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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA TWENTY-SECOND REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING SEVENTH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1919

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 PROVINCE OF BKITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-SECOND REPORT
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
SEVENTH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS
AND THE FORTY-SIXTH REPORT OF VITAL
STATISTICS DEPARTMENT
SIX MONTHS ENDING JUNE 30th, 1918
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY   OF  THE   LEGISLATIVE   ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by William H. Ctjllin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1919.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1918.
To His Honour Sir Frank Stillman Barnard, K.C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Provincial Board of Health
for the six months ending June 30th, 1918.
j. d. Maclean,
Provincial Secretary.  REPORT of the
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., Jul}' 31st, 1918.
Doctor the Honourable J. D. MacLean,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Twenty-second Report of the Provincial Board of
Health, being for the first six months of the year 1918. I do not call this an annual report,
as it forms the connecting link as between the previous annual reports and those to follow.
It is an annual report in so far as the report of the Medical Inspection of Schools is concerned,
but the other matters deal only with the first six months of this year.
In my report of last year, submitted to you in January of this year, I recommended for
your consideration a change in the date of the issuance of the report in order to enable the
Department to issue the report in midsummer; my reasons being that under the Statute we
are obliged to present our annual report at the meeting of the Legislature, which occurs in this
Province in January. The result of this was that we were often obliged to say that returns
have not been received from certain outlying districts; this not because of any fault on the
part of the officials at these points, but owing to distance and uncertainty of the mail service.
The Department desires to acknowledge the fact that you have seen fit to concur in the request,
and for the future the annual report of the Provincial Board of Health will be issued at the end
of June.
In the present report the report of the Medical Inspectors of Schools embraces the term from
August 1st, 1917, to the completion of the school term in 191S, thus covering the full school-year
of two terms,
British Columbia is fortunate in the physical conditions presented in the Province. It is a
mountainous country with an abundant supply of water derived from the forest-clad hills, and
in all parts, with probably a few exceptions where industries are developing along the watercourses, remarkably pure, and being a new Province sparsely populated we are better able to
control the source of supply, with a consequential diminution in the number of water-borne
diseases. Our population is composed of people accustomed to outdoor life, and this, coupled
with the fact that we possess an unrivalled climate, is another factor in the preservation of the
health of the community. We have, of course, to contend with the fact that there are vulnerable
points due to our being a seaboard Province, also that we are at the termination of three transcontinental railroads.
Our Municipal Health Boards, however, are well established and well administered, especially
in our seaport towns, and while there are a sufficient number of cases of infectious diseases from
time to time to keep us on the qui vine, we have been able to keep perfect control, and the results
are that our returns of the existence of infectious diseases are very satisfactory from a health
point of view.
We have continued, during the past six months, our work along educational lines, and we
are pleased to report what we consider very satisfactory progress. The health propaganda in
the Province, as well as in the Dominion as a whole, has been wonderfully assisted by the fact
that probably every Canadian has some friend in the army, and everything in connection with
the work of our men is eagerly read and discussed. Naturally those immediately related to the
men are very much interested in their environment in the camps, in the conditions surrounding
them when they are travelling, and particularly their modes of life at the Front. In the war
we accept and are prepared for the account of the casualties on the firing-line, but what we do
not want to hear of is the existence of disease in cantonments or the prevalence of epidemics
amongst our men. The history of previous wars has always been a sad one, from the fact
that the enumeration of the fatalities always shows from three to five dead from disease where
one died of wounds. During the present war, with millions of men in the field, and living
under the highest pressure of effort, both mental and physical, the reports of deaths from
disease have shown a small percentage of the total casualties of the army.    This has been A 6 British Columbia. 191!)
brought about by strict observance of health regulations, insistence upon sanitary surroundings, and the inoculation of our men against the inroads of infectious diseases. The people
of Canada are educated and intelligent, and the publication of the state of health of the
troops has led them to ask, if such virulent diseases as smallpox and typhoid can be stamped
out in the army, why they cannot be stamped out an civilian life where conditions are more
organized and stable. They are coming to the conclusion that there is no reason why they
cannot be, if the people themselves will follow the directions given by their officers of health
in the same way that their friends are following them out under military command. In the
army they have to do it; in civilian life, the effort, to be successful, must be voluntary. They
are beginning to realize that within natural limitations any community can determine its own
death-rate, and also to realize that " prevention is better far than cure." The result of this has
been that we have seen that during the past three years conviction is dawning in the minds
of the people that under other circumstances would have probably taken twenty-five years of
constant effort to have brought about. They are beginning to realize what the influence of the
individual as regards his relation to the community means, and as regards the efforts he must
make individually in the prevention of disease by attention to personal hygiene, the education
of himself and others in the idea of prevention of disease as distinct from its cause. They are
beginning to believe health authorities when they say that there are more people dying in
civilian life to-day from preventable causes than are being lost as a result of the war, and
they are determined to so order their lives that this immense drain upon the population of the
country shall cease.
The majority of our people belong to some one of the many organizations that are concerned
in war-work, and they are learning this lesson, and learning it in such a way that many of these
organizations will continue after the war to carry on the war against disease. They are learning
what splendid results can be obtained from unity of action, especially when the unity of action
is backed by a thorough knowledge of the results to be attained and a consciousness of the fact
that in their organization they have the means of accomplishing these ends.
Go-operation as between the Board of Health, the medical profession, and the general public
is absolutely essential for the carrying-out of a successful health propaganda, and in this connection I would beg leave to call your attention to the laxity on the part of the medical profession
in regard to the provisions of the " Health Act '* in reference to the reporting of infectious
diseases. It has been a source of constant anxiety on our part to note that the profession does
not seem to recognize that upon them devolves the care of the health of the public at large.
Many of our problems have to do with physical facts capable of direct demonstration, while
others deal with the ethical bearings of certain groups of facts upon man's relations to society.
The notification of disease belongs peculiarly to the latter class. The war has been of importance
to our generation, since it has forced into prominence certain public issues which have demanded
attention, but which in time of peace are merely academic discussions. We have reached the
point where positive action is necessary. It ought to be Clearly recognized that, if medicine
is a profession, then its highest ideals must be maintained in the practice of it. If, however, it
be an art of business sanctioned by law and licences, then in the interests of the public it must
be strictly regulated, and one of the first things the Legislature can say is: " That for the
granting of the licence to practise medicine a physician must be under .the ' Registration Act,'
report at once every birth and death occurring in his practice, and likewise must report every
case of communicable disease that comes under his charge. Indeed, it is an axiom in all law
and government that the licensing power carries with it the right not only to regulate what it
licenses, but also to inspect the carrying-on of the art or trade which it licenses as to its
complying with the law."
If we accept this view—and we must—we arrive at the point where we must say that if the
physicians of the Province fail to recognize their obligation to the State, then the State must
resort to compulsion in order to make sure that every man will do his duty.
The health of the people is above the law, and I would earnestly recommend to your consideration the suggestion that some means be adopted whereby the fact may be brought home
to the medical profession that in accepting from the State a licence to practise their profession
they are assuming an obligation that is mandatory.
Supervision of the work of the hospitals must come more directly under the purview of the
Government.    In co-operating with the physicians the hospital must become more of a health 9 Geo. 5 Board of Health. A 7
centre in the community. The staff of these hospitals must be educated in health matters, and
house-to-house work must be carried out in order that the purpose of the regulations of the
Board of Health may be explained to the people. Where a case of tuberculosis exists it must
be reported by the physician. It is absolutely essential that the case should be reported if the
health-work emanating from the hospital centre is to be made effective, and the people taught
that a case of tuberculosis is infectious, and also taught how the other members of the family
may be protected from it. If the physician does not report it we can never hope to control the
disease. Under your directions, the Board of Health has gone ahead with requests to the
physicians to co-operate, but I regret to say that we have not been met with the response that
we hoped for.
This is especially true in reference to our efforts to have our cases of tuberculosis reported.
In the State of New York, about twenty years ago, the City Board of Health of New York took
positive steps to make the notification of tuberculosis compulsory. That was in 1897. Speaking
of this in a paper in 1913, Dr. Briggs, now State Commissioner of Health of New York City,
said:—
" Of the various features of the anti-tuberculosis work, none is more fundamentally important
than notification and registration of cases; and none has been more misunderstood or opposed
by the medical profession. In spite of almost innumerable objections at first urged, it has finally
been realized that no adequate control of tuberculosis can be effected without such notification
and the objectors one by one have been silenced. Certain it is that not one of the disastrous
consequences urged against notification has materialized, and in New York City such notification
has now been in force for almost twenty years."
Clearly in British Columbia, if we want to give effect to the measures instituted by yourself,
we must be notified of active cases of tuberculosis and have these registered. This is necessary
for very obvious reasons; but it is enough to say that, with notification ever increasing the
effectiveness of the measures taken, the death-rate in the Province will decrease, because if we
do not know of the cases we cannot give effect to the measures which will tend to control and
gradually eliminate the disease from amongst us.
Every good physician to-day is too much of a sociologist not to co-operate in any general
practice in the public interest, but it is to be feared that in too many cases it is the indifferent
and sometimes incompetent physician who neglects his duty. As a matter of fact, he cannot act
in the best interests of his patient and of the highest art and science of his profession, unless he
makes provision for sanatorium treatment of the patient and for the examination of other
members of the exposed family with a view of their early treatment if found diseased.
I am mentioning tuberculosis in particular because we have made a special appeal to the
profession to report these cases, but the argument advanced as to the physician's duty applies
equally to the reporting of all other cases of infectious diseases. A fire which might develop
into conflagration could be controlled if found when it is only a small blaze, and just so in the
case of infectious diseases. Two or three cases of smallpox which are not reported and are not
looked after, but allowed to mingle with the people, may give rise to an epidemic that will cost
hundreds of thousands of dollars, to say nothing of the loss of life.
I think I am safe in saying that we have learned nothing of great importance along public-
health lines in the present war up to the present time, but what we have gained is the awakening
of a very satisfactory proportion of the people to the importance of health-work and to its
possibilities.    Not in a theoretical direction, but as demonstrated by actual accomplishment.
We must look upon our health-work from a broader outlook. Formerly it was the highest
ambition of public-health workers to show each year a diminished morbidity and mortality rate
from certain named diseases. If the Public Health Officer could show that in a brief period of
his incumbency he had cut the typhoid death-rate down to one-fifth of its former proportions and
had a steadily diminishing rate for scarlet fever or diphtheria, he felt that he had done a great
deal. But within the past few years we have had a higher ambition. We have felt that we must
deal with more than the negative side of health, and that it was most distinctly within the
province of a Health Officer to put forth every effort to raise the vitality of every human unit
in his community to the highest point of efficiency. He must no longer be satisfied with the
knowledge that from the result of his efforts a number of individuals have survived who might
have died from some preventable disease, but he must also feel that he must lay a foundation A 8 British Columbia 1919
for the robust citizens of to-morrow, and so our ideals have advanced, taking in not only the
previous field of sanitation, but also that of personal hygiene.
How to reach the individual, however, has been the problem. Health Officers could not
personally supervise the daily life of each individual in the community, and he recognizes, therefore, the necessity for educational measures, directed both to the end of securing better understanding, and hence better support to the Health Department, and also to so educate the
individual as to furnish him with the knowledge of how to promote his individual health and
with the incentive to put that knowledge into effect. To accomplish this we must do as I said
in the beginning; that is, to secure co-operation as between the Board of Health, the medical
profession, and the public. Our efforts are being directed along these lines, and during the past
six months we have been able to secure the active co-operation particularly of the Women's
Institutes in British Columbia. Series of meetings have been held, health films for moving
pictures and slides for lanterns have been procured, and a great amount of literature is being
distributed. During the coming months an active campaign has been outlined, and a constant
effort will be made to bring to the people the knowledge of the fact that public health is
purchasable, and that " within natural limitations a community can determine its own death-
rate."
In our work in the immediate future special stress will be laid upon the question of rural
sanitation. This is a very important question, especially in a Province such as ours, but at
the same time the physical conditions in British Columbia are such that we should be able to
deal with the difficulties that arise and to educate the people to the adoption of such measures
as will do away with the sources of contamination which have been in the past all too prevalent
in the rural districts. The logical course, of course, is to deal with contamination of water and
food-supplies at the point of origin. The agricultural resources of British Columbia are being
developed in a gratifying manner, and especially so in our cannery industries of fruit and fish.
The Sanitary Department of the Board has been very active during the past months in the
supervision of the canning industries, and a detailed account of their efforts will be found in
the Chief Sanitary Inspector's report.
In the matter of milk inspection, we believe that we can be congratulated upon the effective
measures which have been adopted for the Province through the Agricultural Department inspection of the cattle and dairies, and also the enactment of the municipal by-laws founded upon
the " Milk Act" of the Province. The Agricultural Department, through their very efficient
staff, are lending the Board of Health splendid assistance in this department, and there is no
doubt that the value of our milk inspection is unquestioned. But there remains a further field
of food inspection which merits further development, and the Board of Health would recommend
for your serious consideration future activity along certain lines.
First: As to the physical examination of all food-handlers, and the exclusion from food-
handling of those having communicable diseases.
-Second: The inspection of methods of food-handling to prevent the contamination of food
with disease organisms through unclean methods.
Third:   The inspection at slaughter of the carcasses of animals used for food purposes.
The carrying-out of the provisions for the first two above suggestions would rest upon the
Board of Health, and more particularly upon the Local Boards in the municipalities. Their
work in this respect is hampered by inadequate appropriations for health-work, but more particularly by the failure of Municipal Health Officers to develop information which will indicate
the need and value of the services mentioned and convince the citizens of the community of its
necessity. In our larger cities much credit is due the Local Health Officers for the advances
that they have already made in this respect, and their organization is developing in a way that
will permit of a normal growth and the accomplishment of effective results.
As regards the third, however, the inspection of animals intended for food purposes, I regret
to say that this has been either neglected or ignored entirely not only in British Columbia, but
in practically all the Provinces of the Dominion, as inquiry will reveal. The Dominion Government provides inspection of carcasses, but for carcasses used only for export, neglecting entirely
any protection for our own citizens. Their system is a splendid one and would prove adequate
could it be available for the inspection at the time of slaughter of the meats for the home
markets. A great difficulty experienced by the 'health authorities of the Province and by the
municipalities is in controlling the small slaughter-houses and in the inspection of so-called 9 Geo. 5 Board of Health. A 9
" farm-killed" animals. Your Department has been working along these lines for some time,
and I would recommend that the Board be authorized to undertake a campaign which would
bring about the adoption of means that would provide for the future inspection of all slaughtering,
and I would recommend:—
First: That the municipalities be empowered to pass laws requiring the slaughtering of
animals within prescribed limits and in certain definite places.
Second: To bring about, if possible, the co-operation of operators -of small abattoirs. If
such co-operation is not possible, then to provide for the regulating of the days and hours of
slaughtering in small abattoirs, so that even a small inspection force will be able to visit all
establishments and inspect the slaughtering in all.
For the controlling of the inspection of " -farm-killed ". animals—that is, those slaughtered
by individual farmers on their own premises—a large Western city has adopted a plan which
works well, and is one which could be adopted successfully by practically all small cities. A
city inspection station is provided, to which all carcasses, not otherwise inspected at the time
of slaughtering, are brought, for inspection before being sold to local dealers. A veterinarian is
stationed at this inspection office, and stamps, as approved, or condemns all carcasses brought
to the office.
These suggestions are made to meet the present conditions. The question of the establishment of a municipal abattoir is one that is very debatable, but I believe that a practical solution
may be worked out from the suggestions offered above for the control of the meat furnished our
citizens. If fees for the inspection of carcasses are required, meat-inspection services should be
largely self-supporting.
Water.
In my last year's report I referred to the important questio'n which had come before the
Board as to the water-supply of the City and District of North Vancouver and the City of
Vancouver and adjoining municipalities. Subsequent reservations were placed upon the watersheds by the Government reserving all unalienated lands within the bounds of the watersheds.
Regulations governing the companies operating on the watersheds have been issued, Inspectors
have been appointed, and I beg leave to report that to date the procedure adopted by the Board
has been approved of by the municipalities and the conditions imposed found not to be too
onerous, but have proved efficacious in the protection of the water-supply. It is the purpose
of the Board to ask that these districts be declared game reserves in order that fishing and
hunting parties may be prevented from frequenting them. It is found to be very difficult to deal
with people Who go in for a day or two for fishing or hunting, as they do not seem to realize
the necessity of protecting the water-supply. However, with the Inspector working as a Game
Warden for the district, this trouble will be gotten rid of.
Approval was given to the water-supplies at Silverton, North Vancouver (MacKay Creek),
East Trail (McKelvey and Dry Creeks). The extension of the cemetery-site at Maple Ridge
was also approved.
We have distributed 289,000 units of antitoxin and 415 vaccine points for smallpox. The
small amount distributed is an indication of the little trouble which we have had in dealing
with infectious diseases, and I beg to report for the Province as a whole a remarkably clean
bill of health for the six months past. There was a report of a slight epidemic of mumps in
the Langley District and of whooping-cough at Ocean Falls, and reports of measles which was
the aftermath of the epidemic which we suffered last year.
I feel that we are to be congratulated upon the condition of affairs, and I am attaching a
table showing the report by the Medical Health Officers of the different infectious diseases in
the different districts.
The work of the Department during the past six months has been very onerous, particularly
in the Vital Statistics Branch, owing to the compulsory registration of the population, and I feel
very much indebted indeed to my staff for their very great devotion to duty and the splendid
co-operation that they have given me.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG,
Provincial Officer of Health. A 10                                                    British Columbia                                                       1919
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pS A 12 British Columbia. 1919
GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C.. September 9th, 1918.
H. E. Young, Esq., M.D., LL.D.,
Provincial Officer of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith beg to submit the Eighth Report on Sanitary Inspection for the Provincial
Board of Health.
This report, coming at a time when we are speeding to the limit in our field-work, must of
necessity be extremely brief, yet full of meat to those interested in such work.
As a " curtain-raiser " for 191S, the protection of watersheds from which Greater Vancouver
derives its water-supply was taken up in earnest, and regulations framed for enforcement through
your Sanitary Department. Up to this time the Lynn Valley watershed is the only one where
industrial development, such as logging and mining, is being carried on within the defined watershed areas. An experienced resident Inspector is in charge of the sanitary arrangements of
these camps and works, the writer making frequent visits in order to be familiar with conditions.
The sanitary precautions insisted upon and followed in these camps removes any probability
of water-pollution through industrial development on the watershed. All sewage and urinary
waste is incinerated daily; kitchen and table waste is incinerated or removed from the watershed ; dish-water is disinfected and run to septic pits; the camps are visited regularly by a
duly qualified registered physician; every employee is examined and a medical certificate issued
for each man; any employee not able to pass the doctor's examination or found to be possessed
of any insanitary or filthy habit is at once removed from the watershed area. This is accomplished through the co-operation of the operators in their desire to effect the intent of the
Provincial Regulations in safeguarding a public water-supply.
Whilst on the subject of protection for watershed areas, I beg to suggest in all seriousness
that immediate steps be taken to insist upon the installation' of approved chlorinating plants for
every public water-supply or reservoir. In spite of the most drastic laws or regulations to
protect a watershed area, an absolute certainty is quite impossible unless the watershed is owned
entirely by the municipality or party distributing the water. Therefore, in view of such ownership control, they should be given an opportunity of showing their desire to protect the consumer
by chlorinating the water in a scientific modern yet inexpensive manner.
Another source of danger to watershed areas which should and could be easily disposed
of is the menace of camping and fishing parties. The taking of fish or hunting for game upon
any prescribed or defined watershed should be prohibited and all waterwork or intake officials
appointed as Game Wardens for such watershed connected with their regular employment. This
would, to a great extent, mitigate an existing menace. Furthermore, the intake officials at
Seymour and Capilano should be instructed to stop trespassers passing through waterworks
property. The lack of such instruction or power indicates, to my mind, the missing link in
the chain of co-operation on the part of affected municipalities. So far this year there has been
no sickness attributed or traceable to infected water from a public supply in British Columbia.
Quarantine-work of this Department for unorganized districts has been unusually light this
year so far. During February and March an outbreak of variola occurred in a construction
camp near our southern boundary-line. Through the vigilance and assistance of the Local
Medical Officer of Health we were enabled to confine and stamp it out.
During the past sixty days there has been one death and five recoveries from typhoid fever
amongst Japanese camped on a small island near Musquam, on the North Arm of the Fraser
River, some twelve miles below New Westminster. The cause was drinking Fraser water which
receives the sewage of Westminster and adjacent settlements. There has also been five isolated
cases at remote parts of the Province—four Orientals and one white; three deaths and two
recoveries.    The cause of infection is now being investigated. 9 Geo. 5 Board of Health. A 13
At Vernon, during an inspection of the municipal sewage-disposal plant and water-supply,
my attention was called to a case of typhoid which was traced by Dr. Williams, the attending
physician, to defective house-plumbing. City Engineer Blakeborough instituted remedial measures
without delay. The Okanagan Valley has been almost free from infectious fever, due, no doubt,
to the vigilance of the Local Medical Officers and the distribution from your office of prophylactics.
Whilst in Nelson during July I arranged for the posting of typhoid warning notices at points
along the Kootenay where the waters are liable to infection. During June some alarm was taken
by the residents of Kootenay River District owing to the discharge from Balfour Sanatorium
septic works finding its way to the river. The matter was taken up with the Supervising Medical
Officer and a proper sub-irrigation system of disposal adopted.
Summer Resorts.
The British Columbia seaside resorts have been invaded this season by record-breaking
crowds. At the larger and thickly populated camps health notices have been conspicuously-
posted for perusal by parents and guardians. These notices excite favourable comment and
much good will undoubtedly result. A notable improvement of sanitary conditions exists in all
the summer camps visited, but, with few exceptions, an adequate and convenient supply of pure
drinking-water is lacking.
Fruit and Vegetable Canneries.
Following last year's survey of the food canning and storage establishments of the Interior,
the following regulations were provided:—
" Every owner or person in charge of premises used for the preparation, canning, packing,
curing, cooking, preserving, or manufacture of any food product, either in liquid or solid form,
shall be held responsible for the sanitary condition of the said premises and grounds or yard
belonging to or adjacent thereto.
" Adequate washing facilities of modern and efficient type must be furnished for employees.
" Efficient and separate toilet accommodation for both sexes, conveniently located and
screened from observation, must be provided and maintained in an orderly and clean condition
for employees.
" Where sleeping or living quarters are furnished for employees, ample lighting and ventilating facilities must be provided.
" All knives, tables, trays, conveyors, or implements not herein specified, but used in the
preparation, handling, or preserving of food products, must be maintained in an absolutely clean
state at all times, free from rust or stain.
"The employment of any person afflicted with any skin, blood, or infectious disease of any
kind is strictly prohibited in or about the premises used for the preparation of any food product.
Wherever any doubt exists, the person under suspicion must produce a medical certificate from
a duly registered physician.
" Dogs or other animals must not be allowed in or about any establishment used for the
preparation of food for human consumption.
" All outbuildings and rooms used for the storage of raw or prepared food products shall
be limewashed, or coated with approved antiseptic, at least once in every year when buildings
are to be used.
" The accumulation of cuttings, peelings, liquid or solid refuse or wastes in or about premises
used for the preparation of food or food products is strictly prohibited.
" Storage-space enclosed and kept in a sanitary, condition, properly screened from flies, must
be provided for the reception of all refuse, pending removal from the premises."
These regulations were welcomed by the operators, employees, and district municipalities
throughout the great Okanagan Valley. The recommendations made in my July report to the
managers of these establishments have been more than met. Columns could be written on the
awakening of the Okanagan Valley, an empire in itself. The days of canned, bottled, and dried
fruit and vegetable imports are ended. British Columbia will have ample fruit and vegetables
to spare for export from now on. Furthermore, such food exports will create an increasing
demand not wholly because of excellence of flavour, but because it will be known that the preparation and preserving is under most favourable climatic and sanitary conditions, where
Government Inspectors and visitors alike are ever welcome. A 14 British Columbia 1919
Extract from my July report: "My next stop was at Penticton; from here I worked the
southern part of the Okanagan Valley. On the whole, the Okanagan Valley is very iirosperous.
The crops are good, everybody is working hard, and nearly every farmer has an auto to aid him
in his rush to get the products of his labour to the rapidly increasing number of canning, grading,
and packing establishments. The inauguration of Government Sanitary Regulations governing
such food-preparing places was timely and welcomed by both employers and employees. Posters
setting forth our requirements were nailed to every establishment and commented upon most
favourably. Some of the plants will be in operation until December. Many new plants of a
modern design are under construction. The machinery used in the canneries is in many respects
similar to that used in the canneries for salmon. Ninety-five per cent, of the places are preparing
to abide by your new regulations, and in one or two cases we may have to take drastic action
to enforce them in order to protect the public health and provide sanitary conditions for the
employees.
" It may be necessary for me to pay another visit to some of the doubtful places, but in the
meantime'I am preparing a list of the names of local constables where I have requested follow-up
work. To these constables will be sent additional copies of the regulations to supply the proprietors with and insist upon observance where necessary."
Salmon-canneries.
On the Fraser River, far-famed for its salmon, I regret to report that, owing to scarcity of
fish, only half the usual number of canneries are in operation. The Fraser canneries are
operated strictly according to our regulations, and the comment offered by visiting tourists is
most favourable. The falling-off of the Fraser salmon harvest is, however, more than compensated by largely increased catches in our northern and western coast waters. In regard to the
sanitary operation of these canneries, the only fly in the ointment is the lack in many places
of proper disposal of fish offal and cuttings. Whilst the present method of dumping it into the
sea does not in any manner affect the purity of the canned product, it does in many instances
create a foreshore nuisance which is nauseating when disturbed by storm or steamer-wash
during fall and winter months. Some few of the cannery locations are infested with dogfish.
These fish act as scavengers, and thus the cannerymen and locality is relieved of a nuisance.
At Tuck Inlet, near Prince Rupert, a site was approved of by the writer for the establishing of
a modern oilery plant. This institution will take care of all the fish-refuse it can get from the
Nass and Skeena River canneries. This waste will be converted into valuable skid-oil, guano,
and poultry-cake. This cake is similar in appearance to linseed-oil cake, and for poultry is
claimed to be highly nutritious. The operation of this plant will remove the principal objections
of the local canners for proper removal to sea of their fish-offal.
During May I visited the following fish canning and curing establishments located in
northern British Columbia waters:—
Alert Bay Cannery (located on Cormorant Island).—Manager, Mylo Chambers; operated
by the British Columbia Packers' Association, of Vancouver. Cannery premises and outbuildings
in good sanitary condition. Six new bunk-houses just finished for white employees. The entire
plant is well equipped, and with the exception of an offal-chute our regulations are being observed.
Shushartie Cannery (Northern Part of Vancouver Island).—Manager, A. E. Hamilton, for
Western Packers' Association, Standard Bank Building, Vancouver. Premises and outbuildings
clean and isolated. No provision for offal-removal. Those in charge of cannery informed me
that the local waters are infested with dogfish, which devour every particle of refuse fish dropped
from cannery wharf.
~Namu Cannery and Sawmill.—Operated by the Drainey Fisheries Company for R. V. Winch
& Co., Vancouver. This plant is located on Namu Inlet under the management of Henry Doyle.
During the canning season the employees number 300. A number of new dwellings for married
employees are under construction.
Oosse-Millerd Cannery, Bella Bella.—Captain Gosse, manager. This is an extensive canning
and curing plant with good living accommodation for its employees. Entire premises are well
cared for from a sanitary standpoint. The only omission is the lack of some means for the
lawful removal of offal and refuse from the foreshore. Complaints regarding the nauseating
odour from  fish-offal  at this  point' during low-water periods  in the fall seasons  have been 9 Geo. 5 Board of Health. A 15
numerous. Captain Gosse assured me that he intends taking remedial action as soon as possible.
