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RETURN To an Address of the Legislative Assembly for copies of all correspondence, Orders in Council,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly. 1878

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 41 Vic. Correspondence—"Wellington Strike. 525
RETURN'
To an Address of the Legislative Assembly for copies of all correspondence, Orders
in Council, and other documents whatsoever, in relation to the Miners' strike
at Nanaimo, and to the dispatch of a body of armed volunteers, or militia, to
the District of Nanaimo, in the spring of 1877.
By Command.
A. C. Elliott,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Office,
11th March, 1878.
Mr. Spalding to the Lieutenant-Governor.
Stipendiary Magistrate's Office,
Nanaimo, 25th February, 1877.
Sir,—I have the honour herewith to transmit, for 57our information, a communication received by me on this date, from Messrs. Dunsmuir, Diggle & Company.
It appears to me that the miners hitherto employed at the Wellington Colliery are
determined to proceed to extremities, and have already committed such acts of violence
as will necessitate the employment of an armed force to reduce them to order and compel them to respect the law.
I would therefore suggest that one of Her Majesty's ships should be dispatched as
early as possible to this station, for the purpose of overawing the miners and, if need
be, enforcing obedience to authority.
This letter will be conveyed to Victoria by Lieutenant Diggle, B. N., who will
afford Your Excellency any additional information that may be required.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) Warner B. Spalding,
County Court, Judge and S. M.
[Enclosure.]
Messrs. Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. to Mr. Spalding.
Nanaimo,
Sunday, 25th February, 1877.
Sir,—On account of a strike of our miners at Wellington for an advance per ton,
which we refused to grant, wTe discharged them, and procured thirty-three men from
San Francisco. These men agreed to work, and it was intended that they should have
commenced to-morrow morning; but to-day the miners formerly employed came down
in a body to Departure Bay, where we had provided accommodation for the new hands,
and, by threats and violence, compelled them to leave and come to Nanaimo; we, therefore, beg that y7ou, as Magistrate, will grant protection to those men whom we have
employed and who are willing to work if protected.
We have, etc.,
(Signed) Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co.
Mr. Dunsmuir to the Attorney- General.
Departure Bay, 25th February, 1877.
My Dear Mr. Elliott,—For  goodness sake act promptly in this matter, I am
afraid that there will be bloodshed among us at this time; I know the miners as well, I
think, as any one, and I can see that we have all a hard battle to fight.    Diggle will, of
course, tell you all.    I have, etc.,
(Signed) B. Dunsmuir.
36 526 Correspondence—Wellinglon Strike. • 1878
Tfie Attorney-General to Mr. Spalding.
Attorney-General's Office,
27th February, 1877.
Sir,—I have the honour to acquaint you that your communication to His Honour
the Lieutenant-Governor, relative to the disturbances caused by the miners on strike at
Messrs. Dunsmuir & Diggle's mine at Nanaimo, has been duly7 considered, and I have to
inform you that the Government have decided to appoint a Commission to enquire into
the matter.
In the meantime the Commander of Her Majesty's ship "Rocket" has received
instructions to proceed to Nanaimo and to render assistance to the officers of the law
should occasion require, and when called upon by you.
You will be good enough to convey this intimation to the proprietors of the mine
and also to the miners themselves.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) A. C. Elliott.
Mr. Dunsmuir to the Attorney-General.
Departure Bay,
27th February, 1877.
My Dear Mr. Elliott,—Please hurry up the Commission of enquiry relative to the
disturbance with us.    Diggle tells me that you spoke to him about it.    It would give
great satisfaction to have one of the Judges here, so that the matter would be fully
gone into.
Such a lot of men I never had to deal with before, and there will be no peace with
them until they get a proper lesson, and in haste.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) R. Dunsmuir.
Mr. Dunsmuir to the Attorney-General.
Departure Bay,
1st March, 1877.
Sir,—We are going to have trouble, if not bloodshed, when we commence to eject
the miners from the houses; they have got one month's notice to quit, which expires on
the 8th inst., but they say they will not leave, and that we cannot put them out. It is
very urgent that a Bill should be passed immediatelj7 relative to persons occupying
houses belonging to any mining company, saw mill company, or private individual,
when such houses are built purposely for the employes while in employment only,
giving them say eight days to give up the premises so as to make room for others,
notwithstanding rent being deducted from their pay, that is, eight days from the time
they7 stop work. I am tired of all this trouble that wo are having, and I see no other
way out of it but that we will have to shut down the works altogether for some months.
