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TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 1890-91. BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1892

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 TWENTIETH ANNUAL KEPOKT
PUBLIC   SCHOOLS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
1890-91.
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION.
WITH APPENDICES.
VICTOKIA, B. C:
Printed by RioilAlin Wolfenden, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majestv 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 163
PUBLIC   SCHOOLS   REPORT.
1890-91.
To His Honour Hugh Nelson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg herewith respectfully to present the Twentieth Annual Report on the Public
Schools of the Province.
JNO. ROBSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
January, 1892. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 165
PAKT I.
GENERAL REPORT. 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
167
ANNUAL REPORT
OP  THE
SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION.
1890-91.
To the Honourable John Robson,
Provincial Secretary :
Education Office,
Victoria, January, 1892-
Sir,—I beg to submit, for the information of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, the
Twentieth Annual Report on the condition and progress of the Public Schools of the Province
for the school-year ended June 30th, 1891.
It is a pleasing duty to be able to report not only a large increase in enrolment and
average daily attendance at the schools during the past year, but also a steady improvement
in the order, discipline, and management. The progress made was generally satisfactory, and
must be attributed to the fact that our teaching staff, as a body, is composed of faithful
and efficient instructors.
The number of schools in operation was 128, as follows :—
High Schools, 4.
Graded  „      13.
Ward Schools, 6.
Rural      „    105.
The number of teachers and monitors employed was 185, an increase of 24 over that for
the previous year.
The whole number of pupils enrolled during the year was 9,260, an increase of 1,218 over
that for the previous year, and the average actual daily attendance was 5,134.91, an increase
of 801.01 for the same period.
The percentage of average attendance was 55.45. This is a very creditable showing ;
however, when we take into consideration that fifty-five per cent, of regular attendance means
forty-five per cent, of irregular attendance, it is to be hoped that improvement in this respect
will be made during the present school-year. Especially should this be the case in regard to
the record of city districts, their average percentage of regular attendance during the past
year having been only a little over two per cent, higher than that for the Province. The
percentage of regular attendance at these schools should certainly be very considerably greater
than at rural schools. 168 Public Schools Report. 1891
The    cost    of   each   pupil,  based  on   enrolment,  was   $14.78,   and   on   average   daily
attendance was $26.66.
The expenditure for education proper was as follows :—
Teachers' Salaries $ 119,926 95
Incidental  Expenses        10,942 34
Education Office  6,032 44
Total   $136,901  73
Of   the   amount   voted   in   the   estimates   for   education   proper  during the past year,
$15,138.27 were unexpended.
The expenditure by the Lands and Works Department for   the construction of  schoo -
houses, furniture, repairs, and improvements was as follows :—
School-houses $ 23,554 87
Furniture, repairs, &c      10,853  98
Total $ 34,408 85
The total expenditure for all purposes of education during the year was as follows :—
Education proper $136,901  73
Lands and Works Department      34,408 85
Total $171,310 58
The amount paid for salaries and incidental expenses of schools in city and rural districts
was as follows :—
City Districts $ 57,771  31
Rural     „             73,097 98
Total $130,869 29
The expenditure for salaries of teachers in city districts was $51,025.95.
One-third of this amount, together with adjustments on vouchers paid subsequently,
amounting in all to $17,015.62, has been paid into the Provincial Treasury by the City
Municipalities, being the refund required under the " Public School Act."
  \
During the past year school-houses were erected or additions made to school buildings
in the following districts :—
Agassiz, New Westminster,
Anniedale, Nicomin,
Belmont, Port Kells,
Clayton, Puntledge,
East Chilliwhack, Revelstoke,
Glenwood, Rosedale,
Golden, Sea Island,
Howe Sound, Serpentine,
Kamloops, South Gabriola,
Lulu, Union Mines,
Mountain, Victoria. 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
169
At the present time schools are in operation in the following newly-created districts :—
Abbotsford, Junction,
Chemainus Landing, Lansdowne,
Dunach, Northfield,
Duncan, Parksville,
East Sooke, Salmon Arm,
Gordon Head, South Aldergrove,
Surrey Centre.
In addition to the above, schools are now  maintained  at Genoa,   Sahtlam  and Spence's
Bridge.
 o	
The gradual growth of the schools, as well as the cost of maintaining  the same, is  fully
shown by the record of attendance and expenditure given in the following exhibit:—
Comparative Statement of Attendance and Cost of Public Schools
from 1872-73 to 1890-91.
Year.
1872-73
1873-74
1874-75
1875-76
1876-77
1877-78
1878-79
1879-80
1880-81
1881-82
1882-83
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Number of
School
Districts.
25
37
41
41
42
45
45
47
48
50
59
67
76
86
95
104
109
123
141
Aggregate
Enrolment.
1,028
1,245
1,403
1,685
1,998
2,198
2,301
2,462
2,571
2,653
2,693
3,420
4,027
4,471
5,345
6,372
6,796
8,042
9,260
Average
Daily
Attendance.
575
767
863
984
1,260
1,395.50
1,315.90
1,293.93
1,366.86
1,358.68
1,383.00
1,808.60
2,089.74
2,481.48
2,873.38
3,093.46
3,681.14
4,333.90
5,134.91
Percentage
of
Attendance.
55.93
61.60
61.51
58.39
63.06
63.49
57.19
52.56
53.16
51.21
51.36
52.88
51.89
55.50
53.75
48.54
54.16
53.89
55.45
Expenditure
for Education
Proper.
$ 36,763 77
35,287 59
34,822 28
44,506 11
47,129 63
43,334 01
*22,110 70
47,006 10
46,960 69
49,268 63
50,850 63
66,655 15
71,151 52
79,527 56
88,521 08
99,902 04
108,190 59
122,984 83
136,901 73
*Half-year.
Statistical Abstract of Attendance.
Number of pupils enrolled during the year  9,260
Increase for the year  1,218
Number of boys enrolled    4,725
Increase for the year  596
Number of girls enrolled  4,535
Increase for the year  622
Average actual daily attendance  5,134.91
Increase for the year       801.01
Number of pupils enrolled in High Schools  256
Increase for the year  12
Average actual daily attendance in High Schools  154.47
Average actual daily attendance in Graded Schools  3.211 .53
Average actual daily attendance in Rural Schools  1,768.91
Number of School Districts at close of year  141
Increase for the year  18 170
Public Schools Report.
1891
The following table shows the cost of each pupil on enrolment and average daily attendance during the past eleven years :—
Year.
Cost of each
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost of each Pupil
on average daily
attendance.
1880-81 	
I 18 26*
18 57
18 88
19 48
17 66
17 78
16 56
15 67
15 92
15 29
14 78
$ 34 35*
1881-82 	
36 26
1882-83 	
36 76
1883-84                                        	
36 85
1884-85 	
34 04
1885-86 	
32 04
1886-87            	
30 SO
1887-88                                                            	
32 29
1888-89 	
29 39
1889-90               	
28 37
1890-91 	
26 66
*Based on cost of education proper.
Schedule of Salaries of Teachers on Permanent Staff During the Year 1890-91.
1 Teacher at    $110      per month.
8 Teachers at      100
3
2
6
18
4
34
15
81
172
90
85
80
70
65
60
55
50
Average salary    $ 59 . 68
Teachers on Permanent Staff for the Year 1890-91.
Grade.
Males.
Females.
Total.
Highest
Monthly
Salary.
Lowest
Monthly
Salary.
15
24
5
22
3
7
15
32
20
52
13
33
3
*4
$110
100
70
70
60
60
85
60
|50
„    B   	
8
15
30
10
26
3
3
50
Second Class   ,,    A    	
50
50
Third Class     „    A	
50
,,    B	
50
60
1
50
77
95
172
In addition to the above number of teachers, there were employed twelve monitors at the rate of $i
per month, and one monitor at the rate of $30 per month.
*Other holders of temporary certificates taught but a few months during the year, or filled positions :
monitors. 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
171
Teachers on Permanent Staff for the Year  189L92.
Grade.
First Class, Grade A.
B.
Second Class
Third Class     ,
A.
B.
A.
B.
Length of Service
Males.
14
28
10
27
4
7
90
Females.
9
18
34
17
20
3
101
Total.
Highest
Monthly
Salary.
14
$110
37
100
28
75
61
75
21
70
27
60
3
85
191
Lowest
Monthly
Salary.
50
50
50
50
50
60
In addition to the above number of teachers, there are fourteen monitors employed at the rate of $40 per
month, and two monitors at the rate of $30 per-month.
PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS' EXAMINATION, 1891.
The annual examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the
Public Schools of the Province commenced on July 2nd, 1891, in the High School building,
Victoria, and in the Public School building, Kamloops.
The examiners appointed to act with the Superintendent of Education were the *Rev.
Donald Eraser, M. A.; John Anderson, Esq., B. A., and the Ven. Archdeacon Scriven, M. A.,
(Oxon).
The list of successful candidates appeared in the British Columbia Gazette of 30th July,
1891, as follows :—
Certificates.
First Class—Grade A.
Chambers, Mary M., B. A., University of Queen's College, Kingston, 1891.
Kerr, John H, B. A., University of Toronto, 1891.
Mclnnes, William W. B., B. A., University of Toronto, 1891.
McMillan, John, B. A., University of New Brunswick, 1891.
Russell, Ernest H, B. A., University of Queen's College, Kingston, 1891.
Secord, John H., B. A., University of Acadia College, N. S., 1891.
Young, Frederick McB., B. A., University of Queen's College, Kingston, 1891.
Gordon, Robert G., renewal, 1891.
First Class—Grade B—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks,  3,750.)
Marks obtained.
McDougall, Katharine  2718
Tom, Gregory H  2640
Sparling, Robert  2349
Purdy, Raffles A. R  2331
Hawkey, Richard J     2308
Jamieson, George W  2297
Fraser, Robert  2260 172
Public Schools Report.
1891
First Class—Grade B—Renewals.
Halliday, Jas. A	
Offerhaus,  R	
Murray, Paul	
Cameron, Agnes D	
Horton, Lucretia	
Sluggett, George H . . . .
Phelps, William H	
Jones David	
Wood, William M	
Gardiner, Abbie F,	
Gilchrist, Alexander. . . .
McLeod, John A	
Kinney, William T . . . .
Foster, Mrs. Maria	
Coatham, William C . . .
Armstrong, Frances E. .
Plaxton,  Robert J	
Offerhaus, Mrs. Mary A.
Irwin, Joseph	
Pope, Jennie M. H	
Rogers, Ellen	
Nicholson, Thomas	
Watson, Frederick J . . .
McRae, George W	
Campbell,  Eli J	
Renewals.
1880
880
882
883
883
884
884
885
885
885
885
885
886
886
887
887
887
887
887
887
887
Second Class—Grade A—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 3,150.)
Marks obtained.
Norcross, James E  2156
Hall, Robert J  1995
Shepherd, Samuel     1993
Dockrill,   Nettie  1990
Lawson, Maria       1984
Duncan, Christina A  1910
King,  Eliza Jane  1899
Williams, Ada Jane  1896
Hopkins, Nicholas R  1895
Robinson, Edith E  1894
Fraser, John A  1893
Baxter, Truman S  1892
Fletcher, Marie L  1891
Second Class—Grade B—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 2,550.)
Marks obtained.
McPherson, Osborne  1613
King, John W. H  1560
Robinson, Sarah A  1528
Cox, Frances E  1524
Sallaway, Jos. F  1509
Keast, Ada  1495
McLennan, Arch.  D  1465 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 173
Second Class—Grade B—Certificates—Concluded.
Marks obtained.
Calhoun, Lucy M  1459
Gordon, Marion  1456
Hoy, James A  1409
Wintemute, Hanna A  1408
Patterson, Mrs Elsie N  1406
Cairns, Kate  1405
Carscadden, Robert H  1401
Robbins, Fenwick W  1400
Palmer, James W       1400
Dunkerley, Ethel  1399
Morrison, Frank E  1373
Hartt, Flora E  1372
Elliott, Dawson H  1372
Welsh, Duncan J      1364
Howitt, John  1359
Wintemute, Mary A  1355
McLennan, Mrs Ella B  1350
Preston, Sara  1349
Mathers, Isaac N  1348
Lawson, Ellen G  1348
Brown, Isabel  1340
Templer, Mrs. Jennie  1335
Dougherty, Josephine A. L  1308
Irvine, Robert D  1307
Miller, Janet I  1301
Carmichael, Ida M  1297
Matthews, Deborah E  1295
Allan, Robt. H  1290
Pope, S. C. Ruth  1289
Murray, Elizabeth  1287
King, Sarah 0  1284
Haldon, Alice Maude  1282
Coghlan, Ella S  1281
McLellan, Caroline M  1278
Third Class—Grade  A—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks,  1,950.)
Marks obtained.
Stewart, Allan C  1187
Speirs, Mary E  1165
Graham, William A  1125
Robotham, Annie       1113
Freeman, Lena B  1101
Kermode, Sarah  1029
Carmichael, Elinor  1024
Way, Asenath A  1019
Ketcheson, Annie  1010
Isaac, Harriet  997
Williams, Sarah A :  997
Monro, Annie J      996
Halliday,  Grace  988
King, Edith A  984
Dixon, Belle  984
Shortreed, Christina  984 174 Public Schools Report. 1891
Third Class—Grade B—Certificates.
(Maximum Marks, 1,950.)
Marks obtained.
Morrison, Florence E  1081
Telford, Robert  1034
McKinnon, Catherine M  1030
Homer, Mary S  1028
McKay, Minna G  1027
Johnston, Samuel G  1014
Blake, Alice E  1009
Blake, Mary  1004
McDowell, Margaret  992
Stewart, Anna L  986
Lang, Sarah 1  983
Rath, Sarah J  955
McLennan, David  951
Frank, Pauline  938
Murton, Sarah J  936
Stephenson, John J  935
Cathcart, Isabella  934
Carmichael, Annie E  930
Johnstone, Marion B  921
Wilson, Nellie G  916
Thomas, Catherine J  915
Harding, Lizzie  913
Lettice, Edith M. N  910
Black, Jessie A  907
Haarer, Mary P  906
Norris, Martha J  902
McGregor, Margaret  901
McMartin, Jennie S  898
Halliday, Mary F  893
Sivewright, William  887
Jesse, Edith M  872
Lawson, Fanny  871
Goodridge, Florence M  871
Ravey, Martin J   870
Edwards, Ethel  869
Hilbert, Kate  869
McDonald, Mrs. Annie C  867
Walker, E. Frances G  867
Clyde, Thomas  864
Pool,  Christina  839
Ramsay,  Sarah ,  833
Lister Ellen  829
Martin, Geo.  H  828
Harrison, Alice V  821
Barron, Isabella M. F  820
DeBou, Edith S  815
Heisterman, Laura A  792
Miller, Martha S  783
Renewal Certificates for Length of Service.
Caldwell, Mrs. L. M. McDougall, Archena J.
Bailey, Adelaide S. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 175
Certificates of Standing.
Marks obtained.
Brown, William C      1520
Moore, Margaret May    1107
Moore, John Nicola      910
Furness, Katie      804
S. D. Pope, LL.D., |
John Anderson, B. A., V    Board of Examiners.
Austin Scriven, M. A., (Oxon). J
In accordance with the recommendation of the Examiners, Certificates have been granted.
ARTHUR CAMPBELL REDDIE,
Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office, Victoria, 30th July, 1891.
*It is with feelings of deep regret that we are called upon to record the death of the Rev.
Donald Fraser, M.A., a member of the Board of Examiners, who died during the progress of
the examination.
He filled the position of examiner for seven consecutive years with great credit to himself
and to the Province. A deep and lively interest was always manifested by him in everything
that had for its object the advancement of education.
His warm sympathetic nature and nobility of character made friends of all with whom
he came in contact.
In his death, the Education Department lost a true and valued friend, our teachers a
wise counsellor, and our Public School system a learned and an able advocate.
The examination was held simultaneously in Victoria and Kamloops.
The number of candidates was one hundred  and  fifty-four,  of  whom  one  hundred and
thirty-eight wrote in this city, and sixteen in Kamloops.
Of the whole number of applicants, one hundred and thirty-two  succeeded  in  obtaining
certificates, as follows :—
First Class, Grade A  7
First Class, Grade B  7
Second Class, Grade A  13
Second Class, Grade B  41
Third Class, Grade A  16
Third Class, Grade B  48
In addition to the above, twenty-six renewal certificates, and three certificates for length
of service, were granted in accordance with the provisions of the School Act. 176
Public Schools Report.
1891
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Public Schools Report.
177
A very large addition was made to the number of duly qualified teachers at this examination. The list of holders of certificates does not, however, represent the number of available
teachers, inasmuch as this list contains the names of a large number who do not desire to enter
upon active service, as well as the names of a considerable number who have left the profession.
It is noteworthy that of the two hundred and sixty-five persons holding certificates of
qualification to teach in the Public Schools of the Province, one hundred and ninety-two are
the holders of First or Second Class Certificates.
At the last examination more than half of the successful candidates obtained these higher
certificates, and at the present time more than two-thirds of the schools are in charge of
teachers holding certificates higher than Third Class.
From the foregoing it is apparent that our teaching staff, as a body, aims at attaining
high standing at the qualifying examination.
The endeavour to obtain an abundant supply of knowledge is very commendable in every
teacher, but it must be borne in mind that skill in teaching, tact, gentility of manner, and
moral rectitude of life are indispensable to the proper and successful discharge of the duties
and responsibilities of an instructor of youth.
As the prospects are that the supply of teachers will soon exceed the demand, the appli"
cant for a position who possesses all of the foregoing recommendations will have no difficulty
in attaining rank in the profession, commensurate with his standing in each of these requisites.
High moral worth and culture are credentials which Trustees, in the proper discharge of
their duties, cannot lose sight of. The applicant for a position in any of our schools should
be required, before receiving an appointment, to furnish satisfactory evidence of his possessing
these two very important qualifications.
The following table shows the number of applicants and certificates obtained during each
of the past eleven years, and cannot but prove of interest:—
Year.
Number
of
Certificates   Obtained.
Failed to
obtain
Applicants.
First Class.
Second Class.
Third Class.
Certificates.
1881	
45
7
14
20
4
1882	
36
37
6
5
9
3
19
15
2
1883	
14
1884	
64
67
15
15
21
12
16
27
12
1885	
13
1886	
76
93
13
15
6
27
34
30
23
1887	
21
1888	
100
10
41
36
13
1889	
117
9
30
37
41
1890	
143
8
36
61
38
1891	
154
14
54
64
22
Under the Rules and Regulations no male candidate less than eighteen years of age, and
no female candidate less than sixteen years of age, can be permitted to be applicants for certificates of any kind.
Certificates of Standing will not be issued hereafter. 178 Public Schools Report. 1891
REGULATIONS   RESPECTING  FIRST  CLASS  CERTIFICATES,  OBTAINED
PRIOR  TO  JULY,  1888.
Copies of the following Circulars were forwarded to all holders of First Class Certificates
obtained prior to July, 1888, who held Renewal Certificates in September, 1891 :—
Education Office,
Victoria, September 8th, 1891.
In reference to the following regulation:—
"The holders of First Class Certificates obtained prior to July 1st, 1888, desiring to write
for certificates valid for life, shall be permitted, until July 31st, 1893, to be examined only on
the additional standard now required for First Class Certificates."
The Council of Public Instruction directs that candidates for First Class, Grade A, Certificates under this regulation must take the papers set on—
Canadian History,
Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene,
Greek or French,
and must take one of the papers in each of the following groups:—
(a.) Music, Drawing or Botany,
(b.) Zoology, Astronomy, or Rhetoric,
(c.) General History, Chemistry, or Geology.
In the subject of Natural Philosophy the candidate shall have the option of taking the
paper as a whole, or only those questions of the paper which are embraced in the additional
standard now required for First Class, Grade A, Certificates.
The candidate shall be required to obtain 40 °/0 in each of the subjects of examination.
S. D. POPE,
Secretary, Council of Public Instruction.
Education Office,
Victoria, September 8th, 1891.
In reference to the following regulation:—
"The holders of First Class Certificates obtained prior to July 1st, 1888, desiring to write
for certificates valid for life, shall be permitted, until July 31st, 1893, to be examined only on
the additional standard now required for First Class Certificates."
The Council of Public Instruction directs that candidates for First Class, Grade B, Certificates under this regulation must take the papers set on—
Canadian History,
Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene,
English Literature,
and must take one of the papers in each of the following groups:—
(a.) Music, Drawing, or Botany,
(6.) Zoology, Astronomy, or Rhetoric,
(c.) General History, Chemistry, or Geology.
In each of the following subjects the candidate shall have the option of taking the paper
as a whole, or only those questions of each paper which are embraced in the additional standard
now required for First Class, Grade B, Certificates :—
Mensuration, Geometry,
Algebra, Natural Philosophy.
The candidate shall be required to obtain 40 % in each of the subjects of examination.
S. D. POPE,
Secretary, Council of Public Instruction, 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 179
INSPECTOR'S  REPORT.
"Victoria, December, 1891.
" Sir,—I have the honour to submit for your information the following general report for
the year ended June 30th, 1891 :—
" The number of inspections made by me during the past year very largely exceeded that
of the previous year, but the experience was in a great measure similar.
" On all sides appear signs of improvement and advancement; pupils have steadily
advanced in their studies; buildings have been erected in newly-created districts ; school-
houses and grounds have been improved ; and everything in connection with school matters
has shown great activity.
"Course of Study.
" The studies of our schools conform to the public demand and the aim is to furnish
not only elementary, but advanced instruction to those who may desire it.
" Vigilance has been exercised as far as possible to see that the course of study has been
carried out in all the schools. In the very large majority of instances there has been earnest
and intelligent effort to conform to the requirements of the prescribed work. Our teachers
are yearly improving in their methods of instruction, but there are no doubt some who are
more concerned about the form and the amount of the work required than about the influence
it has upon the minds of the pupils. It is sometimes forgotten that the main object of school
instruction, besides giving a certain stock of useful knowledge, is to evoke, through the medium
of the subjects taught, the pupil's own efforts, to produce self-reliance, and to give consciousness of capacity.
" Reading.
" The methods employed in teaching primary reading vary according as the teacher is
trained or untrained. The alphabetic, the phonic, and the word methods are all to be met
with. The trained teacher employs either the word or the phonic method, or a combination
of both, while his untrained fellow-worker clings to the now little used alphabetic method.
The aim is to gain ability to recognize and pronounce words without mental effort, and no
matter what method of teaching reading is followed, much drill is necessary. The necessity
for giving frequent daily instruction in reading to primary classes is very generally recognized
in all the schools visited.
" It would not be proper to claim for our schools very high rank in reading, but they
certainly take a respectable place for general excellence in this subject. In recognition of the
importance of reading, especially in the primary classes, a greater amount of time should be
assigned to it than to any other subject in the prescribed course.
" To make intelligent and fluent readers, the teacher should elicit the full meaning of the
various lessons by judicious questions and observations. ' The investigation of the reading-
lesson,' says a well-known writer on Education, ' forms the highest exercise of connected
thinking in the common school, and, if judiciously conducted, ought to contribute very much
to the habit of reflective reading in after-life.'
" Spelling.
" In regard to this practically important subject, there is nothing specially new to be said.
The schools continue to maintain a high standard of excellence in spelling. With reading,
this subject receives daily attention. The large amount of writing now required in Dictation,
Grammar and Composition, and in the reviews of History, etc., tends materially to assist direct
instruction and to improve the general correctness of the work. Teachers should keep a list
of the words commonly mis-spelled by their pupils, and from this list prepare frequent reviews.
"Arithmetic.
" The importance of this subject demands that it be taught carefully and thoroughly. On
every time  table examined, a liberal  allowance of   time   was   set   apart   for its  study.    It 180 Public Schools Report. 1891
frequently happens that teachers, in their anxiety to deal successfully with a difficult subject,
injudiciously allow it to absorb too much of their time and energy, to the exclusion of other
subjects and to the general detriment of the school.
" Arithmetic, mental and written, is generally well taught in our schools, but is in some
isolated cases allowed more time relatively than should be devoted to it. In my last report
I pointed out the value of mental arithmetic as tending to secure rapidity, to cultivate the
attention, logical thought, and the accurate use of language in its expression. In this study
it is desirable that the sequence of the text-book be followed. Otherwise the course is likely
to be without logical method ; disconnected problems are of but little use in mental training.
" It has been my practice to call attention as far as possible to the necessity of accuracy
and rapidity in the applications of the simple rules. The training given to attain these ends
will do much to remedy a common defect, viz.: that though pupils understand the processes very
well, results are not sufficiently accurate. The great majority of failures in mathematics in
all schools is due to the lack of thorough initial training. Such pupils cannot help ' hating'
Arithmetic and Algebra, because even when they understand the principles they fail in the
execution, and naturally conclude that they cannot succeed in these branches.
" Writing.
" Last year I had the pleasure of reporting improvement in the character of the instruction .
in this subject.    Faulty or injurious positions or postures while writing, however, are, I regret
to say, still to be seen among the pupils of some schools, and awkward and cramped modes of
holding pen or pencil continue to be tolerated in too many quarters.
" Pen-holding seems to be the most troublesome thing with which teachers have to deal,
and many have been the complaints received concerning the difficulty of successfully teaching
the proper manner of execution. It is probable that, in many of the cases referred to, the
real difficulty lay in the lack of well-directed and systematic effort as well as in an absence of
enthusiasm and of determination to succeed.
"The first exercises should be conducted not so much with a view to teach writing as to
secure the free and easy use of the pen. It is very doubtful if good penmen are made by
merely repeating the head-line of the writing-book with the constant reproduction of the same
errors. The additional practice required should be of the nature of movement exercises,
designed to train the hand in acquiring facility in execution.
" The foregoing remarks are certainly condemnatory of the practice of some teachers who
having taught their pupils the elements and principles of the letters, but neglecting to give
due instruction in the proper manner of holding the pen, consider it reasonable to expect good
results.
" Grammar.
" Grammar is a subject that has strong claims to an important place in every course of
instruction.    Its study helps to make the student a good reader and a good writer.
" Before formal lessons in Grammar are commenced, teachers should give patient and
persistent attention to the oral correction of wrong forms of speech used by the pupils.
" Due attention has been given to the study of this subject and very commendable
progress made, but it is frequently regarded as an end rather than as a means to an end.
No study can be made more attractive and profitable, under the competent teacher, than this
much-abused subject of English Grammar. To do this, however, there should be no irksome
routine nor pointless instruction.
" Composition.
" The attention given to this subject is not always in accordance with its value. I regret
to report that in the time tables of a few of the schools visited during the past year no
provision whatever had been made for Composition and Letter-Writing. Inquiry, however,
elicited the information that it was not altogether neglected.
" On the whole there seems to be in a certain degree a lack of attention paid to form;
that is to the general neatness of written exercises with regard to arrangement of parts of a
sentence, paragraphing, penmanship, etc. This training should commence in the primary
classes and grades and be followed with scrupulous care at every step. There should be
nothing to unlearn. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 181
" That Composition is scarcely a separate subject, but an essential part of many subjects,
has already been sufficiently indicated in my several reports. As one of the two forms of
language expression, it constitutes the final appeal in school work. If a pupil cannot write a
clear statement of a fact, he does not know the fact as he should. Hence, in all classes above
the primary at least, the constant test of knowledge ought to be the composition; that is, pupils
ought to be required to express in writing what they know.
" It is most desirable then that pupils at every stage of advancement should be persistently
required to express in writing, as clearly and elegantly as they can, any appropriate knowledge
gained in study, and no such composition should be accepted unless in proper form.
"Geography.
"In this subject, with its multitude of varied and interesting facts, there has naturally
been a great difference in the degrees of success attained in different schools and classes. The
general success has certainly been creditable, yet there are teachers whose failure to employ
the best methods necessarily prevent their pupils from acquiring a proper amount of well-
digested geographical knowledge.
" Map drawing in connection with this subject has no doubt been found of advantage.
Rapid slate and blackboard sketches of countries under consideration, as well as the more
elaborate maps on paper, especially the former, cannot but prove a valuable aid.
" Geography, when properly taught, appeals to the imagination, strengthens the memory,
and stimulates the reasoning powers by inducing the habit of discriminating facts and forming
real relations. I am forced to conclude from inspections made that, in many instances, the
memory alone is appealed to in its study; an oversight which thus deprives pupils of the
full benefit to be derived from proper instruction therein.
" History.
" In my last report I referred to the importance of a careful selection of topics to be
studied. The use of the blackboard in building a consecutive historical chart would no doubt
be found beneficial. In all subsequent instruction there could be constant recurrence to the
skeleton outline, which might  be regarded as the basis of the pupil's knowledge of the subject.
" Due attention has been given to both English and Canadian History, and very
satisfactory progress can be very generally reported.
"Physiology (Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene).
" The facts of this branch of study are, or should be, presented to pupils at almost all
stages of advancement. It does not occupy a great deal of time, but the interest taken in its
study remains unabated.
" The need and the value of illustrating, when practicable, the lessons in this subject
should induce every teacher to provide himself as far as possible with the means of doing so.
Many instances have already come under my notice, where most praiseworthy efforts have
been made by teachers to supply the real objects for this purpose.
" The chief aim of lessons in physiology is to make them the means of imparting a
knowledge of the laws of health. Under this head may be introduced practical directions
about cleanliness, ventilation, work, rest, food, sleep, regular habits, intemperance, &c. Pupils
should be taught that without health life is a failure, and further made to realize as fully as
possible that they must themselves take care of their health.
" Drawing.
" The number of pupils who annually receive instruction in drawing continues to increase.
The outlook is certainly hopeful, although I am unable to report much advancement in this
study.
" During the past year drawing has been taught in a larger number of rural schools than
heretofore. It is noticeable that this subject is always given a place in the time-table of a
school in charge of a teacher who has even a slight knowledge of its scope and practical
application. 182 Public Schools Report. 1891
" Book-keeping, Algebra, and Geometry.
" The report on the teaching of the optional subjects named above differs little from that
of last year.
" These subjects are necessarily taken up to a limited extent in the Rural Schools. In
one of the Graded Schools (situated at a very considerable distance from a High School) they
were taught with marked success.
" Physical Training.
" There is evidence of a deepening interest in physical education. The mistake is
frequently made that physical training is given by a few dilatory movements once or twice a
day.
" ' School drill is designed not to supersede, but to supplement the games and plays of
childhood. If we leave physical culture wholly to natural impulse, why not leave mental
culture to take care of itself 1 In mental training we recognize the principle that intellectual
development is attained only by repeated, long-continued and systematic exercises. Mental
school gymnastics are rigidly enforced for many years. The same law holds true in physical
development. Would not the physique of a class of boys under judicious gymnastic training
for ten years be superior to that of a class left to run wild V
" The girls attending our schools who have outgrown the active games of childhood, and
who have no adequate substitute in the shape of calisthenic drill, suffer the most. Nothing
would be more valuable to them than the ' daily training which would straighten the figure,
deepen the chest, and stimulate the muscles.'
" School Helps.
" The frequent interchange of opinions between teachers with reference to their school
work and its results must necessarily be advantageous. There is, of course, great difference
in the teaching capacity of teachers, as shown by the results of instruction in their respective
schools, and the causes which produce better results in some schools than in others might be
discovered by a comparison of the different methods employed. It is proper that those who
are experienced and have attained skill in their profession should help the young or
inexperienced.
" The monthly meetings of his assistants, which the principal of every graded school is
required to convene, should, if properly conducted, prove highly beneficial. The cordial
co-operation of all the teachers thus convened is necessary before there can be mutual benefit
—a result of which will be the subsequent improvement of the schools under their charge.
" The holding of these meetings will enable an enthusiastic principal to establish a
Reading Circle among his assistants and other teachers. A text on the Science of Teaching
could be taken up and thoroughly studied under his direction. The value of the study would
soon be appreciated, and the schools would profit by the increased interest aroused.
" I offer the above suggestions, notwithstanding that the daily experience of every teacher
ought surely to reveal with increasing clearness that teaching is both a science and an art, and
that, for the proper development of both, constant study and self-discipline are necessary.
" In conclusion, let me say that my work of inspection has brought me into pleasant
relations with many teachers, trustees and parents, and the uniform courtesy and kindness
extended to me by them have very much lightened my labours.
" I have, &c,
"D. Wilson,
" S. D. Pope, Esq , LL.D., " Inspector oj Schools.
" Superintendent of Education,   Victoria." 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 183
SPECIAL REPORTS ON SCHOOLS.
 o	
In order to give statistical  information on the schools in a form that will be most readily
understood, it has been deemed best to furnish special reports in the following order : —
A.—High Schools.
B.—Graded Schools.
C.—Rural Schools.
A.
Special Reports on High Schools.
Nanaimo High School.
Principal, Walter Hunter, B.A., B.C.L.
Salary, $100 per month.
Examined, December 1st, 1890.
June 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 37.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average actual daily attendance,  19.94.
Report of the Principal.
"Nanaimo, August 17th, 1891.
" Sir,—It affords me great pleasure in submitting my report of the Nanaimo High School
for the year ending June 30th, 1891.
"There is little to record that has not already appeared in reports of the school.
" The attendance for the year does not show any increase, but there has, I believe, been
an improvement in the amount and quality of the work done by the pupils.
" At the beginning of the year the school lost five pupils who had taken certificates at
the examination held in July, 1890.
" All these have been engaged as teachers in the public schools during the year now past.
" Miss Christina A. Duncan won the Governor-General's medal for the year. The same
young lady has since obtained a Second Class, Grade A, certificate.
" There were three other pupils from this school who were successful in the examination
held in July of the present year.
" Two of the pupils entered the Montreal Witness prize competition, and Miss Carrie
Brethour, aged 14, won the prize for the Province.
" My duties during the year have been greatly assisted and much pleasure afforded me,
owing to the general good conduct of the pupils and the interest manifested by most of them in
the prosecution of their studies.
" An acknowledgment of thanks is due to the members of the Nanaimo School Board
for their readiness to render assistance when called upon, as well as to the many friends who
sent in prizes for the pupils at the public examinations.
" I have also to express my thanks to yourself and other members of your department for
the kindness that has marked the treatment I have received in the past, and trust that I may
not forget that ' kindness begets kindness.'
" I remain yours, &c,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., "Walter Hunter,
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria, B. C." "Principal. 184
Public Schools Report.
1891
The annexed tabular statement of attendance at this school since its establishment may
be found of interest.
The names of those who stood head of the school at the Midsummer and Christmas Examinations, held since its commencement, are also given.
Males
Enrolled.
Females
Enrolled.
Total
Enrolment
Average
daily
attendance
Head of School.
Year.
Christmas.
Midsummer.
1885 86
6
8
9
13
17
18
6
13
16
17
20
19
12
21
25
30
37
37
11.52
14.15
15.86
17.57
21.99
19.94
James A. W. Bell.
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
James A. W. Bell
James Galloway	
James Galloway	
Herbert D. R. Stewart.
Herbert D. R. Stewart.
James Galloway.
James Galloway.
Herbert D. R. Stewart.
Christina Agnes Duncan
At the Midsummer examination, 1891, Miss Christina Agnes Duncan, having obtained
the highest number of marks, was awarded the Bronze Medal, presented by His Excellency
the Governor-General, for competition among the pupils of this school.
New Westminster High School.
Principal, Hector M. Stramberg, B. A.
Salary, $100 per month.
Examined, December 4th, 1890.
June 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 51.
Average monthly attendance, 35.
Average actual daily attendance, 27.50.
Report of Principal.
"New Westminster, July 4th, 1891.
" Sir,—I beg herewith to submit my report of the New Westminster High School for the
year ended June 30th, 1891.
