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FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT ON THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 1885.1886 BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1887

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 FIFTEENTH   ANNUAL   REPORT
ON   THE
PUBLIC    SCHOOLS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
1885-86
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION.
WITH     APPENDICES.
VICTORIA: Printed by Richard Wolfekben, Government Printer,
at the Government Printing Office, James' Bay. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. 131
PUBLIC   SCHOOLS   REPORT,
1885-86.
To His Honor Clement Francis Cornwall, Lieutenant-Governor of the,  Province of British
Columbia.
May it please Your Honor :
I beg herewith  respectfully to present the  Fifteenth Annual Report on the Public
Schools of the Province.
JNO.   ROBSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
21st January, 1887. 50 Vie. Public Schools Report.
133
PART  I.
GENERAL   REPORT. ANNUAL    REPORT
OF   THE
Superintendent of  Education.
1885-86.
Education Office,
To the Honorable John Robson, Victoria, December, 1886.
Provincial Secretary :
In accordance with requirement of the "Public School Act, 1885," I beg to submit, for
the information of His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, the Fifteenth Annual Report on the
condition and progress of the Public Schools during the past school-year.
The record of the year has been a most satisfactory one, not only showing an increase in
tke number of pupils in attendance and in the number of schools in operation, but also in that
which is of first importance, in the general progress made in the subjects of study prescribed.
The first two facts are accounted for by the rapidly increasing population of the Province,
and the third is evidence of greater efficiency on the part of the teachers as well as of improvement in the methods of instruction adopted.
While the percentage of average attendance has increased from 51.89 in the previous year
to 55.50 in the past year—a most creditable showing,—yet it is not as large as it should be on
comparing the cost of each pupil on enrolment and average attendance, which in the former
instance was $17.78, and in the latter $32.04.
The number of schools in operation during the year was 83, as follows:—
71  Common Schools, 7 Graded Schools,
■2 Ward „ 3 High
These gave employment to 101 teachers.
Schools were established in the following newly created districts :—
Beaver Point, Nicola,
Cadboro, North Thompson,
Courtenay, Oyster,
Cowichan,  South, Stave River,
Departure Bay, St. Mary's Mission.
In addition to the above, the school on Denman Island, which for some time had been
closed, was re-opened.
The aggregate number of pupils enrolled was 4,471, an increase of 444, and the average
actual daily attendance was 2,481.48, an increase of 391.74.
The total number of visits made to the schools by trustees and others was 12,935, an
increase of 6,680.
The expenditure for education proper was as follows:—
For teachers' salaries    $70,337  10
For incidental expenses, including rent        5,833 01
For Education Office        3,357 45
Total    $79,527 56
This shows an increase of $8,376.04 over the cost of the previous year.
As the amount voted in the Estimates for 1885-86 for education proper was $82,235. there
is an unexpended balance for the year of $2,707.44. 136
Public Schools Report.
1886
The following amounts were expended by the Lands and Works Department  in  the  construction of school-houses, for furniture, repairs and improvements:—
For school-houses    $16,613 70
For furniture, repairs and improvements ...'.'       .2,474 88
Total .'    $19,088  58
This outlay is very considerably in excess of expenditures made for similar purposes in
former years.
The largely increased demand for school-houses and improved accommodation, especially
in the rural districts, has been very liberally met, and to such an extent, that the expenditure
by the Lands and Works Department during the present year will be comparatively small.
The gradual growth of the schools, as well as the cost  of  maintaining  the  same,   is  fully
shown by the record of attendance and expenditures given in the following exhibit:-—
Comparative Statement of Attendance and Cost of the Public Schools
from  1872-73 to 1885-86.
Year.
Number of
School
Districts.
Aggregate
Enrolment
1872-73 	
             -25
!
1,028
1,245
1,403
1,685
1,998
1873-
-74	
            37
1874-75 	
              41
1875-76 	
              41
1876-77 	
             42
1877-
-78	
             45
2,198
1878-
1879-
1880-
1881-
-79	
-80	
-81	
-82	
-83	
-84	
-85	
-86	
             45
             47
             48
             50
2,301
2,462
2,571
2,653
1882-
1883-
1884-
1885-
             59
            67
            76
            86
2,693
3,420
4,027
4,471
Average
Daily
Attendance.
575
767
863
984
1,260
1,395.50
1,315.90
1,293.93
1,366.86
1,358.68
1,383.00
1,808.60
2,089.74
2,481.48
Percentage
of
Attendance.
55.93
61.60
61.51
58.39
63.06
63.49
57.19
52.56
53.16
51.21
51.36
52.88
51.89
55.50
Expenditure
for Education
Proper.
$36,763 77
35,287 69
34,822 28
44,506 11
47,129 63
43,334 01
*22,110 70
47,006 10
46,960 69
49,268 63
50,850 63
66,655 15
71,151 52
79,527 56
* Half year.
Statistical Abstract of Attendance.
Number of pupils enrolled during the year  4,471
Increase for the year  444
Number of boys enrolled  2,430
Increase for the year  252
Number of girls enrolled  2,041
Increase for the year  192
Average daily attendance  ■ • • 7  2,481 . 48
Increase for the year  391. 74
Number of pupils enrolled in High Schools       -  157
Increase for the year  23
Average daily attendance in High Schools  102. 35
Average daily attendance in Common Schools  2,379. 1 3
Number of School Districts at close of year  86
Increase for the year  10 50 Vic
Public Schools Report.
137
Teachers on Permanent Staff for the Year   1885-86;
Grade.
First Class, Grade A  	
>',      B
Second Class,   ,,       A   	
B        .
Third Class,    ,.       A   	
B   	
Temporary	
Males.
Females.
1
Total.
9
Highest
Monthly
Salary.
$110
Lowest
Monthly
Salary.
8
$50
21
5
■26
100
50
4
r>
9
70
50
5
12
17
*75
50
3
5
8
60
50
•2
•>
4
60
50
15
13
28
•100
50
58
43
10]
Teachers on Permanent Staff for the Year  1886-87.
Grade.
Highest       Lowest
Males.        Females. 1    Total. Monthly J  Monthly
Salary.        Salary.
10
1
1 1
$110
$50.
,-■      B   -	
.25
6
31
100
50
Second Class,   ,,       A   	
8
1   8
70
50
B	
6
11
17
*75
50
7
9
16
60
50
B 	
1
8
9
60
50
12
5
17
109
*70
50
61
48
* In one instance only, and accounted for by location.
REMARKS.
Of the most noticeable results of the year, the following deserve special reference.:—
1.—Increased Attendance.
That the increase in average daily attendance has been nearly ninety per cent, of the
increase in enrolment is evidence of greater appreciation of those school facilities which
it has been and is the earnest desire of the Government to place within the reach of every
home in the settled portions of the Province.
The annual presentation of Provincial Rolls of Honor has very considerably contributed
to this desirable result. Parents should weigh well the fact that regularity of attendance on
the part of their children is indispensable to progress. It is more in the interest of the pupil
that he be allowed to attend school regularly for six months in the year than that he have a
whole year of irregular attendance. i§8 Public Schools  Report. 1886
It is a pleasure to be able to state that, there has been a marked improvement in regard
to punctuality in attendance. As a great deal depends on the teacher in this matter, trustees
should see that he carefully observe the rules and regulations referring to this subject, and
that he use proper exertion towards training the children under his charge in acquiring in
youth this important habit, which will be found to he ot such great service in their after life.
2.—Rrogrkss  in7  Studies.
From inspections made and examinations held, as well as from information from other
sources, I am in a position to state that there has been general improvement in the management of the schools, and that a very marked advancement in studies has been made by the
pupils.
While in most of the schools, the order and discipline maintained has been creditable, yet
in some, I regret to say, are these—the first essentials—defective. Without good order and
proper discipline there can be very little progress, and trustees are derelict in duty who continue to retain the services of the teacher who, either from apathy or inability, fails to secure
these fundamental characteristics of a good school.
'■'>.—The Lar(;e Number of School-houses Erected.
During the year school-houses have been erected in the following districts : —
Beaver Point, South Comox,
Boundary Bay, South Cowichan,
Courtenay, St. Mary's Mission,
Kamloops, Vesuvius,
North Arm, Victoria (Ward School),
North Cedar, Williams Lake.
The Government has shown great liberality in the erection of so many neat and commodious school buildings during the past year, and in promptly meeting every reasonable requirement for educational purposes.
4.    Demand for Competent Teachers.
An increased desire on the part of trustees to secure the services of thoroughly qualified
teachei's has been apparent from the fact that holders of higher certificates have, generally
speaking, received preference. This recognition by trustees of value attached to certificates
will doubtless be an incentive to teachers  to endeavor to attain high rank in their profession.
It is worthy of note that nearly two-thirds of the whole number on the present stall of
teachers are holders of the higher certificates.
In the appointment of the teacher, however, trustees should not be guided entirely by the
certificate held, as moral worth, successful experience, and adaptability are credentials of
paramount importance.
5.—Visits to Schools
The following is a summary of visits recorded during the year: —
By Trustees      1,586
By Parents and others    10,993
By Superintendent of Education  356
Total    12,935
At no time in the history of our public schools, has there been such a favorable record as
the above, and it is certainly indicative of an awakened interest in the cause of education.
It is the duty of parents and others interested in the welfare of the school to visit the
same frequently, as thereby they not only enliven and encourage the pupils, and materially
aid the teacher in his work, but they also become so acquainted with the school and its
management that they are able to speak intelligently as to it merits and defects. It is too
often the case that criticism of the teacher and his work is made by those who have seldom, if
ever, spent an hour in the school-room. 50 Vic Public Schools Report. 139
PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS' EXAMINATION,   1886.
The annual examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the Public
Schools of the Province commenced on July 5th, 1886, in the Legislative Hall, Victoria.
The  examiners  appointed  to  act   with  the Superintendent   of Education were the Rev.
Donald Fraser, M. A., and Frederick G. Walker, Esq.. B. A., Cantab.
In the   British  Columbia  Gazette of July  20th,   1886, appeared  the  list of   successful
candidates, as. follows :—
Certificates. '
First Class—Grade A.
Stainburn, George, B. A., Cantab    Renewal
Newbury, John C ,
Taylor, Mrs. E. A	
Johnston, J. P        ,,
Howay, Alice        ,,
Muir, John N., B. A	
Stramberg, Hector M., B. A  ,,
Wilson David, B. A	
Campbell, Henry J., B. A        ,,
Walker, Frederick G, B. A , Cantab ,        ,,
Howay, Frederick W           ,,
Reid, Robie L ,
First Class—Grade A   -Certificates.
Paul, Edward B., M. A., University of Aberdeen, Scotland.
Hunter, Walter, B. A., McGill University, Montreal.
Busk, Charles W., M. A., Cantab.
Anderson John, B. A., University of New Zealand.
Rossiter, Henry J., B. A., University of Toronto.
First Class—Grade  B.
Kaye James Renewal
Halliday, James A  ,,
Oft'erhaus, R  ,,
Lewis, S. G  ,,
Reid, Mrs. L. M	
Murray, Paul  ,,
Forrest, Christina       ,,
Bannerman, W. S  „
Gillies, D. W    ^ „
Rabbitt, Daniel    ' ,,
Anderson, Robert A     ,,
Sluggett, George H    ,
Bell, Emelene  ,,
Phelps, William H	
Jones, David                . . .  „
Thain, Joseph H '    ,,
Shaw, Alexander  „
Wright, Frederick G  ,,
"Wood, E. Stuart    ,,
Fraser Roderick L  ,,
McLennan, John C ,
Gardiner, Abbie F  ,,
Gilchrist, Alexander  ,,
Wood, William M	
McLeod, John A  ,,
Kinney, William T   ,,
Palmer, Joseph W  „
Bryant, Maria  „ First Class—Grade B.
Marks
Coatham, William C  1,947
Kerr, Daniel E '  1,857
Purdy, Raffles A. R  1,639
Bannerman, Alexander  1,609
Armstrong, Frances Ella  1,555
Plaxton, Robert J  1,551
Ofierhaus, Mrs. Mary A  1,548
McDonald. Donald J   '  1,538
Second Class  -Grade A.
Harding, Mary L .'  1,109
McDougali, Arohena J  1,108
Second Class   -Grade  B.
Mundell, John  995
Smith, J. F  953
Shaw, John  937
Doran, Edward F  934
Third Class -Grade A.
Blair, Jeanie W  894
Keast, Ada  886
Dougan, James, Jr . .  884
Graves, H. W  880
Scott, John R  864
Clarke, Gertrude  850
Jennings, Margaret  846
Ramsay, J eiinie  841
Sylvester, Elizabeth E  841
Murchie, Margaret J  834
Harding, Margaret M  829
Robinson, Sarah A  814
Catherwood, John A  811
Campbell, Eli J  802
Bannerman, John J  797
Hanna, R. S  796
Metcalfe, James C. F  790
Todd, Katherine  787
Blair, William  782
Andrews, Helen    779
McBride, Gertrude -  778
Grant, Flora Bertha  778
Third Class—Grade B.
Reynard, Eva M  753
Williams, Alice  749
McNish, John  740
Bell, Eva S  725
Mebius, Lucy A  698
Heard, Mary  692
Sivewright, William  676
Dallas, Mary R  665
Carr, Elizabeth E  665
Coghlan, Ella S '.  658
Carmichael, Eleanor M  637
Barron, Isabella M F  625 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. 141
Certificates of Standing.
Boyd, J ohn C  1,458
Pope, J. M. Hallie  1,334
Butler, Florence  1,169
Lee, Alice G  1,139
Reece, Bertha  330
Gibson, Mary L   325
S. D. Pope, B. A., Supt. of Education,      )        „       .   ,,
Donald Fraser, M. A., '       *.  °->
„ r.   «T r>    a     n    i i I      Uxo.miners.
Fred. G. Walker, B. A., Cantab, I
Certificates have been granted as above recommended by the Board of Examiners.
Jno. Robson,
Provincial Secretary's Office, Provincial Secretary.
July 20th, 1886.
Owing to the very large number of applicants, it became necessary to procure a room
affording more, ample accommodation, hence the examination was held after the 6th inst. in
the Agricultural Hall.
Four graduates of British Universities obtained First Class, Grade A, Certificates ; eight
obtained First Class, Grade B ; two Second Class, Grade. A ; four Second Class, Grade B ;
twenty-two Third Class, Grade A ; and twelve Third Class, Grade B.
Of the seventy-nine who wrote at the examination, twenty-three failed to obtain a certificate of any kind.
There were twenty-eight applicants for First Class, Grade B, Certificates, of whom eight
were successful.
That so many were disappointed at the results of the examination cannot be said to be
attributable to the questions being so much more difficult than usual, as a comparison of them
with those of the previous year will verify.
It was noticeable that most of the failures for the higher certificates arose from the want
of a thorough foundation in the ordinary  English branches, such as arithmetic and grammar.
Although it is gratifying to observe that so many of our young people aspire to become
teachers, yet it is eminently requisite that they thoroughly qualify themselves before admission
to the profession.
As stated in last Annual Report, certificates are merely assurances of standing in the
subjects of examination, and not of ability to impart instruction.
While there are holders of Second Class Certificates who are first class teachers, there are
holders of First Class Certificates who are second rate teachers; and, further, there are some
schools in the charge of teachers holding Third Class Certificates whose rank in the essentials
of a good school equals, if not excels, that of those taught by some holders of the higher
certificates.
Notwithstanding these facts, there is no teacher whose heart is in his work, and who aims
to reach the acme of his profession, who will not strive to obtain the highest certificate possible
commensurate with his opportunities and abilities. 142
Public Schools Report.
L886
ATTENDANCE    AT    GRADED    SCHOOLS,
from   1872 to 1886 (Inclusive).
The following tabular exhibits of attendance at the Public Schools in the Cities of
Nanaimo, New Westminster, and Victoria, as well as of the Graded School in Wellington,
since the inception of the present school system, will doubtless prove of general interest :—
Nanaimo.
Year.
Total number
of
pupils enrolled.
1872-73
No returns
1873-74
125
1874-75
153
1875-76
147
1876-77
184
1877-78
248
1878-79
241
1879-80
228
1880-81
265
1881-82
238
1882-83
210
1883-84
374
1884-85
322
1885-86
368
Boys.
Girls.
Average
daily attendance.
59
66
81
75
78
112
83
64
105
93
91
112.5
133
115
154
135
106
136.89
121
107
131.87
148
117
136.95
131
107
118.73
131
79
108.03
224
150
192.53
175
147
180.54
187
181
226.21
New Westminster. 50 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
148
-
Victoria.
Year.
Total number
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
daily attendance.
1872-73
No returns.
1873-74
346
176
170
113.50
1874-75
465
Not given.
N ot given.
272
1875-76
545
Not given.
Not given.
302
1876-77
617
366
251
374
1877-78
734
455
279
450.15
1878-79
726
395
331
398.99
1879-80
790
436
354
398.78
1880-81
720
391
329
410.09
1881-82
765
440
325
433.45
1882-83
770
423
347
414.55
1883-84
1,012
579
433
679.65
1884-85
1,343
702
641
710.70
1885-86
1,427
789
638
807.10
Wellington.
Total number
Year.
of
pupils enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
daily attendance.
1874-75
34
14
20
24.75
1875-76
46
13
33
23.33
1876-77
53
19
34
23.78
1877-78
44
18
26
38.00
1878-79
50
25
25
29.82
1879-80
79
40
39
37.14
1880-81
89
52
37
42.50
1881-82
123
66
57
52.61
1882-83
146
90
56
73.70
1883-84
156
87
69
55.85
1884-85
142
76
66
73.26
1885-86
135             1
79
56
77.66 144 Public Schools Report. 1886
SPECIAL  REPORTS ON   HIGH SCHOOLS AND GRADED   SCHOOLS.
Nanaimo.
High School, Boys' School, and Girls' School
Teachers, 6.
Enrolled during the year, 368.
Average monthly attendance, 274.
Average daily attendance, 226.21.
Expenditure, $4,373.42.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, 111.88.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $19.33.
High School.
Principal, E. B. Paul, M. A.
Salary, $100 per month.
Inspected June 15th, 1886 ; present, 6 boys. 6 girls ; total,  12.
Enrolled during the year, 12.
Average monthly attendance, 12.
Average daily attendance, 11.52.
This school was opened in May, 1S86, and thus far has not complied with the requirement of the Act as to enrolment.
While the number of pupils enrolled has been a disappointment to the trustees as well as
to this department, it is proper to state that the prospects are that the demands of statute
will be fully attained during the present school-year.
It is very desirable in the interests of higher education in this part of the province that
every effort be put forth to place this institution on a permanent basis.
The work accomplished during the limited time that the school has been in operation has
been alike creditable to teacher and pupils.
One of the rooms of the boys' school building affords every necessary accommodation.
Report of the Principal.
"Nanaimo, B. C, July 25th, 1886.
" Sir,—In compliance with the 9th Rule for the Government of Public Schools in this
Province, I have the honor to submit the following report on the condition and progress of the
High School at Nanaimo.
"As you are aware, this school was opened on the 10th May, 1886, and has, consequently,
been in operation only seven weeks.
"The number of pupils enrolled is 12—6 boys and 6 girls. This number falls short of the
number of pupils who were expected to attend the High School; but that deficiency is not
difficult to account for. Many of the pupils passed their Entrance Examination one year or
two years ago, and, having no' High School in this place ready for their reception, were compelled to give up their hopes of an education higher than that which they had already received
at the Public Schools of this District. It was natural, therefore, that they should seek
employment in mercantile and other pursuits. When, however, they were informed that the
Government had generously promised to place higher education within their reach, by the
establishment of a High School here, provided the requisite number of pupils could be obtained,
many gladly embraced the opportunity and promised to attend. And I would respectfully
submit, Sir, that the fact that several pupils, who had promised attendance, failed to be present
at the opening of   the  school,  does  not  necessarily  imply  want of faith on the part of their 50 Vic Public Schools Report. 145
parents. As I have mentioned above, many available pupils were engaged in pursuits by
which they were enabled to support themselves, or to assist their parents. These pupils, while
anxious to avail themselves of the advantages offered by the establishment of a High School,
were yet unwilling to give up their employment for the short term of seven weeks, knowing
that at the end of that period they would have six weeks of enforced idleness. Parents living
at a distance, also, would, I think, naturally prefer to send their children to school after the
holidays. Next month, I am sure, the attendance will be very much larger. Five pupils
passed the Entrance Examination in June, all of whom will attend. These, with the 12
scholars already on the Roll, and those pupils referred to above, will, I trust, bring up the
attendance to the number required by the School Act.
"The following subjects were taught during the period the School was in session:—
"History, Geography, Grammar, Reading, Composition, Arithmetic, Algebra, Euclid,
Physiology, Latin and French.
"The time being so short, and there being so many new subjects to introduce, the study of
Book-keeping was postponed till after the holidays.
" I have much pleasure in bearing testimony to the diligence and good conduct of the pupils
of the High School during the period they were under my charge. The Roll of Honor for
Deportment was awarded to Miss Georgina Augusta Maud Brethour, for Proficiency to Master
James Allen Ward Bell, and for Punctuality and Regularity to Master Herbert Duncan
Reynard Stewart.
" In conclusion, I have to thank you, Sir, and the Board of Trustees for the kindness and
consideration which both you and they have shown me since I undertook the duties of Teacher
here, which have rendered it unnecessary for me to offer any suggestions for the requirements
of the School, and which have conduced not only to its efficiency, but also to my personal
comfort.
"I have, &c,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., (Signed)        "Edward B. Paul, M. A.,
" Superintendent of Education." " Principal.
Boys' School.
Principal, D. Jones ; salary, $90 per month.
1st Assistant, J. Shaw; salary, $60 per month.
2nd Assistant, Miss L. Mebius ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected Sept. 15th, 1885 ; present, 115.
Sept. 16th, 1885; present, 113.
Examined Dec. 15th, 1885 ; present, 117.
Dec. 16th, 1885 ; present, 118.
Mar.   9th, 1886; present, 125.
June 15th, 1886; present, 115.
Enrolled during the year, 181.
Average monthly attendance, 142.
Average daily attendance, 119.14.
The building and grounds now occupied by this school present an attractive appearance,
and afford every convenience and comfort to teachers and pupils.
There has been an increase in both enrolment and average attendance.
At Christmas examination JTerbert Stewart passed the standard required for admission to
a High School.
At examination held in March, James Reid and Vincent Good obtained the percentage
necessary for admission to a High School.
Report of the Principal.
" Nanaimo, B. C, July 6th, 1886.
" Sir,—I beg to submit the following report of the Nanaimo Boys' Public School for the
year ending June 30th, 1886 :—
"There are 181 pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance for the year was 123.69,
being an increase over the previous year of nearly 20 per cent.    The prescribed course of 146 Public Schools Report. 1886
studies for the several divisions of the school has been uniformly adhered to since the adoption
of limit-tables, and the general progress has been very satisfactory.
" The new school-house was opened on April 7th. While noting the superiority of the
building in regard to its accommodation, architectural beauty, and advantageous site, I may
say that not only the teachers and pupils, but the public also, highly appreciate the change.
" Since the opening of the High School in Nanaimo, all the eligible pupils in the Public
School have passed from the Public School to that establishment.
" At the Christmas examination Herbert Stewart passed the standard required for admission to a High School, and in March another inspection was held, when Vincent Good and
James Reid passed for entrance to a High School. Not any of those presented passed at
midsummer, but I feel confident that a larger number will succeed at the next examination
than has passed on any previous occasion. Referring to school apparatus, I wish to call the
attention of the department to the want of maps in the second and third divisions. The latter
has only one, viz., map of the Province ; I think it should also have a map of the hemispheres.
The former has but two maps, viz., the Province, and the Dominion ; I would suggest that it
be supplied, too, with those of the continents. At present the assistants have to borrow from
the Principal. I wish also to bring to the notice of the Government the necessity that exists
for some new furniture, in the shape of three desks for the teachers; and I trust that, with
their usual liberality, they will make an appropriation for the purpose of supplying the same.
The time-worn structures from the old school-house are the ones in use for the time being.
" I have, (fee,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., (Signed)        "D.Jones,
" Superintendent of Education, " Principal Nanaimo Boys' Public School.
" Victoria, B. C."
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss Emelene Bell; salary, $70 per month.
Assistant, Miss Eva M. Reynard ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 15th, 1885; present, 96.
Sept. 16th, 1885; present, 84.
Examined, Dec. 15th, 1885 ; present,  100.
Dec. 16th, 1885; present, 92.
Mar.   9th, 1886 ; present, 95.
June 15th, 1886; present, 94.
Enrolled during the year, 175.
Average monthly attendance, 120.
Average daily attendance, 95.55.
The average attendance having increased nearly 40 per cent, over that of the previous
year, the appointment of a second assistant teacher at the beginning of the present school-year
became necessary.     Miss Maria Bryant was selected to fill the position.
Additional accommodation for the third division of this school is much needed.
At examinations held at times stated, the following passed the standard required for
admission to a High School:—
Christmas—Elizabeth Galloway, Georgina Brethour, Mary L. Gibson.
March—Isabel Fulton.
Midsummer—Amiet Gordon, Christina Pool, Pauline Haarer, Janet Webb.
The trustees have shown by the number of visits made to the schools during the year (114)
that they have exercised a careful supervision, as well as recognized the fact that aid and encouragement are thereby given to both teachers and pupils.
Report of the Principal.
" Nanaimo, September, 1886.
" Sir,—In accordance with Regulation 9 of the Rules and Regulations for the government of Public Schools in British Columbia, I beg to submit the following report of the Girls'
Public School, Nanaimo, for the year ending June 30th, 1886 :— 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. 147
" The total number of pupils enrolled during the year was 175 ; in the senior division 55,
in the junior 120. In order to relieve the overcrowded condition of the latter, I admitted a
number of unprepared pupils into the senior division, thereby greatly interfering with its
progress. The school here is fairly well furnished, but the building itself sadly needs to be
renovated. Indeed, it is to be hoped that ere the close of another year the girls will have
been provided with a new school-house, as the one which they now occupy is much too small
for their accommodation, besides being situated in anything but a desirable position.
I have, &c,
(Signed)        " Emelene Bell,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., "Principal Girls' Public School, Nanaimo.
" Superintendent of Education,
" Victoria, B. C
New Westminster.
High School, Boys' School, and Girls' School.
Teachers, 5.
Enrolled during the year, 353.
Average monthly attendance, 235.
Average daily attendance, 187.49.
Expenditure, $4,997.58.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $14.16.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $26.65.
High School.
Principal, H. M. Stramberg, B. A.; salary, $100 per month.
Inspected, Dec. 11th, 1885 ; Jan. 8th, 1886.
Examined, Dec. 8th, 9th, 10th, 1885; present, 22.
June 1st and 2nd, 1886 ; present, 27.
Enrolled during the year, 40.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average daily attendance, 25.
The record of this school, which has been in operation since August, 1884, has been most
satisfactory. As a partial index of the work accomplished, it may be stated that at each
annual examination of candidates for certificates of qualification as teachers held since its
establishment, several of its pupils have been successful in obtaining Provincial licenses, and
are now on the permanent staff of teachers. Other pupils of this institution have creditably
undergone matriculation examination in a university. The school is at present in good
working order,
At the Christmas examination, 1885, Miss Flow., Bertha Grant stood head of the school.
At the midsummer examination, 1886, Master Richard McBride stood head of the school,
thereby winning the bronze medal presented by His Excellency the Governor-General for
competition among the pupils.
Report of the  Principal.
" New Westminster, B. C.
"September 17th, 1886.
" Sip.,—I have the honor to submit, for your information, my report of the New Westminster High School for the year ended June 30th, 1886.
" The average daily attendance, as you will see by the returns already sent, was greater
than during the preceding year. There was also a larger number of classes; and I have, therefore, to repeat, what I stated in my last annual report, that it was impossible, in the time at 148 Public Schools Report. 1886
my disposal, to teach according to scientific methods all the subjects embraced in the curriculum.
For this reason my teaching partook somewhat of the nature of an experiment; for it consisted
in trying to accomplish, by short processes, within a limited time, that which requires two or
three teachers to do properly ; and I must acknowledge that this attempt to perform, unaided,
the multifarious work devolving upon me—such as preparing students for matriculation in
arts, medicine and law, as well as giving prospective teachers some knowledge of their
profession—was only moderately successful.
"As the condition and prosperity of the Common Schools depend largely on the scholarship
of those in charge of them, and as that scholarship at present can be obtained only at our High
Schools, I would suggest—if I should not be deemed impertinent—that these institutions have
their complement of teachers. Indeed, it is a matter of disappointment to me, and to my
trustees, who are alive to the importance of education, that their request for an assistant
teacher was not granted.
" I am pleased to be able to report that the sentiment in this city is growing stronger in
favor of free, non-sectarian education. Those who a few years ago were loudest in their
demand for separate schools are gradually losing their prejudices and becoming weaker in their
opposition. * * * * * *
" I have, &c,
" S. D. Pope, Esq., (Signed) " H. M. Stramberg,
" Superintendent of Education.,  Victoria." "Principal.
Boys' School.
Principal, D. Wilson, B. A.; salary, $100 per month,
Assistant, Miss E. A. Jamieson ; salary, $60 per month.
Inspected Dec. 11th, 1885.
Jan. 8th, 1886.
Examined Dec. 8th, 1885 ; present, 84.
Dec. 10th, 1885 ; present, 84.
June 1st, 1886 ; present, 78.
June 2nd, 1886 ; present, 73.
Enrolled during the year, 148.
Average monthly attendance, 100.
Average daily attendance, 80.24.
While there has been a slight increase in enrolment, there has been a very considerable
increase in average attendance.
The work of the year has been in every way satisfactory, reflecting great credit on the
principal, to whose zealous efforts, aided by his assistant, the present flourishing condition of
the school is due.
On the resignation of Miss E. A. Jamieson, Mr. W. C. Coatham was appointed to the
position of First Assistant.
Owing to the increased attendance at the graded schools of this city, it became necessary
at the beginning of the present school-year to appoint another assistant teacher. Miss
Gertrude McBride received the appointment, and is now Second Assistant of this school. As
the sexes are not separated in the lower divisions, the teacher has charge of what may be
called the Primary Classes of both Boys' School and Girls' School, and occupies a room in the
same building as the High School.
At the Christmas examination, 1885, the following passed the standard required for
admission to a High School:—
Frederic Turner,
Thomas Guest,
Guy Hall,
Percy Peele.
At a special examination in April, 1886, Silas Norris obtained the percentage required
for admission to a High School. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. 149
At the Midsummer examination, June, 1886,
Humphries Edmonds,
Murdock McLennan,
passed the standard required for admission to a High School.
Report of the Principal.
"New Westminster, Sept. 16th, 1886.
"Sir,—In accordance with the 9th Article, Appendix A, of Rules and Regulations, I
have the honor to submit the following report of the New Westminster Boys' Public School.
"The past year's work has brought to the school a fair measure of success, both real and
apparent. The total number of pupils promoted from the senior department to the High
School was seven, and about the same number received from the junior department. A marked
improvement was noticeable in the management of the junior department under Miss Jamieson,
and there is no doubt but that further successes will attend her efforts.
" It is with pleasure that I notice the provision made for another teacher for the New
Westminster Public School. This will enable a further sub-division of the school work to be
made, and allow the senior departments to give more exclusive attention to the preparation of
pupils to take the High School course.
" Although the supply of school apparatus is at present fairly sufficient for our needs, thanks
to your promptitude in meeting any reasonable demand for the same, yet an additional supply
for the use of young children would be a great boon—such as blocks representing geometric
solids, the conventional standards of measure and weight, illustrations of the colors with shades
and tints.
