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RETURN To an Order of the House for all correspondence between any member of the Government and any other… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1895

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 58 Vict. Appointment of Medical Supt., Asylum for Insane. 599
RETURN"
To an Order of the House for all correspondence between any member of the Government and any other person, in relation to the appointment of Resident Physician
for the Provincial Asylum for Insane at New Westminster, as successor to Dr.
Bentley. Also, such correspondence relating to applications for the position of
such Resident Physician, or recommending any applicant therefor.
JAMES BAKER,
Provincial Secretary's Office, Provincial Secretary.
15th January, 1895.
Hatzic, B. O, December 14th, 1894.
Dear Sir,—I conclude that following on the official report regarding the irregularities
at the New Westminster Asylum there will be a new appointment of Medical Superintendent,
and I am desirous of becoming a candidate for the office.
I think I may venture to say that I have legitimate professional claims to such an appointment, inasmuch as I have had very great experience in the treatment of insanity and the
management of the insane, having been for seventeen years of my life superintendent of an
asylum in England. I am perfectly familiar with the modern humane method of treating
lunatics, and with the working of the English lunacy laws, and the requirements of the
English Commissioners. If I were appointed to the New Westminster Asylum I could, and
quickly would, revolutionize the system and reorganize the institution on a new and sound
basis.
I am not aware at present of the proper mode of making application for the post and the
proper authorities to whom to apply. I venture, therefore, to take the liberty of writing to
you on the subject, and shall feel much obliged if you will instruct me as to the proper channel.
I hope, too, I may reckon upon your support and interest, and I remain,
Dear Sir, yours very truly,
(Signed)        G. F. Bodington, F.R.C.S.
The Hon. Theodore Davie, M.P.P.,
Attorney-General and Premier,
Victoria, B. C.
P.S.—I take the liberty of enclosing herewith a copy of some testimonials which I hastily
gathered together just before coming out to B. C. Several of them make reference to my
special experience of insanity.    I have underlined the particular passages.
G. F. B.
[Enclosures.]
Testimonials in favour op George Fowler Bodington,
M. D. (Durham), M. D. (Giessen), Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England;
member of the Royal College of Physicians of London; formerly Surgeon to the North Riding
Infirmary, Middlesbrough, and House Surgeon to the Queen's Hospital, Birmingham;
President (1876-77) of the Birmingham and Midland Counties Branch of the British Medical
Association; President (1877-78) of the Birmingham Medical Institute, and President (1883-84)
of the Midland Medical Society, England :— 600 Appointment of Medical Supt., Asylum for Insane. 1895
From Alfred Baker, J. P., Fellow and formerly Member of Council of the Royal College of
Surgeons of England; Consulting Surgeon to the Birmingham General Hospital, and to
the Birmingham General Dispensary, etc., etc.
3 Waterloo Street, Birmingham,
September 10th, 1887.
My Dear Bodington,—Let me express my conviction that, whilst your leaving England
will involve to us the loss of an esteemed fellow-worker, it will be a gain to the community in
which you cast your lot.
Having been intimately associated with you for many years, I desire to record my sense of
your high professional attainments and of the warm regard in which you have been held by
your contemporaries and seniors.
The mere mention of your titles—a Fellow (by examination) of the Royal College of
Surgeons of England, a member of the Royal College of Physicians, and the degree of M. D.
in the University of Durham—sufficiently attests your preparedness for any professional trust
that may be reposed in you ; but your moral and social worth can only be vouched for by those
who have long known you. On these points I may warmly congratulate your prospective
patients, and predict that they will receive from you every consideration which can be suggested by thought, judgment, and experience. Inheriting—as you did—an honourable name,
through the reputation of your father and your uncle as medical practitioners, you enhanced
its brightness by your own attainments and unblemished character. You have supplemented
your knowledge of general medicine by special, study of mental and nervous diseases. You
have participated in the professional advances of the day, and your personal merits have been
so fully appreciated in this town that you were successively elected upon the Councils, and
subsequently to the presidential chairs of the " Birmingham and Midland Counties Branch of
the British Medical Association," of the " Birmingham Medical Institute," with its valuable
library, and of the " Midland Medical Society," in connection with the Queen's College.
