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EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT ON THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 1878-79. BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly. 1880

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Full Text

 Eighth Annual Report
ON THE
PUBLIC   SCHOOLS
OF  THE  PROVINCE  OF
British  Columbia.
1878-79.
BY  THE
SUPERINTENDENT  OF  EDUCATION.
With %$pn&tyt%.
"VICTORIA: Printed by Richard Wolfexdes, Govororafcat Printer,
at the Government Printing Office, James" Ssy-
1880.
12  43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 159
PART I.
General Report.  48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 161
Annual Report
OF THE
Superintendent of Education.
1878-79.
Education Office, Victoria.
The Hon. T. B. Humphreys,
Provincial Secretary.
In accordance with the "Public School Act, 1879," I beg to submit, for the information of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, the Report on the condition of the Public
Schools of the Province of British Columbia for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1879.
Schools and School Districts remain the same in number as they were at the time
of the last Eeport.
The children enrolled in all the schools during the year number 2,301, with a daily
average attendance of 1,315.9. This average shows an apparent decrease of nearly 80
on the previous year; it is, however,*a decrease which may be accounted for from the
more accurate manner in which school statistics are now made out.
The cost of education for the eleven months ending 30th June has been $43,311.92;
the cost of each pupil based on the total enrolment of pupils $18.82; and that on their
average daily attendance $32.91, for the same time.
At the commencement of the school-year this department was under the direct
supervision of a Board of Education. This board consisted of seven members, and
included the Superintendent of Education, who was also ex officio Chairman and Secretary of the Board. On the 26th August, John Jessop, Esq., who then held this position,
handed in his resignation to the Hon. the Provincial Secretary. Mr. Jessop's resignation was accepted on the 28th of the same month.
The voluntary resignations of the Board of Education and of their Chairman led to
my appointment as Superintendent of Education on the 9th September, 1878, and I have
thus held the position for the space of one year. I have striven during that time to
promote in every possible way the best educational interests of the Province, and have
endeavoured to carry out the spirit and letter of the School Act. Every attempt to alter
or improve the previously existing state of things has, however, met with strenuous and
determined opposition from some quarter or other, and not less from teachers than from
others. Under the former regime, these as a body were allowed the utmost freedom
and latitude in the internal and external management of their schools, and the quotation
"Every man did that which was right in his own eyes" not inaptly describes the state
of affairs as it then existed and so far as it concerned them. They chose their own time
for opening their schools, absented themselves when they pleased and on trivial grounds,
and closed their schools early or late as it suited their convenience ; children went to
school from the beginning to the end of the year, and in most cases, except perhaps the
teacher, no one, whether parent, trustee, superintendent, or board knew what progress
was being made or what was the actual condition of things. The annual reports of
trustees in the parts filled in by teachers were full of inaccuracies. Teachers to this
day manifest the utmost reluctance to make corrections to these reports, and in some
cases evince a sublime indifference as to whether they are made out at all. On the
whole I cannot forbear from saying that the utmost carelessness and indifference exist
among teachers as to whether the statistical and other information they supply is at all
accurate, and if their zeal educationally is to be gauged by the amount of it they display 162 Public Schools Report. 1879
in their communications with the Education Office, the Province has need to demand of
its servants a thorough reformation in both.
My first care as Superintendent of Education was the preparation of the School
Report of 1877-78. Instead of falling still-born from the press, like previous reports,
the issue of that document was the signal for a series of violent attacks. Its grammar
was criticised, its facts were disputed, and its suggestions were weighed in the balances
and declared to be found wanting. No necessity exists for a defence of the Report on any
of those points, but, before dismissing this question, I must here reiterate the assertion in
the Report on which the attack was principally grounded, namely, that certificates had
not been altogether impartially granted by the late Board of Education, and say in
addition that the revocation of these certificates is imperatively called for.
Owing to the absence of the usual grant for the travelling expenses of the Superintendent, I was unable to visit any but the Victoria schools until after the rising of the
House. I however endeavoured, until the omission was remedied, to become acquainted
with the interests and wants of every district and school, and by constant correspondence laboured to keep up the interest of all. With this object in view and in order to
remedy as far as possible the defect under which the department labours from the
difficulty of inspection, 1 have instituted a system of monthly reporting to the Education
Office, by means of which I am kept informed of all that happens in relation to school
matters in school districts.
To secure the co-operation of trustee-boards, the same monthly information as that
furnished to the Superintendent is also furnished to trustees. Every teacher is furthermore required to report monthly on each child attending his school to his or her parent.
Parent, trustee, and superintendent are thus in constant communication with the teacher,
and it is hoped that the evils of defective inspection are by these means somewhat
guarded against.
With the object of assimilating the internal workings of our system of education
with those of the other Provinces, and in order to make provision on points not previously provided for, the following documents have been framed and issued :—Eules
and Eegulations for the Government of Public Schools; Course of Study for the Victoria
High School; Subjects of Examination for admission to High School; Eegulations for
admission to the High School; Books authorized for use in the High School, in addition
to those already authorized for Public Schools; Eegulations for the Examination of
Public School Teachers ; and Directions for holding School Meetings in Districts.
The annual examination of teachers was this year postponed from the usual time
in July to December. The reasons for this change will be gathered from the following
letter to the Hon. the Provincial Secretary:—
" 15th May, 1879.
"Sir,—I beg to bring under your consideration the fixing of the time at which the
examination of teachers is to be held for the year 1879. This examination has always
been held in the month of July, the month during which the summer holidays of the
Public Schools are kept throughout the Province, and the advantage of this arrangement
is obvious. This year, however, the change in the School Act fixing a limit of four
years as the duration of first-class certificates has rendered liable to re-examination the
holders of such certificates given in 1875 and previously to that date. The shortness of
the time for preparation in their case would operate to their disadvantage. The number
of applicants for situations in schools is also not sufficiently great to allow of the weeding
out of the less competent teachers to the intent of supplying their places by those better
qualified. An extension of th6 time for preparation would eliminate fewer of the latter
and would do full justice to the former, by giving them ample time to study with the
object of recovering the same grade of certificate as that unexpectedly recalled. Furthermore, as it would be scarcely desirable to issue fresh certificates under the old
programme of examination, a two-months' notification, at most, of a new programme
would be scarcely sufficient for enabling teachers of any grade to come properly prepared for examination. For these reasons, and, I believe, for the advantage of the
educational interests of the Province, I would beg to recommend that the time for the
examination of teachers for 1879 be changed from the month of July to the month of
December.   I have, &c.
(Signed)       "C. C. McKenzie,
"Superintendent oj Education." 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 168
The time having been extended to December, all teachers in whose interest this
extension was made were notified of the fact in the following letter:—-"The time for
the examination ot teachers for 1879 has been fixed by Order in Council for December.
It is expected that this extension of time for preparation will enable every candidate for
a certificate to pass far more creditably than he or she might have done had the examination taken place at the usual time in July."
The Legislature at its session in February revoked all previous Education Acts,
and in lieu passed the "Public School Act, 1879," the principal provisions of which, as
distinguished from those of the "Consolidated School Act, 1876," may be epitomized as
follows :—
I.—Provisions of old Act abolished. II.—Provisions added in new Act. III.—Provisions found in old Act but modified in the new.
I.—Provisions of old Act abolished:—1. For a Board of Education; 2. For duties
or powers of Board of Education not revived or transferred; (a) to fix salaries of
teachers; (6) to purchase apparatus; (c) to recommend allowances of $100 each to
teachers in training while at a High School.
II.—Provisions added in new Act:—1. For the appointment by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council of paid examiners to examine teachers and grant certificates of
qualification to teach, countersigned by the Provincial Secretary ; 2, For the temporary
appointment of a paid inspector to visit any school and report on the same; 3. For the
granting by the Superintendent of Education of temporary certificates, countersigned
by the Provincial Secretary ; 4. For the teacher's furnishing monthly information to the
Superintendent of Education respecting his school; 5. For the teacher's furnishing
monthly information to parents respecting each of their children attending school;
6. For the teacher's making affidavit as to the correctness of bis reports to the Superintendent of Education ; 7. For the teacher's giving thirty days' notice to the trustees of
his intention to resign; 8. For trustees to locate one school in a central position, in the
place of two in a district, or to close one of two such schools.
III.—Provisions found in old Act and modified in new:—1. For duties formerly
belonging to Board of Education transferred to the Superintendent of Education;
(a) the prescribing of text-books; (6) the making of rules and regulations ; (c) the care
of apparatus purchased; (d) the establishment of separate schools for females; and
(e) the closing of schools having an average of less than ten; 2. For trustees to dismiss
teachers by giving them thirty days' notice of dismissal, instead of, as formerly, by
obtaining consent of Board of Education ; 3. For placing High Schools under local
trustees of districts, instead of, as formerly, under Board of Education ; 4. For trustees
to report, in their annual report, the number of children residing in their school district
over six years of age and under eighteen, instead of, as formerly, over five years of ago
and under sixteen; 5. For the granting of first-class certificates, to be good for four
years, instead of, as formerly, to be valid until revoked ; 6. For the closing of schools
having an average of less than ten, without, as formerly, leaving this closing to the
discretion of the Board of Education; 7. For the trustees of any boarding school to
appoint and dismiss teachers of such school, with the consent of the Superintendent of
Education, instead of, as formerly, vesting such appointment and dismissal in the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
The clause for the payment of the current expenses of schools struck out of the
"Consolidated Public School Act, 1876," in the session of April, 1878, was also reintroduced into the "Public School Act, 1879."
I have here also to note another step taken in legislation, and one on which we
must congratulate ourselves, namely, the setting apart of lands for educational purposes.
Section 9 of the " Land Amendment Act, 1879," under the head " Educational Endowments," reads as follows:—"And whereas it is expedient to make provision in aid of
education in the Province; therefore Sections 16 and 2Mn each and every Township
hereafter surveyed throughout the Province, shall be and are hereby set apart as an
endowment for the purposes of education,"
Instead of presenting a synopsis of each of the statistical tables accompanying this
report, I proceed to give the following abstract of all:— 164
Public Schools Report.
1879
Statistical Abstract.
School population of the Province	
Increase for the year 	
Number of pupils enrolled in all the schools during the year
Increase for the year	
Number of boys enrolled	
Increase for the year	
Number of girls enrolled	
Increase for the year	
Average daily attendance for the year.	
Decrease for the year	
Number attending private schools 	
Increase for the year	
Number of children not attending any school 	
Increase for the year.
Total enrollment in High School.
for High School	
. for Common Schools.
Increase for the year	
Number of boys enrolled in High School	
Do.     girls do. do.        	
Average daily attendance in      do.        	
Decrease for the year	
Total enrolment in common schools	
Increase for the year	
Average daily attendance in common schools	
Decrease for the year	
Percentage of attendance in all the Public Schools	
Do. do. do.       High School	
Do. do. do.       Common Schools	
Average daily attendance per teacher in all the Public Schools  	
Do. do. do. do.        High School	
Do. do. do. do.        Common Schools 	
Average daily attendance per teacher in the Common Schools of Nanaimo,
New Westminster, and Victoria , ,	
Average daily attendance per teacher in the rest of the Common Schools-
Number of School Districts      	
Do. do.     Houses used 	
Do. do. do.
Do. do. do.
Do.  of brick buildings	
Do.  of frame or wood buildings	
Do.  of log buildings    	
Do.  of rented or rent free school houses	
Do.  of pupils taught in rented or rent free buildings.
Amount paid for rent	
Number of teachers in all the Public Schools	
Number of teachers in the High School	
Number of teachers in all the Common Schools	
Number of male teachers	
Number of female teachers	
Cost of education for 11 months of year	
Proportionate decrease for the year	
Total of teachers' salaries fdr 11 months of year	
Proportionate increase for the year	
Total of incidental expenses for 11 months of year	
Proportionate decrease for the year 	
Total of expenditure for building	
Total of expenditure for rent for 11 months ,	
Total of expenditure for insurance	
'Total number of teachers employed during the year	
Total number of teachers employed on permanent staff...
Not known
Not known
2,301
103
1,263
21
1,038
82
1,315.9
79.6
Not known
Not known
Not known
Not known
76
15
54
22
43.62
6.53
2,225
88
1,272.28
73.07
57.2
57.4
57.15
22 68
21.81
'    22.72
37
16.21
44
52
1
51
1
34
8
9
195
$110
58
2
56
33
25
$43,311 92
905 77
36,892 24
514 08
1,783 08
1,444 12
2,464 75
110 00
679 93
68
58 43 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
165
Schedule of Salaries of all Teachers employed during the year.
1   at $125
1   at  110
3   at  100
5   at  90
1   at  85
1   at  83*
3   at  80
1   at  75
7   at  70
1 at  65
19 at  60
5   at  55
19 at  50
2 at  45
1 at  40
2 .at  20
Schedule of Salaries of Teachers on
present staff.
1   at $110
3   at  90
1   at  85
1 at  83i
2 at  80
1   at  75
6   at  70
18at  60
5  at  55
19at  50
1   at  45
Average monthly salary of all teachers employed  $       59 14
Average monthly salary of all teachers on present staff.  61 26
Highest salary (present) of a teacher  110 00
Lowest salary (present) of a teacher ,  45 00
Estimated value of school sites    12,450 00
Do.           do.            do.    buildings  65,900 00
Do.           do.           do.    furniture    2,800 00
Total valuation of school property  81,150 00
Comparative Expenses of the Public Schools and Total Expenses of the Province.
Year.
Total Expenses of
the Province.
Expenses of
School
Department.
Expenditure on
School Buildings.
Total Expenditure
on
Public Schools.
Percentage of
Expenses for
School Purposes.
1871*
$ 97,691 81
432,0S2  7!
372,618 64
583,355 89
614,658 89
728,310 01
048,783 84
448,835 83
161,715 20
§ 2,578  06
25,435' 78
39,999 89
38,908 30
.    38,891 42
44,506  U
47,129 63
43,334 01
22,110  70
$  2,578  06
25,435  78
39,999 89
38,908 30
56,934 92
56,630 09
47,129 63
43,334 01
22,110  70
$333,061 38
2.64
1872
5.9
1873
10.7
1874
1875
1876
1877
$18,043 50
12,123 98
6.6
9.2
7.7
7.3
1878
9.7
1879+
13.6
Total
$4,088,052 82
$302,893 90
$30,167 48
8.1
* 20th July to 31st December.       t Half-year.
Comparative increase per cent, of Expenses of 1878 on those of 1872.
Percentage of increase of total expenses ...,
Percentage of increase of school expenses.
3.8
70.3 166
Public Schools Report.
1870
Comparative Statement of the Total Enrolment of Pupils and the Average
Daily Attendance.
Recorded visits of Trustees to Schools  237
Do.        do.      Superintendent of Education  44
Do.        do.      Parents and others  507
Total number of visits recorded    7&8
This is the first year since the establishment of the free school system in the
Province, in which no new school district has been created. The Legislature has made
ample and liberal provision for all existing districts. The inhabitants of the following
places have sent in petitions for the creation of School Districts in their midst, namely :—
of Nicola Valley, for one district into two schools ; of four different places in New Westminster Electoral District; of the 150-mile House ; and of two places in Victoria Electoral
District. Several other places have also signified their intention of presenting similar
petitions.
I have to record that a new school house has been built at Nanaimo, costing, with
its building site, upwards of $3,000. This new school house is the north-wing of a
building which, when completed, will consist of a main building and two wings, two
stories in height. The lower story is the only one at present in use. It is divided into
two rooms, one of which is the class-room of the principal of the girls' department, and
the other that of her assistant. There is an abundance of space in the former room for
a reasonable number of scholars, but not so in the latter.
1 have to report the closing during the year of the following schools from lack of
the legal average of ten:—Trenant, by Trustees, from 1st January, 1879 ; Hope, by
Education Office, from 1st January, to 1st April; Stuart's Lake, by Trustees, from 18th
April; Colwood from 1st April, in consequence of the illness and subsequent death of
the teacher, Miss Eobinson, and also on account of the district having no trustees. One
district, Lake La Hache, refused to close when so ordered, and kept its school open ; the
payment of the teacher's salary for that time was refused. Warnings of the consequence
of attendance below the leo;al average, have also been given to the following schools :—
Cedar, Cheam, Clinton, Comox, Denman Island, Gabriola Island (not re-opened by
trustees after July holidays), Langley, and Prairie.
The examination and inspection of schools has been carried on irrespective of school-
years, and the result is so entered in this Eeport. I may here state generally, and as a
sort of summary of what I have seen of the schools of British Columbia, that judging
by the programme and standards issued by the Education Departments of the other
Provinces of the Dominion, and of other places having systems of education, and
supposing the average of these to be a fair showing of the possible attainments of scholars
of certain ages, our Province is considerably behind older countries educationally, and
to the extent of at least one standard in eight, were the subjects taught in Public Schools
divided into that number of standards, but, I believe, that we are now making good
progress. 4S Vic. Public Schools Report. 167
The recommendations contained in the last Eeport have been adopted in part, the
exceptions being those relating to the re-adjustment of teachers' salaries; the re-adjustment of mode of support of schools; and the length of time during which small schools
should be kept open. I have now to recommend that the amount of a teacher's salary
payable to him in any month, be made proportionate to the number of prescribed school
days during which he shall have taught, and that he shall not be entitled to receive his
pay until he shall have fulfilled all his duties as teacher. The payment of salary for
the holiday month of July could also well bear regulation; it seems unjust that that
amount should be paid to the teacher who has taught one or two months of the school-
year, as against the teacher who has taught the other 9 or 8 months of the same period.
In order to secure correctness and celerity of dispatch in the annual reports of
trustee boards, it would be advisable, after a certain date in each year, to withhold all
further educational grants until after the satisfactory performance of this much neglected
duty. The least the Government should require in return for bearing the whole cost
of education is, that the small amount of statistical information it requires, should bear
a slight approach to the truth, and that it should be given indue season. Ontario, New
Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, withhold the comparatively small sums they grant in aid
of education until these and other duties, required by law have been thoroughly performed.
I beg to recommend also that advantage be taken, in the interest of the Victoria
High School, of the scheme contained in the Memorandum of July 3rd, of the Minister
of Militia and Defence of the Dominion, recommending that associations for the purpose
of drill be organized in certain Educational Institutions, and allowing one of these for
the Province of British Columbia. This scheme proposes to supply High Schools gratuitously with (1) a Drill Instructor for one month, and (2) rifles and accoutrements
and books for military instruction, provided school-boards (1) hold themselves responsible for the safe keeping of these arms and accoutrements, and (2) see that uniform
clothing, of a pattern and colour to be approved, are worn by the members of the
company, who must number 40 at least of the age of 14 years and upwards. The introduction into the High School of drill and gymnastics would tend to still further
popularize it as an educational institution. a
Special Reports on District Schools.
