooms and lock-up. The lock-up is
24 feet long and 16 feet wide, containing 2 cells and 1 room. Cells are 8 feet by %\ feet, and
room is 16 feet square. An office, a sitting-room, kitchen and 3 bedrooms are in the main building, used by the resident Mining Recorder, 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 901
MOODYVILLE   LOCK-UP.
This lock-up is 24 feet by 16 feet, containing 2 cells, each 10^ feet by 7|- feet ; frame
building, 2-inch by 3-inch scantling, spiked together. This building is seldom used now. As
there is no resident constable at Moodyville it is found more convenient to take prisoners to
lock-up at Vancouver.
Nakusp Lock-up.
Constable Fauquier in charge.
A log building, 18 feet long and 14 feet wide, lined round the 3 cells with 3-inch plank.
Cells are 64 feet by 4-j feet each. The planks around the cells require plastering in the chinks
badly. Lumber in cells has shrunk to nearly an inch, leaving a crack between planks. Prisoners are liable to escape. The room in front is used for general purposes. The building should
be repaired.
Nanaimo Lock-up.
Chief Constable Stewart in charge.
This lock-up is known as the Hudsons' Bay Co.'s Bastion. Basement of bastion is fitted
up into 2 cells with a small passage. Cells are 8 feet by 6 feet each ; walls of stone with 4
layers of inch boards nailed diagonally. In the cells are bedsteads with mattresses and
blankets, water-tap and sink connecting with outside sewer pipe. The building is lighted with
electric light. In the 1st story there are 2 cells, 11 feet by 8 feet each, with log walls lined
with plank. Cells are in good order, but not furnished. The bastion is now principally used
by the city police as a lock-up.
Nelson Lock-up.
Constable Miles in charge.
This lock-up is 32 feet long and 26 feet wide, containing 5 cells, each 8 feet by 6 feet.
There is also a constable's room, kitchen and pantry. Yard behind lock-up is 42 feet square.
The building requires plastering since it has been found to be almost impossible to keep it free
from vermin.
New Denver Lock-up.
Constable Sproat in charge.
This lock-up is a log building, 20 feet by 16 feet, consisting of 3 cells and a room which is
used by the resident officer as a mining record office.
New Westminster Lock-up.
Constable Bullock-Webster in charge.
This lock-up consists of one cell, 10 feet by 5 feet, which is situate in the basement of the
Law Courts building.    The door is a heavy iron grating with substantial lock.
Nicola Lake Lock-up.
Constable Gillie in charge.
This building, 30 feet long and 20 feet wide, is of lumber, and consists of Court room
with lock-up in rear. The Court room is also used as an office. Lock-up consists of 2 cells,
each of which are 1\ feet square.
North Bend Lock-up.
Constable Cancellor in charge.
This is a 22-foot square, one-story building, built of lumber 2 inches by 4 inches, spiked
together, and contains 3 cells, each 9 feet by 7 feet; floor and ceiling 2 inches by 4 inches;
outside with finished weather boarding. Gaoler's room is used as an office and Court room,
and by prisoners in day time, and is carmine painted; outside of building is whitewashed.
Built, July, 1894.    No water-closet or yard. 902 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
Northfield Lock-up.
Constable McLeod in charge.
This building is 21 feet long and 20 feet wide, ceiling 10 feet; constructed of 2-inch by
4-inch lumber laid close and  spiked  solid; finished on  the  outside  with  rustic.    There are
3 cells, each S feet 7 inches by 6 feet, constructed of the same material, with doors opening
from each cell into the office. Size of doors, 2 feet 3 inches by 6 feet 3 inches, and If
inches thick, with bar and lock fastenings. There, is a ventilator in each cell from the outside
near the ceiling. The office is 11^ feet by 18^ feet, 2 windows and 1 door. The windows
are swung on hinges and iron-barred.
Osoyoos Lock-up.
Constable Cuppage in charge.
This building is of lumber, and measures 18 feet by 15 feet, containing 2 cells, each 1\
feet by 8| feet. The office, which forms part of the lock-up, is 15 feet by 9\ feet. The only
ventilation No. 1 cell has is through the peep-hole of the door into the office. There are two
private rooms, together measuring \%\ feet by 18 feet, one used as a bedroom, the other as a
living room, a rough lumber partition separating the two. The whole of the private part of
the house is built of rough lumber. A small lean-to kitchen and a store-room complete the
building.
Port Essington Lock-up.
Constable Kirby in charge.
Building measures 20 feet long and 15 feet wide, with 4 cells, each 6 feet by 5 feet, made
of 2 by 4-inch rough lumber, with board windows. One front room, 15 feet by 8 feet, used
as a kitchen. Building is lined on the outside with rough lumber and battened at sides and
back; the front is faced with rustic. The cell doors are fastened with bars of iron and padlocks. An addition to this building, to provide an office and Magistrate's Court room, is badly
needed. This addition can be obtained by the expenditure of $200, which I would strongly
recommend.
Quesnelle Forks Lock-up.
Constable Bain in charge.
This building is 24 feet by 8 feet; contains 3 cells 7 feet by 6 feet, and is built of sound
bridge timber, which was saved from the old bridge at Quesnelle Forks. The walls are of
hewn timber, 12 inches by 14 inches, fitted closely together. Walls 8J feet high with double
floor and ceiling of 1-inch lumber and shake roof. There is also a yard, 10 feet square, in the
rear for use of prisoners, which is fenced. This lock-up was erected in April last under the
personal supervision of Mr. Wm. Stephenson, the resident Government official, who had the
work done at the low cost of $204.
Quesnellemouth Lock-up.
Constable St. Laurent in charge.
This is a very old wooden building, erected in 1865, and is 16 feet by 20 feet.    It contains
4 cells of equal size. The cells are very close and have no ventilation. There is an enclosed
yard in the rear of building for use of prisoners.    This lock-up is in a bad state of repair.
Revelstoke  Lock-up.
Constable Graham in charge.
This lock-up is 15^ feet long and 10 feet wide, and is built of rough boards lined between
with paper, shake roofed and ceiled with rough boards. There is also a guard-room 10 feet by
6J feet, which is used by the officer on duty. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 903
Rossland Lock-up.
Constable Hooson in charge.
This lock-up, which was erected in 1895, is built of 4-inch by 2-inch timber, and covered
with rustic on the outside. The dimensions of the building are as follows : 24 feet long and
20 feet wide, containing 3 cells, 1 constable's room and 1 kitchen. The cells are each 8 feet
long and 6 feet 2 inches wide, with an iron grating for ventilation. The two rooms are each
lOJr feet by 9J feet.    The building is a substantial one.
Spence's Bridge Lock-up.
This is a log building containing 3 cells and an office, which is used as a Court room.
Three Forks Lock-up.
Constable Sandilands in charge.
This lock-up, which is situated on north bank of Carpenter Creek, on eastern boundary of
Three Forks, is 28 feet long and 26 feet wide ; has a cottage roof and is finished with lumber
outside. There are 5 cells in lock-up, 4 of which are 7 feet by. 5 feet, and one 7 feet by 6jr
feet. All cells, passage, etc., are made of 2-inch by 4-inch scantling, on edge or flat, as the
case may be. The outside of the building is sheeted with rustic and painted. It has a brick
chimney in centre. The Constable's room is 17 feet by 13| feet, and is ceiled with cedar; it
is also used as office and Court room. The kitchen is 10 feet by lOf feet, and is ceiled with
cedar, and contains a No. 9 cook stove and a complete cooking outfit.