That in your new home you may meet with the advantages you seek, and with the success
you deserve, is the best wish of
Yours, sincerely,
Alfred Baker.
From Thomas lliron Bartleet, M. B. (Lond.J, J. P., Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of
England; Surgeon to the Birmingham General Hospital; Emeritus Professor of Physiology, and Demonstrator cf Operative Surgery in Queen's College, Birmingham, etc., etc.
27 Newhall Street, Birmingham,
September 10th, 1887.
I entertain the highest possible opinion of Dr. George Fowler Bodington as a high-
minded-and honourable gentleman, and as a skilled physician. The latter is testified to by the
high educational qualifications held by Dr. Bodington, while the former is shown by the high
esteem and respect in which he is held by his professional brethren, as evidenced by the fact
that while residing near Birmingham he was successively elected to every post of distinction
and honour in the power of the profession to bestow. Should he attain eminence and
distinction wherever he makes his residence, it will be only what his friends here anticipate,
and what Dr. Bodington himself has a claim to expect.
T. H. Bartleet.
From Alfred II. Carter, M.D. (Lond.), Member of the Royal College of Physicians of London ;
Physician to the Queen's Hospital, and Emeritus Professor of Physiology in Queen's
College, Birmingham; Examiner in Medicine in the University in Aberdeen, etc., etc.
21, Temple Row, Birmingham,
September 9th, 1887.
It has been my pleasant privilege to have known Dr. George Fowler Bodington intimately
for many years past. Until he left us to undertake a new field of work in London, he occupied
a leading position in the ranks of the medical profession of this town and district. 58 Vict. Appointment of Medical Supt., Asylum for Insane. 601
Dr. Bodington is a man of culture, wide information, and original power; and since these
gifts were associated with uncommon geniality, warm-hearted frankness, kindly courtesy, and
unimpeachable integrity, it is no matter of surprise that he won for himself many life-long
friends. No better proof could be adduced of his high professional attainments and of the
honour in which he was held by his professional brethren than the fact that, by the suffrages
of the latter, he occupied the presidential chairs in the Birmingham and Midland Counties
Branch of the British Medical Association (1876-7), the Midland Medical Society (1883-4),
each of them with several hundred members, and also of the Birmingham Medical
Institute (1877-8). I can only express the hope that when he settles—as he is now contemplating—in the Far West of Canada, he will win the same esteem and confidence which he
has so long enjoyed in the " old country."
Alfred H. Carter.
From Thomas Frederick Chavasse, M. D. (Edin.), Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of
Edinburgh; Surgeon to and Lecturer on Clinical Surgery to the General Hospital,
Birmingham ; Member of the General Council of the University of Edinburgh ; Professor
of Anatomy to the Society of Artists, Birmingliam, etc., etc.
24, Temple Row, Birmingham,
September, 26th, 1887.
Dr. George Fowler Bodington has gained for himself such a high reputation in the
Midland Counties of England by his work and writings that he was in turn elected by his
professional brethren President of all the medical societies in Birmingham. His eminent
professional abilities, his strong intellectual powers, his large practical experience, together
with his ever courteous and gentle demeanour towards all with whom he was brought into
contact, endeared him alike to patients and colleagues. In his new sphere of work I have no
doubt that his consummate abilities will speedily be recognized and gain for him the success
and high position which he deserves.
Thomas F. Chavasse.
From Sir Walter Foster, Knight, M. D. (Erlang.), M. P., J. P., Fellow of the Royal College of
Physicians of London, Physician lo the General Hospital, and Senior Professor of Medicine in Queen's College, Birmingham, Member of the General Medical Council of the
United Kingdom, late President of Council of the British Medical Association, etc., etc.
14, Temple Row, Birmingham,
September 10th, 1887.
