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PAPERS Relating to the Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1894

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 57 Vict. Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1013
PAPEBS
Relating to Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892.
 :0:	
Ottawa, November 18th, 1892.
To the Honourable
Sir John Thompson, K.C.M.G.,
Minister of Justice, Ottawa.
Dear Sir John,—Adverting to the conference held on Monday and Tuesday, the 31st
October and 1st November, between Hons. Carling, Ouimet, and yourself on the one hand, and
myself on the other, the subjects discussed may be summarized as follows:—
1. Delimitation of the Railway Belt.
2. Immigration Matters.
3. Quarantine.
4. Public Improvements.
The question of the judicial needs of Vancouver District had already been satisfactorily
arranged at a conference previously had with yourself and deputy, the arrangement being that
one of the Victoria Judges should hold Court weekly at Vancouver, and that during Mr.
Justice McCreight's leave of absence, the Local Government should enlarge County Court
Judge Bole's jurisdiction as a Local Superior Court Judge, and include his name and that of
Mr. Harrison in the Assize Commission, leaving it to the County Court Judges Bole and Harrison to arrange between themselves for the latter's assistance in the County Court work in the
New Westminster Judicial District. A further matter which I was deputed to discuss with
the Dominion Government, was a claim of $8,000, paid to Kinipple & Morris by the British
Columbia Government on Dock account, and now demanded by the Province from the Dominion under the terms of the settlement in 1884. This question, it was arranged, should be
discussed between Mr. Sedgewick and myself, and was, consequently, not taken up at the
conference first alluded to, which was confined to the four subjects above particularized.
Delimitation of the Belt.
Three methods have been proposed for defining the boundaries, one by the Dominion
Order in Council dated 27th May, 1887; a second by an Order in Council of the Provincial
Government dated 24th August, 1887, and a third by a Dominion Order in Council dated 15th
July, 1892. These boundaries are marked upon the map referred to in the Order in Council
of 15th July, 1892, and produced at our conference. The line proposed by the Dominion
Order in Council dated 27th May, 1887, being coloured red; that proposed by the Provincial
Order in Council dated 24th August, 1887, being coloured blue, and the line lastly claimed by
the Dominion Government being coloured brown and green. Without entering into detail, I
think I may say that during our conference the brown and green line was abandoned, and the
question was reduced to the consideration of the red and blue lines, the difference in area
between which is estimated to be between 750,000 and 1,000,000 acres in favour of the
Dominion, should the red boundary be adopted. We afterwards proceeded to the discussion of
titles which had been granted by the Province to lands within the belt, and then to the question of public works and undertakings. I refer with some degree of particularity to such
undertakings further on.
During our conference you asked me to furnish a list of the lands within the red belt sold
by the Province and for which patents have been issued. This I telegraphed for and have since
received, and I enclose the same with this letter. This list includes all sales so far as known,
but cannot be guaranteed to include all, as, in the absence of work upon the ground shewing
where the red line is located, it is impossible, when dealing with a mountainous country, to be
anything like exact. The likelihood of there having been other sales I deal with later on in
this letter. 1014 Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1894
Quarantine Matters.
Were disposed of satisfactorily by Mr. Carling's assurance that Albert Head, or some more
suitable location, would be thoroughly equipped as a quarantine station, without delay, and a
medical quarantine officer stationed there instead of at Victoria. It was also suggested, and I
understood agreed to, that for the examination of vessels coming from Puget Sound ports direct
to Victoria and Vancouver without having reported at Albert Head, the Municipal Health
Officers should, during office, be appointed Dominion Quarantine Officers. I think the same
plan should be adopted at Nanaimo, as Puget Sound vessels visit that port also.
Immigration Matters.
Prior to the month of May last, the Dominion Government, at small cost, maintained
agencies at Victoria and Vancouver, the home in the former city and the land upon which it is
erected being Dominion property, and in the latter being held under rental from the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company. Without previous warning, the Dominion, by Order in Council
dated 28th May, 1892, resolved to close these homes and discharge the agents, which was done
in the month of July following. As it was necessary that the homes should be maintained, and
there was no time for parley, the Provincial Government concluded it best, until some understanding should be arrived at, to themselves keep the homes afoot, and, consequently, appointed
care-takers for Victoria and Vancouver, and have also arranged to retain the agent temporarily
at Victoria. One of the reasons for the discontinuance of the agencies in these towns of the
Dominion in which it was resolved to discontinue them appears, by the report of the Minister
of the Interior, dated 27th May, 1892, to have been the neglect of the Provinces of Ontario
Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia to contribute towards the maintenance of the Lon
don office, to which it had been agreed at a conference held in November, 1874, at which these
Provinces were represented (but British Columbia was not), that the Provinces of Ontario,
Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia should contribute. The principle that the responsibility for all matters connected with the promotion of Immigration should be vested in the
Government of Canada had been affirmed at previous conferences at which British Columbia
was represented, and at one of which, held in September, 1871, it was expressly stipulated that
the Dominion Government should maintain an efficient Immigration Office at Yictoria. Subsequently, after the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway and the growth of the city of
Yancouver, the Government of Canada established the Immigration Home there also. I would
call attention to a Minute in Council of the British Columbia Government dated about 10th
July, 1892, and forwarded to the Hon. the Secretary of State for Canada, wherein the ground
is taken that the agreement arrived at by the conference of September, 1871, to establish an
office at Victoria was such as to place Victoria in the same position as Quebec, Montreal,
Halifax, and St. John, N.B., at which last-mentioned points the Government of Canada, by
Act of Parliament, is bound to establish and maintain Immigration Offices, and it is also pointed
out that whilst the Hon. the Minister of the Interior recommends the closing of the agencies at
London, Hamilton, Toronto, Kingston, Prescott, and Ottawa, he does not report against the
continuance of the offices at Quebec, Montreal, Halifax, and St. John, and that Victoria and
Vancouver occupy the same relative positions on the Pacific as seaport towns, which those
cities do on the Atlantic, and that no discrimination should be made between cities so situated.