The miners have got a hue and cry that we were cheating them in weight; they never
spoke to me about it until after they had struck work. I shall be glad when the commission comes up so that things may be thoroughly looked into from the beginning of
this disturbance. If you have not time yourself get Mr. McCreight to draw up a Bill
to suit the purposes of the houses, and we will pay the costs.
The miners were very quiet when Mr. Todd went out and arrested four of them today, but I can see by them that there is no chance of a settlement for a long time, and
in fact I don't think there will be with the present miners.
Please show this letter to Mr. Gordon, so that he may know the state of things up
here at present, and in haste. I have, etc.,
(Signed) R. Dunsmuir.
Petition of Miners.
Wellington, March 1st, 1877.
This Petition to His Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British
Columbia, humbly showeth :—
1st. That your petitioners are a community of miners residing at Wellington near
Nanaimo.     That they view with deep regret the fact that certain interested parties 41 Vic. Correspondence -Wellington Strike. 527
have made false representations with respect to the behaviour of the miners in that
community now7 out on strike :
2nd. That your petitioners have gone out on strike, as the only means in their
power, for the redress of certain deep and urgent wrongs affecting their liberties as men,
and their means of obtaining support for themselves, their wives, and families as miners:
3rd That your petitioners aver that they deeply feel the disgrace put upon them,
as law-abiding citizens, by the sending of an armed force into their midst:
4th. That we assert and substantiate by our names that no breach of the peace has
been attempted.    That we have no intention of making any such breach :
5th. And that we are ready to turn out to a man for the maintenance of peace and
for the preservation of life and property :
6th. That your petitioners humbly7 pray that a Commission be appointed of good
men and true, who are not interested in the coal mining business personally, for the
purpose of enquiring into the charges brought against the owners by the miners, and if
those charges are found to be correct that the said charges may be redressed, and the
order and well-being of the community restored.
In witness to the before mentioned statement we have hereunto subscribed our
names.
And your petitioners will ever pray, etc.
(Signed) Joseph Dore, Joseph Hardy,
"W. O. Baker, Henry Biggs,
Thomas Goldsworthy, and 101 others.
Sir Matthew B. Begbie to the Attorney-General.
Victoria, 3rd March, 1877.
My Dear Mr. Attorney,—If you inform me expressly that both the parties now
at issue at Departure Bay not merely wish to have an opportunity of stating their unfortunate differences to me in a friendly way, but are ready to accept my informal arbitration to
decide between them; and, further, if you inform me that you think 1 can be of any use
in composing those differences, and ask me to try to do so, I do not think that I ought
to refuse. At the same time I feel considerable difficulty in perceiving what can be
done at present, if this be simply a strike for a rise in wages, and above all, what will
be done m the result, even if I should be able to arrive at a definite conclusion. Perhaps
neither party might accept my conclusion, and matters might be only embittered by my
interference. This would, I think, be a very natural result of any steps taken prematurely, or taken otherwise than on the deliberate invitation of the parties themselves.
I should, therefore, feel compelled to decline your suggestion unless and until you
are in a position to assure me that both parties desire my ^services and will undertake
to carry out the conclusions to which I may arrive after inquiry on the spot.
Believe me, etc.,
(Signed) Matt. B. Begbie.
The Attorney-General to Messrs. Dore, Baker, Goldsworthy, and Davis.
5th March, 1877.
Gentlemen,—The petition signed by7 yourselves and many others, and forwarded to
His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, has been handed to me, and I have the honour to
state that the Government are anxious to assist in every7 way to arrive at an amicable
settlement of the present unfortunate differences existing between yourselves and the
owners of the mine at Departure Bay. I beg, therefore, to inform y7ou that I have had
an interview7 with Sir Matthew B. Begbie, and he has agreed to act, tin a friendly and
informal manner, as arbitrator, provided that both parties will agree to accept and abide
by his decision.
I have wa-itten to Messrs, Dunsmuir & Co. to the like effect, and if both parties
agree, I see no obstacle in the way of a speedy settlement.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) A. C. Eiiioxt. 528 Correspondence—Wellington Strike. 1878
The Attorney-General to Mr. Dunsmuir.
Victoria, 5th, March, 1877.