Union Lock-up.
Constable Hutchison in charge.
This lock-up is built of 2-inch by 4-inch scantling, and is 35 feet long by 26 feet wide,
contains 4 cells, each 8 feet by 6 feet. The walls are 10 feet high, covered with rustic on outside with cottage roof. The corridor is 25 feet long by 6|- feet wide. The office room is 18
feet by 6 feet, and there is one private room, 18 feet by 9 feet, which is used as bedroom for
Constable.    Built in 1895.    It is in first-class order.
Vancouver Lock-up.
Constable Lister in charge.
This lock-up is situated underneath the Law Courts ; size, 36 feet by 32 feet. It contains
4 cells, three of which are 1\ feet by 5 feet, and one 74 feet by 64 feet. The officer in charge
has an office which is situate directly over lock-up and connected therewith by stairway. Size
of office, 18 feet by 10 feet.    The entire building is steam heated.
Vernon Lock-up.
Constable Parke in charge.
This is a log building, 24 feet by 16 feet, containing 2 cells, each 8 feet by 6 feet, and an
outer room.    The building is set on the ground, sheeted  with clap-boards and shingled roof.
Victoria Lock-up.
Sergeant Langley in charge.
This lock-up is situated in the basement of the Law Courts Building in Bastion Square,
and consists of 2 commodious cells adjoining the police guard-room and connected with the
offices of the Provincial Police Department.
Wellington Lock-up.
Constable Stephenson in charge.
This lock-up is 20 feet square, with 3 cells, each 8 feet by 6\ feet; one room, 12 feet by
20 feet, used as office for police and, at times, as Magistrate's Court room. 904 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
Yale Lock-cp.
Wm. Dodd, Government Agent, in charge.
This lock-up is 21 feet square, with 3 cells, each 8-| feet by 6 feet 2 inches, and an outer
room, 19 feet by 10^ feet, used by prisoners.    Building is in good condition.
150-Mile House Lock-up.  "
Constable Rose in charge.
Log building, 36 feet long, 18 feet wide, with board gable-ends. Two cells, each 9 feet by
7 feet. Three private rooms, viz: office, 17 feet by 12 feet; bedroom, 9 feet square, and
kitchen, 9 feet square, used by officer in charge.
New Lock-ups Required.
Fort Steele.
As the building which has been used at this post as a lock-up is entirely unsuitable for
the requirements of this portion of East Kootenay, I would respectfully recommend that a
new and substantial building, consisting of 3 cells and a guard-room, be erected during the
year 1896.
Mission City.
It has been found necessary to station a constable permanently at this point on account
of its close proximity to the Boundary line, and a lock-up is absolutely rrecessary at Mission
City. I would suggest that a small building, containing two or three cells and a room for the
constable, be provided for this station without delay.
Plumper Pass.
A lock-up and small room for Magistrate's Court is badly needed at Mayne Island, which
is the headquarters of Mr. A. D. Drummond, the resident constable for the district. I would
strongly urge that an inexpensive building be erected at Mayne Island for  the above purpose. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 905
Rules and Regulations.
The following rules for prison discipline are in force throughout the Province and have
been found sufficient for the order and conduct of prisons and lock-ups :—
Rules and Regulations   for   the   Government of Provincial Gaols and Lock-ups in
the Province of British Columbia.
1. The Warden shall have full charge at all times of the Gaol and the Prisoners, and he
shall be responsible for the safe custody and general care of the prisoner's, and for the state
and condition of every part of the Gaol and its surroundings, and for the general administration of its affairs.
2. The WTarden shall conform to the Rules and Regulations himself, and shall see that
they are strictly observed by the prisoners and by the officers employed in or about the Gaol.
3. The Assistant Gaolers and Guards, while inside the Gaol, shall be under the orders of
the Warden, or, in the event of his absence, of the office in charge of the Gaol at the time.
And when the chain-gang is on the outside of the Gaol the Senior Guard shall have control of
the Guards and prisoners.
4. Where there is no Warden, these Rules and Regulations shall apply to the Officer in
charge of the Gaol or Lock-up, excepting as to punishments.
5. Upon the admission of a prisoner to the Gaol he must be thoroughly searched in the
presence of a Constable, and a list of all articles found on him entered in the Prisoners' Effects
Book, and all prisoners must be searched every evening before being locked up in their cells,
and the cells and beds must also be searched.
6. No visitors shall be allowed in the Gaol, or to speak with prisoners at any time, except
by permission of the officer in charge, and a Gaol official must be present at all interviews,
unless otherwise ordered.
7. The cells in use must be scrubbed and whitewashed every week, and the cell buckets
every day, and all other parts of the Gaol must at all times be kept in a perfectly clean
condition. Prisoners shall have clean underclothing and a bath when required, and not less
than once a week. All male prisoners while undergoing sentence shall have their hair cut as
close as may be necessary for the purposes of health and cleanliness.
8. The Gaoler may allow such prisoners as he thinks fit to be out in the Gaol yard an
hour and a half in the morning and the same time in the afternoon. On Sundays and holidays
all prisoners, except those in solitary confinement, are to be allowed this privilege. Prisoners
shall not be permitted to promenade in the Gaol corridors without permission, and then only
on condition that strict silence be observed.
9. The Warden, or, if there be no Warden, the officer in charge of any prisoner, other
than a debtor, may place such irons on the prisoner as he may deem necessary for the prevention of escape. And the Senior Guard may refuse to allow any prisoner to go out in the
chain-gang unless he is ironed to his satisfaction. Prisoners' irons must be carefully examined
daily ; those of the chain-gang on leaving for work by the Senior Guard, and on return by the
officer in charge of the Gaol at the time.
10. Any person who in any way interferes with the discipline of the Gaol shall be
excluded from the Gaol as a visitor.
11. The prisoners shall rise at 6:30 o'clock a. m. from April 1st to September 30th, and
at 7 o'clock a.m. from October 1st to March 31st, and will be allowed half an hour to wash
and dress themselves. In Victoria, New Westminster, and Nanaimo Gaols a Guard must be
on the balcony before the cells are opened. The prisoners shall leave the Gaol for work at
7:30 o'clock a.m. in the summer time, returning at 5:30 o'clock p.m., and in the winter time
at 8 o'clock a.m., returning before dark.    One hour shall be allowed at noon for dinner.
12. Strict silence must be observed in the cells, and in all parts of the Gaol. No conversation between prisoners is allowed, except by special permission of the officer under whose
charge they are. Prisoners shall not be permitted to visit from one cell to another. No
marking or scratching the walls nor spitting upon the floor will be allowed, and no lights shall
be allowed in anv of the cells. 906 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
13. All prisoners before leaving their cells must fold their bedding and leave the same in
a tidy condition. Prisoners attending service in the Gaol Chapel shall do so in an orderly
manner.    Spitting on the floor, shuffling the feet, or any unnecessary noise is strictly forbidden.
14. Under no condition whatever are prisoners to use oakum, rags, or other material
liable to choke closet or drain pipes ; nothing but paper regularly supplied will be allowed.
15. Prisoners not under sentence must in no way interfere with or otherwise attract the
attention of prisoners under sentence from their work within the Gaol.
16. All prisoners must obey the orders of any of the Gaol Officers; those in the chain-
gang, while outside the Gaol, must obey the orders of any of the Guards.