It was also shewn by the Provincial Order in Council above alluded to, that the immigrants
housed at Vancouver, particularly, were principally those who might be expected to settle on
Dominion lands in the Railway Belt, there being no Provincial lands in the vicinity.
Consequently, at our conference on Monday and Tuesday, i urged that the Dominion
Government at once resume the maintenance of the agencies at Vancouver and Victoria.
Whilst upon the subject of immigration, I wish also to urge the unfairness of the present
apportionment of the tax imposed upon Chinese immigrants, one-fourth of which only is paid
to the Province, three-fourths being retained by the Dominion. These immigrants settle
almost exclusively in British Columbia, and on their account alone the Province and Municipalities have been obliged to establish a hospital and home for lepers, several of whom have
developed amongst the Chinese. Not only in maintaining this institution are the Chinese a
peculiar burthen upon the Province, but they unduly increase the cost of administering justice,
as criminal statistics shew; they are looked upon as being, and are, an undesirable class of
immigrants, and it is certainly but right that the disadvantage and burthen of their presence
being borne by the Government of British Columbia, the compensation for their incoming
should be enjoyed by the Government shouldering the burthen, and not by the Dominion
Government, which suffers no loss or inconvenience on account of the Chinese whatever, 57 Vict. Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1015
Public Works and Improvements.
It is felt that the prosperity and development of the Province is being seriously retarded
for want of necessary public works and improvements. These have already been pressed upon
the Government of Canada by the British Columbia representatives, and chief amongst them,
and of vital and urgent necessity, may be mentioned :—
1.—Improvements of Rivers.
(a.) A hydrographical survey of the navigable part of the Fraser River, which lias become
seriously choked up by bars and diverted from its ordinary channel, as shown by the Admiralty
charts, thereby causing the washing away of large tracts of valuable land, and threatening
calamitous destruction in the near future. In the restoring of the river to its proper channel
and the removal of obstructions, $100,000 can be usefully expended, and it is estimated will
thoroughly accomplish the work. Upon this subject I refer you to the Minutes of the
Provincial Government forwarded to the Secretary of State, and dated respectively 26th
March, 1890, 2nd April, 1890, 14th March, 1892, and 22nd August, 1892.
(b.) Removing the obstructions in the navigation of Skeena River, which will include
removal of the snags, for which work a steam scow would be necessary, and blasting the rocks
which render the Kit-sa-las Canon dangerous at certain stages of water. For the purpose of
blasting the rocks an appropriation of $2,000 was voted by the Dominion last session, but
$5,000 will be required for the purpose. The removal of the snags and employment of a
steam scow will comparatively not be an expensive matter. The Local Government are
constructing a waggon road from Hazleton to the adjacent agricultural lands, but the efforts
of the Provincial Government to open up this portion of the Province will be unavailing
unless the improvements to navigation upon the Skeena, above indicated, be likewise undertaken.
I will, before I leave Ottawa, endeavour to furnish you with an estimate of the cost of removing
the snags. During our conference I handed Hon. Mr. Ouimet a letter from Mr. R. H. Hall,
M. P. P., giving valuable information upon the subject of the proposed improvements to the
Skeena River.
(c.) The removal of obstructions in the Cowichan River : owing to these obstructions last
year, the railway bridge near Duncan's and the Government road bridge in the same locality,
were both washed away, and serious damage done to the lower bridges, near the sea, also entailing
great loss and inconvenience to the settlers. The Indian Reserve on the river has been
reduced by 100 acres, or more (see report of a survey which it is understood the Indian
Department has had made shewing the quantity of land swept away from the Reserve), and
the settlers have lost a large area of valuable land worth $100 per acre. Similar devastation
is bound to occur in future unless the matter is remedied.
The Dominion Government have for some years expended annually $1,000 for improvement of the Cowichan River, but the work requires to be undertaken on an entirely different
plan, and can be undertaken so as to be effective once for all. As it is now—one year the
stream will wash a few acres from the north bank, and then next summer the $1,000 will be
spent in trying to direct the current from the north bank, with the only consequence of the
inroads of the river being directed towards the south bank ; and so on, year by year, turned
from bank to bank. By this process the river has already cut a channel nearly 400 yards
wide in some places.
The plan which Mr. Croft, an experienced engineer, member of the Local House for
Cowichan District, whose letter to me I have handed to Hon. Mr. Ouimet, recommends, is to
erect suitable guiding works above the railway bridge, and extend them year by year towards
the sea, and thus in a few years the channel could be made straight, the safety of the various
bridges assured, and the farmers' and Indian lands protected from loss. Accompanying Mr.
Croft's letter is a rough sketch illustrating the proposed work.
(d) Removal of log jams in the Koksilah and Chemainus rivers. This would be a work
of trifling expense, but of vast advantage to the community.
(e.) Giving a subsidy for a steamboat service and mail communication to the islands
between Vancouver Island and the Mainland, Comox and those points of settlement on the
Mainland and Island not reached by rail, and extending to Queen Charlotte Islands. There
are large and valuable tracts of land and important industries which might by this means be
opened, populated, and developed, and in this connection I may say that the Local Government
would be prepared to open up roads in places thus made accessible.