I beg to suggest that a letter be sent reminding him of the necessity for such action in order
to obviate this increasing nuisance and menace.
Butedale.—British Columbia Packers, Limited; Mr. Jefferson, manager. This is a large
new plant just being erected, and at the time of my visit, no responsible official was available.
A copy of the regulations was posted on the office and another . marked copy mailed to Mr.
Jefferson.
Lowe Inlet Cannery.—Operated by British Columbia Packers' Association; local manager.
Mr. Curtis. General sanitary condition good. Latrines are over tidal water. Offal is dumped
into sea from cannery below low-water mark.
Claxton Cannery, Skeena River.—Operated by the Wallace Fisheries, Limited, Vancouver;
local manager, T. Wallace. This is a large canning and cold-storage plant. The general living
condition is good. I requested a general clean-up of the Oriental and Indian quarters; also
discussed the offal question with Mr. Wallace, who informed me that he was negotiating with
the new Oilery Company, of Prince Rupert, for its removal in future.
Carlisle Cannery, Skeena River.—Operated by the Buttermer & Dawson Canning Company,
Vancouver; local manager, T. Lake. Sanitary conditions good. No means apparent for lawful
disposal of offal.
Oceanic Cannery, Skeena District.—Operated by Findlay. Durham & Brodie Company, of
Victoria; local manager, Mr. Carter. General conditions good; latrines over tide-water; offal
dumped into the sea.
Inverness Cannery, Skecna Slough.—Owners, Todd & Sons, Victoria; local manager, Bob
Johnson. Large cannery well arranged. Living conditions for employees good. Arrangements
for the lawful disposal of cannery fish-offal are' being made with the new Oilery Company, of
Prince Rupert.
North Pacific Cannery, Skecna Slough.—Owners, Anglo British Columbia Canning Company,
of Vancouver; Dr. Bell-Irving, superintendent; local manager, Mr. Lord. The cannery and
outbuildings are sanitary, but there is not as yet any provision for the lawful disposal of offal.
Dominion Cannery, Skeena Slough.—Operated by the British Columbia Packers' Association.
of Vancouver; local manager, Mai Dickinson. Cannery and outbuildings quite sanitary, but no
apparent provision for the lawful disposal of fish-offal.
Sunnyside Cannery, Skeena Slough.—Owned by Gosse-Millerd Packing Company,. Molson's
Bank Building, Vancouver; local manager, F.' Strang. Cannery premises clean, and a number
of new bunk-houses under construction. Entire premises undergoing improvements along sanitary
lines. Mr. Strong informed me that he was negotiating with the new oilery concern at Prince
Rupert for the removal of offal.
Owing to unfavourable weather and tidal conditions it was not possible to visit the canneries
at Port Essington; consequently I called on Chief Constable Gammon at Prince Rupert and
requested that he forward some of our regulations and notices to Constable Birchall at Port
Essington. Constable Birchall is permanently located at Port Essington, which is known as
the Steveston of the Skeena. Many complaints have been made regarding the general insanitary
conditions of this unincorporated village, and I beg to suggest that my action be augmented by
a letter to Chief Constable Gammon, asking for a report as to any or what action is being taken
by the Port Essington constable. The foreshore conditions during the fishing season are said
to be abominably insanitary.
Whilst at Prince Rupert a visit was made to the site of a new oilery now being constructed
for a company known as " Fish Oil and Products, Limited," with office at foot of Victoria Drive,
Vancouver; R. G. Thompson, managing director; local manager, Captain C. R. Betts. The
location is well isolated at a point known as " Scissors Bay." The machinery is being brought
from Washington, and the main building is well under way. Should this plant be properly
equipped and handled it will be able to take care of all fish-offal from the Skeena River and
Portland Inlet canneries. Judging by the size and condition of the plant, apparent at the time
of my visit, I do not think it will be able to cope with more than six canneries during the season
just opening. However, Captain Betts appears to be an energetic man with good backing, and
it is to be hoped that this concern will prosper and develop. The success of such an industry
means the conversion to profit and use of a valuable fish by-product now being wasted and
becoming a nuisance and menace to the public health. A 1G British Columbia 1919
Canadian Canning & Cold Storage Go's Cannery, Tuck Inlet.—This cannery is located some
five miles west of Prince Rupert, under the management of F. Johnston. The cannery and outbuildings are splendidly equipped and sanitary, with ample fresh-water supply. This will be
one of the first canneries to be served by the new oilery in regard to the removal of offal.
Somerville Cannery, Portland Inlet.—New cannery being constructed for the Western Salmon
Packing Company, Rogers Building, Vancouver; local manager, Colonel J. McMillan. Left
copies of regulations and suggested sites for latrines and offal-chute.
Kincolith Cannery, Mill Bay.—Operated for R. V. Winch Co., Limited, Vancouver; Henry
Doyle, superintendent; local manager, J. Cousins. This cannery uses a scow to convey the
fish-offal out to deep water. The general sanitary conditions are good, excepting the Indian
quarters, which are badly needing limewash and a general clean-up of the surrounding yards.
I called Mr. Cousins's attention to it, but he said that if he limed or cleaned up the Indian
quarters the Indians would desert him.
Nass Harbour Cannery.—Owned by British Columbia Packers' Association, Vancouver;
local manager, Mr. Chambers. The general conditions of the cannery and outbuildings are
good. A scow is kept for the removal of salmon-offal, but local reports indicate that it is not
always used.    Mr. Chambers assured me otherwise.
Arrandale & Port Nelson Canneries, Nass River.—Operated jointly for the Anglo British
Columbia Canning Company (Bell-Irving Company), Vancouver; local manager, Mr. Walker.
Canneries and outbuildings fairly sanitary; offal dropped into river; copy of regulations left
for manager.
Kumeon Cannery.—New cannery under construction for the R. V. Winch Company, Vancouver; local manager, F. Rudge. Dozen bunk-houses being erected for employees. Latrines
over tidal water; ample fresh-water supply; good site and isolated; left copies of regulations
governing canneries.
To summarize on the canneries of Skeena, Nass, and intermediate canneries: The number
of canneries are being increased and general sanitary conditions much improved since my last
visit. There is yet room for improvement, especially in regard to the disposal of fish-refuse.
The new oilery near Prince Rupert will surely have a desirable effect in that respect for a
distance of twenty-five miles from Prince Rupert, north and. south. To take drastic action for
the lawful disposal of fish-offal at this time would be to seriously embarrass the canners owing
to the present difficulty in securing material and skilled labour for construction of chutes and
scows. The cannerymen in most instances recognize the desirability of effectively disposing of
their fish-offal and will no doubt use every available means to that end. An occasional visit
of inspection reminds them, and I am sure that the time is coming when by tactful methods the
Northern canneries will be of the same enviable sanitary standard as the Southern British
Columbia and Fraser canneries.
Industrial Camps and Towns.
The inspection of logging, mining, and quarry camps in unorganized districts throughout the
Province is now being vigorously followed, through the efforts of the Honourable Dr. McLean
in providing this Department with a suitable launch. This work will be handled in a more
thorough, systematic, and less expensive manner than in previous years. The majority of our
industrial camps, towns, and summer resorts are located along our extensive island and coastline ; consequently, a launch conveyance is absolutely necessary. This part of our work is
now being attended to, and already the industrial and summer camps located on the lakes, inlets,
and islands of the Lower Mainland have been visited. This work will be continued along the
islands and coast from the 49th parallel to Queen Charlotte Sound.
In regard to logging camps, numerous complaints of a varied nature and from many sources
have been received and are being investigated. Observation and. experience gained thus far
shows that the small camp is the greater offender. The larger the camp the better the general
sanitary condition. Many of the small logging and shingle-bolt camps are operated by gangs
of men on the co-operative partnership plan. In many instances these camps are most insanitary,
located in isolated places, each man for himself, and they would prefer to do without ordinary
sanitary comforts or conveniences in order to save the apparent expense. The commonest
excuse given to the writer is that " We do not intend to operate here but a few weeks."    In 9 Geo. 5 Board of Health. A 17
the larger camps, where some responsible head can be interviewed, it is not difficult to have
necessary sanitary improvements made. This branch of our work requires much patience and
tact. Precipitous log-chutes have to be negotiated and an extensive wardrobe maintained to
meet the varied requirements and climatic changes. One of the most generally needed and
very necessary wants of the logger is some manner of having his blankets laundered. Facilities
for such are not provided except at the largest camps. The average logger possesses only one
pair. These he gets laundered every time he quits and goes to town. Since prohibition came
into force he stays at his work many months longer; consequently, very often his blankets
become infested with vermin. The above is the gist of an explanation offered by one of our
most prominent transportation officials, who wrote complaining of vermin-infested loggers using
his company's steamers between their camp and the cities. The shortage of labour is responsible
for many improvements in the industrial camps. The food provided is of the best and without
stint. In fact, it would be impossible to procure better in the highest-priced city cafe during
these war-restriction days. In old camps where there is anything to indicate the existence of
vermin, limewashing and disinfectants are requested. In many cases the employees object to
this procedure. The living conditions of the average logging camp are far superior to many of
our coal-mining towns, notably Natal and Michel. Our reports on file would show the city slum
as a palace compared with the shacks used by well-paid coal-miners from Southern Europe at
the towns mentioned. They pay a ground rental on small 30 x 90 lots. Their term of residence
is uncertain; consequently, they decline to erect shelters of proper dimensions commensurate
with the number of their household. The fact that every Provincial constable is a sanitary
officer is the one redeeming grace to check insanitary features of such places.
Referring again to logging camps, I am reminded of the completion of what is termed " the
logging camp de luxe," designed and built for G. G. Johnson, of the Capilano Timber Company,
for use on the Capilano watershed from salt water to Squamish. The camp consists of a train
of large 10 x 60 x S cars with cupola ventilation; also ample windows, high-grade porcelain
wash-bowls, shower-bath compartments, modern flush toilets and urinals, hot and cold running
water, steam heat, and electric light. The sleeping-cars are equipped with sanitary mattresses,
two men to a compartment-room. The dining-cars are equipped to serve fifty persons seated.
The commissariat is equipped with steam-tables, fly-proof food-storage compartments, and every
conceivable contrivance for expeditious and sanitary handling of food. A library-car is also
to be added. All the plumbing is of the most modern type and work. Solid and liquid wastes
are conveyed in Imhoff septic tanks. These portable camps are side-tracked at a suitable and
convenient place to the logging operations, the cut logs being railroaded to tide-water on the
regular logging-train.
The value of running a camp along such sanitary lines is shown in many ways, but most
especially in the fact that whilst there exists a great scarcity of logging help, it is not felt at
this camp. Good men are constantly offering and being accepted. There is an economic feature
to a camp of this type, and no doubt our employing loggers will note it.
Complaints made to the Provincial Board were investigated and disposed of for Local Boards
of Health, as follows :—
Langley :   School latrine menace to local wells.
Vernon:   Septic sewage discharge to Long Creek.
Whiterock:   Insanitary squatters' shacks on foreshore.
Victoria-Saanich :   Septic discharge at boundary limits.
Maple Ridge:   Municipal cemetery drainage.
Steveston:   Removal from foreshore of serious menace through the partial destruction
by fire of 25,000 cases of salmon.
Numerous complaints of alleged menace or nuisances of a minor nature have been attended
to at various parts of the Province, and other cases are now under investigation.
I have, etc.,
Frank DeGrey,
Chief Inspector. A 18 British Columbia 1919
HOSPITAL INSPECTION.
Victoria, B.C., September 9th, 1918;
H. E. Young, Esq., M.D., LL.D.,
Provincial Officer of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Sixth Report on Hospital Inspection in British
Columbia.       ,
Since my last report there has occurred no breach or untoward incident in the maintenance
and general operation of British Columbia civilian hospitals. During July of this year the first
meeting or convention for those interested in hospital-work was inaugurated by Dr. MacEachern,
Superintendent of the Vancouver General Hospital.
Dr. MacEachern is to be congratulated upon the success which has attended his inauguration
of the scheme of a yearly convention of the representatives of the hospitals in British Columbia.
Standardization in hospital management and work is being discussed by the hospitals of the
United States in an earnest desire to arrive at an understanding in the management of these
institutions which will increase their effectiveness and at the same time bring about an economy
in the expenses of management and maintenance. There was a large attendance at the convention. Very interesting papers were read by those immediately concerned in the care of their
institutions and practical suggestions offered by those who nave become expert in the particular
phase of the question in which they have had experience. Committees have been formed, plans
outlined, and effect will be given to many suggestions which appealed to the practical people
present as being worthy of consideration. We look for much benefit being derived from these
deliberations, and we hope that the enthusiasm displayed at this the first meeting will give the
movement such initial impetus as will result in benefits to the hospitals of the Province as a
whole.
My work of inspection has been confined chiefly to the small or private hospitals having no
Board of Directors or Government representatives.
During the past few months two new licences have been issued for maternity homes—one
at Victoria and one at Kamloops. Another one is now being considered on the Lower Mainland.
Two illegal alleged maternity hospitals have been suppressed, and another is under suspicion.
Government representatives have been appointed to sit at the Boards of Control for Alert
Bay, Rock Bay, Vananda, Lytton, and Powell River Hospitals. This action is commendable,
having a tendency to promote keener local interest in hospital-work. Furthermore, it will prevent
unjust criticism or suspicion of mismanagement on the part of those in charge.
The following licensed private hospitals have been periodically inspected and any changes
or improvements suggested have been carried out:—
Arnold Maternity Home (Mrs. M. Arnold), 316 Robson Street, Nelson.
Backett Sanatorium (Miss R. A. Backett), 1301 Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Britannia Hospital (Dr. Burke), Britannia Beach, Howe Sound.
Bass Maternity Home (Mrs. M. C. Bass), 2625 Prior Street, Victoria.
Bute Hospital (Mrs. M. E. Johnson), Bute and Robson Streets, Vancouver.
Bell Nursing Home (Mrs. L. Bell), 756 Cloverdale Avenue, Victoria.
Coquitlam Hospital (Dr. Sutherland), Coquitlam.
Corbman Maternity Home (Mrs. E. Corbrnan), 855 Eleventh Avenue E., Vancouver.
Down Maternity Home (Miss R. Down), Battle Street W., Kamloops.
East Kootenay Hospital (Dr. Garner), Fernie.
Grandview Hospital (Dr. E. Hall), 1090 Victoria Drive, Vancouver.
Grindon Hospital (Mrs. A. F. Grindon), 61 Nicola Street, Kamloops.
Handley Maternity Home (Mrs. J. Handley), 1218 Queen's Avenue, Victoria.
Impey Maternity Home  (Mrs. M. Impey), 243 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Lonsdale Private Hospital (Mrs. M. D. Schultz), 1900 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver.
Moore Nursing Home (Mrs. E. Moore), Baker and Falls Streets, Nelson.
More Maternity Home (Mrs. C. More), 949 Fisgard Street, Victoria.
Murray Convalescent Home (Miss E. Murray), 215 Sixteenth Avenue E., Vancouver.
Rutherford Maternity Home (Mrs. E. Rutherford), 2321 Shakespeare Street, Victoria.
Roadley Nursing Home (Mrs. L. Roadley), 360 Battle Street, Kamloops.
Roycroft Private Hospital  (Miss Roycroft), 1036 Haro Street. Vancouver. 9 Geo. 5 Board of Health. A 19
Ross Convalescent Home (Miss E. G. Ross), 1145 Faithful Street, Victoria.
Salmon Maternity Home (Mrs. A. Salmon), Garden Avenue, Cranbrook.
Smith Maternity Home (Miss Kate Smith), S55 Queen's Avenue, Victoria.
South Vancouver Private Hospital   (Mrs. Jane Webb), 1298 Fifty-first Avenue,  South
Vancouver.
Skelland Nursing Home (Mrs. E. Skelland), 2316 Lee Avenue, Victoria.
St. Luke's Home (Sister Francis), 309 Cordova Street, Vancouver.
Steveston Fisherman's Benevolent Society Hospital (Dr. W. Hepworth), Steveston.
Sunnyview Sanatorium  (Dr. Irving), Powers Addition, Kamloops.
Tomley  Maternity  Home   (Miss  L.  Tomley),   129 Twenty-second  Avenue  W.,   South
Vancouver.
Victoria Private Hospital  (Miss J. B. Archibald), 1116 Rockland Avenue, Victoria.
West End Hospital (Miss M. G. Tolmie), 1447 Barclay Street, Vancouver.
Witt Maternity Home (Mrs. A. C. Witt), 1845 Forty-sixth Avenue E., South Vancouver.
Winters Nursing Home (Mrs. M. Winters), 1020 Harwood Street, Vancouver.
The charitable institutions in British Columbia are as follows:—
Children's Aid Society, Vancouver.
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver.
Children's Aid Society, Victoria.
Loyal True Blue Orphanage, New Westminster.
Monastery of Our Lady of Charity, Vancouver.
Providence Orphanage, New Westminster.
St. Ann's Orphanage, Nanaimo.
St. Ann's Boys' School, Quamichan.
Salvation Army Maternity Home, Vancouver.
British Columbia Protestant Orphans' Home, Victoria.
Of the last-enumerated charitable institutions nothing but praise can be said. There are but
few vacant cots, the food provided is wholesome, and the general environment cheerful and
sanitary. There is nothing in British Columbia more worthy of help from the public purse
than the Orphan and Refuge Homes, where, owing to war-time calls on the usual contributors
and increased cost of foodstuff, the burden of carrying on is doubly heavy to those in charge
or responsible.
I have, etc.,
Frank DeGrey,
Acting Hospital Inspector. A 20 British Columbia 1919
MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Peovincial Board or Health,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1918.
Doctor the Honourable J. D. MacLean,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg leave to submit the Report of the Medical Inspection of Schools for the past year
previous to June 30th. My request to issue the report at midsummer was based primarily upon
the necessity of securing complete data of the medical inspection of schools and to make our
report coincident with the termination of the school-year.
We have included in the tables submitted the reports for the school inspections from
September, 1917, to June 30th, 1918. Some question has arisen as to the results obtained from
the inspection of schools, and it has been felt that probably the results obtained were not
commensurate with the financial expenditure. I regret that such an implication has been made,
because if one were to go over the reports for the past five years, since the inception of the
inspection of schools, and were to read the reports received from our Inspectors, one could not
help but be struck by the optimistic tone of these reports and the improvement of the condition
of many of the pupils now in comparison with the condition found when the work was begun.
It would be regretted very much indeed if any change were made in the future in this branch
of the Department, other than changes which might be suggestions to further the efficiency of
the work.
The Medical Inspectors are paid for their work, and I must say that in the majority of
cases the responsibility for the proper performance of the duties required has been fully recognized by the Inspectors. In other cases I cannot say so much. The one defect that impresses
itself upon the Department is this: that under the conditions of the " School Act" the physician
who makes the examination is debarred from attending the case. The insertion of this provision
was deemed necessary in order to prevent the accusation being made that the Medical Inspector
was simply creating work for himself. The result is that, while the defect may be recognized
and the parents' attention called to it, unfortunately they do not seem to realize the necessity
of having the defect corrected, and the result is that in some cases the child does not derive the
benefit that it should.
I would suggest that an extension of this work be attempted by the appointment of qualified
nurses to follow up the cases and also to assume the work of the examinations. Power to do this
is embodied in the Act.
The Women's Institutes of the Province have been urging that some such step should be
taken, as they are very anxious indeed to co-operate with the Department in anything for the
welfare of the rising generation. They have assured the Department in their desire to co-operate
especially in the supervision of the sanitary condition of the schools, and have been urging the
adoption of some means whereby the dental needs of the pupils may be attended to. Many of
the dentists are engaged in war-work, and it has been difficult to devise a scheme whereby
dentists might visit the outlying districts. We have approached the College of Dental Surgeons
asking them to co-operate with the Department and with the municipalities, but as yet we have
not received any reply from them as to their intention in the matter. We, however, propose
to continue our efforts to bring about a solution of the question and feel confident that we will
be able to do so.
In my last report I begged leave to suggest for your consideration recommendation to the
School Boards for the establishment of open-air school-rooms for weakly and pre-tubercular
children. These suggestions have been acted upon by Vancouver and Victoria School Boards,
and we are confident that, with the demonstrations in this work, centres for the work will extend
throughout the Province.
I beg leave to submit a detailed report of the work done by the Department, and also a copy
of the reports of the work done by the Medical Inspectors of Schools.
I have, etc.,
H. E. Young,
Provincial Officer of Health. 9 Geo. 5 Board of Health. A 21
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected:   1916, 331, at a cost of $5,653.82;  1917-18, 328, at a cost of $5,674.50.
Schools not inspected:   1916, 117;   1917-18, 173.
Pupils inspected:   1916, 7,945 ;  1917-18, 7,384, a decrease of 561.
Cost of inspection per pupil:   1916, 71% cents ;  1917-18, 76% cents.
Percentage of defects:   1916, 7S.50;  1917, 86.11, an increase of 7.61.
Medical Inspectors :   1916, 2S;   1917-18, 85.
Report from Medical Inspectors:   1916, S9;   1917-18, 82.
Graded City Schools.
Cities, 35.    1916:   Reported, 27;   not reported, 6.    1917-1S:   Reported, 19;   not reported, 16.
Pupils inspected:   1916, 25,564;  1917-18, 24,019, a decrease of 1,545.
High Schools.
High schools, 38,    1916:   Reported, 19.    1917-18:   Reported, 22.
Pupils inspected:   1916, 1,917;  1917-18, 2,155, an increase of 238 pupils.
Rural Municipal Schools.
Municipalities:   1916, 2S;   reported, 22;   not reported, 6.    1917-1S, 27;   reported, 16;   not
reported, 11.
Pupils inspected:   1916, 10,469 ;   1917-18, 10,946;   an increase of 377. A 22
British Columbia
1919
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
'o
a
%
6
■a
3
■ft
'o
o
c
o
la
a
+3
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O
a
o
i>
O
Oi
0J
Q
2
3
3
2
be
B
9
V
O
P
■3 "*
n
3
o
c
<y
«5
3
H
bo
[J
102
3U
99
28
26
58
55
i
4
5
4
W. Dykes.
3
W. Truax              	
62
79
9
M. G. Archibald
W. J. Knox	
1
4
2
11
16
1
1
2
1
"3'
2
1
7
3
30
20
20
91
145
296
5
114
.32
59
48
203
223
170
121
312
2
1
8
7
20
20
91
153
327
16
114
32
266
48
387
750
297
121
314
2
R. H. Port	
17
9
16
Point Orey:
1
1
6
2
l
18
1
9
1
22
16
8
10
20
3
3
9
Prince Rupert	
N. M. McNeill	
3
8
12
3
10
1
1
1
J. W. Coffin                	
Vancouver:
J F. W. Brvdone-Jack 1
"( B. H. Wilson f
) F. W. Brydone-Jack         I
\ B. H. Wilson 1
4
1
4
4
2
2
13
13
J F. W. Brydone-Jack         \
1 B. H. Wilson /
E. A. Martin..                  .     ..
3
19
L. 0. Griffin   .
H. Bone	
61
GRADED CITY
L. A. Patten	
308
338
370
110
436
308
324
107
358
90
420
12
•56
i
4
2
5
21
9
24
38
1
8
22
4
12
2
2
1
3
15
27
14
18
14
6
17
10
30
6
1
15
27
6
25
2
1
"5
8
22
60
4
8
1
15
7
9
6
31
19
14
5
10
1
24
5
17
31
6
6
34
28
38
1
16
15
3
7
16
50
34
65
W. Dykes	
99
W. Truax   ..
9Q
W. H. Wood
31
Kamloops	
M. G. Archibald	
51
W. J. Knox             ....
17
G. II. Tuthill	
247
424
145
138
292
704
315
261
391
348
86
327
316
230
415
143
136
284
658
328
203
355
306
72
296
268
162
46
Nanaimo:
Central	
Middle Ward	
W. F. Drysdale	
M. E. Ward	
114
33
South Ward	
34
83
75
New Westminster:
E. H. McEwen
57
50
i'
11
43
59
8
1
1
16
51
3
2
31
87 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 23
SCHOOLS.
x!
0)
0)
H
q
oS
3
T3
O)
bt>
1
8
"io*
9J
"S
o
24
3
4
2
20
5
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
>
CO
d
0)
ft
a
o
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during- the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
4
Ventilation and
heating good
Good	
Poor   and   inadequate
Yes.
14
Cardiac, 1;  anaemic, 1 ; skin-
disease, 1; otitis media, 1
Whooping-cough	
1
quate.
2
Smallpox, 23	
14
quate.
3
Wood and cement
Good	
Poorly heated	
Good	
Ventilation fair ...
Adequate 	
Good	
Yes.
6
Flush.
5
2
i
21
S
"i
i
4
"io"
7
6
37
i
Typhoid fever, 2	
No.
18
Good.
40
Pink eye, 8 ; heart irurmur, 3 ;
acne, 1
Yes.
90
39
47
44
Chicken-pox, 25; scarlet
fever, 1; mumps, 46
Good.
3
21
1
8
1
24
21
15
4
23
26
German measles, 1	
Adequate.
Yes.
1
82
84
rfO
■
Good	
113
3
Measles,  1;   mumps,  1;
German measles, 6
IF
SCHOOLS.
50
7
74
6
10
2
56
32
2
3
28
13
55
15
31
31
13
21
31
6
6
40
44
36
63
5
*39"
133
2
Measles and chicken-pox
Measles   and   whooping-
cough
Smallpox, 1	
203
Cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 1;  orthopaedic,  1 ;   nasal catarrh,
19 ;  blepharitis, 3 ;  anaemia,
17 ; otitis media, 3
Defective palate, 1; nasal polypi,
1;  Pott's disease, 1
Good	
68
3
1
Wry  neck,   1;   strabismus,   1;
hernia, 1; cardiac, 1
21
Chronic bronchial  catarrh,  7;
cardiac, 4
Cardiac lesions, 3	
Fractured arm, 1;   cardiac, 2 ;
hip-joint disease, 2
Cardiac, 1; kyphosis, 1;  bronchitis, 1 ;  hip-joint disease, 1
1
2
1
8
3
Excellent, modern
Diphtheria, 1	
Diphtheria, 2	
Good	
Cardiac, 1 ; club-foot, 1; defec-
tive'jaw, 1; hip-joint disease,
1
Infantile paralysis, 3 ; pink eye,
70;   heart   murmur,   2;
Bright's disease, 1 ; talipes, 1
2
6
Very good	
Good	
5
Chicken-pox,    80;   German measles, 31
87
Good	
Good	
90
39
47
44
Chicken-pox, 25; mumps,
46; scarlet fever, 1
71
60
3
2
'
Yes.
None.
Yes.
Good.
Yes.
Good, div. 1-7:
poor, div. 8.
Yes.
Yes. A 24
British Columbia
1919
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Prince Rupert:
Borden Street	
King Edward	
Seal Cove	
Revelstoke:
Central	
Selkirk	
Rossland:
Central	
Cook Avenue	
Sandon	
Vancouver:
Aberdeen	
Alexandra	
Bayview	
Beaconsfield 	
Cecil Rhodes	
Central	
Charles Dickens	
Children's Aid	
Dawson  	
Fairview	
Florence Nightingale.
Franklin	
General Gordon	
Grandview	
Hastings ....;
Henry Hudson	
Kitsilano	
Laura Secord	
Livingstone	
Macdonald	
Model	
Mount Pleasant	
Nelson	
Roberts	
Seymour.	
Simon Fraser	
Strathcona	
Tennyson	
Classes for Defects...
Medical Inspector.
N. M. McNeill.
J. H. Hamilton .
J. W. Coffin ..
\V. E. Gomm .
I F. W.
■j B. H.
j F. W
\ B. H.
( F. W
\ M. P.
J '''
( M.
I P.
1 M
{FB.
-P'
I B. II.
j V. W.
| B. II.
I F. W.
"i B. H.
j F. W.
( M. P.
I F. W.
I B. II.
j F. W.
\ M. P.
| F. W.
1 M. P.
/ F. W.
\ JI. P.
j F. W.
( B. II.
I F. W.
1 M. P.
/ F. W.
\ M. P.
J F. W.
1 B. II.
I F. W.
1 B. H.
/ F. W.
1 B. II.
/ F. W.
I B. H.
/ F. W.
\B. H.
I F. W.
1 B. H.
IF. W.
\B. H.
I F. W.
| B. II.
I F. W.
'( B. H.
1 F. W.
'I B. H.
j F. W.
( M. P.
| B. H.
"( M. P.
Brydone-Jack )
Wilson /
Brydone-Jack I
Wilson J
Brydone-Jack ^
Hogg     )
Brvdone-Jack	
Hogg	
Brvdone-Jack	
Hogg f
Brydone-Jack I
Wilson )"
Brydone-Jack	
Wilson	
Brydone-Jack	
Wilson	
Brvdone-Jack \
Wi'lson     /
Brydone-Jack.	
Hogg	
Brydone-Jack	
Wilson	
Brvdone-Jack	
Hogg	
Brvdone-Jack >
Hogg r
Brvdone-Jack {
Hogg )
Brydone-Jack	
Wilson	
Brydone-Jack	
Hogg	
Brvdone-Jack \
Hogg I
Brvdone-Jack	
Wilson.. 	
Brydone-Jack.   	
Wilson	
Brydone-Jack	
Wilson	
Brydone-Jack )
Wilson j
Brydone-Jack.	
Wilson	
Brydone-Jack }_
Wilson )
Brydone-Jack	
Wilson	
Brydone-Jack )
Wilson j"
Brydone-Jack ^
Wilson I
Brydone-Jack I
Wilson    /
Brydone-Jack	
Hogg	
Wilson	
Hogg	
School Nurse.
M. A. McLellan
M. A. McLellan
A. J effers	
M. Cruickshanks
M. Ewart	
E. G. Breeze....
M. Ewart	
M. Cruickshanks
A. Jeffers	
E. G. Breeze....
M. A. McLellan
M. A. McLellan
M. Ewart	
M. Ewart \
A. Jeffers /
A. Jeffers 1
M. Cruickshanks /
M. A. McLellan
A. Jeffers	
A. Jeffers 	
M. Cruickshanks
M. A. McLellan
M. Ewart	
M. A. McLellan
A. Jeffers	
M. Cruickshanks
M. Ewart	
M. Cruickshanks
A. Jeffers	
M. Cruickshanks
M. Ewart	
M. Ewart.
A. Jeffers
E. G. Breeze	
M. A. McLellan
E. G. Breeze....
M. Ewart	
E. G. Breeze...
M. A. McLellan
M. Ewart	
A. Jeffers	
E. G. Breeze /
286
276
358
215
36
334
526
242
176
344
509
274
122
831
593
629
168
347
467
420
458
409
308
328
362
602
837
489
494
633
524
43
140
288
241
261
353
215
36
285
458
230
188
355
433
268
176
726
479
530
192
283
478
460
375
349
288
302
329
464
505
537
741
479
463
8
5
23
9
16
5
17
11
24
9
20
12
6
7
15
4
15
10
42
8
31
11
43
9
48
13
25
12
30
8
30
13
18
13
11
8
52
41
26
32 .
42
59
20
12
67
60
55
33
42
45
25
67
61
10
•17
26
68
40
45
54
91
58 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 25
SCHOOLS—Continued,
3
o
a
'o
0
33
14
61
17
6
5
30
1
13
23
7
39
18
3
25
10
2
3
1
86
7
6
172
3
15
38
12
14
53
15
7
85
2
11
121
4
16
73
15
8
50
5
189
31
33
112
28
21
169
9
23
49
10
12
49
19
13
140
3
14
151
11
21
92
24
27
52
21
13
81
4
8
110
7
8
124
3
8
118
22
16
148
5
13
180
3
22
188
20
21
121
16
13
157
20
20
202
22
21
95
20
8
14
2
■ 2
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Anaemia, 2; defective neck, 2.
pulmonary, 2 ; cardiac, 1
Anaemia, 1 ; bronchitis, 1 ; he^
mophilia, 1
Defective speech, 2
Defective palate, 1; congenital
hip, 1
Cardiac, 4 ; otitis media, 1 .
Cardiac, 2	
Nervous disease, 1	
Vaccinated, 72; cardiac, 5; lung,
2
Vaccinated, 66; cardiac, 4;Iung,
1
Vaccinated 25 ; cardiac, 7	
Vaccinated, 30; cardiac, 6; lung,
1
Vaccinated, 63; cardiac, 7; lung,
2
Vaccinated,  115 ;   cardiac,   8 ;
lung, 1
Vaccinated, 29; cardiac, 2; lung,
1
Vaccinated, 14 ; cardiac, 7	
Vaccinated,  168 ;   cardiac, 19 ;
lung, 12
Vaccinated,  94;   cardiac,   10;
lung, 6
Vaccinated, 72; cardiac, 9; lung,'
2
Vaccinated, 56; cardiac, 2; lung,
2
Vaccinated, 75; cardiac, 4; lung,
4
Vaccinated, 53; cardiac, 7; lung,
2
Vaccinated, 45 ; cardiac, 8	
Vaccinated, 63; cardiac, 7; lung,
3
Vaccinated, 53; cardiac, 6; lung,
12
Vaccinated, 40 ; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 66; cardiac, 5; lung,
1
Vaccinated, 50 ; cardiac, 3	
Vaccinated,   66;   cardiac,   13
lung, 1
Vaccinated, 44 ; cardiac, 5	
Vaccinated, 49; cardiac, 8, lung,
1
Vaccinated, 193 ;   cardiac, 13 ;
lung, 1
Vaccinated,  84;   cardiac,   13 ;
lung, 9
Vaccinated,  41;   cardiac,   51;
lung, 8
Vaccinated, 135 ; cardiac, 8	
Vaccinated, 64; cardiac, 8; lung,
6
Vaccinated, 5	
Chicken-pox, 4 ; German
measles, 27; whooping-
cough, 18
Chicken-pox, 14; German
measles, 68; whooping-
cough, 58
German measles, 14;
whooping-cough, 2
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Communicable diseases in children of
school age in Vancouver City:—
Chicken-pox
v. Diphtheria
287
21
Measles,
Mumps  493
Scarlet fever     32
Whooping-cough   51
Infantile paraly-
J
Condition of
Building.  State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Adequate.
Good	
Adequate
Good	
ii
Fair
Good	
Good.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Adequate.
Yes.
Adequate.
Yes.
Fair.
Yes. A 26
British Columbia
1919
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Vancouver, North:
Lonsdale	
Queen Mary	
Ridgeway	
Victoria :
Bank Street	
Beacon Hill	
Burnside	
Central, Boys	
Central, Girls	
Cook Street	
Fernwood	
George Jay	
Kingston Street...
King's Road	
Margaret Jenkins..
NorthWard	
Oaklands	
Quadra	
Sir James Douglas.
South Park	
Special	
Spring Ridge	
Victoria West	
School Board Office
Medical Inspector.
E. A. Martin.
H. J. Wasson.
School Nurse.
M. Grimmer .
294
381
378
148
125
205
363
408
25
56
331
168
106
203
309
285
249
310
13
136
330
380
375
151
141
198
369
415
25
67
332
173
93
202
278
324
271
302
315
13
130
351
47
■f-~
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Burnaby:
Armstrong Avenue
Barnet.	
Douglas Road	
Edmund Street	
Gilmore Avenue...
Hamilton Road....
Inman Avenue
Kingsway, East., ..
Kingsway, West...
Nelson Avenue	
Riverway, East....
Schou Street	
Second Street 	
Geo. de B. Watson.
E. J. Foster	
Geo. de B. Watson .
E. J. Foster..
Geo. de B. Watson.
W. G. Morris	
Geo. de B. Watson.
W. G. Morris .
E. J. Foster	
Geo. de B. Watson.
30
16
25
304
424
25
92
73
288
116
49
49
27
30
12
25
304
402
25
98
70
249
110
54
43
27
1
3
18
35
2
5
30
1
1
*?
1
3
1
2
2
1
6
4
28
18
6
6
1
2
5
2
4
9
7
3
4
2
2
2
2
7
1 9 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
A 27
SCHOOLS—Concluded.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Chorea, 1; kyphosis, 1	
Asthma, 1 .
Eczema, 1; anaemic, 2; catarrh,
1
Anamiic, 1.
Harelip, 1..
Mongolian, 1; tubercular gland,
1
Anaemic, 1;  exophthalmic, 1..
Cleft palate, 1; bronchitis, 1.
Acne, 1; tropic rhinitis, 1;
anaemic, 2 ; partial paralysis,
1
Defective speech, 1; thyroid, 1
Stutter, 1; partial paralysis, 1.
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Measles	
Measles	
Measles	
Vaccinated, 91; unvacci-
nated, 87
Vaccinated, 71; unvacci-
nated, 61
Vaccinated, 135 ;  unvac-
cinated, 103
Vaccinated, 247;  unvac-
cinated,-152
Vaccinated, 311;   unvac-
cinated, 142
Vaccinated, 16;    unvac-
cinated, 12
Vaccinated, 37; unvacci-
nated, 46
Vaccinated, 223; unvac-
cinated, 148
Vaccinated, 116; unvac-
cinated, 76
Vaccinated, 94 ; unvacci-
nated, 36
Vaccinated,  122 ; unvac-
cinated, 104
Vaccinated, 158 ;   unvac-
cinated, 132
Vaccinated,  164 ; unvac-
cinated, 190
Vaccinated, 162 ; unvac-
cinated, 158
Vaccinated, 228;   unvac-
cinated, 131
Vaccinated, 217;   unvac-
cinated, 135
Vaccinated, 9 ;   unvacci-
nated, 5
Vaccinated, 97; unvacci-
nated, 69
Vaccinated, 205 ;   unvac-
cinated, 159
Vaccinated, 9;    unvacci-
nated, 5
Condition of
Building.    State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Satisfactory
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
SCHOOLS.
14
1
i
6
2
07
37
70
51
7
4
2
30
1
19
7
67
8
32
4
16
1
2
8
12
1
7
Rhinitis, 2 ; nasal defects, 2...
Seborrhcea, 3	
Bronchial catarrh, 2 ; wax in
ears, 1; rhinitis, 2 ; nasal defects, 1
Seborrhcea, 1; uncleanliness, 5 ;
bronchial catarrh, 2; wax in
ears, 7 ; rhinitis, 5 ; nasal defects, 4
Nervous, 1; seborrhcea, 5; blepharitis, 7; ichthyosis, 1
Wax in ears, 2 ; bromidrosis, 1.
Uncleanliness, 1 ; wax in ears,
1; rhinitis, 1; nasal defects, 3
Cardiac, 3 ; blepharitis, 5	
Chorea, 1; seborrhcea, 2 ; blepharitis, 2; strabismus, 1
Cardiac, 1	
Conjunctivitis, 1.
Measles, 1	
Mumps, 2 ; measles, 2..
Chicken-pox, 2	
Chicken-pox, 2; measles,
87; mumps, 105
Chicken-pox, 21; mumps,
34; measles, 54
Measles, 21.
Measles, 1 .,
Measles, 21; diphtheria, 5
Chicken-pox, 3; mumps,
4 ; measles, 8
Measles, 4 ; mumps, 8... A 28
British Columbia
'1919
RURAL
MUNICIPALITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
T3
o
a
v
'ft
6
•6
03
S
03
ft
Ph
o
d
d
c
p
Is
2
2
1
13
fl
03
03
a
i
1
q
0
>
03
03
03
a
2
1
2
2
be
c
03
a
03
03
a)
n
3
5
3
r3 ^
$ ~
03
'03
a
1
5
3
2
T3
'0
C
a>
tJ
<!
3
2
5
5
4
8
1
1
4
7
4
1
1
n
0
H
13
aj
be
_rf
w
8
4
8
6
10
10
1
1
7
9
5
2
2
Chilliwack :
Atchelitz	
66
35
58
44
41
■   64
9
11
90
115
43
10
15
8
57
36
59
41
39
60
9
15
84
103
41
8
14
6
4
11
8
9
38
20
33
16
11
122
16
24
19
53
24
88
21
16
12
60
76
14
12
44
29
21
17
20
53
10
52
59
40
18
22
40
19
31
23
48
7
20
53
42
12
5
48
274
126
J. C. Elliott ...
Chilliwack, East	
1
2
i
i
1
1
1
Promontory	
1
3
2
5
1
8
2
J. C. Elliott	
Strathcona	
i
1
1
Vedder	
Cowichan, North:
Maple Bav	
W. Dykes	
1
6
6
1
1
1
1
2
7
6
9
2
4
27
5
4
6
4
1
2
2
1
6
6
4
1
4
1
6
2
9
5
5
30
4
8
6
11
6
21
5
3
8
19
4
2
8
9
5
4
2
9
9
10
8
3
2
4
4
3
5
6
1
4
7
6
•   Delta:
55
23
39
20
12
1
2
4
2
"2'
Boundary Bay	
Delta, East	
7
1
1
1
3
1
i
14
1
2
4
1
3
7
3
3
5
1
1
2
1
i
1
1
4
4
6
2
6
7
18
26
20
60
35
102
25
17
20
69
89
15
12
45
32
27
25
26
62
10
58
70
45
18
28
44
19
36
43
53
19
23
59
43
17
8
48
291
138
Langley :
Belmont, Superior	
Langley, East	
Langley Fort	
Langley, Prairie	
3
"3
T
1
1
1
6
3
	