17. Every prisoner will find it to his interest at all times to conform to the Rules and
Regulations, and to carefully read them over ; but if a prisoner is unable to read they must
Ire read over or explained by an officer to him on application at a reasonable time.
18. No punishments or deprivations shall be awarded to any prisoner except by the
Superintendent of Provincial Police, or in his absence by the Warden of the Gaol, or by a
Justice of the Peace, who shall have power to order deprivations for the following offences,
namely :—
(1.) Disobedience of any of the Rules and Regulations of the Gaol.
(2.) Common assault by one prisoner on another.
(3.) Cursing or using profane language.
(4.) Indecent behaviour or language towards another prisoner, or any officer of  the Gaol,
or towards a visitor.
(5.) Idleness or negligence at work on the part of a prisoner sentenced to hard labour.
(6.) Refusal or neglect to keep himself or his cell in order.
(7.) Wilfully destroying or defacing the Gaol property.
(8.) Insubordination of any sort.
19. The punishment to be inflicted upon prisoners for any of the foregoing offences shall
not be other than the following :—
(1.) Solitary confinement in dark cells, with or without bedding, not to exceed six days for
any one offence, nor three days at any one time.
(2.) Bread and water diet, full or half rations, combined or not with (No. 1).
(3.) Cold water punishment, with the approval of the visiting Physician.
20. The Gaoler or officer in charge of the Gaol shall have authority summarily to confine
any prisoner for misconduct in a solitary cell, or to place irons upon his hands and feet should
he find it necessary, such restraint not to extend over a longer period than is necessary to
bring the matter before the Superintendent of Provincial Police, or the Warden of the Gaol,
or, in the event of their absence, before any Justice of the Peace.
21. There shall be kept at the Victoria Gaol, and at New Westminster, Nanaimo, and
Kamloops Gaols, a " Conduct Book," in which shall be kept a daily record of the conduct and
industry of every convicted prisoner confined therein, with the view to determining the amount
of remission of sentence to which such convicted prisoner may be entitled for good conduct at
the end of every month.
22. Every convicted prisoner sentenced to any of the above-named gaols may earn a
remission of a portion of the time for which he is sentenced to be confined, viz.: Five days for
every month during which he is exemplary in behaviour, industry, and faithfulness, and does
not violate any of the prison rules.
23. Every such prisoner who commits any breach of the above regulations shall, besides
any other penalty to which he is liable, be liable to forfeit the whole or any part of any
remission which he has earned under Rule 22 of these regulations.
By Command.
F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police and Warden of Gaols. 59 Vict.
Police and Prisons Report.
907
Statement showing the offences for which prisoners were sentenced to terms of imprisonment
in Provincial Gaols during the years 1891, 1892, 1893, 1894, and 1895, each year ending
on the 31st October.
Offences.
Victoria.
New Westminster.
Nanaimo.
Kamloops.
Abduction and rape	
Abusive   and  obscene Ian-
guage 	
1891
1
"16
1892
2
"l6
6
16
2
28
1893
1
1
16
12
8
34
1894
1895
1891
2
6
11
1
1892
1
10
IS
1893 1894
2  ....
1
i ....
-
6     7
1895
1
14
1
1891
1
7
1892
1893
1894
1895
1891
1892
1893 1894
1895
3
16
6
10
1
20
5
1
15
7
5
31
1
1
1
Aiding prisoners to escape .
18
2
13
4
1
8
23
8
1
8
3
1
2
2
3
1
9
1
7
7
1
3
Breaches of Merchant Ship-
Breaches of Naval  Discip-
14
23
1
1
1
2
1
3
	
2
1
1
4
1
■
4
1
3
2
1
4
2
2
4
4
2
6
2
1
2
4
1
1
Carrying unlawful weapons
i
6
2
1
3
1
2
Counterfeit money, passing
4
1
1
5
6
1
4
7
"l
2
1
1
4
"•21
3
1
3
1
1
4       1
1
Cutting-, wounding, and at-
1
2
3
3
3
276
2
5
248
Destroying-    and    injuring-
4
14
1
3
7
2
6
5
57
1
56
4
8
2
2
23
2
3
1
5
1
3
3
4
6
5
1
13
257
92
27
36
41
39
31
Drunk and disorderly 	
55
1
3
S
34
1
1
I
29
Escaping from and obstructing Constables ...    	
Fraud, or obtaining money
and goods by false pre-
2
"2
1
9
5
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
'"2
2
2
1
2
3
4
2
67
"60
3
10
19
3
2
1
9
3
1
1
2
3
1
1
51
2
45
6
1
4
1
2
"4
2
28
4
59
1
2
2
3
6
2
3
8
1
30
"77
2
4
5
Horse,   cattle,   and    sheep
3
2
55
40
2
1
4
eo
i
38
1
38
5
44
1
3
42
3
3
1
79
45
2
49
2
31
1
1
3
4
35
"37
2
1
1
91
io
1
1
Indecent assaults and   exposure 	
Infraction of Indian Liquor
Inmates and frequenters of
3
83
"ii
1
1
1
4
98
23
2
40
1
23
57
14
30
10
8
is
16
11
27
2
1
3
1
1
Murder, attempt to commit
1
2
1
3
2
13
3
12
2
Possession   of   stolen   pro-
1
3
1
1
2
4
Selling   liquor    without   a
19
3
1
1
13
2
173
2
1
15
6
29
294
4
6
2
20
264
1
1
15
1
449
Threatening- and   seditious
3
3
5
5
11
273
5
158
5
14
9
210
"H
11
13
218
1
21
5
22
229
4
20
4
426
1
7
30
479
1
3
'   12
3
202
1
4
8
4
143
3
8
6
116
1
15
2
132
7
4
82
14
1
126
8
14
32
225
13
9
238
12
5
123
The Cities of Victoria, Vancouver, and New Westminster are each provided with a city
lock-up, which is maintained by the Municipal Government, and during the above years a
large number of prisoners sentenced to short terms of imprisonment for drunkenness or for
non-payment of fines have served their terms of imprisonment in the lock-ups. The above
statement does not include such prisoners. The Cities of Nanaimo and Kamloops do not use
a lock-up for such purposes, but send all their prisoners to the County Gaol as soon as they
have been convicted. 908
Police and Prisons Retort.
1896
Statement showing the offences for which prisoners were convicted and sentenced to imprisonment in the City Lock-ups during the years 1894 and 1895, each year ending 31st
October.
Offences.
Assaults	
Breach of City By-Laws	
n Game Act	
// Indian Act	
a Licences Act    	
// Merchant Shipping Act	
n Public Morals By-Law	
// Revenue Tax Act	
Carrying concealed weapon	
Contempt of Court   	
Cruelty to animals	
Destroying and injuring property	
Drunk arrd disorderly	
Fraud or false pretences	
Frequenters, inmates, and keepers of houses of
Furious driving [ill-fame
Gambling	
Indecent assaults and exposures    	
Larceny .   	
Obstructing constables    	
Pointing revolver unlawfully	
Possession of stolen property	
Smuggling	
Threatening and seditious language	
Unsound mind	
Vagrancy	
Other offences	
Victoria.
1894
22
79
4
67
1
4
423
1
2
1
9
10
041
1895
53
100
2
66
2
12
14
4
1
10
272
2
19
4
14
3
2
5
1
2
8
31
13
640
Vancouver.