" The history of the school during the year is not marked by any event of more than
ordinary importance. On the whole the pupils made satisfactory progress. Of course, there
were some that did not do well. Kept at home on account of illness, they fell so far behind
that when they returned to school they could do very little in the classes to which they
belonged ; and as I had not much time for giving special instruction, they became disheartened
in their work, and gave up the struggle with the difficulties with which they had to contend.
" It was highly pleasing to the Trustees and myself to note the wisdom of the Government
in making provision for an assistant. You will have seen by the reports already sent, that
fifty-one pupils were enrolled during the year ; and although the average daily attendance,
owing to sickness and other causes, was not so large as might have been expected with such an
enrolment, the probability is that, with two teachers, there will be henceferth a greatly
increased attendance. Indeed, in this part of the Province, the educational prospect was never
brighter than at present. To me it is a hopeful sign to see so many pupils from the country
coming to New Westminster to pass the entrance examination to the High School ; and it
must be gratifying to all the well-wishers to learning in the Royal City to know that they
have here, in the great agricultural centre of the Mainland, an institution where all the clever
youth of the district may receive an advanced education. Vict.
Public Schools Report.
185
"I am inclined to believe that if more prizes were given in our high schools, the effect
would be good. The rolls of honour and medals are not without their influence, but there
should be more of them. Thirty or forty dollars given every year to a school like ours would
be a great incentive to study. The pupil who makes the highest number of marks in any
subject of the examination should receive a prize, and this amount would be sufficient for that
purpose. While I would not ask the Government to grant any money for such an object, I
would suggest that teachers and those who take an interest in educational matters be reminded
that in no other way can a small amount of cash be made to do more for advancing the cause
of education than by giving it as a reward to deserving students.
"The objections generally raised to the prize system are fortunately removed by the mode
of conducting our yearly examinations. If teachers themselves were the examiners, I should
not be in favor of prizes, but as the papers are marked by competent men, who are
slightly—if at all—acquainted with the pupils or their parents, there is not likely to be any
ground for suspecting favoritism in the matter of awards
" I am, with respect,
" Your obedient servant,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., " H. M. Stramberg,
"Superintendent of Education,  Victoria." "Principal.
The annexed tabular statement of attendance at this school since its establishment may be
found of interest.
The names of those who stood at the head of the school at the Midsummer and Christmas
Examinations, held since its commencement, are also given.
Year.
Males
Enrolled.
Females
Enrolled.
Total
Enrolment
Average
daily
attendance
Head of
Christmas.
School.
Midsummer.
1884-85
1885-86
21
20
16
20
17
25
27
19
20
22
28
16
22
24
40
40
38
48
33
47
51
21.77
25.00
19.25
22.75
20.86
24.96
27.50
Thomas R. E. Mclnnes.
Frederic Wm. Howay.
Richard McBride.
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
Richard McBride	
James Rankin.
James Rankin.
Blanche L. Millard.
1889-90
1890-91
Margaret F. Homer....
Margaret F. Homer.
Arthur^Whiteside.
At the Midsummer examination, 1891, Master Arthur Whiteside was awarded the
Bronze Medal, presented by His Excellency the Governor-General, for competition among the
pupils of this school.
Vancouver High School.
Principal, Robert Law, B.A., Ph. B., until June 30th, 1891 ; present Principal, Alexander
Robinson, B.A.
Salary, $ 100 per month.
Examined, December 1st, 1890.
June 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 42.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average actual daily attendance, 24.36. 186
Public Schools Report.
1891
Report of the Principal.
"Vancouver, August 5th, 1891.
" Sir,—I have the honour of reporting to you the progress of the Vancouver High School
for the past year.
" Last summer seven of my pupils received teachers' certificates, the largest number from
any school in the Province, and Miss Anna Stewart won the District Prize kindly offered by
the editor of the 'Montreal Witness,' for excellence in composition. This summer eight of my
pupils have been successful in obtaining certificates, and Miss E. Magee has been ranked second
of the Province in writing an essay for the ' Montreal Witness.'
"You will find from the annual report that the average attendance has been excellent.
"As the school has been inspected by yourself and Inspector Wilson, and also subjected
to a thorough written examination, its efficiency must be well known to the Education Department.
" As there are no training schools in British Columbia where young teachers may receive
a practical education, I would suggest for your consideration that each of the High Schools be
made a training school during the fall term of each year, and that teachers in training be
allowed to practice in the city schools and also in rural schools near the cities.
" As many of our teachers spend two weeks in writing for certificates, two weeks in suspense waiting for certificates, and the remainder of their holidays in trying to secure positions,
I would suggest that you extend the summer holidays till the 1st of September, and make the
teacher's position permanent.
" Allow me to thank you for the prompt and efficient manner in which all business connected with this school has been transacted by the officials of the Education Department.
"I have, &c,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., " R. Law,
"Superintendent of Education." "Principal.
The annexed tabular statement of attendance at this school since its establishment may be
found of interest.
The names of those who stood head of the school at the midsummer examinations held
since its commencement are also given.
Males
Enrolled.
Females
Enrolled.
Total
Enrolment
Average
daily
attendance
Head of School.
Year.
Midsummer.
1889-90
1890-91
10
13
21
29
31
42
24.67
24.36
Catherine A. Barnes.
Florence E. Morrison. 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
187
Victoria High School.
Principal, John P. McLeod, B.A., until  December 31st, 1891 ; present Acting Principal,
John H. Kerr, B.A.
Salary, $110 per month.
1st Assistant,  Henry Go ward,  M.A.,  until   February 28th, 1891; present 1st Assistant,
R. Offerhaus.
Salary, $100 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Agnes D. Cameron.
Salary, $90 per month.
Examined, December 1st, 1890.
June 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 1 26.
Average monthly attendance, 93.
Average actual daily attendance, 82 67.
Report of the Principal.
"High School, Victoria, July 6th, 1891.
"Sir,—I beg to report that the High School is still in existence, and that, notwithstanding
opposing influences, considerable progress was made by the pupils during the past year.
" I would respectfully urge you to give your serious consideration to that portion of my
last report which was not published in your last Annual Report.
"At the commencement of the year the Trustees were fortunate in securing the services
of Miss Cameron as teacher of the third division. Not only did Miss Cameron do excellent
work in the first and second divisions but at both the Christmas and the Midsummer Examinations she succeeded in passing all her pupils into the second division.
"I am, &c,
"J.  P.
" S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D.,
" Superintendent of Education."
McLeod,
Principal.
From the following tabular statement of attendance at this school since its establishment,
an accurate idea of the number of pupils who have therein received instruction in the different
branches of a higher education may be obtained.
The names of those who stood head of the school at the Midsummer and Christmas Examinations held since its commencement are also given.
Males
Enrolled.
Females
Enrolled.
Total
Enrolment
Average
daily
attendance
Head of School.
Year.
Christmas.
Midsummer.
1876-77
1877-78
43
47
54
51
37
39
34
45
37
47
44
49
57
59
55
17
14
22
31
39
35
27
39
57
58
63
71
67
70
71
60
61
76
82
76
74
61
84
94
105
107
120
124
129
126
49.00
50.15
43.62
54.69
52.75
45.07
38.00
56.63
56.34
64.27
69.87
67.00
74.08
78.39
82.67
John C. Newbury	
John C. Newbury.
1878-79
Herbert C. Carey.
Charles Hayward.
J. B. Carmichael.
Wm. W. Halliday.
Samuel Schultz.
Christina Forrest.
Abbie F. Gardiner.
John C. Boyd.
Arthur B. Haynes.
Francis B. Gibbs.
Jeannette Mebius.
Ernest Arthur Powell.
Francis John Nicholson.
1879-80
1880-81
1881-82
1882-83
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Charles Hayward	
R. Clayton Fawcett	
W. F. Carey Pope
Arthur E. Haynes	
Jeannette Mebius	
Ernest Arthur Powell.. 188 Public Schools Report. 1891
The silver medal annually donated by His Excellency the Governor-General for competition
among the pupils of this school, was awarded to Master Francis John Nicholson at the Midsummer Examination, 1891.
The High Schools.
The value and importance of our High Schools are yearly becoming more appreciated.
They afford to all classes the opportunity of obtaining a superior English education as well as
of taking a course of study in the more advanced branches, and for the present, they form the
apex of our school system.
During the past year, two hundred and fifty-six pupils attended these schools. From
reports of inspections made and examinations held, we are prepared to say that good work has
been done in them. They are not only of great benefit to the children residing in the cities,
but also to many of the children of rural districts, a considerable number of whom have taken
advantage of the opportunity afforded by these schools of obtaining a more extended knowledge
of the higher subjects of study.
At the last Teachers' Examination, a large number of pupils of these schools was successful
in obtaining certificates, and many of them are now engaged in teaching.
Although not having had the benefit of thorough, systematic, and special training, so
essential to the person assuming the responsible duties of teacher, yet there are teachers, educated in our High Schools, who have attained high standing as instructors. This can only be
attributed to their having good judgment, tact, and other indispensable qualifications for success
in the profession.    In other words, they possessed natural aptitude for the work.
To prepare pupils that they may be able to obtain teachers' certificates, is not the only
work accomplished.
Quite a number of youths, on leaving these schools, have matriculated in Universities, and
it is a pleasure to record the fact that some of these young men are now the holders of degrees.
Many former high school pupils are at present engaged in the learned professions, in mercantile pursuits, or in other honourable avocations, for the performance of the duties of which
they are, doubtless, in a great measure indebted to the knowledge and inspiration received while
attending one of these higher schools of learning.
But perhaps the greatest benefit afforded by our High Schools is in the cultivating of a
taste for a higher education. It is not possible to form an estimate of the lasting good accomplished by them in this direction.
These schools are well deserving of the aid granted them by the Legislature and of the
provision made for their support by the Municipalities in which they are located. 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
189
B.
Special Reports on Graded Schools.
ATTENDANCE AT GRADED SCHOOLS,
from 1872 to 1891, inclusive.
The following tabular exhibits of attendance at the Public Schools in the Cities of Nanaimo,
New Westminster, Vancouver, and Victoria, as well as at the Graded Schools in Wellington,
Victoria West, and Kamloops, will, doubtless, prove of general interest:—
Nanaimo.
Year.
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average daily
attendance.
1872-73
No returns.
1873-74
125
59
66
81
1874-75
153
75
78
112
1875-76
147
83
64
105
1876-77
184
93
91
112.50
1877-78
248
133
115
154
1878-79
241
135
106
136.89
1879-80
228
121
107
131.87
1880-81
265
148
117
136.95
1881-82
238
131
107
118.73
1882-83
210
131
79
108.03
1883-84
374
224
150
192.53
1884-85
322
175
147
180.54
1885-86
368
187
181
226.21
1886-87
414
209
205
244.93
1887-88
455
21-8
237
246.35
1888-89
490
236
254
229.54
1889-90
576
286
290
294.63
1890-91
682
342
340
372.40
New Westminster.
Year.
Total number of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average daily
attendance.
1872-73
No returns.
1873-74
87
50
37
73
1874-75
65
32
33
37
1S75-76
101
63
38
65
1876-77
121
73
48
67.25
1877-78
132
75
57
90
1878-79
200
102
98
99.03
1879-80
204
115
89
109.53
1880-81
202
116
86
103.63
1881-82
212
131
81
97.29
1882-83
255
150
105
121
1883-84
287
168
119
129.27
1884-85
329
184
145
151.19
1885-86
353
192
161
187.49
1886-87
444
230
214
212.43
1887-88
447
235
212
262.27
1888-89
448
233
215
262.32
1889-90
673
348
325
348.89
1890-91
847
426
421
426.28 190
Public Schools Report.
1891
Vancouver.
Total number
Average
Year.
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
daily
attendance.
1886-87
248
138
110
168.40
1887-88
642
333
309
238.19
1888-89
1024
533
491
537.69
1889-90
1465
720
745
817.84
1890-91
1748
840
908
1011.09
Victoria.
Total number
Average
Year.
of
Boys.
Girls.
daily
pupils enrolled.
attendance.
1872-73
No returns.
1873-74
346
176
170
113.50
1874-75
465
Not given.
Not given
272
1875-76
545
Not given.
Not given
302
1876-77
617
366
251
374
1877-78
734
455
279
450.15
1878-79
726
395
331
398.99
1879-80
790
436
354
398.78
1880-81
720
391
329
410.09
1881-82
765
440
325
433.45
1882-83
770
423
347
414.55
1883-84
1012
579
433
679.65
1884-85
1343
702
641
710.70
1885-86
1427
789
638
807.10
1886-87
1437
794
643
894.29
1887-88
1539
801
738
917.39
1888-89
1623
839
784
996.11
1889-90
1896
995
901
1096.23
1890-91
2100
1088
1012
1284.68
Victoria West.
Total number
Average
Year.
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
daily
attendance.
1888-89
100
53
47
54.42
1889-90
120
67
53
54.81
1890-91
140
78
62
71.40 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
191
Wellington.
Total number
Average
Year.
of
Boys.
Girls.
daily
pupils enrolled.
attendance.
1874-75
34
14
20
24.75
1875-76
46
13
33
23.33
1876-77
53
19
34
23.78
1877-78
44
18
26
38.00
1878-79
50
25
25
29.82
1879-80
79
40
39
37.14
1880-81
89
52
37
42.50
1881-82
123
66
57
52.61
1882-83
146
90
56
73.70
1883-84
156
87
69
55.85
1884-85
142
76
66
73.26
1885-86
135
79
56
77.66
1886-87
151
78
73
79.34
1887-88
179
87
92
75.43
1888-89
227
103
124
100.38
1889-90
283
135
148
127.61
1890-91
234
118
116
113.86
Kamloops.
Total number
Average
Year.
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
daily
attendance.
1887-88
110
61
49
44.27
1888-89
113
70
43
49.92
1889-90
121
75
46
64.39
1890-91
118
70
48
86.29 192
Public Schools Report.
1891
THE FOLLOWING GRADED SCHOOLS WERE IN OPERATION
DURING THE YEAR.
Schools.
Kamloops	
Nanaimo—Boys'	
Do.        Girls'	
New Westminster—Boys'
Do. Girls'
Vancouver—Central	
Do. East	
Do. West	
Do. Mt. Pleasant
Victoria—Boys'	
Do.      Girls'	
Victoria West	
Wellington	
Number
of grades.
Percentage
of regular
attendance.
73.12
60.88
51.16
51.81
54.32
55.59
64.75
52.38
57.12
61.01
64.92
51.00
48.65
In order to secure greater uniformity in the management of Graded Schools, the following
additional regulations have been prescribed by the Council of Public Instruction :—
The Principal shall prepare the Limit Table for each division of his school, and must forward a copy of the same to the Education Department for approval.
Semi-annual written examinations for making promotions shall be held in the different
divisions of each graded school.
The Principal shall prepare the questions for these examinations and shall fix the time of
holding the same, but the promotion lists must be read on the date on which each public examination of the school is held.
As it is not deemed proper to place too great reliance upon a single written examination,
the Principal shall consult the assistant teacher of each division in preparing the promotion
list. The assistant's recommendation, based upon record kept as to progress and standing of
pupils claimed to be worthy of promotion, should be accorded proper consideration.
A copy of all questions set for each promotion examination, together with a statement of
the results of the examination of each division (on blanks supplied by the department for that
purpose), must forthwith be forwarded to the Education Department. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 193
Kamloops.
Principal, E. S. Wood.
Salary, $80 per month.
Assistant, Miss Janet Hepburn until December 31st, 1890 ;
present assistant, Miss J. M. H. Pope.
Salary, $60 per month.
Monitor, Mrs Laura Marshall until Juno 30th, 1891 ;
present monitor, Miss Deborah E. Matthews.
Salary, $35 per month.
Special examination held July 7th and 8th, 1890.
Examined April 13th and 14th, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 118.
Average monthly attendance, 102.
Average actual daily attendance, 86.29.
Expenditure, $2,010.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.03.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $23.29.
At the special examination held in July, 1890, Martha Elizabeth Lauder and John Moore
passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
At the examination held in April, 1891, James Malcolm Palmer achieved a similar
honour.
Report of the Principal.
" Kamloops, July 7th, 1891.
" Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report of the Kamloops Public School
for the year ending June 30th, 1891 : —
" The addition of a monitor in January was a step in the right direction, and has added
greatly to the efficiency of the school, particularly in allowing more time to be devoted to the
advanced classes.
"The grading for past half-year has been as follows : —
" First Division, 4th and 5th Readers.
" Second      ,, Sr. 2nd and 3rd Readers.
" Third ,, 1st and Jr. 2nd Readers.
" For the ensuing term this classification will be continued, except that the Second
Division will have all pupils in 2nd and 3rd Readers.
" During a considerable portion of the year eight pupils have been attending who have
passed the Entrance Examination to a High School, and we have endeavoured to take up most
of the High School work for the first year.
During the year three pupils passed the examination for entrance to a High School;
two received the required percentages for Third Class Teachers' Certificates, and six are now
preparing to write on Second Class B papers at the forthcoming Teachers' Examination.
" Public Examinations were held according to Regulations. They were well attended, and
in every sense satisfactory.
" Honour rolls were awarded as follows :—
" First  Division — Deportment, M. Elizabeth Lauder.
Proficiency, Deborah E. Matthews.
Punctuality, Edith Lauder.
" Second Division—Deportment, John A. Munro.
Proficiency, Edw. A. Brown.
Punctuality, Joseph Goddard.
" Third Division — Deportment, Leopold Unwin.
Proficiency, Bricey Goodfellow.
Punctuality, Fred. Lauder.
" Owing to ill-health, Miss J. Hepburn  resigned  her position  as  teacher of the  Second
Division on December 31st.    Miss J. M. H. Pope was appointed to  the  vacant position, and 194 Public Schools Report. 1891
Mrs. Laura Marshall was appointed teacher of the Third Division, duties to commence January
1st. As both ladies were experienced teachers, they discharged their duties with ability and
success.
" On June 30th, Mrs. Marshall resigned her position and retired from the profession.
" The  school buildings  and premises require some repairs, but as I understand that the
Trustees intend looking after the matter during vacation, details need not be specified here.
" I have, &c,
" E. Stuart Wood,
"■ S. D. /'ope, Esq., LL.D., "Principal.
"Superintendent of Education,  Victoria''
Nanaimo.
Boys' School.
Principal, John Shaw ; salary, $90 per month.
1st Assistant, James A. Galloway ; salary, $65 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Lucy A. Mebius until September 30th, 1890 ; present 2nd Assistant,
Miss Flora E. Hartt; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 2nd and 3rd, 1890.
June 2nd and 3rd, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 231.
Average monthly attendance, 174.
Average actual daily attendance, 140.65.
At the  Christmas  Examination,   1890,  the  following passed the standard required- for
admission to a High School:—
John Thomas Lukey,
John Andrew Fraser,
George Francis May,
Howard Wilson Musgrave.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1891, Joseph  Hardy obtained the percentage  required
for admission to a High School.
Report of the Principal.
"Nanaimo, June 26th, 1891.
" Sir,—Herewith find annual report of the Nanaimo Boys' Public School for the year
ending June 30th, 1891.
" The rapid growth of the city has had the effect of crowding the school to its fullest
capacity, but I understand we are to have more accommodation and assistance after the
vacation. The number of pupils enrolled is 324, viz., 1st Division, 53; 2nd Division, 78 ;
3rd Division, 100, and *4th Division, 93 (including as many girls).
" Last August we had another teacher added to the staff, taking the position of Third
Assistant for both boys and girls, but even with this assistance (190 names being enrolled
in 4th Division) we are in a more crowded condition than we then were.
" The promotions, as you will see in the other reports, are very much greater than those of
last year, with the exception (I am sorry to say) of the 1st Division, which has been rather
unfortunate. However, regardless of the result of the examination, I am perfectly satisfied
that the progress of this division has been equal to that made in any other term.
" I cannot close this report without referring to the kindness of the parents and friends of
the pupils for their liberal donations, and especially of Mr. S. M. Robins, of the V. C. Co., who
donated over $50 for prizes at the Christmas Examinations.
" Respectfully yours,
"J. Shaw,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., "Principal.
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria."
*    Included in Girls' School. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 191:
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss Abbie F. Gardiner, until December 31st,  1891 ;   present Principal,   Miss
Maria Lawson.
Salary, $70 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss Maria Bryant until September 30th, 1890 ; present 1st Assistant, Miss
Lucy A. Mebius ; salary, $55 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Isabel Brown ; salary, $50 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Mary P. Haarer ; salary, $50 per month.
Examined December 2nd and 3rd, 1890.
June 2nd and 3rd, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 414.
Average monthly attendance, 281.
Average actual daily attendance, 211.81.
At the  Christmas Examination,   1890,  the  following  passed  the  standard  required  for
admission to a High School: —
Sarah Ferguson Muir,
May Woodman,
Margaret Fraser.
At the Midsummer Examination,  1891, the  following obtained  the percentage  required
for admission to a High School : —
Mary Jane Wall,
Maud Charman.
Report of the Principal.
" Nanaimo, June 27th, 1891.
" Sir,—I beg leave to submit the following annual report of the Nanaimo Girls' Public
School :—
" During the year just completed the pupils have done the best work that they were
capable of, and the results have been quite satisfactory. The promotions in all the classes,
with the exception of the 1st division, have exceeded those of previous years. The teachers
have all shown themselves capable of performing earnest work, and I may make special mention
of Miss Haarer of the 4th division, who, with 190 pupils, succeeded in promoting the greatest
number of all. A larger room than the Principal's is much needed in which to hold the public
examinations. So many visitors have come of late to witness the closing exercises at the
school, that there is no room for the pupils after we have accommodated their parents and
friends. Some kind of building is also necessary for the children to play in during the wet
weather. One building might therefore be made to serve the double purpose of assembly room
and play house.
" During the present vacation the trustees will, I trust, attend to everything in the school
which requires their attention.
" Thanking you for kindness shown to us during the past year,
" I am, <fec,
" Abbie F. Gardiner,
" Principal Girls' School.
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D.,
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria."
Nanaimo Schools.
High School, Boys' School, Girls' School.
Teachers, 8.
Enrolled during the year, 682.
Average monthly attendance, 481.
Average actual daily attendance, 372.40.
Expenditure, $6,892.12.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $10.10.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $18.50. There was an increase of 106 in enrolment during the past year, and the average actual
daily attendance increased during the same period from 294.63 to 372.40.
At the beginning of the present school-year, the attendance at the Boys' School and the
Girls' School was so large that it was found necessary to establish two Ward Schools in the
city. At the present time there is urgent need of a still further increase of the teaching staff,
and it is to be hoped that the required accommodation will be provided at an early date.
The number of teachers at present employed is eleven.
The schools are in good working order, and as evidence that they are duly appreciated, it
is proper to state that the visits made to the schools during the past year by trustees and
parents increased from 894 in 1889-90 to 1,641 in 1890-91.
New   Westminster.
Boys' School.
Principal, William C. Coatham ; salary, $90 per month.
1st Assistant, George W. McRae until October 31st, 1890 ; present 1st Assistant, Robert
G. Gordon ; salary, $65 per month.
Supplementary Assistant, Miss Janet I. Miller, from March 24th, 1891, to June 30th,
1891 ; salary, $50 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Melrose Dockrill until June 30th, 1891 ; present 2nd Assistant,
Frank E. Morrison ; salary, $50 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Mary S. Homer until June 30th, 1891 ; present 3rd Assistant, Miss
Melrose Dockrill ; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 2nd and 3rd, 1890.
June 2nd and 3rd, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 375.
Average monthly attendance, 294.
Average actual daily attendance, 194.31.
At the Christmas Examination, 1890, the following passed the standard required for
entrance to a High School :—
George Duncan Turner,
Oliver H. P. Rogers,
William Nelson Oarty,
Thomas John Rankin,
Robert Brown Bell,
Frederic Tremaine Hill,
Hallie Bruce Tingley.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1891, the following obtained the percentage required
for admission to a High School :—
George Nash,
William G. E. McQuarrie,
Melvin Keville Dickinson,
Charles Reginald Bourne,
Charles Lawrence Thornber,
John Hutcheson McKeen.
Report of the Principal.
"New Westminster, July 4th, 1891.
" Sir,—The following is the report of the New Westminster Boys' School for the year
ending June 30th, 1891 :—
" The number of visitors at the school was large compared with that of other years, and
the deep interest displayed by all shows that the progress of our schools is closely watched.
We regret to state that few of our trustees found time to make calls at the Central School,
perhaps owing to duties elsewhere, and also that the visits of the Superintendent and Inspector
were few—too few and too short to produce a good effect upon teachers and pupils. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 197
" For some time during the year the three highest divisions of this school were overcrowded, preventing the attainment of better results. They were relieved at the end of March
by a new division, which, having no more suitable accommodation, occupied a room in the old
high school building, which proved far too small to accommodate a class of over fifty pupils.
Most of the work done by my assistants was quite satisfactory, and that of the first Assistant
calls for special mention.
" A careful study of the progress of the schools leads me to conclude that the City Board
should engage only experienced teachers of the higher grades, and that preference should
always be given those teachers of normal training.
" Owing to the sexes being separated in all but the infant class, until lately three teachers
have covered the remaining limit, and that with large classes. Much better work could certainly have been done had the limit been half as much, and both sexes in the same room.
Until another Assistant at least is placed in the Boys' School, we cannot hope for excellent
work.    If a Principal is to perform all his duties well he must have but one class.
" During the last school-year thirteen pupils were promoted to the High School from my
division, and a special examination will be asked for those too ill to attend the one held at
Midsummer.     One of the pupils secured the Governor-General's Medal.
" My report would not be complete without mention of the small and irregular attendance
of the pupils during May and June, owing to the measles and other illnesses, which certainly
affected the promotion results.
" I am of the opinion that a small fund should be at the disposal of the Principals of City
Schools for the purpose of defraying the expense of printing promotion examination papers,
limit tables, and for meeting similar school expenses worthy of mention.
" 1 remain, Ac,
" W. C. Coatham,
" Principal Boys' Sc/tool.
" S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D.,
•' Superintendent of Education."
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss Ellen Rogers.
Salary, $70 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss Mary L. R. Walker.
Salary, $55 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Blanche Millard.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 2nd and 3rd, 1890.
June 2nd and 3rd, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 171.
Average monthly attendance, 120.
Average actual daily attendance, 92.98.
At the  Christmas Examination, 1890, the following passed  the  standard  required for
admission to a High School:—
Lillian May Parker,
Gertrude Mary Fales,
Fannie A. M. Mead,
Grace Ada Scott,
Ethel Sophia Cunningham.
At the Midsummer Examination,  1891, the following obtained the percentage required
for admission to a High School:—
Jennie Fraser,
Elsie May Smith. 198 Public Schools Report. 1891
Report of the Principal.
" New Westminster, June 25th, 1891.
"Sir,— I  have  the honour to submit to you the annual report of the New Westminster
Girls' School.
" At Easter an additional teacher was added to the Central School, and a re-distribution
of classes was made throughout all the rooms. At that time several promotions were made
in order that the number of pupils in each room might be as nearly equal as possible. Owing
to this, and to the fact that the measles were extremely prevalent in the city during May and
June the number of promotions at midsummer was unusually small.
"During the year seven pupils were promoted to the High School. At the regular semiannual promotion examinations, thirteen pupils were promoted from the 1st assistant's to the
principal's division, ten from the second assistant's division to that of the 1st assistant, and
twenty-nine girls and twenty boys from the 3rd assistant's division to the next higher division.
"At different times during the year the attendance has been much lessened by the
prevalence of scarlet rash, chicken-pox, and measles among the pupils. Notwithstanding the
disadvantages under which the assistants have thus laboured, they have all done excellent work.
" I have, &c,
" Ellen Rogers,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., "Principal, New Westminster Girls' School.
" Superintendent of Education."
Sapperton.
Teacher,  Norton Strople.
Salary, $50 per month.
Monitor, Miss Gertrude McBride, until June 30th, 1891.
Salary, $35 per month.
Present Assistant, Miss Janet I. Miller.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 13th, 1890; present, 23 boys, 14 girls; total, 37.
September 5th, 1890 ; present, 28 boys, 16 girls; total, 44.
October 23rd, 1890; present, 26 boys, 14 girls; total, 40.
April 17th, 1891 ; present, 38 boys, 23 girls; total, 61.
Enrolled during the year, 103.
Average monthly attendance, 74.
Average actual daily attendance, 49.72.
Westside.
Teacher, Miss  Mary E. Ourrie,  until March  22nd, 1891; present teacher, Miss Nettie
Dockrill.
Salary, $50 per month.
Monitor, Mrs. A. C. McDonald.
Salary, $35 per month.
Inspected, August 13th, 1890; present, 8 boys, 16 girls; total, 24.
September 5th, 1890; present, 25 boys, 30 girls; total, 55.
October 23rd, 1890; present, 21 boys, 26 girls; total, 47.
April 17th, 1891 ; present, 31 boys, 31 girls; total, 62.
Enrolled during the year, 147.
Average monthly attendance, 80.
Average actual daily attendance, 61.86. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 199
New Westminster Schools.
High School, Boys' School, Girls' School, Sapperton School, and Westside School.
Teachers, 11 ; monitors, 2.
Enrolled during the year, 847.
Average monthly attendance, 603.
Average actual daily attendance, 426.28.
Expenditure, $9,485.55.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $11.19.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $22.25.
As compared with the record of the previous year, there was a marked increase in
both enrolment and average daily attendance during the past year.
Owing to the large attendance at the High School during the present year it was found
necessary to provide an assistant teacher. Mr. R. Law, B. A., received the appointment, and
commenced his duties in November, 1891.
The fine and commodious brick building, erected during the present school-year, now
affords ample accommodation for the High School and Girls' School, thus leaving the Central
Building to be occupied by the Boys' School only.
During the past year a school building containihg four rooms was erected on an eligible
site in Sapperton. The school at present consists of two divisions, in charge of a teacher and
an assistant.
The only additional accommodation at present required is for Westside School.
The staff of teachers at the present time numbers sixteen.
The discipline and management of the schools are, and have been very satisfactory, and
the usual good results may be confidently looked for at the close of the present school-year.
Vancouver.
Central School.
Principal, Alexander Robinson, B. A.,  until  June  30th, 1891 ;  present principal,   F. M.
Cowperthwaite, B. A.; salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant,   F.   M.   Cowperthwaite   until  June   30th,   1891 ;   present 1st Assistant,
Gregory H. Tom ; salary, $80 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Margaret Hartney until June   30th,   1891 ;  present  2nd  Assistant,
Robert Fraser ; salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Isabella M. Rutherford ; salary, $60 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Margaret J  Murchie ; salary, $55 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Emma Hay until Febrnary 28th, 1891 ; Miss Margaret M.  Harding
until June 30th, 1891 ; present 5th Asssistant, Miss Margaret Hartney ; salary, $50 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Margaret M. Harding until  February  28th, 1891 ; Miss  Marion B.
Johnstone until June 30th, 1891 ;  present 6th Assistant, Miss Margaret M. Harding;  salary,
$50 per month.
Examined December 2nd and 3rd, 1890.
June 2nd and 3rd, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 547.
Average monthly attendance,  390.
Average actual daily attendance, 304.13.
At the Christmas  Examination,   1890,   the following  passed the  standard   required for
entrance to a High School:—
William Andrew Short,
Annette Mahala Creighton,
John William Gibb,
Percy Charleson,
Ethel Catherine McElmon,
Evelyn May Frank,
Edwin Harvey,
Mary Theresa Pyatt,
Minnie Catherine Hambrook,
William Harold Brown,
Mary Elizabeth Dinsmore. 200 Public Schools Report. 1891
At the Midsummer Examination, 1891,  the following  obtained  the percentage  require
for admission to a High School :—
Francis Emory Shook,
Percy Henry De Pencier,
Florence Mary Southcott,
Alice Hay,
Walter Bourse,
Florence Selina Cameron,
Max Macgowan,
Mary McKinnon,
Marguerite Stuart Agnew,
Mary Ellen Ward,
Douglas Creighton,
Willena Naomi Barnes,
Louise Harwood Bodwell,
Roval Waldo Brown.
Report of the Principal.
" Vancouver, Sept. 28th, 1891.
"Sir,— I  have the honour to  submit the report of the Vancouver Central Public Schoo
for the year ending June 30th, 1891.
" An earnest desire to promote the advancement of the pupils was noticeable in the work
of all the teachers, and any cases of failure that may have occurred in the teaching of the
particular branches are to be ascribed rathei to inexperience than to a lack of enthusiasm. A
Provincial Normal School is urgently required. As matters stand at present, to place over
divisions containing 75 pupils and upwards, young teachers fresh from our High Schools,
whose knowledge of method has been acquired by the reading of some text-book on the subject,
is manifestly unfair both to the pupils and teachers themselves.
" Permit me again to call your attention to the subject of admitting children to our
primary division. It is impossible for our primary teachers to do good work when children
who have never before attended school are allowed to enter at any period during the term. A
specified time, say three weeks in August and January respectively, should be allowed parents
for presenting their children for entrance to this division, and upon the expiration of this
period no more pupils should be enrolled. This applies, of course, only to one division, since it
would be manifestly unfair to exclude pupils who have previously attended school.
" In closing, allow me to suggest the following changes :—
" 1. That in our cities, the school hours throughout the year be from 9 a. m. to 12 m.,
with the ordinary recess ; and from 1:30 p. m. to 3:30 p. m. without any recess.
" 2. That semi-annual instead of annual reports be made by each teacher to the
Education Department.
" 3. That a City Superintendent be appointed for Vancouver, whose duties shall be to
grade, twice in the year, each division in the city, consult with the trustees as to the
appointment of each teacher on the city staff, and have the supervision generally of our city
Schools.
" I have, &c,
" Alex. Robinsok,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., " Principal, Central School.
" Superintendent of Education."
East School.
Principal, James B. Ganton ; Salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss Alice Christie until June 30th,  1891 ;   present 1st  Assistant,  John
McMillan, B.A. ; salary, $70 per month.
2nd Assistant, James J. Dougan; salary, $65 per month.
3rd*Assistant, Miss Catherine A. Barnes ; salary, $60 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Bessie Johnston ; salary, $55 per month. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 201
5th Assistant, Miss Minna G.  McKay  until  June  30th,   1891 ;   present  5th Assistant,
Miss Marie L. Fletcher ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 14th, 1890;
September 4th, 1890 ;
October 22nd, 1890 ;
December 5th, 1890 ;
April 9th, 1891.
Examined, June 2nd and 3rd, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 512.
Average monthly attendance, 425.
Average actual daily attendance, 331.55.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1891, Isabel A. McLean passed  the  standard  required
for admission to a High School.
Report of the Principal.
"Vancouver, August 15th, 1891.
" Sir,—I beg leave to submit the following report of Vancouver East School for the year
1890-91 :—
" In the first part of the year, the accommodation was insufficient, but in March, a fine
eight-roomed brick building was completed. At the same time, an addition of two teachers
was made to the staff, and the standing of the school raised to that of the Central School.
The entire block surrounding the school was also secured for play-ground. This, when cleared,
will give an opportunity for physical development which was lacking in the old quarters.
" Owing to the illness of .the First Assistant, the second division was for a large part of the
year in the hands of frequently changed substitutes. This and lack of accommodation in the
early part of the year retarded progress, but, due allowance for these being made, satisfactory
results were obtained.
" I regret to say that Miss Christie's health forced her to resign at the close of the year,
and we lost the services of the oldest as well as one of the most efficient teachers on the staff.
" The addition of a seventh teacher would relieve some of the lower divisions, which have
again become overcrowded.
" I have, &c.j
"J. B. Ganton,
" Principal East School,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D.,
" Superintendent of Education, Victoria."
West   School.