Victoeia High School.—Enrolled: boys, 54; girls, 22; total 76. Average, 43.62.
Present at different-visits, 40, 35,48, 38, 38, 42, 25 (Senior Division), 20 (Senior Division),
23 (Senior Division\ &c, &c. The school was examined at Christmas 1878, and at
Midsummer 1879. Each of these examinations extended over four days, and included
the following subjects: English and Eoman history, geography, grammar, spelling and
dictation, arithmetic, Euclid, mensuration, algebra, book-keeping, natural philosophy,
Latin and French. Printed questions were given on these subjects and answered by
the pupils. On the first of these occasions, the examination showed an extremely
unsatisfactory state of things, the work shown by almost all the scholars being very
poorly done. A decided improvement had taken place on the second occasion, both in
the senior and junior divisions of the school. At the Christmas examination, the
average number of marks obtained by each scholar, of the 1200 obtainable, was 203, or
about 17 per cent.; while at the Midsummer examination this stood 407J, or nearly 34
percent.; this for the whole school. For the Senior Division, the averages and percentages stood thus:—at Christmas, 338, or 28 per cent ; at Midsummer, 504, or 42 per
cent. For the Junior Division, the averages and percentages stood thus:—at Christmas,
83, or 7 per cent.; at Midsummer, 301, or 25 per cent. The greatest number of marks
obtained at Christmas by any of the 17 pupils of the Senior Division examined was 804
(Thomas Baker), or 67 percent.; the lowest, 199; at Midsummer, by any of the 22
examined, the greatest, 906 (Herbert Carey), or 75$ per cent.; the lowest, 180. In the
Junior Division, at Christmas, of 19 examined, the greatest number of marks obtained
was 186, by E. C. Fawcett, or 15J percent.;   the lowest, 4;   at Midsummer, of 20 168 Public Schools Report. 1879
examined, the greatest, 687, by J. B. Carmichael, or 57 i per cent.; the lowest, 65. The
total number examined at Christmas was 36, and at Midsummer, 42; an increase of 6.
The teacher of the Senior Division and Principal of the High School, J. H. McLaughlin
(appointed in July, 1878); the teacher of the Junior Division and Second Master, J.
Pleace (appointed October 1st, 1877).
Victoria Public School.—Christmas Examination, 1878. At this examination 91
boys and girls, namely, 52 boys and 39 girls were examined. The subjects of examination
were spelling, arithmetic, geography, and grammar; and on each of these a printed
paper of questions was set, valued at 100 marks. Of those examined, 34 (17 boys and
17 girls) obtained over 60 per cent, of the 400 marks obtainable. Fourteen (5 boys and
9 girls) of the 34 had previously passed the High School Entrance Examination, so that
20 (12 boys and 8 girls) were now declared to have so passed. Their names and percentage of marks follow:—-Alex. J. Jackson, 81J per cent.; Guy Cavin, 80$; Wm. H.
Walsh, 77; Christopher Spencer, 75$: George Cox, 74|; Ada Botterell, 73J; James
Stewart, 73; Abbie F. Gardiner, 72J; Margaret E. Watson, 72; Wm. Partridge, 71; Wm.
B. Naylor, 69i; T. McLaughlin, 68f; Adelaide Miller, 67; Louisa Cox, 66$; Mary Ellen
Jones, 65; Georgina Eichardson, 63f; Manasseh Meiss, 63; Mary Jane Carne, 62};
George A. Richardson, 62J; W. H. Finlaison, 61f. Of all examined, the following is the
order of merit of first ten (7 boys and 3 girls) with their percentages of answering:—
1. J. B. Carmichael, 99 per cent.; 2. W. H. Hayward, 85; 3. F. Jesse, 84J; 4. A. J.
Jackson, 81$; 5. Agnes M. Gowen, 80; 6. Guy Cavin, 79$; 7. Isabella Smith, 781; Isabella Manson and "W. H. Walsh, equal, 77; 10. C. Spencer, 75$. On the whole, the
examination of these two Departments of the Victoria Public School was very satisfactory. Teachers of the Boys' Department—J. Kaye (Principal), E. M. Clemitson, A. W.
Struthers, and J. W. Thomson; of the Girls',—Mrs. Hayward (Principal), Mrs. Wilson-
Brown, Mrs. Caldwell, Miss Eichardson, and Miss Holloway.
The Victoria Schools were the only ones examined at this Christmas examination.
I have adopted the following method of examination, a method practicable enough
at present, as the number of children able to be so examined is not yet too great to
admit of its being done. Two sets of examination papers are prepared, one for senior
and one for junior scholars. The papers for senior scholars number five, and are one
for each of the following subjects:—spelling and punctuation, arithmetic, geography,
grammar, and English history; those for junior scholars include all the same subjects
except history, but are of a much less difficult character than the former. Each paper
is valued at 100 marks, so that the maximum obtainable by a senior scholar is 500 marks,
and that by a junior 400 marks. Besides this written examination, the same scholars
are examined viva voce, but principally in reading. Those unable to undertake the
written examination are examined entirely viva voce.
The schools examined up to 30th June are classified apart from those examined
since that date, as, although examined on very similar papers, it would hardly seem fair
to compare schools that have not been examined on precisely the same papers. The two
lists are, however placed side by side, thus allowing comparisons to be made by those
so inclined.
Examination of Schools up to SOtii June, 1879. Examination of Schools after 30th June, 1879.
The following- 208 pupils of the Public Schools have been ex- The following* 40 pupils of the Public Schools have been examined, by means of written answers to printed questions, in amined, by means of written answers to printed questions, in
spelling, arithmetic, geography, grammar, and English history: spelling, arithmetic, geography, grammar, and English history:
71 Victoria Boys (1st and 2nd divisions, or 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 8 Chilliwhack School, boys and girls (1st class)
4th classes.) 5 Craigflower     do.            do.               do.
62 Victoria Girls (1st and 2nd divisions, or 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4 Lake               do.            do.               do.
4th classes.) 4 Granville         do.             do.                do.
17 Nanaimo Boys (1st class of 1st division.) 3 Cheam            do.            do.               do.
19      do.     Girls      do.                 do. 3 Maple Eidge   do.           do. .           do.
13 N. West'r Boys      do.                 do. 3 Metchosin       do.           do.               do.
17      do.     Girls      do.                 do. 3 South Saanich do.            do.               do.
4 Cedar Hill School (1st class) 2 Esquimalt       do.             do.                do.
2 Prairie         do.         do. 2 Burrard Inlet do.            do.               do.
2 Wellington  do.          do. 1S. Cowichan    do.            do.                do.
1 Esquimalt   do,         do., (examined with Victoria Boys.) 1 Sooke              do.           do.               do.
1 Sumass do. do. do. 48 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
169
The following 195 pupils have been similarly examined in | The following1 90 pupils have been similarly examined in
spelling, arithmetic, geography, and grammar, on papers of a spelling, arithmetic, geography, and grammar, on papers of a
lower grade than those in the former case: lower grade than those in the former case :
54 Victoria Boys (3rd and part of 4th division, or oth, 6th, and
7th classes.)
41 Victoria Girls (3rd and part of 4th division, or 5th, 6th, and
7th classes.)
17 Nanaimo Boys (2nd class of 1st division.)
15 . do.       Girls *   do. do.
12 N. West'r Boys      do. do.
10 do.       Girls      do. . do.
11 do.       Boys and Girls (1st class of 2nd div., or 3rd class.)
S Wellington School (2nd class.)
7 Prairie
do.
do.
6 Cedar Hill
do.
do.
5 Gabriola
do.
(1st class.)
5 Cedar
do.
do.
4 Langley
do.
do.
Classification, in order of merit, of these Public Schools, by divisions and classes, according to the average proficiency of the
pupils, as shown in the result of the written examination on
first-class, or A, papers (500 marks.)
Rank.
School.
Teacher.
is
£■2
<-
f 5
11
1
2
3
4
Victoria Girls', 1st division,
New Westminster Boys', 1st
class of 1st division	
Victoria Boys', 1st division,
or 1st and 2nd classes ...
Mrs. Hayward
J. A. Halliday
J. Kaye	
Miss Kern	
Miss Coutts...
R M Clemitsoii
J. Mundell ...
Miss Polley...
Mrs. Brown ..
0. D. Sweet ..
Mrs. Young ..
320.76
281.92
227.07
220
293.71
160.42
148.70
109.50
107.12
105
99.94
30
13
40
2
6
6
7
New Westminster Girls', 1st
class of 1st division
Victoria Boys', 2nd division,
or 3rd and 4th classes ...
Nanaimo Boys', 1st class of
17
31
17
,  8
9
10
11
Victoria Girls', 2nd division,
or 3rd and 4th classes ...
Cedar Hill, 1st class ......
Nanaimo Girls', 1st class of
2
32
4
19
*
Classification on Skcond Class, ok B, Paphrs (400 marks).
1
wc
&q
Bank.
School.                      Teacher.
S H
a|
<s
£ 3
a
1
New Westminster Boys', 2d
class of 1st division	
J. A. Halliday
233.16
12
2
231.42
7
3
New Westminster Girls', 2d
Miss Coutts...
190.10
10
4
Victoria Boys', 3rd division,
or 5th and 6th classes ...
A.W.Struthers
157
34
5
Victoria Girls', 3rd division,
or 5th and 6th classes ...
Mrs. Caldwell.
109.06
30
6
Gabriola Island, 1st class..
O. M. Gregory 104
5
7
Victoria Boys', part of 4th
i
division, or 7th class	
J.W.Thomsonil02.04
20
S
Miss Polley...
82.12
8
12
13
14
15
Victoria Girls', part of 4th
division, or 7th class. /..
Nanaimo Girls', 2nd class of
1st division  	
New Westminster Boys' and
Girls', 1st class of 2nd div.
Cedar Hill, 2nd class	
Cedar, 1st class	
Langley, 1st class	
Nanaimo Boys', 2nd class of
1st division   !
10 South Saanich School, Boys and Girls (2nd class.)
9 Chilliwhack
do.
do.
do.
7 Esquimalt
do.
do.
do.
7 Maple Ridge
do.
do.
do.
6 Burgovne Bav
do.
do.
(1st class.)
6 South Cowichan do.
do.
(2nd class.)
5 Craigflower
do.
do.
do.
5 Granville
do.
do.
do.
4 Cheam
do.
do.
do.
4 North Cowichan do.
do.
(1st class.)
4 Sooke
do.
do.
(2nd class.)
3 Lake
do.
do.
do.
3 Metchosin
do.
do.
do.
3 Burrard Inlet
do.
do.
do.
3 North Saanich
do.
do.
(1st class.)
3 Salt Spring Is'c
do.
do.
do.
3 Sumass
do.
do.
(2nd class.)
3 Yale
do.
do.
do.
2 North Arm
do.
do.
do.
Classification, in order of merit, of these Public Schools, by classes,
according to the average proficiency of theii* pupils, as shown
in the result of the written examination on first-class, or A,
papers (500 marks.)
8
9
10
11
12
13
School.
Teacher.
South Saanich, 1st class
coke
Granville
Craigflower
Chilliwhack
Esquimalt
Burrard Inlet
Maple Ridge
South Cowichan   do.
Lake do.
Cheam do.
Metchosin do.
Sumass do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
S. D. Pope	
Miss Ella	
Mrs. Cordiner.
J. C. Newbury
D. M. McMillan
Miss Bayley...
Mrs. Colbeck..
J. W. Sinclair.
A. Dods	
S. G. Lewis...
Miss Holmes..
Mrs. Fisher...
J. R. Stirling .
356
329
312.80
307|
28H
280"
264
211
191|
1801
174
152
to a
Classification on Second Class, or B, Papers (400 harks).
,, Richardson] 75. <
[
Mrs. Young .,! 73.J
Miss MeDougal
0. Sweet	
T. Clyde
57
62
R. II. Holding I 48
I
J. Mundell ...    45
11
15
Rank.
School.
Teacher.
if
3S
1
Mrs. Cordiner.
327.8
5
2
Miss Bailey ...
Mrs. Colbeck..
3
3-
Burrard Inlet, 2nd class.,.
301
3
4
Craigflower          do.
J. C. Newbury
292
5
5
Burgoyne Bay, 1st class...
C McNaughten
Mrs. Clark	
272
6
6
Salt Spring Is'd   do.
259.3
3
7
Lake                 2nd class...
S. G. Lewis...
242.3
3
S
Chilliwhack          do.
D. McMillan ..
240.6
9
0
N. Cowichan    1st class ...
W. H. Lomas..
232.75
4
10
South Saanich, 2nd class...
S. D. Pope....
232
10
11
Metchosin             do.
Mrs. Fisher...
222
3
12
Maple Ridge        do.
J. W. Sinclair.
-209.6
7
13
Sooke                    do.
Miss Ella	
190.25
4
14
North Arm       1st class ...
Miss Carscaden
184
2
15
Cheam              2nd class...
Miss Holmes. .176.75
4
16
North Saanich, 1st class ...
H. Brethour.. j 176.6
3
17
Sumass             2nd class...
J. R. Stir ling. 1174.6
3
18
Esquimalt            do.
MissBavlev ..'165.14
7
19
South Cowichan, do.
A. Dods
163.5
6
I 170
Public Schools Report.
1879
Honour List.
Pupils of these Public Schools, arranged in order of merit, who
obtained 60 per cent, (or nearly so) and over, of the possible
marks (500) for papers in spelling, arithmetic, geography,
grammar, and English history.
Honour List.
Pupils of these Public Schools, arranged in order of merit, who
obtained 60 per cent, (or nearly so) and over, of the possible
marks (500) for papers in spelling, arithmetic, geography,
grammar, and English history.
Rank.
m{
7
^q-{
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
JEq.{
31
34
35
iEq-{
Name,
Bunting, Lillie	
Halliday, W. W. M.
Smith, J	
Manson, J	
Horton, L	
Cox, L	
Gardiner, A	
Botterell, A	
Forrest, C	
Brown, Thomas	
Halliday, Ernest...
Howay, Alice 	
Frye, George	
Howay, Fred. N	
Anderson, A	
Clute, J. S	
Robertson, C	
Woodward, A	
Johnston, J	
Hyde, G	
Johnston, M. A. ...
Fox, K	
Andrews, L	
Cox, George...	
Huxtable, A	
Wadhams, E. B. ...
Mathers, M	
Finlaison, W. H	
Bell, J	
Wilby, G	
Cooper, G	
Finlaison, C	
Jones, M. E	
Armstrong, W. J. J,
Martin, E	
Smith, L	
Whittaker, W	
Lawrence, M	
Hodges, J	
Richardson, G. A. .
Wilson, Joseph	
School.
Victoria Girls'	
New Westminster Boys'
Victoria Girls'	
do	
do	
do	
do.
do	
do	
Victoria Boys'	
New Westminster Boys'
New Westminster Girls'
Victoria Boys'	
New Westminster Boys'
Victoria Girls'	
New Westminster Boys'
Victoria Girls'	
Nanaimo Boys'	
Victoria Boys'	
do	
New Westminster Girls'
Victoria Girls'	
do	
Victoria Boys'	
Victoria Girls'	
New Westminster Boys'
New Westminster Girls'
Victoria Boys'	
Nanaimo Boys'	
Esquimalt	
Victoria Boys'	
do	
Victoria Girls'	
New Westminster Boys'
Victoria Girls'	
do	
Victoria Bays'	
Victoria Girls'	
Victoria Boys'	
do	
do	
Marks.
459
459
451
450
441
435
430
421
421
418
418
414
409
403
395
376
375
373
366
363
362
357
351
349
346
343
340
333
331
331
328
323
323
311
310
309
291
291
Pupils of these Public Schools, ranked in order of merit, who
have now, but who have not previously, passed the examination for the High School.
Rank.
Name.
School.
Marks.
1
New Westminster, Boys'
Do.             do.
403
376
366
4
Wadhams, E. B	
New Westminster, Boys'
343
331
328
323
310
J5q.{
309
309
308
12
298
291
Rank.
Summary.
New Westminster, Boys' Department, passes 3 pupils, with an
average of 373 marks.
Victoria, Boys' Department, passes 6 pupils, with an average of
319J marks.
Victoria, Girls' Department, passes 3 pupils, with an average of
309 marks.
Esquimalt School passes 1 pupil, with 331 marks.
jEq.j
3
4
Mq.i
10
11
14
15
16
17
18
19
Name.
Harrison, Herbert
Simpson, Edward
Ashwell, J. H	
Wilby, George....
Adams, Fred	
McDonald, B. R...',
Muir, Marion Mary
Kipp, E. A	
Bryant, Wesley ...
Rogers, Willie ....
Miller, Fred	
Cordiner, Fred....
Kipp, M. J	
Stewart, Joseph ..
Smith, Clara	
Parker, John	
Newbury, Jessie..
Porter, Robert	
Chapman, Geo. ...
School.
South Saanich
do.
Chilliwhack ..
Esquimalt	
Craigflower ..
Chilliwhack ..
Sooke	
Chilliwhack ..
Granville	
do	
do	
do	
Chilliwhack ..
Craigflower ..
Burrard Inlet
Craigflower...
do.
do.
Chilliwhack ..
Marks.
418
418
407
395
362
362
356
343
341
332
328
315
315
310
300
299
297
296
294
Pupils of these Public Schools, ranked in order of merit, who
have now, but who have not previonsly, passed the examination for the High School.
Rank.
Name.
Adams, Fred	
Muir, Marion Mary
Rogers, Willie ....
Stewart, Joseph ..
Smith, Clara	
Parker, John	
Newbury, Jessie ..
Porter, Robert	
Craigflower .
Sooke 	
Granville	
Craigflower .
Burrard Inlet
Craigflower .
Do.
Do.
362
356
332
310
301
299
297
SCMMAET
Craigflower passes 5 pupils, with an average of 312 4/6 marks.
Granville passes 1 pupil, with 332 marks.
Burrard Inlet passes 1 pupil, with 301 marks.
* Esquimalt passes 1 pupil, with 395 marks.
• Examined in June with Victoria Boyi,
- Summary of all Examined.
School.
Number
examined on
A papers.
Number
who answered
60 per cent.
of A papers.
Number
examined on
B papers.
Number
who answered
60 per cent.
of B papers.
Total number
examined
on A and B
papers.
Total number
who answered
60 per cent.