1894
32
41
2
21
1
1
19
158
69
22
1
2
2
4
92
16
490
1895
31
29
22
20
25
11
116
1
16
2
21
51
3
1
1
2
7
3
37
14
417
New.
Westminster.
1894
11
16
10
1
24
13
12
7
7
109
1895
17
3
1
15
1
1
11
43
3
41
1
2
2
22
2
167
Nanaimo.
1894
14
1
29
1895
54
25
1
28
4
11
143 59 Vict.
Police and Prisons Report.
909
Statement showing the offences for which prisoners were convicted and sentenced to imprisonment in the Provincial Gaols and City Lock-ups during the year ending 31st October,
1895.
Victoria.
Vancouver
New
West'r.
Nanaimo.
Kamloops.
Totals-
Offences.
3
"o   .
■3 'o
> «g
go
Ph
Ph
si
hA
A
>~?
hA
[eg
'q -H
d p
>p~-
iH
Ph
1
14
A
'c.
ll
■a c<s
pe
u
Ph
Ph
3
3
'O  ~H
.9 3
of
each
offence.
1
15
7
2
39
6
8
100
3
2
66
2
i
30
17
3
4
129
6
"      aggravated and felonious	
7
1
29
1
3
2
19
132
3
1
79
1
5
31
1
15
1
1
2
57
1
2
5
3
30
8
22
20
25
30
304
27
a         Merchant Shipping Act	
a         Naval Discipline Act	
a         Post Office Act	
32
31
1
1
15
1
a         Public Morals By-Law	
12
14
4
27
14
Carrying concealed weapon	
4
2
7
1
3
1
2
4
9
]
10
1
1
1
10
1
4
1
2
1
Cutting, wounding, and attempts	
1
2
2
1
Destroying and injuring property	
10
272
11
110
1
13
2
1
9
11
43
35
27
54
29
554
2
Forgery      [tences
Fraud, or obtaining money or goods by false pre-
Frequenters, keepers, and inmates of houses of ill-
Furious driving  [fame
3
10
2
19
1
16
2
21
1
3
1
25
1
28
1
1
20
41
4
2
3
8
1
77
2
4
9
87
2
3
6
3
1
45
11
Indecent assault and exposures	
Larceny  	
4
14
51
6
41
10
1
27
266
2
4
Obstructing constables	
1
3
2
5
3
1
1
1
2
1
10
4
Possession of stolen property	
12
5
3
3
1
24
1
4
Receiving stolen property	
Robbery, and attempts   	
1
2
....
2
8
31
7
640
1
2
2
7
3
37
8
5
4
8
3
4
6
2
2
264
1
21
5
16
229
2
2
22
2
167
"i
15
2
132
4
ii
143
8
12
2
20
Unsound mind	
Vagrancy	
49
135
39
Totals	
417
123
2115 910
Police and Prisons Report.
1896
List of prisoners convicted of murder and manslaughter,  from January 1st, 1873, to October
31st, 1895.
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
Prisoner's Name.
Jas. McGrath	
Chillaehan	
Che-la-hun	
George (Indian)	
Thomas Schooley ....
Peter Adair	
Johnny (Indian)	
Quanimicarr (Indian) .
Leo (Indian)	
Batiste Thomas  	
James N. Brown ....
John Jordan	
Edward Morgan	
Wyochute (Indian) ..
Toby,
Jacob, a
Dandy Jim,     n
Wyachute,      »
Johnson, alias Alton .
Alexander Hare	
Charlie McLean	
Archie McLean	
Allen McLean	
Peam (Indian)	
William,    it     	
John Hall  .   	
Woong Foorig	
Neet-tope   	
Lakka-a	
Chil-chow-malt	
Wm. Robertson	
Edward Lemon	
Alexander Ingle	
Haatg   	
Jos. Rogers	
Tul-wha-lem	
Oct, alias Alick	
Jimmy	
Jas. Harry (Indian). .
John Everson	
Antoine 	
Kaywus (Indian) ....
Chas Suet (Chinese)..
Albert Malott	
Robert E. Sproule . ..
Peter Derose	
James Connelly  	
James Maxwell	
Wm. Shearer	
Jim Williams	
Louis Omegash  	
Ah Chow	
Ah Fat	
Lee Sam [dian)
Johnny Macmoose (In-
Michael Kennedy....
Jim Isnuequass  	
Ah Yow	
En Cow	
Joe Kammel (Kanaka)
Chan Ah Hung	
Un Bacht	
Jim (Indian)	
Frank Spencer	
Place of Trial.
Victoria	
it 	
a 	
a 	
Yale .,.'.'.'.".'.'.'.'.".
New Westminster-
Victoria 	
a        	
New Westminster
Victoria	
New Westminster
Victoria	
// 	
New Westminster
Clinton   	
Yale	
New Westminster
Victoria
Clinton
Victoria	
New Westminster
Victoria . ."	
Lytton	
Victoria	
Yale	
New Westminster
Victoria	
Yale	
Kamloops   	
Nanaimo  	
New Westminster
Kamloops	
Victoria	
Lytton	
New Westminster
Nanaimo
Lytton . .
Victoria .
Nanaimo	
Kamloops	
Nanaimo 	
New Westminster-
Victoria
Nanaimo 	
New Westminster
Kamloops	
Date of Trial.
June 16th, 1873
Nov. 7th,    //
Dee. 4th,     „
Mar. 17th, 1874
Oct. 16th,    /,
Oct. 18th,    »
Nov. 11th,  „
Ap'l 26th, 1875
May 13th,    „
May 15th, 1878
May 27th,    //
Sept. 23rd, „
Nov. 26th,  i,
June 23rd, 1879
July 10th,   „
Aug. 28th,   //
Dec. 15th,   n
Airg. 5th,  1881
Nov. 27th, 1882
Dec. 4th,     ;/
June 7th,   1883
July 25th,   a
Nov. 15th,  n
April 7th, 1884
May 22nd,   n
Nov. 24th,   „
Oct. 18th, ,,
Dec. 10th, „
Feb. 11th, 1885
Oct. 12th, „
Oct. 24th, „
Dec. 1st, //
Mar. 31st, 1886
June 9th,     »
Oct. 11th,  1886
Ap'l 13th, 1887
May 4th,      „
June 7th,     n
Oct. 10th,    „
Nov. 28 th,   „
1888
June 5th,
Oct 2nd,
Nov. 5th,
Nov. 22nd.
Nov. 28th,  „
May 20th, 1889
June 4th,     n
Nov. 12th,  ,i
June 2nd,  1890
Verdict.
Manslaughter
Murder	
Manslaughter
a
Murder	
Manslaughter-
Murder 	
Manslaughter-
Murder 	
Manslaughter-
Murder 	
a        	
//        	
a       	
n       	
a       	
Manslaughter
Murder	
//       	
Manslaughter
Murder	
//       	
Manslaughter
Murder	
Manslaughter
Murder
Manslaughter
a
Murder . ..
Manslaughter
Murder ...
Manslaughter
Murder ...
Manslaughter
Murder
Sentence.
[prisonment.
Fined $300, or 12 months im-
4 years, Penitentiary.
4 a     Hard Labour.
2     a      Imprisonment.
Death—Executed.
14 years, Penitentiary.
2 n i,        [Penit'y
Death—Commuted to 10 yrs.
14    i,
6 years, Penitentiary.