" During the past year the school lot has been carefully levelled and planted with several
rows of shade trees. The people of New Westminster may well be proud of their fine school
grounds, which are scarcely equalled by any in the Province. However, further improvements
are needed in the shape of plank or gravel walks from the streets to the doors of the school-
house, as well as similar ones to the out-houses. Such walks are necessary to the health and
comfort of pupils during the rainy season, as well as to the cleanliness of the school-rooms.
" I have, &c,
(Signed)        "D. Wilson,
"S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., "Principal of Boys' School.
"Superintendent of Education, Victoria."
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss M. R. Davidson; salary, $70 per month.
Assistant, Miss E. A. Davidson ; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected December 11th, 1885.
January 8th, 1886.
Examined December 8th, 1885; present, 90.
December 10th, 1885 ; present, 87.
June 1st, 1886; present, 100.
June 2nd, 1886 ; present, 93.
Enrolled during the year, 165.
Average monthly attendance, 106.
Average daily attendance, 82.25.
There has been a marked increase in both enrolment and average attendance.
The record of the school as to order and discipline, as well as to progress of the pupils,
been very commendable.
Both teachers have been most assiduous in the performance of their duties. 150 Public Schools Report. 1886
At the Christmas examination, 1885, the following passed the standard required for
admission to a High School :—
Alice Claire Clute,
Alida Mabel Robinson,
Kathleen C. Black,
Florence A. Hacker.
At a special examination in January, 1886, Miss Blanche Millard obtained the percentage
necessary for admission to a High School.
At the midsummer examination, 1886, the following passed the standard required for
admission to a High School:- —
Maud H. Turner,
Annie M. Ellard,
Alice Homer,
Hester M. McMartin.
The bronze medal, presented by His Excellency the Governor-General for competition
between the schools of Nanaimo and New Westminster, was won by Miss Maud H. Turner, a
pupil of this school.
The trustees of this city are to be congratulated on the improved appearance of the school
property. The grounds have been levelled, and shade trees planted around the entire plot,
thereby giving to the reserve as fine an appearance as that of any school property in the
Province.
That these gentlemen are keenly alive to the vital interests of their schools is shown by the
selection made by them of so competent a staff of teachers.
Report of the Principal.
" New Westminster, June, 1886.
"Sir,—I have, the honour of forwarding the report of the Girls'Public School, New
Westminster, for the year ending 30th June, 1886.
"In August, 1885, Miss E. A. Davidson succeeded Miss E. Bell as assistant teacher, and
during the past year has done excellent work.
"I find a marked improvement over last year, especially in the under grades. There are
102 names enrolled, with an average of 48, and although the room is greatly over-crowded the
order is perfect.    Out of a class of 22 all have been promoted, making 100 per cent.
"On the roll of the Advance Department there are sixty-three (63) names with an average
of 35, showing quite an increase since June,  1885.
"Out of twelve (12) pupils presented for examination for entrance to a High School, nine
have been successful, making 75 per cent, during the year.
"At Christmas, 1885, one of the pupils made a percentage of 7S|, and at Midsummer,
1886, another obtained 70|, thereby gaining the Governor-General's Medal.
" The trustees endeavour in every way to forward the interest of the school. I find them
gentlemen, who promptly attend to all the wants of our school.
"I find quite an improvement over last year with regard to parents visiting our schools.
<lI have, &c,
(Signed)       " Mary R. Davidson,
"Principal N.  W. Girls' Public School.
"S. D.Pope, Esq., B. A.,
"Superintendent of Education,   Victoria." 50 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
151
Victoria.
High School, Boys' School, Girls' School, James' Bay Ward School, Johnson Street Ward
School.
Teachers, 17.
Monitors, 1.
Enrolled during the year, 1,427.
Average monthly attendance, 1,001.
Average daily attendance, 807.10.
Expenditure, $15,967.77.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $11.19.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $19.78.
High School.
Principal, J. N. Muir, B.A.; salary, $110 per month.
Second Master, R. Offerhaus ; salary, $100 per month.
Examined, December 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 1885.
June 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 1886.
Inspections and visits, 39.
Enrolled during the year, 105.
Average monthly attendance, 75.
Average daily attendance, 64.27.
This school, the leading educational institution in the Province, completed its first decade
with the close of the last school-year.
From the following tabular statement of attendance since its establishment, an accurate
idea of the number of pupils who have therein received instruction in the different branches
of a higher education may be obtained.
The names of those who stood head of the school at the Midsummer and Christmas
Examinations held since its commencement, are also given :—
Year.
Males
enrolled.
Females
enrolled.
Total
enrolment.
Average
daily-
attendance
Head of School.
Christmas.
Midsummer.
1876-77
1877-78
43
47
54
51
37
39
34
45
■S7
47
17
14
60
61
49.00
50.15
43.62
54.69
52.75
45.07
38.00
56.63
56.34
64.27
John C. Newbury.
1878-79
22                 76
Herbert C. Carey.
Charles Hayward.
J. B. Carmichael.
Wm. W. Halliday.
Samuel Schultz.
Christina Forrest.
Abbie F. Gardiner.
John C. Boyd.
1879-80
1880-81
1881-82
1882-83
1883-84
1884-85
1885-86
31
39
35
27
39
57
58
82
76
74
61
84
94
105
Charles Hayward	
R. Clayton Fawcett	
W. F. Carey Fope	
During the past ten years this school has sent forth a large number of young people to begin
the battle of life in varied avocations. Its ex-students are to be found in all parts of the
Province, some being engaged in business for themselves, others in positions of trust, and all,
as far as known, in honorable employment.
That the Province as well as its children has very materially benefited by the establishment of this school, is shown by the fact that it has yearly added names to the list of certificated teachers whose success has not been inferior to that of instructors from the older
provinces. I may further add that nearly one-third of those holding certificates of qualification
to teach in the Public Schools of the Province, are indebted, in part at least, to this school for
their education, and at the present time to more than one-half of the staff of teachers in the
graded schools of Victoria is this institution their alma mater. 152 Public Schools Report. 1886
At no time has the school been so largely attended as at present, hence the duties of both
the Principal and Second Master are certainly arduous. They are to be congratulated not only
on the results of the past year, but on the general high standing attained by their pupils.
At the Christmas examination, 1885, Master W. F. Carey Pope stood head of the school.
At the Midsummer examination, 1886, Master John C. Boyd stood head of the school,
thereby winning the Silver Medal presented by His Excellency the Governor-General for
competition among the pupils of this school. The presentation was made by His Honor
Lieutenant-Governor Cornwall, who congratulated the young man on the proud distinction
achieved, and encouraged the disappointed competitors to renewed energy.
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, June 26th, 1886.
" Sir,—In accordance with Article 9 of the Regulations, 1 send you this report of the
High School:—
"The total number enrolled for the year was 118, viz., 56 in the senior division and 62 in
the junior division, 13 of whom were re-enrolled in the senior division, thus making a total of
105 in attendance during the year. The average attendance was 66—viz., 34 in the senior
division and 32 in the junior division.
" In addition to the subjects formerly taught, classes were formed in Grecian History, and
in Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene. The charts in Natural Philosophy furnished last year
by the Education Department proved to be of great assistance in teaching those subjects.
" The change in the course of study prescribed for High Schools will prove of great
benefit, enabling those who desire to prepare themselves to pass the examination for teachers
to do so without taking up any other subjects.
" About this time last year we expected that a separate building was going to be built for
the High School, but we have been disappointed. Until the walls between the High School
and the Public School are constructed so as to prevent the transmission of sound, we cannot
expect to make such progress as we might make under ordinary circumstances. We can hear
the noise from the adjoining rooms, which detracts attention from study, and when the Public
School children are going into or out of their building, it is impossible to study in the senior
division room of the High School. I hope that something may be done in this matter before
re-opening in August.
" I have, &c,
"S. D.Pope, Esq., B. A., (Signed)        "J. N. Muir.
"Superintendent of Education, "Principal.
" Victoria."
Boys' School.
Principal, J. A. Halliday ; salary, $100 per month.
1st Assistant, J. H. Thain ; salary, $80 per month.
2nd Assistant, A. Dods; salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss A. O. Gowen; salary, $60 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss E. J. Gardiner ; salary, $60 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss C. Forrest; salary, $50 per month.
6th Assistant, Miss E. M. Carmichael; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, Dec. 3rd and 4th, 1885.
June 7th, 8th, and 9th, 1886.
Inspections and visits, 90.
Enrolled during the year, 578.
Average monthly attendance, 403.
Average daily attendance, 325.19.
There has been considerable increase in both enrolment and average daily attendance.
That the general record of the school during the past year has been very satisfactory, notwithstanding the fact that there has been a daily average of nearly 47 to each teacher, is due to
united effort on the part of the worthy Principal and his efficient assistants. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. 153
From the enrolment attained thus far in the present school year, it is evident that an
additional teacher will soon be required.
While there is no position in a graded school that does not demand energy, experience,
and tact, in order that results required be accomplished in each division, these qualifications
are all the more necessary in this the largest graded school in the Province as to enrolment
and average attendance.
On the resignation of Mr. Archibald Dods, in August, 1886, Mr. James Kaye was
appointed to the position thereby rendered vacant.
On the retirement of Miss 0. W. Forrest, in September, to take charge of Rock Bay
Ward School, Mr. F. G. Wright became her successor.
Miss E. M. Carmichael having received an appointment in the Girls' School, Miss Annie
Pollard was selected to fill the vacancy.
At the Christmas examination the following passed the standard required for admission
to a High School:—
Richard Brodrick,
Albert Edward Whittaker,
Thomas Lee,
Thomas Munro Miller,
Richard George,
Percy Oliver Dickinson,
John Campbell McLagan,
George Washington Hale,
Stanley Reginald Engelhardt,
Walter Kerr,
George William Aikmau.
At the midsummer examination the following obtained the percentage uecessary for
admission to a High School:—
William B. McDowell,
Milton B. Oppenheimer,
Henry A. E. Courtenay,
Charles Steele,
James G. Ure,
Henry G. Mason,
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, 8th July, 1886.
" Sir,—I have the honor to submit herewith my Annual Report as Principal of the
Victoria Boys' School for the year 1885-86.
" There has been very little in the work of the school during the past year that calls for
comment, or seems to need special mention in a Report. The regular work has gone on
without interruption, and the progress has been quite as satisfactory as we had reason to
expect.
" The number of promotions from the different divisions during the year was higher than
in any previous one, notwithstanding that the standard of admission to the High School is
now very difficult of attainment; and it, in a great measure, guides the grading of the
different divisions.    Very high percentages were in many cases obtained in all the divisions.
" In the first division in individual cases for promotion to High School 72% was obtained
in Grammar, 76% in Geography, 85% in Written Arithmetic, 100% in Mental Arithmetic, 90%
in Spelling and Dictation, and 90% in Writing, showing that difficult as the examination is, it
is possible for an industrious pupil to overtake the work.
"In the second division 100% was obtained on some of the subjects; the third division
also ranks well considering the large number in that class.
" Miss Annie Gowen, teacher of the fourth division, cannot receive too much praise for
the efficient manner in which she has conducted the work of her division, being always on
time and ready to do anything for the advancement of the school. The result of the closing
examination  shows that diligence and thoroughness had been the mottoes for the term.    In 154 Public Schools Report. 1886
Reading 21 pupils obtained over 80%, in Spelling 30 obtained 80%, in Writing 34 over 90%,
in Grammar 25 over 80%, in Arithmetic 35 over 50%, in Mental Arithmetic 36 over 50%, in
Composition 27 over 80% ; in 7 cases pupils took full marks on some of the subjects. The
part taken by this class at the closing entertainment in Theatre Comique gave proof of much
skill and care in preparing their part.
"The fifth division under Miss E. J. Gardiner, is under excellent discipline, and did well
at the Promotion Examination ; 44 of the 56 examined obtained full marks in Composition ;
the Writing is very neat and in accordance with the system prescribed ; they excel in Spelling,
and in Reading high  percentages were  obtained.
" The sixth division has had more to contend against in making a good showing than any
other. Owing to the excessive crowding of the seventh division, many have been promoted
into this division before they had received as much training as fitted them to compete with
others of the division, thus entailing a large amount of work on Miss Forrest, for which she
gets no credit, except from those fully acquainted with all the details, but it is one of those
incidents that cannot be avoided. I think it quite a proper thing to draw your attention to
the fact, as the number promoted from her room is not a true index of her success. There is
no teacher on the staff more anxious to succeed and more deserving of promotion.
" The seventh division, under Miss E. M. Carmichael, has enrolled 124 pupils, some of
them so childish looking as to make one doubt their being of the prescribed age. As this is
the young lady's first school, and a heavy one, much allowance must be made. It is a division
that requires tact and experience. In schools as large as this in other cities an assistant is
appointed to take charge of the highest division, that the time of the Principal may be devoted
to supervision, promotions, &c. I hoped that this want would have been met by the appointment of an Inspector.
" I would recommend that the Examinations be held the last week of the term, the
promotion one being immediately followed by the public one. The result could be announced
to better advantage and with greater accuracy at the opening of the new term. A feeling of
unrest takes possession of many of the pupils after the written examination, and it is found
very difficult to keep the classes up to the close.
" A resident janitor would save us from much annoyance by keeping cattle off the
grounds, deterring idlers from playing about the buildings, writing on the out-buildings,
breaking windows, <fec.
" Respectfully submitted,
" S. D. Pope, B. A., (Signed) " James A.  Halliday,
" Superintendent of Education." " Principal.
Girls' School.
Principal, Miss F. E. Armstrong; salary, $80 per month.
1st Assistant, Mrs. L. M. Caldwell; salary, $70 per month.
2nd Assistant, Mrs. L. M. Reid ; salary, $70 per month.
3rd Assistant, Miss A. D. Cameron ; salary, $60 per month.
4th Assistant, Miss L. A. Barron ; salary, $55 per month.
5th Assistant, Miss L. Horton; salary, $50 per month.
Examined, December 3rd and 4th, 1885.
June 7th, 8th, and 9th, 1886.
Inspections and visits, 84.
Enrolled during the year, 474.
Average monthly attendance, 348.
Average daily attendance, 280.71.
It is worthy of note that while there has been a decrease of 28 in enrolment, there has
been an increase in average attendance of 31.68.
The record of the school has been very satisfactory as to work accomplished, and taking
into consideration the fact that there has been an average daily attendance of nearly 47 in
each division, the results are all the more commendable.
The teachers are faithful in the discharge of their duties, and to this, in a great measure,
is attributable the present flourishing condition of the school. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. 155
Of the graded schools in the Province, this ranks second in enrolment and average
attendance. Although the duties of the Principal are necessarily onerous, they have been
very successfully discharged.
At the Christmas examination, 1885, the following obtained the percentage required for
admission to a High School:—
Gertrude Maud Fox,
Julia M. Bradley,
Amelia A. Oppenheimer,
Louise Sylvester,
Julia Askew,
Alice Carr,
Mary Cox,
Bertha M. Jay,
Louisa Mallandaine,
Christina Allan,
Lillian Parks,
Agnes Jamieson,
At the midsummer examination the following passed the standard required for admission
to a High School:—
Flora Fraser,
Or villa North cote,
Gertrude Withrow,
Emily Booth,
Elizabeth McConnell,
Grace Fawcett,
Elizabeth M. Wilson,
Matilda Tite.
The Bronze Medal presented by His Excellency the Governor-General for competition
between the pupils of this school and the Boys' School, was won by Miss Flora Fraser.
The presentation was made by His Honor Lieutenant-Governor Cornwall, who complimented
the young lady on the achievement of so high an honor, and in impressive language counselled
her not to be content with present acquirements, but to aim at success in the higher paths of
learning.
In July, 1886, Mrs. L. M. Reid retired from the profession. During her connection
with the school for several years, she not only endeared herself to all under her charge,
but proved to be a most faithful and successful instructor, and resigned her position to the
regret of pupils, parents, and trustees. On her retirement she was made the recipient of a
handsome gift, presented by her pupils and fellow-teachers as a token of the very high esteem
in which she was held by them.
The following promotions, and additions to the staff, have been made during the present
school-year :—
Miss A. D. Cameron,       2nd Assistant.
,,    L. A. Barron, 3rd        ,,
„    L. Horton, 4th ,,
„    E. M. Carmichael,   5th        „
„    Ada Keast. 6th
Report of the Principal.
"Victoria, June 30th, 1886.
" Sir,—The following is my report of the Victoria Girls' School for the year ending
June 30th, 1886 :—
" The present enrolment is 480, showing an increase of 45 over that of last year.
" During the year both the Education Department and the Board of Trustees have been
liberal in supplying necessary requirements, thus materially aiding our efforts in the advancement of education. The work is well done in each division of this school, and my assistants
all show an earnestness in their work arising from a full sense of the high responsibilities of 156 Public Schools Report. 1886
their profession.    The results, as  shown by  the written  examinations held in December and
June, were highly satisfactory.
" Mrs. Reid, who for some years ably tilled the position of second assistant, and who has
at all times conscientiously fulfilled her duties, resigned her position at midsummer. On her
retirement the teachers and pupils of the city schools presented Mrs. Reid with an address,
accompanied by a well-filled purse, as a manifestation of the esteem in which she was held by all.
" Successful public examinations were held at Christmas and midsummer, and were well
attended by parents and others interested in education. It is to be regretted, however, that
the trustees thought best to hold the midsummer examination outside the school building, as
it is not conducive to order to remove the pupils from their accustomed places, and thus the
public receire an erroneous impression of the general order and discipline of the schools. It
would be thoroughly appreciated had we an Assembly Hall adjoining the school buildings, in
which all such exercises might take place. We are also sadly in need of a shed in the playgrounds for the use of the girls in rainy weather. In January, of the present year, the first
four divisions of girls removed to a new building at the rear of the main building. The change
to this well-lighted, comfortable, and convenient edifice is much appreciated by both pupils
and teachers.
"The addition of a seventh division in this department after midsummer will beneficially
relieve the fifth and sixth divisions.
" Fifteen dollars were granted by the trustees at midsummer towards purchasing prizes,
which money was augmented by private subscription. A handsome prize for drawing, also,
was awarded by D. R. Harris, Esq., and one for history by J. Stuart Yates, Esq.
" I have, <fec,
(Signed)        " F. E. Armstrong,
" To S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., "Principal Girls' School.
" Superintendent of Education."
James' Bay Ward School.
Teacher, Miss M. V. Storey.
Salary, $70 per month.
Examined, Dec. 10th, 1885.
June 11th, 1886.
Inspections and visits, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 104.
Average monthly attendance, 69.
Average daily attendance, 55.37.
There has been an increase in both enrolment and average attendance.
A large number of promotions has been made to the Central Schools during the year.
The teacher has been most faithful in the performance of her duties.
Johnson Street Ward School.
Teacher, Miss H. Jackson; salary, $70 per month.
Monitor, F. G. Wright; salary, $25 per month.
Examined, Dec. 11th, 1885.
June 10th, 1886.
Inspections and visits, 11.
Enrolled during the year, 166.
Average monthly attendance, 106.
Average daily attendance, 81.56.
On account of the very large increase in enrolment, it became necessary at the beginning
of the past school-year to provide additional assistance.
Mr. F. G. Wright received the appointment as Monitor, which position he filled until the
close of the year.
A large number of promotions has been made to the Central Schools.
The teacher has been most assiduous in the discharge of her duties. 50 Vic Public Schools Report. 157
Rock Bay Ward School.
Provision having been made in the estimates of last Session for the establishment of this
school, a very neat and commodious building has been erected on an eligible site in the western
portion of the city.
The school was opened in September of the present year, and has so relieved the Johnson
Street Ward School of its crowded condition that a monitor is no longer- required in the latter.
The fact that already over 70 pupils have been enrolled, is a proof of the urgent need of
its establishment.
Miss C. W. Forrest, an energetic and faithful teacher, is in charge.
The excellent record of the schools of Victoria during the past year, with an enrolment of
1,427 pupils, under the instruction of 17 teachers, not only proves the ability and worth of
the principals and their assistants, but is one of which parents and citizens may well feel
proud. In the order observed and in the discipline maintained, as well as in the advancement
in the prescribed subjects of the different grades, these schools compare favorably with those
in cities of equal population in other parts of the Dominion. Their present flourishing condition is due in great measure to the interest manifested by the trustees, who have not only
devoted much time and attention to the settlement of the varied complications that necessarily
arise, but have given evidence of this interest by the very large number of visits (678) made
to the schools during the year.
These gentlemen are deserving of the thanks of the community at large for valuable
services gratuitously rendered in the cause of education in this city.
The gradually increasing population of Victoria will necessitate the  early establishment
of another ward school.
Wellington.
Principal, G. Stainburn, B. A.. Cantab; salary, $75 per month.
Assistant, Miss J. W. Blair, until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, Miss Mary
Lawrence; salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 16th, 1885; present, 78.
June 16th, 1886; present, 65.
Examined, March 10th, 1886 ; present, 79.
Enrolled during the year, 135.
Average monthly attendance, 98.
Average daily attendance, 77.66.
Expenditure, $1,581.37.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $11.71.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $20.36.
While there has been a slight decrease in enrolment, there has been an increase in average
attendance.
Several improvements have been made to the school property during the year, which have
materially contributed to the comfort of both pupils and teachers.
Notwithstanding the large attendance, the progress of the pupils has been creditable to
the teachers.    The school is under the charge of a painstaking and experienced principal. 158 Public Schools Report. 1886
Report of the Principal.
"Wellington, B.C., October 20th, 1886.
"Sir,—The Wellington Public School was closed for the holidays on the 25th of June.
The pupils who distinguished themselves most in the midsummer examination wrere Edna
Wall, Elizabeth Jane Moffat, and George Green.
" In the senior division, the winners of the Provincial certificates were :—
" Elizabeth Jane Moffat, deportment;
"Jonathan Green, punctuality;
" Edna Wall, proficiency.
" In the junior division, the certificates were awarded to—
" Richard Ivey, deportment;
"Mary Jane Wall, punctuality;
" Elizabeth Jane Currie, proficiency.
" In the Superintendent's examination for admission to a High School, which was held in
March, eight pupils were examined, of whom one had passed previously.    No additional pupils
passed the required standard ; the average obtained by the class was 53 per cent.
" The number attending the school remains about the same from year to year. There is
little farming in this district; hence it is obvious that the school cannot indefinitely progress,
as it might in an agricultural district, where new land is continually being taken up. Here
everything depends on the coal mines ; when these fail, all subsidiary industries, stores,
schools, churches, &c, immediately collapse. If there should be a great extension of mining
operations in this neighborhood, in that case, and not otherwise, the school attendance would
materially increase.
" It should be noticed that the appropriation for incidental expenses during the past year
proved insufficient. I suppose it would have sufficed under ordinary circumstances. But it is
well known that in the year 1884-85 the school-house was reduced by the resident hoodlums to
an utter wreck; consequently, a great part of the money allowed us was absorbed in repairing
the damage that had been wrought, and the appropriation became exhausted long before the
expiration of the year.
" I may mention that of late there has been no repetition of the malicious attacks on the
school property, by which this town has so long been disgraced. Considerable alterations and
improvements have been recently made in the school building and premises.
(Signed)        "G. Stainburn,
" Principal*
" S. D. Pope, Esq., B.A.,
" Superintendent of Education,  Victoria." 50 Vic, Public Schools Report. 159
SPECIAL REPORTS ON  COMMON SCHOOLS.
Barkerville.
Teacher, W. S. Bannerman, until August 31st, 1886; present teacher, Archibald Dods.
Salary, $100 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 19 girls ; total, 32.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.47.
Expenditure, $1,420. ,
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $44.37.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $63.20.
This school has creditably maintained its high percentage of average attendance. At
written examination on questions sent by this department, Master Hubert Watt passed the
standard required for admission to a High School.
Big Bar.
Teacher, Miss M. A. Grinder, until November, 1885 ; present teacher, John Gallagher.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 6 girls ; total, 13.
Average monthly attendance, 11.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.29.
Expenditure, $432.90.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $33.30.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $46.60.
The average attendance for the year has not quite equalled the requirement of Statute.
The school was re-opened at the beginning of the present school-year, but was closed  in
October on account of inability to maintain the average daily attendance required.
Beaver Point.
Teacher, Miss Margaret Jackson, until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, William Sive-
wright.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 14 girls ; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average actual daily attendance, 18.58.
Expenditure, $505.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $21.04.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $27.18.
This school was opened in September, 1885. The average attendance has surpassed expectation, and the number of visits made by trustees and parents shows the lively interest
taken in educational work in this newly-established district. 160 Public Schools Report. 1886
Burgoyne Bay.
Teacher, W  T. Kinney, until October, 1886 ; present teacher, Dixon Irwin.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the.year, 13 boys, 12 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 2l.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.44.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.60.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $36.70.
The work of this school has been very satisfactory. As evidence of increased interest, I
may mention, that the number of visits, nine during 1884-85, was augmented to fifty-nine
during the past school-year. This is mainly attributable to the efforts of the teacher, who has
proved himself to be an energetic and competent instructor.
Burton's Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Katherine Todd.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 19th, 1886 ; present, 15 boys, 10 girls; total, 25.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 11 girls ; total 27.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.72.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.70.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $38.28.
The progress of the pupils as well as the order and discipline maintained has been very
satisfactory. It is alike creditable to the teacher and to trustees and parents that the number
of visits increased from one hundred and thirteen during the previous year to one hundred and
eighty-three—the largest number of visits, with one exception, to any rural school during the
past year.
Too much credit cannot be given to teacher and trustees for the neat appearance of schoolroom and grounds.
Cache Creek (Boarding School).
Teacher, R. M. Clemitson.
Matron, Mrs. R. M. Clemitson.
Salary of Teacher, $75 per month.
Salary of Matron, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 19 girls ; total, 34.
Average monthly attendance, 30.
Average actual daily attendance, 26.06.
Expenditure, $1,700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $50.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $65.23.
During the past two years there has been a very marked increase in average attendance.
From an inspection of this institution during the early part of the present school-year, I
am in a position to state that this school has been doing and is doing good work.
While the pupils are afforded every opportunity of receiving a good common school education under an able and experienced teacher, their instruction in social and moral virtues is not
neglected. 50 Vic Public Schools Report, 161
Cadboro.
Teacher, Miss A. S. Bailey, until November, 1885 ;
Miss Helen Bailey, until March, 1886; present teacher, Miss Mary Williams.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, September 25th,  1885 ; present, 5 boys, 8 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 18 girls ; total, 34.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.07.
Expenditure, $633.54.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.63.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.03.
This school was opened in August, 1885. The average attendance and number of visits
made by parents and others attest thorough appreciation of school facilities.
The school property in this rural district is one of the most attractive in the Province.
Under the charge of the present efficient and painstaking teacher, the success of the
school is assured.
Canoe Pass.
Teacher, F. W. Howay, until October, 1886 ; present teacher, M. Beattie.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 12 girls ; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.06.
Expenditure, $640.'
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $26.67.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.52.
The average attendance in this new district has been very satisfactory.
Trustees and parents have shown a thorough interest in their school.
Cedar (North).
Teacher, Ernest E. Kaye until May, 1886 ;  present teacher, Miss Jennie Ramsay.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected Sept  16th, 1885; present, 10 boys, 12 girls; total, 22.
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 22 girls ; total, 42.
Average monthly attendance, 29.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.72.
Expenditure, $669.85.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.95.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $29.48.
It is gratifying to note the increased number of visits made by the trustees.   .
A commodious and comfortable building has been erected  on  the  school   reserve  in this
district, which is a great improvement on the one occupied in former years. 162 Public Schools Report. 1886
Cedar (South).
Teacher,   Miss  Mary  Lawrence  until   Oct.,   1885 :   J.  S.   Kaye until June 30th, 1886 ;
present teacher, Miss M. F. Halliday.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 17th, 1885 ; present, 7 boys, 9 girls ; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 13 girls ; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 15.90.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $27.83.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $40.25.
There has been a perceptible increase in average attendance, as well as a marked addition
in the number of visits made by trustees and parents.
Cedar  Hill.
Teacher,   R.   A.   Anderson   until   March.   1880:    W.   M.   Wood  until  June 30th, 1886;
present teacher, D. E. Kerr.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 25th, 1885; present, 10 boys,   10 girls; total, 20.
Examined, March 4th, 1886 ; present, 14 boys, 11 girls ; total, 25.
Visited, June 25th, 1886 ; midsummer public examination.
Enrolled during the year, 29 boys, 21 girls ; total, 50.
Average monthly attendance, 30.
Average actual daily attendance, 23.81.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.20.
Cjost of each pupil on average attendance, $31.92.
While there has been an increase in both enrolment and average attendance the number
of visits has decreased. In so important a school it is to be expected that trustees and parents
will not only feel but show their interest in its welfare by more frequent visitations.
The school is in good working order, and prospects for the present year are encouraging.
Oentrevillh.
Teacher, O. O. Lyons until Nov. 12th, 1885 :  present teacher, J. P. Johnston.
Salary, $80 per month.
Examined, May 17th, 1886; present, 30 boys, 23 girls; total, 53.
Enrolled during the year, 41 boys, 34 girls ; total, 75.
Average monthly attendance, 54.
Average actual daily attendance, 40 48.
, Expenditure, $1,000.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $24.70.
Of the rural schools, this ranks first in enrolment and average attendance. Thus far
during the present year the attendance has been very large, and any material increase will
necessitate the providing of additional assistance.
The school is in charge of a faithful and experienced instructor.
It is to be expected that, in so important a district, very general interest will be taken in
the welfare of the school, and that trustees and parents will encourage both teacher and pupils
by frequent visits. 50 Vic Public Schools Report. 163
Oheam.
Teacher, Miss Helen Andrews.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected May 17th, 1886 : present, 22 boys, 10 girls ; total, 32.
Enrolled during the year, 29 boys, 18 girls ; total, 47.
Average monthly attendance, 30.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.03.
Expenditure, $640.'
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.62.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $31.95.
While there, has been a large increase in enrolment, the average attendance has slightly
decreased.
The record of the school during the present year shows considerable increase in attendance.
The very satisfactory results attained are clue to the energy and tact of the teacher, who
has had charge of the school for nearly five years, as well as to the encouragement and aid
given her by trustees and parents
Chemainus.
Teacher, S. G. Lewis.
Salary, $50 per month.
Visited September 9th, 1885; found the school closed temporarily on account of epidemic,
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 5 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.01.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $32.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, 663.94.
Trustees and parents have, by the number of visits made, shown a  lively  interest in the
school.
Chilliwhack.
Teacher, A. H. Gillanders.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected May 17th, 1886; present, 10 boys, 15 girls; total, 25.
Enrolled during the year, 15 boys, 16 girls ; total, 31.
Average monthly attendance, 25.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.95.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $20.65.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $35.65.
The number of pupils enrolled increased from 23 in the previous year to 31, but there has
been a very slight decrease in the average attendance. 164 Public Schools Report. 1886
Clinton.
Teacher, John F. Smith until June 30th, 18b6 ; present teacher, Miss Ella B. Shaw.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 7 girls ; total, 18.,
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.81.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $42.22.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $77.47.
The average attendance for the year has not been satisfactory, and it is a matter of regret
that trustees and parents have not, by more frequent visits, shown a greater interest in the
welfare of the school.
Clover Valley.
Teacher, Robie L. Reid.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected October 20th, 1885 ; present, 12 boys, 1 girl; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 11 girls ; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.80.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.07.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $46.38.
There has been a perceptible increase in average attendance.
It is gratifying to be able to state that the number of visits made by trustees and parents
increased from 7 in 1884-85 to 50 in the past year.
The people of the district have every reason to feel proud of the neat appearance of their
school property.
Colwood.
Teacher, A. M. Bannerman until  August 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, J. J. Bannerman.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected August 12th, 1885 ; present, 5 boys, 9 girls ; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 15 girls ; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.74.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.62.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $43.42.
The average attendance has slightly decreased.