Vice-Principal, Thomas A. McGarrigle, B.A. ; salary, $85 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss Mary  L.   Harding  until  June  30th,   1891 ;   present  1st Assistant,
Robert Sparling; salary, $65 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Frances E. Cox until June 30th, 1891 ; present 2nd  Assistant,  Miss
Mary L. Harding; salary, $50 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Lena M. Ferguson; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 14th, 1890;
September 3rd, 1890 ;
October 21st, 1890 ;
December 5th, 1890;
April 10th, 1891 ;
June 1st, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 391.
Average monthly attendance, 260.
Average actual daily attendance, 204.81. 202 Public Schools Report. 1891
Mount Pleasant School.
Vice-Principal, Miss Archena J. McDougall ; salary, $85 per month.
1st Assistant, George W. Jamieson ; salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Emily 0. Agnew ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 14th, 1890 ;
September 3rd, 1890;
October 21st, 1890 ;
December 5th, 1890;
April 9th, 1891 ;
June 1st, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 256.
Average monthly attendance, 184.
Average actual daily attendance, 146.24.
Vancouver Schools.
High School, Central School, East School, West School, Mount Pleasant School.
Teachers, 21.
Enrolled during the year, 1,748.
Average monthly attendance, 1,285.
Average actual daily attendance, 1,011.09.
Expenditure, $18,280.77.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $10.45.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $18.08.
There was an increase in enrolment of 283 over that of the previous year, and the average
actual daily attendance increased 193.15 during the same period.
On July 31st, 1891, Mr. R. Law, B.A., resigned the position of Principal of the High
School, and Mr. Alexander Robinson, B.A., was appointed to succeed him.
At the beginning of the present school-year, owing to the largely increased attendance at
this School, Mr. J. H. Secord, B.A., received the appointment of Assistant Teacher. The
prospects are that additional accommodation for the school will be needed in the near future.
The Central and East Schools are now each in charge of a staff of eight teachers.
The attendance at West School has become so large as to necessitate the renting of a
room for the accommodation of a fifth division. A commodious building is much needed for
this school.
The time is fast approaching when it will be necessary to raise the standard of West and
Mount Pleasant Schools to enable pupils to pass directly from them to the High School.
At the present time the staff of teachers of this city numbers twenty-seven.
The past record of the schools has been very creditable, and there is every indication that
the work of the present year will even show improvement on that of the previous year.
Victoria.
Boys' School.
Principal, Stephen B. Netherby; salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant, John F. Smith ; salary, $80 per month.
2nd Assistant, Angus B. McNeil; salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Edward F. Doran ; salary, $60 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Elizabeth E. Sylvester ; salary, $60 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Flora C. Fraser until December 31st, 1890; present 5th Assistant,
Miss Gertrude H. Withrow ; salary, $50 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Gertrude H. Withrow until December 31st, 1890; present 6th
Assistant, Miss Sarah Kermode ; salary $50 per month.
7th Assistant, Miss Sarah Kermode until December 31st, 1890; present 7th Assistant,
Miss Grace H. Fawcett; salary, $50 per month. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 203
Examined, December 2nd and 3rd, 1890 ;
June 2nd and 3rd, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 666.
Average monthly attendance, 490.
Average actual daily attendance, 406.35.
At the Christmas Examination, 1890, the following obtained the percentage necessary for
admission to a High School:—
Henry Procter,
Thomas R. Futcher,
Percy W. Marchant,
Percy Dunkerley,
Alexander Cooke,
Henry R. Jorand,
George Henry Jesse,
John Gill,
Henry Heisterman,
Edward R. Vigor,
Frank Pen will,
Arthur D. Hardie,
Sewell Prescot Moody.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1891, the  following  passed  the  standard   required  for
admission to a High School :—
Robert Cameron,
Walter E. Adams,
Joseph Kirchberg,
Walter F. Askew,
Douglas C. Tuck,
Ronald K. Finlaison,
William A. Butler,
Charles H. Waller,
Hugh A. Holmes,
Frederick George,
Cecil Trimen,
Walter W. Wolfenden,
Kenneth A. Finlayson,
James Byrn,
George W. Andrews,
Christopher Becker,
John Cartmel.
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, July 10th, 1891.
"Sir,—In submitting my report for the school-year ending 30th June, 1891, I am
happy to be able to bear testimony to a fair degree of prosperity in the educational interests of
this city.
"There has been a steady increase in the attendance during the year just ended.
" A marked degree of good feeling and co-operation among the teachers under my supervision has prevailed.
" No case of wanton disobedience on the part of any pupil has been brought to my notice.
" The teachers have worked hard in the interests of their pupils, and the examinations
just over show that they have been remarkably successful.
" Large numbers of parents and others interested in the cause of education attended the
examinations at the end of each term.
" The Superintendent and Inspector have watched the working of the school very closely,
and in many ways have aided the teacher in his arduous labours. " The pupils were presented with many prizes at the closing exercises, for which we thank
the donors.
" A small number of cases of truancy, from some of the lower forms, has been reported,
but I think on the whole truancy, as well as irregularity, is decreasing. Permit me to state
that much of this irregular attendance arises from real or supposed necessity for keeping
children at home to aid their parents at certain seasons of the year. A great deal may be
accomplished by the teacher to do away with irregular attendance. If he takes careful note of
any pupil's absence, finds out the cause, or, if necessary, visits the parents, he will do a great
deal to counteract irregularity. The real efficiency of any system of public instruction, as well
as the prosperity of those great interests, which can safely rest only on the intelligence and good
moral habits of the people, must depend mainly on the teachers. If it be desired to elevate
the teaching profession to its true position means must be provided for training young persons
to enter upon the work with a full knowledge of its duties.
"' Parrotage,' blind and feeble, is fast passing into the dark shades of oblivion and
extinction. The intellectual system is winning the widening way to universal sovereignty.
The knowledge of the pupils is made to pass through the judgment into the memory ; hence
their acquisitions are substantial and enduring. The methods of instruction are such, in
general, in our school as to ensure the attention of the whole class ; therefore the invaluable
habit of concentrating the mind to reason connectedly is formed, and the giant evil, inattention,
is abolished.
" Permit me to remark that I consider the establishment of a school library an indispensable
adjunct of our system of elementary education. If ' reading makes a full man,' the necessity
of books to read becomes apparent.
"Among young teachers the great lack is general culture. To gain the requisite knowledge to enable them to pass the examination for certificates occupies some years of their time,
so that after the legal qualification has been obtained their information needs to be supplemented
before they are properly equipped to discharge efficiently and well their important and
responsible duties.
" The best agencies to supply this want are school libraries, which not only aid the teacher
and enlarge the views of the pupils, but diffuse intelligence among the people generally. Can
not something be done in the near future towards the establishment of a school library in this
city?
" In conclusion, I cannot refrain from expressing the great satisfaction I have always
experienced from the cordial co-operation of the Education Department, teachers, trustees, and
all other friends of education in endeavouring to advance the educational interests of this
beautiful city.
" I have, &c,
" S. B. Netherby,
" Principal.
" S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D.,
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria."
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss Frances E. Armstrong ; salary, $80 per month.
1st Assistant, Mrs. L. M. Caldwell; salary, $70 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Mary Williams; salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss Ada Keast; salary, $60 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss Elinor M. Carmichael; salary, $55 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss Sarah A. Robinson; salary, $50 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss Annie J. Monro; salary, $50 per month.
7th Assistant, Miss Alexa Russell; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 2nd and 3rd, 1890.
June 2nd and 3rd, 1891. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 205
Enrolled during the year, 583.
Average monthly attendance, 440.
Average actual daily attendance, 378.48.
At the  Christmas  Examination, 1890, the following  passed  the  standard  required for
admission to a High School :—
Annie McDowell,
Catherine Munroe,
Annie Godding Jones,
Prances Anne Brown,
Edith Mary Shrapnel,
Mabel Agnes Gaudin,
Ethel Julia Crockford,
Edith Madeline Dalby,
Mary Lucy Porter,
Josephine Colquhoun,
Mabel Mary Wolfenden,
Gertrude May Bucket,
Olive Askew,
Mary Elsie Elford,
Isabella Milne,
Violet Lilian Luker,
Julia Louise Johnston.
At the Midsummer Examination; 1891, the following obtained   the percentage necessary
for admission to a High School :—
Edna Almira Rugg,
Ethel Maud Johnston,
Katharine Bertha Schwengers,
Janet Sinclair,
Eva Isabel Miller.
Mary May Creech,
Eleanor Alice Kettle,
Ethelyn Viola Humphreys,
Christina Grace Hall,
Alice M. V. Askew,
Jessie Maud Mallett,
Susan Elizabeth Spring,
Minnie Eleanor Nicholas,
Eva Eleanor Harrap.
Report of the Principal.
" Victoria, July 4th, 1891.
" Sir,—i oeg to submit the following report of the Girls' School, for 1890-91 :—
"Since the opening of the school-year an Eighth Grade has been formed, with very
beneficial results.
" A handsome lot of prizes was kindly donated to the school by His Honour Lieutenant-
Governor Nelson, to be awarded at the Christmas closing. His Honour and Mrs. Nelson were
pleased to attend the examination and present the prizes, thus adding special interest to the
occasion.
" The written examinations held in December and June throughout the school were very
satisfactory, as evinced by the number of pupils promoted from the various grades. During
the year satisfactory progress has been made in the various branches of study in all the divisions
of our school. 206 Public Schools Report. i<S91
" I think, Sir, we should pay more attention to Vocal Music than we do at present. I
believe it is admitted the world over there is no more elevating or refining influence than
music. This being so, I consider we should make a strong effort to have vocal music taught
in all our schools. The Tonic-Sol-Fa system specially recommends itself for our schools, on
account of its simplicity, and I think it should be taught by a special teacher.
" We are very much in need of a large assembly hall where all the pupils could meet for
any special exercises, and particularly for our closing examinations. I think the happy results
attained would amply justify the comparatively small expense of such a building.
" We beg to thank all kind friends who donated prizes at Christmas, or Midsummer.
" We beg also to thank the Education Department and Board of Trustees for their kindness in promptly sending all necessary supplies for the school.
" I have, <fcc,
"Frances E. Armstrong,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., "Principal.
" Superintendent of Education."
James Bay Ward School.
Teacher, Miss Julia M. Bradley.
Salary, $70 per month.
Monitor, Miss Christina T. Lorimer.
Salary, $35 per month.
Examined, December 5th, 1890;
June 16th, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 195.
Average monthly attendance, 142.
Average actual daily attendance, 121.81.
Hillside Ward School.
Teacher, Miss Frances E. Arrowsmith ; salary, $70 per month.
Monitor, Miss Orvilla Northcott until December 31st, 1890 ; present Monitor, Miss Isabel
M. F Barron ; salary, $35 per month.
Examined, December 5th, 1090 ;
June 16th, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 201.
Average monthly attendance, 140.
Average actual daily attendance, 115.06.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1890, Mabel Amanda Witmer, a pupil of this school,
having obtained second rank at the competitive examination between the pupils of all the
Ward Schools, won the prize semi-annually donated by H. F. Heisterman, Esq., of this City.
Rock Bay Ward School.
Teacher, Miss Lucretia Horton; salary, $70 per month.
;      Monitor, Miss Isabel R. Christie; salary, $35 per month.
Examined, December 5th, 1890;
June 16th, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 137.   \
Average monthly attendance, 90.
Average actual daily attendance, 72.24.
At the Christmas Examination, 1890, William Peddle, a pupil of this school, having
attained second rank at the competitive examination between all the pupils of the Ward
Schools, won the prize semi-annually donated by H. F. Heisterman, Esq., of this City. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 207
Spring Ridge Ward School.
Teacher, Miss Lizzie A. Barron ; salary, $70 per month.
Monitor, Miss Grace H. Fawcett until December 31st, 1890 ; present Monitor, Miss Orvilla
Northcott.
Examined, December 5th, 1890 ;
June 16th, 1891.
Enrolled during the year, 192.
Average monthly attendance, 131.
Average actual daily attendance, 108.07.
At the Christmas Examination, 1890, John Myrdal, a pupil of this school, having attained
first rank at competitive examination of all the pupils of the Ward Schools, won the prize
semi-annually donated by the Hon. Mr. Robson, Minister of Education.
At the Midsummer Examination, 1891, Regina Elizabeth Behnsen, a pupil of this school,
achieved a similar honour.
Victoria Schools.
High School, Boys' School, Girls' School, James Bay Ward School, Hillside Ward  School,
Rock Bay Ward School, and Spring Ridge Ward School.
Teachers, 23 ; monitors, 4.
Enrolled during the year, 2,100.
Average monthly attendance, 1,526.
Average actual daily attendance, 1,284.68.
Expenditure, $23,112.87.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $11.00.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $17.99.
It is noteworthy that while the increase in enrolment was 204 over that for the previous
year, the increase in average actual daily attendance for the same period was 188.45.
On February 28th, 1891, Mr. H. Goward, M.A., resigned his position as First Assistant
in the High School, and Mr. R. Offerhaus received appointment as his successor.
The present attendance at this school renders the appointment of a Third Assistant
teacher necessary as soon as proper accommodation has been provided.
Early in the present school-year, owing to the largely increased attendance in the Fourth
and Eighth Divisions of the Boys' School, it was found necessary to appoint monitors to assist
the teachers of these divisions.
Additions have been made, during the present school-year, to James Bay, Hillside, and
Spring Ridge Ward School Buildings. Each of these schools is now in charge of a teacher and
two monitors.
An addition has recently been made to Victoria West Graded School, and the staff of
teachers increased by the appointment of a Second Assistant and a Monitor.
As stated in last annual School Report, a Graded School is urgently needed in the James
Bay portion of the city. This school would not only properly meet the wants of the locality,
but would greatly relieve the present overcrowded state of the Central School.
The number of Teachers, including Monitors, at present employed is thirty-six.
The schools, on the whole, are in an efficient condition, and are a credit to the teachers
and to the city.
Victoria West.
Principal, Thomas Nicholson; salary, $80 per month.
Assistant, Joseph F. Sallaway ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 15th, 1890; present, 44 boys, 31 girls; total 75.
October 17th, 1890 ; present, 43 boys, 31 girls; total 74.
November 14th, 1890 ; present, 39 boys, 31 girls ; total 70.
May 13th, 1891 ; present, 36 boys, 30 girls ; total 66.
Visited, December 19th, 1890 ;
June 26th, 1891. 208 Public Schools Report. i89l
Enrolled during the year, 140.
Average monthly attendance, 90.
Average actual daily attendance, 71.40.
Expenditure, $1,680.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.00.
Cest of each pupil on average attendance, $23.52.
At the semi-annual examination held in Victoria, December 2nd and 3rd, 1890, Master
James Berry and Miss Louisa Anne Nicholson, pupils of this school, passed the standard
required for admission to a High School.
In 1891, the limits of the City of Victoria were extended, and this district being included,
the school was placed under the control of the Trustees of the City.
The school is now under the charge of a Principal, two Assistants, and a Monitor.
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria West School, July 14th, 1891.
" Sir,—I beg leave to present my report of the Victoria West School, for the year ending
June 30th, 1891.
"In consequence of the rapid growth of this district and the large increase in the number
of children of school age, it will be found necessary, in order to accommodate the pupils seeking
admission, to add one or more rooms to the building. The Government, no doubt anticipating
a large increase in the school population of the district during the next school-year, made
provision in the estimates for two additional teachers.
" During the past year the limits of Victoria City were extended so as to include Victoria
West.     Our school will in consequence be changed from a district to a city school.
" Instruction in Vocal Music and Drawing has been given regularly and systematically
throughout the school by my assistant, Mr. Sallaway, and the results have been very satisfactory.
" The fund for incidental expenses at the disposal of the Trustees was not sufficient to
enable them to offer salary sufficient to induce any competent person residing in the district
to accept the position of janitor. The school-rooms, therefore, were not kept as clean and tidy
as desirable.
" To say the least, a great deal of inconvenience was felt all through the year in not having
a supply of water. I trust, however, that the city trustees will, with as little delay as possible,
remedy this.
" I have, &c,
"Thomas Nicholson,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., Principal.
"Superintendent of Education."
Wellington.
Principal, John L. McKay.
Salary, $80 per month.
1st Assistant, Miss Jennie Ramsay.
Salary, $55 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss Sarah Ramsay.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, August 11th, 1890 ; present, 42 boys, 45 girls; total, 87.
April 7th, 1891 ; present, 51 boys, 53 girls; total, 104.
Enrolled during the year, 234.
Average monthly attendance, 162.
Average actual daily attendance, 113.86.
Expenditure, $2,167.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $9.26.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $19.03. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 209
Report of the Principal
"Wellington, August 17th, 1891.
" Sir,— I beg to submit the following report of the Wellington Public School for the
year ending June 30th, 1891 :—
" During the first three months of the year school was held in the old building, and on
November 10th the new building was opened and a second assistant appointed.
"The attendance, compared with last year, shows a decrease, but now that the strike in
the mines is practically ended, we expect the attendance will soon be as large as usual. The
change of population caused by this strike has been a serious drawback in the classification of
the school.
" The school grounds are much in need of improvements. They require grading and
fencing.    A well is also needed.
" The breaking out of diphtheria in the district, which necessitated the closing of school
on April 10th, was deeply regretted by all, as it proved fatal in several cases.
" I have, &c,
"J. L. McKay,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., LL.D., "Principal.
"Superintendent of Education,   Victoria."
This school was closed during part of April and during May and June, 1891, owing to
the prevalence of an epidemic.
The opening of a school at Northfield has very materially relieved this school of its
formerly over-crowded attendance. 210
Public Schools Report.
1891
C.
Special Reports on Rural Schools.
Agassiz.
Teacher,    William    McCuaig,    until   June    30th,   1891 ;   present   teacher,   Miss    Mary
Wintemute ; salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 9 girls ; total 20.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.11.
Expenditure, $290.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $14.50.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $23.94.
The school in this new district was opened in February, 1891, and during each of the
remaining months of the school-year maintained more than the required average daily
attendance.
Alberni.
0 per month.
30th,   1891 ; present Monitor, Miss Edith S. DeBou;
Teacher, John Howitt ; salary, $
Monitor, J. S. Jolly,  until  June
salary, $35 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 32 boys, 23 girls ; total 55.
Average monthly attendance, 33.
Average actual daily attendance, 25.53.
Expenditure, $990.75.
There are two schools in this district, Alberni and Beaver Creek, under the charge of
a Teacher and a Monitor, respectively.
The Beaver Creek School was not re-opened until October 7th, 1890, the Trustees not
being able to secure the services of a Monitor at an earlier date.
It would certainly be in the interest of education to divide this large district as soon as
the requisite number of children of school age, resident in the Beaver Creek portion, is
available.
The following is a list of enrolment average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
1886-87 	
41
47
47
51
55
12.02
21. IS
22.57
24.66
25.53
$13 99
24 85
20 00
20 78
18 01
$47 74
1887-88	
37 55
1888-89	
41 64
1889-90	
42 98
1890-91 	
38 80 55 Vict'.
Public Schools Report.
211
Aldergrove.
Teacher, Miss  Martha  McDowell, until June 30th,   1891 ;  present   teacher,  Samuel   G.
Johnston ; salary, $50 per month.
Visited, September 19th, 1890 ; School closed on account of sickness.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 20 girls ; total, 39.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.50.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average  attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
1886-87 	
21
23
31
31
39
15.27
9.98
12.11
13.50
13.50
$ 5 34
25 02
20 64
20 64
16 41
$ 7 35
1887-88 	
57 66
1888-89 	
52 84
1889-90 	
47 40
1890-91    	
47 40
Ashcroft.
Teacher, Miss Sara O. King; salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 14 girls ; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.16.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each  pupil  since  the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
1886-87 	
16
20
11
24
26
9.78
12.06
5.37
14.31
14.16
$30 00
38 00
16 36
29 16
29 23
$49 08
1887-88	
63 01
1888-89	
33 51
1889-90 	
48 91
1890-91 	
53 67 212
Public Schools Report.
iS9l
Barkerville.
Teacher, William H. Phelps; salary, $100 per month.
No Inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 8 girls ; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.07.
Expenditure, $1,420.
It is noticeable that the percentage of average attendance was nearly 85—the best record,
in this respect, made by the school for many years.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
27
31
32
30
28
29
33
26
Average
attendance.
19.55
22.50
22.47
22.92
22.14
20.70
22.44
22.07
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$45 18
38 54
44 37
46 76
50 71
48 96
43 03
54 61
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
$62 40
53 11
63 20
61 21
64 13
68 59
63 28
64 34
Beaver Point.
Teacher, Robert Watkin ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 19th, 1891 ; present, 9 boys 8 girls ; total 17.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 8 girls;  total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.61.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of  each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
1885-86	
24
25
26
24
14
18
1886-87	
1887-88 	
1888-89 	
1889-90 	
1890-91 	
Average
attendance.
18.58
16.06
14.95
13.26
11.23
13.61
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$21 04
25 60
24 61
26 66
45 71
35 55
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
127 18
39 85
42 80
48 26
56 99
47 02 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
213
Belmont.
Teacher, Miss Mina Sanderson, until June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, Miss Asenath S.
Way ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 18th, 1890 ; present, 7 boys, 8 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 17 girls ; total, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.67.
Expenditure, $540."
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.
Cost of each pupil on average actual attendance, $30.56.
The  school in this   new   district   was   opened   in   September,   1890,  and   has  thus   far
maintained a good attendance.
Bigger Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Harriet Isaac ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 18th, 1890; present,'8 boys, 6 girls; total 14.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 11 girls ; total 25.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.16.
Expenditure, $590."
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.60.
Cost of each pupil on average daily attendance, $48.51.
This   new   school,   which   was   in   operation   during  the   entire year,  has maintained a
atisfactory attendance.
Boundary Bay.
Teacher,  Miss Annie G. Walter,   until  December  31st,   1890; J.  H. Kerr, B. A., until
June 13th, 1891.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 16th, 1890 ; present, 8 boys, 3 girls ; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 8 girls; total 28.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.13.
Expenditure, $540.
The school in this district was not in session during August, 1890, and January, 1891.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
1886-87	
26
29
26
23
28
15.91
10.30
10.40
9.07
11.13
$17 99
22 06
22 69
22 02
19 28
$29 40
1887-88	
62 13
1888-89 ...               ;	
56 73
1889-90	
55 86
1890-91	
48 51 214
Public Schools Report.
1891
Burgoyne Bay.
Teacher, Alfred W. Cook.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 18th and 19th, 1891.    Attendance very small on account of sickness.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys,  17 girls ; total, 30.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.90.
Expenditure,
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
31
36
25
27
26
28
31
30
Average
attendance.
16.33
19.07
17.44
16.97
15.42
18.03
19.59
17.90
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$20 64
17 43
25 60
24 40
26 92
22 85
19 59
21 33
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
$39 19
32 91
36 70
38 82
45 39
35 49
31 02
35 75
Burton's Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Margaret McGregor,  until June 30th,   1891;   Miss  Ellen  Lister,   until
November 30th, 1891; present teacher, Miss Margaret McGregor.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 24th, 1890; present, 10 boys, 6 girls; total 16.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 16 girls ; total, 37.
Average monthly attendance, 27.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.06.
Expenditure, $617.75.
The average daily attendance maintained during the past year shows an increase over that
of the previous year, which was then the largest since the establishment of the school.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
22
27
27
30
28
23
39
37
13.72
17.58
16.72
14.70
14.25
13.43
19.39
20.06
$28 53
23 51
23 70
21 33
22 85
27 82
16 41
16 69
$45 76
1884-85	
36 11
1885-86    	
38 28
1886-87 	
43 54
1887-88    	
44 91
1888-89	
47 65
1889-90 	
33 00
1890-91 	
30 79 55 Vict.                                  Public Schools Report.                                           215
Cache Creek.
Teacher, Joseph Irwin, until September 30th, 1890.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 5 boys, 7 girls ; total, 12.
Average monthly attendance, 1 2.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.82.
Expenditure, $180.
As stated in last Annual Report, the school was closed on September 30th, 1890, by the
retirement of Mr. J. Irwin.
It is not now in operation.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
34
38
34
31
29
28
25
12
19.91
25.46
26.06
22.27
20.64
21.13
19.81
9.82
$53 76
44 74
50 00
54 84
58 62
60 71
54 40
15 00
$91 81
1884-85	
66 78
1885-86	
65 23
1886-87 	
76 33
1887-88 ,	
82 36
1888-89 	
80 45
1889-90	
1890-91 	
68 65
18 32
Is ; total, 14.
ice, and cost of each pupil since the
Cadboro.
Teacher, Miss Alice V. Harrison.
Salary, $50 per month
Inspected, 16th October, 1890 ; present, 9 boys, 5 gir
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 9 girls ;  total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.78.
Expenditure, $614.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendai
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
1885-86	
34
40
39
35
21
25
14.07
15.37
13.07
16.53
12.00
13.78
$18 63
16 00
16 41
18 28
29 29
24 56
$45 03
1886-87	
41 64
1887-88	
48 96
1888-89	
38 71
1889-90 	
51 26
1890-91	
44 55 216
Public Schools Report.
1891
Canoe Pass.
Teacher, Richard J. Hawkey, until June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, John J. Stephenson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 15th, 1890 ; present, 4 boys,  4 girls; total, 8.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 8 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.06.
Expenditure, $586.13.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance,  and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89 .
1889-90 .
1890-91 .
Year.
Enrolment.
24
24
27
36
30
29
27
Average
attendance.
11.21
14.06
10.48
11.04
18.27
12.39
13.06
Cost of
each pupil on
Cost of
each pupil
enrolment.
on average
attendance.
$15 99
$34 24
26 67
45 52
16 71
43 04
16 38
53*44
14 61
23 99
22 07
51 65
21 70
44 87
Cedar Hill.
Teacher, Robert Landells, B.A.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, October 16th, 1890 ; present, 13 boys, 15 girls ; total, 28.
Enrolled during the year, 28 boys, 29 girls; total, 57.
Average monthly attendance, 38.
Average actual daily attendance, 26 84.
Expenditure, $760.
During the present school-year it was found necessary to divide this district to form a new
school district, to be known as Gordon Head.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
1883-84
1884-85
1S85-86
1886-87
1887-S8
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
30
44
50
56
45
43
41
57
Average
attendance.
15.62
19.05
23.81
26.10
26.36
25.10
24.09
26.84
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
829 33
19 86
15 20
13 57
16 88
17 67
18 53
13 33
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
$56 33
45 89
31 92
29 12
28 83
30 27
31 54
28 31 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
217
Cedar, North.
Teacher,   Miss Jeannette  Mebius, until December  30th, 1890 ; Miss Kate Cairns, until
June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, Miss Annabella McKenzie.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, December 4th, 1890; present, 10 boys, 11 girls; total, 21.
Enrolled during the year, 22 boys, 21 girls; total, 43.
Average monthly attendance, 32.
Average actual daily attendance, 21.40.
Expenditure, $630.32.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
36
36
42
40
37
37
39
43
Average
attendance.
18.24
21.80
22.72
22.02
20.62
21.24
22.88
21.40
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$17 70
18 59
15 95
17 50
18 91
17 29
16 20
14 65
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
$34 95
30 70
29 48
31 79
33 94
30 13
27 62
29 45
Cedar, South.
Teacher, Miss Lena B. Freeman.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, December 4th, 1890; present, 7 boys, 6 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 13 girls ; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.50.
Expenditure, $619.85.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
17
24
23
23
24
21
25
23
Average
attendance.
12.38
13.76
15.90
16.21
13.66
13.16
14.09
12.50
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$37 64
26 30
27 83
27 33
25 05
30 47
24 76
26 95
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
$51 69
45 88
40 25
38 78
44 01
48 63
43 93
49 58 218
Public Schools Report.
1891
Centrevillk.
Teacher, William M. Wood.
Salary, $70 per month.
Monitor, Miss Anna Fraser, until June 30th, 1891 ;  Miss Frances Gordon Walker,  until
October 31st, 1891; present monitor, Miss Jessie A. Black.
Salary, $35 per month.
Inspected, September 22nd, 1890; present, 24 boys, 25 girls; total, 49.
September 23rd, 1890;   present, 25 boys, 20 girls; total, 45.
Enrolled during the year, 55 boys, 47 girls; total, 102,
Average monthly attendance, 75.
Average actual daily attendance, 52.96.
Expenditure, $1,320.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84     	
78 •
71
75
75
81
81
107
102
38.75
36.22
40.48
45.54
44.32
42.12
53.00
52.96
$12 80
14 64
13 33
13 33
14 50
14 44
11 21
12 94
$25 76
28 71
1884-85	
1885-86 	
24 70
1886-87 	
21 96
1887-88	
26 51
1888-89	
28 01
1889-90           	
22 64
1890-91   	
24 92
Cheam.
Teacher, Nicholas R. Hopkins.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, September 22nd, 1890; present, 17 boys, 12 girls; total, 29.
Enrolled during the year, 34 boys, 25 girls; total, 59.
Average monthly attendance, 38.
Average actual daily attendance, 26.98.
Expenditure, $700.
The decrease in attendance for the year was doubtless caused by the opening of schools in
the newly-created and adjacent districts—East Chilliwhack and Rosedale.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84    	
25
37
47
51
52
59
73
59
15.18
21.61
20.03
25.43
27.18
23.79
35.36
26.98
$25 60
17 30
13 62
12 55
12 30
11 86
9 59
11 86
$42 16
1885-86	
1887-88      	
29 62
31 95
25 17
23 54
1888-89        	
29 42
1889-90                        	
19 76
1890-91   	
25 94 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
219
Chemainus.
Teacher, Miss Isabel M.  F. Barron, until December 30th,  1890 ; Miss  Ethel Edwards,
until June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, Miss Sarah J. Murton.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 17th, 1891; present, 6 boys, 5 girls ; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 9 girls; total 21.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.26.
Expenditure, $615.50.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84 	
30
27
20
24
28
26
21
21
1884-85	
1885 86 	
1886-87	
1887-88               	
1888-89 	
1889-90 	
1890-91 	
Average
attendance.
7.95
10.61
10.01
11.06
11.42
12.42
11.34
11.26
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$20 67
23 46
32 00
26 66
22 85
22 69
28 09
29 30
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$78 01
59 71
63 94
57 86
56 04
47 50
52 02
54 66
Chemainus Landing.
Teacher, Miss Clara  C  Curry,  until December 31st,   1890 ; Miss Marion Gordon, until
June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, Robert Telford.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 17th, 1891 ; present,  7 boys, 10 girls ; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 11 girls ; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.55.
Expenditure, $550.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $28.94.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $35.36.
This school was opened in August, 1890.
A school-house is now in course of construction. 220
Public Schools Report.
1891
Chilliwhack.
Teacher,   Miss Annabella McKenzie,   until  June  30th,   1891 ; present teacher,  Mrs. J.
Templer.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, September 23rd, 1890; present, 5 boys, 15 girls; total,  20.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 24 girls ; total, 38.
Average monthly attendance, 31.
Average actual daily attendance, 26.26.
Expenditure, $700.
The average daily attendance maintained during the past year was the largest since the
establishment of the school.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84 	
25
26
31
38
41
32
33
38
1884-85 . .                                      	
1885-86   	
1886-87	
1887-88 	
1888-89 	
1889-90    ...
1890-91 	
Average
attendance.
17.85
18.03
17.95
17.81
20.17
17.20
19.99
26.26
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$13 51
23 65
20 65
16 84
15 60
20 00
19 39
18 42
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$18 92
34 11
35 65
35 93
31 73
37 20
32 01
26 65
Chilliwhack, East.
Teacher, Miss Mary J. Wallace.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 23rd, 1890 ; present, 12 boys, 11 girls ; total, 23.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 18 girls ; total, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.81.
Expenditure, $540.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.00.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $23.67.
The school in this new district was opened in September, 1890, and has thus far maintained
a good attendance.
Clayton.
Teacher, John A. McLean, until December 31st, 1890 ; Miss Jeanie Brown, until June
30th, 1891 ; present teacher, David McLennan.
Salary, $50 per month.
Visited, September 18th, 1890.    School closed on account of illness of teacher.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 16 girls ; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.76.
Expenditure, $590.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.65.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $50.17.
The school in this new district was in operation during the entire year. 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
221
Clinton.
Teacher, Miss Adelaide S. Bailey.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 9 girls; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 12.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.62.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
22
19
18
15
24
27
16
17
11.30
10.55
9.81
8.81
10.94
11.45
10.60
10.62
$34 54
39 74
42 22
40 80
31 03
28 14
47 50
44 70
$67 25
1884-85 ..          	
71 56
1885-86 	
77 47
1886-87	
69 46
1887-88	
1888-89	
68 07
66 37
1889-90 	
71 69
1890-91 	
71 56
Clover Valley.
Teacher, William McDonagh.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 18th, 1890; present, 4 boys, 6 girls; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 12 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.50.
Expenditure, $640.
The average daily attendance maintained thus far during the present school-year has
exceeded that of the previous year, notwithstanding the fact that a school was opened in
August, 1891, in the newly-created and adjacent district of Surrey Centre.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84	
22
29
29
31
26
27
37
27
1884-85	
1885-86	
1886-87 	
1887-88	
1888-89	
1889-90 	
1890-91 J	
Average
attendance.
11.00
11.28
13.80
13.49
12.69
11.82
11.28
10.50
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$29 06
22 07
22 07
20 64
24 61
23 70
17 29
23 70
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$58 13
56 74
46 38
47 44
50 43
54 14
56 73
60 95 222
Public Schools Report.
1891
Colwood.
Teacher, Duncan Ross ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, January 23rd, 1891 ; present, 10 boys, 6 girls ; total 16.
May 5th, 1891 ; present, 8 boys, 6 girls ; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 11 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.94.
Expenditure, $626.30.
At the semi-annual examination held in Victoria, December 2nd and 3rd, 1890, Master
Albert Edward Wale, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a
High School.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
24
22
26
22
23
26
31
23
14.76
15.13
14.74
12.21
12.94
16.90
12.47
12.94
$24 56
28 90
24 62
29 09
27 82
24 61
20 64
27 23
$39 94
1884-85 	
42 02
1885-86	
43 42
1886-87 	
52 41
1887-88 	
49 45
1888-89 	
37 87
1889-90 	
51 32
1890-91 	
48 40
Comox, North.
Teacher, Fenwick  W. Robbins ;  salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, August 14th, 1890; present, 2 boys, 10 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 27 boys, 36 girls ; total, 63.
Average monthly attendance, 5l.
Average actual daily attendance,  34.17.
Expenditure,  $700.
The large attendance at this school during the past year necessitated the  division of the
district, the western portion of which is now known as Puntledge School District.
The number of pupils enrolled in each of  these schools during the present year is over 40.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance and cost of  each pupil during the
past eight years : —
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84                        	
30
33
29
39
46
60
60
63
1884-85 	
1885-86 	
1886-87 	
1887-88 	
1888-89	
1889-90 	
1890-91     	
Average
attendance.
12.30
13.93
13.76
14.26
17.73
25.57
27.81
34.17
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$20 05
19 39
22 07
15 16
13 91
10 66
10 66
11 11
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$48 89
45 94
46 51
41 46
36 09
25 02
23 01
20 48 55 Vict.                                  Public Schools Report.
223
Comox, South.
Teacher, James Sutherland, until June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, Miss Ella S. Coghlan ;
salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, August 14th, 1890 ; present, 9 boys, 6 girls ; total 15,
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 15 girls ; total, 34.
Average monthly attendance,  22.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.17.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average  attendance, and  cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1884-85   	
23
21
29
37
43
35
34
13.05
14.93
16.49
18.07
24.24
24.28
20.17
$29 73
33 33
21 33
17 29
14 43
18 28
20 58
$52 39
46 89
37 50
35 41
25 60
26 35
34 70
1885-86 	
1886-87     	
1887-88   	
1888-89 	
1889-90	
1890-91 	
present teacher, James Sutherland ;
3e, and   cost  of  each  pupil since the
CoURTENAY.