1
T
1
'e
5
3
1
1
2
"i'
i
3
3
2
2
2
3
Otter	
Patricia.	
Maple Ridge:
1
"1
1
1
2
1
1
3
2
5
2
7
1
1
5
1
3
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
Alexander Robinson 	
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
2
3
2
1
2
6
2
2
2
3
3
1
2
6
2
Webster's Corners	
Matsqui:
Aberdeen	
R. H. Port	
Matsqui	
Mount Lehman	
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
"3'
11
24
Ridgedale 	
Oak Bay :
2
2
2
1
2
1 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 29
SCHOOLS—Continued.
£3
03
H
o
QJ
Q
T3
C
3
T3
a;
bfl
i
"2
a3
'0
a
5
3
4
3
3
10
1
1
7
10
4
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
>
o
GO
d
0)
ft
a
5
o
%
a
3
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
9
Good	
Yes.
18
3-1
4
5
4
'
9Q
Fair	
Good	
10
'1
i
It
3
,,
53
3
"    	
12
Yes.
6
u
3
1
1
Ir
(
3
)r
tl
1
1
3
1
9
2
2
2
3
Diphtheria, 1 .   	
S jarlet fever, 2	
Good	
5
14
Ir
,
2
i
8
,,
,,
" 	
,,
50
5
'10
3
Scarlet fever, l	
9
1 >	
Ir
4
Mumps, 2	
13
1
2
'2
4
,,
19
in
2
2
6
6
Measles, 30 ; chicken-pox
Chicken-pox, 6	
Good	
Crowded	
Good	
Yes.
No.
',4
Yes.
9
3
1
2
2
Good	
Yes-.
17
3
1
1
2
1
1
99,
Cleft palate, 1
Measles, 5 ; pink eye, 17.
6
2
Good	
,-,
16
1
1
• ,
9
2
1
Measles, 9	
lf
8
It
Ir
7
'
11
1
4
Measles, 20	
Measles, 3	
	