(j.) Lighthouses.—Nanaimo Harbour, Departure Bay, Cape Mudge, the northern entrance
Johnson's Straits, and Moresby Islands, 1016 Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1894
(g.) Fog alarms.—East point of Entrance Island.
(h.j Telegraph lines between Nanaimo, Alberni, and Comox, and signal line, northern
entrance to Johnson's Straits ; also the better maintenance of the telegraph service provided by
the Carmanah and Cape Beale wire. As an instance of the inefficiency of the last-mentioned
service, I have handed Hon. Mr. Ouimet a clipping from the Colonist of 20th October, ult.,
shewing the experience of the ship Dumfrieshire, proving the present working of the line to be
simply a delusion.
(i.) Harbours.—Victoria and Nanaimo. Removal of rocks from inner harbour at Victoria,
dredging both harbours, and new dredging plant.
(j.) Beacon light to be placed on Brotchie's ledge.
(k.) Indian schools.—The extention and maintenance of these institutions, as being a
most effective way of promoting order and usefulness amongst the natives, as fully proved by the
success which has so far attended the efforts of the Dominion in British Columbia in this direction.
Another matter which has been pressed upon the Government by the members is the
question of remuneration to the post office employees. The present scale is hardly sufficient to
provide, in British Columbia, the ordinary necessaries of life. Living wages should be allowed,
else depletion of the service must ensue. As you know, the cost of living in British Columbia
cannot be gauged by eastern prices.
Kootenay Indians.
The Dominion Government should, I think, strengthen their staff of officials dealing with
the Indian affairs in the District of Kootenay. These are a troublesome tribe of Indians, and
their numbers are frequently augmented by visits of tribal friends from the United States.
They are not properly kept upon their reserve, but squat on Crown lands, and go about well
armed. Recently the Alberta Company, who have a contract with the Local Government for
which entails the cutting of a canal, having to operate their works through some of the garden
patches which had been laid out by Indians on Crown land outside of the reserves, were met with
resistance from the Indians. Things looked quite threatening, and the Local Government
were appealed to. We are, of course, responsible for the administration of justice, but we
cannot be expected to cope with bands of armed savages. We adopted what, under the
circumstances, was the most feasible course, and gave authority to our local agent to treat with
the Indians and compensate them for the lands which the works of the Company had disturbed.
I am not aware yet of the amount of compensation paid, but I am informed by letters which I
have received since my arrival that the trouble is now over for the present. There can
be little doubt that, but for the policy of compensation adopted by the Local Government,
there would have been a serious disturbance, little short of an Indian war.
The Fisheries.
It was decided in the case of Reg. v. Robertson, 6 C. S. G, R. 52, that the ungranted
lands in a Province being in the Province, the exclusive right to fish follows as an incident and
is in the Crown as a trustee for the benefit of the people of the Province, and that therefore a
license by the Dominion to fish in streams running through Provincial property would be
illegal. The Dominion, however, issues licenses in British Columbia and assumes control of
the fisheries. This seems in excess of their power as defined by the authority above quoted, and,
moreover, the people complain of the Dominion regulations as unsuited to the fishing interests.
Jnsolvency.
There is a general desire in commercial circles, as expressed by the Boards of Trade, for
an  insolvency  law,  the  want  of  which  causes  much  financial   difficulty.     It   would   be
satisfactory to the people of the Province if I could assure them that the intention of your
Government is to enact an insolvency law in the near future.
Adjustment of the Railway Belt Question.
******
I  shall be  glad  to be informed whether the Dominion Government  are prepared to
relinquish the claim of issuing fishing licenses  and  of recognizing the  Provincial control of
fisheries and right to administer them.
I have the honour to be,
Dear Sir John,
Your most obedient servant,
Theodore Davie,
Premier of British Columbia. 57 Vict. Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1017
Office of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada,
Ottawa, Canada, 30th December, 1892.
Sir,—I have the honour, by direction of the President of the Council, to transmit herewith a certified copy of an Order in Council, No. 3,194«, dated the 30th December, instant,
with reference to the placing of a beacon light on Brotchie's Ledge.
I have, &c,
(Signed)    John J. McGee,
Clerk of the Privy Council.
The Hon. Theo. Davie,
Premier of the Province of British Columbia.
Certified copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved by
His Excellency the Governor General in Council on the 30th December, 1892.
The Committee of the Privy Council have had under consideration a communication
addressed by the Premier of British Columbia to the Minister of Justice dated the 18th of
November, 1892, calling attention to the placing of a beacon light on Brotchie's Ledge.
The Minister of Marine and Fisheries to whom the communication was referred reports
that it was proposed to erect during the past season a stone or concrete beacon on the ledge in
question, and to surmount it by an electric light connected with the shore system of electric
lights, but in consequence of the stranding of the steamer "Quadra," the vessel was not available during the high spring tides of last summer, the only time at which the work could be
done advantageously.
The Committee, on the recommendation of the Minister of Marine and Fisheries, advise
that the Premier of British Columbia be informed that arrangements will, however, be made
by the Department of Marine and Fisheries to carry out the work next season.
(Signed)        John J. McGee,
Clerk of the Privy Council.
The Honourable Mr. Davie,
Premier of the Province of British Columbia.
Department of the Secretary of State,
Ottawa, 17th January, 1893.
Sir,—I have the honour to transmit to you herewith, for the information of your Government, copy of an Order of His Excellency the Governor-General in Council, approving of a
report of the Honourable the Minister of Marine and Fisheries, on the subject of certain lighthouses and fog alarms in British Columbia.
I have, &c,
(Signed)        L.  A. Catellier,
His Honour
The Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia,
Victoria.
Under Secretary of State.
