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ANNUAL REPORT ON THE ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE, NEW WESTMINSTER, FOR THE YEAR 1895. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1896

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 ANNUAL   REPORT
ON  THE
ASYLUM FOE THE  INSANE,
NEW   WESTMINSTER,
YEAR  1895.
VICTORIA, B. C.:
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1896. 59 Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1059
REPORT
ON   THE
ASYLUM   FOR   THE   INSANE.
1895.
To His Honour Edgar Dewdney,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it.please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Medical
Superintendent of the Asylum for the Insane for the year 1895.
JAMES BAKER,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
March, 1896. 59?Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1061
REPORT
OP  THE
MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT OP THE ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE,
New Westminster, B. C.
For the year endeng Slst December, 1895.
To the Honourable Colonel Baker,
Provincial Secretary.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you herewith the Annual Report for the twenty-
fourth year of the Asylum, ending December 31st, 1895.
The statistical tables appended contain a full record of the operations of the institution
for the year.
During the year, the total number of patients under treatment was 224, of whom 172
were males and 52 were females. Remaining in residence at the end of the year were 164, of
whom 130 were males and 34 were females.
Admissions.
In referring to Table 1, the number shown as admitted is 62, this being 18 less than
during the previous year. In the number admitted are included 5 by warrant, and 8 who
had been taken by their friends on probation, but were obliged to be sent back owing to a
return of their malady.    Deducting these 8 on probation, the number of new patients is 54.
Among the re-admissions are the two female patients who have been alternating between
the Asylum and their homes for several years past.
Discharges.
The discharged number 39, of whom 29 had recovered, being 46.77 per cent, of the
admissions ; 9 were discharged improved, and 1 was not insane.
The patient, a male, who proved not to be insane, was suffering from cancer, of which he
died at his own home soon after his discharge.
Escapes.
There were several escapes during the year, and it is, I may observe, almost impossible,
in the present state of the boundary fences, to prevent occasional escapes, unless indeed the
staff of attendants were largely increased. In only one instance, however, was the escape
finally successful. A very active patient, nearly recovered, with the assistance of another,
climbed over the wall of the airing court and got away. I heard, shortly afterwards, of his
safe arrival at his home. As he was convalescent, I took no steps for his re-capture, and he
was accordingly discharged. In every other instance of escape, the patient was brought back
within 48 hours.
Deaths.
The number of deaths was 20, being 8.92 of the whole number treated, exactly the same
percentage as in the previous year.    Of these 20 patients, 16 were males and 4 females.
Post-mortem examinations were made in three cases, one of these being the case of a
female patient from Nanaimo, who was brought in unconscious and in a moribund condition.
She died within a few hours after admission. As I knew nothing of the case, I could not
certify the cause of death, and an inquest was consequently held by Captain Pittendrigh, the
Coroner. The verdict returned was " Died by the visitation of God," a correct verdict, no
doubt, but one which throws no light whatever on the physical cause of death, and signally 1062
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
i895
fails to explain why the patient was submitted,  in a  dying  state, to  the long and fatiguing
journey by sea and land from Nanaimo to New Westminster.
There were no suicides, nor attempts at suicide, during the year.
Work.
During the year, all the available land of the farm and garden was duly cultivated, and
the amount of the various crops will be seen on reference to Table No. 18. The number of
clays of work done by male patients is given in Table No. 15. The total amounts to 21,564
days, which seems at first sight to be a very great amount, but in estimating the volume of
work done, and the general result, it must be remembered that a clay's work for these patients
only amounts to about 4 or 4|- hours, and that the men employed are, for the most part, in a
languid or feeble bodily condition, and the quantity of work per hour done by them is considerably less than the average done by an ordinary able-bodied labourer or mechanic.
The carpenter and plumber have both been fully employed during the year doing a great
variety of work, some of which, being outside the ordinary routine, will be alluded to presently.
The shoemaking department, which was started in March, 1895, made, during the rest of
the year, 44 pairs of boots and 102 pairs of slippers, besides attending to all repairs.
The tailoring department, which was also started in March, returns for the year 39 coats,
12 vests, 8 pairs of trousers, and 3 canvas suits made, besides such repairs as were too heavy
for the female ward to handle.
The female ward has contributed its due share of work, as will be seen upon reference to
Table No. 16.
The poultry yard has returned 150 dozen eggs, and 58 fowls have been killed for the use
of the patients, and 7 sold, a total of 65, which, at the market price of $5 per dozen, amounts
to $27.50. The eggs, at the average contract price for the year of 27\ cents per dozen, would
have cost $41.25, making the total for fowls and eggs $68.75. The feed for the poultry (vide
Table No. 13) has cost, during the year, $7.91, which leaves a net profit of $60.84.
The returns from the hogs for the year are as follows : Six hogs, bought on March Sth,
1894, for $32.50, sold on March 30th. 1895, for $118.15, of which money $100 was paid into
the Treasury on June 27th, 1895, the balance, $18.15, being taken, with $4.85 added to it
from the petty cash account, to purchase 8 small pigs, which will, no doubt, when fit to be sold,
realize a like good sum.    The hogs are entirely fed from the refuse of the kitchen and garden.
Expenditure.
The per capita cost (Table No. 17) includes all the expenditure of the Asylum, salaries,
provisions, fuel, lighting, drugs, furniture, etc.; in fact, everything but what belongs to the
Lands and Works Department and to the Transport of Lunatics.
The cost this year per patient per month was $16.67, and per day 54J- cents, that of the
previous year being 48-| cents, showing an increase of cost of 6>J cents per patient per diem.
Estimates.
The following will show the amounts expended as compared with the amounts voted, and
as the yearly report is from January 1st to December 31st, and the estimates are passed for
the fiscal year, which commences July 1st and ends on June 30th, it will be necessary to
include the vote for the fiscal year of 1894-5 in order to give a clear estimate.
Vote 1894-5.
Expended
to June 30th, 1895.
Balance lapsed.
411,'005 00}$13'88500
....'     7,000 00
     2,500 00
        350 00
        300 00
        900 00
$13,531 83
9,539 04
2,758 77
590 38
331 20
1,160 39
877 48
Supplementary
Fuel and Light
Medicines, &e .
vote
I   353 17
Excess  2,539 04
258 77
„         240 38
„           31 20
„         260 39
Furniture, &c
        700 00
        600 00
        700 00
177 48
600 00
800 14
985 59
100 14
ks
     6,000 00
5,014 41 59 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1063
The excess of expenditure on this year's vote is owing to the large increase of patients
during the latter half of 1894, and to the diminished vote of supply as compared with that of
the previous fiscal year. From the large balance of $5,014.41 in the Lands and Works vote
must be deducted the expenses incurred in building the new laundry, the accounts of which
did not pass through the office of the Asylum.