38
2
3
u
,,
36
2
2
2
"3'
4
2
40
Measles, 2	
„
28
n
18
1
1
M
15
,,
28
1
11
ir
5
1
1
4
Crowded	
Good ,	
Yes.
6
Chronic   eczema,  1;   rheumatism, 1
Mumps,   13;   whooping-
cough, 6
8
10
No.
Rheumatism, 1; paralysis, hand,
1
Yes.
3
Measles, 1	
6
1
6
Poorly heated	
Good	
No.
4
Mumps, 3; whooping-
cough, 2
Yes.
9
9
Mumps, 4	
Typhoid fever, 2	
Measles, 23 ; diphtheria,
1;   scarlet fever,   1;
rheumatism, l;rotheln,
20
Measles, 3 ; varicella, 13,
rotheln, 10
v
6
8
12
6
3
3
No.
73
Paresis, 1; appendicitis, 2; abnormal soft palate ;  cardiac ;
stammering, 1
Nervous,  2;  defectives, 4; orthopaedic, 1; anaemia, 1
3
3
4
2
Yes.
43
Fair.
Fair. A 30
British Columbia
1919
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Name of School.
Peaehland:
Public	
Trepanier	
Pitt Meadows:
Pitt Meadows	
Richardson	
Point Grey:
Eburne	
Kerrisdale	
Lord Kitchener..;
Magee	
Queen Mary	
Shaughnessy.
Saanich :
Cedar Hill	
Craigflower	
Gordon Head....
North Dairy	
Mackenzie Avenue
Prospect 	
Quadra Street....
Royal Oak	
Saanichton	
1   Saanich, West....
Straw berry Vale..
Tillicum	
Tolmie	
Model 	
Sum as :
Huntingdon	
Straiton 	
Summerland	
Vancouver, North:
Capilano	
Keith Lynn	
Lynn Valley	
North Star	
Roche Point	
Vancouver, South:
Carleton	
Champlain	
Connaught	
General Brock....
General Wolfe....
Lord Selkirk	
Moberley	
Medical Inspector.
Wm. Buchanan.
G. Morse	
A. Lowrie	
C. Denton Holmes.
C. P. Higgins.
T. A. Swift ....
F. W. Andrews
E. A. Martin .
L. O. Griffin .
School Nurse.
Miss Headington )
Miss Ellis....... J
Ditto	
70
20
158
161
263
47
65
115
21
39
51
37
59
54
373
80
53
45
215
118
22
64
284
703
273
56
16
156
160
251
72
72
40
49
96
16
28
45
32
36
53
105
336
74
38
6
151
53
45
210
115
22
46
257
238
'7 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 31
SCHOOLS— Continued.
03
H
03
03
03
Q
•a
%
a
X3
03
hxj
s-
13
H
1
'o
O
50
14
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
03
>
CD
|
Q
m
d
.=.D
m
p.
o
a
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if crowded, poorlj*
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
13
Good	
Yes..
2
25
5
54
8
15
11
9
9
21
7
4
3
12
3
4
4
3
2
4
9
28
9
14
31
8
17
26
33
2
2
1
1
1
1
Nervous, 3; orthopaedic, 3; cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 2
Cardiac, 3; nervous, 1; skin, 1;
pulmonary, 1
4
29
li
10
Mumps, 1;  measles, 33 ;
chicken-pox, 20 ; jaundice, 5
Measles, 23 ;  nvunps, 5 ;
chicken-pox, 3; scarlet
fever, 1
Measles, 7 ; mumps, 33..
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps,
32 ; measles, 9
Mumps, 2 ;  measles, 23 ;
chicken-pox, 2
Measles,  11; mumps, 5 ;
consumption,  2
Diphtheria, 2 ; measles, 5
Diphtheria,  1;  scarlet
fever, 2
Mumps, 2 ; measles, 4...
Measles, 7 -	
Whooping-cough, 14....
36
28
29
Skin, 3; pulmonary, 3; orthopaedic, 1; cardiac, 2
Cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 2; skin,
1; orthopaedic, 1
Cardiac, 6; orthopaedic, 1; pulmonary, 1; nervous, 2
1
2
6
1
l
i
2
33
49
15
Satisfactory	
Temporary bldg...
23
13
11
I(
39
2
9
13
Measles, 5	
8
1
1
1
6
3
9
1
14
11
Measles, 4	
Whooping-cough; 7;
measles, 3
Chicken-pox, 2; measles,
8; whooping-cough, 3
Measles, 44; scarlet fever,
23
14
37
102
7
26
Vaccinations, 9	
25
23
T
Pulmonary, 2 ; eczema, 1; cardiac, 1
German measles, 44;
chicken-pox, 6
Measles and chicken-pox
Measles and chicken-pox
Measles and chicken-pox
Measles and chicken-pox
Measles and chicken-pox
German  measles,   63;
mumps, 8 ;   whooping-
cough, 11; chioken-pox,
4; conjunctivitis, 1
G erman   measles,   12;
whooping-cough,   1;
chicken-pox, 1
Chioken-pox, 2;  German
measles, 19 ; measles, 1
Diphtheria, 1; whooping-
cough, 10 ; mumps, 2 ;
German measles, 22;
measles, 1
German   measles,   53 ;
measles, 4; whooping-
cough,  5 ;    rheumatic
fever, 1; scarlet fever,
1; mumps, 5
German   measles,   97;
measles, 3; mumps, 31;
whooping-cough,  5 ;
chicken-pox, 25; scarlet
fever, 2
German   measles,   23;
mumps, 3;   whooping-
cough, 11
Good	
Good.
12
Yes.
13
65
1
1
30
,
7
276
32
1
2
15
33
41
11
3
11
2
2
10
31
17
44
13
2
2
12
9
11
15
173
Pulmonary, 5 ; cardiac, 4	
Orthopaedic, 1; pulmonary, 1;
cardiac,2
Cardiac, 3 ; orthopaedic, 1	
5
2
1
1
7
1
1
337
4M)
163 A 32
British Columbia
1919
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
«
>
£
."S
bo
a
03
3
c
^
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
3
a
o
(V
i>
0)
w
o
£
(2
"C
®
03
03
>
0)  ^
2
o
O
p
a
fc
fe
JS
P
a
a
<j
H
Vancouver, South—Concluded:
L. 0. Griffin	
H. Bone	
437
432
1
27
24
51
52
94
576
501
11
13
"5
9
17
83
240
203
4
7
5
8
6
49
105
123
532
95
107
482
3
9
3
2
2
3
14
5
4
18
3
3
9
18
3
15
97
13
64
260
206
2
5
8
8
3
32
RURAL AND ASSISTED
T. A. Swift	
G. C. Read	
26
25
21
13
13
17
6
9
7
7
18
22
11
55
7
10
8
18
14
12
14
12
6
24
11
12
15'
14
12
20
24
1
1
1
3
3
1
3
4
14
16
21
8
12
7
7
20
24
13
57
11
10
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
A. W. McCordick .
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
E. H. S. McLean  	
2
1
5
2
1
5
6
1
1
1
6
5
H. M. Keith   ..              	
2
Aspen Grove	
J. J. Gillis	
P. W. Turnor	
G. C. Bead	
Franklin von Gou-
der   	
1
ii'
14
2
2
2
2
4
4
1
1
5
5
4
24
12
20
13
6
31
11
14
20
21
12
24
27
3
M. Callanan	
1
1
1
2
1
9
B. E. Church	
3
5
1
9
C. T. Hilton   ..
"i
2
3
E. M. Sutherland   	
4
1
1
1
W. H. VVillson
E. M. Sutherland
1
5
5
4
1
9 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 33
SCHOOLS—Concluded.
JS
0)
H
3
"
TJ
;3
■
S-
P
H
233
33
5
336 .
49
11
166
11
4
64
8
2
64
5
2
321
55
11
119
19
4
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Cardiac, 2 ; orthopaedic, 1.
Cardiac, 3..
Pulmonary, 4 ;  cardiac, 5 ;  orthopaedic, 2; chorea, 1
Cardiac, 3 .
o
0
QJ
s
P.
be
—
S_
s
18
3
7
12
3
1
2
1
8
2
1
5
1
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Gen an measles, 48;
measles,   19;   mumps,
26; w:booping-cough, 8
diphtheria, 1; chicken
pox, 8
German   measles,   46
measles, 3 ; mumps, 18;
whooping- cough, 16
chicken-pox, 12; scarlet
fever,   2;   rheumatic
fever, 1
German   measles,   22
mumps, 2;   whooping-
cough, 2; chicken-pox
5 ; rheumatic fever, 1
measles,   23;     scarlet
fever, 7
Whooping-cough, 6; Ger
man measles, 33
Whooping-cough, 2; German measles, 1; chick
en-pox, 6
German measles, 69
measles, 1; whooping-
cough^ ; mumps, 3
Chicken-pox, 19; con
junctivitis, 6; rheu
matic fever, 1
German  measles,   16
measles, 4 ; whooping-
cough, 15; mumps, 23
chicken-pox, 12; scarlet
fever, 1
Condition of
Building.   State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc^
Good.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
SCHOOLS.
8
Good	
7
3
1
2
6
Yes.
Poorly lighted	
Old ; poor repair..
Good	
13
2
"i
2
Measles	
adequate.
Yes.
3
3
9
4
2
6
4
4
2
Good	
13
Nervous trouble, 1;  club-foot,
1; hip-disease, 1
9
17
Good.
4
3
5
2
2
2
3
7
Well  ventilated ;
not well heated
Good	
quate.
9
Good.
5
7
Log	
4 pits.
5
Measles, 3	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
commended.
2
9
15
Good.
"2'
5
" i
Yes.
3
Whooping-cough	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory;   no
water-supply
Fair 	
Good	
5
No.
3
1
'"&
3
3
7
2
Healthful	
quate. A 34
British Columbia
*
1919
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
•6
o
c
"3
d
03
03
°o
6
0
a
"5
03
03
03
03
R
6
o
>
03
03
03
0
03
O
a
s',2
03  03
o
Ol
03
a
-a
-3
03
<
R
O
H
T3
tf
"c
1
22
4
5
1
1
1
W. Truax	
7
62
31
18
10
5
9
12
14
14
6
22
95
14
104
35
26
20
12
7
18
16
10
31
35
7
26
27
9
19
9
60
32
72
71
14
12
6
14
13
103
7
58
28
12
9
5
8
12
8
13
3
22
94
12
128
32
24
15
12
7
9
12
9
17
25
33
4
18
25
8
18
3
55
32
06
62
12
10
6
10
13
99
17
17
13
11
38
12
14
22
5
23
126
9
20
16
12
6
46
19
i
1
i
14
3
Big Eddy	
H. H. Murphy	
1
1
1
Blind Bay	
1
1
H. R. Fort	
2
1
3
i
2
4
2
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
"■&
6
i
l
2
3
2
1
2
2
42
i
7
13
6
41
8
6
5
1
1
1
2
1
2
15
1
T. J. McPhee	
P. W. Tumor	
Miss C. Collishaw.
E. H. S. McLean	
1
1
1
1
1
2
9
Cahilty	
M. G. Archibald	
B. E. Church	
H. H. Murphy	
1
W. F. Shaw	
1
8
4
4
7
3
1
io'
i-2
3
J. J. Gillis	
Miss Brome	
W. S. Rhycard
1
1
3
W. H. Willson	
1
1
1
6
1
3
3
1
1
i-2
1
10
9
3
4
2
2
T. J. McPhee   	
Miss C. Collishaw.
1
1
2
1
4
3
1
3
T. J. McPhee	
No report for 1917-18.
C. T. Hilton	
Chilco	
3
3
W. Truax	
H. H. Murphy	
2
1
8
3
3
3
5
3
4
10
4
6
'2'
1
Cobble Hill	
W. Dykes	
17
26
12
2
1
1
2
2
J. C. Elliott..
W. Dykes.   ...
1
3
4
2
3
6
1
14
15
E. M. Sutherland	
1
"i
1
3
1
G. C. Read	
1
2
1
8
W. H. Willson
127
11
26
21
12
9
50
19
10
2.
1
1
1
10
"i
i
10
2
1
3
2
J. C. Elliott .  ..
H. M. Keith .
1
2
J. E. H. Kelso .. .
E. H. S. McLean
i
4
1
T. J. McPhee ...
1
1 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 35
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
JS
p
o
O
P
3
bo
as
'a
"5
O
Other Conditions specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
.5
60
CO
d
•V
o
&
fcc
a
S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
Rather poor bldg..
Needs cleaning....
Fair.
46
11
12
Orthopaedic, 1;  blepharitis, 1;
otitis media, 1
Chicken-pox ; whooping-
cough
12
quate.
Yes.
2
4
Scalp seborrhcea, 1; pulmonary
tuberculosis, 1
Wood	
,,
6
2
1
Average	
Fair.
2
1
4
Poliomyelitis, 1	
,,
Yes.
2
Ventilation good..
Good	
4
Not kept in good
3
5
order.
Yes.
Clean.
8
2
31
4
Rather crowded...
Good	
13
Divs. 1 & 2 good,
9
Div. 3 crowded.
Fairly so.
77
3
2
i
7
8
2
1
Measles; chicken-pox;
mumps;     whooping-
cough
Good;   town site
crowded
Good	
Good.
13
1
Yes.
4
Satisfactory ;  no
water-supply
Good	
No.
6
2
Cold and draughty;
windows fit badly
Satisfactory	
Good	
Poorly ventilated
and crowded.
Clean   and   ade
7
2
quate.
2
Yes.
14
i
i'
10
5
Orthopaedic defect, 1	
tl
16
2
3
Too small.
Yes.
4
4
Bad.
10
First-class 	
Good  	
Good	
Painted wood	
2
7
1
adequate.
2
„
i
l
21
1
"i
15
1
1
ing.
Good.
3
Yes.
2
Good	
Good.
6
2
1
1
2
6
1
1
Nervous,   2;   cardiac,   1;   pulmonary, 5 (bronchitis); orthopaedic, 1
7
1
No	
Lighting   bad,   no
water-supply, no
cloak-room.
Good	
8
1
5
1
3
2
9
4
8
3
Y
3
2
Tongue-tied, 1	
1
Fair.
6
Yes.
9
u
11
lr
Good.
Yes.
Fair	
Good	
1
No	
14
Not clean.
3
Good. A 36
British Columbia
1919
RURAL AND
>   Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
03
C
a
A
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6
a
6
yA
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~£
II. D. Leitch	
32
50
12
9
11
9
10
26
27
12
17
28
10
20
92
9
23
10
15
20
12
24
34
13
49
38
18
55
43
11
11
13
30
16
13
41
9
8
10
112
18
17
7
21
21
15
279
28
45
2
9
10
8
10
23
27
10
15
25
10
18
89
9
18
10
13
18
12
24
12
44
38
15
33
43
9
10
1
25
13
10
41
10
7
9
113
13
13
5
13
19
11
260
14
8
8
7
47
13
6
7
9
8
41
13
8
54
146
1
A. C. Frost	
E. M. Sutherland	
G. R. Baker	
1
Duck Range	
1
2
W. S. Rhvqard	
i
1
i
1
2
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
(School closed.)
Elko	
B. E. Church	
\
W. J. Knox	
3
1
.3
2
4
2
4
"2
3
W. Ross Stone	
H. M. Keith	
1
2
Mrs. Campbell....
5
Errington	
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
4
1
47
3
Fauquier	
J. E. H. Kelso	
5
Fife	
W. Truax	
1
4
J.-E. H. Kelso	
R. W.Irving	
1
i
4
1
4
1
4
"2
B. E. Church ,	
(School closed  on
account of measles.)
i
i
i
i
3
2
3
3
2
2
3
C. Ewert	
9
Fort Steele 	
Greene and MacKinnon	
7
*
1
3
E. M. Sutherland	
2
1
1
1
3
2
....
1
2
1
5
3
1
4
Gill	
C. T. Hilton	
Gillis Bay	
1
E. H. S. McLean	
12
1
2
Miss McTaffgart ..
6
2
12
2
4
2
4
1
27
E. H. S. McLean	
4
R. L. Beadles	
2
H. M. Keith	
2
5
3
24
3
3
28
3
"2
"i
1
13
1
9
T. J. McPhee	
W. H. Willson	
Miss C. Collishaw..
1
8
8
8
49
23
6
8
9
9
43
13
8
60
146
H. D. Leitch	
1
Hedley	
R. W. Large	
2
1
1
4
1
1
3
4
2
Robert Elliot	
5
Heffley Creek	
H. H. Murphy	
9
1
1
1
G. R. Baker	
1
2
Hillier	
J. C. Elliott	
3
1
2
1
4
17
1
3
15
1
1
1
2
31
1
6
W. H. Willson	 9 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
03
H
>
03
'S
a
-a
a
3
■a'
§>
7
'0
a
6
2
1
1
Other Conditions specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
a
>
<D
d
o
bo
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
13
Well ventilated
and heated.
Good	
39
heated.
Good.
Satisfactory	
9
1
Good	
Good.
9
14
Chicken-pox and whoop-
In greough
Poor ventilation ..
Good	
Fairly good	
Good	
3
i
2
1
2
1
5
2
T
4
Yes.
9
7
Yes.
6
Cleft palate, 1    club-foot, 1 ..
Fair	
Ventilation poor ..
Good	
No	
Good	
2
2
79
5
m
2
6
1
1
1
Very good	
Healthful	
Good	
Fairly good	
Another required.
11
90
12
5
1
Typhoid, 2 	
11
Satisfactorj7	
Good	
Excellent	
Situation bad ; old
bui 1 ding ;    no
water, etc	
Fair; lighting bad.
Crowded; lighting
and ventilation
bad;  temporary
premises	
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Good	
Satisfactory	
No	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good.
7
18
i
2
1
2
1
Yes.
Too open.
1
1
No.
1
11
6
4
1
6
Scarlet fever, 5	
3
Yes.
5
Require   attention.
Average.
Yes.
in
2
.
62
21
2
11
3
1
Nervous, 2 ; heart, 2 ; scoliosis,
5 ; pigeon breast, 1
Typhoid, 1 ; mumps, 24 .
6
7
3
6
4
2
5
-
1
99
10
1
1
3
1
1
6
1
12
1
1
-
Good.
9
4
Whooping-cough ...
Well ventilated ...
Fairly satisfactory.
First-class 	
Satisfactory	
ii        	
No	
Good	
Heat'g insufficient.
Fair	
No...,	
Ventilation good..
Old bldg. crowded;
new wing good.
Good.
2
Yes.
6
Tapeworm, 1; anremia, 2; granular lids, 1
2
12
Measles, 12	
5
Yes.
Yes.
Good.
96
5
1
3
2
1
6
1
34
3
Yes.
25
22
Chicken-pox ; measles...
Good. A 38
British Columbia
1919
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"B
'S.
d
11
11
11
20
18
34
■ 13
8
8
12
18
18
49
14
103
33
11
11
22
13
14
9
28
20
43
31
14
24
60
13
44
8
18
21
10
24
6
9
16
33
25
39
7
51
32
11
9
8
35
7
21
13
60
76
23
26
8
15
83
11
21
24
20
15
8
9
c
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0
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03
0
03
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03
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a
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1
03
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03
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H
H. M. Keith	
10
6
9
20
10
25
11
8
7
8
18
18
46
11
100
29
11
9
18
12
11
9
25
18
39
30
13
27
23
57
11
35
8
16
17
7
15
6
8
13
22
24
38
6
37
32
6
9
8
31
6
20
10
60
72
22
24
8
15
81
10
18
22
18
15
8
9
3
B. E. Church	
1
1
P. W. Turnor	
2
1
"1
i
1
5
6
B. E. Church	
3
W. D. Calvert	
2
2
3
4
A. W. McCordick	
2
2
1
2
2
5
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
4
1
2
1
5
2
"i
1
3
No report 1917-18.
W. J. Knox	
4
Robert Elliot	
6
W. Truax	
9,
D. McCaffrey	
20
6
H. II. Murphv	
1
1
H. H. Murphv	
1
Little Fort	
"i
1
3
1
1
i
1
2
1
2
5
1
2
2
2
4
"»'
1
3
i
2
1
3
2
4
i
i
2
2'
2
4
"2'
"3'
....
3
• 1
2
5 -
3
4
1
2
•  5
3
'2
2
3
1
2
2
3
2
2
R. W. Irving	
4
10
H. G. Williams	
9
II. R. Fort	
5
H. G. Williams	
W. Dvkes	
3
2
18
Mapes	
W. R. Stone	
1
H. M. Keith	
6
Marysville	
1
A. C. Nash	
Mayne Island	
9,
3
1. H. Wright	
3
3
9
»
1
5
11
3
4
W. J. Knox	
5
Model Farm	
(School closed.)
H. II. Murphy	
2
Moyase	
Moyie	
1
1
2
1
3
3
1
2
i
2
3
5
i
1
1
2
B. E. Church	
4
Nakusp	
Nanaimo Bay 	
E. H. S. McLean	
9
1
1
2
4
2
1
2
1
1
14
6
"7'
26
T. J. McPhee	
12
F. W. Andrew   ..
W. R. Stone	
4
2
4
2
1
1
1
9
4
2
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
W. E. Gomm	
3
1
1
8
9
1
21
Nickel Plate	
1
J. J. Gillis	
H. D. Leitch
Miss Edmonds....
4
1
2
5
6
6
3
7
10
W,
2
2
A. W. McCordick	
1
1
1
1
1 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 39
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
03
H
03
>
03
03
03
a
CO
3
3
aj
<?<
eg
'c
w
u
"o
O
2
Other Conditions specify,
(Nervous, Puhnonary, cardiac
Disease, etc.).
03
QJ
03
m
d
bjD
g-
o
is
bJ3
00
s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
2
Good	
Not sufficiently
heated
Yes.
4
1
Yes.
13
4
2
Good	
Good.
9
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean	
Good	
No	
Good	
Inadequate.
15
6
2
3
Yes.
1
2
5
2
8
1
16
Good.
4
1
Bad water ; blinds
needed
Good and clean ...
First-class	
Rather poor ventilation
Good	
Satisfactory	
Stove too small ...
Excellent	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Healthful	
Good ; fair ventilation
Good	
Yes.
2
14
Measles, 14	
4
9
31
Measles, 15	
Good.
9
Yes.
1
1
1
1
Yes.
6
Excellent.
2
9
Yes.
4
17
16
2
5
2
i
7
5
7
3
1
3
Mumps, 1	
Measles, 4	
Yes.
3
1
Verv bad.
15
Cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 1;  orthopaedic defects, 3
2
Good	
First-class	
No	
Good	
Healthful	
Good	
Normal	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Very good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Heating and ventilation good
Good; blinds needed
Satisfactory.
Good.
6
4
Yes.
40
2
One; clean.
10
8
1
Yes.
3
Yes.
4
,,
2
6
l
2
Yes.
3
3
Good.
Yes.
3
6
1
1
12
Fair.
Yes.
26
Good.
2
Adequate.
23
6
Wax in ears, 17;   catarrh, 3;
anaemia, 3 ; otitis media, 1
Clean and ade
5
quate
Yes.
3
10
Yes.
9
Satisfactory	
Good 	
Good; lightingpoor
Good	
,,
5
n
6
Good.
39
5
2
10
19
1
11
4
'i'
l
n
5
2
2
4
1
1
14
2
7
8
2
1
It
4
	