My Dear Bodington,—I am very sorry you propose to leave England, and I am very
sure all my medical confreres in the Midland districts will share my regret. You are personally so popular in the district, and so much esteemed by the profession, both on account of your
medical learning and for your administrative capacity, that it seems hardly fair that England
should lose you. It is the first time, too, that I remember, that a man who has held such
high positions as you have, viz. : President of the Birmingham and Midland Counties Branch
of the British Medical Association, President of the Midland Medical Society, and President
of the Birmingham Medical Institute, indeed all the highest honours we could give you, has
gone to settle abroad. Your reasons on account of your family are, however, conclusive, and
I trust the distinctions you gained here, as well as your own high personal qualities and your
wide and practical knowledge of your profession, will commend you to the good will of your
new neighbours. They will, I am sure, have reason to congratulate themselves on so able a
doctor, so learned and so capable a citizen settling among them, and I confidently anticipate
for you in the other hemisphere a continuance of the useful and honourable career accomplished
in this.
With best wishes, and trusting my letter may serve you,
Believe me, very truly yours,
B. Walter Foster. 602 Appointment of Medical Supt., Asylum for Insane. 1895
From William Chancellor Garman, Member of the Royal  College of Surgeons of England ;
Consulting Surgeon to the Walsall Hospital, etc., etc.
Great Barr, Birmingham,
September 16th, 1887.
I have had the pleasure of Dr. George Bodington's friendship for the last fifteen years, and
have had large opportunities of judging of his great ability as an accomplished physician and
scientist. Possessing the highest credentials which his country can bestow, and endowed
with a great intellect, it is not surprising that he should be a leading and eminent member of
his profession, whose co-operation was always eagerly sought, readily afforded, and fully
appreciated by his professional compeers. Dr. Bodington has always done good work in the
district in which he practised. Elected by his professional brethren to fill positions of the
highest importance, he brought to bear a dignity, fund of knowledge and experience possessed
by few men within my knowledge. He was President of the Birmingham and Midland
Counties Branch of the British Medical Association (1876-7) ; President of the Birmingham
Medical Institute (1877-8), and President of the Midland Medical Society (1883-4). He
contributed largely by his great scientific attainments to the various sections for promoting
the scientific advancement of his profession, taking a leading part in the discussions and contributing papers of great originality. His name has been honoured amongst us, and his
departure is a source of great regret to us all.
W. C. Garman.
From James Johnston, M. B. (Lond.J, Member of the Royal College of Physicians of London ;
President of the Birmingham Medical Institute; formerly Physician to the Queen's
Hospital and the Children's Hospital, Birmingham:
9, Easy Row, Birmingham,
September 19th,  1887.
I have very great pleasure in bearing my testimony to the very high professional standing
of my old friend and associate, Dr. George F. Bodington. I have known him intimately for
many years, and can speak positively of his deep learning and large experience in all branches
of his profession, but especially in diseases of the nervous system. Dr. Bodington has been
elected successively by the general consensus of his fellow practitioners to the highest professional honours in their gift, viz: to the Presidentship of the Birmingham and Midland
Counties Branch of the British Medical Association, to the Presidentship of the Midland
Medical Society, to the Presidentship of the Birmingham Medical Institute. After these facts
I need hardly refer to the distinguished diplomas that he holds ; they speak for themselves ;
but I can assert from long friendship's experience that he has always manifested the true
qualities of an earnest and painstaking practitioner of medicine, combined with the honest,
honourable qualities of a good citizen.
James Johnston.
From Furneaux Jordan, Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England; Considting
Surgeon to the Queen's Hospital and the Women's Hospital, Birmingham ; lately Professor
of Surgery in Queen's College, Birmingham, etc., etc.
Selly Hill, Birmingham,
September 11th,  1887.
I am glad to have an opportunity of expressing the high esteem with which I regard
Dr. G. F. Bodington. That this esteem is shared by the medical profession generally is proved
by the circumstance that they have elected him to the highest offices—the presidences of our
medical societies—in succession. Wherever he goes he will win the confidence and esteem of
all around him.
Furneaux Jordan. 58 Vict. Appointment of Medical Supt., Asylum for Insane. 603
From Edward Matins, M. D. (Edin.J, Obstetric Physician to the General Hospital, Birmingham ;   Vice-President of the Obstetrical Society of London.