Dear Mr. Dunsmuir,—Will you have any objection to Sir Matthew B. Begbie
acting as arbitrator in the differences at present existing between your men and yourselves. 1 should bo rejoiced if some settlement could be arrived at which would be
satisfactory to all parties.    Send a reply by to-morrow's boat.
Yours very truly,
(Signed) A. C. Elliott.
Mr. Spalding to the Attorney-General.
Stipendiary Magistrate's  Office,
Nanaimo, 5th March, 1877.
Sir,—I have the honour herewith to transmit the information, depositions, and
cemmitments taken and made by me in the case of Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co., vs. Joseph
Hoskins, James Williams, James Thompson, and J. D. Edwards for "obstructing with
violence," contrary to sub-section 1 of Section 2, 39 Vic, chap. 37, and with conspiracy
at common law.
On Referring to the commitment for the offence under tho statute, you will observe
that the accused parties objected to being tried before me.     Thence it was that under
Section 3 of the before-mentioned Act, I committed them for trial.
The parties accused have been admitted to bail.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) Warner B. Spalding,
Stipendiary Magistrate.
Mr. Dunsmuir to the Attorney-General.
Departure Bay, 6th March, 1877.
My Dear Mr. Elliott,—Your letter to hand, and in reply I beg to state that wo
have no objection whatever, in fact we would much like, that Sir Matthew B. Begbie
would come up and enquire into the late disturbances with the miners lately in our
employment, and the sooner he conies the better for all concerned.
We have a lot of men now in Victoria at a heavy expense, and cannot bring them
up here unless we get protection from the Government. My son Alexander, and Mr.
Bryden will explain matters to j7Ou; trusting you will send the " Rocket" back immediately.   In haste,
Yours, etc.,
(Signed) R. Dunsmuir.
Mr. Walkem to the Attorney-General.
Victoria, March 6th, 1877.
Dear Sir,—I have been retained to defend some Nanaimo coal miners arrested and
committed for trial at the instance of Messrs. Dunsmuir & Co. You are of course aware
that serious questions of a civil and criminal nature are.involved in this matter. As you
have stated that the Government are about to take steps to have the subject of dispute
finally settled, I beg that you will inform me, as counsel for the men, what you propose
doing; and also that you will communicate with me instead of with the men, when
necessary.
A saving of time, apart from other considerations, makes such a course most desirable,
as delay is ruinous to both employers and employes.
Be good enough to give me a reply to-morrow.
Yours, etc.,
(Signed) Geo. A. Walkem, 41 Vic. Correspondence—Welllington Strike. 529
The Attorney-General to Mr. Walkem.
7th March, 1877.
Dear Sir,—The only communications the Government has had with the men on
strike at the Wellington Mine, was one sent through Mr. Spalding, the Magistrate, to
inform them that the Government would take steps to enquire into the matter, and the
other was an answer to a petition of the men, addressed to His Honour the Lieutenant-
Governor.    Neither of these communications having reference to legal proceedings.
Yours truly.
(Signed) A. C. Elliott.
Mr. Dunsmuir to the Attorney-General.
Departure Bay, 8th March, 1877.
My Dear Mr. Elliott,—Yours of the 6th instant to hand, asking if we would have
any objection to Sir Matthew B. Begbie acting as an arbitrator in the differences at
present existing between us and the miners. In reply, we beg to state that w7e have no
objection whatever, in fact, we would rather like to see Sir Matthew here, and the
sooner he comes the better for all concerned.    In haste.
I am, etc.,
(Signed) R. Dunsmuir.
The Miners' Committee to the Attorney-General.
Wellington, March 9th, 1877.
Sir,—Your communication of the 5th instant was duly received by us and submitted to your petitioners, the miners at Wellington, for their consideration.
In answer thereto we beg to state that the miners at Wellington will have great
pleasure in accepting Sir Matthew Begbie as an informal arbitrator in all matters
between themselves and the owners of the mine, and have pledged themselves, through
us, to abide by his decision.
Hoping that by this means a speedy settlement of the difficulty may be arrived at,
We have, etc.,
(Signed)       Phillips, Adams, Bailey, and Harris,
Acting Committee on behalf of the Miners.
The Miners' Committee to the Attorney-General.
Friday Evening, March 9th, 1877.
Sir,—In reply to a letter of yours of the 5th instant, we forwarded an acceptance
on the part of the Wellington miners of your offer of arbitration.