Teacher, John B.  Bennett, until June 30th,   1891 ;
salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 7 girls ; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.26.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendan
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1885-86	
19
19
24
19
18
19
12.92
11.80
13.51
11.49
10.62
12.26
$32 01
33 68
26 66
33 68
35 55
33 68
$47 08
54 23
47 37
55 70
60 26
52 20
1886-87 	
1887-88 	
1888-89 	
1889-90	
1890-91	 224
Public Schools Report.
1891
Cowichan.
Teacher, Miss Jennie M. H. Pope, until December 31st, 1890 ; salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 8 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.10.
Expenditure, $340.
Owing to failure to maintain the average daily attendance required by statute, the  school
was closed December 31st, 1890.
It has not, thus far during the present school-year, been re-opened.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
eight years : —
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84	
18
24
24
29
31
31
34
20
1884-85 	
1885-86 	
1886-87 	
1887-88 	
1888-89 	
1889-90 	
1890-91	
Average
attendance.
10.47
10
33
10
56
9
96
11
41
11
28
11
64
9
10
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$39 08
29 04
26 67
22 07
20 64
20 64
18 82
17 00
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$67 18
67 47
60 61
64 25
56 09
56 73
54 98
37 36
Cowichan, South.
Teacher, Miss Mary 0. Mclntyre, until June 30th, 1891 ; Miss Mina Sanderson, until
September 30th, 1891 ; salary, $50 per month.
Visited, March 21st, 1891 ; school not in operation, teacher having failed to receive notice
of visit.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 7 girls ; total, 15.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.80.
Expenditure, $620.90.
The average daily attendance required by  the  School  Act not  having been maintained
the teacher resigned September 30th, 1891.
The school is not now in operation.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
Year.
Enrolment.
1885-86 	
25
30
36
35
25
15
12.34
12.12
12.62
12.61
10.23
10.80
$12 80
21 33
17 41
18 28
25 60
41 39
$25 93   ■ ",
1886-87 	
52 80 '
1887-88 	
49 69   ■
1888-89	
50 75 M
1889-90 	
62 56    ■
1890-91	
57 49 1  ? 55 Vict.                                    Public Schools Report.                                          225
Craigflower.
Teacher, Robert C. Johnson ; salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, November 14th, 1890 ; present, 7 boys, 8 girls, total 15 ;
January 23rd, 1891 ; present 7 boys, 13 girls, total 20 ;
May 5th, 1891 ; present, 10 boys, 12 girls; total, 22.
Enrolled, during the year, 17 boys, 27 girls; total, 44.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.01.
Expenditure, $760.
At the semi-annual examination held in Victoria, December 2nd and   3rd, 1890, Master
John Benbow Adams, a pupil of this  school, passed the standard required for admission to a
High School.
The following is a list enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil  during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
42
30
34
43
47
45
40
44
22.94
18.66
18.04
23.05
24.88
28.53
24.18
20.01
$18 15
24 69
$33 24
1884-85	
39 70
1885-86	
24 12
45 45
1886-87 	
19 07
16 17
16 88
19 00
17 27
35 57
1887-88 	
30 54
1888-89 	
26 63
1889 90	
31 43
1890-91 	
37 98
,
1;  present teacher,  Miss  Edith A.
ce, and cost of each pupil during the
Denman Island.
Teacher, Miss Ella S. Coghlan, until  June 30th, 189
King ; salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 11 girls ; total, 21
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.11.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendan
past six years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1885-86 	
16
15
17
25
19
21
12.26
11.57
11.48
13.82
12.86
13.11
$12 34
41 05
37 64
25 60
33 68
30 47
$16 10
1886-87 	
53 22
1887-88 	
55 74
1888-89	
46 30
1889-90 	
49 76
1890-91 	
48 81 226                                           Public Schools Report.                                          1891
Departure Bay.
Teacher,   Miss  Mabel  Bryant, until May  5th,   1891 ;  present teacher, Miss Catherine J.
Thomas ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected June 3rd, 1891 ; present, 11 boys, 8 girls ; total, 19.
Enrolled during the year, 32 boys, 16 girls; total, 48.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.70.
Expenditure, $548.33.
The average daily attendance does not compare favorably with the enrolment for the year.
Under   ordinary   circumstances,   a   much   larger   average   attendance   should   certainly    be
maintained.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of  each pupil  since  the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1885-86	
20
29
21
26
46
4S
13.47
13.23
12.51
13.41
18.95
17.70
$ 9 87
22 07
30 47
24 61
13 91
11 42
$14 66
1886-87	
48 37
1887-88	
51 15
1888-89   	
47 72
1889-90 	
1890-91 	
33 77
30 97
Donald.
Teacher, Wesley A. Blair; salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 14 girls; total, 25
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.74.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendan
establishment of the school :—
se, and cost of each pupil since the
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1887-88	
38
34
28
25
20.37
14.88
11.01
14.74
$18 42
21 95
30 38
30 40
$34 36
1888-89	
50 16
1889-90 	
77 26
1890-91	
51 56 55 Vict.                                 Public Schools Report.                                          227
Enderby.
Teacher, Miss  Minnie  H.   Macrae,  until  June   30th,   1891 ;   present teacher, James   E.
Norcross. .
-Salary, $60 per month.
"No: inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 15 girls ; total, 34.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.28.
Expenditure, $760.
There was an increase in attendance over that of the previous year.
The prospects of the school, thus far during the present year, are good.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of  each pupil  since the
establishmsnt of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1888-89 	
29
27
34
17.85
15.45
20.28
$24 13
28 14
22 35
$39 21
1889-90	
42 71
1890-91 	
37 47
1891 ;    present   teacher,   Isaac   N.
■Is ;  total, 7.
ng May and June, 1891.
ce, and cost of each pupil since  the
English.
Teacher,  Miss   Annie  Ketcheson,  until   April  30th,
Mathers.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 24th, 1890; present, 4 boys, 3 gii
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 10 girls ; total 21.
Average monthly attendance, l4.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.97.
Expenditure, $383.34.
Owing to small attendance, the school was closed dur
It is now in operation with a fair attendance.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendan
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1887-88 	
13
27
31
21
8.95
11.43
13.38
9.97
$16 65
21 85
16 83
18 25
$24 18
1888-89 	
51 61
1889-90 	
38 99
1890-91 	
38 44 228
Public Schools Report.
1891
Esquimalt.
Teacher, Edward B. Paul, M.A.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, October 17th, 1S90; present, 23 boys, 22 girls; total, 45.
Enrolled during the year, 29 boys, 30 girls ; total, 59.
Average monthly attendance, 43.
Average actual daily attendance, 37.27.
Expenditure, $8
There was a marked increase in enrolment and average daily attendance during the past
year.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84	
69
59
70
67
55
46
42
59
1884-85 	
1885-86	
1886-87	
1887-88 	
1888-89 	
1889-90	
1890-91 	
Average
attendance.
35.51
29.25
39.13
39.21
27.05
28.50
23.99
37.27
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$11 79
15 27
12 57
13 13
16 00
19 13
20 95
14 91
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$22 92
30 79
22 49
22 44
32 53
30 87
36 68
23 61
Essington.
Teacher, Miss Jessie Noel, until May 31st, 1891.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 6 boys, 8 girls ; total, 14.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 8.28.
Expenditure, $86.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $6.14.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance,  $10.38.
This school was re-opened in April, 1891, but owing to failure to maintain the average
daily attendance required by the School Act, it was closed May 31st, 1891.
The school is not now in operation. 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
229
Gabriola, South.
Teacher,   Robert  J.   Douglas,   until   September  30th,   1891 ;   present teacher,   Michael
McKinnon, M.A.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 12 girls ; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 18
Average actual daily attendance, 12.94.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
20
16
17
25
21
18
24
27
15.07
11.92
13.53
13.03
13.28
12.31
14.05
12.94
$32 00
40 33
37 65
24 69
30 47
34 57
26 66
23 70
$42 46
1884-85	
54 13
1885-86 	
1886-87	
47 30
47 38
1887-88 	
48 19
1888-89 	
50 54
1889-90	
45 55
1890-91 	
49 45
Glenwood.
Teacher, Francis J. McKenzie.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 17th, 1890; present, 5 boys, 6 girls; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 12 girls ; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.81.
Expenditure, $562.58.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24 46.
Cost of each pupil on average daily attendance, $52.04.
The school in this new district was opened August 17th, 1890. 230
Public Schools Report.
1891
Golden.
Teacher,  Miss  Mary F. Halliday, until June  30th,   1891 ; present teacher, Miss Ida M.
Carmichael.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 12 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.02.   *
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance,  and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1888-89 	
11
14
19
9.00
9.24
12.02
$ 7 91
45 20
40 00
$ 9 67
68 49
1889-90                   	
1890-91	
63 22
Grand Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Cora M. Watson, until June   30th,  1891 ;  present teacher, Robert  H
Oarscadden.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 15 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 18.26.
Expenditure, $ 760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1888-89	
20
20
23
14.94
15.81
18.26
$33 93
38 00
33 04
$45 42
1889-90	
48 07
1890-91	
41 62 55 Vict.
Public Schools' Report.
231
Hall's Prairie.
Teacher, James R. McLeod, until December 31st, 1890; present teacher,   Miss  Caroline
McLellan.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 17th, 1890 ; present 4 boys, 7 girls ; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 12 girls ; total 25.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.03.
Expenditure, $610.70.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil  since  the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1885-86	
28
28
30
28
27
25
1886-87 	
1887-88   	
1888-89 	
1889-90 	
1890-91 	
Average
attendance.
18.33
20.39
14.78
12.68
11.64
11.03
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$24 64
22 86
21 33
22 85
23 70
24 42
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$37 64
31 39
43 30
50 47
54 98
55 36
Haney.
Teacher, Ephraim J. Buck.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 26th, 1890; present, 17 boys, 10 girls; total 27.
Enrolled during the year, 26 boys, 20 girls ; total, 46.
Average monthly attendance, 32.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.81.
Expenditure, $640.
At the semi-annual examination held in New Westminster, June 2nd and 3rd, 1891,
Master Dugald McTavish, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to
a High School.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school.
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1888-89   	
1889-90 	
44
42
46
20.81
22.06
22.81
$13 40
15 23
13 91
$28 04
29 01
1890-91	
28 05 232
Public Schools Report.
1891
Hatzic.
Teacher, Miss Susan M. Gowan, until June  30th,   1891 ;  Miss   Anna  L.  Stewart,  until
October, 31st, 1891.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 24th, 1890 ; present, 4 boys, 6 girls; total, 10
Enrolled during the year, 6 boys, 13 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.03.
Expenditure, $559.64.
Owing to low attendance the school was closed during January and part of February, 1891.
The school is not now in operation.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil  since  the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Co-it of
each pupil on
average
attendance
1889-90	
14
19
$ 9 51
10 03
$21 94
29 45
$32 29
1890-91 	
55 79
Hope.
Teacher,   Miss Janet Wilson,  until June  30th,   1891 ; present teacher,  Miss Martha S.
Miller.
Salary, $50 per month.
-  Inspected, April 15th, 1891 ; present, 9 boys, 9 girls;  total, 18.
April 16th, 1891 ; present, 8 boys, 9 girls ; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 17 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.63.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
883-84
884-85
885-86
886-87
887-88
888-89
889-90
890-91
Enrolment.
31
26
36
38
34
37
37
31
Average
attendance.
13.75
10.90
14.17
13.78
17.58
16.41
17.27
16.63
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$15 39
23 98
17 78
16 53
17 35
16 77
17 29
20 64
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$34 71
57 20
45 17
45 60
33 56
37 82
37 05
38 48 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
233
Howe Sound.
Teacher, Mrs. L. A. B. Smith, until June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, William A. Graham.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys,  13 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.77.
Expenditure, $315.80.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.73.
Cost of each pupil on average daily attendance, $21.38.
The school in this new district was opened January 19th, 1891.     It has thus far maintained a fair attendance.
Kensington.
Teacher, Miss Mary McDowell.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 17th, 1890 ;  present, 3 boys, 7 girls; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 15 girls ; total, 28.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.57.
Expenditure, $640.
Although there was a large increase in the  number of pupils enrolled, there was but a
slight increase in average daily attendance.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance,  and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1887-88	
20
17
16
28
14.54
13.28
10.81
11.57
$27 24
34 70
40 00
22 85
$37 47
44 42
1888-89	
1889-90	
59 20
1890-91	
55 31 234
Public Schools Report.
1891
Lake.
Teacher, William Tomlinson.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, October 9th, 1890; present, 7 boys, 6 girls; total, 13.
March 25th, 1891 ; present, 14 boys, 12 girls; total, 26.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 20 girls ; total, 38.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average actual daily attendance, 23.89.
Expenditure, $760.
The attendance at this school has more than doubled during the past five years.
At the semi-annual examination held in Victoria, June 2nd and 3rd, 1891, Master Charles
Bentley Jones, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High
School.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
27
32
17
19
24
30
33
38
13.18
13.12
11.22
12.12
15.62
17.14
21.95
23.89
$22 72
21 59
37 65
33 68
26 66
21 33
19 39
20 00
$46 54
1884-85	
52 65
1885-86	
57 04
1886-87	
52 80
1887-88 	
40 97
1888-89	
37 33
1889-90 	
29 15
1890-91	
31 81
Langley.
Teacher, Eli J. Campbell.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 26th, 1890; present, 7 boys, 9 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 12 girls ; total, 32.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.18.
Expenditure,
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84 	
46
39
37
30
28
31
32
32
16.56
13.58
13.94
12.90
14.53
14.24
15.70
15.18
$15 34
17 82
20 54
25 33
22 85
20 64
20 00
20 00
$42 62
1884-85 ..           	
51 17
1885-86	
54 52
1886-87 	
58 91
1887-88 	
44 04
1888-89	
44 94
1889-90 	
40 76
1890-91 	
42 16 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
235
Langley, East.
Teacher, Miss Annie Creelman, until December 31st, 1890; Miss Ada J. Williams, until
November 30th, 1891 ; Duncan J. Welsh, until December 31st, 1891.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 10 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.41.
Expenditure, $548.06.
The school is not now in operation.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since  the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
16
20
11.18
11.41
$17.98
27.40
$25 73
1890-91                  	
48 03
Lillooet.
Teacher, Mrs. A. J. Colbeck.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 13 girls ; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance,  15.32.
Expenditure, $700.
The average daily attendance at the school during the past year, was greater than during
any one of the previous nine years.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years : —
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84	
29
24
20
20
23
18
IS
29
1884-85 	
1885-86 	
1886-87 	
1887-88 	
1888-89	
1889-90 	
1890-91 	
Average
attendance.
14.84
11.74
10.34
11.51
11.27
10.17
8.85
15.32
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$26 96
31 77
34 37
38 00
30 43
38 88
35 55
24 13
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$52 69
64 94
66 49
66 03
62 11
68 82
72 31
45 69 236
Public Schools Report.
1891
Lulu.
Teacher, Robert G. Gordon, until November  9th,   1890 ;  Joseph  Irwin,   until December
31st, 1890 ; Robert Sparling, until June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, William T. Kinney.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 24tb, 1890; present, 4 boys, 4 girls; total, 8.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 20 girls; total, 34.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.86.
Expenditure, $640.
The frequent change of teachers during the year was certainly detrimental to the
interests of the school. These changes, however, were mostly caused by the retirement of the
teachers to accept more lucrative positions.
The attendance thus far during the present school-year shows considerable improvement.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1S86-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
27
28
24
37
22
38
28
34
Average
attendance.
12.73
11.90
10.08
13.34
9.09
16.20
11.71
10.86
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$25
81
25
56
29
17
18
51
28
IS
19
21
22
85
18
S2
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$54 74
60 15
69 44
51 34
68 20
45 06
54 65
58 93
Lytton.
Teacher,   Miss   Grace  Halliday,  until   June  30th,   1891 ;   present teacher,  Miss   Millie
Pickard.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, April 14th, 1891 ; present, 11 boys, 4 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 8 girls; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.42.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years : —
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
31
23
23
25
30
28
27
27
19.85
15.31
12.99
15.56
17.34
17.67
16.11
14.42
$24 52
32 51
33 04
30 40
25 33
27 14
28 14
28 14
$38 29
1884-85 	
48 85
1885-86 	
58 51
1886-87                       	
48 84
1887-88	
43 S2
1888-89 	
1889-90 	
1890-91	
43 01
47 17
52 70 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
237
Maple Bay.
Weather very stormy.
Teacher, Miss Edith M. N. Lettice.
Salary, $50 per month.
Visited, March 20th, 1891.    No pupils present at 10.30 a.m.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 13 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.31.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
24
21
21
22
19
26
23
23
10.81
10.47
9.97
10.50
10.75
11.55
11.11
10.31
$30 91
33 92
23 33
27 57
33 68
24 61
27 82
27 82
$68 64
1884-85            	
68 05
1885-86 	
49 15
1886-87            	
57 78
1887-88 	
59 53
1888-89            	
55 41
1889-90 	
57 60
1890-91	
62 07
Maple Ridge.
Teacher, Paul Murray.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, September 26th, 1890; present, 10 boys, 4 girls ; total, 14.
April 11th, 1891 ; present, 14 boys, 9 girls; total, 23.
Enrolled during the year, 39 boys, 21 girls ; total, 60.
Average monthly attendance, 43.
Average actual daily attendance, 29.90.
Expenditure, $880.
At the semi-annual examination held in New Westminster, June 2nd and 3rd, 1891,
Masters Ernest Worcester Howison and Richard James Trembath, pupils of this school, passed
the standard required for admission to a High School.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84	
73
67
65
59
60
51
57
60
1884-85	
1885-86	
1886-87	
1887-88	
1888-89 	
1889-90	
1890-91       	
Average
attendance.
30.87
28.20
35.52
30.58
29.19
27.63
31.39
29.90
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$10 41
11 34
13 54
14 91
14 66
17 25
15 44
14 66
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$24 61
26 95
24 77
28 77
30 14
31 84
28 03
29 43 238
Public Schools Report.
1891
Mayne Island.
Teacher, William H. Mawdsley, until December 31st, 1890 ; present teacher, Mrs. Elsie
N. Patterson.
Salary, $55 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 11 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.88.
Expenditure, $361.13.
This school was re-opened October 6th, 1890, but owing to small attendance was closed at
the end of the following December. It was again re-opened in April, 1891, and has continued
in operation since that date.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
30
28
29
23
21
33
23
20
19.38
16.16
17.07
14.38
14.68
18.83
14.95
10.88
$16 50
22 79
23 45
30 43
33 33
21 21
30 43
18 05
$25 54
1884-85 	
1885-86 	
39 49
39 84
1886-87 	
1887-88 	
48 67
47 68
1888-89 	
37 17
1889-90             	
46 82
1890-91 	
33 19
Metchosin.
Teacher,   George A.  Ferguson,  until  February  14th,  1891 ; S. J. Dorrington Lee, until
June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, Dawson H. Elliott.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 5th, 1891 ; present,  11 boys, 3 girls ; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 4 girls; total 17.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.65.
Expenditure, $544.40.
This school was closed during  part of  February and all of  March, on account of low
attendance.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years : —
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84* 	
IS
22
20
20
18
14
19
17
10.40
15.31
13.14
15.11
10.21
11.40
10.69
11.65
$35 79
31 28
36 17
37 20
36 66
40 87
33 68
32 02
$61 94
1884-85*	
44 95
1885-86*             	
55 06
1886-87*	
49 23
1887-88 	
64 64
1888-89 	
50 19
1889-90	
59 87
1890-91 	
46 72
f Including Rocky Point. 55 Vict.                                   Public Schools Report.                                           239
Moodyvillh.
Teacher, Thomas E. Knapp.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, April 18th, 1891 ; present, 13 boys, 10 girls; total 23.
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 16 girls ;  total, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.18.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years.
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84               	
40
37
39
41
34
39
34
36
18.91
17.85
20.22
19.52
18.12
13.42
16.63
20.18
$17 81
19 85
17 95
15 73
20 58
17 94
20 59
19 44
$37 68
1884-85	
41  14
1885-86	
34 62
1886-87 	
33 04
1887-88	
38 63
1888-89 	
52 16
1889-90	
42 09
1890-91 	
34 68
i, 1891 ; present teacher, Miss Mabel
; present  monitor,   Miss  Elizabeth
5; total 47.
total, 85.
7.
increased  attendance, a monitor was
o take charge of the primary classes.
ce, and cost of each  pupil  since the
Mountain.
Teacher, Miss Minna G. McKay, until February 28tl
Bryant.
Salary, $70 per month.
Monitor, Miss Christina Pool, until June 30th,   1891
Murray.
Salary, $35 per month.
Inspected, April 7th, 1891; present, 29 boys, 18 girl
June 3rd, 1891 ; present, 43 boys, 42 girls
Enrolled during the year, 104 boys, 83 girls; total, li~
Average monthly attendance, 135.
Average actual daily attendance, 57.67.
Expenditure, $765.16.
In   order   to  meet the requirement  of the  largely
employed during the last three months of the school-year, i
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendan
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1887-88	
32
66
81
187
17.01
34.25
39.36
57.67
$13 81
9 69
7 90
4 09
$25 98
1888-89	
18 68
1889-90 	
16 26
1890-91 	
13 26 240                                           Public Schools Report.                                         1891
Mount Lehman.
Teacher, Daniel W. Sutherland, until December 31st,  1890 ; present teacher,  James R.
McLeod.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected September 25th, 1890; present, 9 boys, 13 girls;  total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 19 girls ; total, 34.
Average monthly attendance, 27.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.05.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil  since  the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1884-85	
27
36
34
26
31
33
34
14.13
14.54
15.08
14.26
15.71
15.35
20.05
$18 24
17 78
18 82
24 61
20 64
19 39
18 82
$34 86
1885-86 	
44 02
1886-87	
42 44
1887-88	
44 88
1888-89 	
40 73
1889-90	
41 69
1890-91	
31 92
girls; total 15.
ce, and cost of each pupil during the
Mud Bay.
Teacher, Thomas Leith.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 16th, 1890 ; present, 8 boys, 7
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 19 girls ; total, 39
Average monthly attendance, 2l.
Average actual daily attendance,  12.79.
Expenditure, $590.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendan
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
34
29
22
25
39
43
31
39
13.70
13.03
11.48
11.99
16.98
14.61
11.33
12.79
$15 59
22 07
24 55
25 40
16 41
14 88
18 92
15 12
$38 69
1884-85	
49 12
1885-86	
47 04
1886-87	
52 96
1887-88	
37 69
1888-89	
43 80
1889-90 	
51 77
1890-91 	
46 13 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
241
Nicola.
Teacher, Miss Jessie R. Olding,  until June 30th, 1891; present teacher,  Miss Jessie
McQueen. _
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 16 girls ; total, 28.
Average monthly attendance, 23.
Average actual daily attendance, 19.50.
Expenditure, $760.
The  following  is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
19
27
32
30
26
28
Average
attendance.
12.00
16.20
16.29
18.82
17.59
19.50
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$40 00
25 92
23 75
25 33
29 23
27 14
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$63 33
43 21
46 65
40 38
43 20
38 97
Nicola Valley.
Teacher, Miss Jessie McQueen, until June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, Joseph Irwin.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 9 girls ; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.22.
Expenditure, $720.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84	
33
19
19
16
17
21
20
17
1884-85 	
1885-86 	
1886-87 	
1887-88	
1888-89	
1889-90	
1890-91	
Average
attendance.
14.88
9.86
10.94
11.17
9.96
11.34
10.22
10.22
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$21 30
39 46
40 00
46 73
43 45
36 19
38 00
42 35
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$47 25
76 04
69 47
66 94
74 16
67 01
74 36
70 45 242
Public Schools Rkport.
1891
Nicomin.
Teacher, Miss Margaret R. Dallas, until June 30th, 1891
October 31st, 1891 ; present teacher, Samuel G. Campbell.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 12 girls ; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.44.
Expenditure, $425.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.00.
Cost of each pupil on average daily attendance, $40.70.
The school in this new district was opened November 10th, 1890.
Miss Lucy M. Calhoun, until
North Arm.
Teacher, Miss Bessie Johnston, until December 31st, 1891; present teacher, Miss Katharine
McDougall.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 24th, 1890; present, 4 boys, 9 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 15 girls ; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.50.
Expenditure, $640.
At semi-annual examination held in Vancouver, June 2nd and 3rd, 1891, Miss Winnifred
C. Lawson, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
1886-87
1887-S8
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
24
23
27
23
25
Average
attendance.
15.40
15.00
14.48
11.40
13.50
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$21  11
27 82
23 70
26 71
25 60
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$32 90
42 66
44 19
53 90
47 40 55 Vict
Public Schools Report.
243
North Thompson.
Teacher,   Miss  Sarah McLean,  until June  30th,   1891 ;   present teacher, Archibald  D.
McLennan.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 5 girls; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.03.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1885-86   	
20
22
21
23
24
26
1886-87	
1887-88   	
1888-89 	
1889-90	
isno-9i   	
Average
attendance.
11.45
13.58
11.47
11.29
12.80
11.03
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
|27 15
34 54
36 19
33 04
31 12
29 23
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$47 42
55 96
66 25
67 31
58 35
68 90
Okanagan.
Teacher, Frederick J. Watson.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual dailv attendance, 10.90
Expenditure, $760."
11 girls; total, 26.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
883-84
884-85
885-86
886-87
887-88
888-89
889-90
890-91
Enrolment.
26
21
27
28
26
28
25
26
Average
attendance.
14.75
11.90
11.44
12.06
11.48
12.48
11.23
10.90
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$28 62
27 43
25 28
26 20
29 23
27 13
30 19
29 23
Cost of
each pupil on
average
Attendance.
$50 45
48 40
59 67
60 83
66 20
60 89
67 2]
69 72 244
Public Schools Report.
1891
Otter.
Teacher, Mrs. A. McKee, until September 30th, 1890 :  Miss Nettie Dockrill, until March
31st, 1891 ; present teacher, Miss Annie Ketcheson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 19th, 1891 ; present, 5 boys, 3 girls; total, 8.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 11 girls; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.61.
Expenditure, $556.13.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of  each pupil  since the
establishment of the school: —
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90	
24
29
10.90
10.61
$24 58
19 17
$54 12
1890-91 	
52 41
Oyster
Teacher, John W. H. King.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 17th, 1891 ; present, 7 boys, 5 girls; total, 12.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 5 girls; total 16.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.44.
Expenditure, $624.12.
At    semi-annual  examination   held   in   Nanaimo,   June    2nd    and   3rd,   1891,   Master
Robert 0. Wilson, a pupil of this school, passed the standard for admission  to a  High School.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and  cost  of  each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1885-86	
22
27
21
22
17
16
12.46
13.82
10.59
12.80
13.37
12.44
$28 32
23 70
30 47
29 09
37 64
39 00
$50 00
1886-87	
46 31
1887-88 	
60 43
1888-89 	
50 00
1889-90 :	
47 86
1890-91 	
50 17 55 Vict
Public Schools Report.
245
Port Moody.
Teacher, William T. Kinney, until September 30th, 1890; John J. Miller,  B.   Sc, until
June 30th, 1891 ;  present teacher, Robert D. Irvine.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, April 10th, 1891 ; present, 10 boys, 5 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 27 boys, 20 girls;  total,  47.
Average monthly attendance, 32.
Average actual daily attendance, 23.04.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Open  during a portion of the year only.
Prairie.
Teacher, Robert J. Plaxton.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 18th, 1891 ; present, 6 boys, 10 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 26 girls ; total, 43.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 18.03.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84	
36
41
39
36
28
37
35
43
1884-85	
1885-86	
1886-87	
1887-88	
1888-89	
1889-90	
1890-91 	
Average
attendance.
13.21
13.09
17 76
16.51
10.48
16.23
15.52
18.03
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$47 86
42 93
33 95
38 76
59 16
39 43
41 13
35 49 246
Public Schools Report.
1891
Quamichan.
Teacher, Miss Annie Robotham.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 20th, 1891 ; attendance very small, owing to inclement weather.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 23 girls; total, 38..
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.99.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years : —
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
29
40
33
32
25
27
28
38
20.00
21.08
14.63
14.60
12.40
15.88
15.21
16.99
$22 41
16 58
21 21
21 88
28 00
23 70
22 85
16 84
$32 50
18S4-85	
31 46
1885-86 	
47 85
1886-87	
47 94
887-88 	
56 45
1888-89 	
40 30
1889-90 	
42 07
1890-91 	
37 66
Que
SNELLE.
Teacher, Miss Alice Northcott, until June 30th, 1891 ;  present  teacher, John A. Fraser.
Salary, $70 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 10 girls ; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance. 10.02.
Expenditure, $880.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past seven years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1S84-85 	
29
27
18
29
21
18
18
9.89
11.19
10.08
11.24
10.91
12.10
10.02
$31 83
37 04
55 55
34 48
42 61
48 88
48 88
$93 35
1885-86 	
89 37
1886-87	
99 20
1887-88 	
88 96
1888-89	
82 03
1889-90 	
72 72
1890-91	
87 82 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
247
Revelstoke.
Teacher, Miss Lydia J,   Irvine,  until June  30th,  1891 ;  present teacher,  Miss  Grace
Halliday.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 19 girls; total, 38.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.07.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each  pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1886-87	
1887-88	
17
Not open.
Not open.
44
38
10.30
$19 12
$31 57
1888-89	
1889-90 	
18.08
16.07
15.64
18.42
38 07
1890-91 	
43 55
Rocky Point.
Teacher, Miss Alice M. Haklon, until June  30th,  1891 ;   Miss  Maria Lawson, until
December 31st, 1891 ; present teacher, Miss Fannie Lawson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 5th, 1891 ; present, 5 boys, 6 girls; total, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 8 girls ; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.99.
Expenditure, $640.
At semi-annual examination held in Victoria, June 2nd and  3rd,   1891,  Miss Gertrude
Ball, a pupil of this school, passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
The following is a list of enrolment,   average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1887-88 	
15
18
21
17
13.26
11.93
12.34
11.99
$31 00
35 55
30 47
37 64
$35 06
1888-89 	
53 64
1889-90 	
51 86
1890-91	
53 37 248
Public Schools Report.
1891
Rosed ale.
Teacher, William G. Thomson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 22nd, 1890; present, 6 boys, 9 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 16 girls; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average actual daily attendance, 19.03.
Expenditure, $540.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.41.
Cost of each pupil on average daily attendance, $28^37.
The school in this new district was opened in September, 1890, and has thus far maintained
a good attendance.
Round Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Martha J. Norris.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 9 girls ; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance,  17.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.10.
Expenditure, $760.
The opening of a school during the present year in the newly-created district of Lansdowne,
which is adjacent to this district, has not materially affected the attendance at this school.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
20
26
21
18
22
Average
attendance.
11.46
10.89
11.58
11.00
11.10
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$27 35
29 23
36 19
42 22
34 54
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$47 74
69 78
65 63
69 09
68 46 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
249
Saanich, North.
Teacher, Oliver H. Cogswell, B.A.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, March 26th, 1891; present, 18 boys, 24 girls; total, 42.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 31 girls; total, 50.
Average monthly attendance, 43.
Average actual daily attendance, 38.47.
Expenditure, $880.
The percentage of average daily attendance was 76.94 for the year, the highest yet attained
by this school.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
49
52
49
47
48
50
61
50
24.70
24.40
25.71
29.00
31.39
31.62
39.46
38.47
$17 95
16 92
17 96
18 72
18 33
17 60
14 42
17 60
$35 62
1884-85	
36 07
1885-86 	
34 23
1886-87	
30 34
1887-88 ,	
28 03
1888-89 	
27 83
1889-90 	
22 30
1890-91 	
22 87
Saanich, South.
Teacher, George H. Sluggett.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, March 26th, 1891 ; present, 19 boys, 18 girls ; total, 37.
Enrolled during the year, 25 boys, 27 girls ; total, 52.
Average monthly attendance, 40.
Average actual daily attendance, 32.04.
Expenditure, $880.
The  prospects of increased  attendance  at this school during the present year are good,
there being already 48 pupils in attendance.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84 	
55
51
53
50
55
51
39
52
1884-85	
1885-86    	
1886-87	
1887-88 	
1888-89 	
1889-90	
1890-91	
Average
attendance.
35.24
27.95
31.99
32.84
32.53
27.61
26.33
32.04
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$18 19
19 60
18 87
20 00
18 18
19 60
25 64
16 92
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$28 40
35 76
31 26
30 45
30 74
36 21
37 97
27 46 250
Public Schools Report.
1891
Saanich, West.
Teacher, Joseph McK. McLennan.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, March 25th, 1891 ; present, 7 boys, 10 girls; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 12 girls ; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.30.
Expenditure, $760.
The percentage of average daily attendance for the year was very creditable.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1S83-84	
29
43
39
35
42
35
32
24
20.00
24.74
18.83
19.48
20.87
17.94
16.61
17.30
$21 89
14 98
19 49
21 71
18 09
21 71
23 43
31 66
$31 75
1884-85   	
26 04
1885-86   	
1886-87	
40 36
39 01
1887-88	
36 41
1888-89 	
42 36
1889-90	
45 15
1890-91	
43 93
Sahtlam.
Teacher, Miss Jeanie W. Blair, until June 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, Miss Margaret
McDowell.
Salary, $30 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 5 boys, 5 girls ; total, 10.
Average monthly attendance, 8.
Average actual daily attendance, 6.37.
Expenditure, $306.77.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $30.67.
Cost of each pupil on average daily attendance,
This school was opened in August, 1890, under authority given by sub-section 5 of section
7 of the " Public School Act, 1885," and is continued in operation under similar power granted
in the " Public School Act, 1891,"—sub-section 4 of section 6.
3.15.
Salmon Arm.
Teacher, Miss Florence M. Goodridge.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 7 girls ; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.59.
Expenditure, $660.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $36.66.
Cost of each pupil on average daily attendance, $62.32.
The school in this new district was opened in August, 1890.
There are good prospects that the attendance during the present school-year will be larger
than that of the past year, 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
251
Sea Island.
Teacher, Miss Edith E. Robinson.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 11 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.23.
Expenditure, $413.33.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.78.
Cost of each pupil on average actual daily attendance, $33.79.
The school in this newly-created district was opened in November, 1890.
time over 20 pupils are in attendance.
At the present
Shawnigan.
Teacher, James A. Hoy.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 21st, 1891 ; present, 7 boys, 8 girls; total, 15.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 9 girls; total 27.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.28.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past seven years :—
Year.
1884-85'
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Average
attendance.
54
28.78
26
14.80
34
15.67
28
13.62
24
11.35
25
12.18
27
13.28
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$13 25
25 77
18 82
22 85
26 66
25 60
23 70
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$24 86
45 27
40 84
46 98
56 38
52 54
48 19
Including Bench Branch School, now known as South Cowichan School. 252
Public Schools Report.
1891
Shuswap Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Sara Preston.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 14 girls ; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.66.
Expenditure, $760.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past seven years :—
Year.
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
17
13.76
18
11.70
17
10.31
19
10.08
17
10.92
23
12.56
22
12.66
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$29 72
42 22
43 95
40 00
44 70
30 94
34 54
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$36 71
64 96
72 46
75 39
69 58
56 65
60 03
Somenos.
Teacher, Miss Alice L. Johnston.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 20th,   1891 ; present, 7 boys, 3 girls; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 11 girls; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.32.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil  since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
19
21
23
29
30
22
23
Average
attendance.
12.88
11.24
12.94
16.99
18.10
11.49
12.32
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$10 53
30 48
27 83
22 06
21 33
29 09
27 82
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$15 53
56 94
49 45
37 66
35 35
55 70
51 94 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
253
Sooke.
Teacher, James H. MacGill, B. A., until March 31st, 1891 ;  present  teacher. George A.