Old Square, Birmingham,
September 3rd, 1887.
I have much pleasure in bearing testimony to the distinguished ability and high character
of Dr. G. F. Bodington. For many years his professional standing in this locality has been
of the first position. In succession he has held the posts of " President of the Birmingham
Branch of the British Medical Association," " President of the Birmingham Medical Institute,"
and "President of the Midland Medical Society." No more emphatic proof could be given of
the estimation in which he has been held by his professional brethren.
Combined with extensive knowledge and exceptional culture, he has always displayed
the soundest judgment and practical aptitude.
Beloved as a friend, honoured as a citizen, and held in the highest repute as a medical
man, he has gained the esteem which can only be acquired as the result of those higher qualities which prove unusual attributes.
Edward Malins.
From Oliver Pemberton, J. P., Fellow of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of England and of
Edinburgh; Member of Council of the Royal College of Surgeons of England; Senior
Surgeon of the Birmingham General, Hospital; and Professor of Surgery in Queen's
College, Birminghafn, etc., etc.
Edgbaston House, Birmingham,
September 11th, 1887.
My Dear Bodington,—I have great pleasure in giving my testimony regarding your
excellent qualifications to undertake any division of labour or responsibility in the medical
profession. You inform me you are about to settle and to practice in British Columbia.
When I think that I have known you well for upwards of thirty years, I consider I am able
to speak of your abilities and experience with some degree of friendly authority. You have
held nearly every post of distinction in our societies here—President of our Branch of the
British Medical Association, of our Medical Institute, of our Midland Medical Society. These
positions are alone evidences of the consideration entertained for you by the profession. For
myself I can say, in all truth, that your coming to any medical centre of work should, in my
judgment, add greatly to the health as well as the scientific progress of the community, whilst
your academic position as a Fellow, by examination, of our College, must assure you due
respect from the members of the profession.
You have my best wishes for your success and happiness.
I am, as always, yours,
Oliver Pemberton.
From Edwin Rickards, M. A. and M. B. (Oxon.), Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of
London ; Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England,; Physician to the Birmingham General Hospital; Consulting Physician to the General Dispensary, and Professor of
Materia Medica and Therapeutics in Queen's Colleye, Birmingham.
Union Club, Birmingham,
September 10th, 1887.
I have great pleasure in stating that I have known Dr. G. F. Bodington for many years,
and entertain a very high opinion of his professional ability and his personal qualities.
Having attained the highest degrees attainable, he has, by his kindly manners, secured and
retained the confidence and esteem of his patients and friends. He has occupied positions
held only by leaders in our profession, and by his conduct in them has shewn that he has
merited the honours conferred on him. In quitting England he is leaving many friends who
will feel his absence, but wish him success wherever he may settle. I trust he may have a
long and useful life.
Edwin Rickards. 604 Appointment of Medical Supt., Asylum for Insane. 1895
From Robert Saundby, M. D., Fellow of the Royal, College of Physicians of London ; Physician
to the General Hospital, Birmingham; Consulting Physician to the Birmingham and
Midland Eye Hospital, and to the Hospital for Women ; lately Editor of the "Birmingham
Medical Review" etc.
Birmingham, September 10th, 1887.
I have much pleasure in saying that Dr. Geo. Bodington is well known to me, and that
I have had the pleasure of a tolerably intimate acquaintance with him for twelve years. Dr.
Bodington is a Doctor of Medicine of the University of Durham, a Fellow of the Royal
College of Surgeons of England, and a Member of the Royal College of Physicians of London,
diplomas which sufficiently attest his educational attainments. He is also the author of a
considerable number of practical and valuable papers, chiefly on Insanity, to which, for many
years, he devoted his attention. The respect in which he was held in this district is shown by
the fact that he has held the three most important offices which can be conferred on any
member of the profession, viz : President of the Birmingham and Midland Counties Branch
of the British Medical Association; President of the Birmingham Medical Institute, and
President of the Midland Medical Society. He was, when in this district, a very popular
member of the profession, and I have no doubt, wherever he goes, his great talents, kind heart
and genial manners, will win for him many good friends, and professional success.