It is creditable to the trustees and parents of this district that the number of visits made
to the school by them increased from 9 in the previous year to 55 in the past year. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. 165
 . __ =1== 1__—       ^ 	
Comox, North.
Teacher, Miss Marie F. Halliday until August, 1886 : present teacher, John Mundell.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 12 girls ; total, 29,
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.76.
Expenditure, $640.'
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.07.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $46.51.
From a recent inspection I am justified in stating that the work has been satisfactory, and
that prospects for the present year are good.
Comox, South.
Teacher, Miss Mary Heard.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year,  10 boys, 11 girls ; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.93.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $33.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $46.89.
There has been a slight increase in average attendance.
The school-house recently erected is not only pleasantly but centrally located, and that
the improvement in accommodation afforded thereby is fully appreciated, has been manifested
by the very general interest shown in educational matters in the district.
Courtenay.
Teacher, J. D. McMillan.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 8 girls; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.92.
Expenditure, $608.25.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $32.01.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.08.
The neat and commodious school-house erected during the present year, in this newly-
created district, is now occupied.
Of the rural schools of the Province, this ranks first in the number of visits received from
trustees. This is an honor alike creditable to the trustees themselves and to the1 people of the
district. 166 Public Schools Report. 1886
Cowichan.
Teacher,  E. J. Campbell.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 8th, 1885 ; present, 6 boys, 5 girls; total 11.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 11 girls ; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.56.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $26.67.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $60.61.
The record of the school has not materially changed during the year.
The school-house erected during the present year is now occupied.
Cowichan,  South.
Teacher, Walter Hunter, B. A., until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher,  John   R.   Scott.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 7 girls ; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.34.
Expenditure, $320.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.80.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $25.93.
This school was opened in January, 1886     The prospects for the present year are good.
Craigflower.
Teacher, John Mundell, until August 31st, 1886 ; present teacher, A. M, Bannerman.
Salary, $65 per month.
Inspected, August 12th, 1885; present, 10 boys, 3 girls; total, 13.
Examined, March 24th, 1886; present, 13 boys, 11 girls; total, 24.
Visited, June 25th, 1886 ; midsummer public examination.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 13 girls ; total, 34.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 18.04.
Expenditure, $820.'
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.12.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.45.
While there has been no material change in the record of the school, the work has been
satisfactory.
The prospects for the present year are encouraging. 50 Vic Public Schools Report. 167
Denman Island.
Teacher, Miss Helen Bailey until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, Miss Mary L.
Harding.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 5 boys, 11 girls : total, 16.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.26.
Expenditure, $197.42.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.34.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $16.10.
This school, which was closed for a considerable time on account of inability to maintain
average attendance required, was re-opened in March, 1886.
Its success thus far is in a great measure attributable to the thorough interest manifested
by trustees and parents.
Departure   Bay.
Teacher, Miss Sophie E. Lindsay.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 9 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 19.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.47.
Expenditure, $197.42.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $9.87.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $14.66.
The school-house in  this  newly-created  district   presents   a   neat   appearance,  and  the
progress of the pupils has been satisfactory.
Esquimalt.
Teacher, Miss Nellie Wolfenden.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, November 5th, 1885 ; present, 22 boys, 17 girls; total, 39.
Examined, March 24th, 1886 ; present, 21 boys, 19 girls ; total, 40.
Visited, June 25th, 1886 ; midsummer public examination.
Enrolled during the year, 38 boys, 32 girls; total, 70.
Average monthly attendance, 48.
Average actual daily attendance, 39.13.
Expenditure, $880.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $12.57.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $22.49.
Of rural schools this ranks second in enrolment and average attendance.
The very large increase in average daily attendance, amounting to almost 34 per cent,
over that of the previous year, is most satisfactory evidence of the rapid growth of this school.
The progress of the pupils and the order and discipline maintained have been and are
highly creditable to the teacher. Trustees and parents have shown a lively interest in the
scholastic training of their children.
On examination, Master Hugh Logan obtained the percentage required for admission to a
High School. 168 Public Schools Report. 1886
Gabriola, North.
Teacher, Miss Jennie Ramsay until May, 1886 ; present teacher, Miss E. S. Bell.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 13 girls ; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.74.
Expenditure, $636.78.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $28.94.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $54.24.
While there has been a slight decrease in the average daily attendance, the number of
visits made by trustees and parents has considerably increased.
From a recent inspection, I am in a position to state that the school is in good working
order, and that the teacher is zealous and efficient in her work.
Gabriola, South.
Teacher, Alexander Shaw until October, 1886 ; present teacher, Miss Sara Preston.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 5 boys, 12 girls ; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.53.
Expenditure, $640.'
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $37.65.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.30.
There has been an increase in average daily attendance, as well as in the number of visits
made by trustees and parents, doubtless due, in a great measure, to the efforts of the teacher.
On examination, Miss Margaret R. Shaw passed the standard required for admission to a
High School.
Granville.
Teacher, J. W. Palmer until Sept. 1886 ; present teacher, J. W. Robinson.
Salary, $60 per month
Examined, April 13th, 1886; present, 27 boys, 26 girls; total, 53.
Inspected April 14th, 1886 ; present, 26 boys, 25 girls ; total, 51.
Enrolled during the year, 51 boys, 54 girls ; total, 105.
Average monthly attendance, 59.
Average actual daily attendance, 44.65.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $7.24.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $17.02.
During the year the enrolment increased from 58 in the previous year to 105, and the
average attendance from 29.16 to 44.65,
This very considerable increase in the number of children attending the school is attributable to the large addition to the populatiou of the district, caused by the construction of
extensive railway works in the vicinity.
As the name of the town of Granville was changed by Legislative enactment to Vancouver
a corresponding change has been made in the name of this district, which will hereafter be
known as " Vancouver School District."
The disastrous conflagration that occurred on June 13th, 1886, necessitated the immediate
closing of the school, which was not re-opened until November.
A building which will afford suitable accommodation will be ready for occupancy after
the Christmas holidays. With the New Year the school will open in this building under the
charge of a principal and an assistant teacher. 50 Vic Public Schools Report. 169
From the attendance thus far reported there is every prospect that it will be found
necessary in the near future to supply additional assistance.
If trustees and parents take that interest in the matter of education which its importance
demands, there can be no doubt that the record of the school will in a very short time compare
favorably with that of any graded school in sister cities.
Hall's Prairie.
Teacher, J. C. McLennan.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 12 girls : total, 28.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 18.33.
Expenditure, $690.'
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.64.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $37.64.
The average daily attendance maintained since the establishment of this school in April,
1885, has been very creditable.
To united effort on the part of teacher, trustees and parents is due the excellent record
for the year.
Hope.
Teacher, Mrs.   Clara   P.  Starret until  June   30th, 1886 ; present   teacher,  Miss  A. J.
McDougali.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 20 girls ; total, 36.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.17.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.78.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.17.
There has been a marked increase both in enrolment and average attendance.
The school is in good working order.
Lake.
Teacher, William M. Wood  until March, 1886 ; present teacher, William Tomlinson.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 29th, 1885; present, 6 boys, 5 girls; total, 11.
April, 7th, 1886 ; present, 7 boys, 6 girls; total, 13.
Examined, March 31st, 1886 ; present, 8 boys, 6 girls ; total, 14.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 7 girls; total, 17.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.22.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $37.65.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $57.04.
The large decrease in enrolment from 32 in the previous year to 17 caused a proportionate
decrease in average attendance.
As stated in last Annual Report, the number of children in the district is very limited ;
hence the school will be dependent for any material increase on the addition of settlers having
families.
The school property, with the addition of shade trees, would present a pleasing appearance
and compare very favorably with that in any of the rural districts. 170 Public Schools Report. 1886
Langley.
Teacher, Miss Ellen Dockrill   until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, Robert J. Plaxton.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, Oct. 22nd, 1885 ; present, 14 boys, 3 girls; total, 17.
May, 20th, 1886; present, 9 boys, 4 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 26 boys, 11 girls : total. 37.
Average monthly attendance, 20.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.94.
Expenditure, $760.'
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $20.54.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $54,52,
There has been no material change in enrolment or average attendance.
The new school-house is conveniently located on an attractive site.
Lillooet.
Teacher, James M. Campbell until February, 1886; E. B. Paul, M. A., until May, 1886 ,
W. 0. Coatham until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, Walter Hunter, B.A.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 9 girls ; total, 20,
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.34.
Expenditure, $687.48.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $34.37.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $66.49.
There has been a slight decrease in attendance.
On the occasion of a recent visit the school was found to be in good working order.
Lulu (North Arm).
Teacher, Miss Mary L. Harding, until June 30th, 1886; present teacher, O. D. Sweet.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 10 boys, 14 girls ; total, 24.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.08.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $29.17.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $69.44.
There has been a slight decrease in average attendance. 50 Vic Public Schools Report. 171
Lytton
Teacher, D. W. Gillies.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 11 girls : total 23.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.99
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $33.04.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $58.51.
There has been a decrease in average daily attendance.
It is gratifying to note that the number of visits by trustees and parents increased over
one hundred per cent.
On a recent inspection, the order and discipline observed, as well as the proficiency of
pupils in the different classes were highly creditable to the teacher.
Maple Bay
Teacher, W. J. Mufford until January, 1886 ; H. W. Graves until August, 1886 ; present
teacher, Miss I. M. F. Barron..
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected September 7th, 1885 ; present, 5 boys, 5 girls ; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 10 girls ; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.97.
Expenditure, $490.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.33.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $49.15.
This school which was closed during a part of the previous year for want of maintaining
average daily attendance required by statute, was re-opened in April, 1886.
Present prospects as to attendance are good, and it is to be hoped that by united effort
on the part of trustees and parents the children of this district will not again be deprived of
school privileges.
Maple Ridge.
Teacher, Paul Murray.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected October 23rd, 1885 ; present, 11 boys, 17 girls; total, 28.
Examined May 21st, 1886 ; present, 19 boys, 16 girls; total, 35.
Enrolled during the year, 34 boys, 31 girls ; total, 65.
Average monthly attendance, 44.
Average actual daily attendance, 35.52.
Expenditure, $880.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.54.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $24 77.
The average daily attendance increased from 28.20 in the previous year to 35.52. This
high percentage of increase (25 %) is all the more creditable to teacher and pupils from the
fact that there was a slight decrease in enrolment.
Of rural schools, this ranks first in number of visits received from trustees and parents
(200)—a true index not only of the esteem in which the teacher is held, but of the thorough
interest taken in the cause of education in this district.
The school property is pleasantly located and presents a very neat appearance.
On examination, Miss Minnie Vasey passed the standard required for admission to a
High School, 172 Public Schools Report. 1886
Mayne Island.
Teacher, W. H. Phelps.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 15 girls; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.07.
Expenditure, $680.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.45.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $39.84
There has been a slight increase in average attendance. The number of visits made by
trustees and parents increased from 19 in the previous year to 61.
The school has been in chai'ge of an energetic and efficient teacher, hence results have
been very satisfactory.
The salary of the teacher has been increased to $55 per month.
Metchosin (Including Rocky Point).
Teacher, F. L. Stephenson until September, 1885; J. Gillies until February, 1886; D. E.
Kerr until June 30th, 1886 ;   present teacher, Fred. J. Amery.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected August 12th, 1885; present, 5 boys, 1 girl; total, 6.
Enrolled during the year, 12 boys, 8 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.14.
Expenditure, $723.50
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $36.17.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $55.06.
A decrease in average daily attendance, as well as in the number of visits made by trustees
and parents, is noticeable.
This old established school can only be placed on a more permanent basis by the locating
in the district of a number of settlers having children of school age.
The prospects for the present year are good.
Moodyville.
Teacher, Miss M. Kirkland until October, 1886 ; present teacher, Miss A. S. M. Charlton,
Salary, $55 per month.
Examined April 14th, 1886; present, 10 boys, 10 girls; total, 20.
Enrolled during the year, 23 boys, 16 girls ; total, 39.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average actual daily attendance, 20.22.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.95.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $34.62.
There has been quite on increase in both enrolment and average daily attendance.
The progress of the pupils, as well as the order and discipline maintained, has been very
creditable to the teacher. 50 Vic Public: Schools Report. \7"i
Mount Lehman.
Teacher, Miss Ella Coghlan.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected May 19th, 1886; present, 10 boys, 9 girls ; total, 19.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 18 girls; total, 36
Average monthly attendance, 21,
Average actual daily attendance. 14.54.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.78.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $44.02.
It is noticeable that while there was a large increase in enrolment there was no appreciable
increase in average daily attendance.
The number of visits by trustees and parents by no means indicates that interest in the
school which a monthly attendance of over twenty pupils demands.
Mud Bat.
Teacher, Miss A. J. McDougali until  30th June, 1886 ; present teacher, R. S. Hanna.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Oct. 20th, 1885 ; present, 6 boys, 4 girls ; total, 10.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 11 girls ; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance 11.48.
Expenditure, $540.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $24.55.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.04.
There has been a decrease in both enrolment and average daily attendance.
It is to be hoped that trustees and  parents will  encourage  both teacher  and  pupils  by
more frequent visits to the school during the present year,
Nicola.
Teacher, Miss Tda Armstrong until June 30th June, 1886 ; present teacher, Miss Jeanie
O. Douglas.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 7 boys, 12 girls ; total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.00.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $40.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $63.33.
In order to meet the requirement of this locality for educational facilities, a school was
established in July, 1885. Not having at that time the number of children demanded by the
Act (15) the district was not created until the present school-year.
By permission from this department the school was in operation for twelve consecutive
months ending with June, 1886.
Average attendance maintained and progress made, as well as general interest exhibited
by trustees and parents, have been satisfactory. 174 Public Schools Report. 1886
Nicola Lake.
Teacher, Miss Annie E. Carmichael until May 31st, 1886.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 6 boys, 7 girls : total,  13.
Average monthly attendance, 10.
Average actual daily attendance, 9.37.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $49.23.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $68.30
This .school was closed, May 31st, 1886, on account of inability to maintain the requisite
average daily attendance.
The loss of school privileges is a matter of regret, and it is to be hoped that the trustees
will soon be in a position to re-open the school.
Nicola  Valley.
Teacher, D. J. McDonald   until June 30th, 1886 : present teacher,  Miss E, A. Jamifcson.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 8 girls : total, 19.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.94.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $40.
Cost of each pupil on average, attendance, $69,47.
There has been no material change in enrolment or average attendance.
Trustees and parents by more frequent visits would assist and encourage both teacher and
pupils and thereby contribute to the building up of the school.
North Thompson.
Teacher, Miss M. R. Dallas.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 13 boys, 7 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.45.
Expenditure, $543.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $27.15.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.42.
The school in this newly-created district was opened in Dec, 1885.
The school-house is centrally located on a very eligible site, and has a teacher's residence
attached.
The record as to attendance and general interest manifested by trustees and parents has
been satisfactory.
On the occasion of a recent inspection, the advancement found to have been made by the
pupils, most of whom had never before an opportunity of attending a school, was very
creditable to the teacher. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report, 175
Okanagan.
Teacher, Thomas Leduc until Oct., 1886 ; present teacher, Fred. J,  Watson.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 8 girls ; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.44.
Expenditure, $682.58.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.28.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $59.67.
There has been a very slight decrease in average daily attendance. >
The number of visits by trustees and parents shows an increased interest in the success of
the school.
Oyster,
Teacher, John R. Scott, until June 30th, 1886 ;  present teacher, James Dougan, Jr.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 16 boys, 6 girls ; total, 22.
Average monthly attendance, 16.
Average actual daily attendance,  12.46.
Expenditure, $623.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $28.32.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $50.
The school in this newly-created district was opened in August, 1885.
The school-house, erected on a central site, is commodious and presents a neat appearauce,
but the fallen timber not having been cleared away, there is not sufficient space for a play
ground.    This urgent improvement should receive early attention.
Average attendance as well as interest shown by trustees and parents has been satisfactory.
On the occasion of a recent visit, although the school was called together on a Saturday,
nearly the whole number enrolled was present. Correct and ready replies, as well as apparent
interest in the various exercises, gave evidence that a proper foundation had been laid in the
subjects in which the pupils were examined.
Port Moody.
Teacher, Miss A. S. Howay until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, D. J. McDonald.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, December 11th, 1885 ; present, 12 boys, 12 girls ; total, 24.
Enrolled during the year, 26 boys, 19 girls; total, 45.
Average monthly attendance, 32.
Average actual daily attendance, 23.63.
Expenditure, $700.'
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.55.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $29.62.
There has been an increase in enrolment and average attendance.
While the school property presents a neat appearance and meets present requirements,
the prospects are that increased accommodation will be required in this district.
On examination, Master Welsford Murchie passed the standard required for admission to
a High School. 176 Public Schools Report. 1886
Prairie.
Teacher, Miss Augusta  McCartey.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, October 21st, 1885; present, 12 boys, 8 girls; total, 20.
December 9th, 1885 ; present, 10 boys, 8 girls : total, 18,
Enrolled during the year, 23 boys, 16 girls ; total, 39.
Average monthly attendance, 25.
Average actual daily attendance, 17.76.
Expenditure, $602.90.
Cost of each pup'l on enrolment, $15.46.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $33.-95.
There has been a marked increase in average attendance.
The residents are to be. congratulated on the erection of a school-building  which  not only
affords every comfort to both teacher and pupils, but is an ornament to the district.
The record of the school reflects great credit on the teacher.
Prikst's  Vallky.
Teacher, R. S. Hanna until June 30th, 18S6
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 11 girls ; total, 20.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 12.60.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $38.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance,  $60.32
As the average attendance shows an increase for the year, it is a matter of regret that,
owing to the want of a sufficient number of children in the district to maintain the average
daily attendance required by Statute, the trustees have not been able, thus far in the present
year, to re-open the school. There is every probability that this difficulty will be removed at
an early date.
Quamichan,
Teacher, Mrs. A. Monk.
Salary, $55 per month.
Inspected, September 8th, 1885 ; present, 7 boys, 6 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 19 girls ; total 33,
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.63.
Expenditure, $700.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment,  $21.21.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.85.
There has been a marked decrease in average attendance, which is accounted for by the
fact that the district was visited by an epidemic, necessitating the closing of the school for a
considerable time.
The school is now in good working order. 50 Vic Public Schools Report.      . 177
Quesnelle.
Teacher, Miss Alice Northcote.
Salary, $75 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 9 girls ; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.19.
Expenditure, $1,000.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $37.04.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $89.37.
There has been a slight increase in average attendance.
Saanich, North.
Teacher, J   W. Thomson until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, H. J. Rossiter, B. A.
Salary, $70 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 30th, 1885 ; present, 6 boys, 15 girls; total, 21.
Examined, April 8th, 1886 ; present, 9 boys, 20 girls ; total 29.
Enrolled during the year, 17 boys, 32 girls ; total, 49.
Average monthly attendance, 37.
Average actual daily attendance, 25.71,
Expenditure, $880.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $17.96.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $34.23.
There has been an increase in average attendance.
Several improvements to the school property have bsen made, which contribute to the
comfort of the pupils as well as add to its neat appearance.
It is worthy of note that the number of visits made by the trustees doubled that of the
previous year.
At examination held, Miss Sarah Adelaide Williams passed the standard required for
admission to a High School.
Saanich, South.
Teacher, Roderick L. Fraser.
v      Salary, $80 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 30th, 1885; present, 13 boys, 14 girls ; total, 27.
Examined, April 9th, 1886; present, 14 boys, 20 girls; total, 34.
Enrolled during the year, 33 boys, 20 girls ; total, 53.
Average monthly attendance, 39.
Average actual daily attendance, 31.99.
Expenditure, $1,000.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $18.87.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $31.26.
There has been a considerable increase in average attendance.
The fact that the number of visits made by the trustees increased from four in the
previous year to fifteeen, and that of parents from two to eighty-five, is gratifying evidence of
lenewed interest in the welfare of this old established school, and is in a great measure
attributable to the faithful performance of duty on the part of the teacher.
On examination, Miss Fannie Thomson passed the standard required for admission to a
High School. 178 Public Schools Report. 1886
Saanich, West
Teacher, George H. Sluggett.
Salary, $60 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 29th, 1885 ; present, 15 boys, 7 girls ; total, 22.
Examined, April 7th, 1886 ; present 10 boys, 7 girls ; total, 17.
Enrolled during the year, 24 boys, 15 girls ; total, 39.
Average monthly attendance, 26.
Average actual daily attendance, 18.83.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $19.49.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $40.36.
There has been a decrease in average attendance.
The record of the school as to progress has been satisfactory. The addition of new desks
has not only greatly contributed to the neat appearance of the school-room, but has materially
added t.o the comfort of the pupils.
The number of visits made by trustees and parents is an evidence of the high esteem in
which the school is held.
On examination, Miss Maud Butler passed the standard required for admission to a High
School.
Shawnigan.
Teacher, James A. Hoy.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 20 boys, 6 girls ; total, 26.
Average monthly attendance, 22.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.80.
Expenditure, $670.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $25.77.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.27
The average attendance maintained is creditable, and prospects for the present year are
good.
While there is a noticeable increase in the number of visits made by parents, the same
cannot be said of those made by trustees.
Shuswap Prairie.
Teacher, James C. F. Metcalfe.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 6 boys, 12 girls ; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.70.
Expenditure, $760.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $42.22.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $64.96.
There has been a perceptible decrease in average attendance.
Judging from the number of visits made by trustees and parents, very little interest has
been shown in the welfare of the school. It is to be hoped that the record of the present year
will show a great improvement on the past in this regard. 50 Vic, Public Schools Report. 179
Somenos.
Teacher, E. Stuart  Wood until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, Miss Jeanie W. Blair.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Sept. 8th, 1885; present, 7 boys, 6 girls; total, 13.
Enrolled during the year, 11 boys, 10 girls ; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 14.
Average actual daily attendance, 11.24.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $30.48.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $56.94.
The record of the school in this new district is satisfactory.    Trustees and  parents have
shown praiseworthy interest by frequent visitations.
Sooke.
Teacher, Miss Margaret J ennings.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 9 boys, 14 girls ; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 17.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.17.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $27.83.   .
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $48.60.
There has been an increase in average attendance.
The large number of visits made by parents is not only an evidence of the interest taken
by them in the educational welfare of their children, but reflects credit on the teacher
Spallumcheen.
Teacher, Daniel Rabbitt.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 8 boys, 10 girls; total, 18.
Average monthly attendance, i4.
Average actual daily attendance,  12.
Expenditure, $520.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $28.88.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $43.33.
There has been a slight decrease in average attendance. From a division of this district
Round Prairie School District has been created. Both schools are at present in good working
order.
Trustees and parents have encouraged both teacher and pupils by frequent visits. 180 Public Schools Report. 1886
Stave River
Teacher, Miss Melrose Dockrill until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, Miss A. S.
Howay.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 20th, 1886; present, 9 boys, 7 girls; total,  16.
Enrolled during the year, 25 boys, 15 girls; total, 40.
Average monthly attendance, 24.
Average actual daily attendance, 16.41.
Expenditure, $635.87.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $15.89.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $38.75.
This school, opened in August, 1885, in a new building erected on an eligible site, has
maintained a good average attendance. The fact that 40 pupils were enrolled during the year
is evidence that with proper interest on the part of the trustees and parents an increased
average attendance can be secured.
St. Mary's Mission.
Teacher,   B.   R.   McDonald   until  November,   1885 ; J. A. Catherwood until June 30th,
1886 ; present teacher, J. A. Catherwood.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, May 19th, 1886 ; present, 11 boys, 5 girls; total, 16.
Enrolled during the year, 19 boys, 6 girls; total, 25.
Average monthly attendance, 15.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.52.
Expenditure, $515.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $20.60.
Cost of each pupil on average daily attendance, $48.95.
This school was opened in September, 1885.
A school-house has been erected, which is an ornament to the district.
Prospects for the present year are good.
Sumas.
Teacher, John A. McLeod.
Salary, $50 per month.
Examined, May 18th, 1886 ; present, 16 boys, 14 girls; total, 30.
Enrolled during the year, 21 boys, 19 girls ; total 40.
Average monthly attendance, 30.
Average actual daily attendance, 22.30.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $16.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $28.70.
Very little change has been made in the record of this school as to enrolment or average
attendance.
Considerable improvements and repairs have been effected, which not only add to the
appearance of the school property but contribute to the comfort of the pupils.
Proficiency and general progress have been very satisfactory.
On examination, the following passed  the standard required for admission to a  High
School;—
Edna A. Chadsey,
Catherine A. McGillivray,
Louis L. Chadsey. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. 181
Trenant.
Teacher, Alexander Gilchrist.
Salary, $50 per month.
Inspected, Oct. 19th, 1885 ; present, 8 boys, 7 girls ; total   15
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 11 girls; total, 29.
Average monthly attendance, 21.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.08.
Expenditure, $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $22.07.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $45.45.
The school is in good condition.
The large number of visits made during the year shows appreciation on the part of those
interested in the cause of education in this district.
Vesuvius.
Teacher, Raffles A. R. Purdy.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 18 boys, 5 girls ; total, 23.
Average monthly attendance, 18.
Average actual daily attendance, 13.58.
Expenditure. $640.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $27.83.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $47.12.
There has been an increase in average attendance.
A school-house has been erected, which is a very great improvement on the one in use for
several years.
Trustees and parents evince thorough interest in the success of the school.
Prospects for the present year are most encouraging.
Williams Lake.
Teacher, William Manson.
Salary, $70 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 13.boys, 8 girls ; total, 21.
Average monthly attendance, 13.
Average actual daily attendance, 10.88.
Expenditure, $905.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $43.09.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $83.18..
While there has been a slight decrease in average daily attendance, it is worthy of note
that the number of visits made by trustees and parents increased from 2 in the previous year
to 19. 182 Public Schools Report. 1886
Yale.
Teacher, J. Irwin until October, 1886 ; present teacher, W. T. Kinney.
Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 31 boys, 28 girls ; total, 59.
Average monthly attendance, 44.
Average actual daily attendance, 36.09.
Expenditure, $795.'
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $13.47.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $22.03.
There has been a marked increase in average daily attendance.
On the occasion of a recent inspection the school property was found to be in neat condition
and the pupils attentive to their work.
Prospects of the school for the present year are encouraging.
York
Teacher, Miss M   E. Norris  until June 30th, 1886 ; present teacher, Miss Bertha Grant.
Salary, $50 per month.
No inspection.
Enrolled during the year, 14 boys, 13 girls ; total, 27.
Average monthly attendance,  18.
Average actual daily attendance, 14.21.
Expenditure, $625.48.
Cost of each pupil on enrolment, $23.16.
Cost of each pupil on average attendance, $44,02.
While there has been a slight increase in average daily attendance, there has been a very
perceptible decrease in the number of visits made by trustees and parents. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. 183
PROVINCIAL TEACHERS' INSTITUTE.
The second meeting of this association was held in Victoria in July, 1886.
The, very large number of teachers who were present at each meeting, as well as the
spirited manner in which the discussion of the different subjects presented for consideration
were conducted, proves a growing appreciation of the benefits to be derived from attendance
at the Institute, which may be termed a professional school.
Although the number of meetings held was necessarily limited, yet it was apparent to all
who took an interest in the proceedings of each session that this annual convention of teachers
for interchange of thought on subjects pertaining to their profession, will prove to be an
important agency in the educational work of the Province.
The following report was forwarded to this Department by J. A. Halliday, Esq.,
Secretary :—
" Victoria. 19th October, 1886.
" Sir,—I beg herewith to transmit, for the information of the Department, the
following report of the proceedings had at last Annual Convention of the Provincial Teachers'
Institute held in this city. I have, <fec.,
(Signed)        "James A.  Halliday.
" S. D. Pope, Esq., B. A., "Secretary.
"Superintendent of Education."
Teachers' Institute.
" At the Second Annual Convention of the British Columbia Teachers' Institute, held on
15th and 16th July, there were four sessions, the first being occupied with reading and adopting
the minutes of previous meeting, the enrolment of members, payment of dues. The following
officers were duly elected for the ensuing year '.—
" S. D. Pope, B, A., Superintendent of Education President.
"D. Wilson, B. A., Principal New Westminster Boys' School. . 1st Vice-President.
"J. N. Muir, B. A., Principal Victoria High School 2nd        „
" Miss Agnes D. Cameron, 3rd Assistant, Victoria Girls' School. . 3rd „
" R. L. Fraser, South Saanich School Tieasurer.
" Miss F. E. Armstrong, Principal Victoria Girls' School Corresponding Sacretary
" A. Dods, 2nd Assistant Victoria Boys' School Secretary.
" In addition to the above officers, Messrs. R. Offerhaus (Second Master Victoria High
School) and A. Gilchrist (Trenant School) were elected members of the Committee of Management.
" The second and third sessions of the Convention were confined entirely to the discussion
of subjects pertaining to school work.
" Mr. D. W. Gillies read an able and instructive paper on ' Time Tables,' which elicited
many questions and so much discussion that he was compelled to enter more fully into detail
by illustrating the subject on the blackboard. Miss Armstrong and Messrs. Offerhaus, Kinney,
Gilchrist, and Mundell expressed their views at considerable length.
"Mr. J. F. Smith, of Clinton, read a paper on 'Hygiene,' presenting the subject in an
attractive and practical form.    It was criticized by Messrs. D. Wilson and A. Dods.
" At this stage of the proceedings Messrs. A. Dods and W. Sivewright made a few remarks
on the practical use of these conventions, referring to the weight that would be attached to
any recommendation emanating from such a large body of teachers.
" An adjournment then took place until 2 p. m. 184 Public Schools Report. 1886
" On resuming, Mr. Dods read a paper on the ' Importance of Physiology as a subject to
be taught in our Schools,' claiming for it a place in the curriculum of our schools. His remarks
were commented upon by Misses Armstrong and Cameron, and Messrs. Offerhaus, Shaw,
Gilchrist, and others.
"' First Steps in Reading,' by Mr. Muir, was fully illustrated on the blackboard. He
recommended a combination of the Look and Say System with the Alphabetic.
" Mr. Kinney did not think that there was a teacher in British Columbia that held such
ideas as those advanced by M.r  Muir.
" Mr. Sivewright also found fault with the system as shown by Mr. Muir, and in a
vigorous and humorous way explained his ideas on the subject.
" Mr. Muir claimed the right to reply, and proved that the last two gentleman agreed
with him in principle, differing from him only in the methods of carrying it out. The Phonetic
system he could not too strongly condemn.
" Rev. D Fraser then addressed the Convention on ' Morality as it should be taught in
our Schools,' confining his remarks to the demands of the School Act on the subject, which
says ' The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no religious dogma or creed shall be
taught.'
" On resuming his seat he was heartily applauded.
"An entertaining and instructive paper on 'English in these our English-speaking
Schools,' by Miss A. D  Cameron, elicited many encomiums.
" The following resolutions were then passed :—
" ' That the Managing Committee be requested to communicate with the Government
with the view of granting five days during the year to each teacher to enable him to visit other
schools.'
" 'To ask that First and Second Class Certificates be made permanent.'
"The Managing Committee was empowered to fix time and place of next meeting.
" A cordial vote of thanks was given to the Hon. Jno. Robson, Provincial Secretary, for
his exertions in securing for those attending the Convention reduced rates over the different
lines of transportation.
" The unanimous thanks of the Convention were ordered to be tendered to Capt.
Irving, of the C. P. N. Co.; J. H. Turner, Esq., M. P. P., of the P. N. Co.; F. Barnard, Esq.,
of the Stage Line; H. Abbott, Esq., of the C. P. R: and Hon. J. A. Mara, M. P. P., for
reduction of fare to half-rates.