Ferguson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 6th, 1891 ; present, 7 boys, 7 girls; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 11 girls ; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.11.
Expenditure, $963.08.    (Including East Sooke).
During the present school-year a new site has been selected and a school-house built.
Sooke, East.
Monitor, Miss Sarah Jane Murton,  until  June 30th,  1891;  present teacher,  Robert H.
Allan.
Salary, $35 per month.
Inspected, March 6th, 1891 ; present, 8 boys, 8 girls ; total 16.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys,  10 girls; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.91.
In September, 1891, a teacher was appointed to take charge of the school in this newly-
created district.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84 ..             	
18
25
23
27
25
34
31
44
1884-85 	
1885-86 .                 	
1886-87	
1887-88	
1888-89	
1889-90 	
1890-91      	
Average
attendance.
10.00
11.81
13.17
11.65
11.31
20.97
19.42
24.02
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$35
55
24 74
27
83
23
70
25
60
26
32
30 28
21
88
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$64 00
52 37
48 60
54 93
56 58
42 6S
48 34
40 09 254
Public Schools Report.
1891
Spallumcheen.
Teacher, Donald J. McDonald, until August 31st, 1890.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 4 boys, 4 girls;  total, 8.
Average monthly attendance, 8.
Average actual daily attendance, 7.11.
Expenditure, $102.58.
On the retirement of Mr. McDonald in August, 1890, the school was closed.    It has not
been re-opened since that date.
The following is a list of enrolment, average  attendance, and  cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
1884-85	
17
IS
16
17
14
16
8
1885-86 	
1886-87 	
1887-88   	
1888-89	
1889-90           	
1890-91 	
Average
attendance.
15.98
12.00
10.74
9.77
9.95
9.95
7.11
Cost of
each pi
pil on
enrolment.
$29
18
28
88
47
14
44 70
54
28
47
50
12 82
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
$31 02
43 33
70 22
77 71
76 38
76 38
14 42
Spence's Bridge.
Teacher, Thomas Clyde.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 3 girls ; total, 1 4.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.16.
Expenditure, $550.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of  each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
9
17
11
12
14
Average
attendance.
6.30
8.03
7.98
8.30
11.16
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$10 10
42 35
54 54
50 00
39 28
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
$14 43
89 66
75 18
72 29
49 28 55 Vict.                                 Public Schools Report.                                         255
Stave River.
Teacher,   Frank  E.   Morrison,  until  June  30th,   1891; present teacher,   Miss  Annie G.
Waller.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, April 11th, 1891; present, 7 boys, 7 girls ; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 13 girls ; total, 28.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.81. .
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each  pupil  since the
establishment of the school :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1885-86   .                     	
40
25
25
32
36
2S
16.41
12.77
11.75
13.86
13.32
11.81
$15 89
25 60
25 60
20 00
17 77
22 85
$38 75
1886-87 	
50 11
1887-88 	
54 46
1888-89 	
46 17
1889-90 	
48 04
1890-91 	
54 19
9 girls; total, 21.
ry to grant a monitor to this school
s of construction.
ce, and cost of  each pupil since the
St. Mary's Mission.
Teacher, John Gillis.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 25th, 1890 ; present, 12 boys,
Enrolled during the year, 28 boys, 34 girls ; total, 62
Average monthly attendance, 36.
Average actual daily attendance, 26.89.
Expenditure, $640."
The attendance so increased that it was found necesss
in October of the present year.
An addition to the present school-building is in course
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendan
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1885-86	
25
25
37
37
39
62
10.52
12.55
16.05
16.20
19.59
26.89
$20 60
25 60
17 29
17 29
16 41
10 32
$48 95
1886-87	
50 99
1887-88 	
39 57
1888-89	
39 50
1889-90	
32 67
1890-91	
23 80 256
Public Schools Report.
1891
Sumas.
Teacher, Robert J. Hall
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, September 20th, 1890; present, 8 boys, 8 girls; total 16.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 19 girls ; total, 33.
Average monthly attendance, 22
Average actual daily attendance, 16.17.
Expenditure, $700.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years : —
Year.
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
1886-87
1887-88
18S8 89
1889-90
1890 91
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
36
21.20
40
22.27
40
22.30
34
18.73
32
18.15
34
15.78
34
15.70
33
16.17
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$17
85
16
00
16 00
20
59
19
85
18 58
17
84
21
21
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$30 31
28 74
28 70
37 37
35 01
40 04
38 64
43 29
Tolmie.
Teacher, Miss Annie E. Carmichael, until November 30th, 1891 ; present teacher, Miss
Ada J. Williams.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October, 9th, 1890; present, 9 boys, 8 girls; total 17.
February 20th, 1891 ; present, 14 boys, 8 girls ; total, 22.
March 25th, 1891 ; present, 14 boys, 8 girls ; total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 25 boys, 22 girls ; total, 47.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average actual daily attendance, 21.68.
Expenditure, $640.
While the enrolment shows an increase of over 74 per cent, over that of the previous
year, the average daily attendance increased nearly 84 per cent, during the same period.
The registers of the school thus far during the present year, show a larger attendance than
that recorded at any time during the past year.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
43
33
27
47
Average
attendance.
15.85
16.18
11.82
21.68
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$10 00
19.39
23.70
13.61
Cost of
each pupil
on average
attendance.
$27 12
39 55
54 14
29 52 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
257
Trenant.
Teacher, Alexander Gilchrist.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, September 15th, 1890; present, 20 boys, 18 girls; total, 38.
Enrolled during the year, 38 boys, 31 girls ; total, 69.
Average monthly attendance, 46.
Average actual daily attendance, 35.02.
Expenditure, $760.
The records of attendance at this school show a steady increase.
Although a fine and commodious school-building was erected during the past year, yet,
should the attendance continue to increase, the providing of additional accommodation will be
a necessity in the near future.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past eight years :—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
Attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
35
35
29
45
55
67
68
69
11.53
14.98
14.08
19.65
25.12
28.12
32-27
35.02
$17 14
18 29
22 07
13 88
11 63
10 44
10 29
11 01
$52 03
1884-85	
42 73
1885-86            	
45 45
1886-87             	
31 79
1887-88	
25 47
1888-S9	
1889-90                    ....
24 89
21 69
1890-91 	
21 70
Union Mines.
Teacher, William A. Gilchrist.
Salary, $55 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 44 boys, 32 girls; total, 76.
Average monthly attendance, 46.
Average actual daily attendance, 38.53.
Expenditure, $700.
The average attendance at this school thus far during the present year has been the
largest in any rural school in charge of one teacher.
Provision having been made in the estimates for the salary of a monitor, an appointment
should be made at an early date.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil since the
establishment of the school:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1889-90 	
61
76
31.25
38.53
$7 87
9 21
$15 36
1890-91	
18 16 258
Public Schools Report.
1891
Vernon.
Teacher, William Sivewright.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boy, 9 girls; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.03.
Expenditure, $760.
Owing to the completion of the Shuswap and Okanagan Railway as far as this thriving
village, the attendance has considerably increased during the present year, over forty pupils
being already enrolled.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past seven years :—
Year.
1884-85 .
18S5-86
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Enrolment.
19
20
15
26
22
18
26
Average
attendance.
11.49
12.60
11.87
12.55
13.37
12.92
14.02
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$29 88
38 00
14 66
29 23
34 55
33 08
29 23
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$49 41
60 32
18 53
60 55
56 90
46 09
54 16
Vesuvius.
Teacher, Raffles A. R. Purdy.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, March 18th, 1891; present 4 boys, 8 girls :
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 12 girls; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.39.
Expenditure, $710.    (Including North Vesuvius.)
total, 12. Vict.
Public Schools Report.
259
Vesuvius, North.
Monitor, Mrs. L. Haskins, until June 30th, 1891; Miss Mary F. Halliday, until September
30th, 1891; present monitor, Miss Nellie G. Wilson.
Salary, $35 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 9 girls ; total, 16.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.39.
Owing to distance from Vesuvius school, the settlers of this portion of the district desire
to have the same created a separate school district. There can be no objection to this, provided
the requisite number of children of school age resides within the limits proposed for the new
district.
The dividing of the district would certainly be in the interests of the children residing in
North Vesuvius, and would not in any way affect the attendance at Vesuvius school.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during
the past eight years :—
1883-84
1884 85
1885-80
1886-87
1887-88
1888-89
1889-90
1890-91
Year.
Enrolment.
19
25
23
32
30
28
25
38
Average
attendance.
9.17
10.64
13.58
16.09
12.37
11.75
9.83
24.78
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$24 30
26 93
27 83
20 00
21 33
22 85
25 60
18 68
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$50 35
63 26
47 12
39 77
51 73
54 46
65 10
28 65
Williams Lake.
Teacher, David Jones.
Salary, $70 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 4 girls; total 16.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.86.
Expenditure, $792.65.
Owing to failure to obtain a teacher, the school was not in operation during August, 1890.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
Average
attendance.
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
1883-84	
10
17
21
20
23
18
14
16
10.84
12.20
10.88
12.12
12.22
11.28
10.44
10.86
$47 50
32 50
43 09
44 00
38 26
40 20
57 85
49 54
$70 11
1884-85	
1885-86 ■	
45 29
83 18
1886-87 	
72 60
1887-88 ..                                            	
72 01
1888-89                                      	
64 15
1889-90                     	
77 58
1890-91 	
72 98 260
Public Schools Report.
1891
Yale.
Teacher, Samuel Shepherd.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, April 15th, 1891; present, 8 boys, 20 girls; total, 28.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 25 girls; total, 39.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.82.
Expenditure, $740.68.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past eight years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
1883-84 	
62
65
59
58
32
36
37
39
1884-85 	
1885-86 	
1886-87	
1887-88 	
1888-89	
1889-90 	
1890-91	
Average
attendance.
34.31
27.72
36.09
27.15
15.65
22.67
20.74
20.82
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$12 81
12 07
13 47
13 70
24 84
18 12
17 29
18 99
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$23 16
.   28 30
22 03
29 28
50 79
28 77
30 85
35 57
York.
Teacher, Thomas Henderson, M.A.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 19th, 1890; present, 4 boys, 6 girls; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 14 girls; total, 28.
Average monthly attendance, 2l.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.68.
Expenditure, $640.
The following is a list of enrolment, average attendance, and cost of each pupil during the
past seven years:—
Year.
Enrolment.
1884-85           	
17
27
25
28
32
32
2S
1885-86 	
1886-87 	
1887-88 	
1888-89	
1889-90 	
1890-91            	
Average
attendance.
13.00
14.21
12.36
16.32
16.55
13.28
13.68
Cost of
each pupil on
enrolment.
$32 35
23 16
22 21
22 87
20 00
20 00
22 85
Cost of
each pupil on
average
attendance.
$42 30
44 02
44 93
38 38
38 67
48 19
46 78 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 261
Progress op Pupils.
Every parent is, or should be, solicitous for the progress of his children at school. The
success of the child does not alone depend on the ability and energy of the teacher; the parent
is a very important factor in the matter.
The rapid advancement of the pupil will be best assured when the parent unites with the
teacher in efforts made to accompany this end.
The following thoughts in this connection are deemed appropriate :—
First.—The pupil must attend regularly A single day's absence causes the loss of a
day's lessons, which cannot but discourage the pupil and disarrange the work of the teacher.
The loss of a day's lessons generally means that some of those prescribed for the next day
are unprepared, for failure in which the usual excuse is given, "I was absent yesterday." It
is a difficult task for the pupil to "catch up" with the class after a few days' absence, and it is
often a more difficult task for the teacher to incite the pupil to undergo the extra labour necessary under these circumstances to bring him up to the same standing as his classmates.
Repeated absence has a demoralizing effect on the pupil, and a pernicious influence over
the school. The teacher's ability and success being often gauged by the percentage of regular
attendance at his school, he is certainly justified in enforcing stringent rules in order to secure
regularity of attendance.
It is the experience of teachers everywhere that those who are loudest in their complaints
in regard to the failure of their children at examinations are those parents who have allowed
their children to average one or two days' absence for each week of the term.
The allowing of children to be frequently absent from school on the merest semblance of
an excuse, or on any avoidable pretext, tends to create in them a desire for freedom from the
labours and restraints of the school-room, and too often causes the habit of irregular attendance
to become chronic.
The truth that regular attendance is essential to progress cannot be too strongly impressed
on parent and pupil.
Second.—Punctuality in attendance is essential. Want of promptitude in arriving at the
school is a loss to the pupil of possibly one or more recitations of lessons, diturbs those who
were punctual, is an annoyance to the teacher, and, what is worst, of all, tends to cultivate the
wretched habit of procrastination.
The habit of punctuality in attendance is essential to success.
In connection with this subject we desire to call attention to a common practice, injurious
in its effects, which parents alone can remedy. This is the habit of frequently sending notes
to the teacher requesting that their children be dismissed before the close of school, or at recess.
These requests are often made for trivial reasons. Were the evil consequences to the child
and to the school more fully understood there would be a far less number of these notes for early
dismissal in the teacher's possession at the end of each month.
Third.—Some lessons must be learned at home. The proper preparation of home lessons is a
duty which the pupil owes to himself, in order that he may make rapid progress in his studies.
The teacher is certainly encouraged by this evidence of interest and will labour, it may be
unconsciously, more diligently for the advancement of such a pupil.
The right performance of these three school duties on the part of the pupil in a great
measure depends upon the parent.
He who is anxious for his children to make rapid progress must see to it that they attend
with regularity, that their attendance is marked with punctuality, and that they properly
prepare their home lessons, 262 Public Schools Report. 1891
Another duty which the parent owes to both teacher and pupil is to visit the school
frequently.     Every visit made by him encourages the pupil, and is an aid to the teacher.
It should also be borne in mind that the pupil must have a thorough respect for his teacher
in order to receive the full benefits of his instruction; hence, parents should be careful not to
speak of the teacher disapprovingly or disparagingly in the presence of their children.
From the foregoing suggestions we conclude that the progress of pupils depends little less
on the efforts of the parents than on those of the teacher.
In a district prossessing a really good, school, it will be found that teacher and parents act
together in securing the advancement of the pupils.
Mainland Teachers' Institute.
The annual meeting of the Mainland Teachers' Institute was held in the City of Vancouver
on the 4th and 5th of the present month.
There was a very large attendance of teachers and others interested in the cause of education. The work of each session was of a very instructive character. In addition to practical
illustrations of method and discussions thereon, a number of essays on appropriate topics was
contributed.
From information received, we cannot but conclude that much benefit was derived by
those who attended this convention.
Public School Act, 1891.
At the last Session of the Legislature the "Public School Act, 1885," and all subsequent
amendments were repealed, and the "Public School Act, 1891," was passed.
The principal changes embodied in the present Act are as follows:—
1.  The members of the Executive Council  constitute a  Council  of  Public  Instruction,
having the following powers:—
(1.) To create School Districts and to define their boundaries:
(2.) To set apart waste lands of the Crown for school purposes:
(3.) To provide for the payment of teachers' salaries; to erect school-houses in rural
districts, and to furnish the same, as well as to pay the incidental expenses of
the schools in such districts:
(4.) To establish schools in localities having less than fifteen children of school age:
(5.) To appoint Examiners of candidates for teachers' certificates:
(6.) To appoint Inspectors of Public Schools:
(7.) To  make  and establish  rules and regulations for  the conduct   of the Public
Schools, to prescribe the duties of teachers and their classification:
(8.) To determine the subjects and percentages for all classes and grades of certificates
of teachers:
(9.) To prescribe a uniform series of text-books, as well as courses of study for schools:
(10.) To suspend or cancel for cause the  certificate of  qualification of any  teacher,
subject to the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor, as expressed by an Order in
Council:
(11.) To determine all cases of appeal arising from decisions of Trustees:
(12.) To make any provisions, not inconsistent with the Act, that may be necessary to
meet exigencies occurring under its operation; 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. 263
(13.) To establish a Normal School and make regulations for its conduct and management:
(14.) To establish a High School in any locality having not less than twenty persons
duly qualified and available to be admitted as pupils.
2. It is the duty of the Superintendent of Education, subject to the Council of Public
Instruction,—
(1.) To have the supervision of the Inspectors and Schools:
(2.) To organize a Teachers' Institute or Teachers' Institutes.
3. The annual meeting for the election of School Trustees in Rural Districts is held on
the last Saturday in June in every year, commencing at 11 a.m., and the voting closing at 4
p.m. of the same day.
4. Every householder or freeholder, resident in any School District for a period of six
months previous to the election, must be of the full age of twenty-one years before he is entitled
to vote at any school meeting.
5. The Board of Trustees of each City School District consists of seven members, three of
whom are appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, and the other four by the City
Council, one of which four is Chairman of the Board.
6. In City Districts, one-half of the salaries of teachers, the whole cost of construction of
school buildings, repairs, and all other incidental expenses are paid by the Municipal Corporations.
7. The Board of Trustees of City Districts has power and it is its duty to provide sufficient
school accommodation and tuition, free of charge, to all children of school age in the district;
to appoint the number of teachers for whose salaries provision has been made in the Estimates;
to report annually to the City Council upon the expenditure of the moneys received by the
Board; to furnish annually, on or before the 15th day of July, to the Superintendent of
Education a full report of its proceedings, also returns of schools in accordance with the forms
supplied by him.
8. Trustees of City Districts must serve without emolument or reward, and must not be
interested, directly or indirectly, in any contract authorized by the Board of Trustees.
9. In case from any cause a school meeting is not held at the proper time, any five voters
in the district may, within twenty days thereafter, call a meeting by posting three notices in
public places in the school district, given ten days' notice of such meeting.
10. The Board of Trustees of Rural Districts must meet at least once in every three
months, and must visit the school at least three times a year.
11. The site on which to erect a school-house in a Rural District is chosen by the Trustees, who immediately thereafter must call a special meeting of the voters of the district to
approve of the selection made. If a majority of the voters of the district at this meeting does
not ratify the site chosen by the Trustees, the voters of the district determine upon a suitable
site at this meeting, and their decision, subject to the approval of the Council of Public
Instruction, finally decides the matter.
12. Upon notification from the Council of Public Instruction of the inefficiency or misconduct of the teacher, the Trustees must give such teacher thirty days' notice of dismissal,
13. The Board of Examiners is given authority to grant certificates as follows:—
Third Class, Grade B, valid for one year.
Third Class, Grade A, valid for two years.
Second Class, Grade B, valid for three years.
Second Class, Grade A, valid for five years.
First Class, Grades A and B, valid for life, or during good behaviour. 264 Public Schools Report. .1891
14. Each candidate for a certificate must satisfy the Board of Examiners that he is a fit
and proper person to be granted a certificate.
15. Graduates in Arts, of recognized British or Canadian Universities, who have proceeded
regularly to their degrees, are exempt from examination in other than professional subjects;
but they may be required, by oral examination, to further satisfy the Examiners as to knowledge of the Art of Teaching, School Discipline and Management, and the School Law of the
Province.
16. The use of the Lord's Prayer is made permissive in opening or closing the school.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. D. POPE,
Superintendent of Education.
VICTORIA, B. C:
Printed by BlCHAfeu WoiiFKNDBN, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty. c. Public Schools Report. 1891
5. Journalize and post the following ; close the Ledger, and make a Balance Sheet:—
Invested in business, cash $5,000.
Bought of R. S. Slim & Co. Mdse. amounting to $4,000.    Paid for the same cash $2,500,
and gave my note for balance @ 90 days.
Sold  Mdse. to R. P. Plumb $350.    Received in payment  cash  $300, and  his  note for
balance.
Sold Mdse. to A. B. Credit for $1,100.    Received in payment cheque on Bank of  British
Columbia for $500, note against S. R. Debit for $500, and his note for balance.
Paid by note held by R. S. Slim & Oo. for $1,500, as follows :—
Gave them S. R. Debit's note for $500
Cash      970
Discount allowed      30
Inventory, $3,200.
Geography.
1. (ffl.)  Account for the size of the various zones.
(/>.)  What zones have the four seasons 1
(c.) Name the three motions of the water in the ocean, stating the cause of each.
2. (a.) Explain fully the various conditions that influence the climate of British Columbia.
(b.)  What are isothermal lines ?
3. Draw a map of British Columbia, indicating and naming mountain ranges, rivers, lakes,
and districts.
4. (a.) Give some idea of the railway system of each Province of the Dominion of Canada.
(b.)   What is the area of the Dominion 1    Of this Province 1
5. To what nation does each of the following belong :—
(a.) Heligoland.
(b.) Hayti.
(c.) Aden.
(d.) Tasmania.
(e.)  Alaska.
(/) Patagonia.
6. Locate and define :—
(ffl.) Washington, D, C.
(b.) Edmonton.
(e.) St. John's.
(d.) Deccan.
( e.) Charleston.
(f.) Aspinwall.
(».) Brindisi.
7. State how you find from the Globe the time at which the sun rises and sets at Victoria
on May 25th. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report.
English Grammar.
...  Analyze the following :—
Spake full well in language quaint and olden,
One who dwelleth by the castled Rhine,
When he called the flowers, so blue and golden,
Stars, that in earth's firmament do shine.
2. Parse the italicized words in above extract.
3. (a.) Give the etymology of the preposition.
(6.) What are  the proper prepositions to use after accuse, differ, content, need, agree?
Frame sentences to illustrate your answer.
4. (a.) Describe and exemplify three uses of what and that.
(b.) What is the special use of mine, thine, &cJ    Complete the list in both numbers.
5. (a.) Write out in full the periphrastic form of the present indefinite tense, subjunctive
mood, of the verb to speak,
(b.) How many roots are employed in the conjugation of the verb to be ?    Name them
6. (a.) Inflect the past indictative, active voice, of the verb to write in its three forms.
(b.) Distinguish between a gerund and a participle 1    Illustrate.
7. Explain the term Cognate Objective.    Give an example.
Composition.
1. Discuss the following maxim in its  relation to written composition :—" Brevity is the
soul of wit."
2. Distinguish between the use of love and like; of ride and  drive; of skill and genius ;
of trade and profession; of custom and habit ; of mechanic and artist.
3. (a.) What  are  the chief points to be observed  in  the  mechanical arrangement of a
letter ?
(b.) Give directions for folding a sheet of letter-paper for inclosure,
4. Mark the pronunciation of the following words and give the meaning of each :—
Imbecile, indictment, corollary, respite, and deficit.
5. Write a composition on one of the following subjects :—
(a.) War.
(6.) Our City.
(c.) The Animal Kingdom.
(d.) Historical Reading.
(e.) The Empress of India.
Canadian History.
1. («.) Name the chief pioneers of France in Canada.    Give dates.
(b.) What was the Company of One Hundred Associates 1
2. Narrate the principal events connected with the rule of Frontenac.
3. Under what circumstances was Quebec twice captured by the English 1    Give dates.
4. (as.) Describe the chief events of the Patriots' War.
(6.) What valuable suggestions did Lord Durham's Report contain? cii. Public Schools Report. 1891
Explain the following terms :—
(ffl.) Federal Union.
(6.) Municipal System.
(c.) Cabinet.
(d.) Dissolution.
In what way did the following affect Canada :—
(ffl.) The American Revolution.
(b.) The War of 1812.
(c.) Red River Rebellion,
(a.) When was the Reciprocity Treaty terminated.
(6.) Distinguish between National Policy and Unrestricted Reciprocity.
English History.
1. (ffl.) State the chief events connected with Danish rule in England.
(b.) Describe the battle in which the last Saxon King was killed.
2. (ffl.) What great names are connected with the Hundred Years' War ?
(b.) What was the cause of this war?
3. Give historic reference of :—
(a.) Hereward.
(b.) Warwick.
(c.) Thomas Cromwell.
(a*.) Richard Cobden.
( e.) Earl of Beaconsfield.
4. (ffl.) Trace the origin and growth of the English Parliament.
(b.) For what period is a member of the House of Commons elected 1
5. (ffl.) Name with dates the monarchs during the seventeenth century.
(6.) Describe the battles of Aughrim and Copenhagen.
6. (a.) Name three treaties made with the United States.
(b.) Describe one of them.
7. (ffl.) Explain the following :—
National Debt; National Covenant; and Home Rule.
(b.) Who was "The Great Commoner?"
Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene.
1. (a.) Name the bones of the arm.
How are they connected at the elbow ?
Of what motions are they capable ?
(6.) Describe the hip joint.
2. (ffl.) What are the differences in function between arteries, capillaries and veins ?
(b.) How is the flow of the blood maintained ?
3. Describe the position and functions of the following organs :—
(a.) Liver.
(b.) Thoracic duct.
(c.) Larynx.
id.) Salivary glands.
(e.) Cochlia.
4. (ffl,) Why is pure air essential to health?
(b.) What three organs assist in purifying the blood ?
5. Describe the general circulation of the blood, commencing at the right auricle.
6. (ffl.) Name two mineral foods.
(b.) Mention the several fluids that assist in the work of digestion.
7. (ffl.) Explain the relation of sleep to repair and waste.
(6.) Why do children require more sleep than adults ?
8. (a.) What unhealthful habits have you changed since you commenced the study of this
subject? 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
cm.
Botany.
a.) Classify buds, and describe each kind.
6.) What are deciduous plants ?    Name five.
2. (ffl.) Distinguish between a rhizome and a tuber,
b.) Describe a bulb.     Name a tunicated bulbous plant.
3. (ffl.) What is the chief use of the floral envelopes ?
6.) What is the essential part of the stamen?
a.) Name the different kinds of leaves, and state a plant to which each kind belongs.
b.)  What are stomata?     Describe their functions.
5.  («.) How do you distinguish a cryptogam from a phcmogam ?
6.) What is another name for dicotyledons ?
a.) Name, describe, and give the functions of the different layers of the bark of i
tree.
b.) What are the living parts, of a tree ?
«.) Name three indehiscent fruits ?
b.) What is the pericarp 1
1.
3.
1.
5.
Roman History.
a.) What is the date usually ascribed to the founding of Rome ?
b.) What three nations formed the early inhabitants of Rome ?
a.) What was the object of an agrarian law ?
b.) Who were the Gracchi, and what did they accomplish ?
a.) By what wars did Rome extend her power?
b.) At the time of Augustus what was the extent of the Roman Empire?
ffl.) Name the Twelve Csesars, stating an event in connection with each.
b.) After the time of the Antonines, what body virtually appointed the Emperors?
ffl.)  By whom and when was the Empire divided into two parts?    What was the effect
of that division ?
b.) How, and when, did the Western Roman Empire become extinct ?
Give historic reference of —
(d.) Stilicho.
(e.) Attila.
(as.) Brutus.
(6.) Coriolanus.
(c.) Sejanus.
(/.) Justinian.
Grecian History.
1. (a.) How is the Trojan War connected with the History of Greece?
(6.)  What is meant by the Return of the Heracleids ?
2. (ffl.) Give an account of  the Laws of Solon.
(6.) What forced Sparta to abandon the system of Lycurgus ?
3. (ffl.) What was the cause of the Persian Wars?
(b.) Give an outline of the Second Persian War.
4. Give historic reference of—
(ffl.) Codrus, (ffl7.) Xenophon,
(6.) Pericles, (e.) Socrates,
(c.) Demosthenes, (/.) Philopoemen. civ. Public Schools Report. 1891
5. Explain the following :—
(ffl.) Ostracism,
(b.) Olympiads,
(c.) Archons,
(d.) Thirty Tyrants,
(«.) Ounaxa.
6. Locate the following, and state a fact connected with each :—
(a.) Delphi, (d.) Ipsus,
(b.) Thebes, (e.) Cheronea,
(c.) Corinth, (/) Pydna.
English Literature.
1. (a.) Who was the most prominent writer of prose in old English ?
(b.) In what way are the names of William Caxton and John  Wycliffe associated with
English literature ?
2. Give a brief outline of—
(ffl.) The Canterbury Tales.
(b.) The Faerie Queene.
3. Who were the contemporaries of—
(ffl.) Shakespeare ?
(b.) Sir Walter Scott?
4. Name a work of each of the following authors :—
(ffl.) Dryden. (c.) Addison.
(b.) Locke. (d.) Hume.
(f.) Tennyson.
5. (a.) What is a Satire ?    A Sonnet ?
(6.) Distinguish between Tragedy and Comedy.
6. Who were the authors of the following :—
(a.) Thanatopsis. (d.) Hudibras.
(b.) Pleasures of Hope. (e.) Hiawatha,
(c.) The Lady of the Lake. (/.) The Deserted Village.
7. Write five poetical quotations, stating the author of each.
speech.
Rhetoric.
1. State the distinction in the use of each of the following synonyms :—
(a.) hope and expect.
(b.) instruction and education.
(c.) two and couple.
(d.) artist and artisan.
2. Define  personification   and  metonomy,  giving   sentences  containing  these figures  of
3. (a.) Distinguish between sarcasm and irony.
(6.) What is mock-heroic ?
4. (a.) Name five kinds of Composition.
(6.) What is Oratory ?
5. (a.) What is style?
(6.) What is its first cardinal quality ?
6. Write the following sentences correctly :—
(ffl.) It received the popular assent of the people.
(b.) Bridget promised her mistress that she would pay her debts.
(c.) The "ne plus ultra " has been reached. 55 Vict.                                   Public Schools Report.                                            cix
APPENDIX  K.
QUESTIONS SET AT TEACHERS' EXAMINATION, JULY,  1891.
Spelling.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Tuesday, July 7th ; 3 p.m. to If.SO p.m.     Total marks, 100.
Write the following words :—
1.
rhythm                                                                                                           26.  lachrymal
2.
license                                                                                                             27.  catechise
3.
windlass                                                                                                         28. negotiation
4.
buhr-stone                                                                                                      29.  opossum
5.
gossamer                                                                                                   30. paraffine
6.
egregious                                                                                                        31.  oxidized
7.
omission                                                                                                         32. Ptolemaic
8.
pageant                                                                                                          33.  chastisement
9.
cachinnation                                                                                                  34.  hemorrhage
10.
yeomanry                                                                                                       35.  sycophantish
11.
quiescent                                                                                                  36. Gnosticism
12.
litigious                                                                                                          37.  rhododendron
13.
annealed                                                                                                         38.  synonymously
14.
alluvial                                                                                                           39.  unembarrassed
15.
immovable                                                                                                     40.  unprejudiced
16.
assignee                                                                                 -                  41. apocryphal
17.
chrysalis                                                                                                        42.  pneumonia
18.
crystallized                                                                                                    43. irreconcilable
19.
deciduous                                                                                                       44.  incarceration
20.
exhilarate                                                                                                      45.  Renaissance
21.
extirpate                                                                                                        46.  equilibrium
22.
facsimile                                                                                                         47. hypochondriac
23.
financier                                                                                                         48. eccentrically
24.
vacillate                                                                                                         49.  disfranchise
25.
inveiglement                                                                                                 50.  ornithorhynchus.
Writing.     (For all Classes and Grades.)
Saturday, July 4th : 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.     Total marks, 100.
1.
State three fundamental principles on which the teaching of writing depends.
2.
(a.) State the principal benefits of Analysis.
(b.) Would you teach analysis to a beginner ?
(c.) Give reasons for your answer.
3.
Analyze—
(ffl.) C,D.
(b.) g, p, b.
4.
(ffl.) How wonld you impress upon your pupils the importance of the proper holding of
the pen ?
(b.) " The top of the pen should  point  slightly inward to the  shoulder."    Show the
importance of this rule.
5.
(ffl.) Discuss the value of good penmanship.
(6.) Why are there so many poor writers among ex-pupils of our Schools ? 55 Vict.
Public Schools Report.
cv.
Geology.
1. (ffl.) Distinguish between Geology and Mineralogy.
(b.) Show the value of a knowledge of Geology from a practical point of view.
2. (ffl.) State how organic agencies tend to modify the crust of the earth.
(&.) Which of the animal agents is the most notable in this respect ?
3. (ffl.) Name the two great divisions of rocks, stating by what agency each was formed.
(b.) Can mud be properly classified as a rock ?    Why ?
4. (ffl.) Between what two systems does the Old Red Sandstone lie ?
(b.) Describe the New Red Sandstone System.
5. (ffl.) What is the most remarkable rock-system in the British Islands ?
(b.) In what part of this Province is the same system found?
6. (a.) Define lithology and palaeontology,
(b.) Show their value to the geologist.
Education.
2.
3.
ffl.) What is Education ?
b.) Is it a science or an art ?    Why ?
ffl.) Name the subjects that are compulsory in our Common Schools.
6.) State what subjects are optional in these schools,
«.)  What method of teaching spelling would you follow ?
b.) What and now much oral instruction would you advise in primary classes?
ffl.) What is an object lesson ?
b.) Write a brief sketch of an object lesson, showing what should appear on the blackboard when the lesson is finished.
ffl.) Who are legal voters in a Rural School District ?
b.) By whom, and under what provision, are School Districts created ?
ffl.) State five duties of teachers prescribed by the Rules and Regulations.
b.) When can trustees dismiss teachers summarily ?
Latin.
1. (ffl.) What nouns of the third declension form the genitive plural in ium?
(b.) Decline pulchra dies ?
2. (a.) Which of the cardinal numerals are indeclinable ?
(b.) Write the ordinals from decimus to vicesimus.
3. (ffl.) Write twelve pronouns, giving the meaning of each.
(6.) Decline iste and quis.
4. (ffl.) Give the 3rd per. plural of the perfect tense, active and passive, in all the moods,
of the verb scribere.
(b.) Write all the participles, active and passive (naming each), of the verb mittere.
5. Conjugate—
tangere. tollere.
fieri, capere.
currere, prodesse.
ferre. dare,
canere. cvi. Public Schools Report. 1891
6. Translate—
(a.) Two girls were sent to the queen to beg for the life of the citizens.
(6.) Let us return to Sicily, to see our parents.
(c.) There is no doubt but that Csesar is able to make himself master of all Gaul.
(d.) Let us be happy.
(e.) You cannot be happy without virtue.
7. Translate one of the following :—
(ffl.) Hie pagus unus, cum domo exisset, patrum nostrorum memoria, Lucium Cassium
Consulem interfecerat, et ejus exercitum sub jugum miserat. Ita, sive casu, sive consilio
Deorum immortalium, quae pars civitatis Helvetia? insignem calamitatem Populo Romano
intulerat, ea princeps poenas persolvit. Qua in re Csesar non solum publicas, sed etiam privatas
injurias ultus est, quod ejus soceri Lucii Pisonis avum, Lucium Pisonem legatum, Tigurini
eodem prcelio, quo Cassium, interfecerant.
(b.) Olli subridens hominum sator atque deorum
Vultu, quo ccelum tempestatesque serenat,
Oscula libavit natse ; dehinc talia fatur :
Parce metu, Cytherea ; manent immota tuorum
Fata tibi; cernes urbem et promissa Lavini
Mcenia, sublimemque feres ad sidera cceli
Magnanimum .ZEnean : neque me sententia vertit.
(c.) Quin et Atridas, duce te, superbos
Uio dives Priamus relicto
Thessalosque ignes et iniqua Trojse
Castra fefellit.
Tu pias lsetis animas reponis
Sedibus, virgaque levem coerces
Aurea turbam, superis deorum
Gratus et imis.
Give reference of Atridas, Ilio, Thessalos, and duce.
8. Parse the first twenty words of extract translated.
French.
1. (ffl.) Write the feminine of epoux, compagnon, oncle, quel, and empereur.
(b.) Give two plural forms for oeil, del, and aeiul, and state the meaning of each form
2. (ffl.) Write six relative pronouns.
(b.) Distinguish between I'un Vautre and I'un et I'autre.
3. (ffl.)  Write the cardinal numbers between quatorze and trente.
(b.) Par quels deux mots peut-on traduire mille en anglais ?
4. (a.) Write the imperfect indicative and pluperfect subjunctive of recevoir.
(b.) Give the imperative mood and participles of alter, dire, and rire.