,,
2
„
Fairly crowded ...
Good	
Bad ventilation ...
Good	
Needs repairs.
Clean.
4
8
Yes.
12
3
4
Good.
9
Yes.
8
No	
Good	
tl
3
Fair. A 40
British Columbia
1919
RURAL AND
Name of School.
North Bend.
Northfield ..
Notch Hill ..
Ocean Falls..
Okanagan	
Okanagan Centre...
Okanagan Falls	
Okanagan Landing..
Okanagan, South	
Olalla	
Osland	
Otter Point	
Oyama	
Oyster, North	
Oyster, South   ..
Park Siding  	
Parksville	
Pemberton Range .
Pender Island	
Perry Siding...,
Porcher Island..
Port Clements..
Port Essington .
Port Simpson	
Powell River	
Princeton	
Princeton, East .
Procter 	
Qualicum Beach.
Qualicum, Little..
Quesnel	
Renata	
Retreat Cove	
Riondel	
Roberts Creek  . .
Robin Range....
Robson	
Rock Bay   ...
Rocky Point.,
Roosville	
Roseberv
Rose Hill	
Royston
Rutland	
Saanich, North.
St. Elmo	
Salmo 	
Savona   .
Sechelt	
Shaw-nigan	
Shuswap	
Shusvvap Falls..
Sidney	
Silverton	
Similkameen...
Sirdar	
Slocan City... .
Slocan, South .
Smithers	
Soda Creek ,..
Solsqua	
Sooke	
Sooke Harbour..
Sorrento	
Spences Bridge.
Medical Inspector.
II. R. Fort.
T. J. McPhee	
Walter Scatchard.
John Christie	
W. J. Knox.
H. McGregor ..
H. G. Williams.
W. J. Knox	
Robert Elliot ..
R. W. Large...
W. D. Calvert..
H. G. Williams.
A. C. Frost	
John Nay	
II. E. Langis	
R. W. Irving	
E. M. Sutherland .
W. H. Willson
R. W. Large ...
A. C. Nash ..
R. W. Large,
A. Henderson.
D. McCaffrey .
G. C. Read ...
II. E. Langis .
G. R. Baker	
J. E. H. Kelso
E. M. Sutherland .
G. C. Read	
F. Inglis	
M. G. Archibald...
J. E. H. Kelso	
R. L. Beadles	
C. P. Higgins	
B. E. Church	
W. E. Gomm	
R. W. Irving	
G. K. MacNaughton.
W.J. Knox	
A. E. McMicking..
J. C. Elliot	
John Nay	
R. Wightman	
F. Inglis	
W. Dykes	
Walter Scatchard .
H. G. Williams....
C. P. Higgins	
W. E. Gomm	
Robert Elliot	
G. B. Henderson....
W. E. Gomm	
W. H. Willson	
C. «. G. Maclean .. .
S. E. Mostyn Hoops.
J. H. Hamilton .
W. D. Calvert ..
Walter Scatchard.
J. J. Gillis	
School Nurse.
31
150
103
23
24
111
5
124
73
13
15
57
84
15
15
30
13
12
55
35
39
22
17
16
20
31
12
11
12
42
25
15
6
33
8
15
25
150
100
17
30
36
9
41
24
10
9
8
22
20
11
22
5
11
14
15
34
17
31
12
13
21
6
5
102
66
10
15
54
17
28
11
14
24
8
11
20 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 41
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
0)
H
CD
•a
S
as
3
-a
11
a;
"3
o
5
Other Conditions specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc ).
a
>
0)
6
&
Pi
£
o
is
he
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past-   .
Year.
Condition of
Building.'   State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
m
Measles ; diphtheria, 1..
Good	
Very good	
One,  good;   one,
bad.
7
sn
1
i
2
5
18
1
3
5
3
4
2
3
5
Chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
Excellent	
4
2
2
5
Whooping-cough, 4	
Measles, 5	
Excellent	
Fair	
Dirtv 	
Good	
Well ventilated &
7
Bad.
2
4
10
fi
2
1
17
1
Measles, 6	
Measles, 20	
15
10
Good	
Fair	
Good	
Healthful	
Satisfactory ;  no
water-supply
Crowded;   poor
building
Only   fairly   satisfactory
3
1
Whooping-cough, 1	
Fair.
Good.
91
Yes
1
2
5
5
Scarlet-fever, 5	
No.
7
Valvular heart murmur, 1	
Inadequate.
Bad.
R
In
12
8
1
5
Good	
14
Whooping-cough	
Measles, 4	
quate
15
1
31
21
6
9
7
7
2
Ventilation 6l heating fair
Good	
Fair	
2
3
4
2
7
2
fi
Yes. -
Q
4
'
4
Yes.
3
1
fi
1
4
4
2
Very good	
Good	
Verv fair	
Good	
Healthful	
Heating and ventilation good
Heating bad	
Fair	
Good	
Ventilation good..
Good	
Wood	
Good	
adequate
8
3
3
Very fair.
Yes.
2
3
2
2
13
6
1
3
1
8
Measles, 12 	
6
10
Fair.
19
Yes.
7
Good.
7
Only one closet.
9
1
4
4
8 pits.
Good.
7
5
1
1
21
S
Fair	
Excellent	
Good	
Good	
New building	
Excellent	
Satisfactory	
Chronic bronchitis, 1; cardiac,
1
1
Measles, 1   	
9
1
Yes.
1
"Y
12
5
1
4
Measles	
Whooping-cough, 1	
Good.
S
3
Another required.
i
2
1
Chicken-pox, 5	
Good.
5
3
11
Wood 	
Good	
4 pits.
Good.
10 A 42
British Columbia
1919
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
1
School Nurse.
p
n
03
'P.
d
•A
03
- 'B1
6
o
0
'S
a
03
O
P
1
c
>
03
o
03
Q
10
2
2
1
c
03
X
03
03
a
_h si
03  0>
03
a
4
1
3
'o
q
11
2
1
1
s
o
H
E
41
15
17
14
6
30
8
7
10
16
7
19
10
17
11
6
11
66
51
54
10
21
15
76
9
10
41
13
16
11
5
24
8
5
3
15
6
14
10
13
10
6
11
52
45
42
9
16
15
40
9
6
34
8
13
36
26
123
25
10
7
13
17
10
28
9
25
31
24
33
n
8
W. II. Stone	
3
II. H. Murphy	
1
E. H. S. McLean	
(School closed.)
4
2
7
i
5
1
1
10
1
->
H. H. Murphv	
1
1
"i
1
D. McCaffrev	
1
1
Turtle Valley..	
4
1
3
i
9
9
1
1
3
2
1
i
4
14
5
W. It. Stone	
8
8
10
E. M. Sutherland	
2
1
1
Voight Camp (Copper Mtn.)...
Waldo	
D. McCaffrev	
1
"i
1
3
B. E. Church .   .
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
16
11
14
44
26
130
25
14
3
T. J. McPhee	
1
1
2
1
i
2
3
2
1
7
3
18
1
2
Willow Point 	
W. H. Willson	
15
19
13
3
1
1
C. Ewert	
i
6
2
P. W. Tumor	
1
W. II. Willson	
P. W. Turnor	
9
27
32
28
35
W. J. Knox	
i
i
2
3
2
3
4
9
Wvcliff e	
2
8
2
9 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 43
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Concluded.
J3
•D
H
o
ft
T5
a
3
3
a!
"0
3
2
4
Other Conditions specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
|
%
Q
CO
d
be
&
s
p
O
P
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building,    State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
32
Measles	
Old building,  but
good condition
Good	
Good.
fi
Heart trouble, 1	
Yes.
4
Satisfactory   	
Inadequate and
poorly heated
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Good	
Satisfactory.
Not sanitary.
Yes.
Ifi
1
1
1
3
2
Pulmonary tuberculosis, 1	
Fibrosis rt. apex	
Satisfactory.
Yes.
1
2
4
1
4
3
4
"2
3
1
4
2
Wood	
Good.
lfl
3 pits.
Yes.
fi
4
3
28
Cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 1; an-
pemic, 1
Fair	
Poorly heated	
Satisfactory;  no
water-supply
Ditto	
42
12
No.
4
Scarlet fever, 1	
Measles, 2	
Whoopi ng-cough   and
measles
Yes.
9
i
2
Good	
Very good	
Not arranged properly
Good.
31
fi
1
Good.
9
Yes.
32
1
R
2
5
3
31
4
5
1
16
i
2
3
Fair	
Satisfactory ......
Good	
1
Good.
Whjoping-cough	
Whooping cough	
Whooping-cough	
Poor repairs	
Fair	
Good	
2
Good.
ft
Chronic otitis media, 1; mitral
insufficiency,   1 ;    nasal   catarrh, 1
Yes.
fi
Good.
3
10
1
2
1
Chicken-pox  	
3
Good.
4
Yes.
4
2
SI
Good	 A 44 British Columbia 1919
REGISTRAR'S REPORT UNDER THE VITAL STATISTICS ACT.
Victoria, B.C., September 20th, 1918.
H. E. Young, Esq., M.D.,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sik,—Herewith please find Forty-sixth Report of Vital Statistics, being for the first six
months of the year 191S.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Yours obediently,
MUNROE MILLER,
Deputy Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages.
In presenting this report for the first half of the year instead of for the full twelve months,
au explanation of why the departure from the former custom was made may not be out of place.
First: The year has heretofore closed with December, and the report of the business of the
immediate past twelve months, fully classified and arranged, was to be laid before the House as
soon after the first of January following as possible. As the number of the agencies and volume
of transactions increased, new difficulties presented themselves.
Second: The distance between many of the District Registrars and the head office, coupled
with the delays attending the inclement season of the year, made it anything but easy to get
the report ready.
Third: At that season the King's Printer is swamped with reports from all departments,
and the strength of his entire staff is required to produce documents considered of paramount
importance; and, finally, there-is no time left to scan exchanges, make comparisons, and draw
conclusions.
By adopting the present plan, commencing the year with July and ending with June, a far
better opportunity is given to prepare a more fully detailed report, and, as far as possible, make
a mass of statistics interesting.
For the assistance of all or any who may wish to communicate with the different District
Registrars of the Province, the following list of offices is published:—
Victoria Division— New Westminster Division—Concluded.
Victoria City. Outside.
Cowichan. Chilliwack City.
Esquimalt. Chilliwack Township.
Oak Bay. Nanaimo Mining Division—
Saanich. Nanaimo Division.
New Westminster Division— Alert Bay.
New Westminster City. Comox-Cumberland.
Burnaby. Comox, outside.
Coquitlam. - Ladysmith.
Fraser Mills. Powell River.
Ladner. Beaton Group—
Langley. Beaton.
Maple Ridge. Cranbrook.
Mission. Fernie.
Matsqui. Golden.
Port Coquitlam. Kaslo.
Port Moody. Nakusp.
Pitt Meadows. Nelson.
Sumas. New Denver.
Surrey. Revelstoke. 9 Geo.
Board of Health.
A 45
Beaton Group
Rossland.
S.locan City.
Trail.
Trout Lake.
Wilmer.
Alberni Group—
Alberni.
Anyox.
Atlin.
Bella Coola.
Clayoquot.
Fort Fraser.
Hazelton.
Fort St. John.
Hudson Hope.
Pouce Coupe.
Porter's Landing.
Prince Rupert.
Quatsino.
Queen Charlotte.
Stewart.
Telegraph Creek.
Ashcroft Group—
Ashcroft.
Concluded.
Ashcroft Group
Fort George.
Tete Jaune Cache.
Clinton.
Lillooet.
Quesnel.
150-Mile House.
Xale.
Fairview Group—
Fairview.
Greenwood.
Grand Forks.
Kamloops.
Nicola.
Princeton.
Vernon.
West Summerland.
Vancouver Division—
Vancouver City.
South Vancouver.
Point Grey.
North Vancouver.
West Vancouver.
Unorganized.
Richmond.
Concluded.
Barkerville.
Under proper headings, and in tables of the returns of births, deaths, and marriages, will be
found returns of each of the above places, but for expedition the gross for each division or group
of divisions follows for the years 1916, 1917, and 1918.   The loss or gain can be readily determined.
In all tables and totals let it be remembered that figures for 1918 apply only to the first six
months of the year.
Divisions and Groups
of Divisions.
Births.
Deaths.
Marriages.
1916.
1917.
1918
(6mos.).
1916.
1917.
1918
(6 mos.).
1916.
1917.
1918
(6 mos.).
Victoria	
Vancouver	
1,516
647
3,866
1,094
196
1,086
329
1,107
1,398
575
3,658
1,150
196
1,057
357
1,059
689
311
1,964
629
SO
515
177
575
654
233
1,506
453
77
443
127
394
589
218
1,549
495
74
364
144
463
3,896
358
128
820
257
28
165
77
213
2,046
516
119
1,454
311
54
299
94
322
449
112
1,391
279
44
218
107
258
223
67
731
'135
Ashcroft	
Fairview	
Beaton	
18
115
47
107
Totals	
9,841
9,450
4,940
3,887
3,169
2,861
1,443
As usual, the question of population of the Province has arisen. On interviewing the
Inspector of Municipalities he pronounced in favour of the figures used last year, expressing
the belief that no material change had been made in the matter of increase or decrease. Such
being admitted, the natural increase was sought that it might be added to the number assumed
for 1917, resulting as follows:—
Assumed population in 1917    379,804
Registered births, 1918    4.940
Registered deaths, 1918   2,046
Natural increase       2,S94
Present population   382,698 A 46
British Columbia
1919
On obtaining these figures it was found that another adjustment was required, it being
apparent that the three principal cities had increased in population by and through enterprises
put afoot through exigencies created by the present great war.
To obtain the just allotment to the principal cities it was considered expedient to resort to
school enrolment, with the following result:—
Vancouver City has enrolled : '.   16,465 x 6% = 107,022
Victoria City has enrolled     5,711 x 6% =  37,121
South Vancouver has enrolled     4,851 x 8% =  31,531
Total    ,   175,674
Assumed balance of Province   207,024
Population of Province being    3S2,69S
These figures will be used in our computations.
Following are the registrations for:—
1915.
1916.
1917.
1918
(6 mos.).
Births	
10,516
3,832
3,393
9,841
3,887
3,169
9,450
3,896
2,861
4,940
2,046
1,443
17,741
16,897
16,207
8,429
Following are the rates per thousand of population for births, deaths, and marriages for the
years 1916, 1917, and six months of 1918:—
Province—
Registered births	
Registered deaths	
Registered deaths, less still-born
Registered marriages	
Vancouver City—
Registered births	
Registered deaths	
Registered deaths, less still-born
Registered marriages	
Victoria City—
Registered births	
Registered deaths	
Registered deaths, less still-born
Registered marriages	
South Vancouver-
Registered births	
Registered deaths	
Registered deaths, less still-born
Registered marriages	
Remainder of Province—
Registered births	
Registered deaths	
Registered deaths, less still-born
Registered marriages	
1916.
Pop. 383,380.
1,841-
1,887-
1.686-
1,169-
!,686-
1,240-
1,125-
1,152-
1,106-
533-
508-
420-
579-
112-
97-
110-
5,470-
>,002-
1,956-
25.66
■10.14
9.60
- 8.27
28.07
-12.96
11.65
13.08
■30.29
■14.59
13.09
12.59
■20.60
3.98
3.45
- 3.91
-24.47
- 9.16
- 8.76
- 6.21
1917.
Pop. 379,804.
9,433—24.83
3,896-10.25
3,721— 9.79
2,861— 7.53
2,670—27.81
1,307—13.61
1,223—12.74
1,191—12.40
995—26.97
476—13.03
456—12.48
382—10.46
480—17.07
88— 3.13
76— 2.70
97— 3.09
5,288-24.12
2,025— 9.23
1,966— 8.96
1,191— 5.43
1918 (6 mos.).
Pop. 382,698.
4,940—12.91
2,046— 5.34
1,954— 5.10
1,443— 3.77
1,493—13.95
681— 6.36
641— 5.99
624— 5.83
492—13.25
285— 7.68
272— 7.32
201— 5.41
207— 6.56
52— 1.64
45— 1.43
52— 1.64
2,748—13.27
1,028— 4.96
996— 4.81
566— 2.73 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 47
Following is a classified list of deaths occurring in British Columbia for the years 1913 to
June 30th, 1918 :—
General diseases	
Diseases of the nervous system and organs of special sense	
Diseases of the circulatory system	
Diseases of the respiratory system	
Diseases of the digestive system	
Non-venereal diseases of the genito-urinary system and annexa
The puerperal state	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue	
Diseases of the bones and organs of locomotion	
Malformations	
Diseases of early infancy	
Old age * ?	
Affections produced by external causes	
Ill-defined, including executions	
Totals      4,619
997
404
501
458
300
338
53
12
'"9
765
68
717
97
856
358
403
345
329
207
65
13
"42
579
66
642
72
336
479
340
260
163
50
7
1
51
526
70.
583
71
389
456
494
224
206
50
15
3
55
438
80
473
3,887
1917.
540
439
268
204
59
23
3
51
405
54
455
50
3,896
1918
(6 mos.).
523
220
293
278
109
102
17
8
1
24
186
37
225
23
That one may be better enabled to make comparisons the results of the above tables have
been segregated, and each division charged with what belongs to it. It is desired to forcibly
impress upon the reader the fact that column 1—" General diseases "—contains returns for both
tuberculosis and cancer, as well as many diseases peculiar to children, which will account for its
large total—523—making it responsible for 25.55 of all deaths.
The following table of diseases has been compiled from returns of the whole Province from
1900 to June, 1918. It is considered' deserving of attention. Also the same table has been
segregated, thus showing the different localities' liability to or immunity from the diseases
contained in the list.
t
0
0
CS
79
6
7
2
1
0
35
11
7
0
01
32
6
31
6
CO
0
03
24
12
21
17
1
0
—.
42
3
16
8
1
2
48
4
19
6
104
0
34
4
10
4
1
'48
4
15
7
100
CO
0
or.
39
4
15
6
2
1
45
6
11
2
110
©
c
63
26
21
4
10
'53
9
22
26
217
CO
O
<5
72
9
29
5
6
1
33
11
19
5
152
33
44
419
c-.
55
18
14
16
1
59
12
30
10
1 53
46
36
450
c5
102
15
23
14
7
1
74
51
31
5
164
51
42
580
Q
92
23
68
31
11
CM
Ol
99
15
36
12
13
cd
85
27
35
18
11
Til
c;
42
23
11
3
1
os
32
9
11
14
CO
OS
23
37
18
1
12
-
24
21
19
7
6
3
53
45
17
224
92
36
554
c
30 5
5
14
7
2
17
17
3
14
9
131
48
23
290
C3
O
H
Whooping-cough  	
979
272
393
164
8
Diarrhoea and enteritis	
35
6
11
98
29
4
13
3
102
30
6
11
6
155
22
2
16
11
115
63
24
30
10
237
85
60
724
130
23
39
10
258
124
63
822
113
24
10
11
195
66
51
646
108
13
45
11
183
64
47
551
72
14
34
18
157
62
47
470
35
14
29
36
228
110
49
622
1,057
237
220
Pneumonia	
3,083
22
274
26
230
22
312
19
260
24
277
'16
243
20
261
47
498
Totals	
8,483 A 48
British Columbia
1919
Allotment or Specified Diseases to each Mining Division.
c
&
H
3
o
O*
o
X3
oj
03
5
03
03
01   '
Os-
a)
o3
OJ
o
s
T3
SB
5
a
a
~33 =
S P.
*3 cj
— cj
11
oj
C
0J
eg
d
'3
o
OJ
a
.2
o
g
5.
o
.a
CJ
o
2
a
0
CO
'oS"
±1
O
H
Ashcroft Group—
1
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
Yale                	
	
1
2
i
4
Fairview Group—
	
—
—
	
	
	
	
	