Vote 1895-6.
Salaries $14,800 00
Provisions  9,000 00
Fuel and Light  3,200 00
Water  600 00
Medicines, &c  400 00
Clothing  900 00
Furniture, &c  800 00
Transport  600 00
Miscellaneous  700 00
Lands and Works  1,000 00
Expended to
Balance for use
31st December, 1895.
to June 30th, 1896.
$7,743 82
$7,056 18
4,367 83
4,632 17
1,714 19
1,485 81
385 99
214 01
255 32
144 68
680 52
219 48
1,295 69
Expended.
600 00
268 94
431 06
1,708 94
Expended.
It is obvious by these figures that the yearly expense of the Asylum increases, and I
regret to find that, at the end of the fiscal year, the general vote will not cover the expenditure. It probably may do so in the votes for provisions, transport, and miscellaneous expenses,
but all the other votes for requirements are already more than half expended, and as the
probabilities are that there will be an increase of patients rather than a decrease, the votes
will not cover the expenditure. I wish, however, to draw your attention to two of the votes
already expended, that of $800 for furniture and the one for Lands and Works. The former
vote has been exceeded through the furnishing of Lawn House (the residence formerly
occupied by the Medical Superintendent) for the convalescent and orderly female patients, and
for certain beds and other articles of furniture in the main building, which, under the changed
circumstances of management and system, I have found it impossible to do without.
The vote for the Lands and Works Department was altogether too small for the many
requirements of the institution and the grounds around it, and I found it impossible, under
the circumstances of the case, to keep within the prescribed limit. When I mention further
on the items of work done in this Department, it will be quite evident, I think, that the
excess of expenditure was absolutely essential for the safety and well-being of the institution,
and was altogether unavoidable. The supplementary vote, No. 128, of $6,000 for additions,
alterations, and repairs is not now included, as the accounts in this case did not pass through
this office. The additions and alterations in question were those made necessary by building
a residence in connection with the main building of the Asylum in place of the detached
house formerly occupied by the Medical Superintendent.
The chief events of the year have been the-additions, alterations and repairs alluded to in
the last paragraph. A new residence for the Medical Superintendent has been added on to the
front of the Asylum, under the direction of Mr. G. W. Grant, of Vancouver, the architect engaged.
The new apartments consist of dining-room, drawing-room, two large and three small bedrooms,
bath-room, kitchen, and all the general requirements of a residence. The rooms are small, but
conveniently arranged ; they are lighted by electricity, warmed with hot water, and are very
comfortable. The residence is, in its internal arrangements, fully adequate to the purpose for
which it is intended, and, externally, it is generally conceded, the new additions have vastly
improved the architectural appearance of the Asylum. An entrance lodge was one of the
additions included in the above-named vote, a very desirable and even necessary appendage to
such an institution as the Asylum, and a new slate roof was also put upon the old part of the
building, which includes Wards E and F, in place of the dangerous and much-worn shingle
roof previously existing. This roof is now water-tight, and is free from the danger of ignition
in dry weather, an occurrence that actually took place in 1894, which might easily have
resulted in the destruction of the whole pile. The above-named additions and alterations have
added very materially indeed to the safety and convenience and usefulness of the Asylum
structure. They were begun on April Sth, 1895, and the Medical Superintendent with his
family went into residence in the new apartments on September 14th, 1895.    The contract, so 1064 Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1895
far as can be observed at present, seems to have been faithfully executed, and the building
erected in a stable and efficient manner. The galvanized iron roof of the Asylum, covering
the whole of it except the part of it above mentioned, now slated, was in an exceedingly
imperfect condition. There were very numerous leaky places, letting water through into the
wards on every occasion of rain, and causing, naturally, much discomfort and inconvenience.
Mr. James Gow, of New Westminster, inspected this roof, and, after a close examination, came
to the conclusion that by a complete alteration of the plan on which the galvanized plates
were laid on an effectual remedy for this bad condition of things could be applied, and he gave
in an estimate amounting to $410, which was accepted by the Government, and the work was
done in the months of September and October, 1895. Since that time, the leaks have not
been observed, and the roof now seems to be in perfect order. Mr. Gow has guaranteed to
keep it in good repair, free of cost, for five years.
On the vacation of the Medical Superintendent's residence, and his removal into the new
apartments, the house was appropriated to the use of some of the quiet, orderly, and convalescent female patients, whereby much-needed relief was afforded to the over-crowded female
ward, and much comfort added to the lives of the quiet, harmless patients by removing them
from association with the noisy, violent, and refractory ones. Four patients of this class had
been accommodated in this house for some weeks before the Medical Superintendent's family
left it, in order to relieve the congestion of the ward, and, as soon as it was at liberty, cleaning, repairing, and furnishing were proceeded with as rapidly as possible, and ten patients
placed in it under the care of Mrs. Janet Crawford as Assistant Matron, acting under Mrs.
Ross, the Matron. Since then a variable number of patients have occupied the house, and the
arrangement works well and very much to their comfort and advantage. To distinguish this
house from the main asylum, it has been named Lawn House, and is now generally so
designated.
The road up to the front door of the Asylum, from Columbia Street, was a sort of lane
or cutting, very low, with nothing but loose planks by way of sidewalk, very dirty in wet
weather, narrow and inconvenient. Starting, as it did, at a low point below the front garden
of Lawn House, all vehicles coming in had to go down hill on Columbia Street some 200 yards
or more, and then to mount up again nearly the same distance to approach the Asylum. To
remedy this defect a road has been made, starting from the new lodge at the west corner,
directly to the front door. This new road is nearly level, it is planked by a good permanent
sidewalk, and the approach thereby, both for vehicles and foot passengers, very much
improved in all respects. The old low lane has been abolished, and is now nearly filled up
with gravel and other materials. All the labour on this road has been done by the patients
of the institution and the attendants.
The grounds in front of the Asylum have at the same time been partially levelled and
converted into ornamental lawns, with flowers and shrubs upon them. This work, which is
also being done by the patients and attendants, is still in progress.
The farm, garden and orchard have, as already mentioned, been carefully cultivated, and
the orchard in particular has received the following additions :—Apple trees, 37 ; pear trees,
3; cherry trees, 2; plum trees, 12; currants, black, 68; currants, red, 120; raspberry canes,
264; blackberry vines, 59; rhubarb roots, 72.