Certified copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved by
His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 13th day of January, 1893.
The Committee of the Privy Council have had under consideration a communication from
the Premier of British Columbia to Sir John Thompson, dated 18th November, 1892, calling
attention to the necessity for—
(a.) Lighthouse on Cape Mudge;
(b.) Lighthouse in Nanaimo Harbour;
(c.) Lighthouse on Moresby Islands;
(d.) Fog alarms, East Point of Entrance Island. The Minister of Marine and Fisheries, to whom the communication was referred, reports
as follows:—
(a.) Lighthouse on Cape Mudge:—
In 1891 a communication was received from the British Columbia Board of Trade, which
included a light on Cape Mudge in the list of aids required for navigation in northern waters.
It was ranked as one of secondary importance.
This cape is at the south entrance to Discovery Passage, about forty miles north-westwardly
from the light already built at Yellow Island.
The Chief Engineer of the Department of Marine and Fisheries was sent in the spring of
1891 to make a thorough inspection of the aids required for navigation, and the interests of
the navigation to be affected thereby in the Province of British Columbia. He visited Cape
Mudge and reported that a light upon a certain site which he had there examined would show
up Discovery Passage, and around it into the strait as far as Texada Island. He, however,
expressed doubt whether the necessity for this light was very great, or whether the absence of
a light at this place was attended with much risk to vessels, and the Minister is of the opinion,
considering the present condition of traffic, that the urgency for a light at this point, compared
with the demands elsewhere, is not sufficient to warrant the necessary expenditure.
(b.) Lighthouses, Nanaimo Harbour, Departure Bay:—
The Department of Marine and Fisheries has already placed two lights upon buoys at the
entrance to this harbour, in lieu of building a lighthouse at that point. Having consulted
his officers the Minister finds that the Department of Marine and Fisheries has no reason to
believe that these buoy lights are not giving satisfaction. If this be so, no necessity exists for
a special light in Nanaimo Harbour.
The importance of trade is fully recognized by the Minister, and the Engineer, on the
visit above referred to, ascertained that aid was required for entering the harbour at night.
At his suggestion, the buoys were lighted; and, as far as the records of the Marine and Fisheries Department show, this appears to have satisfied the pilots. These harbour lights are said
to give mariners aids where they are most wanted, while lights on shore would be at a considerable distance from the somewhat intricate channels that have to be found and kept on
entering the harbour.
Lighthouse in Departure Bay :—
The Engineer having visited this point, reported that a chance anchor light lantern on a
pole on the east point of Jesse Island, in Departure Bay, would be a useful guide, but that it
was not so urgently required as Nanaimo Harbour Light, the entrance being bold and the
water good.
Considering the great number of demands made throughout Canada for expenditure on
aids to navigation, the Minister is of the opinion that, in the, absence of any further representations from those engaged in navigation, it would appear that the shipping in this district is
fairly served by existing aids.
(c.) Lighthouse on Moresby Islands.
Many requests have been made for a light on Pelorus Point, Moresby Islands. The
Engineer having visited this place, reports that while a light would be a useful guide to vessels
approaching this point, its chief utility would be as a point of departure for vessels using the
Swanson Channel in going through Active Pass.
The American Government have, however, since the above applications, definitely decided
to place a light on Turn Point, Stewart Island, and, consequently, much of the necessity for a
light on Pelorus Point has disappeared. These two points are not more than four miles apart,
and Turn Point is the better situated of the two for vessels approaching from every direction.
(d.) Fog alarm, East Point of Entrance Island :—
This subject is dealt with on another report to Your Excellency.
The Minister of Marine and Fisheries adds that, while every effort is being made to keep
pace with the growth of trade in British Columbia, so far as providing the necessary aids to
navigation is concerned, it must be recollected that throughout the great inland waters of
Canada new routes are being constantly opened up as well, and the demands are yearly 57 Vict. Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1019
increasing for similar aids in various other parts of Canada. Great caution is therefore
necessary, in order that, while the interests of navigation may be fairly served, the charges of
construction and maintenance of these aids may not be unduly increased.
The Committee, on the recommendation of the Minister of Marine and Fisheries, advise
that a copy of this Minute, if approved, be transmitted by the Secretary of State to the
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia, for the information of his Government.
(Signed)        Joseph Pope,
Assistant Clerk of the Privy Council.
Department of the Secretary of State,
Ottawa, 28th January,  1893.
Sir,—I have the honour to transmit to you herewith, for the information of your Government, copy of an approved Minute of Council, having reference to the erection of a fog alarm
on the East Point of Entrance Island.
I have, &c,
(Signed)        L. A. Catellier,
His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor Under Secretary of State,
of British Columbia, Victoria.
Certified Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Rrivy Council, approved by
His Excellency the Governor-General in Council, on the 23rd January, 1893.
On a Report, dated 19th of January, 1893, from the Minister of Marine and Fisheries,
stating with reference to the Order in Council of 13th January instant, in regard to the
erection of a fog alarm on the East Point of Entrance Island, that a lighthouse has already
been erected in the interests of navigation on Entrance Island, and steps have recently been
taken for the improvement of the light by replacing the Catoptric Light by a Fifth Order
Dioptric Light.
The Minister, in view, however, of the large amount of tonnage now visiting the Port of
Nanaimo, larger than visits either Victoria or Vancouver, and considering the approaches are
more dangerous, recommends that the subject be favourably considered when the Estimates for
the next fiscal year are dealt with.
The Committee, on the recommendation of the Minister of Marine and Fisheries, advise
that the Secretary of State be authorized to forward a copy of this Minute, if approved, to the
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia, for the information of his advisers.