1
1
1
i
i
i
3
5
1
i
3
2
7
9
2
1
4
12
1
2
2
10
Beaton Group-
1
1
i
25
i
1
1
5
5
2
1
i
9
1
9
1
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
8
2
2
3
1
3
1
1
Victoria Division—
2
i
i
1
2
2
i
2
3
5/
18
5
3
35
11
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
i
2
1
. 1
1
3
7
1
2
5
9
1
2
1
1
1
4
Nanaimo Division—
l
2
1
1
i
4
6
25
13
1
4
6
1
1
1
1
2
13
8
2
1
7
18
50
5
3
3
5
2
7
14
3
"2
2
1
1
8
1
1
20
New Westminster Division-
1
1
1
1
20
3
1
i
l
7
1
1
2
1
3
8
2
2
7
i
i
1
6
1
2
1
14
Vancouver Division—
1
2
38
106
11
1
5
2
1
1
20
10
1
4
11
3
11
8
2
1
2
10
6
1
59
133 9 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
A 49
Allotment of Specified Diseases to each Mining Division—Concluded.
CD
>
OJ
'5
ft
B
o
S
G
ft
O
o
■A
0)
ft
Q
33
QJ
fa
QJ
B
56
i
'A
o
S
CO
t3
Is
a
>>
OJ
d
OJ
Br
id
11
t»3 S3
M p.
S 32
OJ
3 rf
t3
.*
■3
o
OJ
a
ft
*5
o
3
g
ft
o
c
o
t-.
fa
o
o
o
H
Alberni Group—
l
1
Atlin	
1
1
l
1
Fort St. John	
l
3
3
7
l
14
9
4
131
5
48
23
10
5
14
7
2
17
17
3
?90
The following table relating to cancer shows that deaths resulting therefrom are on the
increase. For the year 1917 there were 248 deaths, and for the first six months of 1918, 144.
Should this rate be maintained the increase for the present year will amount to 16.66 per cent,
over 1917. The report is given as a whole as well as by specifying each division. The percentage
of all deaths, exclusive of still-born, for the six months is 7.30, and the rate per thousand is 0.37.
1917.     6 Mos., 1018.
Victoria Division      61 33
New Westminster Division     23 12
Nanaimo Division ,       7 7
Beaton Group     10 11
, Alberni Group       5 . 2
Ashcroft Group        .. 2
Fairview Group  '....'     20 9
Vancouver Division   122 68
Totals  248 144
Tuberculosis: Under this heading the same course is pursued as in preceding diseases; that
is, the report as a whole, and then recapitulated.    Number of deaths in 1917, 413;  for the first
six months of 1918, 236, which rate, if maintained, will amount to 472, a gain of 59, or 14.2S
per cent, over 1917.    The percentage of all deaths, exclusive of still-born, for 1918   (first six
months), is 12.07, and the rate per thousand of population is 0.62.
1917. 6 Mos., 1918.
Victoria Division     57 55
New Westminster Division     44 17
Nanaimo Division     17 8
Beaton Group     2S 21
Alberni Group         9 4
Ashcroft Group   ,       8 5
Fairview Group      69 42
Vancouver Division    181 86
Totals    413 236
In Fairview Group is included report from Tranquille Sanatorium. A 50
British Columbia
1919
Not the least interesting portion of this subject is the part borne by Asiatics, and the
opportunity is taken to introduce the following statement. For the first six months of the
year the—
Total number of deaths of Chinese amounted to   139
Total number of deaths of Japanese amounted to   103
Total number of deaths of East Indians amounted to  '       7
249
Deaths from tuberculosis, Chinese     45
Deaths from tuberculosis, Japanese     10
Deaths from tuberculosis, East Indians       1
56
Of the total Chinese, 139, 45 died of tuberculosis = 32.37 per cent, of all Chinese deaths. Of
the total Japanese, 103, 10 died of tuberculosis = 9.7 per cent, of all Japanese deaths. Of the
total East Indians. 7, 1 died of tuberculosis = 14.3 per cent, of all East Indian deaths. Of all
deaths of Asiatics named, 249, 56 died of tuberculosis = 22.49 per cent, of all Asiatic deaths.
Let us view this statement from another angle: Of the 236 deaths from tuberculosis, the
Chinese contributed 45 = 19 per cent, of all deaths from tuberculosis; whilst all three of the
Asiatics are responsible for 56 deaths out of 236 = 23.72 per cent.
Now, if we deduct this 56 from 236 (total deaths from tuberculosis for the first six months
of 1918), we have 180 left for the white race, which cuts our rate very materially; that is to
say, 180 deaths from tuberculosis becomes 9.21 per cent, instead of 12.07 per cent.
The following information is presented as a comparative statement re the ages of decedents
for the years 1916, 1917, and first six months of 1918 :—
Under 1 year	
1 to 2 years	
2 to 5 years	
5 to 10 years	
10 to 20 years	
20 to 30 years	
30 to 40years.	
40 to 50 years	
50 to 60 years	
60 to 70 years	
70 to 80 years	
80 to 90 years	
90 years and up	
Age not given	
Age and sex not given ..
Totals
601
587
260
121
82
45
108
107
58
70
76
44
104
154
93
298
329
161
451
473
244
486
451
248
450
456
259
413
461
244
348
341
181
175
158
97
22
18
11
37
28
9
2
1918
(6 mos.).
1,954
Iii the above figures the still-born are not included with deaths under one year.   There were
201 still-births reported in 1916. 175 in 1917, and 92 for the first six months of 1918.
The cash receipts from January to June, inclusive, 1917, amount to . .$   636 69
The cash receipts from January to June (first six months), 1918   1,617 88
An increase of $   981 19
In fact, the receipts for the first six months of this year amounted to $187.73 more than the
receipts for the whole of the year 1917.
The receipts are a fair index to the increase in the amount of work which fell to our staff;
yet, thanks to every one being familiar with the work of the Department, esprit de corps, and
not a small amount of hard work individually and collectively, we pulled through with very little
assistance.
The certificates issued for military purposes from this office for 1917 were 2,500. and for the
first six months of 1918, 1,143. 9 Geo. 5 Board of Health. A 51
Letters received and dealt with from January to June, inclusive, number 3,311. This does
not include 547 notices of births received from physicians of Victoria and adjoining municipalities,
nor 1,444 notices received from issuers of marriage licences, all of which have to be noted and
filed.
All returns from the District Registrars of the Province amount, to the end of June, to
4,940 births, 2,046 deaths, and 1,445 marriages, making the total entries, on account of the double
indexing of marriages, 9,876, all of which have been indexed, numbered, and placed in alphabetical
order under their proper divisions, in addition to which transcriptions from Church records have
amounted to fully 120,000 words.
One word about registration of births, deaths, and marriages: Assuming that one working
in a department governed by a special Act is more liable to discover, or have thrust upon him,
imperfections in that law, permit rne, with all due respect, to suggest an amendment to section 14
of the "Vital S'tatistics Act." That section and its subsections specifically set forth who may
register the birth of a child. Cases are arising every day where registration is sought, which
registration cannot be made in accordance with the provisions of the Act. It is held that discretion in accepting such returns is not admissible, in that, if allowed, the very backbone of the
Act may be overturned at the whim and caprice of the individual.
The foregoing remarks have been brought forth by and through painful cases presented for
consideration through exigencies created by the present war, as well as by the neglect and death
of all the parties authorized to attend to the matter at the proper time. Let authority to register
be extended.
In the matter of returns of vital statistics in relation to Indians the tabulated statements
following show:—
Registrations of births, January to June, 1918   204
Registrations of deaths, January to June, 1918    171
Registrations of marriages, January to June, 1918     47
S ' 	
Total registrations    422
For twelve months of 1917 registrations stood—
Births     144
Deaths      310
Marriages        67
Total for 1917  '.. 521
Undoubtedly an improvement; yet, inasmuch as three agencies have furnished no returns for
1918, it is hardly fair to construe the information furnished as being complete. Were it so, there
is no reason why the Indian population (in round numbers, 25,000) should not be added to that
which we claim (382,698) as the present population of the Province, and all percentages and
rates per thousand calculated on that total. However, until the system works more smoothly
re Indians, we must adhere to the old plan and present two reports. It cannot be denied that
much is to be said in behalf of the Agents, on account of the different bands not being confined
to their own agencies. At certain times of the year the various tribes virtually swarm to different
locations in search of occupation, and whilst away from home the Agent loses touch with his
charges, and until there is a stock-taking on their return he cannot answer for the condition of
his band.
All tabulated statements follow. A 52
British Columbia
1919
BIRTHS,' 191S.*
Mining- Division.
A ins worth—
Kaslo	
Arrow Lake—
Nakusp>	
Atlin -
Atlin	
Ashcroft—
Ashcroft	
Alberni—
Alberni	
Bella Coola—
Bella Coola	
Cariboo—
Barkerville	
Fort George	
Tete Javme Cache	
Clayoquot—
Clayoquot 	
Clinton—
Clinton	
Fort Steele—
Cranbrook.	
Fernie	
Greenwood—
Greenwood	
Grand Forks—
Grand Forks	
Golden—
Golden	
Kamloops—
Kamloops	
Liard—
Porter's Landing1	
Lardeau—
Beaton  	
Lillooet—
Lillooet i.....
Nicola—
Nicola	
Nelson-
Nelson 	
New Westminster—
New Westminster ....
Burnaby	
Chilliwack   	
Outside	
Nanaimo—
Nanaimo '	
Alert Bay	
Comox  .;	
Ladysmith	
Osoyoos—
Fairview	
Omineca—
Hazelton	
Fort Fraser	
Portland Canal—
Stewart	
Peace River—
Fort St. John	
Hudson Hope	
Ponce Coupe	
Quesnel—■
Quesnel	
150-Mile House	
Quatsino—
Quatsino	
Queen Charlotte—
Queen Charlotte City.
Revelstoke—
Revelstoke	
Si mil k am e en—
Princeton	
Slocan—
New Denver	
Slocan City Division—
Slocan City	
Stikine—
Telegraph Creek	
Carried forward.
Registrations in 1918.
Total
Registrations.
Births in 1918.
TotaIi Births.
Male.
Female.
Sex not
given.
1918.
1917.
Male.
Female.
Sex not
given.
1918.
1917.
4
9
13
24
3
5
8
20
7
8'
15
14
3
6
9
7
1
1
7
1
1
6
16
8
24
35
6
4
10
15
7
13
20
40
2
8
10
27
12
2
14
16
7
1
8
13
1
11
3
17
2
1
28
5
55
15
2
9
2
10
2
19
4
50
15
2
1
1
2
15
1
1
8
47
38
36
49
83
87
137
203
26
28
23
36
49
64
104
159
24
20
44
81
15
11
26
60
17
27
44
77
11
16
- 27
61
14
5
19
40
10
3
13
30
75
73
148
303
47
47
94
204
No retu
rns rece
ived.
1
No retu
rns rece
ived.
1
1
1
3
2
2
1
3
5
1
1
3
23
19
42
70
13
11
24
49
64
48
112
226
30
29
59
162
150
38
21
136
124
26
22
111
275
64
43
247
4S1
160
134
375
69
27
9
55
57
20
11
58
127
47
20
113
322
125
96
254
110
3
43
18
87
2
41
7
197
5
84
25
310
18
166
81
47
3
30
9
48
2
25
5
95
5
55
14
220
9
125
56
16
10
26
81
13
8
21
63
11
3
8
6
19
9
37
17
7
2
8
3
15
5 ,
32
9
2
No retu
3
rns rece
ived.
2
3
2
5
19
1
No retu
2
rns rece
ived.
1
2
1 ,
2
16
2
2
2
2
4
4
27
9
1
1
2
1
3
2
18
4
2
2
4
2
2
4
5
6
11
19
4
5
9
13
38
38
76
122
18
26
44
100
3
11
. s.
14
27
1
9
10
21
7
9
16
29
7
2
7
9
20
7
1
850
1
2
1
1
1
982
1
1,833
3,501
519
507
1
1,027
2,516
* The 1918 returns are for January to June only.    The 1917 returns are for the whole year. 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 53
BIRTHS, 1918—Concluded.
Mining- Division.
Brought forward....
Skeena—
Prince Rupert	
Anyox	
Trail Creek—
Rossland	
Trail	
Trout Lake—
Trout Lake	
Vernon—
Vernon	
Vancouver—
Vancouver City	
North Vancouver City ...
North Vancouver District
South Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Point Grey	
Unorganized	
Richmond 	
Victoria—
Victoria City	
Cowichan	
Esquimalt	
Oak Bay	
Saanich	
Windermere—
Wilmer	
Yale-
Yale 	
Totals.	
Registrations in 1918.
45
43
42
10
108
5
32
22
32
246
27
32
10
Female.
850
36
8
22
35
717
40
32
9
33
18
12.
33
4
7
2,339
Sex not
given.
Total
Registrations.
1,833
75
20
67
78
1,493
82
17
207
5
64
31
65
492
54
50
4,940
3,501
179
7
67
162
418
2,670
131
34
480
8
122
66
147
995
102
80
44
177
22
35
Births in 1918.
Male.
24"
9
9
29
81
3
22
15
28
128
16
15
6
19
Female.
10
24
493
36
3
71
144
15
9
5
20
Sex not
given.
Total Births.
1,027
40
14
19
53
63
10
152
3
43
22
58
31
24
11
39
2,997
144
7
291
2,008
106
27
390
6
84
51
124
744
72
61
33
116 A 54
V
British Columbia   ■                                               1919
PRELIMINARY TABLES  SHOWING DEATHS FOR DIVISIONS  OR  GROUPS OF
DIVISIONS, BY MONTHS.
Divisions and Groups of
1917.
1918.
Divisions.
Jan.
44
1
3
3
2
Feb.
Mar.
53
3
2
1
Apr.
31
4
1
1
2
May.
40
3
3
5
June
37
3
2
3
Totals.
Jan.
Feb.
44
5
4
2
Mar.
Apr.
72
4
3
May.
June
Totals.
Victoria Division.
41
5
4
4
54
10
2
9
3
246
18
13
9
17
37
4
1
1
4
58
6
7
2
38
4
2
5
56
36
4
1
1
4
26
Oak Bay	
21
20
Totals	
53
9
61
10
4
3
17
140
6
2
5
1
4
3
39
15
8
23
51
9
1
7
2
19
45
303
47
12
8
5
55
7
1
4
1
13
73
15
1
15
2
33
81
46
358
Nanaimo Division.
6
11
2
59
3
44
12
10
1
10
2
25
6
2
6
3
13
131
6
5
2
2
9
1
9
4
19
88
12
4
2
1
59
6
5
2
16
17
Totals	
24
89
9
5
5
2
19
118
25
128
Vancouver Division.
132
15
2
8
2
128
6
4
2
2
1
111
3
1
7
5
2
116
11
2
2
1
1
3
716
50
12
31
9
2
15
10
98
9
4
v    3
3
3
104
6
6
2
1
4
5
128
20
4
4
13
41
106
9
4
3
154
10
9
5
32
17
7
1
5
2
2
1
2
112
3
1
3
1
1
2
19
Totals...   	
162
25
5
3
IS
163
19
1
3
Ifi
143
129
136
845
120
130
182
.23
6
3
15
47
160
23
1
1
13
110
820
New Westminster Division.
16
2
4
8
31
6
3
19
59
15
4
5
11
35
20
4
21
45
1
126
22
18
96
23
5
S
13
24
3
2
14
20
2
2
16
39
Totals	
51
1
30
42
262
49
43
38
2
257
Ashcroft Group.
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
6
1
1
4
3
4
12
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
9
1
1
2
1
1
1
150-Mile House   	
1
2
1
Yale	
1
5
6
8
1
14
1
1
5
3
3
2
1
2
29
4
6
1
2
13
1
15
34
5
Totals	
5
12
33
4
3
1
3
2
8
1
3
Fairview Group.
5
3
6
14
6
1
8
43
3
3
6
12
3
8
1
2
1
16
3
3
2
3
13
20
19
19
98
10
5
42
2
1
1
3
2
8
17
3
2
2
18
1
6
32
3
3
9
5
3
11
34
3
3
11
3
10
30
62
1
7
6
8
38
9
32
2
23
Totals ,	
42
35
213
18
165
Beaton Group.
Beaton	
10
1
3
3
28
1
1
2
9
2
1
4
5
6
4
3
1
12
1
3
3
1
15
75
9
19
4
64
7
24
18
2
14
8
6
1
1
1
12
1
4
2
6
9
2
1
8
4
8
5
1
5
2
4
3
6
8
3
1
14
1
4
1
2
8
1
1
1
6
1
8
1
8
10
2
9
5
4
2
""36
Kaslo	
14
2
7
1
10
3
3
3
1
5
3
2
14
1
3
46
7
6
14
6
13
3
4
3
9
4
5
3
29
Trail..	
2
2
2
1
5
13
1
1
33
1
3
1
34
Totals	
50 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 55
Pkeliminaey. Tables  showing Deaths by Divisions or Groups of Divisions, by Months—
Concluded. '■
Divisions and Groups of
1917.
1918.
Divisions.
Jan.
3
Feb.
Mar.
1
Apr.
May.
2
June
Totals.
Jan.
4
1
1
Feb.
Mar.
1
Apr.
May.
June
Totals.
Alberni Group.
Atlin 	
2
3
10
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
7
2
Bella Coola	
1
1
2
8
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
2
1
11
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
5
10
3
2
4
6
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
Prince Rupert	
5
7
5
4
7
6
34
5
2
6
2
4
5
2
24
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
13
8
6
1
1
14
1
1
13
2
13
390
12
Totals	
8
12
11
322
70
17
12
14
77
315
376
361
334
2,098
318
318
363
432
332
283
2,046 A 56
British Columbia
1919
PRELIMINARY TABLES  SHOWING BIRTHS FOR DIVISIONS.
Januar
- TO  JL
xe, 1917.
January to June, 1918.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
April.
May.
June.
Totals.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
April.
May.
June.
Totals.
Ashcroft Group.
1
2
2
1
i
5
1
4
2
1
3
i
2
4
2
i
3
1
4
4
1
1
i
11
9
22
1
3
1
6
3
13
2
5
1
i
1
1
11
3
5
1
2
1
1
i
4
3
6
1
i
1
1
i
1
1
1
10
19
Tete Jaune Cache	
4
1
1
3
150-Mile House ...-.	
•Yale	
2
6
Totals	
5
5
12
12
13
58
8
5
4
16
3
2
31
10
12
5
46
Fairview Group.
i
i
2
4
2
14
1
20
14
3
7
15
2   -
1
25
4
3
24
4
24
5
6
11
6
1
25
s
6
5
16
4
3
15
67
29
22
24
81
18
9
109
i
'l
2
1
1
11
2
2
13
10
6
8
12
6
2
17
3
4
5
27
4
2
28
6
10
9
27
9
2
17
21
26
27
94
24
10
107
Totals	
2
i
7
i
2
i
i
i
5
i
43
67
69
54
292
2
32
61
61
73
80
309
Beaton Group.
2
14
1
3
"i
1
11
3
9
1
8
13
4
4
8
2
7
3
4
15
i
1
10
14
4
21
1
9
18
2
8
13
2
1
1
9
1
13
4
i
'2
'5
16
1
1
is
1
13
3
1
6
3
65
2
34
77
13
13
2
59
6
54
16
6
57
9
3
10
i
2
ii
11
3
2
6
1
10
2
1
'8
9
2
4
io
6
'9
i
'7
11
4
1
2
17
'9
5
13
i
12
8
1
2
1
15
3
14
5
i3
'i
's
15
3
1
4
11
5
4
7
9
2
49
64
13
8
9
59
9
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Trail	
44
19
53
Wrilmer	
6
Totals	
20
16
2
3
48
70
58
4
8
3
3
76
87
58
348
16
54
49
54
5
9
3
6
70
75
69
45
7
4
4
14
333
Victoria Division.
45
6
2
4
62
8
1
5
10
59
8
7
1
8
63
7
3
5
6
303
33
21
16
34
15
1
i
35
6
3
4
60
8
2
1
5
76
63
4
6
3
9
85
272
31
24
11
39
21
57
11
'6
7
86
83
84
407
17
48
77
74
377
Nanaimo Division.
2
i
3
26
9
5
16
18
7
20
2
17
5
44
18
ii
5
93
4
61
30
5
3
1
14
1
5
2
21
1
6
2
20
i2
4
36
12
ie
23
3
13
3
42
95
5
55
14
Totals	
24
40
43
34
188
9
22
30
30
169
New Westminster Div.
New Westminster City...
6
5
3
11
11
9
18
23
9
3
18
53
28
7
10
24
38
12
5
22
32
13
8
32
138
57
35
117
5
1
2
12
9
3
11
26
8
5
3
32
6
3
28
27
10
5
25
67
25
12
3
24
127
47
20
113
Totals	
14
49
69
146
29
5
10
2
19
8
77
85
347
10
35
62
69
64
307
Vancouver Division.
44
8
i
li
l
92
26
1
3
'8
3
14S
36
9
13
5
11
9
178
42
9
6
2
1
10
2
200
38
9
12
4
2
9
8
808
179
33
45
13
3
68
31
55
6
i
ii
1
135
20
3
10
ii
3
194
36
9
8
3
14
4
268
175
35
9
14
3
1
8
8
261
31
17
13
2
1
4
2
177
24
5
17
2
• 1
12
4
997
152
43
North Vancouver City...
North Vancouver District
63
10
3
58
22
65
133
231
219
250
2S2
1,180
74
180
253
331
242
1,348 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 57
Preliminary' Tables showing Births for Divisions—Concluded.
Alberni Group.
Alberni 	
Anvox	
Atlin	
Bella Coola	
Clayoquot	
Fort Fraser..   	
Hazelton	
Fort St. John	
Hudson Hope    .
Pouce Coupe	
Porter's Landing
Prince Rupert	
Quatsino , .
Queen Charlotte	
Stewart	
Telegraph Creek	
Totals	
Grand totals.
January to June, 1917.
Feb.
15
1
1
136       368       573       611       602
April.
14
3
May.
i
1
14
1
28
Totals.
17
1
9
1
60
1
4
646        2,936
10
138
January to June, 1918.
Feb.
1
i
17
Mar.
April.
2
2
i
i
3
5
2
4
3
2
i
'9
3
14
24
569
599
May.
1
ii
28
701
10
14
1
8
'5
15
1
40
2
108
!,997 '      A. 58
British Columbia
1919
DEATHS, FIRST SIN MONTHS, 1918.
•6
'" ?
■p
C
d
Mining Division.
03 "?
m
X
e3
bo
ei
ot
ce
co
rt
00
OS
od
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o
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m
Ainsworth—
2
1
2
1
3
3
6
19
13
1
Arrow Lake—
1
2
2
1
3
4
1
Atlin—
Atlin	
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
Ashcroft—
1
1
2
1
2
3
0
2
3
Alberni—
2
1
1
3
4
3
7
10
3
Bella Coola—
1
9
2
2
1
8
8
2
6
Cariboo—
9
2
1
2
5
4
9
6
3
1
3
4
4
1
3
Clavoquot—
1
1
1
1
Clinton—
1
1
1
1
Fort Steele-
10
12
1
3
2
2
3
2
1
1
4
6
7
3
7
5
4
5
2
1
1
24
33
12
13
36
46
15
75
21
"?.9
2
5
Greenwood—
1
2
1
4
1
6
3
9
19
10
Grand Forks-
6
1
1
2
1
6
4
10
19
9
Golden—
1
1
3
2
6
1
7
9
2
Kamloops—
V
3
48
14
62
98
36
1
Liard—
Lardeau—
Lillooet—
1
1
1
4
3
Nicola—
Nicola	
4
3
3
2
7
5
12
10
2
Nelson—
%
Nelson	
6
1
1
7
4
5
7
5
13
3
2
33
21
54
64
10
3
New Westminster—
21
2
5
2
4
7
16
21
16
16
18
5
83
50
133
126
7
9
Burnaby 	
4
1
2
1
4
1
5
3
12
9
21
22
1
1
4
10
3
1
7
2
2
4
2
13
1
4
4
10
4
7
3
16
4
1
1
16
57
4
26
20
83
18
96
2
"i3
1
2
Nanaino—
Nanaimo	
5
2
3
5
2
9
14
10
5
3
1
40
19
59
59
1
1
1
6
6
3
3
7
2
2
2
2
i
9
2
8
1
2
5
4
4
3
4
2
1
34
13
12
4
46
17
44
12
2
5
Osoyoos—
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
10
3
13
20
7
Omineca—
3
1
2
5
1
1
1
6
2
10
5
4
3
2
1
Portland Canal-
1
1
1
1
Peace River—
Fort St. John	
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
0
1
3
9
1
Quesnel—
1
1
1
1
3
1
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
4
4
Quatsino—
1
1
2
•>.
2
Queen Charlotte—
1
2
2
1
5
1
6
<>
4
1
Revelstoke—
4
2
1
3
4
2
5
6
1
1
19
10
29
24
6
Similkameen—
2
1
1
1
1
2
4
6
5
1
1
Slocan—
1
1
3
4
1
5
7
2
..
Slocan City Division—
106
89
70
1
35
1
5
513
1
239
1
752
2
825
74
1
147
..
111
17
98
IX
■3-1
57
99
84
28 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 59
Deaths, First Six Months, 1918—Concluded.
Mining Division.
T3
C     ■
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99
1
3
4
2
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84
0
1
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106
1
2
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89
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513
2
17
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239
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02
06
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752
2
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2
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74
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147
10
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03
Brought forward	
Stikine—
28
Skeena—
Prince Rupert	
Trail Creek-
5
3
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
Trout Lake-
Vernon—
5
135
2
2
13
1
13
2
6
1
18
2
15
1
5
28
1
1
3
6
53
1
7
81
1
3
4
100
1
3
5
87
1
4
6
81
6
"s
6
43
1
2
10
1
8
1
34
3
3
24
3
3
1
1
18
2
2
1
3
3
i
4
'2
2
2
30
400
14
2
22
1
23
12
9
168
18
16
4
15
2
23
281
3
5
30
'"9
7
2
117
8
5
2
5
53
681
17
7
52
1
32
19
11
285
26
21
6
20
2
42
716
31
9
50
2
12
15
10
246
18
13
9
17
3
12
2098
11
2
"20
4
1
39
8
8
"3
181
35
14
2
i
"3
1
12
233
1
Vancouver—
40
North Vancouver	
North Vancouver District	
South Vancouver	
7
5
8
2
41
8
2
2
3
i
2
i
6
1
1
1
1
4
i
16
1
1
2
2
24
2
8
2
"s
32
1
3
1
1
40
3
1
6
4
3
26
3
3
1
2
4
36
2
"2
4
1
1
Richmond 	
Victoria—
13
i
Windermere—
1
2
1
1
2
l
Yale—
Totals	
352
45
58
44
93
161
244
248
259
244
181
97
11
9
1296
750
2046
92 A 60
British Columbia
1919
MARRIAGES, 1918.
Number oe  Marriages.
Victoria Division-
Victoria City   201
Cowichan  7
Esquimalt  4
Oak Bay!  4
Saanich  7
      223
Nanaimo Division—
Nanaimo  45
Alert Bay  2
Comox  15
Ladysmith ...i  5
        67
Vancouver Division—
Vancouver City  624
South Vancouver  52
Point Grey  24
North Vancouver City !  20
North Vancouver District  5
West Vancouver	
Richmond ....  3
Vancouver (outside)  3
       731
New Westminster Division—
New Westminster City  89
Burnahy  8
Chilliwack      19
New Westminster (outside)  19
 135
Ashcroft Group—
Ashcroft '.   3
Barkerville	
Fort George  8
Tete Jaune Cache	
Clinton  1
Lillooet	
Quesnel  1
150-Mile House  4
Yale!  1
 IS
Fairview Group—
Fairview  11
Greenwood  7
Carried forward  18 1,174
Brought forward  18 1,174
Fairview Group—Concluded.
Grand Forks  14
Kamloops ,  45
Nicola  7
Princeton  2
Vernon  29
       115
Alberni Group—
Alberni   5
Anyox  3
Atlin  2
Bella Coola  2
Clayoquot 	
Fort Fraser  3
Hazelton  7
Fort St. John	
Hudson Hope 	
Pouce Coupe  4
Porter's Landing-	
Prince Rupert  21
Quatsino	
Queen Charlotte	
Stewart	
Telegraph Creek	
 47
Beaton Group—
Beaton	
Cranbrook  21
Fernie    29
Golden  6
Kaslo  3
Nakusp  2
Nelson   25
New Denver  3
Revelstoke  4
Rossland  3
Slocan City	
Trail  9
Trout Lake	
Wilmer ,  2
 107
Grand total    1,443
MARRIAGES, JANUARY TO JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918.
Bridegroom and Bride born in same Country.
     0
    1
    65
     1
   107
     5
   135
     4
     2
     1
     1
    10
    11
     7
   355
     4
     3
     1
     1
    11
    36
     5
     3
   540 Board op Health.
A 61
MARRIAGES, JANUARY TO JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918— Continued,
Bridegroom and Bride born in different Countries.
Place op Birth.
Australia	
British Columbia	
Canada	
China	
England 	
Iceland	
Ireland	
New South Wales	
United States of America
Wales	
Number of
Marriages.
Total.
British Columbia .
Canada	
Russia	
British Columbia	
British West Indies	
Canada	
England	
India	
Scotland   	
United States of America.
United States of America
Total.
British Columbia .
Canada	
England	
France	
Germany	
Holland	
Not given   	
Russia	
Scotland	
Sweden	
Isle of Man	
Italy..:	
Australia	
	