0
2
0
4
3
8
0
1
5
2
0
4
0
3
»      3
17
19
13
17
0
2
0
3
0
1
1
71
62
2
0
0
2'
0
0
0
5
0
0
I
0
4
0
0
0
0
3
0
6
3
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
11
17
0
0
6
3
5
6
4
9
4
6
5
7
5
5
3
4
7
3
17
15
15
18
2
7
3
10
3
4
3
54
41
S
3
4
3
0
0
0
5
1
0
5
0
0
5
2
0
2
2
0
0
8
2
0
4
0
7
2
0
0
5
10
0
3
6
5
5
10
7
17
4
7
10
9
5
9
7
4
10
6
34
34
28
35
2
9
3
13
3
5
4
125
103
10
3
4
5
0    .
Cedar Hill	
0
0
10
1
0
10
1
0
9
2
0
2
2
3
Nanaimo {Gui::;:::::::::::::::::
0
14
5
0
4
0
9
2
1
0
16
Victona| gms::::::::::::::::::::::
17
0
Yale	
3
247
60
285
60
532
120
Barkerville.—No inspection.    No returns.    Teacher, G. C. Phinney.
Burgoyne Bay.—Inspection 23rd and 24th September. Teacher, Miss McNaughten.
Enrolled: Boys, 15; girls, 11; total, 26; average 13.42. Present: Boys, 15; girls, 7;
total, 22. There being no class qualified to take the A papers, 6 pupils were examined
in the B papers. The result of the examination ranks the highest class of this school
as 5th among the 2nd classes of schools ex.amined with it. The highest percentage of
marks obtained was 82 per cent., by E. McNaughton; the lowest, 481; and the average,
68. Besides these, 6 first readers (tablets), 8 second readers, and 2 third readers were
examined orally.    The history class also acquitted itself fairly.
Burrard Inlet.—Inspection, 21st August. Teacher, Mrs. Colbeck. Enrolled:
Boys, 32; girls, 27; total, 59; average, 32.S6. Present: Boys. 18; girls, 6; total, 24. Two
pupils were examined in the A papers, and 3 in the B. The result of the examination
ranks the 1st class as 7th, and the 2nd class as 3rd among similar classes examined with
them. The highest percentage of marks obtained in A papers, was 60 per cent., by
Clara Smith; lowest, 52; in B papers, 83 per cent., by George H. Hodgson; lowest, 71;
and the average of 3, 75 per cent. The following were also examined orally:—3 fourth
readers; 3 third readers; 7 second readers; 4 first readers (tablets). This school passes
one scholar for the High School.
Cache Creek Boarding School.—No inspection. Teacher, Thomas Leduc; Matron,
Mrs. Schubert.   Enrolled: Boys, 16; girls, 19; total, 35; average, 24.89.
Eeturns of Receipts and Expenditure during the year :—
Cash, including balance of old accounts, received from 1st
August, 1878, to 30th June, 1879  $1,017 70
Cash disbursed during same time  $712 56
Balance in hand  305 14
$1,017 70    $1,017 70 172 Public Schools Report. 1879
Amount due the school by parents and others    $1,199 94
Amount due to others (Government account not included)   50 49
Balance in favour of School    $1,149 45
Expenses from 1st August, 1878, to 30th June, 1879:—
Butter ,  $203 85
Beef  317 12
Flour ,  295 00
Groceries  288 79
Cow feed  52 00
Vegetables  156 19
Freight and tolls  79 98
Furniture  79 63
Labour, including cooking, repairing, washing, &c  353 85
Total Expenses ,    $1,836 41
(Signed)       Charles A. Semlin, ) mrils+P(,„
Charles Pennie.      J lrustees-
Cedar.—Inspection, June 10. Teacher, Thomas Clyde. Enrolled: Boys, 11; girls, 17;
total, 28; average, 11.73. Present: Boys, 5; girls, 8; total, 13. There being no 1st class
qualified to take the A papers, 5 pupils were examined in the B papers. The result of
examination ranks the highest class of this school as 13th among the 2nd classes of the
schools examined with it. The highest percentage of marks obtained was 18j per cent.,
by Minnie Gordon; the lowest, 9; and the average of the 5, 14 per cent. There were
also examined 5 first readers, and 3 second readers.
Cedar Hill.—Inspection, 26th June. Teacher, O. D. Sweet. Enrolled: Boys, 24;
girls, 13; total, 37; average, 21. Present: Boys, 11; girls, 7; total, 18. Pour pupils
were examined in the A papers, and 6 in the B. The result of the examination ranks
the 1st class as 10th, and the 2nd class as 12th, among similar classes examined with
them. The highest percentage of marks obtained in the A papers, was 33 per cent., by
Maggie Irvine; the lowest, 14; the average, 21 per cent.; in the B papers, the highest
was 30 per cent., by C. J. Sweet; the lowest, 4£ ; and the average 14£ per cent. There
were also examined 3 first readers, and 5 second readers.
Cheam.—Inspection, 25th August. Teacher, Miss Holmes. Enrolled: Boys, 14;
girls, 18; total 32: average 15. Present: Boys, 8; girls, 10; total, 18. Three pupils
were examined in the A papers, and 4 in the B. The 1st class ranks 11, and the second
15th among similar classes examined with them. The highest percentage of marks
obtained in the A papers, was 42 per cent, by S. J. McC'onnell; the lowest, 31; and the
average of the three, 36 per cent; in the B papers the highest was 49 per cent., by J.
Harrison; the lowest, 37; and the average of the four, 44 per cent. There were also
examined orally, 6 first readers, and 5 second readers.
Chilliwhack.—Inspection, 26th August. Teacher, D. M. McMillan. Enrolled :
Boys, 31; girls, 28; total, 59; average, 32.22. Present: Boys, 28; girls, 19; total, 47. Eight
pupils were examined in the A papers, and 9 in the B. The result of the examination
ranks the 1st class as 5th, and the 2nd class as 8th among similar classes examined with
them. The highest percentage of marks obtained in the A papers, was 81 per cent., by
J. H. Ashwell; the lowest, 40; and the average of the eight, 61 per cent.; in the B
papers the highest was 92, by F. H. Greer; the lowest, 4.-3; and the average of the nine,
60 per cent. There were also examined 9 first readers (tablets), 8 first readers (part II),
1 second reader, and 12 second readers. This school is the largest in the Province outside of Victoria, Nanaimo, and New Westminster; it presents the largest number for
examination; its best scholar stands 3rd in the Honour List; and F. H. Greer heads the
B class with 369 marks out of 400 obtainable. 48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 173
Clinton.—No inspection. Teacher, A. McKenzie. Enrolled: Boys, 11; girls, 6;
total, 17; average, 12.95.
Colwood.—No inspection. Teacher, Miss Bobinson; resigned in April, died in June.
Enrolled: Boys, 11; girls, 3; total, 14; average, 10.95.
Comox.—No inspection. Teacher, S. F. Crawford. Enrolled: Boys, 18; girls, 15;
total, 33; average, 11.80.
North Cowichan Schools (Central or Comiaken Branch, and Agricultural Hall
Branch).—Inspection, 18th and 19th September. Teacher, A. Dods. Enrolled: Boys,
21; girls, 5; total, 29; average, 19.68. Present: Boys, 13; girls, 5; total, 18. Eleven
pupils attend both schools. The written examination took place at Agricultural Hall,
the pupils of both schools meeting there for the purpose, the ten who were present at
the Comiaken Branch on the previous day having been so notified. None being qualified
to take the A papers, 4 were examined in the B papers. The highest class in these schools
ranks as 9th among the 2nd classes examined with it. The highest per centage
of marks obtained was 70J per cent, by J. Menzies; the lowest, 50; and the average of
lour 58 per cent.   There were also examined 9 first readers (tablets) and 5 second readers.
South Cowichan Schools (Kokasailah Branch and Bench Branch).—Inspection,
16th and 17th September. Teacher, W. H. Lomas. Enrolled: Boys, 22; girls, 12;
total, 34; average, 17.40. Present: Boys, 12; girls, 5; total, 17. Five pupils attend
both schools. The written examination took place at the Bench School, the pupils of
both schools meeting there for the purpose, the eight who were present at the Kokasailah
School on the previous day having been so notified. One was examined in the A papers,
and six in the B papers. The 1st class ranks as 9th, and the 2nd as 19th, among similar
classes examined with them. The boy, J. Dougan, examined in the A papers obtained
42 per cent, of the total marks obtainable. The highest percentage in the B papers,
was 55 per cent, by J. Mitchell; the lowest, 23; and the average of the six, 41 per cent.
There were also examined 6 first readers, 3 second readers, and 2 third readers.
Craigflower.—Inspection, 8th August. Teacher, J. C, Newbury. Enrolled: Boys,
30; girls, 15; total, 45; average, 28.34, Present: Boys, 19; girls, 7; total, 26. Five
pupils were examined in the A, and five in the B papers. The 1st class ranks as 4th,
and the 2nd class as 4th, among similar classes examined with them. The highest percentage obtained in the A papers, was 72J per cent, by Frederick Adams; the lowest,
59; and the average of the five examined, 62 J per cent. The highest in the B papers,
was 80 per cent, by W. Parker; the lowest, 63; and the average of the five examined,
73 per cent. There were also examined 8 first readers, and 8 second readers. This
school passes at this examination more pupils (vide Appendix G) for the High School
than any other school except the Victoria Boys' School.
Denman Island.—No inspection. Teacher, J. E. McCutcheon. Enrolled: Boys, 10;
girls, 7; total, 17; average, 10.88.
Esquimalt.—Inspection, 7th August. Teacher, Miss Bayley. Enrolled: Boys, 19;
girls, 15; total, 34; average, 23.5. Present: Boys, 10; girls, 6; total, 16. Two pupils
were examined on the A, and 7 on the B papers. The 1st class ranks as 6th, and the
2nd class as 18th among similar classes examined with them. The highest percentage
of marks obtained in the A papers, was 79 per cent, by G. Wilby; the lowest, 34; and
the average of two examined, 56 per cent. The highest in the B papers was 58 per cent,
by Ernest Millington; the lowest, 20; and the average of 7 examined, 41 per cent. There
were also examined 4 first readers and third readers. This school passes one scholar
for the High School (vide Appendix G.)
Gabriola.—Inspection, 11th June. Teacher, O. M. Gregory. Enrolled: Boys, 13;
girls, 5; total, 18; average, 9.43. Present: Boys, 5; girls, 4; total, 9. None being
qualified for the A papers, 5 were examined in the B's. The highest class of this school
ranks as 6th among the 2nd classes examined with it. The highest per centage of marks
obtained was 48 per cent., by Maggie Dignan and Mark Edgar; the lowest 8, and the
average of the 5 examined 26 per cent. The attendance having fallen below the average
required by law, and no more than 9 attending at all, the Trustees did not re-open this
school in August.
13 174 Public Schools Report. 1879
GRANVILLE.—Inspection 22nd August. Teacher, Mrs. Cordiner. Enrolled: Boys,
19; Girls, 16; total, 35; average, 27.48. Present: Boys, 16; girls, 14; total, 30. Four
pupils were examined in the A and 5 in the B papers. The first class of this school
ranks as 3rd, and the 2nd class as 1st, among similar classes examined with them. The
highest per centage of marks obtained in the A papers was 68 per cent., by Wesley
Bryant; the lowest 63, and the average of the four examined 66 per cent. The highest
in the B papers was 93 per cent, by Jane Bryant; the lowest 73, and the average of the
5 examined 82 per cent. There were also examined 9 third readers, 6 second readers,
and 6 first readers. The viva voce examination of the lower classes showed them to be
remarkably proficient in arithmetic, written and mental, and in reading and spelling.
This school passes one scholar for the High School (vide Appendix G.J
Hope.—No inspection. Teacher, Miss Trenaman. Enrolled: Boys, 15; girls, 9;
total, 24; average, 8.34. This school was closed at the time of the Superintendent's visit
owing to the teacher's illness.
Lac La Hache.—No inspection. Teacher, W. Abel. Enrolled: Boys, 7; girls, 5;
total, 12; average, 9.80. This school was ordered to be closed after 31st December,
1878, on account of having been for eighteen months below the legal average. The
Trustees, however, kept it open until 30th June, 1879. The attendance during these
months reached the legal average, except for the month of January. It is extremely
doubtful whether the average of ten would have been maintained during the other
months but for the order given respecting the school. The Trustees did not re-open
the school after the holidays in July.
Lake.—Inspection 11th and 14th Augr.st. Teacher, S. G. Lewis. Enrolled: Boys,
15; girls, 7; total, 22; average, 15 32. Present: Boys, 9; girls, 5; total, 14. Four
pupils were examined in the A papers and 3 in the B's. The 1st class ranks as 10th,
and the 2nd class as 7th, among similar classes examined with them. The highest per
centage of marks obtained in the A papers was 55J per cent, by D. Stevens, the lowest
19, and the average of 4 examined 38 per cent. In the B's, the highest was 65 per cent.
by G. Bertram, the lowest 55, and the average of 3 examined 60J per cent. The junior
classes were also examined orally.
Langley.—Inspection, 20th June. Teacher, R. H. Holding. Enrolled: Boys, 13;
girls, 10; total, 23; average, 10.47. Present: Boys, 6; girls, 2; total, 8. None being-
qualified to be examined in the A, four were examined in the B papers. The highest class
ranks as 14th among the 2nd classes examined with it. The highest percentage of marks
obtained was 21 per cent, by Mary Taylor; the lowest 3J, and the average of the four
examined 13 per cent. The high water has affected the attendance at this school, but
Other causes must also operate to keep the average attendance so low.
Lillooet.—No inspection. Teacher, C. Phair. Enrolled: Boys, 17; girls, 13; total,
30; average, 18.35. A new school is about to be built in this district, the present rented
building being altogether too small and unsuitable.
Lytton.—No inspection. Teacher, Miss Crease. Enrolled: Boys, 10; girls, 16;
total, 26; average, 13.05.
Maple Eidge.—Inspection 20th August. Teacher, J. W. Sinclair. Enrolled: Boys,
18; girls, 23; total, 41; average, 24.70. Present: Boys, 11; girls, 15; total, 26. Three
pupils were examined in the A papers and 7 in the B's. The 1st class ranks as 8th, and
the 2nd class as 12th, among similar classes examined with them. The highest per
centage of marks obtained in the A papers was 57 per cent, by Henry Newton; the
lowest 51, and the average of the three examined 53 per cent. In the B's the highest
was 6SJ per cent, by Ellen Isaac; the lowest 36|, and the average of the 7 examined 52
per cent. There were also examined 7 first readers, including one in the alphabet; 3
second readers, and 6 third readers.
Matsqui.—No inspection.   This school has been closed since December, 1876.
Metchosin.—Inspection 24th October. Teacher, Mrs. Fisher. Enrolled: Boys, 12;
girls, 13; total, 25; average, 15.87. Present: Boys, 6; girls, 9. Total, 15. Three
pupils were examined in the A papers, and 3 in the B's.   The 1st class ranks as 12th, 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 175
and the 2nd class as 11th, among similar classes examined with them. The highest per
centage of marks obtained in the A papers was 43 per cent, by Mary E. Fisher; the
lowest 21, and the average of the three examined 35 per cent. In the B papers, the
highest was 75 per cent, by Minnie Swanwick; the lowest 31J, and the average of the
three examined 56 per cent. There were also examined 6 second readers, besides 2 in
ABC.
Nanaimo—Boys' School.—Inspection 4th and 9th June. Teachers, J. Mundell, Principal; A. Flett, Assistant. Enrolled: Boys, 135; average, 77.12. Present: Boys, 76.
Seventeen pupils were examined in the A and the same number in the B papers, there
being none in the Assistant's division able to undertake a written examination. ' The 1st
class ranks as 7th, and the 2nd as 17th, among similar classes examined with them. The
highest per centage obtained in the A papers was 83J per cent, by Thomas Brown; the
lowest 3 J, and the average of the 17 examined 30 per cent. In the B papers the highest
was 22J per cent, by Robert Bryden; the lowest 2, and the average of the 17 examined
11J per cent. The Assistant's division was also examined, 13 pupils being in the second
reader, 6 in the first reader, and 19 in the tablets.
Nanaimo—Girls' School.—Inspection 4th and 9th June. Teachers, Mrs. Young,
Principal; Miss McGregor, Assistant. Enrolled: Girls, 106; average, 59.77. Present:
Girls, 64. Nineteen pupils were examined in the A and 15 in the B papers, there being
none in the Assistant's division qualified to pass a written examination. The 1st class
ranks as 11th, and the 2nd class as 10th, among similar classes examined with them.
The highest per centage of marks obtained in the A papers was 41 per cent, by Emily
Bandle; the lowest 9, and the average of the 19 examined 20 per cent. The highest in
the B papers was 38 per cent, by Janet Webb; the lowest 1, and the average of the 15
examined 19 per cent. The Assistant's division was examined orally. The two Nanaimo
schools were formerly under the same building. As soon as the new school for the girls
was completed they were removed thither. This separation of the two schools will
make them much more efficient than they have been in the past.
New Westminster Schools.—Inspection 18th June, 29th August, 1st September.
Boys' school: Teachers, J. A. Halliday, Principal; Miss McDougall, Assistant. Girls'
school: Miss Coutts, Principal. Enrolled: Boys, 102; girls, 98; total, 200; average,
109.03. Total number present at different visits, 97, 78, and 109. Boys' school: Thirteen were examined in the A papers and 12 in the B's. The first class ranks as 2nd,
and the 2nd class as 1st among similar classes examined with them. The highest per
centage of marks obtained in the A papers was nearly 92 per cent, by W. M. Halliday;
the lowest 25, and the average of the 13 examined 56 per cent. In the B papers, the
highest was 83 per cent, by C. Dickinson; the lowest 24, and the average of the 12 examined 56 per cent. Three pupils passed the High school entrance examination ( Vide
Appendix G.)
Girls' school: Seventeen were examined in the A papers and 10 in the B's. The 1st
class ranks as 5th, and the 2d class as 3rd, among similar classes examined with them.
The highest per centage of marks obtained in the A papers was 83'per cent, by Alice
Howay; the lowest 22, and the average of the 17 examined 41 per cent. In the B
papers, the highest was 83 per cent, by Grace Halliday; the lowest 17, and the average
of the 10 examined 48 per cent.
Eleven of the boys and girls in the 2nd division of the Boys' school were also
examined in the B papers. Fred. Turner obtained the highest per centage of marks, 42
per cent.; the lowest being 5, and the average of the 11 17 per cent. There were also
examined orally in this division 12 tablet readers, 3 first readers, 22 second readers in
classes of 14"and 8, and 17 third readers in two classes of 9 and 8.