5. Translate—
(a.) What pleases me is his modesty.
b.) The year begins on the first of January and ends on the thirty-first of December.
(c.) Tel qui rit vendredi dimanche pleurera.
(d.) I know your nephew ; he is a young man who knows many things for his age.
(e.) Le tout est plus grand que sa partie. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cvii.
6. Translate one of the following :—
(a.) Elle trouva dans son chemin un gros arbre qui etait creux, et elle resolut de s'y
retirer pendant la nuit avec ses enfants. Le jour suivant elle avanga encore autant qu'ils
purent marcher ; elle rencontra des nids d'oiseaux, dont elle prit les eeufs ; et, voyant qu'elle
ne trouvait ni hommes ni betes feroces, elle resolut de se soumettre a la volonte de Dieu, et de
faire son possible pour bien elever ses enfants. Elle avait sauve du naufrage une Bible, et un
livre de prieres ; elle s'en servit pour leur apprendre a lire, et a connaitre Dieu.
(6.) Craignez, repartit Mentor, qu'elle ne vous accable de maux : craignez ses trompeuses
douceurs plus que les ecueils qui ont brise votre navire. Le naufrage et la mort sont moins
funestes que les plaisirs qui attaquent la vertu. Gardez-vous bien de croire tout ce qu'elle vous
contera. La jeunesse est presomptueuse, elle se promet tout d'elle-meme : quoique fragile, elle
croit pouvoir tout et n'avoir jamais rien a craindre : elle se confie legerement et sans precaution.
Gardez-vous d'ecouter les paroles douces et flatteuses de Calypso, qui se glisseront com me un
serpent sous les fleurs; craignez ce poison cache ; defiez-vous de vous-meme, et attendez toujours
mes conseils.
(c.) Gustave Vasa avait ete otage de Christiern et retenu prisonnier contre le droit des
gens. Echappe de sa prison, il avait erre, deguise en paysan, dans les montagnes et dans les bois
de la Dalecarlie: la il s'etait vu reduit a la necessite de travailler aux mines de cuivre, pour vivre
et pour se cacher. Enseveli dans ces souterrains, il osa songer a detroner le tyran. II se
decouvrit aux paysans; il leur parut un homme d'une nature superieure, pour qui les hommes
ordinaires croient sentir une souinission naturelle : il fit en peu de temps de ces sauvages des
soldats aguerris II attaqua Christiern et l'archeveque, les vainquit sou vent, les chassa tous
deux de la Suede, et fut elu avec justice par les etats roi du pays dont il etait le liberateur.
7. Parse the verbs in the extract translated.
Mensuration.
1. (a.) A tree broken off 24 feet from the ground rests on the stump, the top touching
the ground 30 feet from the foot of the tree.    What was the height of the tree ?
(b.) The distance between the opposite corners of a square field is 60 rods ; how many
acres in the field ?
2. A square room, whose floor measures 32 sq. yd. 1 sq. ft., is 11 ft. 6 in. in height; find
the cost of whitewashing the ceiling and walls at 5 cents per square yard.
3. Find how many pieces of money f of an inch in diameter, and ^ of an inch thick must
be melted in order to form a cube whose edge is 3 inches long.
4. A conical wine glass is 2 inches wide at the top and 3 inches deep ; find how many
cubic inches of wine it will hold.
5. A, B, C, and D is a quadrilateral ; the sides A B and D C are parallel. A B = 165
feet, C D — 123 feet; the perpendicular distance of A B and D C is 100 feet. E is a point
in A B such that A E is equal to half the difference of A B and C D ; find the area of the
triangle EEC and of the quadrilateral A E C D.
6. Find the cost of gilding the inner surface of a hemispherical bowl 2 feet 4 inches in
diameter at ljd. per square inch. cviii. Public Schools Report. 1891
Zoology.
1. (ffl.) State the most important distinction between an animal and a plant.
(b.) Name two leading functions possessed by animals which plants do not have.
2. (a.) Name the animal tissues.
(b.) What is the essential material of these tissues ?
3. (ffl.) State Cuvier's Classification of the animal kingdom.
(6.) Name two structural differences between vertebrates and invertebrates.
4. (ffl.) Give the characteristics of the reptilia.
(b.) What is another name for the batrachia?
5. (a.) Name the classes of the Mollusca.
(6.) To which of these classes does each of  the following  belong :—Oyster, cuttle-fish,
snail, and clam ?
6. (ffl.) Give the names and locations of the different fins commonly found on a fish.
(b.) What common fish has a cartilaginous skeleton ?
7. (a.) Name the orders of the Aves.
(£>.) To which of these orders does each  of the following belong:—Owl, crow, goose,
grouse, and crane 1
Astronomy.
1. (a.) Of what is the Solar System composed?
(b.) Name the primary planets in order of distance from the sun.
2. (ffl.) Describe the planet Venus.
(6.) When is Venus an evening star?
3. (a.) What is the mean distance of the earth from the sun ?
(b.) How many degress in width is a temperate zone ?    Why ?
4. (ffl.) Describe and account for the phases of the moon.
(b.) Distinguish between perigee and perihelion.
5. (ffl.) What is the greatest number of eclipses that can take place in a year ?    Name
them.
(6.) What is the least number of eclipses that can occur in a year?    Name them.
6. (a.) On what part of the earth is the North Star never visible ?    Why?
(5.) Jupiter revolves around the sun in 12 of our years.    Compute Jupiter's distance
from the sun by applying Kepler's Third Law. ex. Public Schools Report. 1891
6. Does the use of Copy-books with lithographed head-lines render it unnecessary that the
teacher should be a good writer?    Discuss this question.
7. State and explain the five s's to which attention must be paid in learning to write.
8. What difficulties occur in the formation of the following:—
(a.) The letters t, d, f e.
(b.) Turns.
(c.) Connecting lines?
9. Write as a specimen of penmanship—
'Twas Pentecost, the Feast of Gladness,
When woods and fields put off all sadness.
Thus began the King and spake;
'So from the halls
Of ancient Hofburg's walls,
A luxuriant Spring shall break.'
Drums and trumpet echo loudly,
Wave the crimson banners proudly,
From balcony the King looked on;
In the play of spears,
Fell all the cavaliers,
Before the monarch's stalwart son.
10.  Criticize your writing in the last three lines.
Geography.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Thursday, July 2nd ; 1.30 p.m. to 1/. p.m.     Total marks. 200.
1. (a.) Explain the following terms :—
Orbit, ecliptic, zodiac, llanos, lagoon, and mistral.
(b.) Why is the earth nearer the sun in winter than in summer?
(c.) Give two reasons for the coldness of winter.
2. (ffl.) How  do you find,  by  the  use of a terrestrial globe, the places at which the sun
neither rises nor sets ?
(b.) What is the length of the polar diameter of the earth ?
How is the mean diameter found ?
(c.) Why do islands have a more equable climate than continents?
3. (a.) Give the boundaries of the following :—
Brazil, Holland,
Persia, Ontario,
California,
(b.) Name the capital of each of the foregoing, stating the water on which each city is
located.
4. Locate the British possessions in the Mediterranean, in Africa, South America, and Asia.
5. Trace the course of the following rivers :—
Tay, Godavery,
Congo, Murray,
Shannon, Saskatchewan,
Ural, Essequibo. cxx. Public Schools Report. 1891
Into what two classes have curves been divided ?
Give an example of each class.
Distinguish between the ellipse and the oval.
Show how to draw each.
What is meant by interlacing ?
Draw two interlacing triangles.
What do you understand by conventionalism ?
Draw the conventional form of the maple-leaf.
Describe the characteristics of the Egyptian, the Grecian, and the Roman forms of
ornament.
Of these three styles, which do you consider the best ?   Give your reasons.
Into what two parts may Model and Object Drawing be divided ?
Explain what is meant by chiaroscuro.
4.
(«.)
(b.)
5.
(a.)
(6.)
6.
(ffl.)
(b.)
7.
(«.)
(b.)
8.
(a.)
(6.)
9.
(«.)
(6.)
10.  Draw in simple outline a glass goblet standing on a chair.
Botany.     (For Second Class, Crade B.)
Wednesday, July 8th ; 3.30 p.m. to 5 p.m.     Total Marks, 200.
1. (a.) Describe the process of germination.
(b.) Why does the root grow downwards and the stem upwards?
2. (a.) Give the characteristics of exogens in stem and leaf.
(b.) Explain the different modes of dehiscence, giving examples of each kind.
3. (a.) Name the parts of the pistil,
(b.) What are apocarpous pistils ?
4. (a.) Describe the structure and functions of the leaf.
(b.) Give  a  diagram representing  a cordate, petiolate, stipulate, serrate, and pinnate-
veined leaf.
5. (a.) Define ^Estivation.
(b.) What are double flowers ?
6. (a.) What are dioecious plants ?
(b.) In Indian corn, what name is given to the rachis or axis of inflorescence ?
7. (a.) Give the prominent characteristics of cereals,
(b.) Why is buckwheat not a cereal ?
8. Explain the following terms :—
(a.) Capsule, (f) Protoplasm,
(b.) Sessile, (g.) Verticillate,
(c.) Sterile, (h) Epiphytes,
(d.) Deciduous, (i.) Gamopetalous,
(e.) Hirsute, (j.) Endocarp.
9. (a.) To what is the copious flow of sap from the sugar maple and grape vine due ?
(b.) When should the grape vine be trimmed ?    Why ?
10. Explain the natural system of classification, and  state the gradation of groups from
the species upward, with examples. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. exi.
6. (ffl.) Locate the five principal capes of Europe.
(b.) Where are the following straits:—
Palk, Bass,
Cook, Sunda,
Menai, Torres,
Northumberland, Davis,
Serpent's Mouth ?
7. (ffl.) Locate four mountain ranges and four lakes of this Province.
(6.) Where are the following places situated :—
Quesnelle, Vernon,
Chemainus, Comox,
Revelstoke ?
8. Mention six trading ports of Europe, stating the exports of each.
9. State the natural products and climate of the following: —
Cyprus, Penang,
British Guiana, Sierra Leone,
The Windward Islands.
10.  Draw a map of one of the following :—
(a.) Scotland—with mountains, rivers, and chief cities.
(b.) The Black Sea—with chief ports and mouths of rivers.
(c.) The   Boundary   Line   between   Canada   and  the   United   States—with   adjacent
territories.
English History.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Thursday, July 2nd; 9.30 a.m. to 12 in.    Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) What two agencies contributed most to the civilization of the Britons?
(b.) By what other names were England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales known'
2. Give the names of the Saxon kings, stating the leading events of that period.
3. Sketch the character and reign of Henry I., and of Elizabeth.
4. Describe the chief events in Scotland during the reign of Edward I.
5. What was the condition of Parliament during the Protectorate of Cromwell ?
6. What were the chief foreign events in the reign of Queen Anne 1
7. Give descent, character, and date of accession of each of the following :—
(a.) Stephen.
(b.) Edward IV.
(c.) James I.
(«".) William III.
(e.) George I.
8. What was the social condition of England—
(ffl.) During the 15th century ?
(6.) During the first half of the 18th century ?
9. Give historic reference of—
(ffl.) Anselm.
(b.) Field of Cloth of Gold.
(c.) " Ich dien."
(d.) " Killing no Murder.'
(e.) Rizzio. cxii. Public Schools Report. 1891
10.  When were the following Acts passed ; and what are their chief provisions ?
(«.) Repeal of the Corn Laws.
(b.) Septennial Act.
(c.) Catholic Emancipation.
(d.) Ballot Act.
(e.) Municipal Act.
Canadian History.     (For all Classes and Grades.)
Monday, July 6th ; 9.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Give a short account of the following persons :—
(a.) Donnacona. (b.) Tecumseh.
(c.) Hennepin. (d.) Strachan.
(e.) McNab.
2. What events are associated with the following places .—
(ffl.) Hochelaga. (6.) Lacolle.
(c.) Annapolis. (d.) Niagara
(e.) San Juan.
3. (ffl.) Discuss the expatriation of the Acadians.
(6.) What was Seigniorial Tenure?    When was it abolished ?
4. (a.) State some questions settled by the Treaty of Washington.
(b.) When was this treaty ratified by Canada?
5. Sketch the career of—
(a.) Lord Sydenham.
(b.) Lord Elgin.
6. Give a short sketch of the history of British Columbia.
7. Mention the constitutional changes in Canada from   1759  to  1867, stating the leading
principles of each.
8. State the circumstances which led to the separation of New Brunswick from Nova
Scotia.
9. Name the reasons which led to the choice of Ottawa as the Capital of the Dominion.
10.  (a.) Mention five things which come under the jurisdiction of the Provincial Legislatures.
(b.) Name the chief subjects of legislation belonging to the Dominion Parliament.
English Grammar.     (For all Classes and Grades.)
Friday, July 3rd ; 1.30 p.m. to ^ p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) Name and define the two most important parts of Etymology.
(b.) Explain clearly what is meant by the expression " Parts of Speech."
2. (a.) Give the rules for the formation of the plural of nouns ending in  eh.    Illustrate
each by an example.
(b.) Write the plurals of attorney, tyro, radius, genus, analysis,
(c.) How do you account for such expressions as a hundred horse, five hundred foot,
&c.
3. fa.) Account for the terminations in the names spinster, songstress, vixen.
(b.) Give the reason for the apostrophe in the possessive case.
4. (a.) Distinguish between the use of the possessive pronouns my and mine,
(b.) What two distinct offices are performed by the relative pronoun?
(c.) Show when the word as is a relative pronoun.    Give examples. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxiii.
5. Discuss the following :
(a.) Voice.
(b.) Mood.
(c.) Tense.
6. (a.) Show the differences in meaning between / dined, I have dined, and I had dined,
(b.) How- would you distinguish in meaning between the  auxiliaries will and  shall in
the formation of the future tenses of verbs.
7. (a.) Define the following—Adjective clause.  Adverbial clause,  Noun clause.    Give an
example of each.
(b.) Write a sentence containing a clause in direct quotation, and change it to indirect
quotation.
8. Correct   the following   sentences   where   necessary,   and   give   your   reasons   for   the
correction :—
(a.) I intended to have seen you before this.
(b.) We knew it to be him.
(c.) He divided the estate between his four sons.
(d.) A lady entered, who I afterwards found was my cousin.
fe.J The flowers smell very sweetly and look beautiful.
9. Analyze :—
Inspiring thought of rapture yet to be,
The tears of love were hopeless, but for thee !
If in that frame no deathless spirit dwell,
If that faint murmur be the last farewell,
If fate unite the faithful but to part,
Why is their memory sacred to the heart ?
Why does the brother of my childhood seem
Restored awhile in every pleasing dream ?
Why do I joy the lonely spot to view,
By artless friendship bless'd when life was new ?
10.  Parse the following:—
" Of little use the man, you may suppose,
Who says in verse what others say in prose.
Yet let me show a poet's of some weight,
And, though no soldier, useful to the State."
Composition.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Tuesday, July 7th; 9.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m.     Total marks, 200.
Write an Essay on one of the following subjects :—
1. The Study of Mathematics.
2. Agricultural Societies.
3. The Wild Animals of this Province.
4. Hobbies.
5. Effects of Climate on National Character.
6. National Games.
7. Lynch Law.
8. The Pursuit of Happiness.
9. A Distinguished Female Character.
10. Description of a Trip by Land or Sea. CX1V.
Public Schools Report. 1891
Arithmetic.     (For all Classes and Grades.)
Friday, July 3rd; 9.30 a.m. to 12 m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Find the difference in yards and fractions of a yard between  30 chains- 15  links,  and
3 furlongs 6 rods.
2. (a.) What is the compound interest on $800 for 3 years @ 5' % per annum ?
(6.) Find the true discount on $800 for 3 years @ 5 % per annum.
3. At a special sale, a merchant gave his  customers 40 % off the  marked  price,   but  the
goods had been marked at an advance of 60 % on their cost. Did he gain or lose,
and at what rate per cent, on the price received ?
4. What is the circumference of a wheel which makes 514   revolutions  in  passing over 1
mile 467 yards and 1 foot ?
5. Bought stock @ 2 % below par and sold it at 5 % above,  the   brokerage in each case
being \ °/o.    Cleared $161.85.    How many $15 shares were there ?
6. A quantity of sugar, valued at $42,134 Spanish gold,   was  entered for duty  at  30 %.
In consequence of Spanish gold having been taken at par, whereas it was worth
only 92J cents on the dollar, a refund was afterwards claimed. Find the amount
of the claim.
7. A New Westminster merchant wishes to  remit to  Loudon  £23  2s.   6d.,   the  rate of
exchange is 10| % premium.  What does he pay for the bill in Canadian currency?
8. A gallon of fresh water measures 277'271 cubic  inches, and weighs lOlbs.   avoirdupois.
A ton of sea water measures 35 cubic feet; what is the weight of a lb of sea water
in pounds and decimals of a pound ?
9. A  vessel's  cargo  worth   $10,000   gets   damaged,   and  the   owner  consequently   sells
1 3/n      3 1/7
■—— of _    ,    of it for half the former value  of the whole cargo.    What is  the
1 V-21 5 V5
value of the remainder at the same rate, and what will he lose on the whole cargo
by selling at this rate 1
10. A train 160 yards long is approaching another 150 yards long ; the first is going at the
rate of 40 miles an hour, and the second at the rate of 18 miles an hour. Find
how long a person in the long train will see the other train while passing it.
11. A clock loses at the rate of 8.5 seconds per hour when the fire is  alight,  and  gains  at
the rate of 5.1 seconds per hour when the fire is not burning; but on the whole it
neither loses nor gains.     How long in the 24 hours is the fire burning ?
Mental Arithmetic.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Tuesday, July 7th; 2 p.m. to 2.1^5 p.m.    Total marks, 100.
1. A fathom is what part of a rod ? Ans.
2. What is the cost of 180 yards @ $1.62| per yard ? Ans.
3. I have a garden 40 yards long and one-fourth  as wide.     How  many
times must I walk round it to travel 10 miles? Ans.
4. A perch is what °/0 of an acre ? Ans.
5. If 4| yards cost $ .90, how many yards can be bought with $2.50 ?  Ans.
6. What % pure is 16 4/s carat gold ? Ans. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxix.
7. A circular plate of lead, two inches in thickness and eight inches in diameter, is con
verted without loss into spherical shot of the  same density, and each of .05 inch
radius.     How many shot does it make ?
8. A cone and a hemisphere being supposed to have a common base and to lie at opposite
sides of it; required the ratio  of the  altitude  of the  cone  to the  radius  of the
hemisphere, in order that the volumes of the two solids may be equal.
9. How far over the surface of the Earth could a person standing on the top of a moun
tain one mile high see?    (Earth's radius = 4000 miles.)
10. Find the expense of paving a circular court 30 feet in diameter at 2s. 3d. per square
foot, leaving in the centre a space in the form of a regular hexagon, each side of
which measures two feet.
Music.    (For Second Class, Grade B.)
Wednesday, July 8th; 3.30 p.m. to 5 p.m.     Total Marks, 200.
1. (a.) In the use of the voice what errors are to be guarded against?
(b.) Illustrate a common error in executing the portamento.
2. (a.)  Define musical rhythm.
(b.) Indicate by proper characters a whole rest, a half rest, a double rest.
3. (a.) What is transposition 1
(6.)  What is the signature of the key of B flat ?    Explain why.
4. (ffl.) Distinguish between tie and slur,
(b.) What is a triplet?
(c.) Write a specimen of a triplet.
5. (a.) What is the chromatic scale?
(b.) Write one octave with D as key note.
6. Describe—
(ffl.) Major and minor thirds.
(b.) Perfect and augmented fourths.
7. Define tetrachord and diatonic major scale.
8. (a.) What is meant by time signature?
(b.) What time signature would be required for two  crochets  three  quavers  and two
minims in the bar ?
9. (ffl.) Define accent and its use.
(b.) What is the difference between three-four and six-eight time ?
10.  Write correctly a stanza of a familiar air.
Drawing.     (For Second Class, Grade B.)
Wednesday, July 8th ; 3.30 p.m. to 5 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (ffl.) Mention some of the qualifications that are necessary for the successful teaching of
this subject.
(6.) Show the advantages of ocular over terbal instruction.
2. (a.) What methods would you adopt to teach pupils how to judge distances ?
(b.) Define horizontal, vertical, and oblique, as used in drawing.
3. Explain the following terms :—
(ffl.) Symmetry.
(b.) Repetition,
(c.) Alternation. cxl. Public Schools Report. 1891
Trustees to appoint and give notice of meetings.
43. It shall be the duty of the Trustees of each school district to appoint the place of
each annual school meeting of the voters of the district, and of elections and of a special meeting
for the filling up of any vacancy in the Trustee Corporation occasioned by death, removal, or
other cause, and to cause notices of the time and place to be posted in three or more public
places of such district, one of which shall be upon the school-house, at least ten days before
the holding of such meeting, and to specify in such notices the object of such meeting. They
shall also call and give like notices^of any special meeting for any school purpose which they
may think proper.
Meeting not being held through want of notice.
44. In case, from the want of proper notices, or from any other cause, any annual school
meeting required to be held for the election of Trustees, or any special meeting or election,
shall not be held at the proper time, any five voters in such district may, within twenty days
after the time at which such meeting should have been held, call a meeting by giving ten days'
notice, to be posted in at least three public places in such school district, and the meeting then
called shall possess all the powers and perform all the duties of the meeting in the place of
which it is called.
Trustees may resign.
45. Any person chosen as Trustee may resign, by giving written notice of such intention
to his colleagues in office.
Appointment of Secretary and Treasurer.
46. It shall be the duty of the Board of Trustees to appoint one of themselves to be
Secretary and Treasurer to the Corporation, who shall give such security, as may be required
by a majority of the Trustees, for the correct and safe keeping and forthcoming, when called
for, of the papers and moneys belonging to the Corporation, and for the correct keeping of a
record of their proceedings in a book procured for that purpose, and for the receiving and
accounting for all school moneys which shall come into his hands, and for the disbursing of
such moneys, in the manner directed by a majority of the Trustees.
Meetings of the Board.
47. The Board of Trustees shall meet at least once in every three months.
Powers and duties of Trustees.
48. The Trustees shall take possession and have the custody of and safe keeping of all
public school property which has been acquired or given for public school purposes in such
district, and shall have power to acquire and hold as a Corporation, by any title whatsoever,
any land, movable property, or income for school purposes, and to apply the same according
to the terms oh which the same were acquired or received; with the approval of the Council
of Public Instruction to do whatever they shall judge expedient with regard to the building,
repairing, renting, warming, furnishing, and keeping in order the district school-house or
houses, and the furniture and appendages belonging thereto, and the school lands and enclosures held by them; to visit, at least three times a year, each school under their charge,
and to see that it is conducted according to the authorized regulations; to see that no unauthorized books'are used in the school, and that the pupils are duly supplied with a uniform
series of authorized text-books ; to exercise all the corporate powers vested in them by this Act;
to cause to be*prepared and read at the annual meeting of their district, their annual school
report for the year then terminating; and such report shall include, amongst other things, a
fidlfand detailed account of the receipt and expenditure of all school moneys received and
expended in behalf of such district, for any purpose whatever, during such year; to prepare
and transmit annually, on or before the fifteenth day of July, a report to the Superintendent of
Education, signed by a majority of the Trustees, and specify therein—
(1.) The whole time the school in their district was kept by a qualified teacher, during
the year ending the 30th day of June :
(2.) The amount of money received for the school district, and the manner in which such
money has been expended: 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxli.
(3.) The whole number of children residing in the school district under the age of six
years, and between six and sixteen, the number of children taught in the school or
schools respectively in such district, distinguishing the sexes, and the average attendance of pupils during the year :
(4.) The branches of education taught in the school, the number of pupils in each branch,
the number of visits made by each Trustee, the number of public school examinations,
visits, and lectures, and by whom made or delivered, and such other information as
may be required :
(5.) The uses to which the school buildings and lands have been applied during the year,
and the damage arising or the revenue derived therefrom :
Selection of site for School-house.
49. The site on which to erect a school-house in a rural district shall be chosen by the
Trustees, who shall immediately thereafter call a special meeting of the voters of the district
to approve of the selection made; if a majority of the voters of such district present at this
meeting do not ratify the site chosen by the Trustees, the voters of the district shall at this
meeting determine upon a suitable site, and their decision, subject to the approval of the
Council of Public Instruction, shall finally decide the matter.
General Provisions.
Appointment and dismissal of Teachers.
50. The Trustees of any school district shall, from time to time, select and appoint (from
amongst those persons properly qualified) the teacher or teachers in the school district of such
Trustees, and may remove and dismiss such teacher or teachers upon giving at least thirty
days' notice to the teacher or teachers of such intention of removal and dismissal, and the
reasons therefor. The Trustees shall, upon notification from the Council of Public Instruction
of the inefficiency or misconduct of the teacher, give such teacher thirty days' notice of
dismissal. Nothing in this section shall be taken to confer on any teacher a right to such
thirty days' notice, or salary in lieu of notice, where any teacher has been suspended by the
Trustees for gross misconduct : Provided, always, that in any case where the Trustees have
suspended or dismissed any teacher on a charge of gross misconduct, such teacher may appeal
to the Council of Public Instruction, who shall have power to take evidence and confirm or
reverse the decision of the Trustees ; but in case of a reversal of the decision the teacher shall
not, without the consent of the Trustees, be reinstated in the same school.
Report to Superintendent of Education of appointments and dismissals.
51. The Trustees shall forthwith report to the Superintendent of Education the appointment, resignation, or dismissal of any teacher or teachers in their district, and in case of
dismissal must state the reasons for such dismissal.
Qualification of teachers.
52. No person shall be appointed or retained as a teacher in any Public School, unless he
shall hold a First, Second, or Third Class Certificate, or a Temporary Certificate of Qualification.
When temporary certificates granted.
53. Temporary Certificates shall be granted according to the following regulations :—
(1.) The expression "persons properly qualified," in section 50 of this Act, shall mean
persons holding a First, Second, or Third Class Certificate of Qualification : Provided, however, that the Trustees may, upon their satisfying the Superintendent of
Education of their inability to secure a person properly qualified, suitable as a
teacher for their school, appoint as a teacher, temporarily, the holder of a temporary
certificate:
(2.) A temporary certificate shall be valid until the next public examination of teachers
has been held, and no longer, and no person to whom a temporary certificate has
been issued, who has neglected or failed to obtain at such next public examination a
First, Second, or Third Class Certificate, shall be entitled to receive a second
Temporary Certificate, except in the case of the holder of an expired First, Second,
or Third Class Certificate,  who may obtain a second Temporary Certificate upon cxlii. Public Schools Report. 1891
satisfying the Superintendent of Education that he or she was prevented by illness
or other satisfactory cause from attending at such public examination.
Teachers' Certificates.
54. The Board of Examiners shall have authority to grant certificates as follows :—
(1.) Third Class, Grade B, valid for one year :
(2.) Third Class, Grade A, valid for two years :
(3.) Second Class, Grade B, valid for three years :
(4.) Second Class, Grade A, valid for five years :
(5.) First class, Grade B,   valid for life, or during good  behaviour, if issued  after
July 1st, 1888 :
(6.) First Class, Grade A, valid for life,   or during good behaviour, if issued after
July 1st, 1888.
By whom siqned.
55. Every certificate of qualification obtained at any examination shall be signed by the
Superintendent of Education, and by at least one Examiner, and shall be countersigned by
the Provincial Secretary.
Moral character and fitness to teach.
56. No certificate shall be given to any person as a teacher who does not furnish satisfactory proof of good moral character, and satisfy the Board of Examiners that he or she is a
fit and proper person to be granted a certificate.
Exemptions from examination.
57. Graduates in Arts, of recognized British or Canadian Universities, who have proceeded regularly to their degrees, shall be exempt from examination in other than professional
subjects ; but may be required by oral examination to further satisfy the Examiners as to
their knowledge of the Art of Teaching, School Discipline and Management, and the School
Law of the Province.
Certificates dated July 1st, 1888.
58. Every First Class, Grade A, Certificate, and every First Class, Grade B, Certificate, in
force on July 1st, 1888, shall, on application of the holder thereof, be renewed annually until
July 1st, 1893.
Certificate-holders who have taught for fifteen years.
59. All holders of certificates, who shall have taught in the public schools of the Province
for a period of fifteen years, shall be entitled to have their certificates renewed annually,
without examination, while they continue actively engaged in the service.
Public School Teachers and their Duties.
Duties of Teachers.
60. It shall be the duty of every teacher of a public school—
(1.) To teach diligently and faithfully all the branches required to be taught in the school,
according to the prescribed rules and regulations :
(2.) To keep the daily, weekly, and monthly registers of the school :
(3.) To maintain proper order and discipline in his school, according to the authorized
forms and regulations; and to send to the parent or guardian of each pupil a monthly
report of the progress, attendance, and punctuality of such pupil:
(4.) To keep  a visitors' book   (which  the  Trustees  shall provide) and enter therein the
visits made to his school, and, if deemed advisable, to present such book to such
visitor, and request him to make therein any remarks suggested by his visit:
(5.) At all times, when desired by them, to give to Inspectors and Trustees access to  the
registers and visitors' book appertaining to the school,  and upon his leaving the
school to deliver up the same to the order of the Trustees:
(6.) To have, at the end of each half-year, public examinations of his school, of which he
shall give due notice to the Trustees of the school, and  through  his  pupils  to their
parents and guardians : 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxlii
(7.) To furnish to the Superintendent of Education, monthly, or when desired, any information which it may be in his power to give respecting anything connected with the
operation of his school, or in anywise affecting its interest or character :
(8.) To verify, by affidavit, before any Justice of the Peace, the correctness of such returns
as the Superintendent of Education may, from time to time, require to be so verified :
(9.) To give at least thirty days' notice to the Trustees of his or her intention of resigning:
(10.) To strictly obey the Rules and Regulations made by the Council of Public Instruction.
Salaries of Teachers.
61. Salaries of public school teachers shall be paid from the Provincial Treasury, but no
public school teacher shall be entitled to draw more than one salary for any month or portion
thereof.
General Provisions.
Schools to be Non-sectarian.
62. All public schools established under the provisions of this Act shall be conducted on
strictly secular and non-sectarian principles. The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no
religious dogma nor creed shall be taught. The Lord's Prayer may be used in opening or
closing the school.
Trustees and Clergy ineligible for certain positions.
63. No Trustee shall hold the office of teacher within the district of which he is a Trustee:
Provided, always, that no clergyman of any denomination shall be eligible for the position of
Superintendent, Inspector, Teacher, or Trustee.
School Property in Rural Districts.
64. School buildings and school lands in rural districts shall be under the control of the
Lands and Works Department; but no public school reserve shall be alienated without the
consent of the Trustees of the school district in which such reserve is situate.
Public School Fund.
65. There shall be set apart by the officer in charge of the Treasury for the time being,
out of the general revenue of the Province, in each year, such sum as may be voted by the
Legislative Assembly for public school purposes, and the said sum of money shall be called the
" Public School Fund."
Compulsory Clauses.
Children of school age must attend School.
66. Every child, from the age of seven to twelve, inclusive, shall attend some school, or
be otherwise educated for six months in every year; and any parent or guardian who does not
provide that every such child under his care shall attend some school or be otherwise educated,
shall be subjected to the penalties hereinafter provided by this Act.
Penalty in case of violation of preceding clause.
67. It shall be the duty of the Trustees of every Public School, or of the Superintendent
of Education, or any person authorized by them or him, after being notified that the parents
or guardians of any child continue to neglect or violate the provisions of the last preceding
section of this Act, to make complaint of such neglect or violation to a Magistrate or Justice
of the Peace; and it shall be competent for the Police Magistrate of any city or town, and for
any Magistrate or Justice of the Peace in any town or school district where there is no Police
Magistrate, to investigate and decide in a summary manner upon any such complaint made by
the Trustees, or any person authorized by them, against any parent or guardian for violation
of the last preceding section of this Act, and to impose a fine not exceeding five dollars for the
first wilful offence, and double that penalty for each subsequent offence, which fine and penalty
shall be enforced as provided in the 71st section of this Act.
Exemptions from Compulsory Clause.
68. It shall be the duty of the Police Magistrate, or any Magistrate or Justice of the
Peace where there is no Police Magistrate, to ascertain, as far as may be, the circumstances of cxliv. Public Schools Report. 1s91
any party complained of for not sending his child or children to some  school,  or otherwise
educating him or them ; and he shall accept any of the following as a reasonable excuse :—
(1.) That the child is under instruction in some other satisfactory manner :
(2.) That the child has been prevented from attending school by sickness, or any unavoidable cause:
(3.) That there is no public school open, which the child can attend,  within a  distance
not exceeding three miles measured according to the nearest passable road from the
residence of such child :
(4.) That such child has reached a standard of education of the  same,  or of a greater
degree, than that to be attained in such public school.
Penalties.
Penalty for false declaration of right to vote.
69. Any person wilfully making a false declaration of his right to vote shall, on a summary conviction thereof before any Justice of the Peace, be sentenced therefor to imprisonment for any period not exceeding three months, or to a fine not greater than one hundred
dollars.
Penalty for disturbing School Meetings or Schools.
70. Any person who wilfully disturbs, interrupts, or disquiets the proceedings of any
school meeting authorized to be held by this Act, or any school established and conducted
under its authority, or interrupts or disquiets any public school by rude or indecent behaviour,
or by making a noise either within the place where such school is kept or held, or so near
thereto as to disturb the order or exercises of such school, shall for each offence, on conviction
thereof before a Justice of the Peace, on the oath of one credible witness, forfeit and pay for
public school purposes, to the school district within which the offence was committed, such
sum, not exceeding twenty dollars, together with the costs of the conviction, as the said
Justice may think fit.
Recovery of Penalties.
71. All fines, penalties, and forfeitures mentioned in this Act may be sued for, recovered,
and enforced, with costs, by and before any Police Magistrate, Stipendiary Magistrate, or
Justice of the Peace having jurisdiction within the school district in which such fine or penalty
has been incurred ; and if any such fine or penalty and costs be not forthwith paid, the same
shall, by and under the warrant of the convicting Justice, be enforced, levied and collected,
with costs of distress and sale of the goods and chattels of the offender, and shall by such
Justice be paid over to the Treasurer of the school district; and in default of such distress,
such Justice shall, by his warrant, cause the offender to be imprisoned for any time not exceeding thirty days, unless the fine and costs, and the reasonable expenses of endeavouring to
collect, the same, be sooner paid.
When Act shall come into operation.
72. This Act shall come into operation on the 30th day of June, 1891, and on that day
all School Trustees who may be acting as such for the school districts of the Cities of Victoria,
Vancouver, New Westminster, and Nanaimo, under any Acts now in force in the Province,
shall cease to act as such Trustees, and their powers and authorities shall cease and determine.
Acting Trustees to continue to act.
73. A School Trustee of a Rural District, who is acting as a Trustee on the day on which
this Act comes into force, shall continue to act as a Trustee under this Act for the same term
as he would have acted had this Act not come into force.
victoria, b. c. :
Printed by Richard Wolfboteij, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxv.
7. Find   the  simple  interest on  $4,000  for 4 yrs. 4 mos.   @ 4   %   per
annum. Ans	
8. The sum of three fractions is 2 ; the  numerators,   when reduced   to
equivalent fractions having least common denominator, are 4, 3, 6.
Find the fractions. Ans	
9 A grocer bought geese and turkeys, in all 100, for $65 ; for the geese
he paid 30 cents each, and for the turkeys 80 cents each. How
many of each did he buy ? Ans    geese and turkeys.
10. How far may a boat whose velocity is 8 miles an hour in still water,
go up a stream whose rate is 4 miles an hour, so that the round
trip may take only 8 hours ? Ans	
Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Monday, July 6th ; 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Describe the structure of the skin, the mucous and serous  membranes, and specify the
uses for which each is designed.