" The proceedings of this the second Convention of the Institute were brought to a close
by a public meeting held in the evening in the Philharmonic Hall, at which there was a very
large attendance of teachers and friends of education. The President, Mr. Pope, occupied the
chair, and along with him on the platform were the Hon. Jno. Robson, Minister of Education;
the Hon. Thomas White, Minister of the Interior; D. W. Higgins, Esq., M. P.P., Chairman, of
Victoria School Board ; E. C. Baker, Esq., M. P.; Rev. D. Fraser ; His Worship Mayor Fell;
and Mrs. Yeomans, the noted temperance lecturer.
" Able addresses were delivered by these gentlemen and the lady mentioned.
" Recitations were given by Miss A. D Cameron, Miss L. Collin, a professional elocutionist
of Boston, and Mr. E. White, a talented non-professional of Victoria.
" Great credit is due to R. Offerhaus, Esq., for the excellent music furnished on the
occasion. He was ably assisted by Misses Dobbs and Reynard, Messrs. Dobbs, Wootten, and
others.
"The Institute, now numbering one hundred and twenty-four members, has good reason
to feel gratified at its success, and takes this opportunity of acknowledging the nurturing care
it has received from Mr. Pope ever since he urged its establishment.
(Signed)        "J. A. Halliday,
" Secretory." 50 Vic Public Schools Report. 185
Branch Institutes.
It has thus far been deemed expedient to hold only annual meetings of the Provincial
Institute, owing to the fact that our school districts are scattered over such a large extent of
territory, thereby causing the teachers who attend very considerable loss of time in travel, not
to speak of the expense connected therewith.
In order to reap the benefits to be derived from more frequent meetings, it is recommended that branch institutes be formed in centres which will enable a large number, or even
a few, to meet monthly, or quarterly, for the discussion of educational topics.
It is gratifying to be able to state that such branches have already been organized in
Nanaimo, New Westminster, and Victoria.
The following are the officers ot these associations :—
Nanaimo :—
E. B. Paul, M.A., President;
Geo. Stainburn, B.A., Vice-President;
David Jones, Secretary ;
Miss E. M. Reynard. Corresponding Secretary.
New Westminster:—
David Wilson, B.A.., President;
H. M. Stramberg, B.A., Vice-President ;
W. C. Coatham, Secretary;
Miss M. R. Davidson, Corresponding Secretary;
Messrs. A. Gilchrist and R.  L.  Reid, additional  members of the Executive
Committee.
Victoria :—
J. N. Muir, B.A., President;
J. A. Halliday, Vice-President;
A. Dods, Secretary (resigned).
A valuable collection of educational works has been presented to this institute by the
Rev. Mr. Jennings, of Port Essington. 186 Public Schools Report. 1886
CLOSING   REMARKS.
Reports.
Promptness and accuracy in all reports to this department are required ; especially are
these necessary on the part of teachers, as failure in these respects in the past has caused much
inconvenience and delay in the work of this office.
It is a pleasure to state that teachers in most of the rural districts keep the department
fully acquainted with matters affecting the interests of their schools.
Average Attendance.
In consideration of the large expenditure made for the maintenance of schools, which is
now no inconsiderable burden on the revenue, the Province has a right to expect of trustees
and parents of each district that the cost of each pupil on enrolment, compared with the cost
of each pupil on average attendance, shall bear a more satisfactory comparison ; or, in other -
words, the percentage of average attendance in each district, as compared with the enrolment,
shall show a better record.
Change of Teachers.
It is certainly not in accord with the spirit of the School Act that trustees should accept
the resignation of the teacher without the thirty days' notice demanded, unless in case of sick
ness or other equally urgent cause.
Teachers above all others are cognizant of the truth of the assertion that frequent change
of instructors is detrimental to the interests of the school ; and trustees should take into
consideration in the appointment of a teacher the fact that the desire of frequent change on
his part is evidence of lack of that interest in his work which is necessary to success.
Visits.
During the early part of the present school-year,  the following schools, not previously
visited during my term of office, were inspected:—
Yale, Lytton, Cache Creek, Lillooet, Kamloops, North Thompson, Oyster,  Beaver Point,
Vesuvius, Departure Bay, North Comox, South Comox, Courtenay, and Denman Island
On the occasion of visit to Clinton the school was found to be temporarily closed. Teachers' Certificates.
In view of the rapid progress made in educational work in the Province during the past
few years, the Board of Examiners recommended in their last report that the range of subjects
for examination of candidates for teachers' certificates of qualification be extended, and that
changes be made in the present standard for obtaining certificates,
As this is a subject which effects the educational walfare of the province as well as the
vital interests of the teachers, it is one that demands most careful deliberation.
It is conceded that Canadian History, and Physiology and Hygiene should be added to
the present range of subjects of examination for all classes of certificates.
A change should be made not only in the range and scope of subjects and standard
required for Second Class, Grade A, Certificates and Second Class, Grade B, Certificates, but
there should be a discrimination as to duration of each.
Changes should be made in the range and scope of the subjects of examination for both
grades of First Class Certificates.
First Class Certificates should be valid for life, or during good behavior.
Before any of these changes can be made, it is necessary that the regulations prescribed
in Section 41 of the " Public School Act, 1885," be amended.
I have the honor to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. D. POPE
Superintendent of Education.
VICTORIA: Printed by Richard Wolfendek, Government Printer,
at the Government Printing Oiflce, James' Bay. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report.
PART   II.
STATISTICAL  RETURNS. Public Schools Report.
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L886
Provincial Roll of Honor.—Continued.
Schools.
Deportment.
Hall's Prairie    [Ida Hart	
Hope    j Martin Gutierrez
Lake j Nellie Stevens . ..
Langley 	
Lillooet	
Lulu	
Lytton	
Maple Bay	
Maple Ridge	
Mayne Island	
Metchosin	
,,        Rooky Point.
Moodyville 	
Mount Lehman	
Thomas Maxwell	
Katie Dickey.   	
William Boyd	
Arthur Thomas .Seward . .
Emily May	
Claudia Frances Wetmore
Frances Heck	
Chester Field	
Annie Argyle	
Alice James	
Elijah Long	
Mud Bay j Elizabeth Ann Brewster..
Nanaimo:—
High School.
Boys', 1st Division.
Boys', 2nd      ,,
Boys', 3rd      ,,      .
Girls', 1st       ,,
Girls', 2nd      ,,
New Westminster:—
High School	
Boys', 1st Division.
Boys', 2nd      ,,
Girls,' 1st
Girls', 2nd      ,,
Georgina A. M. Brethour.
Richard Gibson 	
Christopher Ganner	
Richard Snedden Ferguson
Margaret Ferguson 	
Sarah Ferguson Muir ....
Gertrude McBride	
Robert Beecher	
Rosabella Jane Lennie .   .
Ellen Homer	
Amy Grimmer	
Nicola    j Lizzie Riley	
Nicola Lake [Isabella Barbara Scott  ...
Nicola Valley . ..
North Thompson
Okanagan   	
Minnie Earnshaw..
George Mill Brown
Helen McLean ....
Oyster I Mary Alice Conway.
Punctuality & Regularity.
Proficiency.
David W. Brown	
Ellen Hart
James Yates	
Katie Clement Smith
Henry Goyette	
Lizzie Lindsay
William Maxwell	
Thomas Harris
William Lee Dickey
May Vermilyea	
Laura Sherman
Arthur Brandon Buie ....
Nellie Lytton Buie
Carrie Edgson	
Frederick Beaumont
Dalton Deacon
Lawrence Whitlaw	
Mary A. Pears
Fred Argyle  	
Grace Argyle
Lena Elizabeth Randall . .
Clara Crook
James Merryfield	
Mabel Coghlan
Benjamin George Johnson.
Agnes McKay
Herbert D. R. Stewart. . .
James Allen Ward
Oliver Randall	
Archibald C. VanHouten
Arthur David Morgan....
Charles Edward Stewart
Louis Erastus Lawrence
Amiet Gordon
Nellie Ramsay
Richard McBride
Humphries Edmonds
Arthur Wellesley Gray. . .
Fanny Alberta M. Mead
Maud H. Turner
George D. Turner
John Gilmore
Arthur J. Turner Scott . .
Griselda Mena Seott
Clarence W. Woodward. .
Emma Woodward
Isaac Brock McQueen ....
Malcolm McAulay
William Brent
Robert John  Porter	
George Robert Porter 50 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
Provincial Roll of Honor.—Continued.
Schools.
Port Moody	
Prairie	
Priest's Valley    	
Quamichan    	
Quesnelle	
Saanich, North	
Saanich,  South 	
Saanich, West :
Shawnigan   	
Shuswap Prairie	
Somenos	
Sooke 	
Spallumcheen	
Stave River	
St. Mary's Mission	
Sumas	
Trenant 	
Vesuvius  	
Victoria:—
High School, Sen. Div.
,, Jun. Div.
Boys', 1st Division...
,.      2nd      ,,
,, 3rd
4th
5th
.,      6th
,,      7th
Girls',  1st      ,,
,,      2nd      ,,
„      3rd       „       ...
„      4th
,,      5th
Deportment.
Punctuality & Regularity.
Proficiency.
Alonzo George Annand. . .  Edgar David Murehie
Neil McLeod  Eliza Culbert	
George Tronson  Edward Tronson	
Mary Marriner Esther Humphrey. .."....
Mary Deschamps Fred. Sherman Shepherd.
Isabella Reid. . .
Annie Turgoose
Susan Hagan. ..
Carrie Stella Brethour . ..
Benjamin Harrison ....
I Frederick C. Steinbergev
David C. Barry Tierney P.  Barry.
j
[Catherine McKenzie [Lizzie McPherson. .
j Ethel D. Sumner William Evans ....
[Maud Helen Muir | John Miller Muir. .
[Daniel G. Crozier Hermann Ehmcke .
■ Andrina Robertson  j Noble Oliver	
i Harvey Wren  John Wren	
Sarah Anne Toop i David W. Chadsey
Carrie A. H. Green
Charles Bitancourt.
William Cleaver Wilson.
i Julia Askew	
Edward K. Brown . . .
Henry W. Dodd	
George F. Askew....
Thomas Humphreys .
Marquis Ellis [Edward Ure	
John A. Morley i Robert Charles Smith .
Gus. Morris (Walter Shotbolt	
Chester W. Wadhams,... .
Wm. Henry Alex. Norton
Clara Etta Ure	
Hugh Jonah Logan. .
William N. Lenfesty.
James Hepworth
Albert James	
Harry McKillican .   .
Lora M. Watson ....
Alice Louise Ball	
Matilda E. Coates	
Olive Askew	
Florence L. Shotbolt. .
Elizabeth Horton	
Amelia Lawrence  	
Gertrude Ure	
Josephine L. Burkholder
Eleanor A. Kettle	
Ellen Elizabeth Clarke
Edith May Robinson
Susan McNeill
Mary Lomas
Josephine St.Laurent
Nellie Mcllmoyl
Alice Maud Halden
Lawrence C. C. Hagan
Eliza A. Verdier
Philip McBryan
Ernest Jones
Alice Esther Muir
Lucy M. Crozier
Annie Oliver
Hartly Abercromby
Edna A. Chadsey
Thomas Ellis Ladner
George Henry Silversen
John Charles Boyd
Josephine Gertrude Hill
William McDowell
William Sylvester
Charles Holmes
John Kermode
William M. J. Smith
Hubert J. Elford
Charles Redmond
Flora Fraser
Kate Levi
Mary H. Croekford
Lily Oliver Elford
Matilda Mary Isaacs Hi.
Public Schools Report.
1886
Provincial Roll of Honor.—Continued.
Schools.
Deportment.
Punctuality & Regularity.
Proficiency.
Victoria—Continued.
Girls', 6th Division . .
Gertrude H. King	
Etta F. Steers :
Josephine Jonasssu
James' Bay Ward Sch.
Johnson St.        ,,
Francais A. Deveraux ...
Mary  Marmillia Gilchrist
Marie Elise Gaudin
Wellington,  Sen. Division Elizabeth Jane Moffat....
Jonathan Green	
Edna Wall
,,           Jun.      ,,
Richard Ivey	
Mary Jane Wall	
Elizabeth Jane Currie
Hamilton Moffat Hamilton
Margaret Manson	
Gavin Hamilton, Jr
Yale	
Margaret Fraser	
York    	
Katie Russell	
Clarence Melvin Acherman 1 Sarah Moore Campbell ,50 Vic. Public Schools Report. liii.
APPENDIX J.
HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION—MIDSUMMER,  188S.
Written Arithmetic.
1. Multiply 20 ac. 2 ro. 17 per. 15 yds. 3 ft. 3 in. by 64.
2. Simplify {f . + £_ JL of ±\ Xlf
3. Divide two ten thousandths bv twenty-five hundredths.
4. Find the value of .243 of a ton.
5. What weight of sugar may be bought for $449.28, when the cost of  6 cwt.   2 qrs.  it
8133.12?
6. If 100.8 lbs. of flour support 20 men for 3 days, how many men will 46.305 cwt. support for 7.35 weeks ?
7. In what time will 1672 @ 8% simple interest amount to $994.56 ?
8. Find the true discount on $1,057.50 for 1\ years @ 7%.
9. What will 846,390 feet of lumber cost at $10.25 f M %
10. Find the Q. 0. M. (or H. 0. F.) of 5795, 6460, and 5548.
Mental Arithmetic.
1. Find the difference between the number of grains in an oi.
Troy and in an oz. Apothecaries' weight. Ant. . .
2. What part of a rod is a fathom 1 . Ans. . .
3. What will 250 lbs. of butter cost @ .29 f lb. Ans. $ .
4. What is the least number divided by 3, 6, and 9 leaves 2 for
remainder in each case 1 Ans . . .
5. What number must be added to the sum of 3| and 2 Vio to
give 10 9/20? Ans. 8.
6. If a horse eat 6 quarts of oats a day, how long will 6 bushels
last him ? Ans. . .
7. If 1| dozen thimbles cost $0.45, what will 5 thimbles cost? Ans. 8.
8. A. B. and 0. can do a piece of work in 5 days, B. and 0. can
do it in 8 days ; in what time can A do it alone ? Ans. . .
9. What is the simple interest on $800 for 8 months @ 8% per
annum ? Ans. $.
10. Bought a cow for $35 and sold her for $55; what was my
gain % t Am. . . liv. Public Schools Report. 1886
Geography.
1. Bound the zones between the Tropic of Cancer and Antarctic Circle, stating the width
of each in degrees.
2. Locate five rivers in Europe, and five mountain chains in Asia.
3. What waters wash the shores of Arabia ? Labrador ?
4. Name the countries of Central America.
5. Locate  the following bays  or   inlets:—(a)  Quinte,   (6)   Bras  d'Or,   (c)  Burrard,   (d)
Chaleur, (e) Nootka.
6. Name the largest lake in (a) British Columbia, (b) Ontario,  (c) England,  (d) Scotland,
(e) Ireland.
7. Locate   the   following   capes:—(a)  Comorin,   (6)   Gallinas,   (c) York,  (d)   Race,   (e)
Spartivento.
8. Name   the  highest   mountain   in   Europe ? Asia ?   Africa ?    North   America ?   South
America 1
9. Through what waters would you pass in sailing from Odessa to Calcutta ?
10. Draw a map of the Dominion, marking the position of the capital  of  each  Province
thus *.
English Grammar.
1. Define each of the cases, and write the possessive plural of thief, mouse, genius, who,
and she.
2. (a) Define the parts of speech that admit of comparison,    (b) Compare five of each.
3. What is a Relative Pronoun 1    Name five.
4. Give the principal parts of the verbs lie, eat, owe, saw, undo.
5. Write the third person plural of all the tenses that denote past time in the subjunctive
mood, passive voice, of the verb to go.
6. What is a finite verb ?    Name five that are not finite.
7. Write the following sentences correctly, stating reasons for changes made:—
(a) Me, you and John seen her.
(b) It is neither Marys or their's.
(c) He done it for conscience sake.
(d) For horses oats is more preferable than wheat.
(e) Neither of us are willing to give up our claim.
8. Write a sentence containing (a) a noun in the nominative absolute, (b) a noun in the
objective in apposition, (c) a present participle used as subject, (d) a noun used as an interjection, (e) for used as a conjunction.
9. Analyze—
Is learning your ambition ?
There is no royal road ;
Alike the peer and peasant
Must climb to her abode;
Who feels the thirst for knowledge,
In Helicon, may slake it,
If he has still the Roman will
"To find a way, or make it!"
10. Parse the first six lines of extract in preceding question. 50 Vic Public Schools Report.
5. (a.) What places have no longitude !
(b ) What time is it now in London (Eng.)?
(c.)   What is the shortest distance in statute miles between two places on the equator,
one in 160° west longitude, and the other in 160° east longitude ?
6. Draw a map of one of the following countries :—Arabia ; Canada ; France.
7. Bound the zone uninhabited by man, and the one that is the most populous.
8. What is the established religion, and what form of government prevails in (a) Russia,
(b) Brazil, (c) Egypt, (d) France, (e) Canada.
Grammar.
1. When are what, that, and as relatives?    Write sentences illustrating.
2. Conjugate 5 verbs of the strong conjugation, and 5 of the weak conjugation.
3. Why is there only one person in the Imperative Mood ?
4. Give a complete paradigm, active voice, of the verb to se'e.
5. Parse the italicized words in the following sentences :—
(1) It is worth a dollar.    (2)  " Woe  worth the day 1"    (3) He went a fishing.     (4)
Save him, all were lost.    (5)   What I have written, I have written.
6. Analyze—
" Oh, many a shaft at random sent,
Finds mark the archer little meant;
And many a word at random spoken,
May sooth, or wound, a heart that's broken."
7. Parse the first two lines of preceding extract.
Composition.
1. Define Synecdoche and Metonymy.
2. Write the following lines correctly, supplying necessary punctuation marks :—
within a mile of edinburgh town
we laid our little darling down
our first seed in gods acre sown
so sweet a place death looks beguiled
of half his gloom or sure he smiled
to win our wondrous spirit child.
3. Conciseness is violated by redundancy, by tautology, and by circumlocution.
Point out each violation of conciseness in the following sentence :—
Whenever an opportunity presented itself, the old veteran gave his advice and
counsel free gratis.
4. Write a composition on one of the following subjects :—
(a) Our High Schools.
(b) The newspaper.
(c) The telephone.
(d) Athletic sports.
(<?) Advantages of a good education. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. lv.
Composition.
1. Write two interrogative sentences—one that cannot be answered by yes or no, and one
hat does not require an answer.
2. Write a sentence  containing a hyphen and an exclamation point.
3. Address a letter to the present Premier of Canada.
4. Explain the following abbreviations:—C.O.D., J.P., A.D., Do.
5. Write a composition on  one  of   the.   following   subjects:--The Rainbow,   Railroads,
Truth, Temperance, Vacation.
English History.
1. Give   dates   of  the  Roman   Period.     What  Roman  General discovered the insular
character of Britain ?
2. Which of the Saxon Kings had four sons, each of whom successively held the Crown?
Name the four sons.
3. State a point of interest in connection with the reign of each of the Norman Kings.
4. Describe the battles of Evesham and Agincourt.
5. Who were the parents of Mary I. and Mary II.?
6. What caused the Civil War in the reign of Charles 1.?    Name the principal battles of
the war, with dates.
7. Who was the last of the Stuart Kings?
8. Name, with dates, the Brunswick line.
9. Give historic reference of (a) The Black Prince, (6) Sedgmoor,   (c)  Lady Jane Grey,
(d) Jacobites, («) Septennial Act.
10. Trace the descent of  Queen  Victoria from George I.    When was she born?    How
long has she reigned ? lvi. Public Schools Report. 1886
APPENDIX K.
HIGH SCHOOL MIDSUMMER EXAMINATION—JUNE. 1888.
Arithmetic.
1. How many bushels of wheat %\\ cents ■$ tb. can I get for 2 oz. 10 dwts. 18 grs. of
gold dust @ $16 per oz.
2. If 16 men dig a ditch 24 yards long in 20 days, by working 10 hours a day, how many
men will dig a ditch 72 yards long in 60 days, working 8 hours a day 1
3. A man bequeathed his wife $1,250 a year ; what sum must be invested at 6 % interest-
to pay it ?
4. The par value of shares in a Canada Life Assurance Company is $100. The stock is
at a premium of b\ %. If I purchase 200 shares through a broker who charges me \ % for
buying, what do the shares cost me ?
5. Find the true discount on $1,750 for 9 months @ 8 % per annum.
6. Find the square root of 10747.4689 and the cube root of 189119224.
Mental Arithmetic.
1. How many fathoms in 40 rods ? An*  	
2. At $7.50 f dozen, what will 10 cost? Ans	
3. What part of a guinea is a sovereign ? Ans	
4. At $30 f ton, what will 175 fts. cost?   ' Ans	
5. If 3/8 of a ton cost $13.50, what will 5/9 of a ton cost? Ans	
6. A, B and C together have 80 marbles; for every 4 that
A has, B has 5, and C 7 ; how many has each ? A B........ C.
7. Divide 3.20 by .016 and,.045 by 15. Ans .
8. What is the commission on $150,000 @ If % ? Ans	
9. What is the simple interest on $900 for 1 year and 8 months @ 9 %
per annum 1 Ans  	
10. Sold a horse for $300, losing thereby 40 % of the cost price; had
I sold it at 33J % advance on the cost, what would I have received for it ?   Ans	
Mensuration.
1. Trees are planted 12 feet apart around the sides of a rectangular field (40 rods long)
containing 2 acres.    Find the number of trees.
2. What will be the cost of carpeting a room 16 feet 8 inches in length and   12 feet 3
inches in width with carpet lj yards wide, at $1.75 per yard ?
3. The sides of a triangle are 13 inches, 14 inches, and 15 inches, respectively; find the
diameter of the circle described round the triangle.
4. A B C D is a quadrilateral; A B = 845 feet, BC= 613 feet, CD =810 feet ; A B is
parallel to C D, and the angle at A is a right angle:    Find the area.
5. The diameter of a well is 3 feet 9 inches, and its depth 45 feet; find the cost of excavation at $1.45 per cubic yard. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report.
Algebra.
1. Multiply—
(a.) as + 2y - 3z by x - 2y + 3z.
(6.)   :c$ + y% by rri-f/i.
2. Divide—
(a.) xi - 5af -f 11»2 - 12* -f- 6 by sc2 - 8a; -j- 3.
(6.) a by a-1".
3. Resolve into factors—
(a.) Xs - 3mx4 - 10m2.
(b.) (Ix + yf - (2x + 3y)*.
(c.) a3-216.
(d.) 3a:2-f- lx-%.
4. Find the H. C. F. of x* - ix1 -f 9a: - 10, x* + 2sjs - 3a; + 20, and .-e5 -f 5a;2 - 9x -f 35.
And the L. 0. M. of sc2 - 1, x* + 1, and ** - 1.
»• («•) ;B_t2
(6.)
7
. 034-10
12 8    _   32
5—is      4—X      x+2
6.  (a.) A person after paying an income tax of sixpence in  the pound,  gave away one-
thirteenth of his remaining income, and had £540 left.    What was his original income ?
(b.) A rectangular field is an acre in extent, and its perimeter is 308 yards ; what are
the length of its sides ?
Euclid.
1. The angles at the base of au isosceles triangle are equal to one another ; and if the
equal sides be produced, the angles on the other side of the base shall be equal to one another.
2. If a straight line be divided into two equal, and also into two unequal parts, the
rectangle contained by the unequal parts, together with the square on the line between the
points of section, is equal to the square on half the line.
3. The angle at the centre of a circle is double of the angle at the circumference upon the
same base, that is, upon the same part of the circumference.
4. To describe a circle about a given triangle.
5. (a.)  Distinguish between Problem—Theorem.    An angle in a segment—an angle of a
segment.
(6.) In what parallelograms can circles be inscribed ?
(c.)  Show that the area of an equilateral triangle inscribed in a circle is one-half of a
regular hexagon inscribed in the same circle.
Trigonometry.
1. Find the Trigonometrical Ratios for an angle of 22^*.
2. Find A and B from the equations—
Sin A+SinB = i/2.
Sin2 A + Sin2 B = |.
_     _,, j i    . tan A Cot A ,
3. Shew that -—;—:—«+7rn—7rr5 = l.
tan A — tan B   '   Cot A — Cot B lviii. Public Schools Report. 1886
4. A person standing on the bank of a river observes the angle subtended by a tree on
the opposite bank to be 75°, and when he retires 20 feet from the bank of the river he observes
the angle to be 60°; determine the height of the tree and the breadth of the river.
5. The sides of a triangle are 68, 75, and 77 ; find the length of the perpendicular on the
largest side from the opposite angle.
Natural Philosophy.—(Statics.)
1. What is Physics?    Name the principal physical agents.
2. Distinguish between—
(a.) An atom—a molecule.
(b.) Adhesion—cohesion.
(c.) Fluid—liquid.
(d.) Endosmose—exosmose.
3. State the law of reflected motion. What effect has the centrifugal force on the shape
of the earth ?
4. (a.) A lever is 46 inches in length, the fulcrum is 8 inches from the end : what weight
applied at this end will balance a weight of 22 lbs. at the other end ?
(b.) How much farther will a body fall in 5 seconds than in the fifth second of its fall ?
5. (a.) What would be the weight of a body weighing 1,000 lbs. at the surface of the
earth, if removed 1,000 miles above the earth ? If weighed 1,000 miles below the surface?
At the centre of the earth ?
(6.) Explain the mechanical advantage of the capstan, and if the radius of the axle be 2
feet, and 6 men push, each with a force of 1 cwt., on spokes 5 feet long : find the weight they
will be able to support.
Book-keeping.
1. What is a journal ?    What check do you use as you post from this book ?
2. Define debtor, stock, balance, blotter, and index.
3. Make out an Account Current.    Receipt it.
4. Journalize —
(a.) Sold Wm. Jones merchandise at 90 days.
(b.) Bought of Reid & Co. merchandise amounting to $500 ; gave in payment cash
$300 ; our note at 90 days for balance $200.
(c.) Gave Reid & Co. draft for $180 ten days' sight on Bank of British Columbia in
payment of our note held by them.     Face of the note $200.
5. Make at least five entries in the day-book ; journalize, post the same, and balance the
ledger.
Geography.
1. Give the capitals of the countries in Europe, Asia, and Africa that are washed by the
Mediterranean Sea.
2. Name five isthmuses, stating lands connected and waters separated by each ?
3. Name the principal range of mountains and largest river in each empire.
4. Locate and define—
(1) Callao, (2) Messina, (3) Yokohama,  (4) Long Island,  (5) Brandon,  (6) Palmas,
(7) Havre, (8) Davis, (9) Miramichi, (10) Ashcroft. Ix.
Public Schools Report.
1886
English History.
1  What circumstances led to the Norman invasion ?    State results.
2. During what centuries did the Plantagenets rule ? Name the three greatest monarohs
of this line ?
3. (a) State leading features of the Stuart period, (b) Give historic reference of Bloody
Statute and Bloody Assize.
4. Describe five great battles of the present century.
5. Trace the descent of Queen Victoria from Henry VII.
6. (a) Name the Three Estates of the British Realm. (6) When was the Crown of Hanover united with that of Great Britain 1 When separated ? (c) How long has Canada been
a British possession ?
4.
5.
Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene.
a) Name the bones that meet at the elbow, and those that are attached to the sternum.
b) How many bones-in the head ?    How divided ?
c) How many phalanges in the human body ?
d) How many vertebras ?
a) How is a tooth divided ?
b) Of what is it composed ?
c) How many bicuspids ?      By what other names are they known ?
d) State three functions of teeth ?
a) Name the circulatory organs.
b) Name the two largest arteries, and the two largest veins,
c) Of what is blood composed ?
d) Describe the heart ?
a) What is digestion ?
b) State some hygienic rules as to food.
a) Name the glands that secrete saliva.
b) What is hair ?
Botany.
1. (a) What is a root?    (b) Name the different kinds of roots.
2. (a) Give the divisions of plants as to mode of growth,    (b)    Name three aorogens.
3. (a) What is a cotyledon 1    (b) Name five dicotyledonous plants.
4. (a) Name the different parts of a flower,    (b) What is inflorescence 1
5. )a) What is mould ?    (b) What are internodes ?
Roman History.
1. By whom was Rome founded ?    When?
2. Who was chosen dictator three times 1    Who was the last of the Decemvirs ?
3. State the chief battle of each of the Punic Wars.    Give place and date of Hannibal's
defeat. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. lxi.
4. Describe the contest between Marius and Sulla.
5. Give historic reference of (a)  " Mother, thou hast  saved  Rome, but lost  thy  son ! "
(b) The Ides of March ; (c) Catiline ; (d) The die is cast ; (e) Cleopatra.
6. What event occurred in 3 B. G.I    Which of the twelve Cajsars succeeded  his father ?
What was the chief event of his reign 1
Grecian History.
1. What is the first Age in Grecian history 1    State its four principal legends.
2. (a) Describe the ^Eolian migration.
(b) What other migration occurred a little later ?
(c) Who was Codrus?
3. (a)   What two States first rose to prominence 1
(b) Who were the Helots 1    The Ephors ?
4. (a) Who was Lycurgus ?
(b) State some of the laws introduced by him.
5. (a) Name the first wars in which Sparta was engaged.
(b) Who were the heroes of these wars ?
6. Name the great lawgivers of Athens.    State what you know of each.
7. What was the Ecclesia?    The Areopagus ?
8. («)  Who were the Pisistratids '!
(6)  What was ostracism ?
Music.
1. How are musical sounds produced '(
2. Give the different meanings of the word tone f
3. State the various positions and names of the " C " clef.
4. What are accidentals ?     What notes are affected by them ?
5. What is the melodic minor scale ?
6. Distinguish chromatic from diatonic semitone ?
7. What are related keys ?    Name those of C major.
8. Define turn and tone of disjunction.
9. Name the three departments of the elementary principles of music.
10. Transpose the major scale (from the Treble clef to the Bass clef) in E flat.
Latin.
1. Decline magister, is, iter, and melior.
2. (a.) Give the rule for comparing adjectives.
(b.) Compare five adjectives that are exceptions.
3. (ft.) Write the future indicative and pluperfect subjunctive active voice of jubere.
(o.) Give the infinitives, participles, supines and gerunds of audire. 4.  Translate—
(o.)  Money is the root of all evil.
(b.) No one can be happy without virtue.
(e.)  I have a good book which teaches me of eternal life.
(d.) Every wave from the sea is broken against the rooks.
(5.) Translate—
(a.) Postulavit deinde eadem, quaa legatis in mandatis dederat, "ne aut ^Eduis,
aut eorum sociis helium iuferret; obsides redderet : si nullain partem Germauorum domum
remittere posset, at ne quos aniplius Rhenum transire pateretur.''
(b.)       Dixit:  et avertens rosea cervice refulsit,
Ambrosiseque com* divinum vertice odoreni
Spiravere ; pedes vestis defluxit ad irnos,
Et vera incessu patuit Dea.     I He, ubi matrem
Agnovit, tali fagientem est voce secutus :
•'Quid natum totiens, crudelis tu quoque, falsis
Ludis imaginibus? our dextrae jungere dextram
Non datur, ac veras audire et reddere voces?"
(c.)  Parse the first three lines of extract (b.)
(d.)   Scan the last three lines.
French.
1. Give the feminine plurals of le mien, I. ami, le sot, It Suisse, le roi.
2. («)  Write the first ten ordinal numbers.
(6)  "Madame, vous etes bien bonne."     Why not bonnes?
3. («)  Write   the   preterite anterior  indicative  and  imperfect  subjunctive  of  the  verb
chanter.
(b)  Give the participles of the verbs concevoir and savoir.
4. Translate—
(«) Nothing ails my niece, but something is the matter with the banker's widow.
(b) Can any one contemplate the heavens without being  convinced   that the  universe
is governed by a supreme and divine intelligence ?