The senior scholarsof these schools having made some progress beyond the subjects
comprised in the A papers, 7 of the boys were examined in algebra, Euclid, natural
philosophy, book-keeping, and mensuration, and 5 girls in algebra. The highest per
centage of answering by the boys was 41 per cent., W. M. Halliday, and the average
25 per cent.; the highest by the girls was 30 per cent., by Alice Howay, and the average
20 per cent. This school is increasing rapidly in numbers. It now has three teachers,
the assistant in the Boys' school having been added in the middle of April. All the
smaller boys and girls of both schools are under her charge. 176 Public Schools Report. 1879
Nicola Valley Schools.—No inspection. Teacher, A. Irwin. East End Branch—
Enrolled: Boys, 8; Girls, 8; total, 16; average, 12.40. West End Branch—Enrolled:
Boys, 11; girls, 3; total, 14; average, 7.51.
North Arm.—Inspection 2nd September. Teacher, Miss Carscallen. Enrolled:
Boys, 3; girls, 9; total, 12; average, 11. Present: Boys, 3; girls, 8; total, 11. This
school had only been open since 1st August. Two pupils were examined in the B
papers, one of whom, Priscilla Magee, obtained 56 per cent, and the other 35 per cent.
There were also examined 7 first readers, 1 second reader, and 1 third reader. The
highest class ranks as 14th among the second classes examined with it.
Okanagan.—No inspection. Teacher, Miss Coughlan. Enrolled: Boys, 12; girls,
12; total, 24; average, 17.50.
Prairie.—Inspection 19th June. Teacher, Miss Kern. Enrolled: Boys, 12; girls,
11; total, 23; average, 10.43. Present: Boys, 10; girls, 8; total, 18. Two pupils were
examined in A and 7 in B papers. The first class ranks as 4th, and the 2nd class as 2nd
among similar classes examined with them. The highest per centage of marks in the A
papers was 44 l-5th per cent, by Mary Norris, and the lowest 43 4-5th. In the B's, the
highest was 79 per cent, by W. Innes, the lowest 43|, and the average of the 7 examined
46 per cent. There were also examined 4 first readers, 1 second reader, and 4 third
readers, the junior division of a class of 11. At the commencement of the year the
school very nearly died out, but accessions to the school population by immigration and
the exertions of parents now enable it to maintain the average required by law.
North Saanich Schools.—Inspection 12th August. Teacher, H. Brethour. North
End Branch—Enrolled: Boys, 11; girls, 6; total, 17; average, 12.50. Present: Boys,
9; girls, 5; total, 14. South End Branch—Enrolled: Boys, 3; girls, 4; total, 7; average,
5.75. Present: Boys, 6; girls, 6; total 12. There were none qualified to be examined
in the A papers and only 3 qualified for the B's. The highest class ranks as the 16th
among the 2nd classes examined with it. The highest per centage of marks obtained
was 53 per cent, by Agnes Wain; the lowest 40, and the average of the 3 examined 44
per cent. There were also examined 9 first readers, 7 second readers, and 4 third
readers. The teacher of these schools teaches at the one school in the morning and at
the other in the afternoon.
South Saanich.—Inspection 13th August. Teacher, S. D. Pope. Enrolled: Boys,
37; girls, 25; total, 62; average, 32.78. Present: Boys, 21; girls, 17; total, 38. Three
pupils were examined in the A and 10 in the B papers. The 1st class ranks as 1st, and
the 2nd class as 10th, among similar classes examined with them. The highest per
centage of marks obtained in the A papers was 83J per cent, by Herbert Harrison and
Edward Simpson; the lowest 52J, and the average of the 3 examined 73 per cent. In
the B's, the highest was 77 per cent, by Minnie Young; the lowest 28, and the average
of the 10 examined 58 per cent. There were also examined 6 first readers, 9 second
readers, and 6 third readers. This school has two of its pupils as head of one of the
two Honour Lists.
Salt Spring: Island Schools.—Inspection 20th and 22nd September. Teacher, Mrs.
Clark. North Settlement Branch—Enrolled: Boys,'1; girls, 8; total, 12; average, 6.68.
Present: Boys, 0; girls, 3; total, 3. Central Branch—Enrolled: Boys, 14; girls, 6; total 20;
average, 12.56. Present: Boys, 5; girls, 3; total, 8. Two children attend both schools.
Three were examined in the B, none being qualified for the A papers. The highest
class of these schools ranks as 6th among the 2nd classes examined with it. The highest
per centage of marks obtained was 74 per cent, by E. Norton; the lowest 11, and the
average of the three examined 05 per cent. There were also examined 4 first readers,
and 4 second readers. This school having two branches has so reduced its average that
its existence is only a question of time.
Sooke.—Inspection 21st and 22nd October. Teacher, Miss Ella. Enrolled: Boys,
7; girls, 9; total, 16; average, 11.38. Present: Boys, 5; girls, 8; total, 13. One was
examined in the A and 4 in the B papers. The 1st class ranks as 2nd, and the 2nd class
as 13th among similar classes examined with them.   In the A papers, Marion Mary 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 177
Muir obtained 71 per cent, of the total number of marks obtainable. In the B's, the
highest per centage was 58 per cent, by B. C. Muir; the lowest 35, and the average of
the 4 examined 48 per cent. The highest per centage of all examined in spelling and
punctuation was obtained in this school—98 per cent.—by M. M. Muir.
Stanley.—No inspection. Teacher, A. Johnstone. Enrolled: Boys, 11; girls, 5;
total, 16; average, 12.80.
Stuart's Lake.—No inspection. Teacher, J. Manion. Enrolled: Boys, 11; girls,
8; total, 19; average, 18.50. This school shows the best attendance in the Province.
It has been closed since the middle of April,- the removal of a family to the lower
country having left it without the requisite number of children.
Sumass.—Inspection 27th August. Teacher, J. B. Stirling. Enrolled: Boys, 8;
girls, 10; total, 18; average, 12.45. Present: Boys, 6; girls, 5; total, 11. One pupil
was examined in the A papers and 3 in the B's. The first class ranks as 13th, and the
2nd class as 17th, among similar classes examined with them. The total per centage of
marks obtained in the A papers was 30 per cent, by Thomas Lewis. In the B papers,
the highest per centage was 53i per cent, by Clara Chadsey; the lowest 34, and the
average of the three examined 44 per cent. The high water has had a great effect in
keeping down the average of this school.
Trenant.—No inspection. Closed since December, 1879. Teacher, Mrs. Ward.
Enrolled: Boys, 7; girls, 13; total, 20; average, 11.50.
Victoria High School.—( Vide Page 167.)
Victoria Boys' School.—Teachers, J. Kaye, (Principal), B. M. Clemitson, A. W.
Struthers, and J. W. Thomson. Enrolled: Boys, 246; average, 154. Present at
different visits, 184, 104, 156, 139, 139, &c. Inspection, Christmas, 1878 {vide page 168),
and at Midsummer, 1879. At the Midsummer examination 71 boys were examined in
the A papers, aud 54 in the B papers. The 71 boys include those belonging to the
two highest divisions of the school, and comprise the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th classes; and
the 54 include the 3rd division, and part of the 4th division, or the 5th, 6th, and 7th
classes. The 1st and 2nd classes together (1st division), and the 3rd and 4th classes
together (2nd division), rank respectively as 3rd and 6th among similar and higher
classes examined with them ; the 5th and 6th classes together (3rd division), and the 7th
class (part of 4th division), rank respectively as 4th and 7th among the higher classes
examined with them. The highest percentage of marks obtained in the 1st division in
the A papers, was 82 per cent by G. Prye; the lowest, 1.20; the average of the 40 examined, 45 per cent. The highest in the 2nd division was 50 per cent, by C. C. Lane;
the lowest 1; and the average of the 31 examined 30 per cent. In the B papers the
highest in the 3rd division was 65 per cent, by F. Stannard; the lowest, 1; and the
average of the 34 examined, 39 per cent.; and the highest in the 4th division was 44per
cent, by E. Wellington ; the lowest, 1; and the average of the 20 examined, 25 percent.
Six boys passed the High School entrance examination (vide Appendix G.)
Victoria Girls' School.—Teachers, Mrs Hayward (Principal), Mrs. Wilson-Brown,
Mrs. Caldwell, Miss Richardson, Miss Holloway. Enrolled: Boys, 95; girls, 309; total,
414; average, 201.37. Present at different visits, 219, 216, 200, 201, &c. Inspection,
Christmas, 1878 (vide page 168), and Midsummer, 1879. At the midsummer examination
62 were examined in the A papers, and 41 in the B. The 62 include the pupils belonging to the two highest divisions of the school, and comprise the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th
classes; and the 41 include the 3rd division, and part of the 4th division, or the 5th, 6th,
and 7th classes. The 1st and 2nd classes together (1st division), and the 3rd and 4th
classes together (2nd division), rank respectively as 1st and 9th among similar and
higher classes examined with them; and the 5th and 6th classes together (3rd division),
and the 7th class (part of 4th division), rank respectively as 5th and 9th among the
higher classes examined with them. The highest percentage of marks obtained in the
1st division in the A papers, was nearly 92 per cent by Lillie Bunting; the lowest, 29;
and the average of the 30 examined was 64 per cent; in the 2nd division, in the same
papers, the highest was 46£ per cent, by L. Mabius; the lowest, 11; and the average of
the 32 examined, 21J per cent. In the B papers the highest in the 3rd division, was 50
per cent, by Mary Neeves; the lowest, 3; and the average of the 30 examined, 27 per 178 Public Schools Report. 1879
cent.; and the highest in the 4th division was 36 per cent, by Lizzie Lindsay; the lowest,
4; and the average of the 11 examined 19 per cent. Lillie Bunting, of this school, and
W. M. Halliday, of New Westminster Boys' School, obtained the highest percentage of
marks of all those examined in the Province. Three girls passed the High School
entrance examination (vide Appendix G.)
It has been found necessary, in the case of these Victoria Public Schools, to order
that none of those pupils of either school who have once passed the High School entrance
examination, should be re-admitted into them. The High School being in its junior
division but a continuation of the public school, there exists no valid reason why objection
should be taken to the promotion of pupils into it from the departments below it, any
more than such an objection could be valid were it made in the case of the promotion of
pupils from a lower to a higher class in the public schools.
Wellington.—Inspection 6th and 9th June. Teacher, Miss Polley. Enrolled:
Boys, 25; girls, 25; total, 50; average, 29.82. Present: Boj'S, 11; girls, 16; total, 27.
Two pupils were examined in the A and 8 in the B papers. The first class ranks as 8th,
and the 2nd class as 8th, among similar classes examined with them. The highest per
centage obtained in the A papers was 30\ per cent, by Mary Dixon, and the average of
the two examined 22 per cent. In the B papers, the highest was 58 per cent, by Edna
Wall; the lowest 1, and the average of the 8 examined 20J per cent. There were also
examined 8 first readers, 4 second readers, and 9 third readers.
Yale.—Inspection 28th August. Teacher, Miss Bailey. Enrolled: Boys, 13; girls,
12; total, 25; average, 14.60. Present: Boys, 10; girls, 6; total, 16. There being none
qualified for the A, 3 were examined in the B papers. The highest class ranks as 2nd
among the 2nd classes examined with it. The highest per centage of marks obtained
was 88£ per cent, by Helen Bailey; the lowest 77*, and the average of the 3 examined
81 per cent. There were also examined 6 second readers and 7 first readers, including
4 in the tablets. Considering their extreme youth, most of the scholars of this school
acquitted themselves remarkably well.
York.—This school has been closed since December, 1876.
In the foregoing classification and inspection of schools 1 have generally refrained
from awarding either praise or blame-to the several teachers concerned. I leave this to
be meted out by parents and trustees, who are aware in each case of the peculiar circumstances to be taken into consideration before either can be given with justice,—as,
for instance, the length of time a teacher has had charge of his school; the character of
the attendance, whether regular or irregular; the ages of the pupils, their number, their
previous training, and the amount of interest taken in their progress at home. The lists
have been impartially and faithfully made out, and an examination into them and into
similar lists in the future will show not only the good scholar but also the good teacher.
Upon the latter, and upon him alone, depends the making of the school. The appendages
ot Education Offices and Boards of Education may be valuable auxiliaries, but
they are mere ciphers when compare! with the teacher in his school. It therefore
behooves Trustees, upon whom entirely rests the appointment and dismissal of the
teacher, to see that their local scho.d is blessed with the presence in it of one enthusiastic
enough to have his heart and soul in his work.
I have the honor to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
C. C. McKenzie,
Superintendent of Education.
Education Office,
BOth November, 1879. 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 179
PART  II.
Statistical Returns. 180
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Public Schools Report.
185
TABLE D—Public School Expenditure for the Eleven Months ending 30th June, 1879.
School Districts.
Teachers.
Amount
paid
each.
Total
Salaries.
3g
11
III
Rent.
Jo-
bS
3
i
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3
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3
to
3
Total.
Amount In
hands of
Treasurer as
per Return.
$131 61
575 06
550 00
605 00
825 00
550 00
80 00
450 00
770 00
550 00
660 00
630 00
450 00
650 00
660 00
605 00
660 00
550 00
650 00
50 00
475 00
605 00
400 00
420 00
65 00
337 10
100 00
650 00
660 00
660 00
660 00
550 00
1080 00
300 00
770 00
300 00
280 00
1080 00
125 00
660 00
705 00
464 51
550 00
94
326 00
81 30
98 70
140 00
680 00
660 00
550 00
610 00
540 00
350 00
150 00
220 97
1345 00
980 00
126 66
900 00
790 00
660 33
94 00
582 00
970 00
770 00
770 00
616 00
270 00
660 00
660 00
$706 67
550 00
605 00
1375 00
530 00
770 00
550 00
660 00
630 00
450 00
550 00
660 00
605 00
660 00
550 00
550 00
525 00
605 00
400 00
420 00
502 10
650 00
660 00
660 00
660 00
560 00
2730 00
1865 00
705 00
464 51
550 00
600 00
770 00
660 00
550 00
610 00
540 00
500 00
220 97
2325 00
3153 00
3295 00
660 00
660 00
88 75
1 62
$9 63
5 25
10 60
75 00
5 25
15 76
5 25
7 00
10 60
7 00
7 00
7 00
7 00
17 50
$725 05
556 87
615 50
1450 00
544 57
829 22
582 75
708 81
640 50
464 50
576 00
687 75
635 75
677 60
620 55
618 50
539 25
633 50
413 00
459 10
523 10
662 00
715 00
676 13
670 69
575 00
5486 64
2121 63
713 75
513 46
598 97
615 25
779 00
691 75
584 08
646 25
540 00
507 00
227 97
2470 50
7260 14
672 75
689 78
5 25
$00 38
Mrs. Schubert (Matron)	
Mrs Hill	
9 32
43 47
27 50
41 81
Cedar Hill	
0. D. Sweet	
D. M. McMillan..
7 50
19 00
20 75
23 75
8 00
16 75
2 25
S. F. Crawford	
A. Dods	
70 55
13 50
9 00
28 50
13 00
39 10
14 00
1 50
16 13
5 44
16 25
209 21
247 26
55 00
B. A. Wake	
5 25
1 26
W. Abel ."	
7 00
10 60
C. W. Rigg	
4 25
K. H. Holding'...
C. Phair	
55 00
J. W. Sinclair	
6 25
8 76
82 68
9 37
8 75
7 00
5 25
7 00
9 00
8 75
11 25
7 25
2464 75
A. Flett	
Do.  Girls' School	
Do.    Girls' School
41 95
43 72
8 25
J. P. Court	
Saanich, South	
J. L. Phillips	
S. D. Pope, B.A	
23 00
22 83
36 25
7 00
7 00
12 50
250 00
8 75
8 75
5 25
J. R. Stirling	
Victoria, High School	
133 00
562 14
4 00
21 03
A. \V. Struthers	
G. C. Phinney	
J. "YV. Thomson	
Miss A. J. Polley	
Yale	
34 25
25 00
6 25
5 25
36892 24
36892 24
1783 08
110 00!
2464 75
679 93
41930 Oil
151 97 186
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TABLE H.
Education Branch of Provincial Secretary's Department.
Expenditure for eleven months ending 30th June, 1879.
Salary of late Superintendent of Education  9  125 00
Salary of present Superintendent of Education     1,216 66
Travelling Expenses of present Superintendent of Education         40 25
        1,381 91
Amount expended on Public Schools       41,930 01
Total Expenditure     S843.311 S2
TABLE H
Of Public School Eeport of 1877-78 (corrected).
Education Branch of Provincial Secretary's Department.
Expenditure for the year ending 31st July, 1878.
Salary of Superintendent of Education ; 81,958 33
Travelling Expenses of Superintendent of Education         45 00
Salary of Deputy Superintendent of Education    1,500 00
Travelling Expenses of Deputy Superintendent of Education        366 50
Expenses of Education Office ,       147 75
        4,012 58
Amount expended on Public Schools .,      44,142 56
Total Expenditure  .,.,,., , ,......,,..    348,155 14 43 Vic.
Public Schools Report,
191
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Public Schools Report.
1879
TABLE K.—Comparative Annual Expenditure in Districts, from 1872-73 to 1878-79.
School Districts.
Barkerville	
Burgoyne Bay	
Burrard Inlet	
Cache Creek	
Cedar	
Cedar Hill	
Cheam	
Chilliwhack	
Clinton	
Colwood	
Comox	
Cowichan, North	
Cowichan, South	
Craigflower	
Denman Island	
Esquimalt	
Gabriola	
Granville	
Hope	
Lake	
Lake La Hache	
Langley	
Lillooet	
Lytton	
Maple Ridge	
Matsqui	
Metchosin	
Nanaimo	
New Westminster	
Nicola Valley	
North Arm	
Okanagan 	
Prairie	
Saanich, North	
Saanich, South	
Salt Spring Island	
Sooke	
Stanley	
Stuart's Lake	
Sumass	
Trenant	
Victoria High School .
Victoria Public School
Wellington	
Yale	
York 	
1872-73.
$602 50
340 00
1,112 50
2,173 25
395 00
1,514 75
1,171 62
1,190 00
805 50
1,889 50
1,278 75
320 00
530 00
660 52
597 50
920 84
379 00
714 41
1,032 00
3,811 76
2,576 38
600 00
1,386 37
617 50
1,361 12
7,1£9 00
680 50
1873-74.
8625 00
697 63
695 00
7,066 73
430 00
888 25
630 00
60 50
620 00
787 00
709 2u
400 00
780 00
1874-75.
913 00
672 63
697 50
670 00
600 00
645 00
670 00
727 50
690 00
2,063 75
1,870 00
649 85
1,000 00
650 00
676 00
772 50
475 00
5,624 50
1,63a 64'
§434 63
550 00
660 00
2,227 52
574 00
1,115 75
450 00
650 00
10 50
37 00
710 00
710 00
660 00
780 00
608 00
665 25
660 00
530 00
317 00
30 00
770 00
730 00
570 00
500 00
735 25
600 00
2,677 16
2,301 55
810 00
660 00
700 00
2S0 00
900 00
620 00
610 00
522 50
180 00
),409 17
760 00
917 00
400 00
1875-76.