Denmark	
England	
iV                 .......
Ireland	
■
Sweden.    ...
United States of America
Wales	
Total.
Australia	
Belgium	
British Columbia	
Channel Islands	
England	
France	
Hawaii	
India	
Ireland  	
Newfoundland	
New South Wales........
Scotland	
South Africa	
United States of America
Wales...:	
Norway	
1
17
20
1
4
1
II
1
5
1
10
12
1
42
54
40
1
2
1
1
10
5
1
1
1
32
1
1
22
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
18
2
1
68
1
42
2
1
1
1
16
1
62
2
2
Place of Birth.
England.
Total.
Australia	
Belgium.	
Bermuda	
British Columbia.....
Canada	
Finland	
Germany	
Ireland	
Monte Video	
Newfoundland	
Not given	
Palestine	
Scotland	
Shetland Islands	
South Africa.	
Sweden	
United States of America
Wales	
Number of
Marriages.
Australia.
British West Indies ...
Brazil .
China .
Corsica...
Denmark.
Falkland Islands.
Finland	
Galicia ...
Germany .
Italy .
Japan .
Java	
Newfoundland.
New Zealand..
Norway	
Carried forward.
British Columbia	
England	
Scotland	
British Columbia	
England	
Russia	
United States of America
British Columbia	
England	
United States of America
Canada 	
British Columbia	
United States of America
France :	
Canada 	
England '.'.	
Scotland   	
United States of America
England	
British Columbia	
Canada :. -	
Ireland	
Canada 	
Spain	
Switzerland	
British Columbia ....-	
Belgium	
Wales	
Canada 	
England	
Canada "	
England	
Argentine	
British Columbia	
England	
S. Africa	
British Columbia	
Scotland .	
Belgium	
British Columbia	
England	
Scotland	
Sweden	
England	
United States of America
United States of America
British Columbia	
Canada	
England	
France	
United States of America
Australia	
British Columbia	
Canada	
England	
Russia	
Scotland	
2
1
1
45
51
1
1
8
1
2
1
1
26
1
3
2
25
1 A 62
British Columbia
1919
MARRIAGES, JANUARY TO JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 191S—Continued.
Bbidegboom and Bkide born in different Countries—Concluded.
Place of Birth.
Number of
Marriages.
Place of Birth.
Groom.
Bride.
Groom.
Bride.
Marriages.
89
1
8
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
Brought forward.,
Ill
Norway   	
Sweden	
United States of America
Holland.  	
Belgium	
British Columbia	
United States of America
British Columbia	
England 	
United States of America
British Columbia	
3
England	
Finland	
5
1
1
.
Italy	
1
.
1
:
1
Servia	
»'.'••
Spain	
United States of America
British Columbia	
England ...     	
1
2
South Africa	
Switzerland 	
1
..
1
Total .
131
Carried forward..
111
Note.—Grand total, 1,443.
Bridegroom and Bride of same Denomination.
Denomination.
Adventist	
Anglo-Catholic	
Baptist	
Brethren 	
Christadelphian	
Christian 	
Christian Science	
Church of China	
Church of England ....
Church of Ireland	
Confucian	
Congregational	
Doukhobor	
Greek Catholic	
Carried forwan
Number of
Marriages.
1
1
32
2
1
3
4
1
219
1
1
o
1
2
Denomination.
Brought forward
Greek Orthodox	
Jewish	
Lutheran	
Methodist	
New Thought	
None	
Not given	
Presbyterian	
Protestant	
Quaker    	
Roman Catholic	
Salvation Army	
Total	
Number of
Marriages.
10
24
117
1
1
3
218
11
1
107
4
Bridegroom and Bride of different Denominations.
Groom.
Bride.
Number of
Marriages.
Groom.
Bride.
Number of
Marriages.
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
      16
1
1
1
1
4     16
Brought forward.
4     16
Church of England	
1
Church of England	
Church of England	
Church of England	
2
Church of England	
Roman Catholic	
Church of England	
2
1
Reformed Episcopal....
Salvation Armv	
2
Church of England	
Church of England	
1
Church of England	
1
1
Church of England	
Church of England	
Congregational 	
1
1
1
1
Presbyterian	
1
1
Baptist	
Carried forward .
21
Congregational	
Methodist	
2
Carried forward..
2
4     37 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 63
MARRIAGES, JANUARY
TO JUNE   (INCLUSIVE),
191S—Concluded.
' Bridegroom and Bride
of different Denominations—Concluded.
Groom.
Bride.
Number of
Marriages.
Groom.
Bride.
Number of
Marriages.
4     37
Brought forward..
21    288
Baptist— Con	
Church of England	
8
Christian Science	
2
1
1
"•
Church of England	
Congregational	
Latter Day Saints	
36
2
1
13
13
"
1
10
1
4
49
"
38
1
1
Christian Science	
I
2
"
11
     124
2
2
1
i,
1
Nazarene	
1
1
1
         9
" ■
1
1
4
         9
Church of England	
1
2
Church of England ......
2
..
1
1
„
2
2
	
35
1
■
4
      12
1
Ir
60
16
ti                	
3
Bible Student	
1     '
13
2
Christian	
Christian Science	
Church of England	
Congregational 	
2
3
72
     131
4
Congregational	
Baptist	
2
9
ti
Christian Science	
1
36
1
Reformed Episcopal..  ..
1
2
3
2
21
Roman Catholic	
1
1
Scotch Episcopal	
       15
Spiritualist	
1
Baptist	
Church of England	
3
     173
1
7
,,
1
.
Christian	
Church of England	
Evangelical Lutheran	
Lutheran	
1
24
16
	
1
1
.
8
1
5
11
t)
-—    47
1
Presbyterian	
15
1
2
       67
         673
Total .,	
Bridegroom and
Bride same denomination.
770
Carried forward,
21    288
1,443 A 61
British Columbia
1919
The immediately following tables refer to Indians exclusively:—■
*Cowieban	
West Coast ......
Babine	
Bella Coola	
Kamloops	
Kootenay ........
Lytton	
Nass	
New Westminster
* Okanagan	
Queen Charlotte..
Stikine	
Stuart Lake	
^Williams Lake.. .
Kwawkewlth	
Totals	
Registrations of Births
in 1917 and 1918.
Male.
4
8
17
9
13
7
1
7
6
25
103
6
5
4
17
13
14
3
1
'9
4
23
104
Sex not
given.
Total
Registrations.
Jan.-June
1918.
12
9
12
34
22
27
10
2
16
10
48
204
1917
(12mos.)
2
37
5
12
3
14
9
9
1
16
24
140
Births in 1918.
4
1
4
11
7
1
43
46
Sex not
given.
Total Births.
Jan.-June
1918.
20
10
14
4
13
89
1917
(12mos.)
2
40
14
7
10
14
23
*No reports received from January to June, 1918.
PRELIMINARY TABLES  SHOWING INDIAN BIRTHS BX DIVISIONS.
Agency.
* Cowichan	
West Coast	
Babine	
Bella Coola	
Kamloops.........
Kootenay	
Lytton	
Nass    .......
New Westminster
* Okanagan	
Queen Charlotte .
Stikine	
Stuart Lake......
* Williams Lake . .
Kwawkewlth
Totals	
January.    February.     March
28
April.
10
May.
June.
6
1
7
2
8
20
10
14
4
13
* No returns received from January to June, 1918.
REGISTRATIONS OF DEATHS IN AGENCIES.
i>r
J-
to
«2
'P
t
£
u
£
£
£
3
° 00
CO
^
33
d
C3
CD
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CD
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u
^
09
be
a ri
00
H
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O
0
0
O
+2
>>
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CD
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m
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0
O
Q
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<o
r
P
irt
0
0
0
CO
0
O
0
to
0
O
00
O
<1
'M
03
H
0
H
55
3
4
2
1
1
1
1
4
'Y
1
3
1
1
4
3
3
4
2
1
3
17
2
11
fi
14
4
10
2
31
6
21
8
35
12
4
1
5
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
20
29
1
1
1
4
1
3
2
4
1
7
11
18
31
3
9
"i
1
5
1
i
2
1
6
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
8
8
3
8
13
1
16
21
4
49
15
1
1
25
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
2
1
2
"i"
2
1
1
4
7
8
3
1
12
7
8
20
8
2
2
6
2
3
3
1
1
20
1
1
1
3
2
2
1
8
3
11
5
28
8
19
13
27
16
10
8
10
11
12
5
1
3
89
82
171
310 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 65
PRELIMINARY TABLES SHOWING INDIAN DEATHS BY DIVISIONS.
Agency.
January.
February.
March.
April.
Msy.
June.
Total.
4
io
3
5
i
3
3
29
5
4
1
4
1
16
1
"l
4
5
43
'6
2
8
1
3
4
1
■ 2
2
29
'9
5
'i
2
2
11
3
2
7
3
1
i
1
5
2
1
2
6
1
1
'2
2
22
hi
6
21
Kamloops   	
8
18
16
21
4
8
20
11
Totals	
33
15
171
* No "returns received from January to June, 1918.
MARRIAGES,  JANUARY  TO  JUNE,  191S.
Denomination.
Number of
Marriages.
Denomination.
Number of
Marriages.
2
16
25
1
1
1
1
Total	
44
3
Total marriages, 47.
PRELIMINARY TABLES SHOWING INDIAN MARRIAGES BY DIVISIONS.
Agency.
-Cowichan	
West Coast	
Babine	
Bella Coola	
Kamloops	
Kootenay	
Lytton	
Nass .	
New Westminster.
*Okanagan 	
Queen Charlotte..
Stikine	
Stuart Lake	
^Williams Lake., .
Kwawkewltb	
Totals....
January.
April.
May.
i
2
3
3
6
"l
4
9
4
12
4
'2
2
2
■ No returns received from January to June, 1918. A 66
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY
d
o
O
8
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
u
CO
C
1
o
53
m
o
IM
5 to 10 years.
8
VICTORIA DIVISION—VICTORIA CITY.
I.—General Diseases.
M.
1
F.
M.
P..
M.'
F.
M.
F.
9
1
10
14
1
2
20
28
28a
29
1
30
31
32
*.
32a
34a
35 a
37
37a
1
40
1
41
42
43
44A
44b
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not specified.
45a
46
50
54a
55a
1
61
11.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs op Special Sense.
2
61A
61b
cerebrospinaimeningitis..:::::':::::::.:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;::::::::
63g
64
....
66
69
71
1
1
1
77a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
78
78a
79
79b
79e
79f
79g
*
80
81A
81b
81c
82
86
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
89
91
2
1
2
92
1
1
1
1
92c
93
98a
98b
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
102
103a
103b
103c
103d
108
109
110b
113 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 67
TO JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918.
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1 A 68
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
S3    ■
5
CJ
o
S
'x
CJ
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
CJ
03
>:
CJ
CJ
>>
f30
O
cj
03
io
o
5 to 10 years.
115
VICTORIA DIVISION—VICTORIA CITY—Concluded.
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System—Concluded.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
117
117a
119
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Axnexa.
120A
124a
130
133a
137
VII.—The Puerperal State.
150
X.—Malformations.
2
2
2
2
1
5
2
151
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
151b
163a
8
3
153b
154
XIL—Old Age.
159
XIII.—Affections produced by External Causes.
160
167
1
169
172
174
175
177
.186
1
187A
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
189
189b
25
16
2
2
4
3
1
28
VICTORIA DIVISION—COWICHAN.
I.—General Diseases,
30A
i
38
1
64
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
71
Convulsions of infants	
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
3
1
77a
90
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
91
1
120A
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa. 9 Geo. 5                                          Board of Health.                                                 A 69
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 191S—Continued.
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117
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2 A 70                                                  British Columbia                                                     1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
ft
a
c
fflS
s
'E
Q
151B
154
1G8
169a
171a
175
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
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CJ
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cj
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M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
XII.—Old Age.
XIII.—Affections produced by External Causes.
4
1
	
	
4
	
9
10
20
28
28a
29
37
50A
61a
78
78a
89
92
92a
94
169
VICTORIA  DIVISION—ESQUIMALT.
I.—General Diseases.
1
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
XIII.—Affections produced by External Causes.
1
1
2
.,
43
54A
71
92a
120a
153a
VICTORIA DIVISION—OAK BAY.
I.—General Diseases.
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense. ,
1
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Still-born 	
1
1
1
- 9 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
A 71
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
10 to 20 years.
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A 72                                                  British Columbia                                                     1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
&
d
.2
o
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
a
(M
O
c3
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5 to 10 years.
40
VICTORIA DIVISION—SAANICH.
I.—General Diseases.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
41
54a
64
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
77a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
78a
79
8lA
89
IV-—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
91
92
1
1
1
151b
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
153a
Still-borr     	
154
XII.—Old Age.
169
XIII.—Affections produced by  External Causes.
3
1
l
NEW WESTMINSTER DIVISION—NEW  WESTMINSTER CITY.
I.—General Diseases.
Typhoid 	
6
1
10
14
1
1
20
28
1
29
30
37
40
41
42
44
46
47
50
5lA
54A
61
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
64
66
67
68
69
71
1
77a
III.--Diseases of the Circulatory System.
78
79
1
79B
79e
80
81B
. 82 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 73
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
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CM
CJ
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60 to 70 years.
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12
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1 A 74
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
n
o
fli
o
(B
O
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
8
(3
0)
tM
C
o
9
o
o
91
NEW WESTMINSTER DIVISION—NEW WESTMINSTER CITY—Concluded.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
92
i
92a
96
98A
102
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
104
i
117
117a
.  1
1
120a
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
123
126
137
VII.—The Puerperal State.
150
X.—Malformations.
i
i
4
2
1
1
151
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Still-born	
153 a
5
1
153b
153c
160
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
165
167
1
169
170
175
1
185
186
13
8
2
3
2
2
~
32a
40
45
51a
77a
81c
92
92a
98a
NEW WESTMINSTER DIVISION—BCRNABY.
L—General Diseases.
Tuberculosis of spine	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, hver.	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not specified
Goitre not specified	
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy	
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Myocarditis ....
Arteriosclerosis.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
Pneumonia.
Lobar.
(Edema of lungs '.
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
Diarrhcea and enteritis (under 2 years)	 9 Geo. 5                                         Board of Health.                                                 A 75
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 191S—Continued.
3
o
O
o
cj
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o
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CJ
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9
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133
M.
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—^
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V A 76
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
c
o
S
3
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
5
3
OJ
O
C3
O)
O
o
o
119
NEW WESTMINSTER DIVISION—BURRABY—Concluded.
VI.— Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
120a
150
X.—Malformations.
Congenita] malformation (still-births not included)	
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Still-horn        	
1
1
153 A
157
XIIL—Affections produced ry External Causes.
175
1
178a
2
2
1
28
NEW WESTMINSTER DIVISION—CHILLIWACK.
I.—General Diseases.
40
50
64
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
71
1
81B
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.        *
84b
92a
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
103
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
122
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
142
VIII.—Diseases of the Skin and of the Cellular Tissue.
'
150
X.—Malformations.
1
1
1
151b
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
153a
154
XIL—Old Age.
167
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
169
170
1
1
-
3
1 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 77
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
CJ
CJ
CD
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O
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cj
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CJ
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o
CD
O
O
CJ
CJ
o
o
O
CO
CJ
O
CO
o
o
CJ
Cj
O
CO
o
o
SO
-cj
CJ
p.
CJ
c
d
CJ
"&
o
s
CJ
bo
<
Total by Sexes.
CJ
>
'be
^J
O
c
X
CJ
U3
s
CJ
e
"cl
^J
O
H
M.
F.
St.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
1
1
1
1
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
	
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
12
1
9
21
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
3
1
2
1
1
16
4
20 A 78
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
a
o
+3
rf
99
F
O
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
(3
OJ
a
P
<3
O
+3
m
O
o
o
6
NEW WESTMINSTER DIVISION—OUTSIDE.
I.—General Diseases.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
i
M.
F.
8
1
10
14
1
28
41
43
46
54A
6lA
11.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
i
64
67
68
77a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
78
78a
79b
79e
80
88a
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
91
92
1
92a
i
94
102
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
103
1
"i"
108
119
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
126
137d
VII.—The Puerperal State.
150
X.—Malformations.
1
I51B
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
1
1
1
1
152a
153a
Still-born	
1
1
1
153b
153e
154
XII.—Old Age.
167
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
i
i
1
169
169a
170
175
177
186 9 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
A 79
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1018—Continued.
u
CJ
CJ
O
OJ
o
o
cj
CJ
O
CO
O
O
OJ
CJ
CJ
o
O
o
CO
CJ
CJ
o
>CJ
O
o
CJ
CJ
o
CD
O
O
io
3
CJ
O
O
O
CO
CJ
03
o
CO
O
o
cj
CJ
o
c;
o
o
CO
'i
c3
cc
00
cj
CD
CJ
'be
o
CJ
bo
<
CJ
X
CO
"cj
O
H
CJ
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0
cj
X
CJ
CO
CJ
0
Q
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0
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
i
1
1
1
1
3
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
i
l
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
6
4
1
1
4
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
l
2
1
2'
7
1
6
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
. 1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
I
5
1
2
1
1-
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
"i'
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2 A SO
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
a
o
o
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
CJ
a
P
O
3
o
*
o
o
189
NEW WESTMINSTER DIVISION— OUTSIDE— Conduded.
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
M.
1
6
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
4
3
4
3
1
1
6
NANAIMO  DIVISION—NANAIMO CITY.
I.—General Diseases.
1
9
1
22a
28
40
41
43
54a
64
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
77a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
78
78a
79
79b
89
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
91
1
92
92a
98a
104
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
2
117
120a
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
XI,—Diseases of Early Infancy.
1
154
XII.—Old Age.
158
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
172
173
174
175
186
1
189
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
2
3
	
	
—
	
9 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 81
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 191S—Continued.
cj
CJ
O
OJ
o
o
cj
o
O
o
cj
CJ
CD
O
o
CO
cj
CJ
O
1CJ
O
o
cj
CJ
o
CO
O
o
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O
o
o
CO
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o
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o
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CO
Cj
p.
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c
cj
o
CJ
'be -
o
H
CJ
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Total by Sexes.
a
CJ
>
'&
o
a
y.
03
W
CO
X
Cj
CJ
c
"cj
o
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
1
2
2
13
2
2
3
5
2
12
4
2
2
1
7
57
26
83
1
1
i
l
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
l
1
1
2
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
'   1
1
2
8
1
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
6
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
i
1
3
1
1
1
7
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
*
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
2
5
1
1
4
5
13
1
7
3
1
2
1
	