2. («.)  What is the chemical composition of bone?
{b.) Why do the bones of the old break more easily than those of children?
(c.) Name and locate the bones of the skull.
(d.) What is a compound fracture ?
3. (ffl.) Into what two classes have the muscles been divided ?
(6.) Show the difference between the contractions of each class,
(c.) Mention a muscle that belongs to both classes.
4. (ffl.) Describe the respiratory and the vocal organs.
(I).)  What is the difference between the air inhaled and that exhaled ?
(c.) What is pneumonia ?  Apoplexy ?
5. Define and locate the following :—
(ffl.)  Pleura.
(b.) Parotid,
(c.)  Retina.
(d.) Pylorus.
(e.) Pancreas.
6. Give the technical names for the following :—
Shoulder-blade, knee-pan, shin-bone, collar-bone, gullet.
7. Classify the different kinds of food according to their chemical  nature, and state what
purpose each kind serves.
8. (ffl.) Describe the composition and uses of the blood.
(6.) Name the blood-vessels connected with the heart, and state with what part of  the
heart each is connected.
9. What treatment would you adopt—
(ffl.) In a case of apparent drowning ?
(b.) In the event of a foreign body entering a pupil's ear ?
10.  Describe the evil effects of—
(ffl.) Alcohol on the nervous system.
(b.) Narcotics on each of the senses. cxvi. Public Schools Report. 1891
Education.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Saturday, July Iftli.; 9.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Define the following:—
(ffl.) Perception, (c.) Knowledge,
(6.) Imagination, (d.) Culture,
(e ) Intellectual Power.
2. (a.) Show that training the senses strengthens the power of the perceptive faculties.
(6.) Describe the subjective and objective methods of mind study.
3. (ffl.) What is meant by unconscious cerebration ?
(b.) What means would you use to awaken the observing faculties and fix the attention
of pupils ?
4. (a.) State the qualities in a teacher that are necessary to success in school government.
(6.)  What do you understand to be the scope of public school education?
5. (a.) What means would you adopt to cure a pupil of indistinctness in reading ?
(6.) Describe an appropriate drill in penmanship.
6. Illustrate the  educational principle  " Ideas  before  Words," drawing examples  from
each of the following subjects :—Reading, Geography, and Arithmetic.
7. (ffl.) Describe the consecutive, the promiscuous, and the simultaneous methods of con
ducting recitations.
(b.) Point out the defects of each method and show how these defects may be overcome.
8. (ffl.) State some points in Arithmetic that require concrete illustration.
(b.) What points in Geography are taken up while pursuing the synthetic method?
9. (a,.) How should desks and seats be arranged in the school-room in order that the light
may be most beneficial to teacher and pupils ?
(6.) What do you understand by good discipline ?
10. (ffl.)  Place diacritical marks over all the vowels in the  following  words,  and   cross  the
silent letters :—
Psychology, Advertisement,
Strength, Respiratory,
Subtle.
(5.)  How would you find the average actual daily attendance  at  your school  for  one
month ?
11. (a.) Show that the teacher should have a good knowledge of the Public School Act, and
of the Rules and Regulations prescribed for the government of the schools.
(b.) State some of the powers and duties of Trustees?    Of Teachers ?
Book-keeping—Single Entry.    (For Second Class, Grades A and B.)
Wednesday, July 8th ; 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) What kind of accounts are kept in Single Entry?
(b.) Describe the books used by a retail merchant and those used by a wholesale
merchant.
2. (a.) Define index, blotter, precis writing, underwriter, and inventory.
(b.) Under what circumstances is the credit system preferable to the cash system so far
as the merchant is concerned ? 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxvii.
3. Write an example of each of the following : —
(a.) A Draft.
(b.) A Cheque.
(c.) An Invoice.
(d.) A Business Letter of Introduction.
(c.) An Advertisement—" House and Lot for Sale."
4. (a.) W7hich would you prefer to have a joint note or & joint and several note?    Why ?
(b.) Write a note that is negotiable by indorsement.
5. (a.) For what purposes only should red ink be used in a set of books ?
(b.) Write a telegram, not exceeding ten words, to be sent to Gage & Co., Toronto,
ordering that firm to send you by express four dozen of Webster's Dictionaries,
and to draw on you at 10 day's sight.
6. (a.) Explain "The Western Milling Co. (Limited)."
(b.) Define the terms mortgage, blank credit, and voucher.
7. (a.) How are errors in posting detected ?
(b.) How would you correct errors in the Day Dook and Ledger?
8. Make ten entries in the Day Book ; post the same and close the Ledger.
Book-keeping—Double Entry.    (For First Class, Grades A and B.)
Wednesday, July 8th ; 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) Define excise, chattels, embargo, contraband trade, and power of attorney,
(b.) Show that Double Entry comprises a system of equations.
2. (a.) In what books, and when, is the term Sundries used ?
(b.) When a   wrong entry  has  been  made  in  a book of original entry, how do you
proceed to make the necessary corrections 1
3. (a.) What are accommodation accounts ?    Name three.
(b,) Why should the holder of an indorsed note demand payment of the  maker on the
date of maturity ?
4. (a.) How is stock account balanced ?
(b.) Write a Bill of Exchange.
5. Give journal entry of the consignor and of the consignee for the following transaction :—
Shipped to Smith & Jones, Vancouver, to be sold on our joint account, each \ :
200 bbls. Mess Pork @ $9.
Paid insurance, \ % on $1500.
6. Enter the following transactions in the journal and   ledger, and make out a Balance
Sheet :—
Commenced business with cash on hand, $550.
Merchandise, $5,500, and notes on hand, $250.
I owe notes outstanding $1,400, and A. B. Sharp on account $500.
Sold merchandise to J. D. Jordan for $1,500, receiving in payment cash $800,
his note for $500, and balance on account.
Paid my note for $900, held by W. D. Short as follows :—Merchandise $100,
cash, $600, order on J. D. Jordan for $200.
Sold merchandise to A. B. Sharp for $500.
Received in payment his receipt in full of account against me.
Sold  merchandise to John James & Co. amounting to $500.    Received in
payment my note held by them for $500.
Bought merchandise of Willis & Co. for $300.
Gave in payment cash, $100, John Gills'note for $250, upon which a discount
of $50 was allowed.
Inventory, $3,250. cxviii. Public Schools Report. 1891
Mensuration.     (For Second Class, Grades A and B.)
Wednesday, Jidy 8th ; 9.30 a.m. to 12 m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Define—
(ffl.) Trapezium, (c.) Sector,
If).) Rhomboid, (d.)  Hypothenuse,
(e.) Perimeter.
2. A square field contains 4 acres.    How   many  rods  of fencing  would  be required  to
enclose it?
3. The chord of an arc is 49 feet, and the chord  of half the  arc  is  25  feet ; find  the
diameter of the circle.
4. Find the area in acres of an isosceles right-angled triangle, the  perpendicular from the
right angle on the hypothenuse being 1000 feet.
5. A field is in the form of a trapezoid, the two parallel sides being 6 chains and 4 chains;
a third side is 5 chains and is inclined to a parallel side at 60°: find the area
6. A penny and a halfpenny have diameters of one-tenth of a foot and of an inch respec
tively, if a halfpenny lie wholly on the top of a penny, what amount of the upper
surface of the penny will be left uncovered ?
7. The two diagonals of a quadrilateral are 30 and 40 chains, and the angle between them
is 30°.     Required the area in acres.
8. It was observed on a certain occasion  that a   vertical scantling  16  feet high  cast a
shadow of 11 feet, and that a fir tree cast a shadow of 154 feet.    Find the height
of the tree.
9. The radius of a circle is 20 inches and the length of a chord if 20 -j/2 inches.    What
is the area of the smaller segment?
10.  The difference between the diameter and the circumference of a circle is 10 feet.   Find
the diameter.
Mensuration.    (For First Class, Grades A and B.)
Wednesday, July 8th ; 9.30 a.m. to 12 m.     Total marks, 200.
1. The diameter of a circle described round a triangle is equal to the product of the sides
of the triangle divided by twice the area of the triangle :    Prove this statement.
2. (ffl.) In the metrical system, what are the units of length and of weight and what is the
relation between them ?
(b.) The weight of water which a certain cylinder will hold  is  36 kilogrammes; the
radius of the cylinder is 15 centimetres.    Find the height of the cylinder.
3. The radii of the ends of the frustrum of a right circular cone are  7  feet  and   8  feet
respectively and the height is 3 feet.    Find the volume of the cone from which the
frustrum was obtained.
4. Find how many superficial feet of inch plank can be sawn out of a log 20 feet 4 inches
long, 1 foot 10 inches wide, and 1 foot 6 inches deep.
5. Find the number of square feet of lead required to cover a pyramidal roof,  the base
being a square of 19 feet in the side and the height 6 feet.
6. Assuming that the difference in Longitude between Kamloops and Victoria is 3°, what
is the area of the position of the Earth's surface contained between the meridian of
Victoria and that of Kamloops?    (Earth's radius = 4000 miles.) 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxxi.
Algebra.    (For Second Class, Grade A.)
Thursday, July 9th ; 9.30 a. m. to 12 m.    Total marks, 200.
1. (ffl.) Wherein does the algebraic notation differ from that of arithmetic ?
(b.) Define the terms index, power, coefficient.
2. Resolve into elementary factors—
(«.) 6x2 + 5x — i.
(b.) ffl2-13ffl& + 4262.
(c.) ffl3 - ffl2* - 6fflx2.
(ffl1.) 662*2 _ 7^3 _ 33.4.
3. (ffl.) Simplify a - [5b - { a - 3(c - b) + 2c - (ffl - 26 - c) ) \
x3 + 3*2 — 20
(b.) Reduce  to its lowest terms, and find its value when x = 2.
4. (a.) What is a simple equation?
(b.) Show how an equation containing several fractions is cleared of them,  and state
the principle upon which this operation is based.
5. Solve the following :—
(».) i/h (Sa + u/s)-1/? (4x-2|) = i (5x-l).
„ , 2*+ 3    4x     1    6*4-2    33 + 1
(b.) 1 = -H .
v  '     4 3     x       3 6
(c.) (a + x) (b + x) = a(b + c) + —- + x2.
6. («.) Find the G. C. M. of—
3*3 — 3a322/ + xy2 — y8 and ix"y — hxy1 + ys.
(b.) Explain the process by which the Least Common Multiple is obtained.
7. Out of a cask of wine, of which x/6 part had leaked away, 10 gallons were drawn, and
then it was f full; how much did it hold ?
8. Divide $149 among A, B, C, D, so that A may have half as much again as B, and  a
third as much again as B and C together, and D a fourth as much  as  A and  C
together.
9. A and B began to play together with equal sums of money ; A first won $20, but after
wards lost half of all he then had, and then his money was half as much as that of
B : what money had each at first ?
10. A starts from a certain place, and travels at the rate of 7 miles in 5 hours; B starts
from the same place 8 hours after A, and travels in the same direction at the rate
of 5 miles in 3 hours : how far will A travel before he is overtaken by B ?
Algebra.    (For First Class, Grades A and B.)
Thursday, July 9th ; 9.30 a.m. to 12 m.      Total marks, 200.
1. (ffl.) What kind of coefficient has every algebraic quantity?
(b.) Show that addition does not always mean augmentation, and that subtraction does
not always convey the idea of diminution.
2. Express in factors the following expressions :—
(a.) a3+ 64. (c.)  1- 18*- 63k2
(b.) 729-2/6. 'd.) 3ai2-4sc + l.
(e.) ** - 29a;2 + 100. cxxii. Public Schools Report. 1891
3.  Extract the square root of—
ffl2     ffl3     a2 x2
(b.) 7 + 2|/ra '
4. Solve the following equations :—
«*=±S + -i-a
*+ 3 03+1
* + 4      03—4      10
'' a7T4 + a7+4 = y'
5. A party was composed of a certain number of men and women, and, when four of the
women were gone, it was observed that there were left just half as many men
again as women ; they came back, however, with their husbands, and now there
was only a third as many men again as women. What was the original number
of each ?
6. On a certain road the telegraph posts are at equal distances, and the number per mile
is such that were there one less in each mile the interval between the posts would
be increased by 214/is yards.    Find the number of posts in a mile.
7. A line of given length is bisected and produced : find the length of the produced part,
so that the rectangle contained by half the line and the line made up of the half
and the produced part may be equal to the square on the produced part.
- 12
8. (a.) Find by the binomial theorem the greatest term in the  expansion of (1+*)
when x = 7/$,
(b.) WThat is  the  least integer  which when added to both terms of the ratio 5 : 9 will
make a ratio greater than 7:10?
9. A person who saved every year half as much again as he saved the previous year had
in 7 years saved £102 19s.    How much did he save the first year?
10.  In a  shooting  competition  a man can score 5,  4,  3,  2,  1, or 0 points for each shot.
Find the, number of different ways in which he can score 30 in 7 shots.
Geometry.    (For Second Class, Grade A.)
Friday, July 10th ; 9.30 a.m. to 12 m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Explain the following terms :—
(a.) Theorem. (/) Parallelogram.
(b.) Axiom. (g.) Line.
(c.) Postulate. (A.) Vertex.
(d.) Hypothesis. (i.) Perpendicular,
(e.) Corollary. (/.) Diagonal.
2. If at a point in a straight line two other straight lines,  upon the opposite  sides  of it,
make  the  adjacent  angles  together  equal  to two  right angles;  then these two
straight lines shall be in one and the same straight line.
3. At a given point in a given straight line,  make a rectilineal angle equal to a given
rectilineal angle.
4. Straight lines which are parallel to the same straight line are parallel to each other.
5. The straight lines which join the extremities of two equal and parallel straight lines
towards the same parts, are also themselves equal and parallel. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxxiii.
6. Equal triangles on equal bases in the same straight line, and towards  the  same parts,
are between the same parallels.
7. The complements of the parallelograms which are about the diagonal of a parallelogram
are equal.
8. In a right angled triangle, the square on the side subtending the right angle is equal to
the squares on the sides containing the right angle.
9. If from the ends of a side of a triangle there be drawn two  straight lines  to  a  point
within the triangle, these shall be less than the other two sides of the triangle, but
shall contain a greater angle.
10.  All the exterior angles of any rectilineal figure, made by producing  the  sides successively in the same direction, are together equal to four right angles.
Geometry.    (For First Class, Grade B.)
Friday, July 10th ; 9.30 a.m. to 12 to.     Total marks, 200.
1. Define—Rhomboid, Rectangle, Sector,   Angle of a  Segment,   Angle in a  Segment, a
line placed in a circle, a line touching a circle.
2. If two triangles have two angles of the one equal to two angles  of the  other,  each to
each, and one side equal to one side, viz. : either the sides adjacent to the equal
angles in each, or the sides opposite to them ; then shall the other sides be
equal, each to each, and also the third angle of the one equal to the third angle of
the other.
3. If a straight line be divided  into two  equal,   and also  into  two  unequal parts;   the
rectangle contained by the two unequal parts, together with the square on the line
between the points of section, is equal to the square on half the line.
4. If one circle touch another in any point, whether internally or externally, the straight
line which joins their centres shall pass through that point of contact.
5. A segment of a circle being given, describe the circle of which it is the segment.
6. Describe an isosceles triangle, having each of the angles at the base double of the third
angle.
7. Describe a circle about a given triangle.
8. The squares on the two sides of a triangle are together double the squares on  half  the
base and on the straight line joining its bisection with the opposite angle.
9. Inscribe a circle in a given sector of a circle.
10.  The equilateral triangle inscribed in a circle is one-fourth  of the equilateral  triangle
circumscribed about the same circle.
Zoology.    (For Second Class, Grade A.)
Thursday, July 9th; 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) How does animal life differ from vegetable life?
(6.) Distinguish between Histology and Morphology.
2. (a.) Describe the zoophyte, and name three.
(b.) What is meant by spontaneous fission 1    By gemmation 1
3. (a.) Name the classes of the Protozoa.
(b.) Describe the sponge.
4. (ct.) Give a brief description of the classes asteroidea and lamellibranchiata.
(6.) What is " rot " in sheep ? cxxiv.
Public Schools Report.                                         1891
5.
(ffl.) How is respiration effected by insects ?
(b.) In what respect does an arachnidan resemble a cephalopodl
6.
Describe a frog—
(a.) As to its structure.
(b.) As to its transformations.
7.
(ffl.) Of what does a typical vertebrate consist?
(b.) Give five modifications of the vertebra type, and a characteristic of each.
8.
Point out the difference between—
(a.) A clam and an oyster.
(6.) A worm and a snake,
(c.) A codfish and a whale.
9.
(a.) Show the connection between the teeth and the food of three mammals.
(b.) Why are the teeth of animals of great importance to the zoologist?
10.
(a.) Name an animal, found in this  Province, belonging to  each  order of the  classes
Mammalia and Pisces. .
(b.) What grand distinctive zoological character separates man from the other animals ?
Astronomy.     (For Second Class, Grade A.)
Thursday, July 9th ; 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1.
Explain what is meant by—
(ffl.) Equation of Time.
(b.) Old Style and New Style,
(c.) Variable Stars.
(d.) Multiple Stars.
2.
(a.) What are the apparent motions of the fixed stars ?
(b.) Account for each.
3.
Mention the names of three constellations  in  the  Zodiac  with  the names of one or
more conspicuous stars in each.
4.
Name the brightest star in Ursa Minor and in Canis Major.
5.
Account for the changes of the seasons.
6.
(a.) What is the periodic time of Mars ?
(b.) Explain why it is longer than that of the Earth.
(c.) Describe the satellites of Mars.
7.
Define node, radius vector, hour angle, perihelion.
8.
Give Newton's statement of the law of universal gravitation.
9.
(ffl.)  Explain how the moon is some times visible when totally eclipsed.
(b.) Why is it not always visible in a total eclipse?
10.
(a.) Distinguish transit from occultation.
(b.) State the practical use made of each phenomenon. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxxix.
Geometry.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Friday, July lOtli ; 9.30 a.m.. to 12 m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Give Euclid's definitions of—
(ffl.) Homologous terms. (c.) Similar segments.
(6.)  Reciprocal figures. (d.) Extreme and mean ratio.
(e.) Lines equidistant from the centre of a circle.
2. If two triangles have two sides of the one equal to two sides of the other, each to each,
but the base of the one greater than the base of the other; the angle contained by the
sides of the one which has the greater base shall be greater than the angle contained by the sides equal to them of the other.
3. Describe a square equal to a given rectilineal figure.
4. If two straight lines cut one another within  a  circle,  the  rectangle contained by the
segments of one of them is equal to the rectangle contained by the segments of the
other.
5. Describe a circle about a given triangle.
6. If three straight lines be proportionals,  the  rectangle contained  by  the  extremes  is
equal to the square on the mean, and conversely.
7. If two triangles, which have two sides of the one  proportional  to  two  sides   of  the
other, be joined at one angle, so as to have their homologous sides parallel, the
remaining sides shall be in a straight line.
8. Draw a line from the vertex of a triangle to the base, which shall be  a  mean  propor
tional between the whole base and one segment.
9. The rectangle contained by two lines is a mean proportional between their squares.
10.  Triangles and parallelograms of unequal altitudes are to each  other in   the  ratio  compounded of-the ratios of their bases and altitudes.
Practical Mathematics.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Saturday, July 11th; 3 p.m. to 5.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) Find that the Trigonometrical Ratios for an angle of 37|°.
(b.) Show that Cos 0° = 1.
2. (a.) Prove that the sum of two cosines is equal to the product of twice the  cosine of
half the sum of the angles, into the cosine of half their difference.
(b.)  Demonstrate the following :—
Sin (A + B) Sin (A - B) = Sin 2A - Sin 2B.
3. (a.) Express in degrees, in grades, and in circular  measure  the  difference  between a
degree and a grade.
(b.) If two sides of a triangle and the contained  angle  are  given,   show  how to find
the other side and angles.
4. From the top of a tower 136.5 feet high, the angle of depression of the  root of a tree
at a distance on the same plane was 22° 40'; what was the distance of the tree
from the bottom of the tower ?
5. Describe Gunter's Chain and Hadley's Quadrant or Sextant.
6. A lighthouse stands 9 miles N. of a port from which a yacht sails in a direction E.N.E.
until the lighthouse is N. W. of her, when she tacks and sails towards the lighthouse until the port is S.W. of her, when she tacks again and sails into port. How
far has the yacht travelled ? 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxxv.
Rhetoric.    (For Second Class, Grade A.)
Thursday, July 9th ; 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Under what circumstances is Tautology admissible ? Give instances.
2. Explain and give examples of—
(a.) Harmony of sound and sense.
(b.) Obverse iteration.
(c.) Circumlocution.
(d.) Humour.
3. (a.) Into what classes may sentences be divided from a Rhetorical point of view ?
(b.) What four properties are essential to a perfect sentence ?
4. Explain the necessity, in Oratory, of a knowledge of the persons addressed.
5. Enumerate the sources of Pathos.
6. What is the standard of  " Good   Use " or " Established   Usage ? "     Give  instances of
" Divided Usage."
7. (a.) What are the essential, and what the non-essential parts of a composition ?
(b.) What does each contain ?
8. Write sentences illustrating the difference in meaning between the following words :—
(a.) Continuous and continual.
(b.) Displace and replace.
(c.) Ingenious and ingenuous.
(d.) Persuade and advise.
(e.) Beside and besides.
9. Distinguish between Barbarisms, Solecisms, and Improprieties, with  instances of each.
10. Give examples of—
(a.) Bathos.
(b.) Archaism.
(c.) Euphemism.
(d.) Antithesis.
Natural Philosophy.    (For First Class, Grades A and B.)
Saturday, July 11th ; 9.30 a.m. to 12 m.     Fotal marks, 200.
1. (ffl.) What is the pressure of the atmosphere on the square inch at the Earth's surface 1
(b.) How was the amount first ascertained?
(c.) Explain how the height of a mountain is found by means of a barometer.
2. (as.) State the laws of reflection of light.
(b.) Describe the solar spectrum.
(c.) Explain what is meant by Fraunhofer's lines.
3. Define—
(ffl.) Inertia.
(b.) Polarity,
(c.) Statics.
4. Describe the declination and the dip of the magnetic needle.
5. Resolve a force of 361bs. into two others, making the angles 90° and  30° with it,  one
on each side.
6. A heavy right-angled triangle is suspended by its right angle, and the inclination of its
hypothenuse to the horizon is 40°.    Find the angles of the triangle. cxxvi. Public Schools Report. 1891
7. A uniform beam rests with one end  on a rough  horizontal  plane,   and  the  other  end
leans at an angle of  45°  against a smooth  vertical  wall ; prove  that  the  friction
required to prevent slipping is one-half the weight of the beam.
8. A balloon is 400 feet from the ground, and ascending at the rate of 10 feet per second.
What time would a sandbag take to fall from it to the ground ?
9. A rectangular barge open at the top is made of sheet  iron a quarter of  an inch  thick
(4801bs. per cubic foot) ; it is 36 feet long, 12 feet wide and  7  feet deep.     What
weight placed in the barge will just sink it ?
10.  A glass ball weighs 3,000 grains,  and  has as  specific gravity  3.      What  will  be its
apparent weight when immersed in a liquid whose specific gravity is .92 ?
English Literature.    (For First Class, Grades A and B.)
Friday, July 10th; 3.30 p.m. to 5.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) Define the term Literature, and state the two forms in which it appears.
(b.) Point out the characteristics of the early Anglo-Saxon poems.
2. Show fully the effects of the Norman Conquest on English Literature.
3. (a.) Name the first English prose writer whose works have been transmitted to us.
(b.) Point out briefly his faults as an author.
4. Give a brief account of the earliest form of the English drama.
5. Write a short biography of Jphn Milton, dividing his  life into three periods, and men
tioning the principal works produced in each.
j.  (a.) Describe the leading features of Wordsworth's poetry.
(b.) Name his principal works.
( c.J To what school of poetry did he belong ?
7. Name the more prominent writers of the Elizabethan age, and give a brief description
of the works of each.
8. Give the name of the author of each of the following : —
(a.) Novum Organum. (b.) Roderick Random.
(c.) Tale of a Tub. (d.) Sartor Resartus.
(e.) The Scarlet Letter.
9. (cs.) Name five great essayists.
if.) Write a stanza from Burns, Moore, Tennyson, or Longfellow.
10. (a.) Explain the meaning of the terms objective and subjective as applied to the poetic
treatment of a subject.
(b.) Give the names of two poets that belonged to the Artificial or French School.
11, Trace the gradual development of the newspaper. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxxvii.
General History.    (For First Class, Grades A and B.)
Friday, July 10th; 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. From what sources do we derive our knowledge of ancient Egyptian history ?    What is
the " Rosetta stone ?"
2. (a.) What is "caste?"
(b.) What is the influence of the system on Indian politics ?
(c.) Name the chief divisions of Hindoo society.
3. Write a short account of—
(«.) Attila.
(6.) Luther.
(c.) Kossuth
4. Describe the influences which undermined the system of Feudalism.
5. Describe the events which led to the rise of Napoleon.
6. Give the meaning and origin of the following names :—
(a.) Mayor of the Palace. (b.) Caliph.
(c.) Archon. (d.) Elector Palatine.
(e.) Exarch of Ravenna. (/.') Protestant.
(«.) Jacobite. (h.) Zollverein.
(i.) Huguenot. (J.)  " The Mountain " (a French party.)
7. (a.) What is meant by the " Balance of Power " in Europe?
(6.) What great wars have been fought to preserve it?
8. Give historic reference of—
(ffl.) Abu Bekr. (6.) Godfrey of Bouillon,
(c.) Daniel O'Connell. (d.) The States-General.
(e.) Sir Francis Drake. (f) Trent.
9. Name the chief events in European history during the 13th century.
10. Describe any three of the following battles :—
(ffl.) Fontenoy. (d.) Sedan.
(b.) Pultowa. (0.) Gettysburg,
(c.) Torres Vedras. (/.) Tel-el-Kebir.
Chemistry.    (For First Class, Grades A and B.)
Friday, July 10th; 1.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1.  (a.) Define molecule, atom, atomic weight, molecular weight.
(b.) What is an acid ?    A base ?    An alkali ?    A salt ?
(c.) What are the chief properties of acids ?
. 2. (a.) What is aqua regia ?    How is it prepared ?
(b.) What is borax ?    How is boric acid prepared ?    Give its formula.
3. (a.) Give the symbol and combining weight of Carbon.
(b.) In how many allotropic forms does it exist 1
(c.) Name them, and describe their physical properties.
4. When carbon is burnt in oxygen gas, it forms carbon dioxide, CO2.     How much carbon
dioxide by weight can be obtained by thus burning 15 grams of carbon ?
5. (a.) What is gunpowder 1
(b.) Why will it burn in a closed space, or under water ?
(c.) Explain the causes which produce (what is termed) an explosion. Public Schools Report. l89i
6. (a.) Discuss allotropism.
(b.) What is ozone 1
7. Give the formulse for the following :—
(a.) Sodium Chloride.
(b.) Sodium Carbonate.
(c.) Calcium Chloride.
(d.) Sodium Sulphate.
(e.) Ammonium Chloride.
8. (a ) What is the chief ore of m.ercury 1
(b.) Where is it found ?
(c.) How many compounds of mercury are there ? Name them.
9. Write the formulae for—
(a.) Calomel.
(b.) Silver Chloride.
(c.) Corrosive sublimate.
(d.) Copper sulphate.
10.  (a.) What is Scheele's Green?
(b.) How is it prepared ?
(c.) Describe Marsh's test for arsenic.
Geology.    (For First Class, Grades A and B.)
Friday, July 10th ; 1.30 to 3.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Of the chemical elements which enter into the composition of the more common  rocks,
name three metallic, and three non-metallic.
2. Explain the origin of quartzite, marble, graphite.
3. Define—
(a.) Kaolin,
(o.)  Conglomerate.
(c.) Shale.
(d.) Breccia.
(e.) Concretions.
4. In what systems do the following fossil remains first appear :—
(ffl.) Lamellibranchs ?
(b.) Angiosperms ?
(c.) Sigillaria?
(d.) Mammals?
5. What was the probable climate of—
(ffl.) The Eocene and the Miocene ?
(b.) Give facts in support of your view.
6. Discuss briefly the influence of frozen water on the earth's crust.
7. Show how life has contributed to the formation of rocks.
8. Explain the following terms :—
(a.) Denudation.
(b.) Lamination.
(c.) Strike.
(ffl1.) Axis.
9. Locate the cretaceous beds on Vancouver Island.
10. (ffl.) Describe the archsean rocks.
(6.) Discuss briefly the progress of life in the geological ages Public Schools Report. 1891
7. A ship sails 136.4 miles due W. on  the parallel  of latitude  49°   30'.     Required  the
difference of longitude made.
8. From a station O within a pentagonal field, the distances and angles measured   were as
follows :—
AO = 1469 links, Angle AOB = 71° 30'.
BO = 1196    „ „       HOC = 55° 45'.
CO=1299    „ „       COD = 49°15'.
DO = 1203    „ „      DOE = 81°30'.
EO=1410    „
Required the area of the field.
Ancient History.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Saturday, July 11th ; 1.30 p.m. to 3 p.m.     Total Marks, 200.
1. Give an account of the life and conquests of Cyrus, Philip, or Pyrrhus.
2. Give a brief account of Hiram and Zoroaster.
3. Describe the reforms of Solon, and of the Gracchi.
4. («.) Give a short description of the following battles : Marathon, Thermopylae, Salamis-
(b.) In what wars did they occur?
5. Who was Pericles, and for what was he famous 1
6. («.) What event led to the First Peloponnesian War?
(6.) Give the names of some of the chief generals, and of the principal battles.
7. (ffl )  What led to the formation of the Achsean League 1
(b.) What caused the Spartans to abandon the code of Lycurgus ?
8. (ffl.) Give an account of the rise and fall of the Assyrian and Macedonian Empires,
(p.) Name the capitals, and state the two greatest monarchs of each.
9. State what you know about the following :—
(a.) Cleopatra. (b.) Semiramis.
(c.) Seneca.     . (d.) Esther,
(e.) Sulla.
10.  For what are the following places famous ?
(a) Delphi. (£>.) Cannai.
(c.) Zela. (d.) Philippi.
(«.) Alba Longa.
Latin.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Monday, July 13th; 9.30 a.m. to 12 m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Translate into Latin the following sentences :—
(a.) I began this examination (probafio) at Victoria at 9 o'clock on July 2nd, 1891.
(6.) The citizens promised to give hostages and to do what he bade them.
(c.) The soldiers pressed on with such speed and spirit, though they had nothing but
their heads above water, that the enemy, unable to sustain the attack of the
legions and the cavalry, forsook the bank and betook themselves to flight.
2. (ffl.) Give the Genders and Genitives of ordo, pulvis, tellus, quies, aer.
(b.) What cases do the following verbs govern :—memini,  egeo,  noceo, impero, impleo ?
(c.)   Explain the meaning of subjective genitive, objective genitive,  partitive genitive,
ethical dative, cognate accusative. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxxxi.
3. Translate—
Denique hos esse eosdem, quibuscum ssepenumero Helvetii congressi, non solum in
suis, sed etiam in illorum finibus, plerumque superarint, qui tamen pares esse nostro exercitu
non potuerint. Si quos adversum proelium et fuga Gallorum commoveret, hos, si qusererent,
reperire posse, diuturnitate belli defatigatis Gallis, Ariovistum, cum multos menses castris se
ac paludibus tenuisset, neque sui potestatem fecisset, desperantes jam de pugna et dispersos
subito adortum, magis ratione et consilio, quam virtute, vicisse. Cui rationi contra homines
barbaros atque imperitos locus fuisset, hac, ne ipsum quidem sperare, nostros exercitus capi
posse.
4. (cf.) Give the object after superarint.
(b.) Show the difference in meaning of timeo, metuo, vereor.
(c.) Describe briefly the arrangement of a Roman Camp.
5. (ffl.) Give with examples the different ways of denoting purpose in Latin.
(b.) Distinguish between the interrogatives quis and qui,  quod and  quid,  and   the
conjunctions aut and vel.
(c.)  Show clearly when the interrogative particles num, nonne and ne are used.
6. Translate—
Hie vero ingentem pugnam, ceu cetera nusquam
Bella forent, nulli tota morerentur in urbe,
Sic Martem indomitum, Danaosque ad tecta ruentes
Cernimus, obsessumque acta testudine limen.
Hserent parietibus scalar, postesque sub ipsos
Nituntur gradibus, clypeosque ad tela sinistris
Protecti objiciunt, prensant fastigia clextris
Dardanida?, contra, turres ac tecta domoruni
Cuhnina convellunt : his se, quando ultima cernunt,
Extrema jam in morte parant defendere telis.
7. (ffl.) Conjugate   morerentur,   ruentes,   cernimus,   obsessum, hcerent,   nituntur, protecti,
convellunt, objeciunt.
(b.) Account for the cases of testudine, parietibus, gradibus, se, telis.
(c.)  Describe the formation of a testudo.
(d.) Scan four lines beginning with Sic Martem.
8. Translate—
Est et fideli tuta silentio
Merces :  vetabo, qui Cereris sacrum
Vulgarit arcana;, sub isdem
Sit trabibus, fragilemve mecum
Sol vat phaselon.    Ssepe Diespiter
Neglectus incesto addidit integrum :
Raro antecedentum  scelestum
Deseruit pede Poena claudo.
9. (ffl.) Write brief notes on the words Diespiter and phaselon.
(b.) Give the derivation of silentio, tuta, fragilem, arcana, incesto.
(c.)  Account for the mood of sit and solvat.
10.  (ffl.) In what metre is the extract in question 8 written?
(6.) Describe at least three other metres used by Horace. cxxxii. Public Schools Report. 1891
French.    (For First Class, Grade A.)
Monday, July 13th; 2 p.m. to £.80p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Write down, with all inflexions, the present and past participles of desceudre, rejoindre,
resoudre, s'asseoir, and soustraire.
2. Explain the different meanings of the following adjectives before  and   after the  sub
stantive "homme":—brave, grand, petit, honnete, pauvre.
3. Write —
(ffl.) The masculine of marraine, niece, trai, tresse.
(b.) The singular of bestiaux, emaux, baux, vitraux, aloyaux.
4. (a.) When is "than" translated by "que," "de," and "que ne"?    Give instances.
b.  Illustrate by examples the uses of the pronouns "y," "en," and "soi."
5. Accentuate the following:—Privilege, eff'rene, inquiete, fete, bonte.
6. Translate—
The next day you find a letter awaiting you at.school. It is from his indignant
mother. She informs you that she fears her little boy will not learn much in the
class you have put him in. He ought to be in one of the advanced classes. He
has read Voltaire, and can speak French. She knows he can; she heard him at
Boulogne, and he got on very well. The natives there had no secrets for him ; he
could understand all they said.
7. Translate—
(ffl.) Les Turcs, qui cependant entouraient cette maison tout embrasee, voyaient avec
une admiration melee d'epouvante que les Suedois n'en sortaient point; mais leur
etonnement fut encore plus grand lorsqu'ils virent ouvrir les portes, et le roi et les
siens fondre sur eux en desesperes. Charles et ses principaux officiers etaient
amies d'epees et de pistolets : chacun tira deux coups a la fois a l'instant que la
porte s'ouvrit; et dans le meme clin d'ceil, jetant leurs pistolets et s'armant de
leurs epees, ils firent reculer les Turcs plus de cinquante pas; mais le moment
d'apres cette petite troupe fut entouree : le roi, que etait en bottes, selon sa
coutume, s'embarrassa dans ses eperons, et tomba ; vingt et un janissaires se jettent
aussitot sur lui: il jette en l'air son epee pour s'epargner la douleur de la rend re ;
les Turcs l'emmenent au quartier du bacha, les uns le tenant sous les jambes, les
autres sous les bras, comme on porte un malade que Ton craint d'incommoder.