10     it
15 „
3 ,,
Death—Executed.
5 years, Penitentiary,    [life
Death—Commuted to imp's't
Penitentiary for life.
Death—Executed.
5 years, Penitentiary.
5     // a
7       ;,
14     „
Death—Executed.
// n
4 months' Hard Labour.
Death—Executed.
// //
14 years, Penitentiary.
Death—Executed.
3 years, Penitentiary.
5     i,
10     ,/ a
5     // a
10     „ a
Death—Executed.
[Commuted to Penile    tentiary for life.
Penitentiary for life.
23 months' Hard Larbour.
5 years, Penitentiary.
Death—Executed.
„ a      [prisonment
it        Commuted to life im-
7 years, Penitentiary.
Life in Penitentiary.
Death—Executed.
3 years, Penitentiary.
12     „
13" a
Death—Committed suicide.
2 years, Penitentiary.
1 year's Imprisonment.
Death—Executed. 59 Vict.
Police and Prisons Report.
911
List of prisoners convicted of murder and manslaughter from January 1st, 1873, to October
31st,  1895.—Concluded.
No.
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
Prisoner's Name.
Alex. Houston	
Tom Lakanitze . . . '.
Sam (Indian)	
Jim,       a        	
Shunagh (Indian)...
Fong Lin Din	
Cepriano Luperino ..
Lawrence Whelan ..
Emia (Indian)	
Jane Melirrda Brown
Charlie (Indian) ....
John a        ....
Carey Jones	
Dominick Tereguollo
Sing Kee	
John Wilson	
Ben Kennedy	
Peter (Indian)	
Jack        //        	
Wm. Sangster	
Albert J. Stroebel . .
John McDougall. ...
Hugh Lynn	
Charlie (Indian) ....
Louis Victor	
Pat Kane	
Place of Trial.
New Westminster
Victoria	
Nanaimo 	
Victoria	
Clinton   	
Nanaimo  	
New Westminster
Nanaimo 	
it        	
ii        	
Victoria	
New Westminster
//
//
Victoria	
Vancouver   .   ....
//
New Westminster
n
Vancouver	
Date of Trial.
June 4th,   1890
Nov. 15th,
Nov. 25th,
Dec. 2nd,
Feb. 2nd,
Sept. 30th.
June 7th,
June 4th,
1891
1892
Dec. 6th,
Oct. 10th. 1893
Nov. 11th, „
Nov. 18th, „
Dec. 19th, „
May 10th, 1894
July 20th, „
May 11th, «
Nov. 6th, „
May 21st, 1895
Verdict.
Manslaughter-
Murder . ..
Manslaughter
I!
Murder . ..
Manslaughter
Murder . ..
// ...
Manslaughter
Murder . ..
Manslaughter
Murder . ..
Manslaughter
Murder ...
Manslaughter
Murder . ..
Sentence.
14 years, Penitentiary.
Death—Executed.
10 years, Penitentiary.
14     „
Penitentiary for life.
Death, but pardoned.
5 years, Penitentiary.
Death \ Commuted  to  Peni-
Death/     terrtiary for life.
Penitentiary for life.
Death—Executed.
// //
12 years, Penitentiary.
Penitentiary for life.
12 years, Penitentiary.
Death—Executed.
8 years, Penitentiary.
Death—Executed.
18 months' Hard Labour.
Death—Executed.     [for life
'/        Commuted to Penit'y 912
Police and Prisons Retort.
1896
Tabular statement of prisoners convicted of murder and manslaughter from January 1st, 1873,
to October 31st, 1895.
Year.
Victoria.
New
Westminster.
Nanaimo.
Kamloops.
Clinton.
Yale.
Yearly
totals.
u
CD
•73
tH
3
Ph
tH
CO
ap
a
5^
CD
tH
a
a
U
CO
4
3
Rj
CD
a
cS
a
Sh
CD
tH
3
Sh
CO
43
H~
M)
cc3
'm
a
ci
a
Sh'
CD
Sh
3
tH
V
-t-»
HP
60
1
ffl
S3
cS
Sh
<D
3
Fh
cp
+3
HH
SO
3
'oa
S3
c3
a
5
CD
43
h3
ao
3
CQ
C
£h
V
Sh
3
a
<D
JS
60
13
efi
1
a
1873
3
4
i
4
1874
i
i
I
3
9
1875
^
1876
1877
1878
1
2
2
5
3
7
9
1879
1
l
1880
1881
2
1
9
1882
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1883
2
3
4
1
6
4
2
1
3
1
1884
1
2
1
3
1885
1
1
1
1
3
1886
1
1
i
l
i
l
1
3
1
1887
1
2
1
4
1
9.
1888
1
4
1889
0
1890
2
1
1
1
7
1891
1892
...
....
2
1
2
4
2
2
2
4
1
1
2
45
9
1893
5
1894
9
1895
13
14
16
20
4
6
3
1
4
5
4
45
The movements of prisoners in the Gaols of the Province during the year ending October 31st,
1895, is summarized as follows :—
Victoria.
New
Westminster.
Nanaimo.
Kamloops.
Prisoners confined October 31st, 1894	
51
289
54
275
21
147
18
174
Discharged since October 31st, 1894	
340
289
329
265
168
135
192
168
51
64
1
51
63
33
24
The increase in the number of prisoners on 31st October,   1895, as  compared with the
number registered 31st October, 1894, was 14. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 913
VICTORIA   GAOL.
Report of the Warden.
Warden's Office, Victoria, B. C, December 2nd, 1895.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the annual statistical report of the Victoria
Gaol for the prison year ending Slst October, 1895. On the 31st October, 1894, there remained
in custody 51 prisoners, received during the past year, 289 ; and there remained at midnight,
31st October, 51 prisoners, being the exact number of that of the previous year. The prisoners
received were brought in as follows :—
From the City Police Court  199
.,    H. M. Ships  31
By the Provincial Police  51
Sheriff •  8
Total ,   289
The gaol buildings are in a good state of repair, considerable painting having been done
where found necessary. Fifty new woven wire mattresses, at a very moderate expense, have
been placed in position in the cells, replacing those worn out.
Good discipline has been maintained throughout the year. There have been no escapes,
but several planned escapes were timely discovered.
The health of prisoners generally has been good, no deaths having occurred. Although
from the returns it will be observed that 99 prisoners were more or less sick during the year,
the illness was principally of a temporary character, and mostly brought on from excesses committed before conviction.
All prisoners sentenced to hard labour have, as formerly, been kept well employed in
blasting and breaking rock, gardening and other work to be done. A considerable quantity
of broken rock (925 yards) has been used in repairing roads in the vicinity of the city.
One remarkable fact worth mentioning is, that during the past year not one person in the
extensive County of Victoria was committed to gaol on the charge of either murder or manslaughter. This is, I believe, the first year since the establishment of a gaol in this county
that such a statement could be made.
The total expenditure for the year, inclusive of salaries, was $10,988.28, and the amount
received for keep of prisoners was $4,579.40. The average cost of keep per diem for each
prisoner, including all expenses, was 53J cents, which is below that of  any previous year.
Members of the " Women's Christian Temperance Union " and of the Salvation Army
have devoted much time to the moral reformation of prisoners in this gaol, and services have
been regularly held on Sundays as in former years.
I have, etc.,
R. F. John,
F. S. Hussey, Esq., Warden.
Superintendent of Provincial Police, etc., Victoria, B. C. 914
Police and Prisons Report.