We beg  now to withdraw this acceptance, as we would prefer that you should
consult with the Honourable G. A. Walkem, our legal adviser, on the subject.
Oblige us by addressing any further communication on this subject to Honourable
G. A. Walkem, as it will save the usual postal delays.
We have, etc,
(Signed)   Phillips, Adams, Bailey, and Harris,
Acting Committee on behalf of the Miners.
Air. Dunsmuir to the Attorney-General.
* Departure Bay, 9th March, 1877.
My Dear Mr. Elliott,—I have told Alexander to bring up the men on Monday;
could you not send the Superintendent of Police with them?
1 expected that there would have been some one up before now to enquire into the
disturbances. You must bear in mind that I would not allow anyone to arbitrate on
our business as I can manage that myself, and in fact there is nothing to arbitrate on
except the breaking of the law by the miners.
Yours truly,
(Signed) R. Dunsmuir, 530 Correspondence—Wellington Strike. 1878
Mr. Dunsmuir to the Attorney- General.
Departure Bay, 29th March, 1877.
My Dear Mr. Elliott,—The miners have defied the under Sheriff, and rumour has
it that our friend Walkem has advised them that there is no law in the country to
compel them to leave the houses. We are at last in a fix—cannot get possession of our
property, and the law set at naught.
Harris must send force, none can be got here.
Yours, etc.,
(Signed) R. Dunsmuir.
Mr. Dunsmuir to the Attorney- General.
Departure Bay, 20th April.
My Dear Mr. Elliott,—If the law cannot be carried out, I shall have to shut down
the works for twelve months; and if there is not something done next week, I shall do
so.   We have been put to too much expense for the want of a proper force; and in haste.
I am. etc.,
(Signed) R. Dunsmuir.
The Attorney-General to the Superintendent of Police.
Attorney-General's Office,
23rd April, 1877.
Sir,—I have the honour to inform you that H.M.S. " Rocket" will shortly proceed
to Nanaimo, in order to assist the Sheriff in the execution of his duty; the miners on
strike at the "Wellington Colliery having recently7 obstructed him in his endeavours to
eject some trespassers. You will be good enough to proceed with the Sheriff and render
such assistance in preserving the peace as may be necessary.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) A. C. Elliott.
Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honour'able the Executive Council, approved by His
Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor on the 24th day of April, 1877.
On a Memorandum from the Honourable the Attorney-General, dated the 23rd
day of April, 1877, reporting that it.is advisable, owing to the resistance offered to the
Sheriff in the execution of his duty by the miners on strike at the Wellington Colliery,
to request Captain Hanmer to dispiatch one of 11 er Majesty's ships to "Nanaimo to
protect and assist the Sheriff in case of repeated outrage, and recommending that it be
so ordered.
The Committee advise that the recommendation bo approved.
Certified,
(Signed) Jas. Judson Young,
Deputy Clerk Executive Council.
The Lieutenant- Governor to Commander Hanmer, R. N
24th April, 1877.
Sir,—On a Memorandum from the Attorney-Genera^ dated 23rd of April, 1877,
reporting that it is advisable, owing to the resistance offered to the Sheriff in the execution of his duty7 by the miners on strike at the Wellington Colliery, my Government is
of opinion that the occasion is sufficiently7 urgent to wan ant the dispatch of one of Her
Majestyr's ships to Nanaimo to protect and assist the Sheriff in case of repeated outrage.
I have the honour, therefore, to apply to you, upon the advice of my7 Ministers, for
the services of H.M.S. "Rocket" to proceed to the scene of disturbance and render such
assistance as may be required.
1 have, etc.,
(Signed) A. N. Richards. 41 Vic Correspondence—Wellington Strike. 531
The Private Secretary to the Attorney-General.
Government House,
Victoria, 25th April, 1877.
Sir,—I nave the honour to enclose herewith, by request of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, a copy of a despatch received this day from Commander Hanmer, of H.
M. S. Daring, in reference to one of Her Majesty's ships proceeding to Nanaimo to afford
protection to the authorities at that place.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) G. Richard Layton.
Private Secretary.
Commander Hanmer, R.N., to the Lieutenant-Governor.
H. M. S. Daring,
Esquimalt, 25th April, 1877.