Au moment que le roi se vit saisi, la violence de son temperament, et la
fureur oil un combat si long et si terrible avait du le mettre firent place tout a
coup a la douceur et a la tranquillite : il ne lui echappa pas un mot d'impatience,
pas un coup d'ceil de colere ; il regardait les janissaires en souriant, et ceux-ci le
portaient en criant Alia avec une indignation melee de respect. Ses officiers
furent pris au meme temps, et depouilles par les Turcs et par les Tartares. Ce fut
le 12fevrierde Fan 1713 qu'arriva cet etrange eveneinent, qui eut encore des
suites singulieres.
(b.) Le temps assez souvent a rendu legitime
Ce qui semblait d'abord ne se pouvoir sans crime.
Rodrigue t'a gagnee, et tu dois etre a lui.
Mais, quoique sa valeur fait conquise aujourd'hui,
II faudrait que je fusse ennemi de ta gloire
Pour lui dormer sitot le prix de sa victoire.
Cet hymen differe ne rompt point une loi
Qui, sans marquer de temps, lui destine ta foi.
8. Parse the verbs in (b) of preceding question. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxxxiii
APPENDIX  L.
H
CHAPTER 40.
AN ACT RESPECTING THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
[20th April, 1891.]
ER MAJESTY, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the
Province of British Columbia, enacts as follows :—
Repeal of the "Public School Act, 1885."
1 The " Public School Act, 1885," an Act passed in the 48th year of Her Majesty's
reign, and all subsequent amendments, are hereby repealed.
Short Title.
2. This Act may be cited as the "Public School Act, 1891."
School  Districts.
Existing Districts.
3. All School Districts existing at the date when this Act shall come into operation shall
continue unaltered until altered under the provisions of this Act.
Council of Public Instruction.
4. The members of the Executive Council shall constitute a Council of Public Instruction.
Superintendent of Education.
5. It shall be lawful for the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to appoint a Superintendent
of Education for the Province of British Columbia, who shall also be Secretary of the Council
of Public Instruction.
Powers of Council of Public Instruction.
6. It shall be lawful for the Council of Public Instruction, from time to time—
(1.) To create School Districts, in addition to those already existing, and to define the
boundaries thereof, and from time to time to alter the boundaries of existing, or
hereafter created, Districts: Provided that no School District shall be created
wherein there shall not be at least fifteen children of school age, between six and
sixteen years of age :
(2.) To set apart in every School District such a quantity of the waste lands of the
Crown as in their opinion may be necessary for school purposes in such District:
(3.) With the sanction of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, to grant, on the application of the School Trustees of any such School District, such sum or sums of money
as may be required to pay the salary of the Teacher in such School District; in
Rural Districts to defray the cost of erecting a school-house, or providing a house or
room within which the Public School of such District may be held; the cost of all
furniture and apparatus necessary for the use of any such school, and the current
expenses connected therewith:
(4.) With the sanction of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, to grant such sum as shall
be thought proper in aid of the establishment of a school in any part of the Province
not being a School District, and not having less than seven and not more than fourteen children between the age of six and sixteen years resident therein, upon the
application of a majority of the parents resident in such part of the Province:
(5.) To appoint two or more Examiners, at such remuneration as shall be thought proper,
who, together with the Superintendent of Education, shall constitute a Board of
Examiners, and shall examine teachers and grant certificates of qualification. Such
certificates shall be of three classes, viz.: first class (grades A and B) certificates, Public Schools Report. 1891
second   class  (grades A  and  B)  certificates,   and   third   class  (grades  A   and   B)
certificates:
(6.) To appoint, at a reasonable remuneration, one or more Inspectors to visit the Public
Schools, and to require such Inspectors to enquire into and report their observations
to the Superintendent of Education in relation to the progress and attendance of the
pupils, the discipline and management of the school, the system of education pursued,
the mode of keeping the school registers, the condition of the buildings and premises,
and such other matters as they may deem advisable in the furtherance of the interests of the schools :
(7.) To make and establish rules and regulations for the conduct of the Public Schools,
to prescribe the duties of teachers, and their classification :
(8.) To determine the subjects and  percentages required  for  all   classes and  grades  of
certificates of teachers, as well as to make and prescribe rules for the governance of
candidates for certificates of qualification as teachers :
(9.) To select, adopt, and prescribe a uniform series of text-books to be used in the Public
Schools of the Province, as well as the courses or standards of instruction and study
for schools :
(10.) To suspend or cancel for cause the certificate of qualification of any teacher, subject
to the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor, as expressed by an Order in Council:
(11.) To determine all cases of appeal arising from decisions  of Trustees,  and  to  make
such orders thereon as may be required :
(12.) To make any provisions, not inconsistent with this Act,  that may be necessary to
meet exigencies occurring under its operation :
(13.) To establish a Normal School with Model  Departments,  and  to  make  regulations
for its conduct and management.
High Schools.
Council of Public Instruction may establish High Schools.
7. The Council of Public Instruction may establish a High School in any district where
it may be expedient so to do, wherein the higher branches may be taught, and every such
High School shall be under the control of the local Board of Trustees for the District wherein
such High School is situate : Provided, however, that no High School shall be established in
any School District in which there are less than twenty persons duly qualified and available
to be admitted as High School pupils.
Duties op Superintendent of Education.
8. It shall be the duty of the Superintendent of Education—
(1.) To take charge of and safely keep all apparatus that may be procured for school
purposes, and to furnish, at his discretion, on the application of the Trustees of any
district, such apparatus as may be required for the schools in such district:
(2.) To establish a separate school for females in any district where he may deem it
expedient so to do; and such school, when so established, may be presided over by a
female teacher or teachers, but otherwise shall be subject to the same obligations and
regulations as Public Schools generally under this Act:
(3.) To examine and enquire into, from time to time, the progress of the pupils in
learning, the order and discipline observed, the system of instruction pursued, the
mode of keeping the school registers, the average attendance of pupils, the character
and condition of the buildings and premises, and to give such directions as he may
judge proper:
(4.) To do all in his power to persuade and animate parents, guardians, trustees and
teachers to improve the character and efficiency of the Public Schools, and to secure
the sound education of the young generally:
(5.) To have, subject to the Council of Public Instruction, the supervision and direction
of the Inspectors and Schools : 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxxxix.
July in each year, to the Superintendent of Education a full report of its proceedings, also
returns of all schools in accordance with the forms supplied by him.
Notification of amount required is to be given to City Council.
34. The Board of Trustees shall, on the thirty-first day of January in each year, notify
the City Council of the amount required for the purchase or lease of school sites, erections,
enlargement, or rent of school buildings, for furniture and all appurtenances, together with
the amount required for incidental expenses of the schools and of the Board in their district.
City Treasurer to keep separate accounts of school moneys.
35. The City Treasurer shall, upon the receipt of any moneys from time to time paid into
his hands on account of the rates and taxes, set apart and keep to a separate account to be
called " The Board of School Trustees' Account," so much and such proportion of such moneys
as the amount ordered to be assessed and levied for school purposes in such city, and pay over
such moneys so set apart to the said Board, as is mentioned in section 32 hereof, and shall, whenever requested, exhibit to the said Board the state of such account; and such moneys so set
apart, or that ought to be so set apart, shall not be applied to any other purpose whatsoever
by the City Treasurer.
School property to be free from taxation.
36. All property acquired by the Board of Trustees shall not be subject to taxation, or be
liable to be taken in execution ; but in case of any judgment being recorded against the Board
of Trustees, they shall forthwith notify the City Council of the amount thereof, and the City
Council shall levy and collect the same as in other cases provided for by this Act.
Auditor.
37. The City Council shall annually appoint an Auditor to audit the accounts of the
Board of Trustees, and the expenses of such audit shall be paid out of the contingent expenses
of the Board.
City Council may demand tuition fees for High Schools.
38. In case the City Council of any of the said cities shall, by resolution, declare that it
is desirable that tuition fees should be paid in respect of pupils attending at any High School
situate within its limits, so as to make such High School wholly, or in part, self-sustaining, it
shall be the duty of such School Board to settle the amount to be paid by parents and
guardians for each pupil attending the High School, and to fix the times of payment, and,
when necessary, to sue for and recover such amounts, and to pay the same to the Treasurer of
the Corporation within the limits of which such High School is situate; but in settling such
amount the Board shall make provision by which pupils, whose parents or guardians find it
beyond their means to pay the tuition fees imposed by the Board, may have the advantages of
the High School, either altogether without fee or at some smaller fee within the means of the
parent or guardian.
Trustees to serve without reward,
39. Trustees shall serve without emolument or reward, and shall not be interested, directly
or indirectly, in any contract authorized by the Board of Trustees.
Rural School Districts—Trustees, their Powers and Duties.
Qualification of Trustees in Rural Districts.
40. Any person being a male householder or freeholder in the school district of the full
age of twenty-one years, and otherwise qualified by this Act to vote at an election of School
Trustees in the said school district, shall be eligible to be elected or to serve as a School
Trustee in a school district.
Occasional vacancies.
41. Any Trustee elected to fill an occasional vacancy shall hold office only for the unexpired term of the person in wdiose place he has been elected.
Trustees to be a Corporation.
42. The Trustees of any school district duly elected, shall be a Corporation under the
name of " The Trustees of the (naming the title) School District." 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxxxv.
(6.) To enforce the provisions of this Act and the regulations and decisions of the Council
of Public Instruction:
(7.) To organize, under regulations framed by the Council of Public Instruction, a
Teachers' Institute or Teachers' Institutes :
(8.) To grant temporary certificates of qualification, countersigned by the Provincial
Secretary; which temporary certificates shall be valid till the next examination of
teachers:
(9.) To make annually, for the information of the Legislature, a report of the actual state
of the Public Schools throughout the Province, showing the number of pupils taught
in each School District, the branches taught and average attendance, the amount of
moneys expended in connection with each school, the number of official visits made
to each school, the salaries of teachers, the number of qualified teachers, their standing and sex, together with any other information that he may possess respecting the
educational state and wants and advantages of each school and district in the
Province, and such statements and suggestions for improving the Public Schools and
school laws, and promoting education generally, as he may deem useful and expedient;
which report shall be laid before the Legislature within fifteen days after the opening
of the next succeeding session thereof :
(10.) To be responsible for all moneys paid through him on behalf of the Public Schools,
and to give such security as the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may require :
(11.) To prepare suitable forms and to give such  instructions  as  he may judge necessary
and proper for making all reports and conducting all proceedings under this Act:
(12.) With due diligence, after any complaint shall have been made to him respecting the
mode of conducting any election of Trustees (as hereinafter provided for), to investigate such complaint and report the facts to the Council of Public Instruction, who
shall confirm or set aside such election ; and in the latter case they shall appoint the
time and place for a new election in such district:
(13.) To close schools where the average attendance falls below ten :
(14.) To cause copies of this Act, with regulations of the Council of Public Instruction, to
be published and furnished gratuitously to Trustees and Teachers.
Proceedings after the formation of New District.
9. Immediately after the formation of any new school district or districts, pursuant to
the provisions of this Act, the Superintendent of Education shall prepare notices in writing
describing such district or districts respectively, and appoint a time and place for the first
school meeting for the election of Trustees, and shall cause copies of such notices to be posted
in at least three public places in each of such school districts at least ten days before the time
of holding the meeting ; and the Trustees elected at any such meeting shall respectively hold
office until the next annual meeting for the election of Trustees, and no longer. At such
meeting the voters present shall elect one of their own number to preside over the proceedings
of such meeting, and shall also appoint a Secretary.
Rural Districts—Election op Trustees and School Meetings.
Trustees of Rural Districts.
10. For each Rural District there shall be three Trustees.
Election of Trustees in Rural Districts.
11. An annual meeting for the election of School Trustees shall be held in all Rural
School Districts on the last Saturday in June in every year, commencing at 11 o'clock in the
forenoon, the nomination closing at 12 noon, and the voting (if any) at four o'clock in the
afternoon of the same dav.
12. At such annual meeting, or at any meeting called under sections 43 and 49 of this Act,
the voters present shall elect one of their own number to preside over the proceedings of such
meeting, and shall also appoint a Secretary. cxxxvi. Public Schools Report. 1891
13. The Chairman of such meeting shall decide all questions of order, subject to an
appeal to the meeting, and in case of an equality of votes shall give the casting vote, but he
shall have no vote except as Chairman.
14. The Chairman shall take the votes by a poll ; and the names  of  all  voters who  are
present shall be recorded by the  Secretary ; such  poll to remain open from  noon  till  fou
o'clock p.m., when the Chairman shall declare the result.
Term of Office of Trustees elected at first election.
15. The Trustees so elected at the first annual school meeting in any district, shall
respectively hold office as follows :—
(1.) The person receiving the largest number of votes shall continue in office for two
years, to be reckoned from the annual school meeting next after his election and
from that time onward till his successor shall have been elected :
(2.) The person receiving the next greatest number of votes shall continue in office  one
year, to be reckoned from the same period, and until his successor shall have been
elected :
(3.) The person receiving the next greatest number of votes shall continue in office  until
the next ensuing annual school meeting in such district, and until his successor shall
have been elected.
Copy of proceedings te be sent to Superintendent of Education.
16. A correct copy of the proceedings of such first, and of every annual, and of every
special, school district meeting in such district, signed by the Chairman and Secretary of the
meeting and countersigned by the Secretary of the Board of Trustees, shall be forthwith
transmitted by the Secretary in such school district to the Superintendent of Education.
One Trustee elected annually.
17. A Trustee shall be elected to office at each ensuing annual school meeting, in place
of any Trustee whose term of office is about to expire; and the same individual, if willing,
may be re-elected; but no School Trustee shall be re-elected, except by his own consent,
during the four years next after his going out of office.
Trustees' report dealt with at Annual Meeting.
18. At every annual meeting held for the election of Trustees under this Act, the report
of the Trustees, as required by section 48 of this Act, shall be submitted and dealt with.
Qualification of Voters.
19. Any householder or freeholder resident in any School District for a period of six
months previous to the election, and being of the full age of twenty-one years, and the wife of
any such householder or freeholder, shall be entitled to vote at any school meeting held in
such district, and for the election of Trustees.    Chinese and Indians shall not vote.
Voter, if challenged to take oath.
20. If any person offering to vote at an annual or other school meeting is challenged as
unqualified by any legal voter, the Chairman presiding at such meeting shall require the
person so offering to make the following declaration :—
" I do declare and affirm that I am a resident householder (or freeholder, as the case
may be), in this School District, and that I have been a continuous resident householder (or freeholder) in this district for the last six months :"
Or, " I do declare and affirm that I am the wife of a resident householder (or freeholder) in this School District, and that my husband has been a continuous resident
householder (or freeholder) in this district for the last six months."
And every person making such a declaration shall be permitted to vote on all questions
proposed at such meeting ; but if any person refuse to make such declaration his vote shall be
rejected. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. cxxxvii.
City School Districts—Appointment op Trustees and School Meetings.
Board of Trustees for City Districts.
21. For each of the School Districts of the City of Victoria, the City of Vancouver,
the City of New Westminster, and the City of Nanaimo, there shall be seven Trustees,
constituting a Board of Trustees for each City respectively ; and each of such boards shall be
a body corporate in relation to all the powers and duties conferred upon it by virtue of this
Act, and shall be styled " The Board of School Trustees of Victoria " (or Vancouver, or New
Westminster, or Nanaimo, as the case may be) ; the organization, rights, powers, duties, and
liabilities of each of which boards shall be as herein defined.
How Appointed.    Chairman.
22. Of the seven members of the Board of Trustees for each City District, three shall be
appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, and the other four shall be appointed by
the Council of the City, of which four one shall be designated by such City Council as Chairman. Such Chairman, at any meeting of the Board of Trustees, shall have a casting vote in
all cases of equality of votes, but shall have no other vote.
Term of office of Trustees appointed by Lieutenant-Governor.
23. The Trustees appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall serve for three
years, except in the case of the first appointments, in which case the first person whose name
appears on the list of appointments as published in the British Columbia Gazette shall serve
for three years, the second person whose name appears on said list shall serve for two years,
and the third person shall serve for one year ; and the Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall
thereafter appoint annually, on or about the 30th day of June in each and every year, a
person to fill the place of the retiring Trustee.
Term of office of Trustees appointed by City Council.
24. The Trustees appointed by the City Council shall hold office for two years, except, in
the case of the first appointments, in which case each of the first two persons appointed shall
serve for two years, and each of the other two persons appointed shall serve for one year ; and
the City Council on the 30th day of June of each year, or as soon thereafter as conveniently
may be, shall appoint two persons to hold office for two years, to fill the places of the two
retiring Trustees.
Publication in British Columbia Gazette.
25. Notice of the first appointment of the Trustees and of all subsequent appointments
shall be published in the British Columbia Gazette as soon as conveniently may be after such
appointments.
Power to remove Trustees.
26. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall be at liberty at any time to remove from
office any Trustee appointed by him, under the provisions of this Act, and to appoint another
Trustee to act in the place of and for the residue of the unexpired term of the Trustee so
removed from office ; and the City Council shall have the same powers with respect to Trustees
appointed by them.
Vacancies—how filled.
27. Any extraordinary vacancy in the Board, caused by death, resignation, removal from
the city, refusal or inability to act, or other causes, shall be filled by a person appointed by
the body or authority who had appointed the person causing the vacancy, and the person so
appointed to fill the vacancy shall hold office for the residue of the term for which his predecessor had been appointed.
Neglect or refusal to appoint Trustees.
28. In case of neglect or omission by the City Council at any time to appoint a sufficient
number of Trustees under the provisions of this Act within fourteen days of the time when
such Trustees ought to have been appointed, or if such Trustees having been appointed by the
Council, or any of them, shall neglect or refuse to act as Trustees, then it shall be lawful for cxxxviii. Public Schools Report. 1891
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, from time to time, to appoint so many persons as may be
necessary to fill up the vacancies caused by such failure of appointment, or neglect, or refusal
to act, and such persons so lastly appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall hold
office until other Trustees are appointed by the Council and act as such, and shall have the
same powers and authorities as if appointed by the Council.
Secretary of Board.
29. Each Board of Trustees shall appoint its own Secretary and fix his salary. The
Secretary shall keep a record of the proceedings of the Board, and perform such other duties
as the Board may prescribe in relation to its corporate affairs, and such record, and all books,
accounts, vouchers, and papers of the Board, shall at all times be subject to the inspection of
the Council of Public Instruction, and any Committee of the City Council.
City School Districts—Teachers' Salaries.
Cities to pay half of Teachers' salaries, and whole of other expenses.
30. One-half of the salaries of the teachers employed in the Public Schools in the cities
of Victoria, New Westminster, Vancouver, and Nanaimo, and the whole of all other expenses
for the purchase or lease of school sites, erection, enlargement or rent of school buildings, for
furniture and repairs, and all other incidental expenses whatsoever incurred by the Board of
Trustees in the respective cities, shall be borne and paid by the Municipal Corporations of the
said cities respectively.
How amount to be paid by Cities is to be ascertained.
31. In order to ascertain and fix the amount payable by each of such Corporations
respectively for its contribution to the salaries of teachers employed in schools within its
corporate limits, the Provincial Auditor shall, at the close of each fiscal half-year, prepare and
certify a statement showing the amount paid during such fiscal half-year as salaries by the
Province to the teachers in the Public Schools in each of the said cities respectively ; and
one-half of the amount, so certified by the Provincial Auditor as having been paid in each of
the said several cities respectively, shall be the amount payable to the Provincial Treasury by
each such Corporation respectively, and the same shall be due and payable at the expiration
of thirty days after the transmission of the said certified statement, by prepaid and registered
letter, to the Clerk of the City liable for such payment.
Amount is to be raised by assessment and paid to the Board within thirty days.
32. The City Council of each of the said cities shall raise and levy any moneys they may
require to meet the amount payable by them under this Act by assessment upon the rateable
property of the city. And the amount required by the Board of Trustees in each of the said
cities shall be paid over by the respective Councils to the respective Boards of Trustees within
thirty days after notification of the amount required shall have been given under the
provisions of section 34 hereof.
City School Districts—Powers op Trustees.
Duties of Board of Trustees.
33. The Board of Trustees shall have power, and it shall be its duty, to provide sufficient
school accommodiation and tuition, free of charge, to all children in the district, between six
and sixteen years of age inclusive, and for such purpose shall organize and establish such and
so many schools as it shall deem requisite, with power to alter and discontinue the same; to
purchase or lease lands or buildings for school purposes ; to erect, enlarge, alter, repair, and
improve school buildings and their appurtenances, according to the requirements of the case;
to furnish school-houses and procure furniture, maps, and apparatus, and to provide text-books
for indigent pupils ; to provide fuel and light, and defray the contingent expenses of the
several schools, and of the Board of Trustees; to have the custody and safe keeping of the
school property of the district, and to insure the school buildings and furniture ; to determine
the sites of the school-houses; to appoint the number of teachers for whose salaries provision
has been made in the estimates; to report annually to the City Council upon the expenditure
of the moneys received by the Board; to furnish annually, on or before the fifteenth  day of 55 Vict. Public Schools Report.
PAET II.
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Esquimalt—22nd October,  1870.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 14th April,  1887; 8th  May,  1888;
8th April, 1891 :
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 26, Esquimalt District; thence easterly in a direct
line to the south-west corner of Section 10 of the said District; thence easterly along the southern
boundary of the said Section to the western boundary of Victoria City; thence south along the western
boundary of the said city to the sea-shore; thence southerly, westerly, northerly, and easterly, following the shore lines of Juan de Fuca Strait and Esquimalt Harbour to the point of commencement.
Essington—8th May, 1889 :
All that tract of land, situated in Cassiar District, embraced within the circumference of a circle
whose centre shall be the centre of the plot of land on which the Post Office building now stands, and
whose radius shall be a distance of three miles from such centre.
Gabriola, North—23rd May, 1883.    Re-defined 24th April, 1884 :
All that portion of Gabriola Island lying to the west of the division line between Sections 9, 10, 14,
15, 18, and 31.
Gabriola, South—10th August, 1872.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 23rd May,  1883.    Re-defined
24th April,  1884:
All that portion of Gabriola Island lying east of " North Gabriola School District," and including
Mudge Island.
Glenwood—12th June, 1890 :
Commencing at the north-west corner of Section 22, Township 7, New Westminster District;
thence due east three miles to the north-east corner of Section 24; thence true south four miles to the
south-east corner of Section 1, on the International Boundary Line; thence west along said line two
and a half miles to the centre of the southern boundary of Section 3; thence due north three miles to
the centre of the southern boundary of Section 22; thence west half a mile; thence north one mile to the
point of commencement.
Golden—5th November, 1890 :
All that tract of land included within a circle having a radius of three miles; the said radius to
commence at the central point of the eastern end of the Government Bridge crossing the Kicking Horse
River.
Gordon Head—8th April, 1891 :
All that portion of Victoria District lying north of the line separating Sections 86, 17, 84, and 85
from Sections 52 and 53, the said line being extended westerly to the northern boundary line of Victoria
District and easterly to the sea-shore.
Grand Prairie—21st April, 1886 ;
Commencing at a point forty chains south of the south-west corner of Lot 458, Group 1, Kamloops
Division of Yale District; thence true north four miles; thence true east nine miles, more or less, to the
eastern boundary of Hugh Currie's pre-emption; thence true south four miles; thence true west nine
miles, more or less, to the point of commencement.
Hall's Prairie—9th January, 1885 :
Commencing at the Iron Post, International Boundary Line, Semiahmoo Bay ; thence east, along
said boundary line, to the eastern boundary of Surrey; thence north, along the eastern boundary line
of Surrey, a distance of three miles; thence west to Semiahmoo Bay; thence south, along the shore line
of Semiahmoo Bay, to the point of commencement.
Haney—8th May, 1888 :
Commencing at the south-west corner of Lot 401, Township 12, New Westminster District; thence
in a direct line north to the northern boundary of said Township; thence due east to the north-west
corner of Township 15; thence due south to Fraser River; thence westerly, following the course of said
river, to the point of commencement.
Hatzic-22nd May, 1889:
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 11, Township 18, New Westminster District;
thence due north to the northern boundary of said Township; thence due east two miles; thence in a
direct line south to the south-east corner of Section 12; thence due west to the point of commencement.
Hope—25th February, 1871 :
All that piece of land comprised within a circle having a radius of three miles from the Court
House.
Hornby—8th April, 1891:
All that tract of land known as Hornby Island, situated in Comox District.
Howe Sound—12th June, 1890:
Commencing at Gower Point, Gulf of Georgia, New Westminster District; thence northerly up
Howe Sound for a distance of four miles; thence directly west two miles; thence south, in a line parallel with the coast, to the sea-shore; thence easterly to the point of commencement, and including
Keats and Pasley Islands. 55 Vict. Public Schools Report. Ii.
Junction—8th April, 1891:
Commencing at the north-east corner of Lot 385, Group One, Block 6 North, Range 1 West, New
Westminster District; thence due east to the Pitt River; thence south-westerly, following the shore
line to the mouth of Coquitlam River; thence in a direct line north to the point of commencement.
Kamloops—11th May, 1886 :
All that tract of land included in Lots 231, 232, 233, and 234, Group 1, Kamloops Division of Yale
District.
Kensington—23rd May, 1887 :
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 21, Township 7, New Westminster District; thence
due north to the north-east corner of Section 33; thence due west to the north-west corner of Section
36, Township 1; thence due south to the south-west corner of Section 24; thence east to the point of
commencement.
Kettle River—14th May, 1891 :
Commencing at the north-east corner of James McConnell's pre-emption claim, in the Osoyoos
Division of the Yale District; thence due south to the International Boundary Line; thence west along
the said line a distance of eight miles; thence due north eight miles; thence due east eight miles;
thence in a direct line south to the point of commencement.
Lake—25th June, 1869.    Boundaries altered 1st June, 1878.    Re-defined 27th May, 1880 :
Commencing at the north-east corner of "Cedar Hill School District," being the point where the
boundary line between Victoria and Lake Districts intersects the sea-shore at Cordova Bay; thence in
a south-westerly direction, following the northern boundary of "Cedar Hill School District," to the
north-east corner of Section 50, Victoria District; thence westerly along the southern boundary of
Section 82 to Colquitz Stream; thence following said stream in a northerly direction to its intersection
with the northern boundary of Section 1, Lake District; thence westerly along the northern boundary
of Section 1 to its north-west corner, being a point on the eastern boundary of Section 22; thence in a
north-westerly direction across Section 22 to the north-east boundary of Section 116; thence westerly,
along the northern boundary of Section 116, to the western boundary of Lake District; thence north,
along said boundary, to the south-west corner of Section 127; thence east along the southern boundary
of Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the south-west corner of Section 53; thence north along the western
boundary of Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the southern boundary of South Saanich District; thence east
along said boundary to the sea-shore; thence following the sea-shore in a south-easterly direction, to
the point of commencement.
Lac La Hache—30th July, 1875 :
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be described with a radius of six miles in
length from the school-house, situate at the 114-Mile Post on the Cariboo Road, as the centre of such
circle.
Langley—30th April, 1871.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 18th August, 1885, and 8th May,
Commencing at the north-east corner of Lot 126, Township 9, New Westminster District; thence
south to the centre of the eastern boundary line of Section 24, Township 8 ; thence due east to the
western boundary of Section 22, Township 11; thence due north to Fraser River; thence westerly,
following the course of said river, to the point of commencement.
Langley, East—28th May, 1885 :
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 1, Township 11, New Westminster District; thence
due west to the south-west corner of Section 3 of said Township; thence due north to Fraser River;
thence easterly, up said river, to the western boundary of '' Stave River School District;" thence south
along said boundary to point of commencement.
Lansdowne—14th May, 1891 :
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 1, Township 35, in the Osoyoos Division of the Yale
District; thence north four miles to the north-east corner of Section 24 of the said Township; thence
due west five miles to the north-west corner of Section 20; thence true south four miles to the southwest corner of Section 5; thence in a direct line east five miles to the point of commencement.
Lillooet—22nd October, 1870 :
A radius of three miles from the Court House.
Lulu—17th August, 1877.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 11th May, 1886; 19th February, 1889, and
17th April, 1890 :
Commencing at the north-west corner of section 24, Block 5 North, Range 6 West, New Westminster District; thence due south to the south-east corner of Section 14, Block 4 North, Range 6
West; thence due west to the sea-shore ; thence northerly and easterly, following the shore line, to the
point of commencement.
Lytton—20th November, 1869 :
A radius of two miles from the Court House.
Maple Bay—16th June,   1870.     Boundaries  altered  and  re-defined,   and  name  changed  from   "North
Cowichan" to " Maple Bay."    Re-defined 2nd February, 1885 :
All that tract of land known on the Official Map as Comiaken District. lii. Public Schools Report. 1892.
Maple Ridge—31st July, 1874.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 8th May, 1888, and 12th June, 1890:
Commencing at the north-west corner of Section 34, Township 9, New Westminster District; thence
true south to Fraser River; thence up the north bank of said river to the south-east corner of Lot 398,
Township 12; thence in a direct line north to the north-east corner of Section 31, Township 12; thence
true west four miles to the point of commencement.
Matsqui—Not defined.
Mayne Island—23rd May, 1883 :
All that tract of land known as Mayne Island, and that portion of Galiano Island lying west of
Active Pass and east of a line running north across the island from the south-west corner of Lot 2.
Metchosin—8th April, 1871.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 16th May, 1888 :
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 33, Metchosin District; thence north-westerly,
along the southern boundary lines of Sections 33, 24, and 25, to the south-west corner of Section 25 ;
thence southerly, along the western boundaries of Sections 27 and 29, to the north-west corner of
Section 30 ; thence westerly, along the northern boundary of Section 43, to the eastern boundary of
Sooke District; thence northerly, along the boundary lines of Sooke and Metchosin Districts, to the
south-west corner of Section 90, Esquimalt District; thence southerly to the north-west corner of
Section 90, Metchosin District; thence in a south-easterly direction to the south-east corner of Section
51, being on the sea-shore ; thence southerly, following the shore line, to the point of commencement.
Moodyville—27th June, 1870 :
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the
school-house on the north side of Burrard Inlet, and whose radius shall be a distance of three miles from
such school-house ; excepting, always, any of the land on the south side of the Inlet.
Mount Lehman—8th May, 1884.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 8th April, 1891 :
Commencing at a point on Fraser River, being the north-west corner of Section 27, Township 14,
New Westminster District; thence due south to the south-west corner of Section 3 of said Township;
thence due east to the south-east corner of Section 6, Township 17 ; thence due north to the Fraser
River; thence north-westerly along the left bank of the said river to the point of commencement.
Mountain—6th June, 1887 :
Commencing at a corner post between Sections 15 and 16, on the eastern boundary of Mountain
District; thence westerly to the south-west corner of Section 16, Range 5; thence southerly to the
north-west corner of Section 8, Range 5 ; thence easterly, on the section line, to the limit of Mountain
District; thence northerly, along the eastern boundary of said district, to the point of commencement.
Mud Bay—23rd May, 1883.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 17th April, 1890, and 8th April, 1891 :
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 23, Township 1, New Westminster District; thence
due north to the north-east corner of Section 2, Township 2; thence west one mile; thence true north
to the north-east corner of Section 22 of the said Township; thence due west to the north-west corner
of Township 19; thence in a direct line south to Mud Bay; thence easterly and southerly along the
shore line of said bay to the western extremity of the line dividing Sections 18 and 19, Township 1 ;
thence in a direct line east to the point of commencement.
Nanaimo—30th July, 1870.    Boundaries re-defined 20th March, 1885, and 8th April, 1891:
All that area embraced within the corporate limits of the City of Nanaimo.
Nanoose—8th April, 1891:
Commencing at the southern extremity of North-West Bay, Nanoose District; thence in a direct
line west to the western boundary line of said District; thence along the western and southern
boundary lines of said District to the sea-shore; thence northerly, following the coast line, to the point
of commencement. .
New Westminster—4th June, 1870.    Boundaries re-defined 8th April, 1891 :
All that area embraced within the corporate limits of the City of New Westminster.
Nicola—11th August, 1886 :
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 25, Township 91, Kamloops Division of Yale
District; thence due north three miles ; thence due east five miles ; thence due south three miles ;
thence west to point of commencement.
Nicola Lake—23rd May, 1883 :
All that tract of land known as Townships 95, 96, 97, 99, and 100, Kamloops Division of Yale
District.
Nicola Valley—31st July, 1874 :
Bounded on the east by a line drawn north and south from the residence of William Charters in
Nicola Valley, and extending on each side of the Nicola River to the natural boundaries of Nicola
Valley ; on the west by a line drawn north and south from the residence of Byron Earnshaw, and
extending on each side of the Nicola River to the natural boundaries of Nicola Valley aforesaid, said
western boundary being about nine miles distant from the eastern boundary; and on the north and
■    ■     south by the natural boundaries of Nicola Valley. 55 Vict. Public: Schools Report. liii.
Nicomin—17th April, 1890 :
All that portion of land known as Nicomin Island (Fraser River), New Westminster District, except
the strip on the west end of said island now included in " Burton's Prairie School District."
North Arm—11th May, 1886 :
Commencing at the western boundary of Lot 311, Group 1, New Westminster District; thence
east, including all lots on the North Arm of Fraser River, to the eastern boundary of Lot 167, Group 1;
thence crossing the said Arm to the north-east corner of Section 36, Block 5 North, Range 4 West;
thence south to the First Correction Line ; thence west, along said line, to the south-west corner of
Section 36, Block 5 North, Range 6 West; thence north to the north-west corner of Section 24, Block 5
North, Range 6 West; thence crossing the Arm to the point of commencement.
Northeield—30th April, 1891 :
Commencing at the north-west corner of Section 15, Range 6, Mountain District; thence east along
the section line to the eastern boundary line of the said District; thence along the said eastern
boundary line to the north-east corner of Section 19, Range 8 ; thence west to the north-west corner of
Section 19, Range 6 ; thence south along the range line to the point of commencement.
North Thompson—25th August, 1884 :
That portion of the valley on each side of the North Thompson River which extends to a distance
of five miles above and five miles below the north-east corner of Section 24, Township 112.
Okanagan—31st July, 1874 :
Commencing at a point at the mouth of Mission Creek ; thence northerly, along the shore of
Okanagan Lake, a distance of five miles; thence easterly a distance of five miles ; thence southerly to
Mission Creek ; thence westerly to point of commencement.
Otter—3rd June, 1889.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 17th April, 1890 :
Commencing at the middle point of the southern boundary line of Section 30, Township 10, New
Westminster Disti ict; thence due north two and a half miles to the centre of Section 6, Township 11 ;
thence due east two and a half miles to the central point of the eastern boundary line of Section 4;
thence due south half a mile to the south-eastern corner of Section 4 ; thence east one and a half miles
to the middle point of the northern boundary line of Section 35, Township 10 ; thence due south three
and a half miles to the centre of Section 14; thence west one and a half miles to the centre of the
eastern boundary line of Section 16; thence north one and a half miles to the north-east corner of
Section 21 ; thence in a direct line west, two and a half miles, to the point of commencement.
Oyster—7th April, 1885.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 8th April, 1891 :
Commencing at the eastern extremity of the northern boundary line of Chemainus District; thence
directly west to the north-west corner of the said District; thence due south to the boundary line
between Sections 15 and 16, Range 1, of the said District; thence west to a point due south of the
south-west corner of Oyster District; thence due north to the said south-west corner of the said
District; thence following the western boundary line of the said District to its north-west corner ;
thence east to the sea-shore ; thence southerly along the coast line to the point of commencement.
Oyster, North—30th April, 1891 :
All that portion of Oyster District lying to the north of the head of Oyster Harbour, and including
Oyster Peninsula.
Parksville—8th April, 1891 :
Commencing at the southern extr