In the open space in the rear of the Asylum were some old privies, in a very filthy and
disgusting state. These have been cleared away and water-closets substituted for them. This
work has been done by the carpenter and the plumber, assisted by certain patients capable of
helping with work of this kind.
Amongst the deficiencies, the insufficient supply of hot water for the baths was perhaps
the most signal of all. The only source of such supply was the kitchen boiler, from which
pipes were laid on to the baths. But this arrangement was extremely imperfect, involving
two evils, namely, robbing the kitchen of the hot water required there, and yet not affording
anything like a sufficient supply for the baths. In effect, the difficulty used to be patched up
by carrying hot water into the wards in pails and buckets, in itself a dangerous practice, from
various sources, amongst others from the boilers of the heating apparatus, a very detrimental
thing for these boilers. All these lame expedients are now obviated by the establishment of
a hot water system solely for the use of the lavatories and baths. A small Gurney furnace
was included in the contract above mentioned. At first it was not found to be large enough
for its work, nor was the old hot water cistern nearly large enough ; a moderate supply of hot
water could be obtained only with difficulty and by forced firing.    The small Gurney furnace 59 Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1065
has been about doubled in size, and the cistern has been doubled in capacity, with the result
that it now requires less coal by one-fifth than it consumed at first, and the hot water supply
to the lavatories and baths is sufficient, constant, and so far satisfactory.
Requirements.
In view of the constantly increasing number of inmates, it is evident that the Asylum
will require enlargement; it is already overcrowded. Dormitories intended originally for four
beds have all of them five, and in some cases even six, patients sleeping in them ; and bedrooms intended for one patient only are in some cases occupied by two. The dining-rooms are
likewise too small for the increased number of patients. The kitchen department, especially,
is too limited in accommodation, and the sculleries, wash-houses and store-rooms are far too
small and exceedingly inconvenient. The cooking range is very much too small for the
present size of the establishment. There are no cellars, and all provisions belonging to the
immediate cooking department have to be stored in an irregular sort of a cavern in the earth
underneath the kitchen, left by the contractor when he made the excavations for his foundations. A new kitchen is required, and an additional cooking range, with the necessary
appurtenances.
Looking at the question of enlargement as a whole, I am of opinion that whatever is
done should be done with a view to better classification of the patients. At present they are
too much mixed up, and there is no sufficient means of segregating the noisy and violent
patients, who disturb the quieter ones, especially at night, very much to the detriment and
discomfort of the latter. Moreover, there is at present no sufficient distinction between those
patients who are maintained wholly by the Government and those who pay for additional
comforts and superior accommodation. I think the best way to accomplish these ends would
be to build new and well isolated appartments for the noisy and violent patients, to build a
new kitchen with a cellar underneath it, converting the present kitchen into store-rooms,
pantries, and sculleries, and to build also one large general dining-room for the patients, with
communication on the one hand with the kitchen, and on the other with the wards. At
present the meals are carried up the front staircase in tins, trays, and other vessels, in
portions—not by any means a convenient or proper method. If these changes and additions
were made, they would liberate the present dining-rooms for use as bedrooms or dormitories,
and to that extent expand the Asylum and increase the accommodation sufficiently to make
it serve its purposes for some few years to come.
New stables are required, and a barn. The present stable is a mere shattered old shed
falling to decay, and there is no barn, consequently no means of storage of hay and straw,
which is brought from the dealers in driblets and deposited at one end of the stable shed.
Moreover, the hay gathered each year from the Asylum land is frequently spoiled, for want of
a barn to preserve it in wet weather.
The workshops are very little better in condition than the stable, and require rebuilding.
I believe it would be a good plan to put the new workshops in the present airing-courts. As
airing-courts, or places of recreation for the patients, they are dismal and dreary to the last
degree. They were condemned by the Commission which sat in 1894, and as airing-courts
ought to be abolished, but they would be suitable as localities for the workshops, and would
have the advantage of security from escapes. There are not a few of the patients in the
Asylum who might be profitably employed, except for their determination to escape on opportunity. If the new workshops were placed in the enclosures now used as airing-courts
(so-called), the chances of escape would be cut off, and the patients alluded to profitably
employed, to their own benefit and the good of the institution.
The morgue is a building wholly unsuitable for its intended purposes, and in an improper
position. It is an old wooden building, with neither gas nor water, no accommodation for
conducting post-mortem examinations, and no decent arrangements for the friends of the dead
to come and view the corpses. The situation, moreover, in full view of and quite close to all
the wards, is an improper one, and a new morgue, in a different and more secluded situation,
is very much wanted.
The fences around the Asylum grounds are in a very defective state. What fences do
exist are not such as are suitable for the outer boundaries, and even these, such as they are,
have never been completed. Around the gardens of Lawn House there is positively no fence
whatever, beyond a low rail about three feet high, and a hedge of the same height.    Such a 1066 Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1895
fence is merely ornamental, and is of no value whatever as a protection against escapes. Any
patient can step over such a semblance of a barrier with the greatest ease. The consequence
of this condition of things is that the Asylum grounds, which in themselves are highly
picturesque, and admirably calculated for use and enjoyment of the patients, are rendered
unavailable. Patients could not be possibly kept under control in the grounds and gardens as
they now are, except by such an enormous staff of attendants as to be out of the question, and
the condition of the boundary fences is such as to render the otherwise great advantages of
the site quite nugatory. There is no more pressing question connected with the Asylum than
the condition of the boundary fences.
I found, on entering upon office here, the locks of the wards and the patients' rooms to
be anything but satisfactory. In the first place, I have to remark that they are locks of poor
quality, and not of a pattern suitable for asylum purposes. They are box locks, screwed on to
the outside of the door, and presenting iron angles and projecting corners, very dangerous in
the case of epileptic or paralytic or violent patients. I need hardly say that the proper pattern
of lock for asylum purposes is that known as a mortice lock, in wdiich the lock is wholly buried
in the wood-work, offering no dangerous angles or projections. Added to this defectiveness
of pattern, the condition of the locks themselves was bad, owing to their original poor quality.