5. (ft)  Traduisez—
J'avais sur ma fourchette un superbe morceau de boudin gras, lorsque mademoiselle Louise Bienvenu me pria d'avoir la complaisance de lui passer un pigeon
qui etait pres de moi: dans nion empressement, sachant a peine ce que je faisais,
je portai a ma bouche le boudin aussi chaud qu'un charbon ardent; il me fut impossible de cacher nion supplice ; mes yeux sortaient de leurs orbites. A la fin, en
depit pe ma honte et de ma resolution, je fus contraint de laisser tomber sur mon
assiette l'instrunient de ma torture. Sir Thomas et les dames eurent compassion
de mon infortune ; chacun conseillat un specitiqne different ; 1'un recommandait
l'huile, un autre l'eau, mais tous convenaient que le vin valait mieux pour calmer
1'inflammation, et on m'apporta du buffet un verre de Madere.
(b) Parse the pronouns and adverbs in preceding extract. APPENDIX L.
QUESTIONS SET AT THE TEACHERS' EXAMINATION, JULY,  1886.
Spelling.     (For all Classes and Grades.j
Wednesday, July lJfbh;  10 to 11 a.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. calisthenics
2. conscientious
3. proselyte
4. lachrymose
5. Pyrenees
6. sinecure
7. cynosure
8. scintillate
9. taciturn
10. silhouette
11. contumacious
12. colander
13. irreconcilable
14. lilliputian
15. surreptitious
16. colonnade
17. parachute
18. cinnabar
19. tattoo
20. renegade
21. -teetotaler
22. cenotaph
23. schottische
24. misogynist
25. evanescent
26. pseudonym
27. hackneyed
28. piscivorous
29. euphemism
30. exhilarate
31. psychical
32. recension
33. chalybeate
34. pharmacopoeia
35. ichthyology
36. inconceivably
37 rejuvenescent
38. macaroni
39. crystallization
40. daguerreotype
41. reveille
42. zouave
43. hygeian
44. piccolo
45. precentor
46. pentateuch
47. macadamize
48. metempsychosis
49. ipecacuanha
50. videlicet—(viz.)
Writing.     (For all Classes and Grades.)
Tuesday, July 18th ; 2 to 4.30 p.m.      Total marks, 100.
1. (a.)  Define spacing and slant
(b.)  Illustrate fully the advantage of boxing in enabling the   pupil  to acquire  correct
judgment on these points,
(c.) Answer the objection that this method is too elaborate.
(d.) State critical points in relation to straight lines.
2. (ft.)  What is a right curve?
(6.) How would you teach, illustrate, and criticise, its formation ?
3. (a.) State the difference between Lower Angle and Lower Turn.
(6.) Describe the latter.
(c.) What mistakes in its formation must the teacher guard against?
4. Analyze the letters m, v, o, a, c.
5. (ft.) What are the critical points in the formation of the letters t, b, p, f, j.
(b.) Why should special pains be taken to form the looped letters accurately ?
6. State the advantages of the use of copy-books with lithographed copies at the head of
the page.
7. («.) How should the teacher prepare himself for work in the writing class ?
(6.) In teaching execution, on what points should the teacher constantly insist? 8. What arrangements would you make for opening and closing writing classes, so as to
economize time and create as little disturbance as possible ?
9. (a.) Point out the differences between ladies' hand and what is called a business hand.
(b.) Account for these differences.
(c.) To what extent should girls take the same course in writing as boys ?
10. Write the following as a specimen of penmanship : —
I hear the trumpet of Alectryon
Proclaim the dawn, the stars begin to fade,
And all the heavens are full of prophecies
And evil auguries.    Blood-red last night
I saw great Kronos rise ; the crescent  moon
Sank through the mist, as if it were the scythe
His parricidal hand had flung far down
The western steeps.    (), ye Immortal Gods,
What evil are ye plotting and contriving ?
Geography.     (For all Classes and Grades.)
Saturday, July 10th ;   .'p.m. lo 4.80 p. m.     Total murks, 200.
1. Define—
(a.) Great Circle.
(b.) Zodiac.
(c.) Ecliptic.
(d.) Isothermal lines.
(«.) Why is the weather colder in winter than in summer ?
2. (a.) Give proofs of the rotundity of the earth.
(b.) Prove that the earth is an oblate spheroid.
(c.) Give lengths of polar and equatorial diameters.
3. Describe the principal currents of the Atlantic Ocean.
4. Name the countries of the world which are crossed by the 42nd parallel of north lat
5. Give the capitals of three British Colonies, or Possessions, in each of the following
continents :—Europe, Asia, Africa, North America, and South America (India and Canada
not to be included).
6. State the source, general course, and termination of the following livers :—
(a.) Godavery.
(6.) Severn,
(c.) Maritza.
(d.) Niger,
(e.) Richelieu.
7. Name five passes in the Rocky Mountains in Canadian territory.
8. Where are the following mountains :—
(a.) Demavend?
(b.) Kunchunjinga !
(c.) Skawfell?
(ft7.) Fusi Yama?
(e.) Adirondack ?
Locate the following volcanoes :—
(a.) La Souffriere.
(b.) Orizaba.
(c.) Pichincha.
(d.) Aconcagua.
le.) Stromboli. 50 Vic Public Schools Report. lxix.
5. Write—
(a.) A Duplicate Receipt.
(b.) An Account Sales.
fc.J A Letter of Credit.
(d.) A Letter of Introduction.
6. Define—(a.) Sundries; (b.) Tare; (c.) Assignee; (d.) Bullion; (e.) Demurrage.
7. When the payee writes his name on the back of a note or draft drawn to  order,   what
is the effect?
8. Balance Sheet.
July 1st, 1866.
Cash                               $ 900 Bills Payable $800
Merchandise                    1500 John Sims 300
Bills Receivable (Gibbs) 300 Stock 2000
James Rogers            400
Enter the following transactions in the Journal, and post the same:—
July 2nd.     Paid my note for $800; discount allowed 1%.
„       ,,       Sold merchandise to Richard Dobbs for $500, receiving cash $200 and his due bill
for balance.
,,    3rd.    Sold merchandise for Cash $300.
„       „       Gave John  Sims an Order on James Rogers for $300.
„    4th.     Bought merchandise amounting to $400.    Gave in payment an accepted draft  at
10 days' sight on Richard Dobbs for $300; balance in Cash.
,,       ,,        Shipped merchandise amounting to $500 to Brooks & Rivers,  Nanaimo, to sell on
my account and risk.    Paid for freight on same $25.
„    5th.    Sold Gibbs' note ($300) to Prim & Co. for $280.
Received payment as follows:—
Cash $100.
Cheque—Bank of B. C. $50.
Draft at 10 days' sight on Bank of B. N. A. $130.
,,       ,,        Brooks & Rivers notify me that they have sold merchandise consigned to them for
$780, and that proceeds less their commission @ 2|- %, are subject to my order.
,,       ,,        Paid the following bills:—
For rent of store $100.
„   shelving and counters $150.
„   board $80.
Inventory $950.
Close books and present Balance Sheet.
Mensuration.    (For First-Class, Grade B.)
Thursday, July 8th; 2 to 4.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. The sides of a right angled triangle are 30 feet and 40 feet respectively: find the perpendicular from the right-angle upon the hypothenuse.
2. It is required to lay out 70 acres 3 roods and 26| perches of land in the form of a
rectangle whose length shall be 3 times its breadth: find the dimensions.
3. The boundary lines of a field are the following:—The first runs north 36 rods; the
second north-east 60 rods; the third south 72 rods; and the fourth west to the place of beginning
48 rods: required the number of acres in the field.
4. The side BC of an equilateral triangle ABC is 30 feet; lines are drawn from the angles
B, C, bisecting the opposite sides and intersecting in D.     Find the area of the triangle BDO,
5. A column is 1J feet in diameter and 30 feet high, has a spiral gold thread on it which
makes a complete circuit in every foot of the column: required the length of the thread. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. Ixv.
9. Locate the following lakes :—
(ft.) Balkash.
(b.) Heilmar.
(c.) Titicaca.
(d.) Nyassa.
(e.) Merom.
What and where are—
(ft.) Lewis?
(b.) Zealand?
(c.) Kronstadt?
(d.) The Dollart?
(e.) Royal Roads '!
10. (ft.)  Draw an outline map of Italy,  sketching  the  courses of  the rivers   Arno, Po
Tiber, and Volturno; locating Rome, Florence, Brindisi, Venice, and  Naples-
(b.)  Describe the water system  which  discharges  through  the  Nelson  River into
Hudson Bay.
(c.)   What are the outlets of the following bodies of water :—-
(1.) Azov?
(2.)  Marmora?
(3.) Red Sea ?
(4.) Baltic?
(5.) Lake Erie?
Name the chief tributaries of each.
English History.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Friday, July 9th; 2 p.m. to 4-30p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (ft.)   What is implied by the maxim "The King can do no wrong?"
(b.) Of what members must the British Cabinet necessarily consist'(
(c.) In whose reign did the introduction of Bills by the Commons originate?
2. Give brief account, with date, of—
(a.) The Irish Church Bill.
(b.) The Cotton Famine.
3. What do you know of the Irish Rebellion of 1798'!
4. (a.) What was the "Peerage Bill?"
(b.) Describe the Treaty of Utrecht?
5. What was trial by Grand Assize ?    When instituted ?
6. Give   historic   reference  of    (a.)  Brian Boru;   (b.)   Carisbrook ;    (c.)   Cato   Street ;
(d.) Drumclog ; (e.) Fidei Defensor; (/) The Redan.
7. From what sources did a Norman King derive his revenue %
8. State, very briefly, the causes and effects of—
(ft.) Thirty Years' War.
(b.) Walcheren expedition,
(c.) Seven Years' War.
(d.) First Chinese War.
9. Give short account of two of the following battles :—■
(a.) Camperdown.
(b.) Flodden.
(c.) Dunbar.
(d ) Copenhagen.
10. Sketch briefly the life and character of (a.) Edmund Burke; (b.) Thomas Cranmer. Public Schools Report.
"1886
English Grammar.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Monday, July 12th;   10 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.     Total marks, 200.
1.  (ft.)  Write the possessive plural feminine of—he, sir, hero, marquis, rabbit.
b.) Prove that the possessive case does not always denote possession or ownership.
ft.) Define each of three principal inflections of the parrs of speech.
b.) Compare—badly, nigh, right, icy, handsome.
3.  (ft.) Enumerate the personal pronouns that are in the second person.
b.) Write a sentence containing an interrogative adverb.
ft.)  In what respect does a participle resemble an adjective?
b.) Wherein does the infinitive mood differ from the other moods?
5.  (ft.)  Write in full the tenses of the subjunctive mood, passive voice, of the verb go.
b) Give all the participles of the verb know.
Write a sentence containing—
ft.) A conjunctive adverb.
b.) Two nouns connected by and requiring a verb in the singular,
c.) A noun in apposition to another noun in the nominative absolute.
ft.) On what three syntactical relations is analysis chiefly based?
b.) What does the adjective part of the predicate always qualify?
8. Correct the errors (if any) in the following sentences, giving reasons for such corrections :
a.) It is hard to be without a single person to talk to.
b.) Siberia even has some places where Nature smiles.
c.) Good order in our affairs, not mean saving, produce great profit to  those  who  use
them.
(d.) Since James has resided on that little flowing rivulet he has gotten the  better of
his former sickness.
9. Analyze—
(a.) When chill November's surly blast
Made fields and forests bare,
One ev'ning, as I wander'd forth
Along the banks of Ayr,
I spied a man, whose aged step
Seem'd weary, worn with care;
His face was furrow'd o'er with years,
And hoary was his hair.
(b.) Knowledge, a rude unprofitable mass,
The mere materials with which wisdom builds,
Till smoothed and squared, and fitted to its place,
Does but encumber whom it seems to enrich.
Knowledge is proud that he has learned so much ;
Wisdom is humble that he knows no more.
10. Parse the quotation (b) in preceding question.
Composition.    (For all Classes and Grades).
Monday, July 12th ; 2.80 to 4.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
Write an Essay on one of the following subjects :—
(ft.) General Elections.
(b.) Parasites,
(c.) Home Rule in Ireland.
(d ) The Colonial Exhibition.
(e.)  Life and Character of George Washington.
(/) The Influence of Climate on National Character.
(g.) Was Hamlet Mad?
(h.) Competitive Examinations,
(i.) Wit and Humor.
(j.) Music. 50 Vic Public Schools Report.
Arithmetic.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Saturday,  July  10th;  10 a. m. to 12.80 p. m.     Total marks, 200
I.Si„pl%Kii+iirfSi)-ri!o,1i«-L)[,[ii-?o4
2. Express .83 of 13s. 4d.  +.138 of £1 4s. as a decimal of £5.
3. Find the least common multiple of 12, 20, 24, 54, 81, 63, and 14; and explain fully
the process.
4. Find the difference in the amount of $415.50 put out at 4 years at 7 per cent.,   1st. at
imple, 2nd. at compound interest.
5. What must be the face of a note so that when discounted at a Bank for 4 months and
9 days, at 9 per cent, per annum, it will give $240?
6. (a.) Give Rule for Equation of Payments.
(b.) What is assumed in this Rule?
(c.) A person owed $3,000 payable  in  10  months; he  paid  $800  in  4  months,   and
$1,000 at the end of 9 months; when was the balance due?
i.  (a.) Find the square root of 84535.5625.
(b.) Find the cube root of 1749.690125.
8. If 70 men in 10 days of 9 hours each can dig a drain 90 yards long, 4 feet wide, and
16 feet deep, what length of a drain 5 feet wide and 18 feet deep can 100 men dig in 14 days
of 10 hours each?
9. If piece of silk cost 80 cents a yard, at what price shall it be marked that the merchant
may sell it at 10 % less than the marked price and still have 20 per cent, profit?
10. A and B do a work in 12 days, B and C in 18 days, A and C in 30 days; all work
together for 5 days and then A leaves; the other two go on for 6 days and then B leaves. In
how many days will C finish the work?
11. The gross annua] rental of a property is $1,800; at what price shall it be bought ao
that, allowing $225 per annum for repairs, and insurance on 5/6 of its cost at 1| %, the purchaser may receive interest at 10 % per annum on his investment?
12. A pound (Troy) of standard gold (22 carats fine) is coined into 45 guineas; if the
value of the alloy be — of an equal weight of pure gold, find the value of the alloy per pound
avoirdupois.
Mental Arithmetic.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Monday, July 12th ; 2 to 2.80 p. m.     Total marks, 100.
1. What is the weight of a gallon of water? Ans. . .
2. What is the value of | of .16 + .375 ? Ans. . .
3. What will 5 cwts. 3 qrs. 15 lbs. of lead cost @ 4/6 of a cent per lb.    Ans. $ .
4. If iron cost $50 per ton. at what price per lb. must it be  sold to
gain 20 % on the cost ? Ans. $ .
5. A can do a piece of work in 4 days, B in 5 days; in what time
will both working together do | of the work ? Ans..
6. How many fathoms in a rod ? Ans. . .
7. What is the simple interest on $8,000 for 2 yrs. 8 mos, @ \ %
per month ? Ans . . . Ixvni.
Public Schools Report. 1886
8.  From the cube root of -— take the square of .33 Ans.
1.728 ^
us.
9. How many more acres in a piece of laud 1-]- miles square than in
one 1 mile square ? A
10. The latitude of St. John is 45° 18', that of Toronto 43' 40l :
allowing 70 miles for the length of a degree, how many miles is St John
north of Toronto ? A ns
Education and the Art of Teaching.    (For all Classes and Grades.)
Tuesday, July 13th; 10 ft. m. to 12.30 p. m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.) Distinguish between theory, science, and art, as applied to teaching.
(b.) Show the great importance of a knowledge of the science of teaching.
2. (a.) In what order must primary instruction proceed?
(6.) State fully your method of teaching beginners in Reading.
3. (a.) Of what does a good Common School Education consist?
(b.) What additional subjects are taught in High Schools?
4. (a.) Name some of the objects of a recitation.
(b.) Explain your mode of conducting the recitation of a class in Geography.
5. (a.) What is the chief objection to the rote system and to rule teaching?
(b.) Criticize the objection.
6. (ft.) What governing principles should be observed in constructing a Programme?
(b.) Make a Time Table for the summer session of an ungraded school having an average
daily attendance of twenty,
(c.)  Make a Time Table for the winter session of the same school.
7. (a.) What should be the aim of all punishment in schools?
(b.) During what time is the pupil amenable to the teacher for his conduct.
(c.) For what offences, and how, should corporal punishment be administered?
8. (a.) What qualifications of a trustee are required by the School Act?
(b.) When, and how, is he elected?
(c.) What are his duties?
9. What provision is made in the School Act for Compulsory Education?
10. Explain fully what is meant by the following statements:—
(ft.) Culture is more valuable than knowledge.
(b.) Instruction should proceed from the concrete to the abstract.
11. In addition to a good moral character, name five requisites of a good teacher.
12. What methods would you adopt for developing and training the moral nature of your
pupils?
Book-keeping.
(For First-Class, Grade A, and First-Olass, Grade B.)
Wednesday, July 7th; 2 to 4-80 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. What is the use of " To " in the Journal?
2. (a.) What is an Open Ledger?
(b.) Give the process of closing it.
3. Distinguish between a draft and a cheque.
4. (a.) What errors does the Trial Balance detect?
(b.) What errors does it not show? lxx. Public Schools Report. 1886
6. Two adjacent sides of a parallelogram are 25 feet and 35 feet respectively, and one of
the diagonals is 10 ]/]J": find the other diagonal.
7. A triangle whose altitude is 40 yards, is bisected by a line drawn parallel to the base
find the perpendicular distance between the base and the dividing line.
8. Find the area of an ellipse, whose axes are 26 chains and 22 chains, 40 links.
9. A carriage wheel 4 feet in diameter is immersed until the width of the immersed part
along the surface of the water is 2 -\/~% feet.    Find the length of tire immersed.
10. In a certain lake, the tip of a lotus ball was seen 9 inches above the surface of the
water; forced by the wind it gradually advanced and. was submerged at the distance of 36
inches:  compute the depth of the water.
Mensuration.    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Thursday, July 8th; 2 to 4-80 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. If 60,000 bricks are required for a wall 50 yards long, 15 feet high, and 1 ft. 10| in.
thick; and if each brick be 9 inches long and 4J inches wide, find its thickness.
2. Three circular flower-beds, each bounded by a line 355 inches in length, are situated so
that their circumferences are in contact. Find the area of the triangular space lying between
and not included within the flower-beds.
3. A field in the form of an equilateral triangle contains just half an acre, what must be
the length if a tether fixed at one of its angles, and the other end to the nose of a horse so as
to allow him to graze exactly one-half of it?
4. Two towers 40 feet and 50 feet high respectively, are standing in the same horizontal
plane 120 feet apart: how far from each tower is that point in the line joining their bases,
which is equally distant from their summits?
5. A statue 80 feet high stands on a pedestal 50 feet high, and to a spectator on a horizontal
plane they subtend equal angles: required the distance of the observer from the base, the height
of the eye being 5 feet.
6. The transverse and conjugate axes of a prolate spheroid are 10 feet and 7 feet: find
the volume.
7. Two wheels are 9 feet and 3 feet in diameter respectively, and their centres are 12 feet
apart.    Find the length of a belt which envelopes the wheels and crosses between them.
8. Find the radius of a sphere whose volume is equal to the sum of the volumes of two
spheres whose radii are 2 feet and 3 feet respectively.
9. Find the solidity of a cone whose altitude is 6 feet and circumference of base 7 feet.
10. If a spherical shell when formed into a solid sphere be equal in volume to its own
cavity: what must be the thickness of the shell ?
Algebra.    (For First-Class, Grade B.)
Wednesday, July 7th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Find the remainder when x3 - px2 + qx- r is divided by x - a.
2. Find the square root of 9ft2 - 6a6 + 30«c + 6ad+ b"- - 106c - 2bd + 25c2 + 10c,i+ da.
3. Find the G. M. C. of 2x* + *3 - 20a:2 - 7x + 24 and 2x* + 3x3 - 13*2 - 7x + 15.
4. Prove that am x an = am + n when m and n are—
(a.) Positive integers.
(b.) Negative integers.
5. Define factor, coefficient, power, square root, surd.
6. Resolve into elementary factors   (a.) a;2 + 6a; + 5;   (b.) xt + x - 6; (o.) ft2*8 - 3azx -t- 2«4;
(d.)  2x3y + 5x2y2 + 2xy3. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. lxxi.
7. Solve—
(a.)     x        a + x     2ft - b
a + x        x 2x
(L)   i-B + iOB-l)-*-*.
(x + 2y = - )
(c.J   [y + 2z = 2
( 3x+%y=z- 1 I
(d.)    x      x+l     13
x~+l + ~~>T =   fi
8. A and B distribute £5 each in charity;  A relieves 5 persons more than B;  B gives to
each Is. more than A.     How many persons did each relieve?
9. A person bought a certain number of oxen for £240, and after losing 3  sold  the  rest
for £8 a head more than they cost him: what number did he buy if he gained £59 ?
10   Shew that the equation xz+px + q = Q has two and only two roots.    When will these
roots be—(a. J Real and different; (b.) Real and equal; (c.J Impossible.
Algebra.    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Wednesday, July 7th :  10 a. m. to 12:80 p. m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Define factor, coefficient, power, square root, surd.
2. Resolve into elementary factors (a.) x2 + Qx + 5 ; (b.) x2 + x - 6 ; (c.J a2x2 - 3a'a; + 2a4 ;
(d.) 2afiy + 5x2y2 + 2xy3.
3. Solve  (a.J 2lrx + \(x-\)=x-i.
x       a+x    2ft—b
(b-J   —~= -r—
a + x       x Ix
ix + 2y = 7 )
(c.J   \y + 2z=2
[3x + 2y = z-l I
x       x+l     13
(d-)x-+~i + — = T
4. A and B distribute £5 each in charity ; A relieves 5 persons more than B, and B
gives to each Is. more than A.     How many persons did each relieve?
5. Given a the first term, d the common difference of an arithmetical series ; find the nth
term and S the sum of n terms.
Find the last term and sum of the series 1,  - 2,  +4,  - 8, (fee, to 10 terms.
ft     c      e ace      a3 + c3 + e3
6. it — == — = — prove — = 	
b     d    f V bdf     b3 + d3+f3
7. Prove the binomial theorem when the index is a positive integer.
8. Find the first time after noon when the hour and minute hands of a watch point
exactly in opposite directions.
9. A, B, and C travel from the same place at the rate of 4, 5, and 6 miles per hour,
respectively; B starts 2 hours after A ; how long after B must 0 start in order that they may
both overtake A at the same time ?
10. The City Council of Victoria borrows $10,000, payable in 10 years, at 6 %; how
much money must be annually paid so that at the end of 10 years the debt, principal and
interest, shall be paid ? lxxii. Public Schools Report. 1886
Euclid.    (First-Class, Grade B.)
Thursday, July 8th ; 10 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.     Total marks, 200.
1. If two angles of a triangle be equal to one another, the sides also which subtend, or
are opposite to, the equal angles, shall be equal to one another.
2. On a given finite straight line describe an isosceles triangle having two sides equal to
another finite straight line.
3. If a side of a triangle be produced, the exterior angle is equal  to the two interior and
opposite angles.
4. All the exterior angles of any rectilineal figure are together equal to four right angles-
5. Equal triangles upon the same base, and on the same side of it, are between the same
parallels.
6. To a given straight line to apply a parallelogram which shall be equal to a given   rectilineal figure, having one of its angles equal to a given rectilineal angle.
7. If a straight line be divided into any two parts, the square on the whole line is equal
to the squares on the two parts, together with twice the rectangle contained  by the two parts.
8. To describe a square that shall be equal to a given rectilineal figure.
9. Through a given point draw a straight line  which shall   be  equally  inclined  to  two
given straight lines.
10. The quadrilateral formed by joining the successive middle points of the sides of any
quadrilateral figure is a parallelogram.
Euclid.    (For First-Class, Grade A)
Thursday, July 8th ; 10 a. m. to 12.80 p. m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Shew that every equiangular triangle is also equilateral.
2. If a parallelogram and a triangle be on the same base and between the same parallels,
the parallelogram shall be double of the triangle.
3. To divide a given straight line into two parts, so that the rectangle contained by the
whole and one of the parts may be equal to the square on the other part.
4. If from a point without a circle there be drawn two straight lines, one of which cuts
the circle and the other meets it; if the rectangle contained by the whole line which cuts the
circle, and the part of it without the circle, be equal to the square on the line which meets it,
the line which meets shall touch the circle.
5. Describe an isosceles triangle having each of the angles at the base double of the third
angle.
6. Similar triangles are to one another in the duplicate ratio of their homologous sides.
7. In a given straight line find a point which shall be equally distant from two given
points without it.
8. A straight line joining the middle points of two sides of a triangle is parallel to the
base and equal to half its length.
9. Describe a circle which shall touch a given circle and also touch a given straight line
at a given point.
10. If perpendiculars be drawn from the extremities of the base of a triangle on a straight
line that bisects the angle opposite to the base, the area of the triangle is equal to the rectangle
contained by either of these perpendiculars and the segment of the bisecting line between the
angle bisected and the other perpendicular. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. lxxiii.
Natural Philosophy.    (For First-Class, Grade B.)
Friday, July 9th; 10 a.m to 12.30 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Explain fully what is meant by the. Triangle of Forces.
2. Two rafters making -an angle of 60° support a chandelier weighing 90 lbs.; what will
be the pressure along each rafter ?
3. A weight of 24 lbs. is suspended by two flexible strings, one of which is horizontal and
the other is inclined at an angle of 30° to the vertical direction ; what is the tension on each
string ?
4. A sphere weighing 200 lbs. rests between two planes inclined to the horizon at angles
of 30° and 60° respectively ; find the pressure on the planes.
5. Two planes of equal altitude are inclined at angles of 60° and 45° to the horizon; what
weight resting on the latter will balance 20 lbs. on the former, the weights being connected
by means of a string passing over the common vertex ?
6. Four weights of 3 lbs., 2 lbs., 4 lbs., and 7 lbs., respectively, are at equal intervals of 8
inches on a lever without weight, 2 ft. in length; find where the fulcrum must be in order
that they may balance.
7. Apply the Triangle of Forces to find the least horizontal force necessary to draw a wheel
4 ft. in diameter and weighing 10 cwt. over an obstacle the height of which is 6 inches,
situated on the horizontal plane on which the wheel rests.
8. How is it that an inclined tower, such as that of Pisa, does not fall, although its top
hangs about 12 feet over the base ?
9. (ft.) Find the ratio of the power to the weight in a system of pulleys in which the same
string passes round all the pulleys.
(b.) If there are six strings at the lower  block  in  this  system of pulleys,  find  the
greatest weight which a man weighing 140 lbs. can possibly raise.
10. A circular plate of 2 ft. radius has a circular hole of 8 inches radius cut in it; find
the distance of the centre of gravity from the centre of the plate, if the centres of the plate and
hole are 12 inches apart.
Natural Philosophy.    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Friday, July 9th; 10 a.m. to 12.80 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. A thread 12 feet long is fastened at points A and B in the same horizontal line 8 feet
apart. At C and D points 4 feet and 5 feet respectively, from A and B weights are attached:
what must be the ratio of the weights that C D may be horizontal?
2. A rod A B without weight, can turn freely about a fixed point at one end B; it is held
in a horizontal position by a force of 50 lbs. which acts vertically downwards through its middle
point and by a force P which acts at the end A in such a manner that the angle BAP equals
30°; find P.
3. (a.) What is meant by the Composition and Resolution of Forces?
(b.) Show how it is possible for a sailing vessel to make way in a direction at right-
angles to that of the wind.
4. A uniform heavy rod A B whose weight is 20 lbs. is kept at rest in a horizontal position
by four forces in addition to its own weight; a force of 10 lbs, acting at B in a direction B D
at right-angles to AB; a force of 10lbs. acting at A in a direction AE which is such that
E A C is J of a right-angle; a force M acting vertically at C; and a force N acting horizontally
at B.    If AC-^2 CB, find M, and N. lxxiv. Public Schools Report. 1886
5. A heavy body is projected directly upwards with a velocity of 100 feet per second, find
its velocity at the end of 5 seconds.
6. If two perfectly elastic balls whose masses are in the ratio 1 : 3 meet directly with
equal velocities, show that the larger one remains at rest after impact.
7. How do you find the specific gravity—(a) of a solid?   (b) of a liquid?
8. A house is supplied with water from a reservoir 241 feet above the ground floor by
means of a pipe laid under ground; what will be the pressure per square inch on a tap 25 feet
above the ground floor, supposing a cubic foot of water to weigh  1000 ozs. ?
9. A rope of given length is used to pull down a vertical pillar; at what height from the
base of the pillar must it be fastened, that a given force pulling it may be most efficacious?
10. An Engineer at the Esquimalt Dry Dock is lowering to its place a stone weighing a
ton by means of a derrick. While the stone is being swung into position, the boom A B is at
an angle of 45° to the horizon and the chain C B which connects the boom with the upright
A C is horizontal.    The boom weighs 1000 lbs.; find the tension on C B.
Practical Mathematics.      (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Tuesday, July 6th; 10 a.m. to 12.80 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. (a.)   Shew   that   the   centesimal method  of estimating   angles   is  preferable to  the
sexagesimal method.
(b.J The number of grades in an angle is equal to two-thirds of the number of degrees
in the supplement of the angle: find the angle.
2. (a.) Determine the value of vers 60°.
(b.J Prove the equation—Tan. A + Cot. A = Sec. A Cosec. A.
3. (a. J Give   geometrical   proof   of   tan.   is A =	
(b.J Find Sin. x from the equation 4 Sin. a;+ 3 Cos. x = 5.
4. The sides AB, BC of a triangle are 1000 and 1200, and the angle A is 36° 50': required
the other parts.
5. From the summit of a hill 360 feet high above a plain, the angles of depression of the
top and bottom of a tower standing on the same plain, were 41° and 54°: required the height
of the tower.
6. (a.) In Tables of Logarithms why is the mantissa alone given?
(b.J Draw a diagram and explain how the distance from the moon to the earth may
be computed.
7. {a.J What is a log-line?    Give lengths of its divisions and subdivisions.
(b.J What is meant by the nautical distance between two places?
8. Lat. left 20° 40' N, long, left 178° 14' W.; dif. of lat. 216 miles S, dif. of long. 420
miles W.: find the latitude and longitude arrived at.
9. Describe at least three of the instruments used in land surveying.
10. From a station O within a pentagonal field, the distances to the different corners A,
B, 0, D, E, were measured and found to be respectively 1469, 1196, 1299, 1203, and 1410;
and the angles AOB, BOO, <fec, contained by them were in order 71° 30', 55° 45', 49° 15', and
81° 30': required the area of the field. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. lxxv.
Ancient History.     (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Tuesday, July 6th; 8.30 to 0 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Give brief sketches of the lives of Cyrus and Sesostris.
2. Write a short account of the second war between Greece and Persia.
3. What do you know of the Thirty Tyrants?    Give list of Greek Colonies  not in  Asia
Minor.
1.  Give historic reference of the five greatest women in ancient history.
5. Sketch very briefly the Second Punic War.
6. Where and under what circumstances did a Roman Consul proclaim  that Greece was
free?
7. In the reign of what Roman Emperor did the first great persecution of Christians take
place?    What were the real and assigned causes, and what were the results of this persecution?
8   Give short account of the life of Judas Maccabseus.
9. What do you know of the Shepherd Kings of Egypt?    What reference is made to them
in the Bible?
10. Give historic reference of—Mizraim; Psammetichus; Codrus;  Tisaphernes; Ptolemy
Lagus; Attila;   Veni, vidi, vici; Brennus; Cornelia; Cloaca Maxima.
English Literature.    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Tuesday, July 6th; 2 to 3.80 p.m..    Total marks, 200.