1896
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT VICTORIA, B. C.
-tot-
Report for the Year ending 31st October, 1895-
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salary per Annum.
Warden	
E. F. John	
Eobt. Liddell	
$1,320 00
840 00
840 00
3rd      „
James Hunter	
840 00
960 00
2nd
800 00
3rd      „     	
J. H. Mascn ..   	
Hon. J. S. Helmcken, M. D	
740 00
400 00
2.—Statement " A."
Number of prisoners remaining in custody 31st October, 1894      51
Number of prisoners received during the year    289
Total.
340
3.—Statement " B."
A return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes  of  Prisoners who died in Gaol during the
year ending 31st October, 1895.—Nil.
4—Statement " 0."
Discharged from Prison on expiration of sentence  195
n     Supreme Court  3
ii     County Court Judge's Criminal Court  8
ii    Provincial Police Court  2
on payment of fine  15
temporarily insane  5
By pardon  3
Transferred to Penitentiary  11
ii             New Westminster Gaol  1
n             Lunatic Asylum  6
ii             Conviction quashed  2
ii             Reformatory  —
ii            Naval authorities  37
Out on bail  1
Remaining in custody 31st October, 1895.
289
51
340 59 Vict. Police -And Prisons Report. 9i 5
5.—Statement " D."
Offenders pardoned during the year    3
Viz., Fred. Allen, Charlie and Louie, all Indians.
C>.—Statement "E."
Number of prisoners in confinement on October 31st, 1894  51
1895  51
Total number received during the year  289
7.—Statement "F."—Receipts and Expenditures for the year ending 31st October 1895.
Amount received for keep of prisoners, Victoria City $2,206  90
Naval    2,212  50
ii ii ii ii Provincial  136  00
ii ii sale of surplus produce  24 00
 $4,579 40
Credit for 925 loads of broken stone, district roads    1,618 75
Provincial fines collected and paid to Superintendent Hussey  26 00
City Police Court fines, collected and paid to Clerk, C. P. Court       270 00
Cash on hand October 31st, 1895.—Nil.
Expenditure.
Bread $724 86
Meat    523  24
Groceries, soap, brooms, and brushes    596 06
Clothing, shoes, and repairing material    520 45
 $2,364 61
Fuel  433 50
Light (gas)  295 20
Water  138 00
Medicine  76 10
Lime, paint, oil, turps, and tar  108 05
Seed potatoes and garden seed  33 45
Repairs to buildings, etc  144 97
Manure, 50 loads, for garden  46 50
New boiler, etc  75 20
Lumber, nails, powder, fuse, and tools  153 90
Miscellaneous accounts  98 80
$3,968 28
Salaries, including special constables ,    7,020 00
Total , $10,988 28
Keep of each prisoner for food and clothing, per day    \\l cents
ii ii        including salaries and all expenses, per diem      53A-    m 916
Police and Prisons Report.
1896
Crimes.
Abduction ,  1
Abusive language    2
Arson  2
Assault     15
ii        aggravated  7
Breach, Merchants' Shipping Act  5
ii       Naval Discipline  31
ii       Prison Regulations  1
Burglary  4
Carrying unlawful weapons  2
Contempt of Court  7
Debtors  1
Damaging property  3
Forgery  1
Gambling  10
Housebreaking  4
Indecent exposure  1
Infraction Game Act  1
Infraction Hawkers' By-law  1
ii         Indian Liquor Act    79
n        Public Morals By-law  15
Larceny  49
Necessary witness  1
Obstructing a Constable  1
Obtaining money by false pretences  3
Possession of stolen property  13
Receiving                  n                   1
Robbery  2
Selling a boy  1
Sheep stealing  1
Threatening bodily harm  2
Unsound mind  10
Vagrancy       11
Wounding .. . . 1
Total 289
Occupations.
Agent     4
Baker  2
Bartender  2
Blacksmith     2
Boatbuilder    1
Boatman     6
Boilermaker  4
Bugler  1
Butcher    ,  1
Carpenter  10
Clerk  3
Cook  10
Electrician  1
Farmer  4
Fishermen  17
Gardener    1
Glazier  1
Housemaid     1
Labourer    75
Laundryman      2
Logger  1
Longshoreman  7
Machinist	
Marine, L. I   	
Miner	
Musician	
Peddler   	
Porter   	
Printer	
Prostitute   	
Seal-hunter	
Seaman, able and ordinary.
Shipwright	
Stoker   	
Stonecutter   	
Store-keeper	
Tailor	
Teamster   , . . .
Tinsmith    ,
Waiter	
Watchmaker 	
No occupation	
Total.
o
7
1
3
3
1
1
3
11
50
6
.   13
2
.     1
I
.     1
1
.     4
,     1
.   18
.289
Nationalities.
British Columbia, Whites  5
ii                Coloured  2
ii                 Half-breed  10
ii                Indian  37
England  75
Ireland  17
Scotland  15
Canada  18
United States  27
China	
Norway and Sweden.
Germany	
Italy	
Denmark	
Japan	
Other countries	
Total.
41
9
7
3
3
3
.   17
.289 59 Vict.
Police
and Prisons Report.
917
Roman Catholic	
Methodist	
Read and wr
Read only
No education
Widowers ..
te. . .
Religious Denominations.
    28
    24                               Total	
    16
Educational.
188
3
98
289
74
208
7
289
58
231
289
     8
    82
 289
29
4
Total	
Social Condition.
Temperate ,.
Intemperate
From 10 to 20 years	
Total	
Habits.
Total	
Ages.
.. .     29    From 50 to 60
years 	
n    20 to 30      ,i     	
...   104        ii    60 to 70
ii    30 to 40     „     	
...     72
Total	
convicted prisoners
    95
289
received in
,,    40 to 50     ,,     	
...    51
Return showing  the  p
Victoria Goal during the ye
One month and
Over 1 month a
2 months
3 „
4 ,,
6 „
7 ,.
9      i,
12      „
16      „
18      „
2 years;
3 „
4 „
5 „
8 „
eriods
ar end
nd unr
ti
of
ing
sentence  passed  on  the
October 31st, 1895.
ler
3      „        	
14
62
30
.. .   11
20
.. .     1
4
...     8
1
,
3
transferre
ii
ii
n
ii
6
...     2
...     1
...     2
...     1 918
Police and Prisons Report.
1896
Return showing the remission time earned by prisoners in Victoria Gaol during the year
ending October 31st, 1895.
79 prisoners earned      5 days each.
39
23
8
4
12
2
1
1
1
1
10
15
20
25
30
40
45
50
55
60
Return showing the town or place from which prisoners were received in Victoria Gaol
during the year ending October 31st, 1895.
Victoria City    221
H. M. Ships	
West Coast, V. I	
Esquimalt District	
The Islands	
Skeena River	
Sea^going vessels	
Lake District	
New Westminster	
31
9
5
4-
4
4
3
2
Vancouver	
Nanaimo	
Alberni   	
Alert Bay	
Fort Simpson . . . .
Victoria  District.
Total    289
Number of cells in the gaol, 75, and 5 solitary cells.
Number of prisoners gaol is capable of holding, 127.
Greatest number of prisoners confined in gaol on any one day during the year, 70.
Lowest number of prisoners confined in gaol on any one day during the year, 36.