Both locks and keys have already begun to be worn out. This was especially the case with
one series of them, namely those of E Ward, which were in so rickety a condition that they
were not only unsafe, but employed a large share of the blacksmith's time in keeping them in
decent repair. It was, in my opinion, essential that the locks on this particular ward should
be replaced without delay, and I therefore procured from Gibbons' Patent and General Lock
Manufactory, of Wolverhampton, England, proper asylum locks for the doors of the main
corridors of all the wards, and also for the bedrooms and dormitories of this Ward E in
particular. The cost has been considerable, but I had to make choice between incurring the
cost and keeping the ward in an unsafe condition. This ward has now a set of locks of the
proper pattern, and of first-class quality, which may be depended on, and which are not
dangerous ; moreover, the blacksmith has not now to fritter away his time in keeping old and
bad locks in repair. I have not gone to the expense of putting new locks on all the doors of
all the wards, but it ought at once to be done. The need is not quite so pressing as in the
case of E Ward, that being the refractory male patients' ward, but certainly new locks ought
to be supplied throughout the institution, and I look upon this as one of the most urgent
requirements.
Precautions have been taken against fire during the past year. A large quantity of dry
kindling wood was found to be stored in the basement, in close contiguity with one of the
heating furnaces. This wood was, as soon as possible, removed. The heating furnaces, that
is, the two large Gurneys for warming the wards, were a source of great danger. The smoke-
pipes were of very thin iron, much worn and collapsed. They frequently became red-hot, and
as one of them was within six inches of the wooden joists of the main building, the danger of
fire was extreme. I have had new pipes of stronger iron fitted to the furnaces, and so
arranged that they do no not come nearer to the floor above than two feet. Both the furnaces
have also been enclosed by brick walls, and the spaces so walled in ceiled with iron laths and
plaster, so that they are now enclosed in practically fire-proof chambers, and the danger
reduced to a minimum. The floor above the small Gurney heater for the baths is also
protected by a ceiling of iron laths and plaster extending around it, and the same thing has
been done in the basement of the Medical Superintendent's new residence for a considerable
distance. By these means the danger of fire arising in the basement is very much reduced ;
in short, I look upon the building as safe from fire in this quarter. If, however, a fire should
unhappily arise in the wards or offices of the main building, the means of extinguishing it are
very faulty. There are seven fire-hose, one for each ward and one for the central offices, of
two inches in diameter; but these seven two-inch hose are supplied, all seven of them, by only
a single pipe from the main, of one inch and a half in diameter. It is obvious that it is
impossible, with such an arrangement, to obtain anything like a sufficient pressure of water in
case of a conflagration. One day last summer, at my request, Mr. Ackerman, Chief of the
New Westminster Fire Brigade, visited the Asylum and tested the pressure. The stream,
even from one hose, was exceedingly feeble, and if ever it should be required to use several of
them at once, it was evident that the stream from each would be so small and weak as to be
almost useless. I have taken the opinions of experts on this point, and am informed that a
four-inch pipe is required to be laid from the main for the supply of the seven hose mentioned, 59 Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1067
and that a second hydrant is required at the rear of the building, in addition to the one now
existing at the front. I think also a fire-hose should be provided for the protection of Lawn
House.
Divine Service.
Divine service has been conducted in the Asylum each Sunday during the year—in the
early part of it by the Rev. Philip Woods, and after his departure for England, in June last,
by the Rev. A. Shildrick, Rector of Holy Trinity Cathedral, New Westminster, and (on two
occasions) by the Bishop of New Westminster. About two-thirds of the patients are in a
fit state to attend these services, and I am able to state that they are very much appreciated
by those who are able to be present. Many of the patients also are visited from time to time
by the priests and ministers of their respective denominations.
Entertainments.
Throughout the year entertainments of a varied kind have been given at tolerably regular
intervals, consisting of plays and recitals by amateurs of the district, who have most cordially
placed their talents at the disposal of the institution for the amusement of the patients,
and, in my opinion, to their great benefit also. In addition to these more formal entertainments, a social reunion has been held in the recreation room about once a month, or oftener,
during the year, at which songs and music of various kinds are given by the officials of the
Asylum, and at which dancing also forms part of the programme. Altogether, an entertainment of one kind or other occurs, except in the hottest weather in summer, about once a fortnight, not with absolute regularity, but as convenience and circumstances dictate. At the
"social evenings" the patients are regaled with coffee and buns or other light refreshments.
It would not be right, in connection with this part of the report, to omit to mention the
active part taken in these entertainments by Mrs. Ross, the Matron, who has the chief hand
in organising them, and to whom most of their success is due; nor would it be right again to
pass by without favourable comment the part taken by Mr. T. R. Duncan. Mr. Duncan was
engaged as attendant and violinist on August 5th, 1895, and has been active since that date
in promoting music in various ways throughout the establishment. He has encouraged several
of the patients to indulge their musical tastes, and has especially done good service in practising with them during the week the hymns for the Sunday services, whereby the singing at
the services on Sunday has been manifestly much improved.
Amongst other items of amusement and diversion must be named the visit to the Agricultural Exhibition, which was visited in October by all patients in a fit state to go to it, and
also a visit by some of them to the lacrosse match in August. A few patients also have gone
on fishing excursions in the charge of attendants, and as frequently as it can be managed
walking excursions outside the grounds are taken.
Changes in the Staff.
As stated in the yearly report for 1894, the present Medical Superintendent took over
the duties on February 1st from Dr. C. F. Newcombe, the then Acting Medical Superintendent.
In the male department, E. Harrap resigned on February 28th, H. Young on June 30th,
and R. S. Cunningham on July 31st. These three attendants were replaced by R. Rees, a
man with 19 years' experience as asylum attendant, partly in England (for 13 years), partly
in the United States (for 6 years). From these fields of employment he brought excellent
testimonials. He came into office on March 1st, and is now in charge of D, the hospital ward,
where he performs his duties very satisfactorily. Thomas Mayes, with 6J years' experience at
Springfield Asylum, Bedford, England, came on July 1st, and is now on duty in E Ward,
where he is proving himself to be a careful and even-tempered attendant, and giving much
satisfaction. Thomas R. Duncan came on August 5th. He had not had previous experience
in any asylum, but was engaged on account of his musical abilities, as alluded to in a previous
part of this report. He is a well-educated man, and has busied himself successfully since his
arrival in training the patients and staff in music. He also, acting under R. Rees in D Ward,
does his duty as an attendant with great regularity, carefulness, and intelligence.