1. What were the chief characteristics of the Anglo-Saxon Poetry?
2. Give list of the works of Chaucer.
3. Discuss briefly the literary works of Sir Thomas More and John Tyndale.
4. Give names of five prominent authors who wrote in the reign of Elizabeth, with a brisf
sketch of the works of each.
5. Describe the literary and political relations to one another of Steele and Addison.
6. Give short account of the life and works of Jonathan Swift.
7. Who were the respective authors of the following:—" The Vision of Piers the Plowman,"
" Why come ye not to Court?" " Arcadia," " Doctor Faustus," " Compleat Angler," " Rape
of the Lock," "Tale of a Tub," "The Rivals," " The Letters of Junius," and " Confessions of
an English Opium Eater."
8. Discuss and compare the works of the three greatest prose writers of the 19th century.
9. Explain the connection between the literary and political history of England.
10. Give one quotation in English verse, with its author when you can, referring to each
of the following subjects :—(a.) Hope; (b.J Pain; (c.J Joy, (d.J Death; (e.J Life. Chemistry.    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Monday, July 6th; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m..     Total marks, 200.
1. Name the different ways in which Heat is transmitted.     Give examples of each.
2. Define—synthesis, molecule, formula, symbol, analysis; illustrating each by examples.
3. Four vessels are placed before you containing nitrous oxide, oxygen, hydrogen, carbonic
acid, respectively.    What tests would you employ to ascertain the contents of each?
4. How does nitrogen occur?    Describe its mode of preparation and qualities.
5. Explain the term hardness as applied to water, and state how it can be overcome.
6. Write in full—
(a.J HN03
(b.) Na. HOO3
(c.)  K2S04
(d.) K Mn. 04
(e.J Ca. H4 (P 04)2
(f) Pb. C Os
(g.J Hcl.
(h.J H4 C.
7. Give the formula for—
(a.J Sulphuric Ether.
(b.J Epsom Salts.
(c.J   Superphosphate of lime.
(d.J Potassium Iodide.
(e.J Iron Alum.
(f.J Ozone.
(g.J Chloride of lime.
(h.j Arsenious Anhydride.
8. Gold—Tn what forms is it met?    How is the gold of commerce produced?
9. Give the chemistry of iron.
10. Name the products that can be obtained from Petroleum, and state the uses for which
they are employed.     Explain the cause of explosions in kerosene lamps.
Latin.    (For First-Class, Grade A.)
Monday, July 5th; 2 to 4-80 p.m.     Total marks, 200.
1. Translate—
(a.J These things being known Caesar sends forward spies and centurions to choose
a suitable place for a camp.
(b.J It cannot be denied that vice increases daily.
(c.J It shows a great mind to spare the conquered.
(d.J Those persons are not to be heard who teach that we ought to be angry with
our enemies.
(e.J He answered that, if he had promised anything, he would perform it.
Cvesar.
2. (a.) Translate—
Eorum fines Nervii attingebant: quorum de natura moribusque Caasar cum qusereret, sic
reperiebat: " Nullum aditum esse ad eos mercatoribus : nihil pati vini, reliquarumque rerum
ad luxuriam pertinentium, inferri, quod his rebus relanguescere animos et remitti virtutem
existimarent: esse homines feros, magnseque virtutis: increpitare atque incusare reliquos Belgas,
qui se Populo Romano dedidissent, patriamque virtutem projecissent: confirmare, sese neque
legates missuros, neque ullam conclitionem pacis accepturos."
(b.J Parse attingebant, moribus, pertinentium, remitti.
(c.J Account for the cases of virtutis, missuros. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report.
Virgil.
3. (a. j Translate—
Quin, ubi transmissse steterint trans ajquora classes
' Et positis aris jam vota in litore solves,
Purpureo velare comas adopertus amicf u ;
Ne qua inter sanctos ignes in honore deoium
Hostilis facies occurrat, et omina turbet.
Hunc socii morem sacrorum, hunc ipse teneto ;
Hac casti maneant in religione nepotes.
Ast, ubi digressum Siculaj te admoverit or*
Ventus, et angusti rarescent claustra Pelori,
. Laeva tibi tellus, et longa heva petantur
^Equora circuitu ; dextrum fuge litus et undas.
Ha-:c loca vi quondam, et vasta convulsa ruina
(Tantum a;vi longinqua valet mutare vetustas),
Dissiluisse ferunt, quum protenus utraque tellus
Una foret: venit medio vi pontus, et undis
Hesperium Siculo latus abscidit, ai'vaque et urbes
Litore diductas angusto interluit lestu.
(b.J Parse solves, velare, adopertus, digressum, tellus, loca.
(c.J Scan four lines, commencing at "Lasva tibi tellus."
Horace.
4. (a. J Translate—
•   Non Dindymene, non adytis quatit
Mentem sacerdotum incola Pythius,
Non Liber asque, non acuta
Sic geminant Corybantes sera,
Tristes ut irae, quas neque Noricus
Deterret ensis, nee mare naufragum,
Nee saevus ignis, nee tremendo
Jupiter ipse ruens tumultu.
Fertur Prometheus, addere principi
Lirno coactus particulam undique
Desectam, et insani leonis
Vim stomacho apposuisse nostro.
Irae Thyesten exitio gravi
Stravere, et altis urbibus ultima?
Stetere causae, cur perirent
Funditus, imprimeretque muris
Hostile aratrum exercitus insolens
Compesce mentem : me quoque pectoris
Tentavit in dulci juventa
Fervor, et in celeres iambos
Misit furentem : nunc ego mitibus
Mutare quaero tristia, dum mihi
Fias recantatis arnica
Opprobriis, animumque reddas.
(b.J Parse ruens,  principi,  coactus, desectam,   vim,   stravere, perirent, furentem,
mitibus.
(c.J Give references—
(1) Dindymene, (2) Pythius, (3) Liber, (4) Prometheus, (5) Thyesten.
(d.J Scan four lines, commencing " Fertur Prometheus," describing the metres.
(e.J Describe two other Horatian metres.
VICTORIA : Printed by Richard Woifenden, Government Printer,
at the Government Printing Office, James' Bay. 50 .Vic.
Public Schools Report.
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Public Schools Report.
TABLE E.—Exhibit of Expenditures for Education Proper, during the year 1885-86.
School Districts.
Barkervilie	
Big Bar	
Beaver Point	
Burgoyne Bay	
Burton's Prairie.	
Cache Creek—Boarding School.
Cadboro 	
Canoe Pass	
Cedar, North	
Cedar, South	
Cedar Hill	
Centreville	
Cheam 	
Chemainus 	
Chilliwhack	
Clinton    _	
Clover Valley "	
Colwood	
Comox, North	
Comox, South	
Courtenay	
Cowichan	
Cowichan, South	
Craigflower	
Denman Island	
Departure Bay	
Esquimalt	
Gabriola, North	
Gabriola, South	
Granville (Vancouver)	
Hall's Prairie	
Hope	
Lake	
Langley	
Lillooet	
Lytton 	
Maple Bay	
Maple Ridge	
Mayne Island	
Metchosin	
Moody ville	
Mount Lehman 	
Mud Bay	
Nanaimo	
New Westminster	
Nicola	
Nicola Lake	
Nicola Valley	
North Arm (Lulu)	
North Thompson	
Okanagan  ,	
Oyster	
Port Moody	
Prairie 	
Priest's Valley	
Quamichan	
Quesnelle	
Somenos	
Sooke 	
Saanich, North	
Saanich, South	
Saanich, West	
Shawnigan	
Shuswap Prairie	
Spallumcheen	
Stave River	
St. Mary's Mission	
Sumas	
Trenant 	
Vesuvius 	
Victoria	
Wellington 	
Williams Lake 	
Yale	
York	
Total       $70,337 10
Amount paid
for Teachers'
Salaries.
* 1
,200 00
392 90
465 00
600 00
600 00
,600 00
543 54
600 00
629 85
600 00
720 00
960 00
600 00
600 00
600 00
720 00
600 00
600 00
600 00
600 00
507 75
600 00
300 00
780 00
177 42
177 42
840 00
596 78
600 00
720 00
600 00
600 00
600 00
720 00
647 48
720 00
450 00
840 00
600 00
683 50
660 00
600 00
500 00
020 65
560 00
720 00
600 00
720 00
600 00
434 00
642 58
550 00
660 00
562 90
720 00
660 00
900 00
600 00
600 00
840 00
960 00
720 00
630 00
720 00
480 00
550 00
475 00
600 00
600 00
600 00
,714 85
,500 00
840 00
720 00
585 48
Amount paid
for Incidental
Expenses,
including Rent.
$ 220 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
200 00
90 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
100 00
100 50
40 00
20 00
40 00
20 00
20 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
90 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
80 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
852 77
437 58
40 00
40 00
40 00
100 00
109 00
40 00
73 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
100 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
85 87
40 00
40 00
40 00
40 00
1,252 92
81 37
65 00
75 00
40 00
Amount paid
for Education
Proper in
each District.
S 1,420 00
432 90
505 00
640 00
640 00
1,700 00
633 54
640 00
669 85
640 00
760 00
1,000 00
640 00
640 00
640 00
760 00
640 00
640 00
640 00
700 00
608 25
640 00
320 00
820 00
197 42
197 42
880 00
636 78
640 00
760 00
690 00
640 00
640 00
760 00
687 48
760 00
490 00
880 00
680 00
723 50
700 00
640 00
540 00
4,373 42
4,997 58
760 00
640 00
760 00
700 00
543 00
682 58
623 00
700 00
602 90
760 00
700 00
1,000 00
640 00
640 00
880 00
1,000 00
760 00
670 00
760 00
520 00
635 87
515 00
640 00
640 00
640 00
15,967 77
1,581 37
905 00
795 00
625 48
$5,833 01
$76,170 11
Cost of each
pupil, based on
aggregate
attendance.
32 01
26 67
12 80
24 12
12 34
9 87
12 57
28 94
37 65
7 24
24 64
17 78
37 65
20 54
34 37
33 04
23 83
13 54
23 45
36 17
17 95
17 78
24 55
11 88
14 16
40 00
49 23
40 00
29 17
27 15
25 28
28 32
15 55
15 46
38 00
•21 21
37 04
30 48
27 83
17 96
18 87
19 49
25 77
42 22
28 88
15 89
20 60
16 00
22 07
27 83
11 19
.11 71
43 09
13 47
23 16
Cost of each
pupil, based on
average daily
attendance.
63 20
46 60
27 18
36 70
38 28
65 23
45 03
45 52
29 48
40 26
31 92
24 70
31 95
63 94
35 65
77 47
46 38
43 42
46 51
46 89
47 08
60 61
25 93
45 45
16 10
14 66
22 49
64 24
47 30
17 02
37 64
45 17
57 04
54 52
66 49
58 51
49 15
24 77
39 84
65 06
34 62
44 02
47 04
19 33
26 65
63 33
68 30
69 47
69 44
47 42
59 67
50 00
29 62
33 95
60 32
47 85
89 37
66 94
48 60
34 23
31 26
40 36
45 27
64 96
43 33
38 75
48 95
28 70
45 45
47 12
19 78
20 36
83 18
22 03-
44 02
Education Office—
Salary of Superintendent of Education $ 1,800 00
Examiners of Public School Teachers        300 00
Examinations of Victoria High School (during absence of Sup't. holding examinations in New Westminster)        55 00
Travelling expenses of Superintendent of Education ,        301 30
Maps and globes, printing certificates, incidental expenses, &c       901 15
3,357 45
Amount paid for Teachers' Salaries   70,337 10
Do. Incidental Expenses of Schools    5,833 01
79,527 66 XIV.
Public Schools Repokt.
1886
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Cedar, North—11th ITebruary, 1874.    Name changed from Cedar and re-defined, 27th May, 1880 :—
Commencing at the north-west corner of South Cedar School District; thence east along the
northern boundary of said District, to the shore line ; thence north-west along the shore line, to the
mouth of Chase River ; thence south to the north-east corner of Section "20, Range 4, Cranberry District ; thence west along the northern boundary of Cranberry District, to its north-west corner ; thence
south along the western boundary of Cranberry District, to the point of commencement.
Cedar Hill—25th June, 1869.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 1st June. 1878, 27th May, 1880, and 7th
April, 1885 :—
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 10, Victoria District; thence northerly along the
eastern boundary of Sections 10, 81, 14, and 50, to the southern boundary of Section 82 ; thence easterly
along the northern boundary of Sections 49 and 64, to the Saanich Road ; thence in a northerly direction along said road to the boundary line between Victoria and Lake Districts; thence following said
boundary in a north-easterly direction, to the sea-shore at Cordova Bay ; thence following the shore line
in an easterly and southerly direction to the north-west corner of Section 44 ; thence south-westerly and
westerly, following the western boundary of " Cadboro School District " and the northern boundary of
"Victoria City School District," to the point of commencement.
Centreville—10th  August,   1874.    Name changed October 27th,   1884,  from " Upper  Chilliwhack"  to
" Centreville ":—
Commencing at the south-east corner of the "Chilliwhack School District;" thence true east
two miles ; thence true north nine miles, more or less, to the south bank of Fraser River ; thence in a
westerly and south-westerly direction, following the meanderings of Fraser River, to the mouth of
Chilliwhack River ; thence following the right bank of Chilliwhack River, to its intersection with the
northern boundary of the " Lower Chilliwhack School District "; thence true east along the northern
boundary of said School District, to its north-east corner ; thence true south four miles, to the point of
commencement.
Cheam—26th November, 1874.    Re-defined 19th July, 1883 :—
Commencing at a point on the eastern boundary of the " Centreville School District "; thence true
east eight miles ; thence true north five and a half miles, more or less, to the south bank of Fraser
River ; thence in a westerly direction, following the meanderings of the Fraser River, to the north-east
corner of " Centreville School District"; thence true south along the eastern boundary of said School
District for a distance of five and a half miles, more or less, to the point of commencement.
Chemainus—23rd May, 1883 :—
All that tract of land known on the Official Map as the District of Chemainus,
Chilcotin—llth August, 1886:—
All that tract of land situated on the Fraser River between " Big Bar School District" and the
mouth of the Chilcotin River, and extending east and west to a distance of five miles on each side of
said Fraser River.
Chilliwhack—19th July, 1883.    Name changed October 27th, 1884, from "Lower Chilliwhack" to "Chilliwhack ":—
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 20, Township 26, New Westminster District;
thence true south along the section line for a distance of four miles ; thence true west following Township line for a distance of four miles, to the south-west corner of Section 2, Township 23 ; thence true
north along the section line for a distance of four miles, to the north-west corner of Section 23, Township 23; thence true east along the section line for a distance of four miles, to the point of commencement.
Clinton—25th June, 1869.    Not defined.
Clover Valley—28th July, 1883.    Boundaries altered and re-defined, and name  changed from "Surrey"
to "Clover Valley," 23rd May, 1883 :—
Commencing at a point on the 49th parallel of north latitude, being the south-west corner of Section
3, Township 7, New Westminster District ; thence true north along the section line for a distance of
ten miles, to the north-west corner of Section 21, Township 8 ; thence true west along the section line
four miles, to the north-west corner of Section 24 ; thence south along the eastern boundary of " Mud
Bay School District," to its intersection with the north shore of Semiahmoo Bay ; thence south-easterly
along the shore of Semiahmoo Bay, to a point on the 49th parallel of north latitude, being the south-east
corner of Section 1, Township 1 ; thence true east along the said parallel a distance of three miles, to
the point of commencement.
Coldstream—June 12th, 1886 :—
All that tract of land known as Township 6, Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
Colwood—3rd October, 1873 :—
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the north end of Parson's Bridge ; thence following Rowe Stream to the boundary line between Sections 97 and 98 ; thence in a northerly direction
along the eastern boundary of Section 98, to the boundary between Highland and Esquimalt Districts ;
thence westerly along said boundary line, to the north-west corner of Section 114 ; thence south-westerly
to the south-east corner of Section 100 ; thence in a south-easterly direction to the south-west corner of
Section 51 ; thence along the section line, between Sections 50 and 51, to the shore at Royal Bay ; thence
north-easterly along the shore line to the southern end of Parson's Bridge ; thence along the said bridge
to the point of commencement. xl. Public Schools Report. 1886
5. History:—
(a.) English History.
(b.) Roman History, especially from the death of Augustus to the close of the reign of
Romulus Augustulus.
(c.) Grecian History.
6. Geography—Ancient and Modern.
7. Book-keeping and Writing:—
(«.) Single and double entry.
(b.) Practice in writing according to the principles  contained  in   Payson, Dunton, and
Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
8. Music—Elements of Music.
9. Natural Science:—
(a.) Geology.
(6.) Astronomy.
Chapter IV.
1.  The course of study in the High Schools of Nanaimo and .New Westminster shall be
the same as in the Victoria High School.
Chapter  V.
Regulations for Admission, etc., into a High School.
1. Teachers of the Public Schools, who have already obtained certificates as teachers, may
be admitted to enter a High School as pupils without being required to pass the usual entrance
examination.
2. In order that a candidate may obtain admission to a High School, the aggregate of his
marks must amount to at least 60 per cent, of the total marks assigned for all the subjects of
examination, and at least 30 per cent, must be obtained in each subject. Candidates will not
be admitted who fail to gain 50 per cent, of the questions in the grammar paper.
3. The examination shall be conducted on paper, but candidates may be subjected to
additional viva voce examination in such subjects as shall be thought proper.
4. Those passing the entrance examination and failing within one year to avail themselves
of instruction in a High School, shall be required to pass another examination before admission,
and pupils of a High School who have not been in attendance for two years, shall not be
admitted without re-examination,
5. Pupils of Public Schools in a School District having a High School, after passing a
satisfactory examination and being declared eligible for promotion from a Public School to a
High School, shall not be received as pupils in the Public Schools of such District.
6. Pupils on entering a High School may for the first six months receive instruction in the
English Course only, but after that period must take either the Commercial Course or the
Classical Course.
7. Pupils shall be arranged in classes corresponding to their respective degrees of proficiency, and each pupil shall be advanced from one class or division to another with reference
to attainments as shown by examination, without regard to the time he may have been in such
class or division.
8. The regulations respecting the duties of pupils .in Public Schools apply to pupils in a
High School, and must be obeyed by the latter.
9. Any pupil absenting himself from the Superintendent's examination, or any portion of
such examination, shall not thereafter be admitted into a High School except by the authority
of the Trustees, given in writing ; and the names of all such absentees shall be forwarded by
the Principal to the Superintendent of Education.
This rule shall be read to the school at a suitable time just before the examination at the
close of each half-year. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. xli.
APPENDIX E.
Books Authorized for Use in Public and  High Schools.
Gage's First Primer, Part I.
Gage's First Primer, Part II.
Gage's Second Reader.
Gage's Third Reader.
Gage's Fourth Reader.
Gage's Fifth Reader.
Gage's Sixth Reader.
Gage's Practical Speller.
Payson, Dunton, & Scribner's Copy-books.
Gage's Copy-books.
Copy-books without headlines.
Elementary Arithmetic (Kirkland & Scott).
Advanced Arithmetic (Smith & McMurchy).
Mental Arithmetic (J. A. McLellan).
Lovell's First Steps in Geography.
School Geography and Atlas.
Swinton's New Language Lessons (Campbell).
Lennie's Grammar.
English Grammar—by Dr. Wm. Smith and T. D. Hall, M. A. (London).
British History (Collier).
British Empire (Collier).
Outlines of General History (Collier).
Public School History of England and Canada—by G. Mercer Adam and W. J. Robertson.
Book-keeping (Fulton & Eastman).
Book-keeping (Beatty &. Claire).
Algebra (Hamblin Smith).
Mensuration (Todhunter).
Pott's Euclid, six books.
Natural Philosophy (Peck's Ganot).
Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene—by Edward Playter.
Manual of Hygiene—by Provincial Board of Health (Ontario).
Trigonometry for Beginners—by Todhunter.
Elementary Statics—by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Hydrostatics—by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Dynamics—by Wormell.
Chambers' Practical Mathematics.
Ancient Geography (Pillans).
Bain's English Composition and Rhetoric.
Ancient History (Schmidt).
Collier's History of Rome.
Collier's History of Greece.
Science  Primers—Introductory,   Chemistry,   IPhysics,    Physical   Geography,    Geology,
Astronomy, Physiology, Botany.
The Chemistry of Common Things (Dr. Macadam).
Elementary Chemistry—by Thomas Kirkland.
Freehand Drawing (Walter Smith).
Smith's Smaller Latin Grammar.
Bryce's First Latin Book
Latin Prose Composition (Arnold).
Principia Latina, Part I. (Smith). xlii. Public Schools Report. 1886
White's Grammar School Texts, Latin.
Riddle's Latin Dictionary.
Curtius' Greek Grammar.
Bryce's First Greek Book.
Greek Prose Composition (Arnold).
Initia Grseca (Smith).
White's Grammar School Texts, Greek.
Liddell & Scott's Greek Lexicon.
Fasquelle's Shorter Course, French.
De Fivas' Elementary French Reader.
De Fivas' Grammaire des Grammaires.
Histoire de Charles XII. (Voltaire).
Le Cid, Corneille.
Physical Culture—by E. B. Houghton.
Common School Education, by James Ourrie (for the use of Teachers).
Art of School Management (Baldwin). ,, ,, 50 Vic.
Public Schooes Report.
din.
APPENDIX F.
List of Certificated Teachers.
First Class, Grade A.
Stainburn, Geo., B. A., Cantab, 1880.    Renewal, L886.
Taylor, Mrs. E A., 1880.    Renewal, 1886.
Johnston, J, P., 1881.    Renewal, 1886.
Newbury, J. C, 1882.    Renewal, 1886.
Howay, Miss Alice, 1882.    Renewal, 1886.
Muir, John N., B. A., McGill University, Montreal, 1884.     Renewal, 1886.
Stramberg, Hector M., B. A., Dalhousie University, Halifax, 1884.     Renewal, 1886.
Wilson, David, B. A., University of New Brunswick, 1885.    Renewal, 1886.
Campbell, Henry J., B. A, Trinity College, Toronto, 1885.    Renewal, 1886.
Walker, Frederick G, B. A., Cantab, 1885.    Renewal, 1886.
Howay, Frederick W., 1885.    Renewal, 1886.
Reid, Robie L, 1885.    Renewal, 1886.
Paul, Edward B., M. A., University of Aberdeen, Scotland, 1886.
Hunter, Walter, B. A., McGill University, Montreal, 1886.
Busk, Charles W,, M. A , Cantab, 1886.
Anderson, John, B. A., University of New Zealand, 1886.
Rossiter, Henry J., B. A., University of Toronto, 1886.
First Class, Grade B.
Kaye, James,
1880.
Renewal, 1886.
Halliday, James A.,
Offerhaus, R.,
>)
Lewis, S. G.,
fi
Reid, Mrs. L. M.,
1881.
Murray, Paul,
Dods, Archibald,
1882.
1883.
H
Irvine, Miss Christina,    „
Cameron, Miss A. D.,       ,,
Horton, Miss Lucretia,    „
Forrest, Miss C. W.,    1883 & 1884
Bannerman, W. S.,
1884.
Gillies, D. W.,
Rabbitt, Daniel,
Anderson, Robt. A.,
>J
j)
Sluggett, George H,
Bell, Miss Emelene,
•>■)
j)
Phelps, William H,
Jones, David,
5)
H
Thain, Joseph H.,
)>
j>
Shaw, Alexander, 1884.
Wright, Frederick G, 1885.
Wood, E. Stuart, ,,
Fraser, Roderick L., „
McLennan, John C,        ,,
Gardiner, Miss Abbie F., ,,
Gilchrist, Alexander,        ,,
Wood, William M.,
McLeod, John A., ,,
Kinney, William T., „
Palmer, Joseph W., ,,
Bryant, Miss Maria,        ,,
Coatham, William C, 1886.
Kerr, Daniel E., ,,
Purdy, R. A. R.,
Bannerman, Alex. M.,     ,,
Armstrong, Miss F. E.,    ,,
Plaxton, Robert J., „
Offerhaus, Mrs. Mary A., ,,
McDonald, Donald J.,     ,,
Renewal, 1886.
Second Class, Grade A.
Berkeley, Mrs. L. A., 1881 and 1884.
McDougali, Miss A. J., 1883 and 1886.
Harding, Miss M. L.,        „ ,,
Jamieson, Miss Eleanor A., 1884.
Storey, Miss Marcella V., ,,
Davidson, Miss Mary R, ,,
Kaye, Ernest E., „
Gowen, Miss Annie 0.,
Munn, Henry A.,
Williams, Miss Mary,
Shaw, Miss Ella B.,
Armstrong, Miss F. Ella,
Kirkland, Miss Maud,
1884.
1885. xliv.
Public Schools Report.
1886
Second Class, Grade B.
Jackson, Miss Harriet, 1881 and 1884.
Gardiner, Miss E. J., 1882 and 1885.
Davidson, Miss Elizabeth A., 1884.
Gardiner, Miss Abbie F., „
Wolfenden,  Miss Nellie F. F.,
Northcote, Miss Alice, ,,
Bannerman, Alexander M., 1884 and 1885.
Michael, Mrs. A. M.,
Gillanders, Albert H,
Pollard, Miss Annie,
Lawrence, Miss Mary,
Shaw, John, „    and 1886.
Smith, Miss Clara P.,
Halliday, Miss Marie F.,
I  Hoy, James A.,
Barron, Miss Lizzie A.,
j  McDonald, Donald J.,
Tomlinson, William,
Muffbrd, William J.,
.   McCartey, Miss Augusta,
Caldwell, Mrs. L. M.,
|  Campbell, James M.,
Dockrill, Miss Melrose,
Mundell, John,
Smith, J. F.,
Doran, Edward F.,
1884.
1885.
1886.
Third Class, Grade A.
Blair, Miss Jeanie W.
Keast, Miss Ada
Dougan, James, Jr.
Graves, H. W.
Scott, John R.
Clarke, Miss Gertrude
Jennings, Miss Margaret
Ramsay, Miss Jennie
Sylvester, Miss Elizabeth E.
Murehie, Miss Margaret J.
Harding, Miss Margaret M.
Reynard, Miss Eva M.
Williams, Miss Aliee
McNish, John
Bell, Miss Eva S.
Mebius, Miss Lucy A.
Heard, Miss Mary
Robinson, Miss Sarah A.
Catherwood, John A.
Campbell, Eli J.
Bannerman, John J.
Hanna, R. S.
Metcalfe, James C. F.
Todd, Miss Katherine
Blair, William
Andrews, Miss Helen
McBride, Miss Gertrude
Grant, Miss Flora Bertha
Third Class, Grade B.
Sivewright, William
Dallas, Miss Mary R.
Carr, Miss Elizabeth E.
Coghlan, Miss Ella S.
Carmichael, Miss Eleanor M.
Barron, Miss Isabella M. F.
Temporary Certificates
Manson, William
Clemitson,  R. M.
McMillan, J. D.
Irwin, Joseph
Leduc, Thomas
Douglas, Miss Janie
Fletcher, Thomas
Monk, Mrs. A.
Sweet, O. D.
Granted on the application of Boards of Trustees.
Gallagher, John
Lindsay, Miss S. E.
Amery, Fred. J.
Preston, Miss Sara
Beattie, M.
Watson, Fred. J.
Irwin, Dixon
i  Charlton, Miss Alice S. M.
Robinson, James W. 50 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
dix.
APPENDIX I.
PROVINCIAL ROLL OF  HONOR,   1885-86.
Pupils Accredited by their Teachers with First  Rank.
Schools.
Deportment.
Punctuality & Regularity.
Proficiency.
Alice Bowron	
Clara Paulina Minnie Trage
Hubert Watt
Beaver Point	
Charles Edward Beddis
Big Bar	
Minnie Kostering	
Emma Grinder	
Louise Kostering
Burgoyne Bav	
George Furness	
Thomas MeKamey	
Nellie Wilson	
Trenholme W. Lyster Fee
Jarnes Darius Weils
Cache Creek 	
Etta Jane Ingram	
.
Cadboro	
George Chapman    	
Edward Harvey
Canoe Pass	
Charlotte Williams	
Elizabeth Maude Fiddick.
Eliza Trim
Cedar, North	
William York.
Catherine Gordon
Cedar, South	
Catherine Jane Thomas . .
Frances Mary Thomas
Cedar Hill	
Adelaide Pollock 	
Esther Pollock	
Charles King
George H. Webb Ashwell
Cheam	
George Frank  Prest  	
William Sperry Nelmes . .
Margaret Ednadale Ryder
Chemainus	
Thomas Henry  Bonsall. . .
George Walter Lilley ....
Ellen Thomas
Chilliwhack   	
Caroline Louisa Webb....
Edwin Allen Wells
Clinton	
George Lepper Walker .   .
Fanny Chenhall
Clover Valley	
Josiah Boothroyd	
George Walkein Shannon.
James McKenzie
Colwood   	
Almira Cessford	
Harry Pidcock 	
Comox, North	
Robert Halliday	
Ida Jane Halliday
Comox, South	
Walter McPhee	
Richard Anderton
Courtenav    	
Jemima Beach	
Cowichan	
Maggie A. Blyth 	
Maria Dougan	
Henry A. McAllister
William Jones
Cowichan, South	
Edward Jones	
Craigflower	
Margaret Grace Calvert . .
Denman Island	
Mary Kenan !	
Robert William Dunsmuir
Departure Bay	
William John Kemp	
Harriet Young
Esquimalt	
Mabel Bunting   	
Edward Logan	
Charles Roland Bunting
Gabriola, North	
Robert Hoggan	
Thomas Degnen	
Sarah Jane Hoggan
Maggie Shaw
Gabriola, South	
Agnes Edgar	
Granville	
Joseph H. Hall	
Ernest Miller 50 Vic Public Schools Report. xlv.
APPENDIX G.
Medalists for 1886
The medals presented by His Excellency the Governor-General were, on result of written
examinations, awarded as follows :—
1. John C. Boyd, Silver Medal, presented for competition in the Victoria High School.
2. Richard McBride, Bronze Medal, presented for competition in the New Westminster
High School.
3. Miss Flora Fraser, Bronze Medal, presented for competition between the Boys' School
and Girls' School, Victoria.
4. Miss Maud H. Turner, New Westminster Girls' School, Bronze Medal, presented for
competition between the Graded Schools of Nanaimo and New Westminster.
List of Successful Candidates for Entrance to a High School.
Christmas Examinations, 1885.
Graded Schools.
Nanaimo Boys' School.
Herbert Stewart.
Nanaimo Girls' School.
Elizabeth Galloway, Mary L. Gibson.
Georgina Berthour.
New Westminster Boys' School.
Frederic Turner, Guy Hall,
Thomas Guest, Percy Peele.
New Westminster Girls' School.
Alice Claire Clute, Kathleen 0. Black,
Alida Mabel Robinson, Florence A. Hacker.'
Victoria Boys' School.
Richard Brodrick, John Campbell McLagan,
Albert Edward Whittaker, George Washington Hale,
Thomas Lee, Stanley Reginald Engelhardt,
Thomas Munro Miller, George William Aikman.
Richard George, Walter Kerr,
Pierey Oliver Dickinson,
Victoria Girls' School.
Gertrude Maud Fox, Mary Cox,
Julia M. Bradley, Bertha M. Jay,
Amelia A. Oppenheimer, Louisa Mallandaine,
Louisa Sylvester, Christina Allan,
Julia Askew, Lillian Parks.
Alice Carr, xlvi. Public Schools Report. 1886
Common Schools.
Esquimalt.
Hugh Logan,
Special Examinations,  1885
Agnes Jamieson, Victoria, Charlotte J. Kempster, Victoria
Midsummer Examinations,  1886.
Graded Schools
Nanaimo Boys' School.
James Reid, Vincent Good
Nanaimo Girls' School.