(Signed)        John J. McGee,
Clerk of the Privy Council.
Office of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada,
Ottawa, Canada, 22nd April, 1893.
Sir,—I have the honour to transmit herewith a certified copy of an Order in Council, No.
1752h, dated the 22nd April, 1893, with reference to obtaining a thorough inspection at the
point of departure of passengers and goods from Asiatic ports, so as to prevent infected persons
and cargoes being received on board vessels destined for Canada.
1 have, cfec,
(Signed)        W. B. Ives,
His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor President of the Privy Council,
of the Province of British Columbia.
Certified copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable  the Privy  Council, approved by
His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 22nd April, 1893.
The Committee of the Privy Council have had under consideration a telegram, hereto
attached, dated 12th March, 1893, from the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia, on the
subject of obtaining a thorough inspection at the point of departure of passengers and goods
from Asiatic ports, so as to prevent infected persons and cargoes being received on board
vessels destined for Canada. 1020 Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1894
The Minister of Agriculture, to whom the question was referred, states that departmental
representations have been already made, having for object to ensure vaccination of all steerage
passengers from Asiatic ports before embarkation, from which it is believed a large measure of
protection may be expected.
The Minister finds that the thorough inspection of vessels from ports in China or Japan
would imply the stationing of Canadian quarantine officers at those ports, which is an action
that would be accompanied with difficulties.
The Committee, on the recommendation of the Minister of Agriculture, advise that a
certified copy of this Minute, if approved, be forwarded to the Lieutenant-Governor of British
Columbia.
John J. McGee,
His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, Clerk of the Privy Council.
Province of British Columbia.
[Telegram.]
Whereas in four several trips of the Empress and Northern Pacific lines of steamers during
the past year Chinese passengers were brought into the Province infected with the loathsome
disease small-pox ;
And whereas there is great danger that Asiatic cholera may at any time be introduced
from China or Japan, and thereby incalculable, vital, and financial loss be caused to the Province
and Dominion ;
Therefore be it Resolved, That a respectful Address be presented to His Honour the
Lieutenant-Governor, praying him to move the Dominion Government to take such steps as
will secure the thorough inspection at the point of departure of passengers and goods coming
from Asiatic ports, so as to prevent infected persons and cargoes being received on board
vessels destined for Canada.
Submitted in report of my Executive Council approved by me.
(Signed)        E Dewdney,
Lieutenant-Governor.
Office of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada,
Ottawa, Canada, 22ncl April, 1893.
Sir,—I have the honour to transmit herewith a certified copy of an Order in Council, No
3,194 11/92, dated the 22nd April, 1893, with reference to the communication, dated 18th
November, 1892, addressed by the Premier of B. C. to the Minister of Justice, stating that the
Government should strengthen their staff of officers dealing with Indian affairs in the District
of Kootenay. I have &c,
(Signed)        Adolphe P. Caron,
The Honourable Theodore Davie, President of the Privy Council.
Premier of British Columbia.
Certified copy of a Report of a Committee of the  Honourable  the Privy  Council, approved by
His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 22nd of April, 1893.
The Committee of the Privy Council have had under consideration an extract, hereto
attached, from a communication dated 18th November, 1892, addressed by the Premier of
British Columbia to the Minister of Justice, stating with regard to the Kootenay Indians that
the Government should, he thinks, strengthen their staff of officers dealing with Indian affairs
in the District of Kootenay, as the Indians are troublesome, and their numbers are frequently
augmented by visits from their friends from the United States ; also, that they are not kept
upon their reserves, but are allowed to squat on Crown lands, and that they go about well
armed.
The Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs, to whom the above extract was referred,
observes that the Premier of British Columbia gives, as an illustration of his description of
these Indians, some trouble experienced by the Alberta Company, who have a contract with
the Local Government entailing the cutting of a canal, in the endeavour of the Company to
extend their works through some of the garden patches laid out by the Indians on Crown lands 57 Vict. Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1021
outside of the reserves, which difficulty amounted to resistance by the Indians, and upon the
Local Government being appealed to the Premier states it adopted what under the circumstances
seemed to be the most advisable course, viz., to give authority to the Local Agent to treat with
the Indians and compensate them for the lands which the works of the Company had disturbed;
the Premier further states that there can be little doubt that, had not this policy been adopted by
the Local Government, there would have been a serious disturbance, little short of an Indian war.
The Minister further states that immediately after the receipt of the copy of the Hon.
Mr. Davie's despatch, communication was opened up with the Indian Superintendent for the
Province of British Columbia on the subject, who in turn communicated with the Indian
Agent at Fort Steele, in the Kootenay country, furnishing him with a copy of Mr. Davie's
letter. The Agent's report, as well as a report from the Superintendent in regard to the said
matter, have been received.
The Minister further states that the Agent expresses the opinion that the Premier of
British Columbia quite misapprehends the matter of the trouble between the Indians and the
Alberta Company, and that he had evidently received no full report on the subject. The
Agent states that whereas the Premier's communication is headed " Kootena}' Indians " it was
really the " Flatbow " or " Canoe" Indians, of the Lower Kootenay Valley, who were involved
in the difficulty referred to. He describes the Kootenay Indians proper as a well behaved and
superior race to the Flatbows, and states that there is no communication between the tribes,
their habits and mode of life being quite different. He describes the few Indians known as
the " Flatbow " or " Canoe " Indians as occupying a reserve, and as frequenting hunting and
fishing grounds far removed from Fort Steele, which is the headquarters of the Agency. And
as to the suggestion made in the Premier's letter, that the Dominion should strengthen their
staff of officials dealing with Indian affairs in the Kootenay District, the Agent states that
there is nothing in the much exaggerated trouble that occurred between the Flatbows and the
Alberta Company, and which took place during the Agent's absence on leave in England, to
call for any action of the kind. He, however, admits that owing to the remoteness of the
Flatbows' reserve from the Agency they are liable to be injudiciously advised by worthless
white men, which neutralizes to a certain extent the advice given them when he visits them.