In the female department it was found necessary, on account of several very violent and
some suicidal acute cases, to employ a night nurse. Mrs. Janet Crawford was engaged for
this  purpose.    She  acted  very efficiently in  this capacity from July 26th,  the day of her 1068 Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1895
arrival, until September 28th, on which day she was transferred to Lawn House as Assistant
Matron, with the charge of the patients there. Mrs. Crawford is a trained hospital nurse,
and has had several years' experience in asylums in the United States. She is a woman of
solid and sedate character, is very kind and encouraging to the patients under her charge,
whom she manages very successfully, and who are all, it seems to me, much attached to her
and happy under her care. She, moreover, keeps Lawn House in a state of exquisite cleanliness and order. On account of the influx of patients and the acute character of many of the
cases, an increase in the staff was essential, and Miss Emmeline Cromley was appointed on
trial for a month, but, finding asylum work not suited to her tastes and capacities, she withdrew at the end of her month of probation, and Miss Ruth Gamble, who has had eight years'
experience in the Toronto Asylum, was appointed in her place. Miss Gamble entered on her
duties on September 17th, and remains here and performs her work very satisfactorily. On
the transfer of Mrs. Crawford to Lawn House, her place in the Asylum was filled by Miss
Annie Carlyon, who, though without any previous experience, seems to have a natural
aptitude for asylum work, and under the guidance of the Matron is rapidly developing into a
valuable attendant. As the character and capacity of the attendants is of the very first
importance, and is, indeed, the key to the successful management of an asylum, I have taken
every possible precaution in making selections, and I am glad to be able to say that the new
officials have so far answered my expectations, and are doing their duties well. I have to add
that the remainder of the staff, whom I found here on entering office, have all been working
diligently, and I have to offer my best thanks to them for their assistance and the cordiality
with which they have fallen in with my wishes and assisted me in my plans. I should not be
doing justice if I were to omit to make special mention of the services of Mrs. Ross, the
Matron. Amidst a great deal which I found here on entering office which seemed to me to
require reformation, I have no hesitation in saying that the one bright spot was the condition
and management of the female patients. By her energy, activity, and enthusiasm, she had
brought the female department into a highly creditable state, and I hope, by degrees, that the
stolid and listless condition of the male patients may similarly be amended, and that they may
be aroused into more life and alertness and self-respect with regard to habits and personal
appearance. This stirring up of the chronic insane to better habits depends largely upon the
lively attention of their attendants, and I think it should be a matter of emulation amongst
all attendants to arouse the interest and awake the dormant faculties of those under their
charge. I have in the course of my experience frequently seen great changes wrought in the
condition of elemented patients by the unceasing and patient and cheerful efforts of attendants.
Attendants require to be excessively vigilant, patient, cheerful, or seemingly cheerful, even if
they do not feel so. The office of attendant on the insane is no sinecure. It demands a combination of qualities not easy to be met with. The occupation is of an exceedingly trying and
exacting nature, and many allowances have to be made for those who undertake the duties
which, to many minds, are absolutely repulsive. But, amidst it all, I am of opinion that a
little wholesome rivalry amongst the staff in different parts of the establishment, as to wdiich
of them shall be most successful in accomplishing the ends and aims in view, is of advantage
to themselves and to those under their care. Those who are accustomed to watch the insane
can usually discern which part of an asylum is most successfully managed by the aspect and
demeanour and tidy and cheerful and composed appearance of the patients.
I have to express my thanks to Mr. Phillips, the Steward, and Mr. Knight, Clerk of the
Asylum, for their services, which have always been cordially and diligently and pleasantly
rendered. Without their assistance, it would be physically impossible for me to cope with
the work of this establishment, and I should collapse. But it is, of course, very important to
have valuable services rendered in an agreeable and friendly manner, and I highly appreciate
the aid of these two gentlemen accordingly.
Acknowledgments.
Nothing more now remains for me to say except to offer my best thanks, on behalf of
the numerous recipients, to many ladies and gentlemen who have, during the past year, taken
interest in the proceedings of this institution, and who have lent a willing hand in promoting
its welfare. First and foremost, I must thank the Rev. Philip Woods and the Rev. A.
Shildrick for Divine services conducted here by them every Sunday, gratuitously. Also, I
have to thank Mrs. E. M. N. Woods and Mrs. Charles Woods for their valuable aid in the
musical part of the same services.    They have been most regular and devoted in rendering 59 Vict. Report on the Asylum for the Insane. 1069
help. Miss Webster has, for many years, taken interest in the Asylum, and, by presents of
books, newspapers, flowers, and fruit, has contributed no less than formerly to the welfare and
happiness of the patients. Mr. Justice Bole has kindly sent the Weekly Colonist, as well as
many books and magazines, that have been of great service in the institution. On August
9th, Mr. Leitch, a missionary from Ceylon, gave an entertaining lecture, illustrated by the
oxy-hydrogen lantern. The King's Daughters, of Vancouver, the Westminster Club, Mrs. E.
M. N. Woods, the Rev. A. Shildrick, Mrs. Jones-Jones, and others, have sent contributions of
books, pictures, Christmas cards, newspapers, and magazines, all of which are most useful and
welcome. We shall be very glad of more such presents from any other donors who will be
kind enough to remember our wants; we can scarcely have too many of the sort of gifts now
mentioned. To mention by name all the ladies and gentlemen who have assisted at the
various concerts and dramatic entertainments would occupy too much space, but I cannot omit
to allude to the efforts of Miss Inglis, who organized and played in the amusing farce given on
December 13th with great success.
The Rev. Father Donteuville was good enough to allow the boys of St. Louis College band
to perform on the same occasion, he himself playing with them and superintending, very much
to the gratification of the audience. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Henderson, Mrs. L. A. Hamilton,
of Winnipeg, Mr. Rickman, Mr. E. Owen Malins, Mr. Arthur Malins, are all thanked for their
exertions, while Mr. Melville Malins deserves a special note of commendation for his active
efforts in organizing and making preparations; his services in that direction have been
invaluable. Mr. W. H. Falding kindly gave a concert with his band in the summer, at which,
amongst other things, Mr. Leslie delighted the audience by his fine solo flute-playing. Mr.
Blood, Mr. Digby, of Sapperton, with others, have contributed their share to the concerts and
dramatic entertainments. All are most warmly thanked for their exertions, given so willingly,
and which, they may feel assured, do not fall on barren ground, but bear good fruit in due
season.
The proprietors of the Daily News-Advertiser and the Daily and Weekly World, of
Vancouver, are warmly thanked for their papers, which come, as a gift to the institution,
with great regularity, and are highly appreciated.
In conclusion, I have to thank the Departments under which I work, the Provincial
Secretary's and the Public Works, for the uniform courtesy with which they have fallen in
with my views and wishes, and, as far as possible, met the demands I have made upon them.