Robert Saundby.
From Sir James Sawyer, Knight, M.D. (Lond.), J.P., Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians
of London ; Senior Physician, Queen's Hospital,; and Professor of Medicine in Queen's
College, Birmingham, etc.
22 Temple Row, Birmingham,
September 12th, 1887.
I have known my friend, Dr. George Fowler Bodington, for many years. While he
practised in this neighbourhood, he held a leading professional position in the Midlands.
During the Session 1876-7, he was President of the Birmingham and Midland Counties Branch
of the British Medical Association; in 1877-8, he was President of the Birmingham Medical
Institute; and in 1883-4, he was President of the Midland Medical Society. With very
distinguished attainments, Dr. Bodington is an accomplished writer and a fluent speaker, and
his courtesy and kindliness have secured him a large circle of warm friends, amongst whom he
has pursued a successful and spotless career.
James Sawyer.
From Robert M. Simon, B.A., M.B. (Cantab), Member of the Royal College of Physicians of
London; Assistant Physician to the Birmingham General Hospital; Consulting Physician
to the Dental Hospital, Birmingham, etc., etc.
27 Newhall Street, Birmingham,
September 16th, 1887.
Every opportunity the medical profession in the Midlands had of doing honour to Dr.
Bodington was eagerly seized one after the other. Every appointment of distinction was
offered to Dr. Bodington, and the duties of office were performed ever with the greatest
efficiency.
His ability, his education and tact, must secure him success wherever he seeks it, and the
only consolation his friends will have in losing his society will be the knowledge of his success,
and prosperity in the New World.
Robert M. Simon, 58 Vict. Appointment of Medical Supt., Asylum for Insane. 605
From James Vose Solomon, Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England ; Consulting
Surgeon to the Birmingham Eye Hospital; Professor of Eye Surgery to the Birmingham
General Dispensary, etc.
Newhall Street, Birmingham,
September 12th, 1887.
I have sincere pleasure in testifying to the professional attainments of Dr. George Fowler
Bodington, which are of the highest order. His experience of diseases and its treatment has
been very large and varied. As a practitioner of medicine and midwifery he has obtained
great success in cases of much intricacy. As a surgeon, Dr. Bodington is a skilful and
successful operator. Dr. Bodington is a man of high principle and of stern integrity in all the
relations of life. In my judgment, the locality in which he may settle will be very fortunate
in being able to avail itself of the services of so distinguished a practitioner and citizen. As
evidence of the estimation in which he was held by his brethren in the town of Birmingham
(England) and neighbouring counties, I may mention that in 1876 he was unanimously elected
President of the Birmingham and Midland Counties Branch of the British Medical Association ; in 1877 he was honoured by being elected, unanimously, President of the Birmingham
Medical Institute; and, in 1883, the Midland Medical Society elected Dr. Bodington as its
President nemine dissentiente..
Dr. Bodington is a Doctor of Medicine of the University of Durham (England); a Fellow
(by examination) of the Royal College of Surgeons of England ; also (of same corporation) a
Licentiate of Midwifery; a Licientiate of the Apothecaries Company, London, &c.
James Vose Solomon.
From Lawson Tait, M.D. (Hon.), New York; M.D. (Hon.), Albany; Fellow of the Royal
Colleges of Surgeons of England and Edinburgh; Surgeon to the Birmingham and
Midland Hospital for Women; Consulting Surgeon lo the Samaritan Hospital for Women,
Noltingftam, and lo the West Bromwich Hospital; President of the British Gynaecological
Society, London ; lately President of the Birmingham Philosophical Society, etc., etc.
7, The Crescent, Birmingham,
September 13th, 1887.
My Dear Bodington,—As you have been one of my cherished and intimate friends for
seventeen years, I feel almost a difficulty in saying how highly I have esteemed your upright
and honourable character. As a practitioner, you have always evinced the keenest sense of
our great responsibilities, an earnest desire for the scientific advance of our profession, and in
every way you have proved yourself an accomplished physician. I regret you have decided to
leave us. I wish you every success in your new sphere of life, and I commend you to all upon
whom this letter may have any influence as one to be trusted entirely.