The Agent, referring to the description given by Mr. Davie of these Indians as a troublesome
tribe of Indians, states that they certainly are untruthful, cunning, dishonest, rude, and
degraded, but that they are few in number, and have never shown any desire to resist the
authorities, and are by nature anything but warlike. In fact they have never been known to
engage in any war when the Kootenays proper were on the warpath. The poverty, as well as
the densely timbered country in which they live, has protected them from the raids of their
more powerful neighbours.
The Minister observes that as respects the further statement made in the Premier's letter,
that their numbers are frequently augmented by visits of tribal friends from the United States,
the Agent reports that the same difficulty occurs elsewhere from members of the same tribe
who live on both sides of the International Boundary exchanging visits with one another, but
that there is doubt that the visits paid to these degraded Flatbow Indians by Indians from the
other side are far from beneficial to them, as the Indians who visit them gamble with them
and frequently deprive them of all they possess.
As regards the statement in Mr. Davie's letter, that the Indians are not properly kept on
their reserves, the Indian Agent explains that the Flatbows, in common with all the Indians
in British Columbia, are allowed to hunt, fish, and camp on unoccupied Crown lands, and that,
were it otherwise, they would starve to death ; that, in case of the Flatbow Indians, their
reserve is quite unadapted for agriculture, were they disposed to follow it, as it is a swamp,
and owing to its being densely timbered there is no room for pasturing stock, so that they are
unable to follow either industry for obtaining a livelihood; and as regards the Premier's further
allegation, that the Indians are allowed to squat on Crown lands, the Indian Agent states, as
regards the Flatbow or Canoe Indians, that there is only a narrow strip of land in the Lower
Kootenay Valley, of about one hundred feet wide along the bank of the river, that is a little
higher than the surrounding flats; that this land is covered with a dense growth of willow,
thorn, &c, and that the Indians have from time immemorial cleared little patches for camping
as they move up and down the river in their bark canoes; and that their dead are buried there;
from the fact of this tract being flooded every third or fourth year their garden patches are of
the smallest dimensions; and that it is on this strip of land that the Alberta Company are
throwing up their embankments. 1022 Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1894
As to the resistance met with by the Company from the Indians, the Agent reports that
when the Company came to the first little garden patch they threw it up with the steam
digger, including the growing crop of potatoes. The Indian made no demand for compensation
for the land, but simply asked to be paid the sum of $7.50 for his potatoes ; that had this
amount been paid, and the slightest regard shown for the susceptibilities of the Indian, no
trouble whatever would have occurred ; on the contrary, the Indian appears to have met with
ridicule and abuse, not however, the Agent says, from the officers of the Company, but probably
from some of the employes, though the Agent does not say from whom ; but he states that
the Indian was told to go to the Indian Agent or the Government for compensation. The
Indian was incensed at the wrong clone him, and having his rifle in his hand used threats, it is
supposed, though this the Indian denies, as well as the statement that he pointed his rifle. The
trouble, however, had been settled by the Local Government Agent before the person who was
acting for the Indian Agent during his absence reached the spot.
The Minister also observes that as regards the Premier's further statement that things
looked quite threatening, and that the Local Government was appealed to, the Agent states
that the interpreter whom the Acting Agent took with him appears to have altogether misinformed the Chief and the Indians as to the purport of his visit, and also to have informed them
that they would be allowed to put in their gardens. The Chief refused to allow the work of
the Alberta Company to go through his garden, stating that he had been advised to do so, and
the Chief said he would not sell it for any price. The Acting Indian Agent then told the
§reman of the works to proceed with his work and that he would himself correct the first Indian
that offered to interfere in any way; that when the Indians saw that their threats were of no
avail they offered no further opposition; aud the Acting Indian Agent, having remained long
enough to see the work well under way, returned to Fort Steele; that the Acting Indian Agent
had no authority to compensate the Indians in any way.
The Indian Chief afterwards expressed sorrow for the way in which he had behaved. The
Indian Agent states that the Local Gouernment had officers on the spot by whom the Indians
should have been prosecuted for any breach of the law, if such was committed by them; and
that, instead of the Indian being paid the $7.50 for the potatoes destroyed by the Alberta
Company's machine, after he had used threatening language, he should have been arrested
previous to being paid that or any sum. The Agent states that when, in November last, he
visited the locality, the Company s steam dredger was within a few hundred feet of the Chief's
garden where the Indians were all camped, and that he, the Indian Agent, promised them that
they would receive right treatment; and notwithstanding that he had, some two years previously, informed the Indians that he could not protect their gardens off the reserve, he, the
Indian Agent, paid the Chief and three others for the portions of their gardens required by the
Alberta Company. The Agent states that the Indians do not understand deferred payments,
or the promises of payment hereafter made to them by the Local Government Agent. The
Agent further reports that he left everything clear for the work of the Alberta Company to
proceed without further annoyance from the Indians, until the dredger gets to the neck of land
where the Indians' grave-yard is, but that this will not be until late in the summer; and that he
informed the foreman of the works that he could not allow the graves to be turned up by the
steam digger, as it would be impossible to prevent the Indians from retaliating in some way if
this were done. The Indians alleged that they were informed by the Local Government Agent
that they could stop where their gardens were, and that every effort to get them on to the
reserve was constantly met by this allegation. The Indian Agent considers that if this statement was made to them by the Local Goverment Agent, the difficulty in inducing them to leave
the gardens will be very much increased. Up to the time of writing the Indian Agent had
not been able to obtain a satisfactory reply from the Local Government Agent as to what he
told the Indians, and he states he informed him that any other arrangements with the Indians
should be made through him as Indian Agent, or that much confusion would ensue. He also
states that an American subject, who resides on the United States side of the line, is an
inveterate mischief-maker amongst the Indians.