Amiet Gordon, Pauline Haarer,
Isabel Fulton, Janet Webb.
Christina Pool,
New Westminster Boys' School.
Humphries Edmonds, Murdock McLennan.
New Westminster Girls' School.
Maud H. Turner, Alice Homer,
Annie M. Ellard, Hester M. McMartin.
Victoria Boys' School.
William B. McDowell, Charles Steele,
Milton B. Oppenheimer, James G. Ure,
Henry A. E. Courtenay, Henry G. Mason.
Victoria Girls' School.
Flora Fraser, Elizabeth McConnell,
Orvilla Northcote, Grace Fawcett,
Gertrude Withrow, Elizabeth M. Wilson,
Emily Booth, Matilda Tite.
Common   Schools.
Barkervilie Hubert L. Watt.
Maple Ridge Minnie Vasey.
North Saanich Sarah A. Williams.
Port Moody Welsford Murchie.
South Gabriola Margaret R. Shaw.
South Saanich Fannie Thomson.
j Edna A. Chadsey,
Sumas  - Catherine A. McGillivray,   -
( Louis L. Chadsey.
West Saanich Maud Butler.
Special Examinations, 1886.
Jessie Dunoon, Victoria. Duncan McGregor McDonald, Victoria
A. E. Mary Powell, Victoria. Ernest A. Powell, Victoria.
Blanche Millard, New Westminster. Silas Norris, New Westminster. 50 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
xlvii.
APPENDIX H.
List of Members of British Columbia Teachers' Institute, 1886.
1
Andrews, Miss H.,
 c
Cheam.
 —
51
Halliday, J. A.,
Victoria.
2
Anderson, Robert A.,
Victoria.
52
Irwin, Joseph,
Yale.
3
Armstrong, Miss F. E
>        j?
53
Jamieson, Miss E. A.
, Nicola.
4
Barron, Miss L. A.,
>>
54 Johnston, J. P.,
Chilliwhack.
5
Bailey, Miss A. S.,
»
55
Jennings, Miss M.,
Sooke.
6
Blair, Miss J. W.,
Somenos.
56
Jones, David,
Nanaimo.
7
Bannerman, A. M.,
Craigflower.
57
Jackson, Miss H.,
Victoria.
8
Bell, Miss E,
Nanaimo.
58
Jackson, Miss M.,
jj
9
Booth, Miss A.,
Victoria.
59
Kinney, W. T.,
Yale.
10
Boyd, J. C,
)»
60
Kirkland, Miss M.,
Moodyville.
11
Caldwell, Mrs. L. M.,
j>
61
Kerr, D. E.,
Cedar Hill.
12
Campbell, E. J.,
Cowichan.
62
Lewis, S. G.,
Chemainus.
13
Cameron, Miss A. D.,
Victoria.
63
Lawrence, Miss Mary
, Wellington.
14
Campbell, H. J., B.A.
»
64
Mebius, Miss Lucy,
Nanaimo.
15
Campbell, J. M.,
Lillooet.
65
Mundell, John,
Comox.
16
Carmichael, Miss A.,
Victoria.
66
Mufford, W. J.,
Langley.
17
Carmichael, Miss N.,
jj
67
Metcalfe, J. C. F.,
Shuswap Prairie.
18
Coghlan, Miss E.,
Mt. Lehman.
68
Muir, J. N., B.A.,
Victoria.
19
Catherwood, J. A.,
St. Mary's Mission.
69
Murray, P.,
Maple Ridge.
20
Clark, Miss G.,
Kamloops.
70 Michael, Mrs. A.,
Cedar.
21
Cook, Miss L.,
Victoria.
71
Munn, H. A.,
New Westminster
22
Dods, A.,
Barkervilie.
72
Monk, Mrs. A.,
Quamichan.
23
Dougan, J., Jr.,
Oyster.
73
Murchie, Miss M.,
Port Moody.
24
Dockrill, Miss M.,
Port Moody.
74
McDougali, Miss A. J.
, Hope.
25
Davidson, Miss M. R.,
New Westminster.
75
McDonald, D. J.,
Port Moody.
26
Davidson, Miss A. E.,
j?
76
McCartey, Miss A.,
Prairie.
27
Dallas, Miss M. R.,
North Thompson.
77
McLennan, J. C,
Hall's Prairie
28
Ferguson, J. B.,
Victoria.
78
McLeod, J. A.,
Sumas.
29
Fraser, R. L.,
Saanich.
79
McSwain, Dr.,
Victoria.
30
Forrest, Miss C,
Victoria.
80
McNeil, D. H.,
j»
31
Fraser, Rev D., M.A.
»         jj
81
McKenzie, John
New Westminster
32
Gillies, D. W.,
Lytton.
82
Norris, MissM. E.,
Langley Prairie.
33
Gilchrist, A.,
Trenant.
83
Northcote, Miss A.,
Quesnelle.
34
Gillanders, A. H.,
Chilliwhack.
84
Offerhaus, R.,
Victoria.
35
Gardiner, Miss E. J.,
Victoria.
85
Pollard, Miss A.,
jj
36
Gardiner, Miss Abbie F.,      ,,
86
Phelps, W. H.,
Mayne Island.
37
Gray, J.,
Gabriola.
87
Pope, S. D., B.A.,
Victoria.
38
Gowen, Miss A. 0.,
Victoria.
88
Paul, E. B., M.A.,
Nanaimo.
39
Grant, Miss Bertha,
York.
89
Purdy, R. A. R„
Vesuvius.
40
Gibson, Miss M.,
Nanaimo.
90
Reid, Mrs. L. M.,
Victoria.
41
Gallagher, —■
Victoria.
91
Reid, R. L,
Clover Valley.
42
Harding, Miss M. M.,
North Arm.
92
Rabbitt, D.,
Spallumcheen.
43
Halliday, Miss M. F.,
Cedar.
93
Ramsay, Miss J.,
Cedar.
44
Harding, Miss M. L.,
Denman Island.
94
Reece, Miss B.,
Chilliwhack.
45
Hanna, R. S.,
Mud Bay.
95
Robinson, Miss S. A.,
Victoria.
46
Howay, Miss A. S.,
Stave River.
96
Reynard, Miss E. M
, Nanaimo.
47
Howay, F. W.,
Boundary Bay.
97
Storey, Miss M. V.,
Victoria.
48
Hunter, Walter, B.A.
, Lillooet.
98
Starret, Mrs. C P.,
Hope.
49
Heard, Miss Mary,
Comox.
99
Scott, J. R.,
Cowichan.
50
Horton, Miss L. A.,
Victoria.
100
Shaw, A., Jr.,
Gabriola. xlviii.
Public Schools Report.
1886
List of Members of Teacaers' Institute.—Continued.
101 Steele, A. C,
102 Stramberg,H.M.,B.A.
103 Scott, Miss J. A.,
104 Sinclair, J. W.,
105 Stephenson, F. L.,
106 Shaw, Miss E. B.,
107 Stainburn, G, B.A.,
108 Shaw, A,
109 Shaw, John,
110 Sivewright, W.,
111 Smith, J. F,
112 Taylor, Mrs. E. A,
Esquimalt.
113 Tomlinson, W.,
Lake.
,New Westminster.
114 Todd, MissK.,
Burton's Prairie.
Cedar Hill.
115 Tolmie, Dr.,
Victoria.
Port Hammond
116 Thompson, Miss E.,
Saanich.
Metchosin.
117  Ure, Miss C.,
Victoria.
Clinton.
118 Wall, Miss Edna,
Wellington.
Wellington.
119 Wright, F. G.,
Victoria.
Nanaimo.
120 Wood, W. M.,
Cedar Hill.
jj
121 Walker, F. G., B.A.
Esquimalt.
Beaver Point.
122 Wilson, D., B.A.,
New Westminster
Ashcroft.
123 Williams, Miss M.,
Cadboro.
Cedar Hill.
124 Wood, E. S.,
Kamloops. 50 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
XV.
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sea xviii. .   Public Schools Report. 1886
TABLE H.—DISTRICTS: DATES OF CREATION: BOUNDARIES.
Alberni—21st-April, 1886:—
All that tract of land included in Alberni District.
Aldegrrove—June 12th, 1886 :—
Commencing at the north-west corner of Section 34, Township 10, New Westminster District ;
thence true east to the north-east coiner of Section 33, Township 13 ; thence south to the Yale Waggon
Road ; thence east on said Road to the western boundary line of Section 24, Township 13; thence south to
the 49th parallel of latitude ; thence west along said parallel to the south-west corner of Section 3
Township 10 ; thence true north to the point of commencement.
Barkerville—28th June, 1871 :—
Circle with a radius of 3 miles from Court House. Richfield.
Beaver Point—18th August, 1885 :—
Commencing at the point in which the western boundary of Section 88, Salt Spring Island, reaches
the sea ; thence due south to Fulford Harbour; thence easterly and along the sea-shore to the point of
commencement; and including. Russell, Portland, and Moresby Islands.
Big  Bar—27th October, 1884.    Re-defined 11th December, 1884:—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the mouth
of Big Bar Creek, and whose radius shall be a distance of 20 miles from such centre.
Bonaparte—11th August, 1886 :—
All that tract of land on the Cariboo Waggon Road situated between the 116-Mile Post aud the
126-Mile Post, and extending to a distance of three miles on each side of the centre of said road.
Boundary Bay—4th May, 18S6:—
All that portion of Township 5 situated between the 49th parallel of latitude and the southern
boundary of " Trenant School District."
Burgoyne Bay—3rd October, 1873.    Re-defined 18th August, 1885 :—
Commencing at the north-west corner of "Beaver Point School District;" thence due west to the
sea-shore ; thence southerly and along the sea-shore to Fulford Harbour ; thence north, along the
western boundary line of " Beaver Point School District," to the point of commencement.
Burton's Prairie—26th April, 1882 :—
Commencing at a point where the line between Sections 22 aud 23, Township No. 17, intersects the
right bank of Fraser River; thence due north for a distance of two miles 33 chains, more or less, to a
point on the First Correction Line, being the north-west corner of Section 35, Township No. 17 ; thence
east along said Correction Line for a distance of seven chains and forty links, more or less, to the southwest corner of Section 2, Township No. 18 ; thence due north for a distance of three miles, to the northwest corner of Section 14, Township No. 18 ; thence true east for a distance of six miles ; thence true
south for a distance of three miles, to the south-west corner o) Section 2, Township No. 21 ; thence due
west along the First Correction Line for a distance oi seven chains sixty-three links, more or less, to the
north-west corner of Section 35, Township No. 20; thence due south for a distance of four miles; thence
due west for a distance of six miles, to the south-west corner of Section 14, Township No. 17 ; thence
due north, along the line between Sections 14, 15, 22, and 23, Township No. 17, for a distance of one
mile twenty-five chains, more or less, to its intersection with the left bank of Fraser River.
Cache Creek—Not defined.
Cadboro—7th April, 1885 :—
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 2, Oak Bay ; thence north-westerly and following
the boundary line of "Victoria City School District" to the south-west corner of Section 25; thence
north to the north-west comer of Section 26 ; thence east to the north-east corner of said Section ;
thence north along the western boundary of Section 31, to the north east corner of Section 37 ; thence
in a right line to the north west corner of Section 44 ; thence along the northern boundary of Section
44, to the sea-shore ; thence southerly along the coast line to the point of commencement.
Canoe Pass—8th May, 1884 :—
All that tract of land lying west of a line commencing at the north-west corner of Lot 96, (Iroup 2,
and extending due south to the (lulf of Georgia, and including Westham Island.
Cedar, South—27th May, 1880 :—
Commencing at the south-west corner of Cranberry District; thence east along the southern boundary of Cranberry and Cedar District, to the coast line ; thence north-west along the coast line, to the
north-east corner of Section 12, Range 5, Cedar District ; thence west along the section line, to the
north-west corner of Section 12, Range 1, Cranberry District ; thence south along the western boundary
of Cranberry District, to the point of commencement. xx. Public Schools Report. 1..S8G
Comox,  North—30th July,   1870.     Boundaries   altered and   re-defined May 8th,   1884,  and  April 7th,
1885 :—
All that portion of Comox District between the western boundary of " South Comox School District " and the eastern boundary of Courtenay School District.
Comox, South—8th May, 1884.    Boundaries altered and re-denned July 21st, 1884 :—
Commencing at the south-west corner of Section 9 ; thence magnetic north, to the Gulf of Georgia ;
thence along the shore to the point of commencement.
Cowichan—16th June, 1869.    Name changed October 27th, 1884, from " South Cowichan" to "Cowichan,7"
and re-defined April 24th, 1884 :—
That portion of Quamichan District situate to the south of Cowichan River, and that portion of
Cowichan District south of Cowichan River and Cowichan Harbour, and not included in the Shawnigan
School District.
Cowichan, South—November 3rd, 1885 :—
All that portion of Shawnigan District north of the line separating S-octions lo aud 16 and east of
the Kokasailah River, and that portion of Cowichan District east of the line dividing Ranges III. and
IV
Courtenay—7th April, 1885 :—
All that portion of Comox District west of Lots 50, 29 and 64.
Craigflower— 23rd July, 1870.    Boundaries altered 1st June, 1878:---
Commencing at the south-west extremity of Cedar Hill School District, and following the western
boundary of said district to where it strikes the southern boundary of Lake School District ; thence
along the boundary of said district to the north-west corner of Section 116; thence along section line
between 116 and 117, west, to the line between R. 1 W. and R. 0 W., south, to the boundary line
between Lake and Esquimalt Districts ; thence west to the north-east corner of Section 98, marked on
the Official Map as "Government Reserve ;" thence along the east line of said Reserve and Mill River
to Parson's Bridge ; thence along the water-line of Esquimalt Harbour, south-easterly, to the southwestern corner of Section 26, Esquimalt District ; thence in a straight line to the south-western extremity of Section 10 ; thence along the southern boundary line of said section, to Victoria Arm ; thence
north to point of commencement.
Denman Island—17th August, 1877 :■—
All that tract of land known as Denman Island.
Departure Bay—25th July, 1885 :—
That tract of land bounded on the south by the Nanaimo School District, on the west by the Wellington School District, on the north by a line running from the north-eastern point of the Wellington
School District to Neck Point on the Oulf of Georgia, and on the east by the Gulf of Georgia, together
with Newcastle, Jesse, and other islands in and about Departure Bay.
Esquimalt—22nd October, 1870 :—
All that piece of land included within the following limits, viz :—Commencing at the western extremity of the south boundary line of the Craigflower School District; thence southerly and easterly
along the shore line of Esquimalt Harbour and Fuca Straits, and northerly along the water-line of Victoria
Harbour to the south-eastern extremity of the said Craigflower School District ; thence along the
southern boundary line of the said District to the point of commencement.
Gabriola, North—23rd May, 1883.    Re-defined April 24th, 1884 :—
All that portion of Gabriola Island lying to the west of the division line between Sections 9, 10, 14,
15, 18, and 31.
Gabriola, South—10th August, 1872.    Boundaries altered and re-defined May 23rd, 1883.    Name changed
to " South Gabriola."   Re-defined April 24th, 1884 :—
All that portion of Gabriola Island lying east of North Gabriola School District, and including
Mudge Island.
Grand Prairie—21st April, 1886 :—
Commencing at a point forty chains south of the south-west corner of Lot 458, Group 1, Kamloops
Division of Yale District; thence true north, four miles ; thence true east, nine miles, more or less, to
the eastern boundary of Hugh Curiae's pre-emption ; thence true south, four miles ; thence true west,
nine miles, more or less, to the point of commencement.
Hall's Prairie—9th January, 1885 :—
Commencing at the Iron Post, International Boundary Line, Semiahmoo Bay ; thence east, along
said boundary line, to the eastern boundary of Surrey ; thence north, along the eastern boundary line
of Surrey, a distance of three miles ; thence west, to Semiahmoo Bay ; thence south, along the shore
line of Semiahmoo Bay, to the point of commencement.
Hope—25th February, 1871 :—
All that piece of land comprised within a circle having a radius of three miles from the Court
House. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxi.
Kamloops—May 11th, 1886 :—
All that tract of land included in Lots 231, 232, 233, and 234, Group 1, Kamloops Division of Yale
District.
Lake—25th June, 1869.    Boundaries altered 1st June, 1878.    Re-defined 27th May, 1880 :—
Commencing at the north-east corner of Cedar Hill School District, being the point where the
boundary line between Victoria and Lake Districts intersects the sea-shore at Cordova Bay ; thence in
a south-westerly direction, following the northern boundary of Cedar Hill School District, to the northeast corner of Section 50, Victoria District; thence westerly along the southern boundary of Section 82,
to Colquitz Stream ; thence following said stream, in a northerly direction, to its intersection with the
northern boundary of Section 1, Lake District ; thence westerly along the northern boundary of Section
1, to its north-west corner, being a point on the eastern boundary of Section 22 ; thence in a northwesterly direction across Section 22, to the north-east boundary of Section 116 ; thence westerly along
the northern boundary of Section 116, to the western boundary of Lake District; thence north along
said boundary, to the south west corner of Section 127 ; thence east along the southern boundary of
Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the south-west corner of Section 53 ; thence north along the western
boundary of Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the southern boundary of South Saanich District ; thence east
along said boundary, to the sea-shore ; thence following the sea-shore in a south-easterly direction, to
the point of commencement.
Lake La Hache—30th July, 1875 :—
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be described with a.radius of six miles in
length from the school-house, situate at the 114-Mile Post on the Cariboo Road, as the centre of such
circle.
Langley—30th April, 1871.    Boundaries altered and re-defined August 18th, 1885 :—
Commencing at the north-east corner of Lot 126, Township 9, New Westminster District; thence
south to the centre of the eastern boundary line of Section 24, Township 8, of said district; thence due
east, to the western boundary of East Langley School District; thence in a right line, north, to the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, of said district ; thence west, to the western boundary
line of said township ; thence due south to point of commencement.
Langley, East—May 28th, 1885: —
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 1, Township 11, New Westminster District ; thence due west to the south-west corner of Section 3 of said township ; thence due north to
Fraser River ; thence easterly, up said river, to the western boundary of Stave River School District;
thence south, along said boundary, to point of commencement.
Lillooet—22nd October, 1870 :—
A radius of three miles from the Court House.
Lulu (North Arm)—August 17th, 1877.     Boundaries altered and re-defined May 11th, 1886 :—
All of Sea Island, and that portion of Lulu Island north of the First Correction Line, and not
included in the North Arm School District.
Lytton—20th November, 1869 :—
A radius of two miles from the Court House.
Maple Bay—16th June, 1870.     Boundaries altered and re-defined, and name changed from " North Cowichan " to "Maple Bay."    Re-defined February 2nd, 1885 :—
All that tract of land known on the official map as Comiaken District.
Maple Ridge.—31st July, 1874 :—
All that tract of land included within the lines commencing at the south-west corner of Section 3,
Township No. 9, New Westminster District; thence in a northerly direction to the north-west corner
of Section 34, Township No. 9 aforesaid ; thence in an easterly direction to the north east corner of
Section 32, Township No. 12, New Westminster District; thence in a southerly direction to the point
of intersection with the Langley School District; thence following the western boundary of the Langley
School District to the northern boundary line of Townships 8 and 11, New Westminster District; thence
westerly to the point of commencement.
Matsqui—Not defined.
Mayne Island—23rd May, 1883 :—
All that tract of land known as Mayne Island, and that portion of Galiano Island lying west of
Active Pass and east of a line running north across the Island from the south-west corner of Lot 2.
Metchosin—8th April, 1871;—
The whole of the District of Metchosin according to the official map, together with that portion of
Esquimalt District adjoining thereto which lies outside of the boundary of the Craigflower School
District.
Moodyville—27th June, 1870 :—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the
,   school-house on the north side of said Inlet, and whose radius shall be a distance of three miles from
such school-house ; excepting always any of the land on the south side of the Inlet. Mount Lehman—8th May, 1884 :—
Commencing at a point on Fraser River, being the north-west corner of Section 27, Township 14,
New Westminster District; thence due south along the section line, for a distance of seven and a
quarter miles, more or less, to the Yale Waggon Road ; thence easterly along the Yale Waggon Road,
to a point being the intersection of the Yale Waggon Road with the dividing line separating Sections
19 and 20, Township 16 ; thence northerly along said section line, for a distance of four miles, more or
less, to Fraser River ; thence north-westerly following the bank of the river, to the point of commencement.
Mud Bay—23rd May, 1883 :—
Commencing at the south west corner of Section 26, Block 1 North, Range 1 West ; thence true
north along the section line to the north-east corner of Section 23, Township 2, New Westminster
District; thence true west along the section line five miles, to the north-west corner of Section 19,
Township 2; thence true south along the township line, for a distance of three miles seventy chains,
more or less, to the north shore of Mud Bay ; thence in a southerly direction and south-easterly direction along the shores of Mud Bay aud Semiahmoo Bay to the point of commencement.
Nanaimo—30th July, 1870.    Boundaries re-defined March 20th, 1885 :—
Commencing at the mouth of Chase River ; thence due west to the boundary line of the Nanaimo
and Mountain Districts ; thence north, on the said boundary line, to the north-east corner of Mountain
District; thence east, to coast line ; thence along the coast line to point of commencement—subdivided
into wards as follows :—
1. All that portion of land north of a line drawn due west from the end of Bastion and Fitzwilliam
Streets to the boundary line of Mountain District, shall be known as the North Ward.
2. All that portion of land south of Bastion and Fitzwilliam Streets, and West of the old Victoria
Road, shall be known as the Middle Ward.
3. All those portions of land not included in either the North Ward or tne Middle Ward, shall be
known as the South Ward.
New Westminster—4th June, 1870:—
A radius of two miles from Lytton Square, New Westminster—subdivided into wards as follows :—
1. All that portion of land north-east of Clement Street, extended in a right line in both directions
to the boundaries of the district, shall be known as St. Patrick's Ward.
2. All that portion of land lying between St. Patrick's Ward and Douglas Street, extended in a
right line in both directions to the boundaries of the district, shall be known as St. George's Ward.
3. All those portions of land not included in either St. Patrick's Ward or St. George's Ward shall
be known as St. Andrew's Ward.
Nicola—11th August, 1886:—
Commencing at the south-west corner of section 25, Township 91, Kamloops Division of Yale
District; thence due north three miles ; thence due east five miles ; thence due south three miles ;
thence west to point of commencement.
Nicola Lake—23rd May, 1883 ;—
All that tract of land known as Townships 95, 96, 97, 99, and 100, Kamloops Division of Yale
District.
Nicola Valley—31st July, 1874 :—
Bounded on the east by a line drawn north and south from the residence of William Charters in
Nicola Valley, and extending on each side of the Nicola River to the natural boundaries of Nicola
Valley ; on the west by a line drawn north and south from the residence of Byron Earnshaw, and
extending on each side of the Nicola River to the natural boundaries of Nicola Valley aforesaid, said
western boundary being about nine miles distant from the eastern boundai-y ; and on the north and
south by the natural boundaries of the Nicola Valley.
North Arm—May 11th, 1886 :—
Commencing at the western boundary of Lot 311, Group 1 ; thence east, including all lots on the
North Arm of Fraser River to the eastern boundary of Lot 167, Group 1 ; thence crossing the said
Arm to the north-east corner of Section 36, Block 5 North, Range 4 West; thence south to the First
Correction Line ; thence west along said line to the south-west corner of Section 36, Block 5 North,
Range 6 West; thence north to the north-east corner of Section 24, Block 5 North, Range 6 West; thence
crossing the Arm to the point of commencement.
North Thompson—25th August, 1884 :—
That portion of the valley on each side of the North Thompson River, which extends to a distance
of five miles above and five miles below the north-east corner of Section 24, Township 112.
Okanagan—31st July, 1874:—
Commencing at a point at the mouth of Mission Creek ; thence northerly along the shore of Okanagan Lake a distance of five miles ; thence easterly a distance of five miles ; thence southerly to Mission
Creek ; thence westerly to point of commencement.
Oyster—7th April, 1885 :—
Commencing at the point where the boundary line between Sections 15 and 16, Range VI.,
Chemainus District, intersects the sea-shore ; thence west along said line to a point due south of the
south-west corner of Oyster District; thence due north to the said south-west corner of said District ;
thence following the western boundary of said District to its north-west corner ; thence east to the
sea-shore ; thence southerly along the coast line to point of commencement. 50 Vic. Public: Schools Report. xxiii.
Port Moody—April 26th, 1884 :—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the
central point of the crossings of Clarke and Douglas Streets, on the Clarke Survey, and whose radius
shall be a distance of 3J miles from such central point.
Prairie—26th November, 1874.    Boundaries altered and re-dofined August 18th, 1885 :—
Commencing at the south-east corner of Langley School District ; thence due west to the eastern
boundary line of Section 21, Township 8, New Westminster District : thence south, in a right line, to
the south-west corner of Section 27, Township 7, of said district; thence due east, to the south-east
corner of Section 28, Township 10, of said district; thence north, in a right line, to point of commencement.
Priest's Valley—23rd May, 1883.    Boundaries altered and re-defined June 12th, 1886 :—
All of Townships 8 and 9, Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
Quamichan—23rd May, 1883.    Altered and redefined February 2nd, 1885 :—
All those portions of the Districts known on the official map as the Quamichan and Cowichan
Districts lying north of the Cowichan River, and north of the Cowichan Harbour, and not included in
the Somenos School District.
Quesnelle—14th April, 1881.   Name changed, in March, 1886, from "Quesnellemouth" to "Quesnelle" :—
Commencing at the junction of the left banks of the Iraser and Quesnelle Rivers; and running
thence due west a distance of one mile; thence due north six miles; thence due east three miles; thence
due south six miles ; thence due west two miles to point of commencement.
Round Prairie—4th November, 1886 :-—
All of Townships 34, 35, and 38, Osoyoos Division of Yale District.
Saanich, North—30th August, 1872.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 3rd October, 1873, and 27th May
1880 :—
All that portion of the Saanich Peninsula lying to the north of South Saanich District, as shown on
the Official Map, and known as the " North Saanich District."
Saanich, South—30th August, 1.872.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 3rd October, 1873, and 27th May,
1880.    Name changed October 27th, 1884, from " East-South Saanich " to " South Saanich ":—
Commencing at the north east corner of the Lake School District ; thence west, along the southern
boundary of South Saanich District, to the south-west corner of Section 18, Range 3 E.; thence north
along the said range line, to the south-east corner of Section 12, Range 2 E.; thence west, along the
southern boundary of Section 12, Range 2 E., to its south-west corner ; thence north, along the range
line, to the south-west corner of Section 4, Range 2 E,; thence west, along the southern boundary of
Section 4, Range 1 E., to its south west corner ; thence north, along the range line, to the north-west,
corner of Section 1, Range 1 E.; thenoe east, along the southern boundary of North Saanich, to the seashore ; thence following the sea-shore, in a south-easterly direction, to the point of commencement.
Saanich West—27th May,  1880.    Name changed October 27th,  1884,  from "West-South Saanich" to
" West Saanich ":—
Commencing at the north-west corner of Lake School District; thence east, along the southern
boundary of Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the south-west corner of Section 53, Lake District; thence
north, along the western boundaries of Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the southern boundary of the South
Saanich School District; thence west, to the north-west corner of Section 56, Lake District; thence
north, following the western boundary of the South Saanich School District, to its intersection with the
southern boundary of North Saanich District; thence west, along said southern boundary, to the seashore at Saanich Inlet ; thence southerly, along the shore line of Saanich Inlet and Tod Creek, to the
south-west corner of South Saanich District; thence south, along the western boundary of Sections 122,
123, 124, 125, 126, 127, Lake District, to the point of commencement.
Shawnigan—8th May, 1884.    Boundaries altered August, 21st, 1885 :—
All that portion of Shawnigan District lying south of the line separating Ranges 15 and 16.
Shuswap Prairie—23rd May, 1883 :—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the school-
house, and whose radius shall be a distance of six miles from such school-house.
Somenos—2nd February, 1885 :—
Commencing at the north-east corner of Section 20, Range VI.; thence south, to the south-east
corner of Section 18 of said Range; thence west, to the south-west corner of Section 18, Range I.;
thence north, to the north-west corner of Section 20 of said Range ; and thence following the boundary
lines of the tract of land known on the official map as the District of Somenos to the point of commencement.
Sooke—23rd May, 1872 :—
The same as those oefined on the official map of the District of Sooke.
Spallumcheen—8th May, 1884.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 4th November, 1886 :—
All of Townships 4 and 7, Osoyoos Division of Yale District. xxiv. Public Schools Report. 1886
Stanley—17th August, 1877 :—
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be described with a radius of three miles in
length from the Court House, Stanley.
St. Mary's Mission—7th April, 1885 :—
All that portion of Section 17, New Westminster District, not included in either Burton's Prairie
School District or in Mount Lehman School District.
Stave River— 5th June, 1884 :—
The tract of land contained in the south half of Township 15, and those portions of Township 14
not included in Mount Lehman School District.
Stuart's Lake—17th August, 1877 :—
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be described with a radius of six miles in
length from Fort St. James on Stuart's Lake.
Sumas—13th October, 1871.    Re-defined 19th July, 1883 :—
Commencing at a point where the northern boundary of Chilliwhack School District intersects the
Chilliwhack River ; thence in a northerly and north-westerly direction, following the meanderings of
the Chilliwhack River to its confluence with the Fraser River; thence in a south-westerly direction,
following the meanderings of the Fraser River, to the mouth of Sumas River ; thence in a southerly and
south-easterly direction, along the eastern bank of the Sumas River and Sumas Lake, to its intersection
witli the southern boundary of Section 31, Township 22; thence true east to the south-east corner of
Section 34, Township 22; thence true north, five miles, to the north-west corner of the Chilliwhack
School District; thence true east, along the northern boundary of said School District, to the point of
com mencement.
Trenant—3rd October, 1873.    Boundaries altered and re-defined 8th May, 1884, and 4th May, 1886:—
Commencing at the north-west corner of Lot 96, Township 5; thence south on the western boundary
line of " Canoe Pass School District " to the south-west corner of Lot 107 ; thence east to the south-east
corner of said Lot ; thence north to the south-west corner of Lot 172 ; thence east to the south-east
corner, of Lot 176 ; thence north to the south-west corner of Section 25 ; thence east to the southeast corner of said section ; thence true north to Fraser River ; thence south-westerly along the left
bank of said river to the point of commencement.
Vancouver—12th February, 1873.    Boundaries altered and re-defined and name changed from "Granville"
to "Vancouver," 4th November, 1886 :—
The same as those defined on the official map of the City of Vancouver.
Vesuvius—August 18th, 1885 :—
All that portion of Salt Spring Island situated north of the northern boundary line of Burgoyne
Bay School District.
Victoria— 25th June, 1869.    Boundaries altered 1st June, 1878.    Re-defined 27th May, 1880 :—
Commencing at the south-east corner of Section 10, Victoria District ; thence easterly, along the
shore line, to the north-west corner of Section 5 ; thence east, along the northern boundary of Section
5, to the north-east corner of said section ; thence south-easterly, in a direct line to the north-west
corner of Section 75 ; thence easterly, along the northern boundary of Sections 75 and 76 to the northeast corner of Section 76 ; thence north, along the eastern boundary of Sections 25 and 26, to the northwest corner of Section 28 ; thence east, along the northern boundary of Sections 28 and 11, to the
north-east corner of Section 11 ; thence south-easterly, along the eastern boundary of Section 11, to the
sea-shore at Oak Bay ; thence following the shore line, in a southerly, westerly, and northerly direction,
to the north-west corner of Section 5—subdivided into wards as follows :—
1. All that portion of land south of the centre of Fort Street, and south and east of the centre of
Cadboro Bay Road to the northern boundary of Section 2, shall be known as James' Bay Ward.