S720 00
560 25
610 50
6,871 33
. 718 75
940 75
764 25
929 00
6S2 75
7 00
657 00
457 00
607 00
797 50
698 00
660 00
650 00
710 00
630 00
1,180 00
791 00
660 00
510 00
645 25
620 25
648 75
2,373 75
2,465 50
778 00
546 63
645 25
175 00
1,034 00
498 75
661 25
357 00
757 00
29,814 48
976 25
908 75
545 25
1876-77.
8S15 00
540 00
650 00
1,616 60
640 00
855 00
647 50
960 00
780 00
699 68
640 00
390 00
640 00
770 00
717 00
520 00
640 00
1,430 00
610 50
770 00
827 50
650 00
695 00
640 00
250 00
640 00
2,940 00
2,130 00
770 00
820 00
448 32
427 00
1,360 00
414 16
640 00
602 50
700 00
2,390 25
6,936 00
700 00
780 00
250 00
1877-78.
$892 25
452 50
660 00
1,700 00
436 43
910 53
640 75
768 62
545 91
625 50
619 75
749 37
711 00
776 60
297 25
780 50
643 00
718 13
739 22
885 25
748 62
748 75
841 13
754 74
773 38
598 50
3,216 12
2,133 78
830 75
65 00
755 00
655 00
691 75
900 00
759 50
608 25
740 26
600 00
632 50
614 25
2,437 75
7,905 19
771 85
808 12
1878-79.
$725 05
556 87
615 50
1,450 00
544 57
829 22
582 75
708 81
040 50
464 50
576 00
687 75
635 75
677 50
620 65
618 50
539 25
633 50
413 00
523 10
459 10
662 00
715 00
676 13
670 69
5 25
575 00
5,486 64
2,121 63
713 75
513 46
598 97
615 25
779 00
691 75
584 08
646 25
540 00
507 00
227 97
2,470 50
7,260 14
672 75
689 78
5 25
Total.
4,814 43
3,597 25
5,003 50
20,931 18
3,343 75
7,712 75
3,085 25
5,041 43
4,234 91
2.458 68
5,161 37
4,893 37
4.459 25
6,471 00
917 80
5,613 76
3,810 13
4,529 13
5,052 74
4,113 35
3,187 62
5,365 09
4,645 13
4,647 78
3,229 32
1,610 75
4,784 25
22,569 18
15,598 84
3,902 50
65 00
3,195 09
3,047 54
3,338 85
7,359 37
4,251 66
5.139 70
1,386 51
1.140 00
4,229 50
2,954 22
7,304 50
71,148 48
3,880 85
5,817 16
1,200 50 48 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
193
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1879
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Public Schools Report.
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Public Schools Report.
1879
TABLE O.—Description and Estimated Value of School Property.
Districts.
Description of Lands.
Approximate
value of
Land.
Approximate
value of
Buildings.
Total value.
School-house purchased by the people in 1870,
S
$
500
500
750
7,400
500
1,500
500
1,000
800
750
600
600
250
250
1,500
$
500
Oue acre given by Mr. Sparrow for school purposes.    School-house built by Government,
500
School-house erected by Government in 1873.
The site belongs to the mill proprietors, and
750
Twenty acres donated by Messrs. Campbell &
Parke for boarding school purposes.    School
house built by Government in 1873 and en-
7,400
Four acres Government land.    School-house and
teacher's residence built by the Government,
500
Cedar Hill	
Two acres—one donated by Dr. Tolmie, M.P.P.,
and the other purchased by the residents from
the Bishop ol Columbia.    School-house built
by Government in 1872.    Teacher's residence
erected in  1876, for which the teacher pays
1,500
One acre given by Mr. J. Nelmes.    School-house
500
Half-acre given by Mr. J. Kipp.    School-house
and teacher's residence built by Government,
1,000
Two town lots—School Reserve.    School-house
800
One acre donated by Mr.   A.  Peatt for public
school purposes.    School-house built by Gov-
750
One acre given by the Bishop of Columbia for a
school  site.    School-house  erected by Gov-
600
One hundred acres of Government land on which
600
Half-section of land was applied for by Trustees,
but not granted on account of Railroad Belt
Reservation.    School-house built by Government in 1873 on the above-mentioned land
The other school-house is built on the Nanaimo
road, near the junction of Kelvin creek with
250
250
Five acres granted by the Puget Sound Company
marked on the official map as a " School Reserve."   School-house and teacher's residence
built by the Hudson Bay Company in 1854.
Cost afterwards refunded by Colonial Government.    The building was thoroughly repaired
750
2,250
$750
$17,400
$18,150 43 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
19T
TABLE O.—Description and Estimated Value of School Property.—Continued.
Districts.
Description of Lands.
Approximate
value of
Land.
Approximate
value of
Buildings.
Total value.
$750
$17,400
200
$18,150
School-house built by Government on nnsur-
200
School-house rented from the Episcopal Church
Two acres donated by Mr. John Kemp,    School-
house and teacher's residence erected by Gov-
500
500
School building and site the property of Hastings
Mill Company.    Used for school purposes free
School-house built by Government on part of
750
600
400
600
750
One-fourth acre given by the late Mr. Bailey.
School-house built by the Vancouver Island
600
School-house built on unsurveyed land by Gov-
400
Half-acre given by the H. B. Co.    School-house
built by the British Columbian Government,
600
School-house rented from the Episcopal Church
Half-acre given by Mr.  H.  Dawson.     School-
500
400
1,000
3,750
2,500
3,500
800
500
School-house built by Government on  unsur-
400
One acre given for public school purposes by the
late Mr  John VVhittey.    School-house erected
by Government, aided by the settlers, in 1871
Boys'  school—Two  town  lots given  by  Vancouver Coal Company; school-house erected
1,000
250
650
2,500
4,000
Girls'   school—Five town lots purchased from
Vancouver  Coal Company.    School erected
3,150
Six acres of ground—School Reserve.    School-
house built in  1865 by  the  Government of
Two  school-houses—one  near the junction of
Coldwater  with  the  Nicola,   and the  other
The Wesleyan Church used as a school-house,
6,000
North Arm	
800
$4,150
$32,900
$3T,050 198
Public Schools Report.
1879
TABLE O.—Description and Estimated Value of School Property.—Concluded.
Districts.
Description of Lands.
Approximate
value of
Land.
Approximate
value of
Buildings.
Total value.
$4,150
$32,900
750
500
.    500
1,750
300
300
750
$37,050
One acre donated by Mr. W. Smithson.    School-
750
Half-acre  given by Messrs.  Cudlip  &   Clarke.
School-house built by Government in 1874....
500
One acre given by Mr. Richard Johns for a public school site.    School-house erected by Gov-
500
Two acres donated by Mr. J. D. Bryant for public school purposes.    School-house built by
Government in 1873, and teacher's residence
removed from old school site and rebuilt in
1,750
One hundred acres granted by the Government
of the day for public buildings.    School-house
erected on this land by Government, aided by
the settlers, in 1863 or 1864	
300
The other scho.ol-house, built in the same way,
on an acre of ground given by Mr. G. Baker
.    300
One acre given for a public school site by Mr.
J. Muir, sen.    School-house erected by Gov-
750
Assembly hall of Welsh Mining Co. used as a
A room in Fort St. James used as a school
Half-acre donated by Mr. Geo. Chadsey.   School-
house   built   by   Government,   aided  by   the
750
500
25,000
750
750
400
750
One hundred and sixty acres—School reserve.
School-house built by Government in 1874....
Ten acres at the head of Yates street, granted
by the Honorable the Hudson Bay Company,
marked on the official map as a " School Reserve."    High School building erected by the
Hudson Bay Company  in   1851  or  1852,   the
cost afterwards defrayed by the Colonial Government.   Public School (brick) erected 1875
Two  town lots  given by the Coal  Company.
School-house erected by the Government in
800
7,500
1,300
32,500
750
Yale	
Two town lots, school reserve.    House built by
the British Columbia Government, aided by
750
School-house built by Government, on unsur-
400
$12,450
$65,900
$78,350 43 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
199
Table P.—Districts ; date of creation ; boundaries.
Districts.
Barkerville 	
Burgoyne Bay.,
Burrard Inlet.,
Cache Creek
Cedar 	
Cedar Hill ,
Cheam
Chilliwhack.,
Clinton..,
Colwood ,
Date of Creation.
28th June, 1871 ...
3rd October, 1873..
27th June, 1870
11th February, 1874....
25th June, 1869
Boundaries altered  1st.
June, 1878.
26th November, 1874...
10th August, 1874.
25th June, 1869 ..
3d October, 1873
Boundaries.
Circle within radius of 3 miles from Court House, Richfield.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at a point
about midway between the head of Ganges Bay and
Beaver Point, on the South side; thence running Westerly, along the summit of the Otter Range, to the seashore ; thence following the shore line, Southerly, to
the point of commencement, and including Moresby,
Russell, and Portland Islands.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference
of a circle whose centre shall be the school-house on the
North side of the said Inlet, and whose radius shall be a
distance of three miles from such school-house ; excepting always any of the land on the sonth side of the Inlet.
Not defined.
All that tract of land within the lines commencing at a
point at the South-east corner of Cedar District; thence
in a North-westerly direction, along the coast line, to
the mouth of Chase River; thence in a Southerly direction to the Northern boundary of Cranberry District;
thence in a Westerly direction to the North-western
boundary of Cranberry District; thence in a Southerly
direction to the South-western boundary of Cranberry
district; thence in an Easterly direction to the point of
commencement.
Commencing on Victoria Arm at the South-east corner of
section 10 ; thence North along ?aid section line, and
the line between sections 7 and 81, 24 and 14, 19 and
50, to section line between 82 and .'0; thence East to
Saanich Road; thence North to boundary line between
Lake and Victoria Districts ; thence along said line to
the salt water in Cordova Bay ; thence along the water
line to the North-east limit of the Victoria School District; thence west along the Northern boundary of said
district to point of commencement on Victoria Arm.
Commencing at a point at the North-east corner of f'hilli-
whack School District on the Fraser River; thence in a
Southerly direction along said boundary, passing Elk
Creek Bridge, to the Mountain Range; thence in an
Easterly direction along said Mountain Range, about
seven miles, to a point due south of the Indian village
at Cheam; thence in a Northerly direction to the Fraser
River at Cheam; thence in a Westerly direction down
said river to the point of commencement.
All that tract of land within the lines commencing at a
point at the North-eastern boundary of Sumass School
District; thence Southerly, following said boundary, to
base of the Sumass Range of Mountains; thence Northeasterly along the said range, for a distance of about
six miles; thence in a Northerly direction, crossing Elk
Creek Bridge, to the Fraser River; thence westerly to
the point of commencement.
Not defined.
All that tract of lnnd within a line commencing at the
North end of Parson's Bridge; thence following Rowe 200
Public Schools Report.
1879
TABLE P.—Districts : dates of creation : boundaries.—Continued.
Comox
Cowichan, North
Cowichan, South .
Craigflower
Denman Island.
Esquimau	
Date of Creation.
30th July, 1870	
16th June, 1370 	
16th June, 1869 	
23d July, 1870	
Boundaries altered 1st
June, 1878.
Stream to the boundary line between Sections 97 and
98; thence in a Northerly direction, along the Eastern
boundary of Section 98, to the boundary between Highland and Esquimalt Districts; thence Westerly, along
said boundary line to the North-west corner of Section
14; thence South-westerly, to the South-east corner of
Section 100; thence in a South-easterly direction, to
South-west corner of Section 51 ; thence along the
section line, between Sections 50 and 51, to the shore at
Royal Bay; thence North-easterly along the shore line
to the Southern end of Parson's Bridge; thence along
the said bridge to the point of commencement.
All that piece of land known on the Official Map as the
District of Comox.
The Districts of Somenos and Comiaken, and those portions of the Quamichan and Cowichan Districts which
are situate North of the Cowichan River.
The District of Shawnigan, and those portions of the
Cowichan and Quamichan Districts which are situate to
the South of the Cowichan River.
Commencing at the South-west extremity of Cedar Hill
School District and following the Western boundary of
said district to where it strikes the Southern boundary
of Lake School District; thence along the boundary of
said district to the North-west corner of Section 116;
thence along section line, between 116 and 117, West,
to the line between R. 1 W. and R. 0. W., South, to the
boundary line between Lake and Esquimalt Districts;
thence West, to the North-east corner of Section 98,
marked on the Official Map as " Government Reserve;"
thence along the East line of said Reserve and Mill River
to Parson's Bridge; thence along the water line of Esquimalt harbor, South-easterly, to the South-western
corner of Section 26, Esquimalt District; thence in a
straight line to the South-western extremity of Section
10; thence along the Southern boundary line of said
section to Victoria Arm; thence North to the point of
commencement.
17th A-.gust, 1877  All that tract of land known as Denman Island.
Gabriola..
Granville.
22nd October, 1870 ,
29th August, 1872	
12th February, 1873 ...
All that piece of land included within the following limits,
viz.: Commencing at the Western extremity of the South
boundary line of the Uraigflower School District; then
Southerly and Easterly along the shore line of Esquimalt Harbour and Fuca Straits, and Northerly along the
waiter line of Victoria Harbour to the South-eastern
extremity ol the said Craigflower School District; then
along the Southern boundary line of the said district to
ihe point of commencement.
The Islands of Gabriola and Mudge.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference
of a circle whose centre shall be the school-house on
the South side of Burrard Inlet, and whose radius shall
be a distance of three miles from such school-house;
excepting always any land on the North side of the said
Inlet. 43 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
201
TABLE P.—Districts ; date of creation ; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
Hope.
Lake .
Lake La Hache.
Langley
.
Lillooet	
Lytton	
Maple Ridge
Matsqui ..
Metchosin.
Date of Creation.
25th February, 1871 ...
25th June, 1869 	
Boundaries altered  1st
June, 1878.
30th July, 1875..
30th April, 1871.
22nd October, 1870 ...
20th November, 1869.,
31st July, 1874	
Nanaimo	
New Westminster.,
Nicola Valley „.,„
8th April, 1871..
30th July, 1870.,
4th June, 1870 ..
|3lBt July, 1874..
Boundaries.
All that piece of land, comprised within a circle, haying a
radius of three miles from the Court House.
All that piece of land commencing at the North-east corner
of Section 50; thence West to the Colquitz stream;
thence North along said stream to the North-west corner
of Section 5 in Lake District; thence along section line
between 1 and 20, to where said line strikes section 22;
thence across said section and along the line between
Sections 116 and 117 to the Western boundary line of
Lake District; thence North to the South-west corner of
South Saanich District; thence East along the boundary
line between South Saanich and Lake to salt water;
thence South along the water line to the north-east
boundary of Cedar Hill School District; thence along
said boundary to point of commencement.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of six miles in length from the
school-house, situate at the 114 mile post, on the Cariboo
Road as the centre of such circle.
Starting on the left bank of the Fraser, at the extreme
North-west corner of the town site of Derby; thence a
right line Southerly, 4J miles; thence Easterly, parallel
with the river, 6 miles; thence a right line back to the
liver and across the Fraser, and also extending a distance inward of half a mile; thence down the right bank
of, and parallel with, the river, as far as Kanaka Creek;
thence down said creek to its confluence with the Fraser
at a point directly opposite the old Government buildings at Derby.
A radius of three miles from the Court House.
A radius of two miles from the Court House.
All that tract of land included within the lines commencing
at the South-west corner of Section 3, Township No. 9,
New Westminster District; thence in a Northerly direction to the Nonh-west corner of Section 34, Township
No. 9, aforesaid; thence in an Easterly direction to the
North-east corner of Section 32, Township No. 12, New
Westminster District; thence in a Southerly direction
to the point of intersection with the Langley School
District; thence following the Western boundary of the
Langley School District to the Northern boundary lino
of Townships 8 and 11, New Westminster District;
thence Westerly to the point of commencement.
Not defined.
The whole of the District of Metchosin according to the
Official Map, together with that portion of Esquimalt
District adjoining thereto which lies outside the boundary of the Craigflower School District.
All that piece of land included within a circle having a
radius of three miles from the Court House.
A radius of two miles from Lytton Square, New Westminster.
Bounded on the East by a line drawn North and South
from the residence of William Charters in Nicola Valley, 202
Public Schools Report.
1879
TABLE P.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
Date of Creation.
Boundaries.
North Arm.
17th Aagugt, 1877 ,
Okanagan.
31st July, 1874.
Prairie
Saanich, North..
Saanich, South..
26th November, 1874.,
1 80th August, 1872,
/3rd October, 1873..
and extending on each side of the Nicola River to the
natural boundaries of Nicola Valley; on the West by a
line drawn North and South from the residence of Byron ,
Earnshaw, and extending on each side of the Nicola
River to the natural boundaries of Nicola Valley aforesaid, said Western boundary being about nine miles distant from the Eastern boundary; and on the North and
South by the natural boundaries of the Nicola Valley.
Commencing at North-west corner of Lot 314, Group 1;
thence due North to Southern boundary of Lot 320;
thence Ivorth-westerly along the Northern boundary of
Musquiam Indian Reserve to Western boundary of Lot
320, Group I, thence due North to North-west corner of
Lot 320; thence following Southern boundary of the
Hastings Saw Mill timber lease to North-west corner of
Lot 336, Group 1; thence due West along the Northern
boundary of Lots 336 and 337 to the North-east corner
of 337; thence due South to Northern boundary of Lot
330; thence due West to North-east corner of Lot 258,
Group 1; thence due South along Eastern boundary of
Lot 258 to North Arm of Fraser River. Then commencing at North-east corner of Section 15, Block 5, North,
Range 5, West, due South, to range line between Blocks
4 and 5 North; thence following the said range line,
due West to North Arm, Fraser River, including Sea
Island.
Commencing at a point at the mouth of Mission Creek;
thence northerly along the shore of Okanagan Lake a
distance of five miles; thence Easterly a distance of five
miles; thence Southerly to Mission Creek; thence westerly to the point of commencement.
Commencing at a point on the North-east corner of Section
13, Township 8, New Westminster District; thence in a
Westerly direction, three miles; thence in a Southerly
direction to the 49th parallel; thence in an Easterly
direction six miles along said parallel; thence in a
Northerly direction, about nine miles ; thence in a
Westerly direction, three miles, to the point of commencement.