A great deal has been done during the year to amend the condition of the building and
grounds and to improve the internal service arrangements, all of which improvements have
cost a considerable amount of ■ money. I regret very much that the appropriations for the
year have been in several instances exceeded, but I need hardly point out that, owing to
exceptional circumstances, last year was an exceptionally heavy year with regard to expenditure. Nevertheless, the Asylum still remains in an undeveloped condition, while the patients,
I am sorry to say, continue to increase, as will be distinctly recognized by reference to the
statistics of the last few years. I am of opinion that further demands will have to be made
upon the Government for the purposes of this institution if it is to be kept abreast of the
times, and carried on in accordance with the dictates of humanity and the wants of modern
civilization.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your most obedient servant,
G. F. BODINGTON, M.D.
Medical Superintendent.
March 1st, 1896. 1070
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1895
ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT
Of the operations of the Asylum for the Insane, New Westminster, for the Year
ending 3 1st December, 1895.
Table No. 1.
Showing movements of patients in the Asylum for the year ending 31st December, 1895.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
132
40
30
22
162
Admitted during the year :—
By Lieutenant-Governor's Warrant ...
5
33
2
16
6
5
49
8
62
172
42
52
18
224
Discharged during the year :—
20
4
9
5
29
9
1
1
Total number of discharges during the year ..
Died	
25
16
1
14
4
39^1
20|
60
130
565
435
34
159
125
164
724
a             discharged       n                     u        ..
n             died                  //                     u        ..
a              escaped             n                      n        ,n
266
161
8
105
20
37n
181 \
560
130
34
164
Table No. 2.
Showing the maximum and minimum number of patients resident in the Asylum, the total
number of days' stay of patients, and the daily average number of patients in the Asylum
during the year ending 31st December, 1895.
Maximum number of patients (on the 20th October)
Minimum „ n (on the 24th March).
Collective days' stay of all patients during the year
Daily average of population	
Male.
133
125
47,221
129.37
Female.
35
32
12,265
33.60
Total.
168
157
59,486
162.97 59 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1071
Table No. 3.
Showing the social state of the patients received during the year 1895, and also of the total
number received since the opening of the Asylum.
Social State.
Admissions of
year.
Admissions since opening.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
12
28
12
10
24
38
124
293
148
119
40
243
333
148
Total	
40
22
62
565
159
724
Table No. 4.
Showing the religious denomination of the patients received during the year 1895, and also of
the total number received since the opening of the Asylum.
Denomination of Religion.
Admissions of
year.
Admissions since
opening.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Church of England ,	
9
2
8
5
6
1
6
5
5
4
1
1
15
7
13
9
6
2
1
4
5
109
90
57
40
20
12
38
166
33
49
30
18
28
2
6
7
15
4
158
Roman Catholic    	
120
75
Methodist	
68
22
18
45
4
5
181
37
Total	
40
22
62
565
159
724 1072
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1895
Table No. 5.
Showing the place of birth of the patients received during the year, and also of the total
number received since the opening of the Asylum.
Place of Birth.
Admissions of
year.
Admissions since
opening.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
10
6
2
5
1
1
15
7
3
115
34
45
4
19
39
38
2
2
18
57
15
25
66
3
1
1
81
33
8
19
7
12
14
24
12
11
1
5
13
148
Scotland	
42
64
4
2
6
1
2
6
1
19
46
50
2
2
2
4
2
5
6
2
1
1
7
10
2
3
1
5
32
81
27
36
5
71
94
Total	
40
22
62
565
159
724
Table No. 6.
Showing the place of residence from which patients were received during the year 1895.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Victoria	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Nanaimo 	
Kamloops	
Langley	
Chilliwhack	
Nelson	
Dewdney	
Alberni	
Ladner's Landing	
Golden ....   	
Sapperton 	
Enderby  	
Lulu Island	
McPherson's Station ...
Port Moody	
Cape Mudge	
Savonas 	
Burnaby	
Port Hammond	
Three Forka 	
Agassiz  	
Salt Spring Island	
Total.
1
1
1
1
40
22
11
8
7
7
3
3
2
2
2
62 59 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1073
Table No. 7.
Showing length of residence in the Asylum of those discharged during the year 1895.
Reg.
No.
Initials.
Sex.
When admitted.
When discharged.
Remarks.
578
N. W.
M.
June 30th, 1894.
January 2nd, 1895.
Recovered.
589
L. S.
F.
August 16th, 1894.
February 3rd, 1895.
Recovered.
528
G. W.
M.
July 31st, 1.893.
February 9th, 1895.
Recovered.
593
H. M.
F.
January 2nd, 1895.
March 4th, 1895.
Recovered.
256
W. A. C.
M.
June 7th, 1887.
March Sth, 1895.
Recovered.
355
J. W. H.
M.
November 28th, 1894.
March 9th, 1895.
Recovered.
607
T. L.
M.
December 1st, 1894.
March 9th, 1895.
Recovered.
613
J. T. W.
M.
January 19th, 1895.
April 14th, 1895.
Improved (escaped).
566
A. H.
M.
March 31st, 1894.
May 2nd, 1895.
Recovered.
551
J. Z.
M.
January 27th, 1894.
May 4th, 1895.
Recovered.
594
E. W.
M.
September 5th, 1894.
May 6th, 1895.
Recovered.
265
P. M.
F.
January 12th, 1895.
May 10th, 1895.
Recovered.
360
J. B.
F.
November 5th, 1894.
May 11th, 1895.
Improved.
617
A. P.
F.
February 16th, 1S95.
May 14th, 1895.
Recovered.
604
S. W.
F.
November 8th, 1894.
May 16th, 1895.
Improved.
610
J. G.
M.
December 31st, 1894.
May 30th, 1895.
Recovered.
625
G. Y.
M.
May 8th, 1895.
June 6th, 1895.
Recovered.
615
K. L.
M.
February 9th, 1895.
June 21st, 1895.
Recovered.
633
A. S. J.
M.
June 8th, 1895.
June 24th, 1895.
Improved.
577
C. P.
M.
June 27th, 1894.
July 6th, 1895.
Recovered.
635
T. W.
M.
June 14th, 1895.
July 8th, 1895.
Recovered.
631
F. S.
M.
May 31st, 1895.
July 15th, 1895.
Recovered.
609
A. E. F.
M.
December 31st, 1894.
July 15th, 1895.
Recovered.
624
J. B.
M.
April 26th, 1895.
July 22nd, 1895.
Improved.
629
E. W.
M.
May 28th, 1S95.
July 23rd, 1895.
Improved.
563
E. E.
M.
March 23rd, 1894.
August 4th, 1895.
Recovered.