2. All that portion of land north of the centre of Fort Street, and south of the centre of Johnson
Street extended in a right line to the Cadboro Bay Road, shall be known as Yates Street Ward.
3. All those portions of land not included in either James' Bay Ward or Yates Street Ward shall
be known as Johnson Street Ward.
Wellington—2nd May, 1874 :—
All that tract of land included within the lines, commencing at a point at the north-west corner of
Wellington District, on the shore line ; thence in a southerly direction along the western boundaries of
Wellington and Mountain Districts, to the section post between Sections 8 and 9, Range 1, Mountain
District; thence easterly, along said section line, to the south-east corner of Section 9, Range 7 ; thence
northerly, to the boundary line of Mountain District ; thence easterly, along the northern boundary of
Mountain District, to the sea-shore at Departure Bay ; thence northerly and westerly, along the shore
line, to the point of commencement.
Williams Lake—27th May, 1880 :—
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference of a circle whose centre shall be the 150-
Mile Post on the Cariboo Road, and whose radius shall be a distance of seven miles from such mile post.
Yale—25th June, 1869 :—Not defined.
York—31st July, 1874 :—
Township No. 19, New Westminster District. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report.
20. In schools where more than one teacher is employed, to attend all meetings of the
teachers called by the Principal. It shall be the duty of the Principal of a school
to convene a meeting of the teachers associated with him at least once a month,
for conference respecting all the departments of the school.
21. To assist the Superintendent of Education in examining and classifying pupils.
22. To  make  a   statutory  declaration   when   required,   as  to  the  correctness  of the
statistical and other information given by him to the Superintendent of Education.
23. Not to detain any pupil in school during the hour's intermission at noon.
24. Previous to leaving the school to dismiss pupils detained for punishment.
25. To make himself familiar with the Rules that relate to his school duties.
26. Teachers of Ward Schools shall admit as pupils only those who are not farther
advanced than the second reader.
9. The Principal of a School shall have a responsible supervision over the time-tables,
exercises, methods, and general discipline pursued in all its lower grades, and shall, on or before
the 15th day of J uly in each year, send to the Superintendent of Education a report of the
condition and progress of the school, with any suggestions he may deem expedient respecting
its requirements.
10. Assistant teachers shall, when required by their Principal, report to him in writing
any and all matters connected with the workings of their division.
11. Principals must report in writing to the Secretary of the Board of Trustees every
violation by teachers of the Rules aud Regulations prescribed for the government of the Public
Schools, and it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Board of Trustees to immediately
report the same to the Superintendent of Education.
12. No pupil shall be admitted to any public school who has been expelled from any
school, unless by the written authority of the Trustees.
13. No person shall be admitted into, or continue in, any school as a pupil, if he be
afflicted with, or have been exposed to, any contagious disease, until all danger of contagion
shall have passed away, as certified in writing by a medical man, or other authority satisfactory to the teacher.
14. Any school property that may be wilfully injured or destroyed by any pupil shall be
made good forthwith by his parent or guardian.
15. it is required of each and every pupil—
1. That he come to school clean and tidy in his person and clothes ; that he avoid
idleness, profanity, falsehood, deceit, and quarrelling and fighting ; that he be kind
and courteous to his fellows, obedient to his instructors, diligent in his studies ;
and that he conform to the rules of the school.
2. That he present to the teacher an excuse from his parent or guardian for tardiness
or absence from school.
3. That he be present at each examination of his school, or present a satisfactory
excuse for absence.
4. That he do not depart, without the teacher's consent, before the time appointed
for closing the school.
5. That he be amenable to the teacher for any misconduct on the school premises, or
in going to and returning from school.
6. That he come to school with the prescribed school books and school requisites ; but
in case of his inability to comply with this rule, the teacher may, under special
circumstances, supply the necessary books free of cost ; but every such case must
be forthwith reported to the Superintendent of Education.
16. The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no religious dogma or creed shall be
taught. The Lord's Prayer may be used in opening and closing school upon the permission of
the Board of Trustees. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxv.
PART  III.
APPENDICES. 50 Vic Public Schools Report. xxvii.
APPENDIX A
Rules and Regulations for the Government of Public Schools in the
Province of British Columbia.   -
1. The hours of teaching shall be from 9 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.,
from April to September, inclusive ; and from 9.30 a.m., to 12 m. and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.,
from October to March, inclusive.
2. There shall be a recess of fifteen minutes in the middle of each morning's work during
the whole year, aud a recess of ten minutes in the middle of each afternoon's work in the six
months from April to September, inclusive.
3. Every Saturday, Sunday, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Queen's Birthday, Dominion
Day, and Thanksgiving Day shall be a holiday.
4. There shall be two vacations in each year. The Summer vacation shall include the
time from the last Saturday in June to the first Sunday in August; and the Winter vacation
shall continue for the two weeks preceding the first Monday in January after the new year.
2. Three days shall be allowed to each teacher for the purpose of visiting schools: he shall
give at least one week's notice to the Secretary of the Board of Trustees of his intention of
closing the school for this purpose, and must report without delay to the Superintendent of
Education the names of schools visited and time spent in each. These holidays shall not be
taken in June or December.
5. Teachers shall be paid their usual salaries during the vacations and holidays ordered
in Rules 3 and 4.
2. Teachers shall not be paid for other vacations or holidays until accounted for to the
satisfaction of the Education Department.
3, Teachers failing to give the thirty days' notice required by the Act on leaving a school,
shall forfeit one month's salary, unless satisfactory explanations be given.
6. Young children, not being of school age, shall not be allowed to accompany teachers
or pupils.
7. Pupils enrolled in Ward Schools shall not be permitted to attend the Central Schools,
except by promotion at examination held by the Superintendent of Education ; and pupils of
the Central Schools shall not be admitted into Ward Schools.
8. It shall be the duty of every teacher—
1. To keep the school register with care and to call the roll previously to beginning
the regular school work each morning and each afternoon.
2. To inquire into and record all cases of tardiness and absence of pupils.
3. To send to each pupil's parent or guardian a monthly report stating the number
of times he was absent, the number of times he was late, his deportment, his progress in each branch of study, and his rank in his class.
4. To be present in the school-room at least fifteen minutes in the morning, and five
minutes in the afternoon, before the time prescribed for commencing school, to
observe punctually the hours for opening and closing school, and not to allow
recesses to exceed the specified time—that is, from the, time study ceases and
commences again.
5. To keep a Visitor's Book (which he shall ask the Trustees to provide), and to
enter therein the visits made to his school, and to allow any visitor who so choose*
to make therein any remarks suggested by his visit.
6. To receive visitors courteously and to afford them every information, Public Schools Report. 1886
7. At all times to give to the trustees access to the registers and visitors' book, and
to deliver up the same to their order upon his ceasing to be employed by them.
8. On the last day of each half-year (unless otherwise arranged with the Department)
to hold a public examination of his school, of which notice shall be given to the
trustees, and to the parents through the pupils.
Provided, however, that in the cities of Nanaimo, New Westminster, and
Victoria, the semi-annual examinations shall be held during the last week of each
session as follows :—
Girls'   School Wednesday.
Boys'       „       Thursday.
High       „       Friday.
The Public examination of Ward Schools shall be held alternately during the
forenoon of the above mentioned days, and if rendered necessary by the establishment of additional Ward Schools, on the other days of the last week of each
session.
Each teacher in these cities shall be required to attend the other public examinations held after the closing of his school.
9. To furnish to the Superintendent of Education monthly, or when desired, any
information which it may be in his power to give respecting anything connected
with the operations of his school, or in anywise affecting its interest or character.
10. To teach diligently and faithfully.
11. To classify the pupils according to their respective abilities.
12. To practice such discipline as may be exercised by a kind, firm, and judicious
parent in his family, avoiding corporal punishment, except when it shall appear
to him to be imperatively necessary ; and then a record of the offence and the
punishment shall be made in the school register for the inspection of trustees.
13. No teacher shall compel the services of pupils for his own private benefit or
convenience.
14. For gross misconduct, or a violent or a wilful opposition to authority, the teacher
may suspend a pupil from attending school, forthwith informing the parent or
guardian of the fact and the reason of it ; but no pupil shall be expelled without
the authority of the trustees.
15. When the example of any pupil is very hurtful, and reformation appears hopeless,
it shall be the duty of the teacher, with the approbation of the trustees, to expel
such pupil from the school ; but any pupil under public censure who shall express
to the teacher his regret for such a course of conduct, as openly and explicitly as
the case, may require, shall, with the approbation of the trustees and teacher, be
re-admitted to the school.
16. Subject to the arrangements of the Board of Trustees, to see that the school-house
is kept in proper order in respect of cleanliness, heating, and ventilation, and
especially that the school-room is ready for the reception of pupils at least fifteen
minutes before the time for opening the school.
17. To daily inspect the yards and outhouses, and report to the Trustees, and to see
that the school-house and premises are locked at all proper times, and to exercise
vigilance over the school property, the buildings, outhouses, fences, apparatus,
books, «kc, so that, they may not receive unnecessary injury, and to give prompt
notice in writing to the Secretary of the Trustees of any such injury.
18. To keep in a conspicuous place in the  school-room a time-table, showing the order
of exercises for each day in the week, and the time devoted to each per day.
19. Not to be absent from the school without permission of the Board of Trustees,
unless in case of sickness, in which case the absence is to be immediately reported
to the Secretary. N.B.—All absences, with reasons for the same, shall be reported
monthly to the Superintendent of Education. xxx.
Public Schools Report.
1886
APPENDIX B.
Regulations for the Examination of Public School Teachers in the Province
of  British Columbia for the Year 1887.
[Approved by His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor  10th December, 1886.\
I.—Time and Place of Examination
1. The examination of candidates for certificates of qualification  to  teach  in  the   Public
Schools shall commence on Monday, July 4th, 1887, at   10 a.m.
2. The examination shall be conducted according to the following schedule :—
Date.
Subject.
Forenoon.
AKTEKNOO!*
July 4, Monday Optional Subjects      10 to 12.30   Latin j 2 to 4.30
.   ,„       . „      ,.    ,   ,,,   ,, ,,, .    ,,, ori   ; (English Literature  2 to 3.30
„   5,   Tuesday...  Practical  Mathematics     10 to 12-30   !J Ancient History  3.30 to 5
,,   6, Wednesday Algebra     10 to 12.30   IBook-keeping  2 to 4.30
Mensuration  2 to 4.30
„   7, Thursday. . :Euclid  10 to 12.30
,,   8,  Friday Natural Philosophy  10 to 12.30
,,   9, Saturday.. . Arithmetic  10 to 12.30
,, 11, Monday. . . English Grammar  10 to 12.30
„ 12, Tuesday. .. .Education and Art of Teaching 10 to 12.30
/M
I 'Reading  !    4.30 to 5
\ English History  !   2 to 4.30
'/ *Reading *  4.30 to 5
\ Geography  i    2 to 4.30
I 'Reading  !   4.30 to 5
i Mental Arithmetic  ',   2 to 2.45
-! Composition  [2.45 to 4.30
( 'Reading  4,30 to 5
j Writing  2 to 4
I 'Reading  4 to 5
"13,  Wednesday- ] g>^|
9.30 to 11
11 to
•As many of the candidates examined as time will permit.
3. The examination shall take place in Victoria, and such other place or places as the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall appoint.
II.— Notice and Testimonials.
1. Every candidate for examination shall send in to the Superintendent of Education, ten
days before the examination, a notice stating the class and grade of certificate for which he is
a candidate (and if necessary his selection of one of the subjects of examination numbered 20,
21, 22), and the description of any certificate he may already possess.
2. Every candidate's notice of intention to be examined must be accompanied by such
testimonials certifying to the temperate habits and good moral character of the candidate as
shall be satisfactory to the Examiners.
HI. Rules to be Observed by Candidates during Examination
1. Candidates must be in their allotted places before the hour appointed for the commencement of the examination.
2. No candidate shall be allowed to leave the examination room within one hour of the
issue of the examination paper in any subject; and, if he then leave, he shall not be permitted
to return during the examination of the subject then in hand. 30 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxi
3. No candidate shall be permitted, on any pretence whatever, to enter the examination
room after the expiration of an hour from the commencement of the examination.
1.  The order to stop writing must be obeyed immediately.
5. No candidate shall give or receive assistance of any kind in answering the examination
questions. He shall neither copy from another himself, nor allow another to copy from him.
He shall not take into the examination room any book, or paper, or slate, or anything else
from which he might derive assistance in the examination. He shall not talk or whisper.
Detection in the breach of these Rules will render the candidate liable not only to the loss of
the whole examination then in progress, but also to the withdrawal or forfeiture of his certificate at any time afterwards, should the discovery be then made that these Rules have been
broken by him.
6. Every candidate shall use the distinguishing number assigned him by the Examiners
in place of his name, and shall write thir number distinctly at the top of each page of his
answer papers. He shall not write his name or initials, or any particular sign or mark of
identification other than this distinguishing number.
7. Candidates, in preparing their answers, will write on one side only of each sheet.
8. Every candidate, preparatorily to his surrendering his answer papers to the Examiners,
shall arrange them in the order of the questions; shall fold them twice, neatly and evenly, in
the direction of the ruled lines; and shall write the subject of the examination paper on the
outside sheet, and his distinguishing number.
9. After the answer papers are once handed in, no candidate shall be allowed to make
any alteration of any kind in them.
IV.—General Conditions.
1. Candidates must furnish satisfactory proofs of temperate habits and good moral
character.
2. No male candidate less than eighteen years of age, and no female candidate less than
sixteen, shall be a granted a certificate to teach, but such persons may be allowed to undergo
the examination and obtain a certificate of standing.
V.—Certificates of Qualification.
The following shall be the classes and grades of certificates:—
1. Temporary Certificate.
2. Third Glass,  Grade  B, Certificate.
3. Third Class,  Grade A, ,,
4. Second Class, Grade B, ,,
5. Second Class, Grade A, „
6. First   Class,   Grade B,
7. First   Class,   Grade A, ,,
VI.—Value and Duration of Certificates.
1. A Temporary Certificate, valid until the next examination of teachers, shall entitle the
holder to teach temporarily in any school.
2. A Third Class Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to teach in any
Public School in which one teacher is employed, or as an assistant in one in which more than
one is employed.
3. A Second Class Certificate, valid for three years, shall entitle the holder to hold any
position in any Public School.
4. A First Class, Grade B, Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to hold
any position in any Public School, or to act as an assistant in a High School.
5. A First Class, Grade A, Certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to hold
any position in any Public or High School. xxxii. Public Schools Report. 1886
VII.-Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1. Reading.—To read intelligently and expressively.
2. Writing.—To write legibly and neatly, and to understand the principles of writing as
given in Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
3. Spelling.—To be able to spell correctly.
4. Arithmetic.—To be thoroughly familiar with arithmetic, and to be able to work
problems in the various rules.
5. Mental Arithmetic.—To show readiness and accuracy in solving problems in mental
arithmetic.
6. Geography.—To have a good knowledge of the geography of the world.
7. Grammar.—To show a thorough knowledge of grammar, and to analyze and parse any
English sentence.
8. History.—To have a good knowledge of the history of the British Empire.
9. Composition.—To be familiar with the forms of letter writing, and to be able to write
a prose composition on any simple subject, correctly as to expression, spelling and punctuation.
10. Education.—To have a thorough knowledge of the approved modes of teaching the
various subjects of the school curriculum, and to be well acquanted with school management—
including school buildings and arrangements, classification of pupils, formation of time-tables,
and modes of discipline, and to be familiar with the School Act and regulations, especially
respecting the office of teacher.
VIII.—First Class, Grade B, Certificate.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
11. Book-keeping.—To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration.—To be familiar with the principal rules for the mensuration of surfaces.
13. Algebra.—To understand the principles relating to simple and quadratic equations,
and the solution of problems giving rise to such equations.
14. Euclid.—Books I. and II., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy.—To be acquainted with the properties of matter, and with the
elementary principles of statics.
IX.—First Class, Grade A, Certificate.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
11. Book-keeping.—-To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration.   -To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
13. Algebra.—To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
14. Euclid.—-Books I., II., III., IV., Defs. of V., and Book VI., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy.—To have a good knowledge of Statics, Dynamics, and Hydrostatics.
16. English Literature.
17. Ancient History.—To have a general knowledge of Ancient History from the Creation
to the fall of Rome. 50 Vic Public Schools Report. xxxiii.
18. Practical Mathematics.—To be versed in right and oblique angled trigonometry, and
to have a fair knowledge of land surveying and navigation.
19. Latin.—To be. able to translate and parse the following:—Csesar, DeBello Gallico,
Books I., II., and III.; Horace, Odes, Book I., Ars Poetica : Virgil, ^Eneid, Books I., II.,
and III.
20. Greek.—To be able to translate and parse the following :—Xenophon, Anabasis,
Books I., II., and III. ; Homer, Iliad, Books I., II., and III.
21. French.—To be able to translate and parse the following :—Voltaire, Histoire de
Charles XII., Books I., II., and III. ; Corneille, Le Cid.
22. Natural Sciences.—To have a fair knowledge of one of the natural sciences.
Candidates shall be allowed to select one of the subjects numbered 20, 21, 22, in which to
be examined.
X.—Conditions of Obtaining Certificates.
1. For a Temporary Certificate. A candidate for a temporary certificate must give satisfactory information as to his character and scholastic qualifications, and must forward an
application from a Board of School Trustees desiring his services as teacher.
2. For a Third Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the,
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
3. For a Third Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 50 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
4. For a Second Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
5. For a Second Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 70 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
6. For a First Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and grade, 50
per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the
subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade.
7. For a First Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and grade, 50
per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to all
the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade, provided always that he obtain at
least 40 per cent, of the marks attached to the Latin paper ; or he must be a graduate of some
British University, who has proceeded regularly to his degree, and must satisfy the Examiners
of his knowledge of the art of teaching and school discipline and management.
8. Every First Class, Grade A, Certificate, and every First Class, Grade B, Certificate,
about to expire, shall be renewed from year to year by the Examiners, on the application of
the holder of any such expiring certificate, provided such certificate shall in the range and
scope of each subject, and of all subjects, fully satisfy the conditions of the examination in
progress at the time of such application for renewal. Provided also, that the applicant
produce satisfactory proof of success as a teacher during the time his certificate has been in
force, if he has been engaged in teaching during that period.
9. Whenever it shall be deemed necessary to raise the standard of examination, at least
twelve months' notice of such intention shall be given. xxxiv. Public Schools Report. 1886
XI.—Fixed Standard Marks of Value Attached to Subjects of Examination.
Marks.
1. Reading -. 50
2. Writing  100
3. Spelling  100
4. Arithmetic     200
5. Mental Arithmetic  100
6. Geography  200
7. Grammar  200
8. History (English)  200
9. Composition  200
10. Education     200
11. Book-keeping ' 200
12. Mensuration ......  200
13. Algebra  200
14. Euclid  200
15. Natural Philosophy  200
16. English Literature  200
17. Ancient History  200
18. Practical Mathematics  200
19. Latin   200
20. 21,  22.    Greek or French, or one of the Natural Sciences  200
XII.—Candidates who fail to obtain First Class Certificates shall not be awarded  marks
for answers to the papers set for those certificates. 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxix.
2. Mathematics:—
(a.) Arithmetic, including simple and compound rules, vulgar and decimal fractions,
proportion, interest, percentage in its various applications, square root and cube root.
(6.) Algebra, including elementary rules, factoring, greatest common measure, least
common multiple, square root, fractions, and simple equations of one, two, and three
unknown quantities.
(c.) Euclid, Book I., with easy exercises.
(d.) Mensuration, including lengths of lines, and areas of plane figures.
(«.) Natural Philosophy (Statics), including properties of matter, composition and
resolution of forces, centre of gravity, mechanical powers.
3. Modern Languages.—French—grammar and exercises, and elementary reader.
4. Ancient  Languages:—
(a.) Latin—Grammar and exercises.
(b.) Greek—Grammar and exercises (optional).
5. History:—
(«,.) Leading events of English History.
(6.) Roman History to the death of Augustus.
6. Geography.—A fair course of elementary geography, mathematical, physical, and
political. Map geography generally—that of Canada and that of the British Empire more
particularly.
7. Book-keeping and   Writing:—
(a.) Single Entry and principles of Double Entry.
(6.) Practice in writing according to the principles contained in Payson, Dunton, and
Scribner's copy-books, or Gage's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of Music,
9. Natural Science:—
(a.) Elementary Botany.
(6.) Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene.
Senior Division.
1. English Language.—The subject generally, including derivation of words, composition,
rendering of poetry into prose, abstracts of selected passages, critical reading of portions of the
works of standard authors, themes, and generally the formation of a good English style.
2. Mathematics.
(a.) Arithmetic generally, with duodecimals and metrical system.
(6.) Algebra. Quadratics, surds, proportion, progressions, permutations, and combinations, Binomial theorem, cube root and properties of numbers.
(c.) Euclid.   Books I., II., III., IV.; definitions of Book V., and Book VI., with exercises.
(d.) Trigonometry.    Plane Trigonometry.
(e.) Mensuration.    Volumes of solids and areas of surfaces, and surveying.
(/) Natural Philosophy. Pressure of liquids, specific gravity and modes of determining-
it ; the thermometer, barometer, siphon, common pump, forcing pump, air pump,
statics, hydrostatics, and dynamics.
3. Modem Languages.—French—Grammar and exercises ; Voltaire, Historie de Charles
XII., Corneille, Le Cid.
4. Ancient Languages:— -
(a.) Latin—Prose Composition, Ca-sar, De Bello Gallico, Book I.; Virgil, iEneid,
Book I.; Horace, Odes, Book I.
(6.) Greek—Grammar and Prose Composition Xenophon, Anabasis, Book I.; Homer,
Iliad, Book I. (optional). 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxv.
APPENDIX 0.
Chapter I.
School Meetings in School Districts.
1.—Notice of Meetings.
1.—The notice calling an annual or special meeting may be signed by the secretary by
direction of the trustees, or by a majority of the trustees themselves. Copies of such notices
shall be put up in at least three of the most public places in the district, at least ten days
before the time of holding the meeting.
II.—Proceedings at Annual Meetings in Rural Districts.
Meetings, how organized.
1. The senior or other trustee present shall, at the proper hour (11 o'clock), call the
meeting to order, and request the voters present to appoint a chairman and secretary from
among themselves.
The chairman, on election, shall at once take the chair, and shall preserve order and
decorum, and shall decide questions of order, subject to an appeal to the meeting. The chairman's power of voting shall be limited to the casting vote. In case of an equality of votes,
the chairman must give the casting vote.
The secretary shall record in writing all the votes and proceedings of the meeting.
Order of Business at Annual Meetings.
2. The following shall be the order of business at the meeting:—
(1.) Calling the meeting to order.
(2.) Election of chairman and secretary.
(3.) Reading of trustees' annual report, including statement of receipts and expenditure.
(4.) Receiving and deciding upon trustees' report.
(5.) Election of trustee to fill the vacancy at the end of the past year.
(6.) Election of trustee or trustees to fill any other vacancy.
(7.)  Any other business of which due notice has been given.
Rules of Order to be observed at Annual Meetings.
3. The following rules of order should be observed at the meetings :—
(1.)  Addressing Chairman.—Every   voter   shall   rise   previously  to   speaking,   and
address himself to the chairman.
(2.)  Order of Speaking.—-When two or more voters rise at once, the chairman shall
name the voter who shall speak first, when the other voter or voters shall next
have the right to address the meeting in the order named by the chairman.
(3.) Motion to be read.—A voter may require the question or motion under discussion
to be read for his information  at any time, but not so as to interrupt a voter
who may be speaking.
(4.) Speaking Twice.—No voter shall speak more than twice on the same question
or amendment, without leave of the meeting, except in explanation of something
which may have been misunderstood, or until every one choosing to speak shall
have spoken.
(5.)   Voting.—The chairman shall take the votes by poll; and the names of all voters
who may present themselves shall be recorded; such  poll to remain open till
three o'clock, when the chairman shall declare the result. xxxvi. Public Schools Report. 1886
(6.) Voters.—In case objection is made to the right of a person to vote, the chairman
shall require the person whose vote is questioned to make the declaration pro
vided by law; after making it the vote must be received and recorded without
further question; but if such person refuses to make such declaration his vote
is to be rejected.
(7.) Protests.—No protest against an election or other proceedings of the meeting
shall be received hy the chairman. All protests must be sent to the Superintendent of Education within twenty days at least after the meeting.
(8.) Adjournment.— A motion to adjourn a school meeting shall always be in order,
provided that no second motion to the same effect shall be made until some intermediate proceedings shall have been had.
(9.) Motion to be made in writing (if requiredj and seconded.—A motion cannot be
put from the chair, or debated, unless the same be in writing (if required by the
chairman), and seconded.
(10.) Withdrawal of Motion.—After a motion has been announced or read by the
chairman, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the meeting; but may be
withdrawn at any time before decision by consent of the meeting.
(11.) Kind of Motion to be received.—When a motion is under debate no other motion
shall be received, unless to amend it, or to postpone it, or for adjournment.
(12.) Order of putting Motion. —All questions shall be put in the order in which they
are moved. Amendments shall be put before the main motion, the last amendment first, and so on.
(13.) Reconsidering Motion.—Amotion to reconsider a vote may be made by any
voter at the same meeting; but no vote of reconsideration shall be taken more
than once at the same meeting.
Close of Meeting.
4. The poll at every election of a trustee shall not be kept open after three o'clock in the
afternoon.
Transmission of Minutes.
5. At the close of the proceedings, the chairman and secretary should sign the minutes,
as entered by the secretary in the minute book ; and the secretary of the board of trustees
must forthwith transmit a correct copy of such minutes, signed by himself, to the Superintendent of Education.
Special School Meeting.
6. As far as possible, special school meetings shall be conducted in the same way as annual
school meetings.
III.—Registration of Voters in City Districts.
[Extracts from "Public School Act, 1885."]
" Sec. 23. Any person registered as a voter, as hereinafter provided, shall be eligible to
vote at any school meeting held in such District, and in the ward in which he is registered, for
the election of Trustees ; provided, always, that it shall not be lawful for any person to vote
for Trustees in more than one ward in any City School District.
" Sec. 24. In the City School Districts a register of voters for the registration of voters
shall he opened on the first day of July in each year, and shall be closed after the 31st day of
May in the following year. Such register shall be kept in the City of Victoria by the Superintendent of Education ; in the Cities of New Westminster and Nanaimo by the Government
Agents. Provided always that for the year 1885 the register shall be opened on the passage
of this Act, and closed after the 31st day of May, 1885.
" Sec. 25. Any householder or freeholder resident in any ward of any City School District
for a period of six months previous to the application to register, and the wife of any such
householder or freeholder, shall be entitled to be registered as a voter for the election of
Trustees in the ward in which he or she resides. Provided Chinese and Indians shall not be
registered." 50 Vic. Public Schools Report. xxxvii.
Chapter II.
Powers and Duties of Trustees.
[These are defined in the " Public School Act, 1885."]
The following regulations are further prescribed for the guidance of trustees :—
1. Trustees cannot give authority to teachers to violate the Rules and Regulations in any
particular.
Appointment of Teacher.
2. Notice of appointment of a teacher to a school should be given him in writing, such
notice specifying the day on which his duties as teacher commence. Trustees cannot appoint
as teacher a person who does not hold a certificate from the Educational Department of this
Province.
Dismissal of Teacher.
3. Notice of intention to dismiss a teacher should be given him in writing, at least thirty
days before such dismissal is to take place.
Superintendent of Education to be notified of appointment or dismissal of 'Teacher.
4. Notice of the appointment or dismissal of a teacher must be forthwith transmitted to
the Superintendent of Education, with the date on which the appointment or dismissal takes
effect.
Care of School-house.
5. Trustees should appoint one of their number whose duty it should be to see that the
school-house is kept in good repair. He should see that the windows are properly filled with
glass ; that at the proper season the stove and pipe, or fireplace, are in good condition, and that
suitable wood or coal is provided ; that the desks and seats are in good repair; that the outhouses are properly provided with doors and kept clean ; that the blackboards are kept painted,
the water supply abundant, and that everything is provided necessary for the comfort of the
pupils and the success of the school.
Use of School-house.
6. No public school-house or school-plot, or any building, furniture, or other thing pertaining thereto, should be used or occupied for any other purpose than for the use or accommodation of the public school of the district, without the express permission of the trustees as
a corporation, and then only after school hours and on condition that all damages be made
good, and cleaning and sweeping properly done.
The teacher has charge of the school-house on behalf of the trustees. He has no authority
to use the school-house other than as directed by them, or to make use of it at any other time
than during school hours without their sanction. At the request of the trustees he must at
once deliver up the school-house key to them.
Expenses of Schools.
7. It is the duty of the trustees to decide what incidental expenses they shall incur for
their school, but they are required to submit such matters (Public School Act, 1885, sec. 7,
sub-sec. 3 ; Revenue Act, 1879, sec. 36),  to the Government for approval.
Extract from  "Revenue Act, 1879."
"36. Before an account is paid by the Deputy Treasurer, or finally placed to the credit of a Sub-
Accountant, or any other person, in repayment of an advance, or in accounting for any portion of revenue by
charging the amount to the head of service, the Auditor must examine the account and endorse thereon the
head of service, number of vote, or authority to which the sum or sums is chargeable, marking his initials
against the total amount to certify to its correctness and that a warrant has been issued."
June, 1879.
The annual reports required of trustees must be received at Education Office before
vouchers for the incidental expenses of schools will be certified. Public Schools 'Report. 1886
APPENDIX D.
-o-
Ohapter I.
Course of Study prescribed for Graded and Common Schools.
Reading, Writing, Spelling, Dictation, Mental Arithmetic, Written Arithmetic, Geography,
English Grammar, English History, Composition, and Letter Writing.
The following subjects may be taught:
Book-keeping; Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene; Drawing; Mensuration; Algebra;
and Euclid.
Chapter   II.
Subjects of Examination for Admission to a  High   School.
1. Spelling.—To be able to spell correctly the ordinary words in the Fifth Reader and
Spelling Book.
2. Reading.—To read correctly and intelligently any passage in the Fifth Reader.
3. Writing.—To write neatly and legibly.
4. Arithmetic.—To have a good general knowledge of numeration, notation, the four simple
and compound rules, reduction, vulgar and decimal fractions, proportion, simple interest and
percentage, compound interest, and discount.
5. Mental Arithmetic.—To be able to solve, mentally, any ordinary problems.
6. Grammar.—To know the principal grammatical forms and definitions, and to be able
to analyze and parse any ordinary sentence.
7. Geography.—To have a good knowledge of the earth's planetary relations, of the general
principles of physical geography, and of the outlines of the maps of Europe, Asia, Africa,
America, Oceanica, and of the British Empire, and more particularly of that of the Dominion
of Canada.
8. History.—To know the different periods and outlines of English History.
9. Composition.—To be able to write a letter correctly as to form and punctuation, and to
write a brief composition on any simple subject.
Chapter III.
Course of Study in High Schools.
English Course.—All subjects prescribed for Graded and Common Schools—Anatomy,
Physiology, and Hygiene.
Commercial Course.—Book-keeping—Single and Double Entry—including Banking,
Commercial Correspondence, Commercial Law, &c, together with all subjects prescribed for
the English Course, and other subjects in which candidates for First Class, Grade B, Certificates
are examined.
Classical Course.—Latin, Greek, French, together with all subjects in which Candidates
for First Class, Grade A, Certificates are examined.
Course of Study in the Victoria High School—Junior Division.
English Language.—Review of elementary work in orthography, etymology, syntax, and
analysis of sentences; derivation of words; rendering of poetry into prose; composition, including the framing of sentences, familiar and business letters, and abstracts of passages in
readers, themes, and generally the formation of a good English style; reading; dictation; and
elocution, including the learning by heart and recitation of selected passages from standard
authors.

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