Sir,—I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch dated 24th
April, 1877, and in reply to the request therein contained I beg to inform you that I
have instructed Lieutenant Harris, commanding Her Majesty's ship Rocket, to proceed
to Nanaimo to afford protection to the authorities at that place.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) John G. T. Hanmer,
Commander and, Senior Officer
[The requisition, signed by a Stipendiary Magistrate and three Justices of the
Peace, addressed to the Deputy Adjutant-General, for the Militia to proceed to the
Wellington Colliery to aid the civil power, was forwarded to the Adjutant-General by7
the Deputy7 Adjutant-General, with his report.]
The Attorney-General to Captain James Cooper.
Attorney-General's Office,
27th April, 1877.
Dear Sir,—Referring to our conversation of yesterday regarding the chartering
of the steamer " Douglas," I find that it is the intention of the Deputy Adjutant-General
to take between 80 or 90 militiamen with him to Nanaimo.
The sleeping accommodation on the "Douglas " not being considered sufficient for
so large a number, the Government has thought it prudent to engage the services of a
steamer having larger accommodation than that of the " Douglas."
Thanking you for your readiness to co-operate with us,
I have, etc.,
(Signed) A, C, Elliott.
The Attorney-General to Mr, Spalding.
Attorney-General's Office,
28th April, 1877.
Sir,—I have the honour to inform you that the Sheriff will be at Departure Bay at
8 o'clock, a.m., on Monday the 30th instant, for the purpose of ejecting the miners on
strike from the premises held by them; he will be attended by a detachment of the
active militia, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Houghton, who has been
requested to assist, with his men, in aiding the civil power and in suppressing any riot
and preventing a disturbance of the peace consequent upon the Sheriff again attempting
to discharge his duty.
You will be good enough to meet the Sheriff at the before mentioned time and place,
and give him such assistance as may be in your power. 532 Correspondence—Wellington Strike. 1878
The officer in command of the militia will remain with you and obey your instructions. See Sec. 1 of 36 Vict., Cap. 46, also the Act respecting riots and riotous
assemblies, 31 Vict., Cap. 70,
I have, etc.,
(Signed) A. C. Elliott.
The Attorney-General to Captain Hanmer, R. N.
Attorney-General's Office,
28th April, 1877.
Sir,—Referring to the despatch of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor of the
24th instant, requesting the services of one of Her Majesty's ships "to proceed to
Nanaimo in order to afford protection to the authorities at that place," and to your despatch to His Honour, dated the 25th instant, stating that you had " instructed Lieutenant Harris, commanding Her Majesty's ship 'Rocket' to proceed to Nanaimo to afford
protection to the authorities at that place," this Government beg the favour that the
" Rocket" may sail at such a time as to enable her to reach Nanaimo to-morrow, the
29th instant, about sunset.
May I also, on behalf of the Government, ask you to order a passage on the
" Rocket " for the Sheriff for Vancouver Island, or his Deputy, to Nanaimo.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) A. C. Elliott.
Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Executive Council, approved by His
Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor, on the 10th day of May, 1878.
On a Memorandum from the Honourable Attorney-General, dated the 10th day of
May, 1877, recommending that authority be given to disburse the sum of $1,600, being
expenses incurred in consequence of the militia being called out and proceeding to the
"Wellington Mine, Nanaimo, to assist the civil authorities in carrying out the law, and
recommending that such authority be given.
The Committee advise that the recommendation be approved.
Certified,
(Signed)       Jas. Judson Young,
Deputy Clerk Executive Council.
Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie to the Attorney-General.
Victoria, 12th May, 1877.
Sir,—I have the honour to enclose for the information of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, a presentment mad^ to me by the Grand Jury at the recent
assizes at Nanaimo, w7ith subsequent correspondence which will explain itself.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) Matt. B. Begbie,
Chief Justice.
[Enclosures.]
Grand Jury Presentment.
Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie, K.C.B.,
Chief Justice of British Columbia.
I have the honoui to present to your Lordship, on behalf of the Grand Jury, that
they, in common with the people of Nanaimo, regretfully feel that a serious stigma has
been cast upon this district by the iact that a military force has been called in to assist
the civil authorities in the execution of their duty, in the case of the ejection of certain
persons at Wellington; but we beg respectfully to remonstrate, that in our humble
opinion, had the civil officer, viz., the Sheriff, attempted to execute his duty with judg- 41 Vic. Correspondence—Wellington Strike. 533
ment on his first visit, that, no opposition would have been offered to the officers of the
law.