Return showing how prisoners have been employed during the year ending 31st October,
1895.
Chain-gang, where and how employed.—Prisoners sentenced to hard labour have been
employed blasting and breaking rock and other necessary work ; in wet and cold weather,
picking oakum inside. One gang of six and eight prisoners have been at work very regularly
improving Government House grounds, &c, during the year.
Amount received for prison labour (if any).—For particulars of cash returns from prison
labour see " Receipts and Expenditures."
8.—Statement " G."—Tenders accepted for Supplies.
Bread McMillan Bros.
Meat John Parker.
Groceries, soap, brooms, and brushes Erskine, Wall & Co.
Clothing, shoes, and blankets Gilmore & McCandless.
Coal Rattray & Hall.
9.—Statement " H."—Value of Prison Property.
Real estate and buildings, estimated value  .$65,000
Stores and tools, &c      1,750
Certified correct.
R. F. John,
Slst October, 1895. Warden. 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 919
JUVENILE REFORMATORY.
Juvenile Reformatory,
Victoria, B.C., January 28th, 1896.
F. S. Hussey, Esq.,
Superintendent Provincial Police, &c, &c:
Sir, — In compliance with your request to report on the Juvenile Reformatory for Boys,
for the year ending 31st October, 1895, I have to state that the Reformatory has been closed
since the Sth of August last, on account of the serious illness of the late Superintendent,
Mr. J. Finlayson. On that date there were but two lads in the Reformatory, both of whom
were handed over to my care. One of the lads, whose sentence expired in October last, I discharged to his parents, the other lad being still in my custody, and for whose welfare I am
doing all that is possible. His term of sentence will expire in April of the present year. The
total cost of maintenance for the year was $1,311.35, and the daily average number of lads
was three, so that the actual cost of each lad for the whole year was $437.11$.
The summary given below shows the operations of the Reformatory during the year ending 31st October, 1895 :—
In residence 1st November, 1894  3
Admitted during the year       1
Discharged according to sentence  3
Remaining in residence 31st October, 1895  1
I have, &c,
R. F. John. 920
Police and Prisons Report.
1896
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT NEW WESTMINSTER.
Report for the Year ending 31st October, 1895.
-Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salary per Annum.
Warden, Nov. 1, 1894, to July 31, 1895..
Airg. 1, 1895, to Oct. 31, 1895. . .
1st. Gaoler, Nov. 1, 1894, to July 31, 1895
2nd      „        	
3rd      "       	
1st Convict Guard	
2nd             „             	
W. Moresby	
W. G.  Armstrong	
f 1,440 00
1,200 00
960 00
G. A.  Calbick	
M. Lavell	
Joseph Burr	
840 00
780 00
960 00
780 00
3rd             „             	
Ben Marshall	
780 00
Medical Officer	
A. McLean	
400 00
2.—Statement "A."
Number of prisoners remaining in custody 31st October, 1894.
n received during the year	
54
275
3.—Statement " B."
Return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes of Prisoners who died in Gaol during the
year ending 31st October, 1895
Name.
Age.
Country.
Calling.
Residence.
Crime.
Date of Death.
Geo. Ashford. .
Louis Victor..
29
England ...
B. 0	
Labourer . . .
Vancouver. .
New West..
Murder	
Insane	
Seduction &\
Abortion    /
January 12, 1895.
Executed January 17,  1895.
September 5, 1895.
October      4, 1895.
Locksley Lucas
29
England ....
Journalist...
Ladner	 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 921
4.— Statement " C."
Discharged from Prison on expiration of sentence  159
ii             ii      Supreme Court  ... . .      15
ii             "      County Court Judge's Criminal Court.  . . . . . .  13
n             n      Provincial Police Court  .......... .   '.'  14
ii           on payment of fine ,  11
n           temporarily insane  4
Transferred to Penitentiary  33
ii                Lunatic Asylum  15
n                  Reformatory  1
Remaining in custody 31st October, 1895  60
Died in Gaol  4
5.—Statement " D."
Offenders pardoned during the year None.
6.—Statement "E."
Number of  Prisoners in confinement on 31st October, 1894      54
ii ,i ii i, 1895      60
Total number received during the year    275
7.—Statement " F."—Receipts and Expenditure for the year ending 31st October, 1895.
Amount received for keep of prisoners $68 00
Cash on hand on 31st October, 1895 None.
Expenditure :—
Food $1,810 95
Bedding  57 00
Clothing  236 58
Hospital stores  309 91
Salaries of Officers.'  5,525 00
Fuel and light  1,025 81
For the erection of new buildings and repairs  352 68
Water       304 03
Sundries       136 45
$9,758 41
Keep of each prisoner for food and clothing per day 10.9 cents.
ii ii including salaries and all expenses 47.7     n
Returns showing how prisoners have been employed during the year ending 31st October,
1895 :—-Prisoners have been employed in Gaol kitchen and Court House, Gaol field, Gaol
laundry floor, Gaol grounds, Court House grounds, Queen's Park. 922 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
8.—Statement "G."—Tenders accepted for Supplies.
Groceries T. S. Annandale.
Meat J. Fader.
Bread A. L. Lavery.
Fish , J. C. McCullock.
Milk J. Fleger.
Clothing J. E. Phillips.
Drugs D. S. Curtis & Co.
Coal Gilley & Rogers.
Wood S. E. Bennett.
9.—Statement "H."—Value of Prison Property.
Real estate and buildings....     $50,000
Stores and tools, &c         500
Certified correct.
W. G. Armstrong,
Gaoler.
Slst October, 1895. 59 Vict.
Police and Prisons Report.
923
PROVINCIAL   GAOL   AT   NANAIMO.
Report for the Year ending 31st October, 1895.
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salary per Annum.
$1,200 00
960 00
3rd      „       	
720 00
780 00
1st Convict Guard	
780 00
2nd
Medical Officer   	
Moses H. Mclndoo	
Louis T. Davis, M. D  	
780 00
240 00
2.—Statement " A."
Number of prisoners remaining in custody 31st October, 1894      21
ii ii received during the year    147
3.—Statement " B."
A return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes of Prisoners who died in Gaol during the
year ending 31st October, 1895.—Nil.
4.—Statement "C."
Discharged from Prison on expiration of sentence  56
ii             ii     Supreme Court  6
ii             ii      County Court Judge's Criminal Court    14
n             ii     Provincial Police Court, a number paying costs    50
ii           on payment of fine •. 97
Transferred to Penitentiary ,  2
ii                Lunatic Asylum  6
Remaining in custody 31st October, 1895  23
5.—Statement "D."
Offenders pardoned during the year Nil. 924 Police and Prisons Report. 1896
6.—Statement " E."
Number of Prisoners in confinement on 31st October, 1894  21
m                         n                1895  23
Total number received during the year  147
7.—Statement "F."—Receipts and Expenditure for the year ending 31st October, 1895.
Amount received for keep of Prisoners     $27 50
Amount of Fines, Forfeitures, and Cash received (full particulars in detail, showing how money
has been disposed of):—
Revenue $1,218 50
Justices' Fees       132 85
Cash on hand on 31st October, 1895 Nil
Expenditure :—
Food $   631 81
Clothing .  68 25
Water  109 02
Sundries     242 54
Salaries of Officers  4,680 00
Fuel and light  131 45
Tools and repairs  142 34
For the erection of new buildings and repairs  164 15
$6,169 56
Keep of each prisoner for food and clothing per day 11    cents.
ii ii including salaries and all expenses, per diem 95-|     n
Return showing how prisoners have been employed during the year ending 31st October,
1895.—Prisoners have been employed in gaol work, inside and outside gaol, cutting wood, in
garden, painting gaol building and Departure Bay Lock-up, whitewashing outside buildings,
fences, and Bastion, blasting for foundation of new Court House, etc.