The Minister further states that the Indian Superintendent, in forwarding the Agent's
report, states that, from his own knowledge of the circumstances, he considers that the Agent's
report is a very accurate one; and that, as to the question of appointing a special agent for the
Lower Kootenay Indians, he cannot see any justifiable ground for any such additional expense,
as no trouble need be apprehended from these Indians if they are treated with ordinary consideration by those who come in contact with them. The Indian Superintendent states that
the whole cost of compensating the Indians for the gardens destroyed by the Alberta Company, amounted to only $53.00, and the Superintendent considers that, when such trifling considerations were at stake, the trouble complained of need not have occurred.
The Minister concurs in the opinion of Superintendent Vowell in this matter, that there
is no real necessity for increasing the staff in the employment of the Department of Indian
Affairs at Kootenay, as the Agent for that locality is considered to be a most efficient man and
one who is quite capable of managing successfully, as he has hitherto done, the Indian Agency
for that District.
The Minister further observes that it appears to him also, that very much has been made
of very little in this matter; and that had proper precautions been taken by the officers and
employes of the Alberta Company, before digging up the gardens of the Indians, all friction
with the Indians would have been avoided.
The Committee, on the recommendation of the Superintendent General of Indian Affairs,
advise that a certified copy of this Minute, if approved, be communicated to the Honourable
the Premier of British Columbia.
(Signed) John J. McGee,
Clerk of the Privy Council.
L
Certified copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved by
His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 9th May, 1893.
The Committee of the Privy Council have had under consideration a communication (an
extract of which is hereto attached), dated 18th November, 1892, from the Premier of the
Province of British Columbia to Sir John Thompson, K. C. M. G., Minister of Justice, with
regard to Indian Schools in that Province.
The Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs, to whom the communication was referred,
submits a statement, hereto attached, prepared by the Department of Indian Affairs, setting-
out fully in detail the expenditure made for Schools in British Columbia, up to date, and the
proposed expenditure during the proximate year 1893-94, which shows a grand total, since the
year 1875-76, of expenditure and proposed expenditure on account of Indian Schools of
$222,161.46.
The Committee, on the recommendation, of the Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs,
advise that a certified copy of this Minute, if approved, be forwarded to the Premier of British
Columbia. (Signed)        John J. McGee,
Clerk of the Privy Council.
STATEMENT
Shewing the expenditure on Indian Schools in the Province of British Columbia from the 1st
of July, 1875, to the 30th June, 1892, together with the appropriations for Indian Schools
in the Province of British Columbia for the fiscal years ending 30th June, 1893, and 30th
June, 1894: —
1875-76.
Nanaimo  $250 00
Port Simpson  300 00
St. Mary's  350 00
Songees  250 00
 $1,150 00
1876-77.
Lytton  $225 75
Metlakahtla  375 00
Nanaimo  62 50
Port Simpson  225 00
St. Mary's  350 00
 $1,238 25
1877-78.
Kathahtammacks  $150 00
Massett  75 00
Metlakahtla  550 00
Naas River  225 00
Port Simpson  300 00
St. Mary's  350 00
 $1,650 00 1024 Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1894
1878-79.
Kincolith  $150 00
Massett  195 50
Metlakahtla  325  00
Naas River  225 00
Port Simpson  300 00
Songees  132 00
 $1,327 50
1879-80.
Kincolith  $258 00
Massett  135 00
Metlakahtla    625 00
Naas River  300 00
Port Simpson ,  300 00
Songhees  159 00
 $1,777 00
1880-81.
Fort Rupert  $130  50
Hazleton  138 00
Kincolith  169 50
Massett  117 00
Metlakahtla    500 00
Naas River  300 00
Port Simpson  788 00
St. Mary's  262 50
 $2,405 50
1881-82.
Fort Rupert  $ 39 00
Hazleton  33 00
Kincolith  52  50
Metlakahtla     125  00
Naas River  120 50
Port Simpson  193 50
St. Mary's  262 50
  $   826 00
1882-83.
Alert Bay  $141  21
Hesquiaht  169 83
Port Simpson  300 00
Metlakahtla  500 00
Naas River  339 27
St. Mary's  350 00
 $1,800 31
1883-84.
Alert Bay  $249 67
Bella Bella  204 99
Kitamart  127 80
Kitwamgach  77 88
Lakalsap  77  13
Naas River  124 88
Port Simpson  51  37
St. Mary's  350 00
 $1,263 72 12,798 21
L
57 Vict. Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1025
1884-85.
Alert Bay •. . . . $ 23 64
Bella Bella    313  51
Cunchew  79 53
Etyteyart     81  51
Hesquiaht  174 81
Kitlatamux  43 50
Kyuquot  600 00
Kincolith  204 06
Massett  300 00
Mitchelety  88 14
Naas River  35 79
St. Mary's     425 00
Port Simpson  428 72
1885-86.
Alert Bay  $ 85 14
Bella Bella  133 32
Hesquiaht  170 76
Kincolith  387 32
Kyuquot ,  212 67
Massett  300 00
Nanaimo  295 59
Naas River  251  46
Port Essington  150 00
Port Simpson  298 70
St. Mary's  500 00
1886-87.