Defined in Government Gazette as follows:—Whereas by
a notice, dated 30th August, 1872, the Saanich School
District was defined as comprising all of South Saanich
and such portion of the District of North Saanich as
lies between a straight line drawn from Saanich Arm to
Bagan Bay, aiong the centre of the road crossing the
district at Brown's larm, and the North boundary of the
District of South Saanich, as laid down in the Official
Map; and whereas by a notice, dated 28th September,
that part of the District of Nortn Saanich which lies
to the North of the said road by Brown's Farm was
created a School District; and whereas it is desirable
to alter and amend the dividing line between the Districts of North and South Saanich: Notice is hereby
given, that the Districts of North and South Saanich
are hereby created separate School Districts, under the
respective titles of the District of North Saanich and
District of South Saanich, and that the boundary line
between such Districts shall be the boundary of these
Districts as laid down in the Official Map of the said
Districts. 43 Vic
Public Schools Report.
203
TABLE P.—Districts; date of creation; boundaries.—Concluded.
Districts.
Date of Creation.
Salt Spring Island,
Sooke .,
Stanley 	
Stuart's Lake	
Sumass 	
Trenant
30th July, 1870	
23rd May, 1872	
17th August, 1877
17th August, 1877
13th October, 1871
3rd October, 187S..
Victoria
Wellington..
Yale ....
York .,.,
25th June, 1869
Boundaries altered
June, 1878.
1st
Boundaries.
2nd May, 1874..
25th June, 1869
31st July, 1874 .,
All that piece of land known on the Official Map as Salt
Spring or Admiral. Island.
The same as those defined on the Official Map of the District of Sooke.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of three miles in length from
the Court House, Stanley.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of six miles in length from Fort
St. James on Stuart's Lake.
On the North, the Fraser River and Atchelitz Reserve; on
the West, the North-eastern boundary line of the Sumass
Lake and the Sumass River, to its confluence with the
Fraser; on the South and East, the base of the Sumass
Mountain Range.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the
Southern bank of the Fraser River, opposite Tilbury
Island; thence running due South in prolongation of
the dividing line of Ranges 4 and 5 West, Blocks 4 and
5 North, New Westminster District, to the sea shore at
Boundary Bay; thence South-westerly, along the shore
line to the 49th parallel of latitude; thence along said
49th parallel to the sea shore at Robert's Bay; thence
along the shore line, Northerly, to Pelly Point, at the
mouth of Fraser River; thence along the said Southern
bank of the Fraser River to the point of commencement.
All that piece of land commencing at the South-east
corner of Section 10, Victoria District; thence following
the water line of Victoria Arm to the North-west corner
of Section 5; thence to the North-east corner of said
section; thence in a straight line to City Boundary Post
or Jewish Cemetery Hill; thence following City boundary
to the point where it cuts the Northern line of Sections
75 and 76; thence along said line and its continuation
to saltwater at Oak Bay; thence along the shore South
and West, following the water line to the point of com.
meccement on Victoria Arm.
All that tract of land included within the lines, commencing at a point at the North-west corner of Wellington
District, on the shore line; thence in a Southerly direction, along the Western boundaries of Wellington and
Mountain Districts, to the Section Post between Sections
8 and 9, Range 1, Mountain District; thence Easterly,
along said section line, to South-east corner of Section
9, Range 7; thence Northerly, to the boundary line of
Mountain District; thence Easterly, along the Northern
boundary of Mountain District, to the sea shore at Departure Bay; thence Northerly and Westerly, along the
shore-line, to the point of commencement.
Not defined.
Township No. 19, New Westminster District.  48 Vic. Public Schools Report. 205
15
PART  III.
Appendices.  43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 207
APPENDIX A.
Rules and Regulations for the Government op Public Schools in the
Province of British Columbia.
1. The hours of teaching shall be from 9 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.,
from April to September, inclusive; and from 9.30 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.,
from October to March, inclusive.
2. There shall be a recess of fifteen minutes in the middle of each morning's work
during the whole year, and a recess often minutes in the middle of each afternoon's
work in the six months from April to September, inclusive.
3. Every Saturday, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Queen's Birthday, and Dominion
Day, shall be a holiday.
4. There shall be two vacations in each year. The Summer vacation shall include
the time from the last Saturday in June to the first Sunday in August; and the Winter
vacation shall continue for the two weeks preceding the first Monday in January after
the new year.
5. Young children, not being of school-age, shall not be allowed to accompany
teachers or pupils.
6. It shall be the duty of every teacher—
(1.) To keep the school register with care and to call the roll previously to beginning
the regular school work each morning and each afternoon.
(2.) To enquire into and record all cases of tardiness and absence of pupils.
(3.) To send to each pupil's parent or guardian a monthly report stating the number of times he was absent, the number of times he was late, his deportment,
his progress in each branch of study, and his rank in his class.
(4.) To be present in the school-room at least fifteen minutes in the morning, and
five minutes in the afternoon, before the time prescribed for commencing school,
to observe punctually the hours for opening and closing school, and not to
allow recesses to exceed the specified time, that is, from the time study ceases
and commences again.
(5.) To keep a visitors' book (which he shall ask the trustees to provide) and to
enter therein the visits made to his school, and to allow any visitor who so
chooses to make therein any remarks suggested by his visit.
(6.) To receive visitors courteously, and to afford them every information.
(7.) At all times to give to the trustees access to the registers and visitors' book,
and to deliver up the same to their order upon his ceasing to be employed by
them.
(8.) At the end of each half-year, to hold a public examination of his school, of which
notice shall be given to the trustees, and to the parents through the pupils.
. (9.) To furnish to the Superintendent of Education, monthly or when desired, any
information which it may be in his power to give, respecting anything connected with the operations of his school or in anywise affecting its interests or
character.
(10.) To teach diligently and faithfully.
(11.) To classify the pupils according to their respective abilities.
(12.) To practise such discipline as may be exercised by a kind, firm, and judicious
parent in his family, avoiding corporal punishment, except when it shall appear
to him to be imperatively necessary; and then a record of the offence and the
punishment shall be made in the school register for the inspection of trustees
and visitors. 208 Public Schools Report. 1879
(13. j No teacher shall compel the services of pupils for his own private benefit or
convenience.
(14.) For gross misconduct, or a violent or wilful opposition to authority, the
teacher may suspend a pupil from attending school, forthwith informing the
parent or guardian of the fact, and the reason of it; but no pupil shall be
expelled without the authority of the trustees.
(15.) When the example of any pupil is very hurtful, and reformation appears
hopeless, it shall be the duty of the teacher, with the approbation of the
trustees, to expel such pupil from the school; but any pupil under public
censure who shall express to the teacher his regret for such a course of conduct,
as openly and explicitly as the case may require, shall, with the approbation of
the trustees and teacher, be re-admitted to the school.
(16.) Subject to the arrangements of the Board of Trustees, to see that the school-
house is kept in proper order in respect to cleanliness, heating and ventilation,
and especially that the school-room is ready for the reception of pupils at least
fifteen minutes before the time for opening the school.
(17.) To have a care that the yards and outhouses are kept in order, and that the
school-house and premises are locked at all proper times, and to exercise
vigilance over the school property, the buildings, outhouses, fences, apparatus,
books, &c, so that they may not receive unnecessary injury, and to give prompt
notice in writing to the Secretary of the Trustees of any such injury.
(18.) To keep in a conspicuous place in the school-room a Time Table, showing the
order of exercises for each day in the week, and the time devoted to each per
•   day.
(19.) Not to be absent from the school without the permission of the Board of
Trustees, unless in case of sickness, in which case the absence is to be immediately reported to the Secretary.
(20.) In schools where more than one teacher is employed, to attend all meetings
of the teachers called by the Principal. It shall be the duty of the Principal
of a school to convene a meeting of the teachers associated with him, at least
once a month, for conference respecting all the departments of the school.
(21.) To assist the Superintendent of Education in examining and classifying pupils.
(22.) To make an affidavit, when required, as to the correctness of the statistical
and other information given by him to the Superintendent of Education.
(23.) Not to detain any pupil in school during the hour's intermission at noon.
(24.) To require all pupils, except those detained for punishment, to pass out of the
school-room at recesses and at dismission, and to dismiss pupils so detained
previous to leaving the school.
7. The Principal of a school shall have a responsible supervision over the timetables, exercises, methods, and general discipline pursued in all its lower grades.
8. No pupil shall be admitted to any public school who has been expelled from any
school, unless bv the written authority of the trustees.
9. No person shall be admitted into, or continue in, any school as a pupil, if he is
afflicted with, or has been exposed to, any contagious disease, until all danger of contagion shall have passed away, as certified in writing by a medical man.
10. Any school property that may be wilfully injured or destroyed by any pupil, is
to be made good forthwith by his parent or guardian.
11. It is required of each and every pupil—
(1.) That he come to school clean and tidy in his person and clothes; that he avoid
idleness, profanity, falsehood, and deceit, and quarrelling and fighting; that
he be kind and courteous to his fellows, obedient to his instructors, diligent in
his studies; and that he comform to the rules of the school. 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 209
(2.) That he present to the teacher an excuse from his parent or guardian for
tardiness or absence from school.
(3.) That he be present at each examination of his school, or present a satisfactory
excuse for absence.
(4.) That he do not depart, without the teacher's consent, before the time appointed
for closing the school.
(5.) That he be amenable to the teacher for any misconduct on the school premises,
or in going to and returning from school.
(6.) That he come to school with the prescribed school books and school requisites;
but, in case of his inability to comply with this rule, the teacher may, under
special circumstances, supply the necessary books free of cost; but every such
case must be forthwith reported to the Superintendent of Education.
12. The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no religious dogmas or creed shall
be taught. Exercises of a religious character in opening and closing school are strictly
prohibited.
April 12th, 1879.
APPENDIX B.
Eegulations for the Examination of Public School Teachers in the Province of
British Columbia for the Year 1880.
[Approved by His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor 22nd May and 13th November, 1879.]
I.—Time and-Places of Examination.
1. The examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the
Public Schools shall commence on Monday, the 5th July, 1880, at 1 p.m.
2. The examination shall take place at Victoria, New Westminster, and such other
place or places as the Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall appoint.
II.—Notice and Testimonials.
1. Every candidate for examination shall send in to the Superintendent of Education,
on or before the 1st June, 1880, a notice stating the class and grade of certificate for
which he is a candidate (and if necessary his selection of one of the subjects of examination numbered 20, 21, 22), and the description of any certificate he may already possess.
2. Every candidate's notice of intention to be examined shall be accompanied by
testimonials certifying to the temperate habits and good moral character of the candidate.
III.—Rules to be Observed by Candidates during Examination.
1. Candidates must be in their allotted places before the hour appointed for the
commencement of the examination.
2. No candidate shall be allowed to leave the examination room within one hour of
the issue of the examination paper in any subject; and if he then leave he shall not be
permitted to return during the examination of the subject then in hand.
3. No candidate shall be permitted, on any pretence whatever, to enter the examination room after the expiration of an hour from the commencement of the examination.
4. The order to stop writing must bo obeyed immediately.
5. No candidate shall give or receive assistance of any kind in answering the examination questions. He shall neither copy from another himself, nor allow another to
copy from him. He shall not take into the examination room any books or notes, or
anything from which he might derive assistance in the examination.   He shall not talk 210 Public Schools Report. 1879
or whisper. Detection in the breach of these rules will render the candidate liable not
only to the loss of the whole examination then in progress, but also to the withdrawal
or forfeiture of his certificate at any time afterward, should the discovery be then made
that these rules have been broken by him.
6. Every candidate shall use the distinguishing number assigned him by the
Examiners in place of his name, and shall write this number distinctly at the top of each
page of his answer papers. He shall not write his name or initials, or any particular
sign or mark of identification other than this distinguishing number.
7. Candidates, in preparing their answers, will write on one side only of each sheet.
8. Every candidate, preparatorily to his surrendering his answer papers to the
Examiners, shall arrange them in the order of the questions; shall fold them twice,
neatly and evenly, in the direction of the ruled lines ; and shall write his number and
the subject of the examination paper on' the outside sheet.
9. After the answer papers are once handed in. no candidate shall be allowed to
make any alteration of any kind in them.
IV.—General Conditions.
1. Candidates must furnish satisfactory proofs of temperate habits and good moral
character.
2. No male candidate shall be less than eighteen years of age, and no female candidate less than sixteen.
V.—Certificates ,of Qualification.
The following shall be the classes and grades of certificates:—
1. Temporary certificate.
2. Third Class, Grade B certificate.
3. Third Class, Grade A „
4. Second Class, Grade B „
5. Second Class, Grade A „
6. First Class, Grade B „
7. First Class, Grade A „
VI.—Value and Duration of Certificates.
1. A Temporary certificate, valid till the next examination of teachers, shall entitle
the holder to teach temporarily in any school.
2. A Third Class certificate, valid for one year, shall entitle the holder to teach in
any Public School in which one teacher is employed, or as an assistant in one in which
more than one is employed.
3. A Second Class certificate, valid for three years, shall entitle the holder to hold
any position in any Public School.
4. A First Class, Grade B certificate, valid for four years, shall entitle the holder
to hold any position in any Public School, or to act as an assistant in a High School.
5. A First Class, Grade A certificate, valid for four years, shall entitle the holder to
hold any position in any Public or High School.
VII.—Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1. Eeading.    To read intelligently and expressively.
2. Writing. To write legibly and neatly, and to understand the principles of
writing as given in Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's copy-books.
3. Spelling.    To be able to spell correctly.
4. Arithmetic. To be thoroughly familiar with arithmetic, and to ho able to work
problems in the various rules. 43 Vici Public Schools Report. 211
5. Mental Arithmetic. To show readiness and accuracy in solving problems in
mental arithmetic.
6. Geography. To have a good knowledge of geography, as contained in the
authorized text-book.
7. Grammar. To answer any question in Morell's Grammar, and to analyze and
parse any English sentence.
8. History.    To have a good knowledge of English history.
9. Composition. To be familiar with the forms of letter writing, and to be able to
write a prose composition on any simple subject, correctly as to expression, spelling,
and punctuation.
10. Education. To have a thorough knowledge of the approved modes of teaching
the various subjects of the school curriculum, and to be well acquainted with school
management—including school buildings and arrangements, classification of pupils,
formation of time tables, and modes of discipline.
VIII.—First Class, Grade B Certificate.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class certificates.
11. Book-keeping.    To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration. To be familiar with the principal rules for the mensuration of
surfaces.
13. Algebra. To understand the principles relating to simple and quadratic equations, and the solution of problems giving rise to such equations.
14. Euclid.   Books I. and II., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy. To be acquainted with the properties of matter/and with
the elementary principles of Statics.
IX.—First Class, Grade A Certificate.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class certificates.
11. Book-keeping.    To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration.   To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
13. Algebra.    To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
14. Euclid.   Books I., IL, III., IV., Defs. of V., and Book VI., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy. To have a good knowledge of Statics, Dynamics, and
Hydrostatics.
16. English Literature. To be familiar with the lives and works of Shakespeare,
Milton, Lytton, Dickens, Macaulay, and Tennyson.
17. Ancient History. To have a knowledge of Eoman History, from the formation
of the first triumvirate to the death of Domitian; and of Grecian History, from the
invasion of Greece by Darius to the death of Alexander the Great.
18. Practical Mathematics. To be versed in right and oblique angled trigonometry,
and to have a fair knowledge of land surveying and navigation.
19. Latin. To translate and parse any of the following: Csesar, DeBello Gallico,
Books I., IL, III.; Horace, Odes, Book I., and Ars Poetica; Virgil, iEneid, Books L,
IL, III.
20. Greek. To translate and parse any of the following: Xenophon, Anabasis,
Books I., IL, III.; Homer, Iliad, I., IL, III.
21. French. To translate and parse any of the following: Voltaire, Histoire de
Charles XII., Books L, IL, III.   Corneille, Le Cid. 212 Public Schools Report. 1879
22. Natural Sciences.   To have a fair knowledge of one of the natural sciences.
Candidates shall be allowed to select one of the subjects numbered 20, 21, 22, in
which to be examined.
X.—Conditions of Obtaining Certificates.
1. For a temporary Certificate. A candidate for a temporary certificate must give
satisfactory information as to his character and scholastic qualifications, and must
forward an application from a Board of School Trustees desiring his services as teacher.
2. For a Third Class, Grade B Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
3. For a Third Class, Grade A Certificate, a candidate must obtain 50 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
4. For a Second Class, Grade B Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
5. For a Second Class, Grade A Certificate, a candidate must obtain 70 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
6. For a First Class, Grade B Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and
grade, 50 per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for
second and third class certificates, and not less than 30 per cent, of the total number of
marks attached to the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade.
7. For a First Class, Grade A Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of
the total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and
grade, 50 per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for
second and third class certificates, and not less than 30 per cent, of the total number of
marks attached to all the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade; or,
he must be a graduate of some British University, and must have proceeded regularly
to his degree.
XL—Fixed Standard Marks of Value attached to Subjects of Examination.
MARKS.
1. Eeading      50
2. Writing  100
3. Spelling  100
4. Arithmetic  200
5. Mental Arithmetic  100
6. Geography  200
7. Grammar    200
8. History (English)....  200
9. Composition  200
10. Education  200
11. Book-keeping  200
12. Mensuration  200
13. Algebra  200
14. Euclid  200
15. Natural Philosophy  200
16. English Literature  200
17. Ancient History  200
18. Practical Mathematics  200
19. Latin  200
20. 21, 22. Greek or French, or one of the Natural Sciences  200 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 213
APPENDIX C.
Chapter I.
School Meetings in School Districts.
I.—Notice of Meetings.
1. The notice, calling an annual or special meeting, maybe signed Sch00i Meetings.
by the secretary by direction of the trustees, or by a majority of the
trustees themselves.    Copies of such notices shall be put up in at least
three of the most public places in the district, at least ten  days before
the time of holding the meeting.
II.—Proceedings at Annual Meetings.
1. The  senior or other trustee present, shall, at the proper hour Annual School Meetings,
(12 o'clock), call the meeting to order, and request the voters present how orsanizod-
to appoint a chairman and secretary from among themselves.
The chairman, on election, shall at once take the chair, and shall
preserve order and decorum, and shall decide questions of order, subject
to an appeal to the meeting. The chairman's power of voting shall be
limited to the casting vote. In case of an equality of votes, the chairman must give the casting vote.
The secretary shall record in writing all the votes and proceedings of
the meeting.
2. The following shall be the order of business at the meeting :—        order of business at.
(1.) Calling the meeting to order.
(2.) Election of chairman and secretary.
(3.) Eeading of trustees'  annual report,  including statement of
receipts and expenditure.
(4.) Receiving and deciding upon trustees' report.
(5.) Election of trustee to fill the vacancy at the end of the past year.
(6.) Election of trustee or trustees to fill any other vacancy.
(7.) Any other business of which due notice has been given.