8.—Statement "G."—Tenders accepted for Supplies.
Bread A. J. Smith.
Meat and vegetables , Edward Quennell.
Groceries, etc Johnston & Co.
Clothing etc Hirst Bros.
Brogans, etc Whitfield.
Lime W. McCape.
Coal    W. Reddy.
9.—Statement " H."—Value of Prison Property.
Real estate and buildings $21,000
Stores and tools, etc      1,200 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 925
Report of Gaoler.
Provincial Gaol,
Nanaimo, 22nd November, 1895.
Sir,—I have the honour to report on the state of the Provincial Gaol at Nanaimo for the
year ending 31st October, 1895. During the year 147 prisoners were received, of whom four
were from Cowichan, nine from Comox, one from Alberni, and eight from Wellington. The
keep of one prisoner was charged to the city.
The conduct of the prisoners during the year (with but few exceptions) has been good.
The officers of the gaol have done their duty faithfully and to my entire satisfaction.
The gaol building was painted and some other necessary repairs done by prison labour.
A root house was also built, and about two and a half acres of land stumped and cleared.
One gang of prisoners has been employed in the spring and autumn about the new Court
House grounds, blasting for foundation and making drains, &c.
One escape was made from the gang during the year-, but the prisoner was recaptured
about twelve hours after and sentenced to four months additional imprisonment.
Divine service has been regularly held every Sunday by the local preachers of the
Haliburton Street Methodist Church and the Salvation Army, on alternate Sundays, and all
prisoners who chose to attend had the opportunity of doing so. The Young Men's Christian
Association has kindly furnished the prisoners with a weekly supply of religious and temperance
newspapers, which has been duly appreciated.
A large crop of vegetables has been raised in the garden during the year. I beg to
enclose the garden account for the year 1895.
I have, &c.
W. Stewart,
F. S. Hussey, Esq., C. C. and Gaoler.
Superintendent of Provincial Police and Warden of Gaols.
Garden Account, Provincial Gaol, 1895.
April 17th, 1895.—To 700 lbs. seed potatoes. J 8 75
// // //   garden seeds     3 45
// // a   cabbage plants     2 75
it   hauling manure 55 00
»   ploughing     3 00
172 95
By 17,192 lbs. potatoes	
„     5,992    //    turnips  89 88
a    4,557    /'    carrots  68 35
//     1,350   a    parsnips  20 25
»        700 head cabbage  21 00
$457 36
A small quantity of beets still in the ground.
The value placed at contract price, 1^ cents per Br. for 1895.
Correct.
W. Stewart,
Chief Constable and Gaoler. 926
Police and Prisons Ri;1 ort.
1896
PROVINCIAL GAOL AT KAMLOOPS.
Report for the Year ending 31st October, 1895.
1.—Official Staff.
Office.
Name.
Salary per Annum.
0. S. Batchelor	
$840 00
720 00
Convict Guard	
James C. McLaren	
E. Furrer, M.D    	
780 00
240 00
2.—Statement "A."
Number of prisoners remaining in custody 31st October, 1894    18
n ii received during the year 174
3.—Statement " B."
A return of the names, ages, callings, and crimes of prisoners who died in Gaol during the
year ending 31st October, 1895.—Nil.
4.—Statement " C."
Discharged from prison on expiration of sentence  72
ii               ii    Supreme Court     1
ii               ii    County Court Judge's Criminal Court  0
ii               ii    Provincial Police Court  45
ii           on payment of fine , 22
ii           temporarily insane  2
Transferred to Penitentiary       6
ii                 Lunatic Asylum  5
n                  Revelstoke       1
ii                 New Westminster Gaol  14
Remaining in custody 31st October, 1895  24
5.—Statement "D."
Offenders pardoned during the year None,
6.—Statement " E."
Number of prisoners in confinement on 31st October, 1894  18
1895  24
Total number received during the year .,..,,., , , , . , ,  174 59 Vict. Police and Prisons Report. 927
7.—Statement "F"—Receipts and Expenditure for the year ending 31st October, 1895.
Receipts :—
Amount received for keep of prisoners $      38 00
Amount of Fines, Forfeitures, and Cash received        185 50
Cash on hand on 31st October, 1895  None.
Expenditure :—
Food $ 1,228 30|-
Bedding  39 00
Clothing   338 50
Hospital stores  66 50
Salaries of Officers  2,580 00
Fuel and light  308 37
For the erection of new buildings and repairs  74 66J
Water  180 00
Milk  34 42J
Total $4,849 761
Keep of each prisoner for food and clothing per day      18^ cents.
ii ii        including salaries and all expenses, per diem 58|-     n
Return showing how prisoners have been employed during the year ending 31st October
1895 : The prisoners are employed in city streets and cutting wood for Gaol and Court House.
Registry and other offices. Work is also done in and around Provincial Home. There was
nothing received for prison labour during the year.
8.—Statement " G."—Tenders accepted for Supplies.
Beef and Fish Hull Bros.
Vegetables W. H. Buse.
Coal and Wood Thos. Hornby.
Bread Wm. Johnson.
Groceries J. S. Smith.
Clothing McArthur & Harper.
Paints, &c Jas. Vair.
9.—Statement " H."—Value of Prison Property.
Real estate and buildings $7,000 00
Stores, tools, etc      700 00 928 Police and Prisons Report. .    1896
Report of Gaoler.
Kamloops Gaol, October 31st, 1895.
Mr. F. S. Hussey,
Superintendent of Provincial Police,
Victoria B. C:
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to your notice the Annual Prison Report for Kamloops Gaol for the year ending 31st of October, 1895.
On the 31st October, 1894, 18 prisoners remained in custody. There were received during the year 174 prisoners, making a total of 192.
There were discharged and removed, 168, leaving 24 in gaol on 31st October, 1895, an
increase of 6 over the same time in 1894.
The prisoners were received from the following townships: Kamloops, 103; Vernon,
12 ; Clinton, 12 ; Lytton, 11 ; Ashcroft 7 ; Revelstoke, 6 ; Nelson, 4 ; Ducks, 4 ; Nicola, 3 ;
Lillooet, 3 ; North Bend, 2; Donald, 1 ; Kaslo, 1; Notch Hill, 1 ; Hat Creek, 1 ; Osoyoos,
1 ; Savonas, 1 ; Morrisville, 1 ; total, 174.
The conduct and industry of the prisoners has been good. Few reports, and none of a
serious nature have been made. There have been no escapes or attempted escapes The
health of the prisoners has been good ; no deaths or accidents have occurred. The number of
cells has not been sufficient at all times. In September, 15 Indians were arrested on charge
of murder, and there was not room to keep each separate, pending inquiry.
The Rev. Mr. Robson, Methodist Minister, conducts service every Sunday morning, and
furnishes the prisoners with religious tracts and newspapers, which are greatly appreciated by
the prisoners.
I have, &c.,
O. S. Batchelor,
Gaoler.
victoria, B.C.:
Printed by RrcriARD Wolfenden, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty,

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