560
B. W. H.
M.
March 22nd, 1894.
August 12th, 1895.
Recovered.
648
M. A. K.
F.
August 10th, 1895.
August 19th, 1895.
Recovered.
640
F. F.
F.
July 13th, 1895.
August 31st, 1895.
Improved.
634
T. W.
M.
June 10th, 1895.
September 9th, 1895.
Recovered.
643
L. N. S.
F.
July 29th, 1895.
October 10th, 1895.
Recovered.
591
E. B. B.
F.
August 24th, 1894.
October 15th, 1895.
Improved.
402
J. A. W.
M.
December 26th, 1890.
October 21st, 1895.
Recovered.
650
C. H.
M.
August 23rd, 1895.
November 4th, 1895.
Not insane.
197
F. Y.
M.
August 15th, 1885.
November 9th, 1895.
Improved.
626
M. G.
F.
May 11th, 1895.
November 18th, 1895.
Improved.
642
C. H. Q.
M.
July 25th, 1895.
November 27th, 1895.
Recovered.
646
E. W.
F.
August 2nd, 1895.
November 30th, 1895.
Recovered.
647
M. A. T.
F.
August 4th, 1895.
December 6th, 1895.
Recovered.
659
L. F.
F.
November 6th, 1895.
December 14th, 1895.
Recovered. 1074
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1895
Table No. 8.
Showing age, length of residence, and proximate cause of death of those who died during the
year ending 31st December, 1895.
Residence in Asylum.
Reg.
Sex
Age.
Proximate cause of
No.
W. Y. M..
Years.
Mos.
Days.
death.
612
M.
47
Jan. 18th,     1895
12
mania.
581
D. McC.
M.
45
Jan. 18th,        n
6
0
Exhaustion, general
paralysis.
565
J. B.
M.
65
Jan. 24th,        »
9
28
Peritonitis  from   strangulated hernia.
316
E. E. K.
F.
44
Feb. 9th,
5
10
29
General    debility   from
hysterial mania.
97
W. M.
M.
Not known.
Feb. 25th,
17
8
24
General feebleness from
chronic mania.
608
T. C.
M.
78
March 10th,    „
2
30
Senile dementia and
abcesses.
614
J. K.
M.
68
March 15th,    /;
1
16
Melancholia.
588
L. L.
M.
25
March 23rd,    »
7
8
Tubercular   diseases   of
liver,   stomach,    and
intestines,  with jaundice.
568
G. W.
M.
57
April 24th,      i,
1
0
13
General paralysis.
627
G. A. C.
M.
32
May 24th,       n
June 30th,       //
10
Acute delirious mania.
521
J. W. L.
M.
18
2
i
00
Epilepsy.
637
J. P.
M.
60
July 5th,         /;
10
Uraemic coma.
212
J. D.
M.
59
July 6th,
9
4
27
Bright's disease of kidneys.
619
E. H.
M.
30
August Sth,    »
4
16
Syphilitic disease of
brain.
547
D. McL.
M.
44
August 22nd, //
1
7
13
General paralysis.
651
S. McG.
F.
43
August 29th,  „
1
644
M. A. K.
F.
34
Sept. 13th,
1
16
Apoplexy supervening
in insanity.
590
S. R.
F.
48
Nov. 20th,      »
1
3
0
Chronic diarrhcea supervening in mania.
616
J. S.
M.
63
Dee. 1st,          »
9
16
Hemiphlegia.
88
J. F. G.
M.
61
Dec. 31st,        a
19
5
6
Chronic insanity and
heart disease. 59 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1075
Table No. 9.
Showing trades, callings, and occupations of patents admitted during  the year ending 31st
December, 1895.
Occupations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
5
1
5
Clerks  	
2
2
2
7
1
1
2
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
3
1
1
2
1
2
12
1
3
I
5
1
No occupation	
7
1
2
13
13
Total	
40
22
62
Table No. 10.
Showing the probational discharges for the year ending 31st December, 1895.
Reg.
No.
Sex.
Initials.
Date of probational
discharge.
Time allowed.
Result.
265
F.
P. M.
May 10th,               1895
6 months.
Returned.
360
F.
J. B.
May 11th,                    n
3
Returned.
604
F.
S. W.
May 16th,
3
Remained away.
633
M.
A. S. J.
June 24th,                  u
2
Returned.
624
M.
J. B.
July 22nd,                  n
3
Remained away.
629
M.
E. W.
July 23rd,
3
Returned.
640
F.
F. F.
August 31st,              »
1        //
Returned.
591
F.
E. B. B.
October 15th,            //
3
Returned.
646
F.
E. W.
November 30th,        n
3
Still on probation.
647
F.
M. A. T.
December 6th,          »
3
Still on probation.
Summary of probational discharges.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
3
7
10
1
2
1
4
2
6
2
2 1076
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1895
Table No.  11.
Periods.
=3.2 g
CD   ,.„ C-
o Mo
3 fl i> ■
tj .9    o»
■a 1 g2
m s °
^ 1 a*"
«H    "    S   °3
° *>,3co
feOqs-tj^
CD
1
4
2
2
o
4
3
4
3
2
1
1
30
18
12
12
6
3
5
5
6
17
16
5
Periods of treatment of
those who were dis-
co co cn to *. to           charged    recovered
during the year.
Periods of treatment of
those who were dis-
10 K"-1            charged     improved
during the year.
Periods of treatment of
those who were discharged unimproved
during the year.
//       2    n     3         n        	
3
1
1
„     9   n 10       a      	
„    10   // 11       //      	
6
1
„      2    rt     3      ii      	
n       3     n     4       n
1
I
„     9   a 10    //     	
a   10   a 15    a     	
1
„    15    a 20     a     	
Total..                   ■
164
29
10
Patients remaining in Asylum, 31st December, 1895.
Males.
Females.
Total.
Whites	
113
33
1
146
1
17
17
Total	
130
34
164 59 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1077
Table No. 12.
Showing admissions, discharges, deaths, escapes; number resident at close of each year;
increase or decrease each year ; percentage of recoveries ; percentage of deaths, from the
opening of the Asylum to the present date, 31st December, 1895.