Yours, ever,
Lawson Tait.
From Thos. Underhill, M.D., J.P., Consulting Surgeon to the Guest Hospital, Dudley.
SUMMERFIELD   HOUSE,   WEST   BrOMWICH,
September 19th, 1887.
Dear Dr. Bodington,—I am much grieved to hear that you are about to leave us, and
settle so far away, and that we shall consequently be deprived of your valuable advice and
assistance.
You have enjoyed for so many years a well-earned reputation, both among your professional brethren and the public, throughout the whole of this district, including, as it does, the
Midland Counties of the Kingdom, that your departure will leave a blank not easily filled.
No stronger proof of the estimation of your professional brethren could be given than the fact
that, on different occasions, you have been unanimously elected President of the Birmingham
and Midland Counties Branch of the British Medical Association, President of the Birmingham
Medical Institute, and also President of the Midland Medical Society.
I sincerely trust that in your new sphere those talents and qualifications which have been 606 Appointment of Medical Supt.. Asylum for Insane. 1895
of such advantage to us, and which have always been placed so readily at our disposal, will be
equally appreciated. I trust you may be long spared to maintain that high tone of professional
morality which you have always held, and with every wish for your prosperity and success,
Believe me, very sincerely yours,
Thos. Underhill.
From Willoughby Francis Wade, B.A., M.B. (Dublin), J.P. ; Fellow of the Royal College of
Physicians of London; Senior Physician, General Hospital, and formerly Professor of
Medicine in Queen's College, Birmingham ; Vice-President of the British Medical Association, etc., etc.
24, Temple Row, Birmingham,
September 10th, 1887.
It gives me great pleasure to state that I have known Dr. G. F. Bodington very well for
many years as an exceptionally able man, with large and varied experience in the practice of
his profession in all its branches. As evidences of the highly favourable opinion held by his
professional brethren of his position, conduct, and acquirements, I may state that while
resident in this neighbourhood he was elected by them to the following distinguished posts,
viz.: President of the Birmingham and Midland Counties Branch of the British Medical
Association, 1876-7; President of the Birmingham Medical Institute, 1877-8; and President
of the Midland Medical Society, 1883-4. Had there been any other similar distinctions to
be conferred on Dr. Bodington, I have no doubt he would have received them.
W. F. Wade.
 :0:	
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, December 20th, 1894.
G. F. Bodington, Esq., M.D.,
Hatzic, B. C.
Dear Sir,—I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 14th inst.,
making application to be appointed Medical Superintendent of the Provincial Asylum for the
Insane at New Westminster.
In reply I would say that should Dr. Bentley's suspension become absolute, your application will receive the consideration of the Executive.
Yours truly,
(Signed)        Theodore Davie.
New Westminster, B. C, Dec. 15th, 1894.
To the Hon. Theo. Davie, M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, &c, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Allow me to hand you my application for the position of Medical Superintendent of
the Asylum for the Insane.
I may say that I am fairly well read in the subject of mental disorders, and eight years
ago was for some time assistant physician in an eastern asylum, besides having had experience
with insane persons in private practice.
In the event of my appointment to the above position I shall endeavour to prove myself
a worthy servant, and give my best efforts to satisfy the Government.
As regards my position and general standing in the community I beg to refer you, sir,
to Hon. Mr. Justice Bole, and Messrs. W. H. Keary, D. S. Curtis, Charles McDonough, Capt.
Pittendrigh, Coroner for the District, &c, and in the matter of professional qualifications I
have much pleasure in referring you to Dr. R. E. Walker of this city.
I have, &c,
(Signed)        G. W. Boggs, M. D. 58 Vict. Appointment of Medical Supt., Asylum for Insane.
607
Attorney-General's Office,
Victoria, December 20th, 1894.
G.  W. Boggs, Esq., M. D.,
New Westminster, B. C.
Dear Sir,—I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 15th inst.,
making application to be appointed Medical Superintendent of the Provincial Asylum for
the Insane at New Westminster.
In reply I would say that should Dr. Bentley's suspension become absolute, your application will receive the consideration of the Executive.