3. The following rules of order should be observed at the meetings :  Roles of Order to be
,.,-,.,„. t, I,,. . observed at Annual
(1.) Addressing Chairman.—Every voter  shall rise previously to Meetings.
speaking, and address himself to the Chairman.
(2.) Order of speaking.—When two or more voters rise at once, the
chairman shall name the  voter  who  shall  speak first,  when
the other voter or voters shall next have the right to address
the meeting in the order named by the chairman.
(3.) Motion to be read.—A voter may require the question or motion
under discussion to be read for his information at any time,
but not so as to interrupt a voter who may be speaking.
(4.) Speaking twice.—No voter shall speak more than twice on the
same question or amendment without leave of the meeting,
except in explanation  of something  which may  have been
misunderstood, or until every one choosing to  speak  shall
have spoken.
(5.) Voting.—The chairman shall take the votes by a poll; and the
names of all voters who may present themselves shall be
recorded; such poll to remain open till four o'clock, when the
chairman shall declare the result.
(6.) Voters.—In case objection is made to the right of a person to
vote, the chairman shall require the person whose vote is
questioned to make the declaration provided by law; after
making it, the vote must bo received and recorded without
further question; but if such person refuses to make such
declaration, his vote is to be rejected. 214 Public Schools Report. 1879
(7.) Protests.—No protest against an election or other proceedings
of the meeting shall be received by the chairman. All protests
must be sent to the Superintendent of Education within twenty
days at least after the meeting.
(8.) Adjournment.—A motion to adjourn a school meeting shall
always be in order, provided that no second motion to the
same effect shall be made until some intermediate proceedings
shall have been had.
(9.) Motion to be in writing (if required) and seconded.—A motion
cannot be put from the chair, or debated, unless the same be
in writing (if required by the chairman), and seconded.
(10.) Withdrawal of motion.—After a motion has been announced
or read by the chairman, it shall be deemed to be in possession
of the meeting; but may be withdrawn at any time before
decision by the consent of the meeting.
(11.) Kind of motion to be received.—When a motion is under debate
no other motion shall be received, unless to amend it, or to
postpone it, or for adjournment.
(12.) Order of putting motion.—All questions shall be put in the
order in which they are moved. Amendments shall all be put
before the main motion, the last amendment first, and so on.
(13.) Reconsidering motion.—A motion to reconsider a vote may be
made by any voter at the same meeting; but no vote of reconsideration shall be taken more than once at the same
meeting.
close of Meeting. 4. The poll for every election of a trustee shall not be kept open after
four o'clock in the afternoon.
Transmission of Minutes. 5. At the close of the proceedings, the chairman and secretary should
sign the minutes, as entered by the secretary in the minute book, and
the secretary of the board of trustees must forthwith transmit a correct
copy of such minutes, signed by himself, to the Superintendent of
Education.
special school Meetings. 6. As far as possible, special school meetings shall be conducted in
the same way as annual school meetings.
Chapter II.
Powers and Duties of Trustees.
(These are defined in the "Public School Act, 1879."}
The following regulations are further prescribed for the guidance of
trustees:—
Appointment of Teacher !• Notice of the appointment of a teacher to a school should be given
him in writing, such notice specifying the day on which his duties as
teacher commence.
Dismissal of Teacher. 2- Notice of intention to dismiss a teacher should be given him in
writing, at least thirty days before such dismissal is to take place.
Su erintendent of Edu- 3. Notice of the appointment or dismissal of a teacher should be
cation to be notified of forthwith transmitted to the Superintendent of Education, with the
StScheT'01'dismissal date on which the appointment or dismissal takes effect.
Care of school-house. 4. Trustees should appoint one of their number whose duty it should
be to see that the school-house is kept in good repair.    He should see
that the windows are properly filled with glass; that, at the proper 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 215
season, the stove and pipe or fireplace are in good condition, and that
suitable wood or coal is provided; that the desks and seats are in good
repair; that the outhouses are properly provided with doors, and kept
clean; that the black-boards are kept painted, the water supply
abundant, and that everything is provided necessary for the comfort of
the pupils and the success of the school.
5. No public school-house or school plot, or any building,  furniture, Use of school-house.
or other thing pertaining thereto should bo used or occupied for any
other purpose than for the use or accommodation of the public school of
the district, without the express permission of the trustees as a corporation, and then only after school hours and on condition that all damages
be made good, and cleaning and sweeping promptly done.
(The teacher has charge of the school-house on behalf of the trustees.
He has no authority to use the school-house other than as directed by
them; nor to make use of it at any other time than during school hours
without their sanction. At the request of the trustees he must at once
deliver up the school-house key to them.)
6. It is the duty of the trustees to decide what incidental expenses Expenses of school,
they shall incur for their school, but they are required to submit such
matters (Public School Act, 1879, Sec. 7, Sub-sec. 3; Revenue Act, 1879,
Sec. 36,) to the Government for approval.
Extract from " Revenue Act, 1879."
"36. Before an account is paid by the Deputy Treasurer, or finally placed to the
credit of a Sub-accountant or any other person in repayment of an advance, or in
accounting for any portion of Revenue by charging the amount to the head of service,
the Auditor must examine the account and endorse thereon the head of service, number of vote, or authority to which the sum or sums is chargeable, marking his initials
against the total amount to certify to its correctness and that a warrant has been
issued."
June, 1879.
APPENDIX D.
Chapter I.
Subjects of Examination for Admission to the High School
' L Spelling and Punctuation.—To be able to spell and punctuate correctly any passage
in the Fourth Reader or Spelling Book.
2. Writing.—To write neatly and legibly.
3. Arithmetic.—To be able to answer questions in numeration, notation, the four
simple and compound rules, reduction, vulgar and decimal fractions, proportion, simple
interest and percentage, and in mental arithmetic.
4. Grammar.—To know the principal grammatical forms and definitions, to be
able to analyze and parse simple sentences, and to be able to write a short narrative,
description, or familiar letter in proper form.
5. Geography.—To have a good knowledge of the earth's planetary relations, Of the
general principles of physical geography, and of the outlines of the maps of Europe,
Asia, Africa, America, Oceanica, and of the British Empire, and more particularly of
that of the Dominion of Canada. 216 Public Schools Report. 1879
6. History.—To know the different periods and the outlines of English History, as
contained in Collier's History of the British Empire (Junior Class Book.)
Chapter II.
Course of Study in the High School—Junior Division.
1. English Language.—Eeview of elementary work in orthography, etymology,
syntax, and analysis of sentences; derivation of words; rendering of poetry into prose;
composition, including the framing of sentences, familiar and business letters, and
abstracts of passages in readers, themes, and generally the formation of a good English
style; reading; dictation; and elocution, including the learning by heart and recitation
of selected passages from standard authors.
2. Mathematics.—(a.) Arithmetic, including simple and compound rules, vulgar and
decimal fractions, proportion, interest, percentage in its various applications; and square
root.
(b.) Algebra, including elementary rules, factoring, greatest common measure, least
common multiple, square root, fractions, and simple equations of one, two, and three
unknown quantities.
(c.) Euclid, Books I, II, with easy exercises.
(<i.) Mensuration, including lengths of lines, and areas of plane figures.
(e.) Natural Philosophy, including proportions of matter, composition and resolution
of forces, centre.of gravity, mechanical powers, pressure of liquids, specific gravity and
modes of determining it, the thermometer, barometer, siphon, common pump, forcing
pump, air pump.
3. Modern Languages.—French—grammar and exercises.
4. Ancient Languages.—(a.) Latin—grammar and exercises.
(b.) Greek—grammar and exercises (optional.)
5. History.—(a.) Leading events of English history,
(6.) Eoman history to the end of Second Punic War.
6. Geography.—A fair course of elementary geography, mathematical, physical, and
political. Map Geography generally—that of Canada and that of the British Empire
more particularly.
7. Book-keeping and Writing.—(a.) Single Entry and principles of Double Entry.
(b.) Practice in writing according to the principles contained in  Payson,  Dunton,
and Scribner's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of music.
9. Natural Science.—(a.) Elementary Botany,   (b.) Elementary Physiology.
Senior Division.
1. English Language.—The subject generally, including derivation of words, composition, rendering of poetry into prose, abstracts of selected passages, critical reading
of portions of the works of standard authors, themes, and generally the formation of a
good English style.
2. Mathematics.—(a.) Arithmetic generally, with duodecimals and metrical system.
(b.) Algebra, quadratis, equations, surds, proportion, progressions, permulations, and
combinations, Binomial theorem, cube root and properties of numbers, (c.) Euclid,
Books I, II, III, IV, definitions of Book V, and Book VI, with exercises, (d.) Trigo-
nometery, plane trigonometry, (e.) Mensuration, volumes and areas of surfaces of
solids and surveying.   (/.) Natural philosophy, statics, hydrostatics, and dynamics. 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 217
3. Modern Languages.—French—grammar and exercises.
4. Ancient Languages.—(a.) Latin; Caasar, Book I, Virgil, Book I.
(6.) Greek; Grammar, Xenophon, Book I (optional.)
5. History.—(a.) English history, the special study of the Stuart and Brunswick
periods, (b.) Eoman history, from the commencement of the Second Punic War to the
death of Augustus, (c.) Grecian history, from the Persian to the Peloponnesian War,
both inclusive.
6. Geography.—Ancient and modern.
7. Book-keeping and writing.—(a.) Single and Double Entry. (&.) Practice in writing
according to the principles contained in Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of Music.
9. Natural Science.—(a.) Geology.   (&.) Astronomy.
Chapter III.
Eegulations for Admission, &c, into High School.
1. Teachers of the Public Schools, who have already obtained certificates as teachers,
may be admitted to enter the High School as pupils without being required to pass the
usual entrance examination.
2. In order that a candidate may obtain admission to the High School, the aggregate
of his marks must amount to at least 60 per cent, of the total marks assigned for all the
subjects of examination, and at least 30 per cent, must be obtained in each subject.
Candidates will not be admitted who fail to gain 50 per cent, of the parsing and analyzing
questions in the grammar paper.
3. The examination shall be conducted on paper, but candidates may be subjected
to additional viva voce examination in such subjects as shall be thought proper.
4. Pupils of Public Schools in a School District having a High School, after passing a
satisfactory examination and being declared eligible for promotion from the Public to the High
School, shall not be received as pupils in the Public Schools of such District.
5. Pupils entering the High School must take the prescribed course of studies.
6. Pupils shall be arranged in classes corresponding to their respective degrees of
proficiency, and each pupil shall be advanced from one class or division to another with
reference to attainments as shown by examination, without regard to the time he may
have been in such class or division.
7. The regulations respecting the duties of pupils in Public Schools apply to pupils
in the High School, and must be obeyed by the latter.
8. Any pupil absenting himself from the Superintendent's examination, or any
portion of such examination, shall not thereafter be admitted into the High School
except by the authority of the trustees given in writing; and the names of all such
absentees shall be forwarded by the Principal to the Superintendent of Education.
This rule shall be read to the school at a suitable time just before the examination
at the close of each half-year. 21s Public Schools Report. 1879
APPENDIX E.
Books Authorized for Use in Public and High Schools—[1872, 1876-77.]
Fixed Price.
$ cts.
Canadian First Reader, Part I    0 05
Canadian First Reader, Part II ,  10
Canadian Second Reader  25
Canadian Third Reader  40
Canadian Fourth Reader  50
Canadian Fifth Reader  60
Canadian Advanced Reader  60
Lennie's Grammar >  10
The World (J. B. Calkin)  50
Modern Geography and Atlas (Campbell) ,  75
Elementary Arithmetic (Smith & McMurchy)  25
Advanced Arithmetic (Smith & McMurchy)   50
Outlines of General History (Collier)  75
British Empire (Collier)   ,  1 00
British History (Collier)  50
Algebra, Part I (Colenso)  50
Euclid, Book I (Young)  12$
Euclid, Book II (Young)  12$
Book-keeping (Fulton & Eastman)  40
Canadian Spelling Book , ,  25
Morell's Essentials, English Grammar, with Exercises ,  25
Pott's Euclid, six Books  75
Todhunter's Mensuration  60
Tyndall's Natural Philosophy  62$
Bain's English Composition and Rhetoric  1 10
Science Primers—Introductory,  Chemistry, Physics,  Physical Geography, Geology, Astronomy,
Physiology, and Botany, each ,  25
Ancient Geography, (Pillans) ,  50
Ancient History (Schmidt) -.  1 00
White's Grammar School Texts, Latin, each  ,  25
White's Grammar School Texts, Greek  ,  30
Bryce's First Latin Book  75
Bryce's First Greek Book  75
Liddell & Scott's Greek Lexicon  2 OO
Riddle's Latin Dictionary  75
Smith's smaller Latin Grammar , ,  87$
Curtiu's Greek Grammar ,  87$
Initial Grasca (Smith)  87$
Principia Latina, Part I (Smith)  87$
Latin Prose Composition (Arnold)  87$
Greek Prose Composition (Arnold)  87$
Books Authorized for Use in the High School—1878-9.
Trigonometry for Beginners, by Todhunter.
Elementary Statics, by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Hydrostatics, by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Dynamics, Wormell.
School Geography of the World, by J. B. Calkin.
Collier's History of Rome.
Collier's History of Greece.
De Fivas' Grammaire des Grammaires.
De Fivas' Elementary French Reader.
Chambers' Practical Mathematics. 43 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
219
APPENDIX F.
List of Teachers in Active Service, with Dates of Last Certificate of each.
First Class, Grade A.
Valid until revoked by Board of Education.   [Act repealed.]
C.,C. McKenzie, M.A., Cantab, July, 1873.
James A. Halliday, July, 1874.
Sarah Hayward, „        „
Letitia M. Caldwell, „        „
S. D, Pope, B.A., August, 1876.
J. H. McLaughlin, July, 1878.
A. W. Struthers,        „       „
First Class, Grade B.
Valid until revoked by Board of Education.   [Act repealed.'}
J.fPleace, July, 1873.
J. Kaye, „ 1874.
J'Mundell, „ 1875.
S. F. Crawford, July, 1876.
T. Leduc, July, 1877.
J. C. Newbury, July, 1878.
J. W. Thompson, July, 1878.
G. C. Phinney,       „       „
Second Class, Grade A.
Valid for Three Years.   [Act repealed.']
Adelaide S. Bailey, July, 1876.
Jane E. Trenaman,   „        „
Jane Coutts, „       „
Second Class. Grade B.
Valid for Three Years.   [Act repealed.]
Archena J. McDougall, July, 1877.
E. H. Holding, ,,       „
D. M. McMillan, July, 1878.
Abbie J. Polley, July, 1876.
J. W. Sinclair,       „        „
Archibald Dods,   „     1877.
C. Phair, „        „
Alice Eichardson, „        „
A Flett, July, 1878.
Thomas Clyde, July, 1878.
W. H. Lomas,     „       „
Joseph Thain, July, 1877.
Anne J. Colbeck, July, 1878.
Elizabeth Fisher, „       „
J. E. McCutchin, „       „
Catherine E. Cordiner, July, 1878.
Third Class, Grade A.
Valid for One Year   Act repealed.
Arabella W. H. Holmes, July, 1878.
Mary J. Hollo way, „        „
Temporary Certificates.
Valid till next Examination.
Mrs. E. V. V. Wilson Brown.
Miss Kern.
A. Johnstone.
A. McKenzie.
Miss Crease.
Miss Coughlan.
H. Brethour.
S. G. Lewis.
J. E. Stirling.
Mrs. Chandler.
Miss Carscallen.
Mrs. Berkeley.
Miss Ella.
Thomas J. Blake.
W. S. Beatty.
C. D. Band, B.A.
Geo. Stainburn, B.A., Cantab.
Bedford H. Smith.
W. D. McKay.
A. Irwin. 220 Public Schools Report. 1879
APPENDIX G.
List of Successful Candidates for Entrance to High School in 1879.
J ANUART.
Victoria Boys' School.—A. J. Jackson, Guy Cavin, Wm. H. Walsh, Christopher
Spencer, George Cox, James Stewart, William Partridge, William B. Naylor, Thomas
McLaughlin, Manasseh Meiss, Geo. A. Eichardson, W. H. Finlaison.
Victoria Girls' School.—Ada Botterell, Abbie F. Gardiner, M. E. Watson, Adelaide
Miller, Louisa Cox, M. E. Jones, M. J. Carne.
February. *
Lizzie Smith, A. Sheldrick.
Midsummer.
Victoria Boys' School.—J. Johnston, G. Cooper, C. Finlaison, W. Whittaker,
James Hodges, JosephJWilson.
Victoria Girls' School.—E. Martin, L. Smith, M. Lawrence.
New Westminster Boys' School.—Fred. Howay, J. S. Clute, E. B. Wadhams.
Craigflower School.—Frederick Adams, Joseph Stewart, John Parker, Jessie
Newbury, Eobert Porter.
Burrard Inlet School.—Clara Smith.
Esquimalt School.—Geo. Wilby.
Granville School.—Willie Eogers.
APPENDIX H.
Examination of Public Schools, Midsummer, 1879.
A Papers.
1st and 2nd Divisions, Boys' and Girls' Victoria; 1st Division, Boys' and Girls' Nanaimo
and New Westminster; and 1st Class (highest) in all other Schools.
1.—Arithmetic : Time, L} hours ; Marks, 100.
1. Express by figures the following numbers, and find their sum:—
Five hundred and thirty-four millions sixty-six thousand and eights-nine;
Nine hundred and eight millions sixty-six thousand and eighty-nine ;
Seven millions eight hundred and sixty-seven thousand six hundred and fifty-
three ;
Seventy millions five hundred and four thousand eight hundred and sixty-
seven.
2. From 1348976091475605
take    299087092769719
3. Multiply 8900 by 3040.
4. Divide 55667788 by 675.
.miles, fur. rods.  yds.   ft.    in.
5. Divide 7     5   29   5   2     9 by 15.
6. Simplify 2A^.6 hv -^~
«      f      J   2/3 of 4% 9 x 7%
7. If 7 men earn #140 in 8 days, how much will 6 men earn in 9 days ?
8. FiDd the sum and product of-008 and 5-125.
9. Find the simple interest of $500 for 3 years 7 months and 15 days, at 9 per cent.
per annum.
10. Make out Daniel White's account from the following memoranda:—
1879, Jan. 1st, You sold him 10 bushels wheat @ $1.10 per bushel, and 3
bushels of potatoes @ 80 cents per bushel. Feb. 4th, He pays you $10. March
5th, He sells you 2 doz. eggs @ 18 cts. per doz. April 8th, You sell him 6 lbs.
butter @ 20 cts. per. lb. 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 221
2.—Geography; Time, 1$ hours ; Marks, 100.