That, no act of violence having been committed, and the law7 having been exceeded
but in the retained occupation of the tenements, the stigma cast upon this community
by the calling in of the military, was caused only7 by the incapacity7 of the Sheriff in
the execution of his duty, and that misrepresentations must have been made to have
induced the Government to proceed to such extreme measures.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) James Brown,
Foreman of Grand Jury.
Nanaimo, B. C, May 9th, 1877.
Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie to the Foreman of the Grand Jury.
Nanaimo, 10th May, 1877.
Sir,—If I had received your presentment in open Court, I could not have done so
in silence. Although I rarely respond to presentments of a Grand Jury, except by7
acknowledging the receipt of them, and promising to forward them to the proper quarter,
with observations, yet this presentment is of such an exceptional character that I must
request you to communicate the enclosed memorandum to your fellow jurymen for
their consideration.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) Matt. B. Begbie,
Chief Justice.
Memorandum.
This presentment is confined to the ejectment question, and is scarcely less unreasonable than the conduct of the men themselves in retaining possession.
I was attended in Victoria on two different days by counsel for tho defendants in
the ejectment cases; and although his attention was pointedly called to the question of
the merits, it was never pretended that the men had any arguable or colourable defence.
In such a case, why did the men resist at all ? It was very7 absurd in them to render
the attendance of the Sheriff necessary. They7 were clearly in the wrong, in the opinion
of their own legal adviser, before the Sheriff appeared on the scene at all; viz.: on the
29th March at all events, when they refused compliance with the summons of the
Deputy Sheriff. It is like the fable of the wolf and the lamb to attempt to throw the
blame of this upon any alleged incapacity of the Sheriff on the 5th April. It is almost
equally weak to attempt to throw the responsibility of the military demonstration (which
must be paid for by the Province) upon any insinuated want of tact on the Sheriff's
part, on the 4th or 5th April, in failing to coaxthe defendants into submission. It is not
by such excuses that the stigma of open resistance to the law can be removed from the
district. Let those who have any influence with these misguided men induce them to
return to work, and try to make amends for the loss and expense which the town and
the whole Province have sustained. I must pity them, and they7 may have other excuses
for other parts of their conduct, as to which I know nothing and say nothing; but they
were entirely in the wrong in the opinion of their own legal advisers upon this ejectment
question (the only one touched upon by the Grand Jury) before the Sheriff appeared at
all, and no want of judgment on his part could make their wrong right.
Since my arrival here, rumours have reached me of a very serious breach of the
peace, throwing a stigma on the town of an even graver character than the obstinate,
yet peaceful resistance of the men on strike to the officers of the law. The transaction
to which I allude was one of wanton, unprovoked and violent attack both on persons and
property, involving serious injury to both; which might apparently have very properly7
claimed the attention of the Grand Jury, sworn to present all things truly without fear,
favour, or affection, or hope of reward.
37 534 Correspondence—Wellington Strike. 1878
Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie, K.C.B.,
Chief Justice of British Columbia.
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of a memorandum from your Lordship, reflecting on the presentment of the Grand Jury, which was duly laid before a
meeting of twelve of my co-jurymen, by whom I am requested to state that the stress
laid by your Lordship in your charge, upon the disgrace to the district occasioned by
the much lamented troubles at Wellington, caused their minds to be so rjreoccupied with
that subject that the raid upon the Chinese inhabitants of this city, for the time, escaped
their consideration, But, previous to the receipt of your Lordship's memorandum, the
case had received their most earnest attention, and that, after careful and strict investigation, they found that the case had been dealt with by tho Bench of Magistrates by
whom it had been dismissed, which action led the jurors to believe that they could
reasonably take no action in the matter.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) James Brown,
Foreman of Grand, Jury.
Nanaimo, B. C, 10th May, 1877.
The Attorney-General to the Mayor of Victoria.
Attorney-General's Office,
May 21st, 1877.
Sir,—A party of miners are expected to arrive this evening from San Francisco,
having been engaged by the proprietors of the Wellington Colliery to take the place of
the miners on strike.
In view of the late disturbances at that place, I have the honour to ask you to allow
two of the City Police to accompany the Superintendent and the men to Nanaimo, in
order that they may proceed to their work unmolested.
The Provincial Government will defray the expenses of the policemen employed
during their absence.
I have, etc.,
(Signed) A. C. Elliott.

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