Alert Bay  $107 53
Bella Bella  110 10
Comiakin     201  24
Cowichan ,  216 84
Clayoquot  168  75
Hesquiaht  336 18
Kincolith  323 37
Kyuquot  576 84
Massett  236 07
Nanaimo  126  15
Naas River  126 00
Port Essington  75 00
Port Simpson  375 00
St. Mary's  625 00
1887-88.
Alert Bay .  $ 46  14
Bella Bella  101 07
Comiakin     154 23
Clayoquot  55  35
Massett  534 87
Kincolith  144 42
Kyuquot  32 22
Naas River  163 08
Nanaimo  96 87
Port Essington  132 48
Port Simpson  400 00
St. Mary's  500 00
$2,784 96
$3,604 07
$2,360 73 1026 Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1894
1888-89.
Ahouset  $     42 48
Alert Bav  71  22
Clayoquot  96 00
Comiakin     154 26
Hesquiaht  57 00
Kincolith  159 33
Kyuquot  86 40
Massett  300 00
Nanaimo ' 126  12
Namukawis  78 21
Naas River  168 30
Port Essington  136 98
Port Simpson  381  88
St. Mary's  625 00
Yale  999 00
Industrial Schools.
Kamloops  65 66
Kuper Island  3,055 59
Metlakahtla    6,121 00
 $12,724 43
1889-90.
Alert Bay  $      50 10
Bella Bella  57 24
Comiakin     89 58
Coqualeetza  650 00
Hazelton  62 70
Kincolith  78 66
Kyuquot  76 08
Massett  293 31
Nanaimo  35 25
Naas River  55 83
Port Essington  84 96
Port Simpson  478 25
St. Mary's  500 00
Yale...  2,028 10
Industrial Schools.
Kamloops  12,683 99
Kootenay    8<503 54
Kuper Island  8,631  17
Metlakahtla  5,224 51
 $39,583 27
1890-1891.
Alert Bay  $      55 63
Bella Bella  112 71
Clayoquot -  73 92
Coqualeetza  2>300 00
Hazelton  23 28
Kincolith  22* 19
Massett  J> 69
Nanaimo  t^tt
Naas River  54 78
Port Essington  159 81
Port Simpson  225 00
Songees  235 25
St. Mary's  i °00 00
Yale  L151  55 57 Vict. Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892. 1027
Industrial Schools.
Metlakahtla '  $5,711  61
Kamloops  5,302 46
Kootenay  6,999 93
Kuper Island  5,237 52
 $28,443 27
1891-92.
Alert Bay  $      74 85
Bella Bella  99 60
Coqualeetza  975 00
Gwayasdums  75 00
Hazelton  37 35
Kincolith  97 02
Kitlope  55 38
Lacland  74 49
Massett  133 05
Nanaimo  287 00
Port Essington  150 00
Port Simpson  300 00
St. Augustine  90 27
St. Mary's  750 00
Songees  300 00
Yale  891 45
Industrial Schools.
Alert Bay  2,835 12
Kamloops  3,399  19
Kootenay  4,928 86
Kuper Island  6,727 53
Metlakahtla    7,689 43
Williams Lake  923 65
(£30,894 24
Appropriation, 1892-93.
Alert Bay  $300 00
Ahouset  300 00
Bella Bella  300 00
Clayoquot  300 00
Cowichan  300 00
Fort Rupert    300 00
Gitlakdamicks  500 00
Hazelton  300 00
Hesquiaht  300 00
Kitkahtla      300 00
Kitwanquht   300 00
Kitlope  300 00
Kincolith ,  300 00
Kyuquot  300 00
Lakalsap  300 00
Massett  300 00
Namukamis  300 00
Nanaimo  300 00
Oiath  300 00
St. Augustine  300 00
Port Simpson  400 00
Port Essington  300 00
St. Mary's  1,000 00
Songhees  300 00
Zawadamiek  300 00 1028
Hon. Mr. Davie's Visit to Ottawa, 1892.
1894
Industrial Schools.
All Hallows  $1,500 00
Alert Bay  2,700 00
Coqualeetza  3,800 00
Kamloops  3,250 00
Kootenay  6,500 00
Kuper Island  3,900 00
Metlakahtla  7,490 00
Port Simpson (Girls)    600 00
Williams Lake  3,250 00
 $41,490 00
Appropriation, 1893-94.
Alberni  $300 00
Alert Bay  300 00
Ahouset  300 00
Bella Bella  300 00
Clayoquet    300 00
Cowichan  300 00
Port Rupert  300 00
Hazelton  300 00
Hesquiaht  300 00
Kitkahtla    300 00
Kitwanquht    300 00
Kitlope  300 00
Kincolith  300 00
Kyuoquot  300 00
Lakalsap  300 00
Massett  300 00
Nanukamis ,  300 00
Nanaimo  300 00
Oiath  300 00
St. Augustine  300 00
Port Simpson  400 00
Port Essington  300 00
St. Mary's  2,400 00
Songeas  300 00
Zawadamick  300 00
Industrial Schools.
All Hallows   $1,500 00
Alert Bay  6,550 00
Coqualeetza  1,300 00
Kamlooos    3,250 00
Kootenay  6,500 00
Kuper Island   3,900 00
Metlakahtla  7,490 00
Port Simpson (Girls)  600 00
Williams Lake  3,250 00
 $44,040 00
Total      $222,161 46
(Signed)        L. Vankoughnet,
Deputy Supt.-General of Lndian Affairs,
Department of Lndian Affairs,
April 13th, 1893.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed l)y Richard Wqi.fbndbx, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty,

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