Yours truly,
(Signed)        Theodore Davie,
Attorney-General.
The Hon. Theo. Davie, M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B. C.
Hatzic, B. C, December 21st, 1894.
Dear Sir,—I am much obliged by your reply to my letter regarding my candidature for
the office of Medical Superintendent of the Provincial Asylum at New Westminster. I am
afraid I have committed an informality in forwarding, as I have done, my letter of application
to the Executive Council to Colonel Baker. I thought as he is Provincial Secretary that he
is the proper person through whom I should present it, but I perceive that you are Clerk of
the Executive Council, and I ought, I presume, to have sent my application through you.
Colonel Baker will, I do not doubt, send it to you, and I beg you to excuse me for the error
inadvertently made.
I take the present opportunity of referring you to Dr. Powell, of Victoria, as he kindly
gives me leave to do so.    In a letter I received from him a few days ao-o he says :
" I am in receipt of your note with accompanying testimonials, though the latter were
not needed to convince me of your ability to fill any position within the scope of your high
professional attainments. * * * I am quite sure your appointment
would be attended with the greatest satisfaction, and in writing to any one in authority you
are quite at liberty to refer to me as one cognizant of your eminent ability to undertake the
duties of such a post."
I am, &c,
(Signed)       G. F. Bodington.
G. F. Bodington, Esq., M. D.,
Hatzic, B. C.
Attorney-General's Office,
Victoria, December 27th, 1894.
Dear Sir,—I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 21st inst., informing
me that you have made an application through the Provincial Secretary's Department for the
position of Medical Superintendent of the Asylum for the Insane at New Westminster.
In reply I would say that the application sent to the Provincial Secretary's Department
will be laid before the Executive for consideration in the same way as if it had been sent
direct to me.
Yours truly,
(Signed)        Theodore Davie, 608 Appointment of Medical Supt., Asylum for Insane. 1895
New Westminster, December 19th, 1894.
Sir,—I have the honour to apply for the position of Medical Superintendent of this
Asylum for the Insane here, which I understand is now open.
As to my professional qualifications I can refer you to almost all the medical men of the
Province, where I have been a member of the Medical Council for the last six years; to Drs.
T. J. Roddick or W. Gardner, of Montreal; to Dr. I. R. DeWolf, of Halifax ; or to Dr. Wm.
Osier, of Baltimore.
I have, <fec,
(Signed)        W. A. DeWolf Smith.
To Hon. Jas. Baker,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B. C.
(Acknowledged 22nd December.)
34, Belleville Street, Victoria.
9th January, 1895.
Sir,—I beg to offer myself as an applicant for the appointment of Superintendent of the
Asylum for the Insane at New Westminster.
I am a duly registered medical practitioner, have been in contact with a large number of
cases of mental disease, both in England and in this country, and received instruction by
lectures in mental diseases from Dr. May, ex-Superintendent of the Insane Asylum at Stockton,
California, from whom I can obtain, if needed, a certificate of attendance on such lectures and
proficiency therein. *****
I am not unknown to the Government, having been appointed during the small-pox
epidemic as health officer in Victoria for small-pox cases. I was also resident physician at
Clinton for four years.
If I am so fortunate as to be honoured by the appiontment I now seek to obtain, I shall
endeavour to perform my duties to the satisfaction of the Government by following those
methods of treatment which have so much commended themselves to alienists in recent years
I am, &c,
(Signed)        Mark S. Wade, M. D., F. C. S.
The Hon. Colonel Jas. Baker,
Provincial Secretary.
(Acknowledged 10th January.)
9th January, 1895.
Sir,—I have the honour to acquaint you that you have been appointed as from the 1st
day of February next to the office of Medical Superintendent of the Provincial Asylum for
the Insane, at a salary of $2,500 per annum, payable monthly, vice Dr. R. I. Bentley, resigned.
I am, &c,
(Signed)        James Baker,
Provincial Secretary.
G. F. Bodington, Esq., M.R.C.S., F.R.C.S., Eng.,
Hatzic.
victoria, b. c. :
Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty,
1895,

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