CD
W
o
o
0
nd
u
H3
o
CD
>
A
c3
cc3     .
fl
HH
"""    -0
Ti   CD
Years.
o
fl
r-    '"
3   cS
CD
r-
■g §
HH    C6
O   CD
cn
fl
cn
-H
CD   r~
s
- i
CD *>
tH   -
S0--1
60 SH
'cn
cn
Ch
CD
>
&0
u
c8
cn
-fl
CD
cn
C3
CD
cn
cS
0
CD
c«   g
CS   CD
s
o
a
CD
o
CO
+3
CD
o
N
!h
O
fl
hH
U
o
CD
O
-fl
g °
2§
<
Ph
fl
R
H
fc
fl
fe
Ph
5.55
66.66
Ph
1872	
18
15
1
10
2
1
5
16
14
2
2
18
31
5.55
1873	
16.12
1874	
12
29
22
14
17
4
3
11
6
9
3
3
3
3
10
5
3
8
...
19
32
35
37
36
5
13
3
2
1
26
48
54
49
54
33.33
10.34
50.00
43.85
47.05
11.53
1875	
20.83
1876	
9.35
1877	
6.12
1878	
16.16
1879	
18
5
8
41
5
54
27.77
14.81
1880	
17
13
7
8
11
21
27
39
4
5
3
4
5
5
16
21
3
1
1
2
1
1
0
5
2
3
2
5
6
5
1
1
48
48
49
49
51
61
65
77
7
58
61
55
57
60
72
88
104
23.52
38.46
42.85
50.00
45.45
23.80
62.96
53.84
8.62
1881	
8.19
1882	
1
3.63
1883	
5.26
1884	
2
10
4
12
3.33
1885	
6.94
1886	
6.81
1887	
4.80
1888	
29
19
2
3
82
5
106
65.51
2.87
1889	
41
19
4
100
18
123
46.34
3.25
1890	
57
22
5
12
1
117
17
157
38.59
7.64
1891 .   	
54
64
49
20
18
21
7
21
15
20
13
14
1
1
123
135
133
6
12
2
171
187
184
37.37
28.12
42.85
11.69
1892 .	
6.95
1893	
7.60
1894	
80
13
19
19
162
29
213
16.24
8.92
1895	
62
29
10
20
1
164
2
224
46.77
8.92
Table No. 13.
Expenditure for the year 1895.
Provisions :—
Butter $   872 53
Sugar  258 90
Cornmeal and oatmeal  366 42
Cracked wheat and rice   96 15
Bacon and ham  242 42
Eggs  44 55
Beef and mutton  2,262 07
Vegetables  1,103 70
Fish      304 20
Milk    753 52
Bread     1,714 09
Tea  139 16
Sago and tapioca  21 48
Vinegar  3 00
Beans  70 70
Lard  10 61
Carried forward $8,263 50 1078
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1895
Brought forward $8,263 50
Salt and pepper         30 89
Cheese            16 78
Worcestershire sauce  3 60
Coffee       118 24
Evaporated apples        136 97
Pearl barley  6 69
Mustard        21 00
Syrup      145 23
Flour        46 20
Currants and raisins         48 22
Sal soda        18 00
Brooms and brushes         30 51
Laundry soap and castile soap         51 95
Tobacco      275 95
Matches        33 74
Coal oil  8 80
Clay pipes -  5 75
Yeast powder  4 00
Small groceries        24 85
Pearline         30 40
Cream of tartar  7 90
Split peas         13 03
Bath brick  1 60
Chicken feed  7 91
Blacking  2 55
Corn starch    1 36
Prunes         77 16
Maccaroni  3 70
Bicarbonate of soda  2 00
Lemons        11 70
Loaf sugar  3 45
Grass seed  1 50
Cocoa  3 00
Lime  9 25
Essence of beef  3 00
Spices  2 80
 9,473 18
Fuel :—Coal, firewood, gas, and electric light      3,227 71
Water         668 11
Medicines :—Drugs and surgical instruments         479 65
Clothing :—Wearing apparel and tailor's fittings      1,356 87
Furniture:—Furniture, bedding, &c       1,757  11
Miscellaneous :—Funerals, P. 0. box, shoemaker's fittings, &e  930 35
Salaries    14,785 47
32,678 45
Lands and Works     2,377 01
Total $35,055 46
Table No. 14.
Showing the amount of money received from paying patients and other sources during the
year 1895.
January 30th—Received from the Dominion Government on account
of arrears for maintenance of Indian patients $1,872 67
From all sources for the half-year ending June 30th, 1895    1,425 39
„ „ December 31st, 1895   1,11117
Total , , , $4,409 23 59 Vict.
Report on the Asylum for the Insane.
1079
Table No.  15.
Showing the number of days' work done by the male patients during the year 1895, and how
they were employed.
How employed.
Assisting the carpenter ....
On the grounds	
Assisting the gardener	
a cook	
In the laundry	
Assisting the plumber	
/; shoemaker . ..
» tailor  	
Ward-work	
Doorkeeper	
Porter	
Stoker 	
Assisting in steward's office
Total
No. of days.
701
4,638
501
2,431
1,174
9
121
401
10,438
365
365
365
55
21,564
Table No. 16.
Showing the articles made and repaired in the female ward during the year 1895.
Articles.
Made.
Repaired.
56
10
12
90
112
14
617
2
68
34
6
9
28
131
142
Handkerchiefs	
n      cases	
48
125
476
6
138
166
631
15
Shirts	
841 1080
Report, on the Asylum
for the Insane.
1895
Table No.  17.
Showing the average number of patients per day, and the average
for the year 1895.
cost per day and per month,
Months.
Average number of patients.
Average
daily
expenses.
Average cost
per capita
per day.
Average cost
per capita
per month.
163
163
160
161
159
161
161
164
165
167
167
165
83.78
96.78
95.24
85.62
83.84
84.63
74.59
86.10
89.33
100.13
96.60
98.32
51
59
60
53
53
52
46
52
54
60
58
60
15.90
February	
March	
May	
16.60
18.45
15.93
16.34
15.75
July	
14.36
16.27
September	
16.23
18.57
November  	
December '.
17.34
18.44
163
89.58
54 5/6
16.68J
Showing the return
18.
duce for the y
ear 1895.
35 bushels
30 gallons.
75 pounds.
50      i,
214 ears.
4,556 pounds.
92     „
17,595     ,,
300 crowns.
29 pounds.
13i gallons.
10,000 pounds.
652 heads.
318 pounds.
28,837      ••
22 gallons.
693 pounds.
100     „
182     ,,
44     „
31 „
40     it
11,666       /;
15     «
TON, M. D.,
fedical Superi
ent Majesty.
Table No.
of garden pro
Hay 	
G.
F.
BODING
A
ntendent.
Printed by Richard Wolfi
VICTORIA, B. C.:
ndkn, Printer to the Queen' Most Excel
1886.

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