1. Define latitude, longitude, meridian, and zone.
2. Give at least 10 mountain ranges of Europe, and state their situation.
3. Give at leastlO rivers of Asia, and state the countries through which they flow.
4. Give the oceans, seas, gulfs, bays, channels, and straits surrounding Africa.
5. Give 10 capes on the east of North America, from Greenland to Florida, inclusive.
6. Give the countries of South America, with the capital of each.
1   7. Give the principal islands of Australasia.
3.—Grammar: Time, 1$ hours: Marks, 100.
1. Define,—noun, pronoun, adjective, verb, and adverb.
2. Write the plurals of axis,  chimney, memorandum, die, journey, penny, and
monarch.
3. Give in the singular and plural numbers, the nominative, possessive, and objective
cases of ox and hero.
4. Give the three degrees of comparison of adjectives, and compare bad, much, old,
long, temperate.
5. Give the third person singular of each of the six tenses of the indicative mood,
active voice, of " go."
6. Correct the following sentences and give reasons for the corrections you make:—
Between you and I, I think quite different.    Every man told their own tale.
7. Analyze and parse:—Their flight would soon terminate the contest.
4.—History : Time, 1$ hours : Marks, 100.
1. Name the Kingdoms of the Saxon Heptarchy.   Which finally absorbed the rest ?
2. Which of the Saxon Kings was called " Great" ?    Give the dates of his reign.
3. Who was the last of the Saxon Kings ?   What became of him ?
4. Give the names of the eight Plantagenet Kings.    Who was the first "Plantag-
enet," and why was he so called ?
5. What line of Kings followed the Tudors, and who was the last of that line that
sat upon the English throne ?
6. Give the names of the Sovereigns of the House of Brunswick.
7. Trace the descent of Queen Victoria from George III.
5.—Spelling, Punctuation, and Writing : Time, 1$ hours ; Marks, 100.
Correct, write in a neat hand, and punctuate these six lines of poetry :—
i here the speke off the bettur land
' thou caulest its children a happey band
muther o whare is that raydient shoar
shall we knot seke it and wepe know moar
is it whare the flour of the orrenge blose
and the fierflyg danse threw the murtle bows.
Correct,—
Fassinnation,   Exammanation,   sufficent,   spredding,   exibbition,  sepperated,
solgerly, vissitter, recieve, barberus.
16 222 Public Schools Report. 1879
B Papers.
3rd and ith Divisions, Boys' and Girls', Victoria ; 2nd class 1st Division, Boys' and Girls',
Nanaimo and New West.; 2nd and 3rd Classes (next below the highest) in all other Schools.
1.—Arithmetic: Time, 1$ hours; Marks, 100.
1. Express by figures the following numbers, and find their sum:—
Five hundred and thirty-four millions sixty-six thousand and eighty-nine;
Nine hundred and eight millions nine hundred thousand and four ;
Seven millions eight hundred and sixty-seven thousand six hundred and fifty-
three ;
Seventy millions five hundred and four thousand eight hundred and sixty-
seven,
2. From 1348976091475605
Take    299087092769719
3. Multiply 8900 by 3040.
4. Divide 55667788 by 675.
miles, fur.  rods. yds.   ft.    in.
5. Divide   7   5   29   5   2   9 by 15.
2.—Geography: Time, 1$ hours: Marks, 100.
1. What is a Peninsula ?
2. What is a Strait ?
3. What is an Isthmus ?
4. Where is the Strait of Magellan ?
5. Where is the Isthmus of Suez ?
6. Name the Oceans.
7. Name the Continents.
8. Name the countries of Europe.
9. Name the countries of North America.
10. Name the great mountain range in North America, and the one in South America.
3.—Grammar: time, 1$ hours: Marks, 100.
1. What is a letter that has a full open sound called ?
2. What is a word of one syllable called ?
3. Give the nine parts of speech.
4. How do nouns generally form their plurals ?
5. What terminations of nouns form their plurals by adding es to the singular ?
6. What are the three cases of nouns ?
7. What are the three genders of nouns ?
8. Give the genders of the following nouns: horse, duck, wisdom, desk, bird.
9. Give the feminine of the following nouns: boy, czar, earl, hero, and father.
10. What is an adjective.
4.—Spelling and Writing: Time, 1$ hours: Marks, 100.
Correct, write in a neat hand, and punctuate these six lines of poetry :—
i here the speke off the bettur land
thou caulest its children a happey band
muther o whare is that raydient shoar
shall we knot seke it and wepe know moar
is it whare the flour of the orrenge blose
and the fierflys danse threw the murtle bows. 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 223
High School Examination, Midsummer, 1879.
Senior and Junior Divisions.
1.—Mensuration : Time, 1J hours : marks, 100.
1. A ladder, 25 feet long, stands upright against a wall; find how far the bottom
of the ladder must be pulled out from the wall so as to lower the top one foot.
2. A country is 500 miles long; find the length of a map which represents the
country on the scale of one eighth of an inch to a mile.
3. Find the length of the side of a regular polygon of twelve sides inscribed in a
circle whose radius is 1 inch.
4. The radius of a circle is 16 inches; find the perimeter of a segment, the arc of
which subtends an angle of 90° at the centre of the circle.
5. If one stalk of wheat will grow on 9 square inches of ground, find how many
stalks will grow on an acre.
6. Find the area'of the gable end of a house, the breadth being 24 feet, the distance
of the eaves from the ground 30 feet, and the perpendicular height of the roof 10 feet.
7. The sides of a quadrilateral taken in order are 27, 36, 30, and 25 feet respectively,
and the angle contained by the first two sides is a right angle ; find the area.
8. The radius of a circle is 18 inches; find the radius of another circle of one-fifth
the area.
9. An equilateral triangle and a circle have the same perimeter; compare the areas.
10. Find the volume of a sphere when its surface is equal to that of a circle 4 feet
in diameter.
2.—Algebra: Time, 1J hours: Marks, 100.     ■
1.—Express —• b — 3c + 4rf, — -2e + 3/ + a by brackets, taking the terms three together. Express your answer by using also an inner bracket, including in it the latter
two of the three terms within each of the outer brackets.
2. Multiply a2 + 2a — 1 by a2 — 3a — 1.
3. Divide 1 -|- xs — 8y* -|- 6xy by 1 + x — 2y.
4. Find the G. C. M. of x2 — 1x -f 10 and 4a:3 — 25x2 + 20x -f 25.
5. Find the value of ——iL i 1 _
x'1—?/J    x—y   x-\-y
6. Solve the simple equation :  = 1-1 ——
1      H x + 2 ^ 2a;—1
7. A horse was sold at a loss for $40 ; but if it had been sold for $50 the gain would
have been three-fourths of the former loss; find its real value.
5x        3x 2
8. Solve the quadratic equation:
x + 4     2x—3
9. Form the equation whose roots are land—4
10. The difference between the hypothenuse and the other sides of a right-angled
triangle are 3 and 6 respectively; find the sides. 224 Public Schools Report. 1879
Senior Division.
3.—Book-keeping (Double Entry) : Time, 1J hours : Marks, 100.
1. How are the terms "Debtor" and "Creditor" used in Single Entry and in Double
Entry ?
2. Name the different classes of accounts and describe them.
3. Name the principal books used, and describe their uses.
4. What is journalizing ? Give directions for journalizing.
5. Journalize the following:—A. B. has made a draft on me at 30 days' sight, which
I have accepted, for $125.
6. Journalize, post into Ledger, and close all the Ledger Accounts in the following
memoranda:—
Commenced business with Cash   $2,000.   B. owes me $200.
Bought merchandise of D, for Cash   2,000
Do.            do.             E, on my note  200
Do.            do.             B, on account   700
Sold            do.        to F, for Cash   500
Do.            do.             A, on account   40
Do.            do.             C, on account   60
Do.             do.              G, on his note   250
Do.             do.              H, on his note  350
Paid Cash to D, for Store expenses  150
Merchandise on hand   2,100
4.—Grammar: Time, 1J hours: Marks, 100.
1. What are the plurals of radius, phenomenon, deer, wharf, tableau, axis, focus,
cherub ?
2. What are the principal parts of a verb? Give those of lie (to lie down), lie (to
tell a falsehood), lay, go, do, drown, throw.
3. Decline goose, calf, and the pronoun thou.
4. Give the 1st per. plural of each of the six tenses of the indicative mood, active
voice of go, naming the tenses.
5. Analyze and parse fully:—To die with honour is all we ean now do.
6. Distinguish between a compound and a complex sentence.
7. Change the construction of the following sentence so that it shall contain a
Nominative Absolute:—Having completed his arrangements for the battle, Napoleon
beheld the vast array defile before him.
8. Correct the following sentences, and give reasons for your correction:—
It was neither him nor her who did it.
Six year's rent seem to be unpaid.
9. What is the use of figures of speech ? Name the figures of sjieech in these sentences :—The clouds of adversity soon pass away, Socrates drank the fatal cup.
10. Write ten lines in proper letter form answering an advertisement headed
"Wanted a Clerk."
Senior Division, First and Second Classes.
5.—Latin (Cesar) : Time, 1J hours : Marks, 100.
Interea ea legione, quam secum habebat, militibusque, qui ex Provincia eonvenerant,
a lacu Lemanno, qui in flumen Ehodanum influit, ad montem Juram, qui fines Sequanorum
ab Helvetiis dividit, millia passuum decern novem murum, in altitudinem pedum sedecim,
fossamquc pcrducit.    Eo opcrc porfecto, prsesidia disponit, castella communit, quo facil- 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 225
ius, si se invito transire conarentur, prohibere possit. Ubi ea dies, quam constituerat
cum legatis, venit, et legati ad eum reverterunt, negat, " Se more et exemplo Populi
Eomani posse iter ulli per Provinciam dare; et, si vim facere conentur, prohibiturum
ostendit." Helvetii, ea spe dejecti, navibus junctis ratibusque compluribus factis, alii
vadis Ehodani, qua minima altitudo fluminis erat, nonnunquam interdiu, saapius noctu,
si perrumpere possent conati, operis munitione et militum concursu et telis repulsi, hoc
conatu destiterunt.
1. Decline in the singular, pedum, sedecim, iter, vim, operis.
2. Give the principal parts of influit, possit, prohibiturum, repulsi, destiterunt.
3. Parse the following:—Se invito, se posse dare, saepius, noctu, militum.
4. What parts of their respective verbs are—'Conarentur, possit, conentur, possunt,
destiterunt.
5. Translate into Latin:—Ambassadors were sent to Caasar. They threw them
roses at Caesar's feet. The Gauls were conquered by the Eomans. The enemy attempt-
etlvove their camp.   The Britons are ordered to give hostages.
Senior Divisoon.
6.—Roman History : Time, \\ hours : Marks, 100.
1. Into what tribes were the citizens of Borne organized by Eomulus ?
2. What form of government succeeded the monarchy, and who were first governors under that form ?
3. What two events led to the overthrow of the tyranny of the Decemvirs ?
4. Where did Greek and Eoman meet for the first time in war ? Who won, and by
what means ?
5. Who excited the Third Punic War ? What was the one event of that war ?
6. What caused the civil war between Marius and Sulla, and how did it end ?
7. Who composed the first triumvirate, and how was the Eoman world divided
between them ?
8. Who composed the second triumvirate ? How did they endeavour to cement the
coalition thus formed ?
9. Where is Philippi, and what event in connection with the second  triumvirate
took place there ?
10. Give an account of the battle of Actium.
Junior Division.
7.—French : Time, 1J hours : Marks, 100.
1. How many articles are there in French ? Give singular and plural foi'ins.
2. How do nouns generally form their plurals ?   Give the singulars and plurals,
using the article, of pere, enfant, reine, nez, chapeau, clou, ciel, ceil.
3. What difference is there between adjectives in English and French ? How do
adjectives generally form their feminines ?
4. Give the feminines of jeune, neuf, heureux, doux, vieux, cruel, bon, cher, beau,
long.
5. How do adjectives generally form their plurals ?   Give the masculine and feminine plurals of grand, tout, nouveau, egal, heureux.
6. State two ways in which the superlative is formed from the comparative.
7. Compare aimable, joli, bon, mauvais, petit.
8. Write down the cardinal numbers from 1 to 20.
9. Give the inflections of "I" and "thou," in the singular and plural.
10. What kind of a pronoun is "dont" and how is it used?    Translate, L'homme
dont vous parlez. 226 Public Schools Report. 1879
Senior and Junior Divisions.
8.—Spelling and Punctuation: Time, \ hour: Marks, 100.
Smal shrimps krabs lobsturs togeather with varyus molusks form the dyet on wich
the vast bulk of the Greneland wale is sustaned driveing with open mowth threw the
congregaited sholes of thees littel cretures the wale engullfs them by millyuns in it's
enormis jaus and continuse it's distructiv corse untill it has suffishently charged it's
mowth with them then kloseing it's jaus and driveing out threw inturstisses off the
walebone the watter wich it has taken with it's pray it retanes the kaptured annimals
wich ar entangeled in the walebone and swauloes them at it's ees.
Correct,—Emmissarys, dinysty, semmy-barberous, oponants, pajentry, sellebbritie,
accootered, queerass, appurtnances, belleggerant.
Senior and Junior Divisions.
9.—Natural Philosophy : Time, 1J hours : Marks, 100.
1. Define matter, force, and motion.
2. Define inertia, momentum, and gravity.
3. Name the three states of matter, and define a liquid.
4. What is the most remarkable property of liquids.
5. What happens if a bottle filled with air and corked is sunk in deep water ? How
do you explain this?
6. Define specific gravity. What substance is taken as the standard for estimating
specific gravity, and under what conditions ?
7. The specific gravity of gold is 19.4, find the weight of a cubic inch of it, having
given that a cubic foot of water weighs 1000 oz.
8. A certain substance weighs 30 lbs. in water and 40 lbs. in air; what is its specific
gravity ?
9. Describe the barometer and explain the principle on which it acts.
10. Describe the thermometer. Graduate a thermometer on whose scale 20° shall
denote the freezing point and whose 80th degree shall indicate the same temperature as
80° Fahrenheit.
Senior Division, 3rd Class ; Junior Division, 1st and 2nd Classes.
10.—Latin : Time, li hours : Marks, 100.
1. Decline the following nouns, pes, a foot; iter, a journey; vis, strength; opus, a
work.
2. Compare following adjectives:—Bonus, nialus, magnus, multus, parvus.
3. Decline hie and is (ea, id).
4. Translate into English:—Pastor parat insidias lupo. Persas solem adorant.
Milites ducenti in praelio vulnerati erant. Pater deorurn risit, atque ranis regem dedit
parvum tigillum.    Pueri sunt docendi, dum aetas sit tenera.
5. Translate into Latin:—Ambassadors were sent to Caasar. They threw themselves at Caasar's feet. The Gauls were conquered by the Eomans. The enemy attempt
to move their camp.   The Britons are ordered to give hostages. 43 Vic. Public Schools Report. 227
Senior and Junior Divisions.
11.—Geography: Time, 1J hours: Marks, 100.
1. Why should the sailor climb to the top-mast when he wishes to see the distant
shore ?
2. Name the eight largest planets, in the order of their distance from the sun.
3. What causes the alternate rise and fall of the ocean ; What is this movement
called; Show by a diagram the relative positions of the sun, moon, and earth when
these movements reach their highest elevation.
4. What influences affect the climate of a country ?
5. Name at least eight of the rivers draining the Atlantic slope of the Alleghany
Mountains.
6. Name at least ten of the coast waters of South America (including the mouths of
large rivers).
7. Name the peninsulas of Europe.
8. What two rivers flow into the Sea of Aral, and what river flows out of Lake
Baikal ?
9. Name the mountain ranges of Africa, and state their situation.
10. By what three practicable routes could you take a ship from Liverpool to
Melbourne ?
Senior and Junior Divisions.
12.—English History: Time, 1-J hours: Marks, 100.
1. Give an account of the rising of the Iceni, with causes, names of leaders, towns
sacked, numbers killed, and its end.
2. How, when, and why did the Eoman occupation of Britain end ?
3. Who was Dunstan, and what change was brought about by him in the church ?
4. What two battles and with whom did Harold II. fight ?
5. Discuss the respective claims of King Stephen and Matilda to the English throne.
How was the dispute between them compromised?
6. What ecclesiastical penalty was imposed upon England in the reign of John, its
cause and effects?
7. What was the great object of Edward I.'s reign, and to what extent was it successful?
8. What great battles were fought in the reign of Edward III., and what prisoners
were taken ?
9. Give an account of the battle of Trafalgar, with date, names of leaders, ships,
fleets, and result.
10. Give the causes of the three wars of England with China.    What commercial
and other advantages did England gain by these wars ? 228 Public Schools Report. 1879
Senior and Junior Divisions.
13.—Arithmetic: Time, 1J hours: Marks, 100.
miles, fur. rods.-yds.    ft.    in.
1. Divide   7   5    29    5   2   9   by 45.
2. Simplify
2/6 ol 5/6 1}4
1/3 of 4%    M    9 X VA
3. If 7 men eai'n $140 in 8 days, how much will 5 men earn in 11 days ?
4. Find the sum and product of -0008 and 51-25.
5. Find the amount of $500 at simple interest for 3 years, 7 months, and 15 days
at f per cent, per month.
6. Find the compound interest of $200,000 for 3 years at 5 per cent, per annum.
7. A. and B. engage in trade. A. invests $60, and at the end of 5 months withdraws
$20 ; B. invests $40, and at the end of 7 months $60 more. Divide between them $136,
their gain at the end of the year.
8. A person having $4,000 Bank Stock sells out when it is at 40 per cent, premium;
what amount of money does he receive, brokerage being | per cent.
9. A piece of silk costs a merchant 80 cents a yard ; at what price must he mark it
in order that he may sell it at 10 per cent, less than the marked price and still have 20
per cent, profit ?
10. Find the cube root of 9 to three places of decimals.
Senior Division.
14.—Euclid: Time, 1| hours: Marks, 100.
1. Give Euclid's definition of a circle and of parallel straight lines.
2. Book I., 20. Any two sides of a triangle are together greater than the third side.
3. Book L, 32. If a side of any triangle be produced the exterior angle is equal to
the two interior and opposite angles ; and the three interior angles of every triangle
are together equal to two right angles.
4. Book IL, 7. If a straight line be divided into any two parts, the squares on the
whole line, and on one of the parts, are equal to twice the rectangle contained by the
whole and that part, together with the square on the other part.
5. Book III., 22. The opposite angles of any quadrilateral figure inscribed in a circle
are together equal to two right angles.
VICTORIA: Printed by Richard Wouenden, Government Printer,
at the Government Printing Office, James' Bay.

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