1
40
19
59
1 A 82
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OP DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
a
.2
s
CO
53
Q
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
aj
—
P
CM
O
3
m
O
u
CO
o
o
91
NANAIMO  DIVISION—ALERT BAY.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
167
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
1
1
169
171A
1
1
28
45a
64
70
71
77a
79
79b
81
87
89
91
Tuberculosis of the lung's..
Cancer of bladder	
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy.
Convulsions (non-puerperal)	
Convulsions of infants	
151B
152a
159
166
169
169A
171a
186
189
NANAIMO DIVISION—COMOX.
I.—General Diseases.
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Myocarditis   	
Organic diseases of the heart.
Chronic valvular disease	
Diseases of the arteries	
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
Diseases of the larynx.
Acute bronchitis  	
Bronchopneumonia. ..
Pneumonia	
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
Other diseases of the stomach (cancer excepted)	
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Non-assimilation of food .
Atelectasis	
XII.—Old Age.
Senility .
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
Suicide by firearms	
Conflagration   ....   	
Accidental drowning..  	
Traumatism in logging camp and sawmill.
Traumatism by falling tree	
Other external violence	
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
Cause of death not specified or ill-defined.	
40
41
NANAIMO DIVISION—LADYSMITH.
I.—General Diseases.
Tuberculosis of the lungs ,	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver."	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum, intestines, rectum. 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 83
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
3
o
0
O
OJ
O
o
o
3
8*
o
o
o
<W
o
q
o
Cj
CJ
o
CD
O
O
too
01
o
j-
o
CD
CD
70 to 80 years.
Cj
CJ
CD
CJ
o
40
O
CO
cj
-CO
B
CJ
CD
OJ
d
CJ
'bij
O
CJ
to
■<
Total by Sexes.
CJ
'Si
o
a
y,
03
W
1
CJ
Q
o
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F. '
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
1
3
6
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
6
2
2
4
1
2
4
• 1
1
1
. 1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
V
1
1
2
1
•
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
2
2
6
2
3
1
2
1
6
g
1
3
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
3
9
7
i
1
5
2
2
1
34
12
46
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 A 84
British Columbia.
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
c
c
«8
5
tg
s
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
u
u
a
■d
a
p
CS
O
ci
OJ
io
c
CM
Sh
ctS
QJ
>3
o
c
in
61
NANAIMO DIVISION-LAT)YSM1TH—Concluded.
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
64
70
71
1
77a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
78
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
93
108
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
1
154
XII.—Old Age.
169
XIIL—Affections produced ry External Causes.
1
172
173
2
1
1
BEATON GROUP—CRANBROOK.
I.—General Diseases.
8
1
28
41
42
44a
54a
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
64
66
71
1
1
77a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
78
1
91
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
1
1
1
1
92
92A
117
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
120a
137a
VIL—The Puerperal State.
153a
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
1
1
1
153b 9 Geo. 5                                            Board of Health.                                                   A 85
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
cj
O
CM
O
O
CJ
CJ
o
CO
C
O
CCJ
cj
O
o
o
CJ
O
US
O
o
cj
CJ
O
CO
O
©
1Q
Cj
CJ
o
O
o
CO
cj
CJ
O
CO
o
1c.
80 to 90 years.
Cj
-CJ
c
Cj
CD
OJ
O
a
CJ
be
Total by Sexes.
c
CJ
'be
o
X
m
4J
Cj
CJ
e
"cj
O
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
17
1
1
1
1
'   1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
13
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
2
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
■ A 86                                                 British Columbia.
1919
CAUSES
OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
o
«
a
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
CJ
CJ
u
CJ
TO1
a
Cj
CJ
o
cj
CJ
1CJ
o
+J
GSJ
CJ
O
rH
O
irj
157
BEATON GROUP— CRANBROOK—CtmcZwrfetf.
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
169
1
2
169A
176
1
6
4
1
BEATON GROUP—FERN IE.
I.—General Diseases.
1
6
1
28
50a
54a
55a
1
::::
61
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
1
1
66
77a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
78
80
82
1
89
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
91
I
92
1
2
1
102
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
109
110
1
151B
XL—Diseases Of Early Infancy.
1
2
1
153a
3
153b
153c
1
154
XIL-Old Age.
169A
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
173
175
6
6
1
2
1
1
3
93
BEATON  GROUP—GOLDEN.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System. ,
124
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
142
VIII.—Diseases of the Skin and of the Cellular Tissue.
' 9 Geo. 3                                            Board of Health.                                                   A 87
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
u
©
CI
p
o
1
o
o
o
0)
o
o
o
>i
O
m
Q
©
cj
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CO
O
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Cj
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O
o
o
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5
CJ
o
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o
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Cj
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O
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o
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£
Cj
CJ
Q
*cj
O
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
1
1
F.
1
1
1
1
36
1
1
4
1
1
1
5
1
3
2
3
1
1
24
12
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
10
2
46
3
1
1
1
1
1
10
2
6
2
1
6
1
1
_1
3
1
4
7
1
2
1
33
13
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
]
• A
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
to
a
-2
oj
o
S
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
•ti
P
&
CD
CM
O
3
O
Ol
IO
o
o
151
BEATON GROUP—GOLDEN— Concluded.
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
170
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
173
1
151
153A
BEATON GROUP—KASLO.
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Cerebral hemorrhage, apoplexy.
Epilepsy	
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
Cirrhosis of the liver.
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Congenital debility, icterus, and sclerema..
Still-born *	
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
Dropsy.
79b
79e
BEATON  GROUP—NAKUSP.
II.-—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Paralysis without specified cause   	
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Chronic valvular disease .
Mitral regurgitation	
1
18
20
28
30
39
40
42
45
50
50a
54a
77a
78
78a
79b
79e
BEATON GROUP—NELSON.
L—General Diseases.
Typhoid fever  ,	
Erysipelas	
Purulent infection and septicemia	
Tuberculosis of the lungs	
Tuberculosis meningitis	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the buccal cavity	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver.	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the female genital organs	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not specified.
Diabetes .
Diabetes mellitus...
Anaemia, pernicious.
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy	
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Myocarditis ,
Acute endocarditis	
Endocarditis following rheumatism
Chronic valvular disease	
Mitral regurgitation	 9 Geo. 5                                            Board of Health.                                                   A 89
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 191S—Continued.
u
cj
CJ
o
CM
O
O
O
CO
O
o
CM
s-
CJ
Cj
o
^1
O
o
CO
5
CJ
o
o
o
'J*
3
CJ
CD
CD
O
o
m
CJ
CJ
O
o
o
CD
CJ
CJ
O
CO
o
o
80 to 90 years.
a
ID,
CJ
TJ
C
Cj
O
CJ
c
CJ
'be
o
a
be
<
Total by Sexes.
CJ
"be
o
y.
03
CO.
en
CD
a
"el
Cj
H
1
2
1
7
M.
F.
M.
F.
M
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
1
F.
1
1
2
1
1
-1L.L
1
2
	
1
6
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
l
l
3
•
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
-
1
1
1
2
	
	
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
......
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
. A 90
British Columbia,
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
o
JS
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
•0
S
o5
CM
O
01
m
c
ci
O
o
89
BEATON GROUP— NELSON—Concluded.
IV. —Diseases of the Respiratory System.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
91
2
Q2
98
103
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System,
113
119
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
120
120 a
124
153a
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Still-born -	
1
2
169
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
1
175
178
186
189
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
1
5
1
1
BEATON GROUP—NEW DENVER.
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy   	
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
Chronic bronchitis	
Lobar pneumonia	
VI.—NON-VENEREAL  DISEASES  OF  GENITO- URINARY   SYSTEM   AND  ANNEXA.
Cysts and other tumours of the ovary	
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
Other external violence	
18
28
39
40
50
64
71
77a
79
81
BEATON GROUP—REVELSTOKE.
I.—General Diseases.
Erysipelas - 	
Tuberculosis of the lungs	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the buccal cavity .
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver.
Diabetes 	
IL—Diseases of the Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy.
Convulsions of infants	
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Myocarditis	
Organic diseases of the heart.
Diseases of the arteries	 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 91
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
CJ
O
OJ
0
o
20 to 30 years.
Cj
O
-JH
o
o
CO
CJ
o
o
o
-JJ
cj
CJ
O
CD
O
O
ICJ
cj
O
1C~
O
o
CD
70 to 80 years.
CJ
O
CJ
o
o
CO
V
Cj
is
&
o
CJ
a
Cj
'bo
C
a
03
bo
Total by Sexes.
c
CJ
'bo
O
a
y.
03
CO
cj
Q
*CJ
O
s
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
i
_^1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
2
3
' 6
1
4
1
8
5
2
1
2
5
33
21
54
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
*
1
1
1
1
' 1
3
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 A 92
British Columbia.
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
0
.2
as
o
s
0j>
cS
O
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
5
cj
CJ
>J
OJ
o
cj
CJ
1CJ
O
CM
ci
CD
©
O
92
BEATON GROUP—REVELSTOKE—Concluded.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
93
104
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
1
105
1
109
120
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
120a
134
VII.—The Puerperal State.
137d
150
X.—Malformations.
2
1
153b
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
173
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
175
178
4
1
1
1
	
	
	
20
29
33a
42
54A
187
187a
BEATON GROUP—ROSSLAND.
I.—General Diseases.
Purulent infection and septicaemia	
Acute miliary tuberculosis	
Tuberculosis of joint	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the female genital organs.
Anaemia, pernicious	
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
Pneumonia
Pleurisy ...
XII.—Old Age.
Senility
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
Ill-defined organic disease.
Dropsy    	
BEATON GROUP—SLOCAN CITY.
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
Other diseases of the stomach (cancer excepted)	 9 Geo. 5                                            Board op Health.                                                   A 93
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 191S—Continued.
cj
O
OJ
o
o
cj
O
CO
O
O
CM
Cj
CJ
o
O
o
CO
cj
CJ
O
o
o
CJ
CJ
CD
CD
O
O
Cj
O
o
o
CD
Cj
O
CO
o
CD
CJ
OJ
o
CJ
o
o
CO
-a
CJ
io
p-
O
CJ
<>
be
O
CJ
y.
CJ
CO •
>>
"cj
O
d
CJ
be
o
a
X
CJ
CO
so
CJ
CJ
O
o
H
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
29
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
'i'
i
l
i
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
3
1
3
2
5
1
1
10
19
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
11
1
l
1
1
1
1
i
l
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
8
3
1
1
1
1
1
	
1 A 94
British Columbia.
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
to
a
.2
ai
*j
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
u
-a
P
ai
OJ
<N
O
o
O
CM
©
o
BEATON GROUP—TRAIL.
IL—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
78
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
1
1
92
IV. —Diseases of the Respiratory System.
119
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
150
X.—Malformations.
1
151
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
2
1
169
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
172
181
189
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
1
3
1
1
1
1
Z7.
79
BEATON GROUP—WILMER.
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
	
	
	
 ■
	
	
	
—
18
28
64
169
169A
ALBERNI GROUP—ALBERNI.
I.—General Diseases.
Erysipelas	
Tuberculosis of the lungs ,	
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy	
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Diseases of the arteries	
VIII.—Diseases of the Skin and o*' the Cellular Tissue.
Other diseases of the skin and annexa   ,	
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
Accidental drowning	
Traumatism in logging camp and sawmill.. 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 95
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
©
O
©
o3
<U
©
CO
o
©
©
O
©
CO
3
©
o
©
83
*
©
O
©
s-
©
o
©
CO
w
aS
©
00
o
p
©
o
©
00
p.
fi
3
©
©
a
a
0)
be
<1
Total by Sexes.
'bX
cu
en
Q
o
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
3
13
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
4
3
7 A 96
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
c
o
cS
5
S3
a
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
i
Qj
fa
d
OJ
o
1
QJ
o
IN
d
OJ
©
o
ALBERNI GROUP-ATLIN.
VII.—The   Puerperal   State.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
172
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
—
	
92
ALBERNI GROUP—BELLA COOLA.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
154
XII.—Old Age.
158
XIII.—Affections produced by External Causes.
164
169
169a
186
189
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
-—
64
ALBERNI GROUP—CLAYOQUOT.
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
 L
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
91
ALBERNI GROUP—FORT FRASER.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
1
1
153A
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Still-born	
1
45
ALBERNI GROUP—HAZELTON.
1.—General Diseases.
113
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
175
XIIL— Affections produced by External Causes.
175b
186
	
	 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 97
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
1»
to
o5
to
oi
03
(B
T3
q
|
©
©
CD
>1
cy
OJ
©
s
s
bo
o
CC
^2
'So
CJ
CJ
Q
©
00
o
c
o
c
©
CJ
H
IO
i>
GO
CjJ
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
8
8
»
1
1
1
1
	
1
1
•
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
2
5
1
6 A 98
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
to
a
.2
A
O
s
-3
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
A
<p
<D
5
A
O)
CO
o
IO
o
CM
aS
O)
©
O
151
ALBERNI GROUP—FORT ST. JOHN.
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
E..
178
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
1
	
	
	
—
109
ALBERNI GROUP—POUCE COUPE.
I.—General Diseases.
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
1
1
20
30a
50
77a
92a
97a
98
150
151B
153b
165
169
186
Purulent infection and septicsemia .
Tubercular peritonitis	
Diabetes	
ALBERNI GROUP—PRINCE RUPERT.
L—General Diseases.
II.—Diseases of Nervous Syste:.! and Organs of Special Sense.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy..
Paralysis without specified cause.
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Myocarditis ,
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
Bronchopneumonia	
Pneumonia	
Lobar pneumonia	
Pulmonary embolism	
Other diseases of the respiratory system (tuberculosis excepted).
VI.—NON-VENEREAL  DISEASES  OF  GeNTTO-URINARY  SYSTEM   AND  ANNEXA.
Uremia .
X.—Malformations.
Congenital malformations (still-births notincluded)	
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Non-assimilation of food.
Premature ...*,.
XIIL—Affections produced ry External Causes.
Other acute poisonings .
Accidental drowning ...
Other external violence. 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 99
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918— Continued.
1
©
<M
O
©
3
©
o
©
CM
©
o
©
i
©
to
o
©
ca
©
eg
o
©
A
©
1-
O
©
©
qj
©
00
o
©
r-
©
o
©
00
3
V,
©
OS
"5j
o
a
OJ
be
<
OJ
X
O
0
'So
0
S3
03
5
CJ
CJ
0
'cl
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
F.
1
1
1
1
 ;
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
:_
	
	
	
	
2
2
1
1
1
1
i
1
»
1
1
1
i
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
3
1
2
2
1
3
2
1
1
17
7
24 A 100
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
a
0
A
Q
«|
Jj
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
A
a
A
OJ
O
®
O
CM
5 to 10 years.
41
ALBERNI GROUP—ANYOX.
I.—General Diseases.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
61
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
1
78
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System,
91
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
1
169
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
172
173
174
186
2
1
ALBERNI GROUP-QUATSINO.
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy	
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
Accidental drowning	
153A
154
169a
171a
ALBERNI GROUP—QUEEN CHARLOTTE.
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Still-born .
Senility ..,
XII.—Old Age.
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
Traumatism in logging camp and sawmill .
Traumatism by falling tree ,
175b
ALBERNI GROUP—STEWART.
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
Traumatism by snowslide	
ALBERNI GROUP—TELEGRAPH CREEK.
I.—General Diseases.
Tuberculosis of the lungs	
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
Acute nephritis	 9 Geo. 5                                            Board of Health.                                                 A 101
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1Q1S—Continued.
A
V
©
(M
O
©
CJ
CJ
o
o
o
OJ
CJ
CJ
J*.
o
O
o
CO
40 to 50 years.
CJ
O
o
o
1CJ
60 to 70 years.
CJ
CJ
o
CO
O
O
to
cj
CJ
O
OJ
-O
O
CO
-a
CJ
'S
ft
3
cj
O
OJ
cj
>
'So
o
fl
CJ
bo
<
Total by Sexes.
s
CJ
'So
o
fl
X
CJ
GO
J:
CJ
CJ
B
"cj
O
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
F.
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
11
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
2
10
1
1
1
1
\
1
2
1
1
1
2
-
1
1
1
1
3
6
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
2
2
	
	
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
 ■
—
1
2 A 102
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
to
a
c
A
O
Sfi
w
A
3
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
u
a
&
1 to 2 years.
01
o
(M
A
(L>
©
o
28
ASHCROFT.
I.—General Diseases.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
69
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
113
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
117a
61
64
66
105
FORT GEORGE.
L—General Diseases.
Tuberculosis of the lungs .
Diabetes 	
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Meningitis	
Cerebral haimorrhage, apoplexy..
Paralysis without specified cause.
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Organic diseases of the heart	
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
Bronchopneumonia	
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
Diarrhoea and enteritis (2 years and over)	
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
Traumatism in logging camp and sawmill	
28
40
166
175
TETE JAUNE.
I.—General Diseases.
Tuberculosis of the lungs	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver.
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
Conflagration	
Traumatism by other crushing (railroad, landslides, vehicles, etc.).
CLINTON.
XIIL—Affections produced ry External Causes.-
Other acute poisonings    	 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.                                                 A 103
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 191S—Continued,
A
OJ
O
CM
O
©
A
O
CO
O
©
CM
©
O
©
A
©
iS
O
O
©
©
o
©
cc
CJ
O
O
O
CD
5
CJ
o
CO
O
©
JJ~
CJ
O
OJ
o
©
CO
u
cj
CJ
T!
CJ
CJ
O
OJ
cc
CJ
'So
o
CJ
tjc
<
Total by Sexes.
a
03
o
CJ
y.
CJ
CC
£
CJ
CJ
P
"cl
O
H
2
1
1
1
5
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
F.
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
I
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
.1
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
5
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
v A 104
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
to
a
o
A
s
A
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
A
OJ
OJ
a
S3
S
(M
o
A
O
CM
Si
o
o
+2
U3
92a
LILLOOET.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
M.
F.
1
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
28
QUESNEL.
I.—General Diseases.
79b
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
120a
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
186
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
	
40
54a
150-MILE HOUSE.
L—General Diseases.
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver.
Anaemia, pernicious 	
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
XIL—Old Age.
Senilitj'
19a
28
30
42
50a
61
64
150
FAIRVIEW.
I.—General Diseases.
Mumps	
Tuberculosis of the lungs _	
Tubercular meningitis    ...'    ....	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the female genital organs.
Diabetes mellitus	
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Meningitis .: ;	
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy	
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
Acute bronchitis	
X.—Malformations.
Congenital malformation (still-births not included)	
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
Absorption of deleterious gases (conflagration excepted) , 9 Geo. 5                                            Board of Health.                                                 A 105
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
A
©
(M
O
©
©
CO
o
©
CM
s-
A
<D   .
©
©
5-
A
©
m
o
+3
©
5
p
©
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A
*
©
O
©
©
A
©
00
o
©
s-
A
Q
©
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o
©
00
T3
A
&
0
C
A
©
©
Age not given.
CJ
y.
CJ
CO
,n
"cj
O
H
a
'5o
o
y,
CJ
w
s:
CJ
a
o
H
1
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
	
2
2
1
3
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
13
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
/ A 106
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
to
a
o
"3
o
s
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
A
V
5
A
CM
O
a!
A
o
A
©
C
42
GREENWOOD.
I.—General Diseases.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
46
1
61
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
79b
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
98c
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
109
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
1
119
.VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
153b
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
1
181
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
1
2
14
40
151
151R
187
GRAND FORKS.
I.—General Diseases.
Dysentery	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
Acute bronchitis ...
Bronchopneumonia.
Pneumonia	
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
Other diseases of the liver	
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Congenital debility, icterus, and sclerema .
Non-assimilation of food	
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
Traumatism by other crushing (railroad, landslides, vehicles, etc.) ..
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
Ill-defined organic disease 	 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 107
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
A
©
o
©
5-
©
CO
o
©
CM
A
©
iff
O
©
A
©
O
©
u
A
V
o
©
o
©
60 to 70 years.
u
ci
©
CO
O
o
Jc~
CJ
CJ
O
OJ
o
©
CO
3
§-
CJ
CJ
O
CJ
Age not given.
Total by Sexes.
CJ
>
'Si
o
c
X
CJ
£
cJ
CJ
a
'cj
O
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
1
%
1
1
'
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
6
3
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
6
4
10 A 108
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OP DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
H
O
!iJ
ta
o
m
A
o
CAUSE OF DFATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
A
c
A
(M
O
A
OJ
IcQ
o
CM
A
©
o
6
KAMLOOPS.
I.—General Diseases.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
10
28
29
30
34a
40
41
54a
64
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
65
66
78a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
*
79b
79e
81
82
92
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
92a
96
1
98
98a
101
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
102
105
117
120A
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
123
150
X,—Malformations.
1
153a
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Still-born	
1
169
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
2
173
3
1
-
1
2
79
81c
NICOLA.
I.—General Diseases.
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver	
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Paralysis without specified cause	
III.- Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Organic diseases of the heart.
Arteriosclerosis	 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 109
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
A
©
fM
C
©
i-
©
CO
O
©
CM
OJ
©
p
©
CO
A
cu
->>
©
o
©
s-
CJ
CJ
©
©
o
o
io
3
CJ
©
o
©
©
CJ
O
o
©
CJ.
o
OJ
o
©
CO
■0Z
cj
oo
a
o
OJ
a
CJ
'a
o
q
CJ
SCO
<
Total by Sexes.
q
'&
o
c
X
CJ
CO
ja
CJ
CJ
o
IS
o
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
18
1
1
1
1
F.
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
8
2
1
1
1
2
20
1
i
•
1
"'jj'
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
*
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
5
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
'"i"
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
i
1
2
1
2
1
8
1
1
8
1
1
3
4
10
1
4
2
3
4
2
	
3
48
14
62
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 A 110                                                British Columbia                                                    1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
to
p
.2
A
V
«
"55
O
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
'5
A
O
t/5
A
<s
in
o
CM
CJ
O
C
89
NICOLA—Concluded.
IV.—Diseases of the Resfiratory System.
M.
i
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
91
120
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
150
X.—Malformations.
1
151
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
1
173
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
174
2
2
28
PRINCETON.
L—General Diseases.
92a
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
110b
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
1
120
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
137
VII.—The Puerperal State.
153 a
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
1
2
	
—
	
, .
	
	
9
VERNON.
1.—General ' Diseases.
1
28
30A
40
41
50
51
61
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
1
64
77
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Pericarditis	
78a
79
79b
79e
82
\
• 9 Geo. 5                                            Board of Health.                                                 A 111
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
CJ
CJ
©
CM
O
©
oi
CJ
©
O
©
cj
CJ
o
O
©
CO
CJ
CJ
©
irj
o
©
Cj
CJ
o
O
o
CD
3
Cj
O
O
o
©
CJ
CJ
o
CO
O
■331
o
J-
Cj
CJ
>l
o
Co
o
©
CO
-J3
cj
'oo
P
TO
C
o
CO
P
CJ
'So
O
c
CJ
bo
<
Total by Sexes.
>
'So
o
c
X
CJ
CO
CJ
CJ
Q
"cJ
O
H
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
12
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
- • 1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
V
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
3
1
1
1
2
2
4
2
12
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
1   .
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
- A 112
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
10
14
20
21
28
28a
29
30
30A
32A
34
34a
36
37
37a
39a
40
41
42
43
44
44B
440
45
45B
45C
46
50
6
to   i
CAUSE OF DEATH.
o
A
O
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
A
tt)
A
aj
A
A
V
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
<N
in
A
O
a
o
+3
o
CM
O
VERNON— Concluded.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
89
91
1
92
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
103
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
119
120a
X.—Malformations.
150
1
1
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
151b
1
1
1
153A
Still-born	
153b
XII.—Old Age.
154
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
157
169
171A
Traumatism by falling tree	
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
189
1
1
*
1
4
1
1
1
VANCOUVER CITY.
L—General Diseases.
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
Dysentery	
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
Other tumours (tumours of the'iemale'genital organ's excepted) " .!.. i.. )[VA '.'.'.' 9 Geo. 5                                            Board of Health.                                                 A 113
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918— Continued.
cj
OJ
>3
o
CM
O
O
ot
CJ
O
CO
O
©
Cj
CJ
©
o
©
j-
CJ
CJ
>i
o
ICJ
O
O
J*.
©
©
o
o
irj
cj
CJ
O
J-~
O
©
©
cj
©
CO
O
©
cj
CJ
O
Co
O
©
CO
-JcJ
%
£.
cJ
©
Co
cj
CJ
'So
O
CJ
&
■3
Total by Sexes.
d
CJ
'Si'
0
c
X
£
as
03
O
"cj
O
H
1
3
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
53
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
3
2
5
3
1
3
2
5
1
4
2
1
2
2
30
23
1
1
1
2 •
4
1
4
1
1
5
1
38
4
4
2
3
1
1
3
2
8
2
7
1
1
6
1
52
4
4
7
4
1
1
3
1
5
1
2
24
5
6
8
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
1
3
"T
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
3
8
1
5
12
1
2
1
8
1
1
5
2
1
14
5
1
1
2
1
1
t
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
6
2
1
2
14
4
1
1
2
1
1
"i'
4
1
4
1
2
"i
2
4
2
1
1
10
1
6
8
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
■ 1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
8 A 114
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
a
.£
1
3
6
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
A
CD
V,
0
E
A
Qj
CM
O
A
IO
o
CM
A
V
O
O
50a
VANCOUVER CITY— Continued.
L—General Diseases—Concluded.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
51
52
54a
55a
56
56a
61
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
1
1
61b
610
63
"63d
63f
64
2
65
66
68A
69
71
7
2
74a
76
1
1
77
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
1
78
1
79
79 \
79b
1
80
81c
...,
1
82
83d
2
Leukemia, lymphatic	
1
87
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
1
1
1
1
90
91
2
1
4
2
1
4
1
"i*
"r
1
1
2
2
1
i
1
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
104
3
1
i 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 115
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1.918—Continued.
J-
CJ
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cj
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cj
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M.
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1
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M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
■F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
4
5
1
1
1
1
1
•    2
3
1
1
5
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
1
_    1
1
3
1
1
5
1
1
4
2
1
2
1
2
1
i
5
1
1
1
1
2
20
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
2
2
1
3
5
4
2
2
5
3
1
2
16
36
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
7
1
1
7
16
2
4
1
1
8
3
1
2
2
1
3
11
9
1
1
1
1
1
6
2
3
2
2
2
3
2
'i'
1
4
8
3
2
2
6
1
1
1
1
22
i
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
7
1
3
1
2
1
l
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
5
6
13
9
1
1
1
1
1
' i
2
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
7
1
1
4
1
6
3
3
18
1
l
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
3
-y
8
9
1
i
l
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
7
17
9
7
1
1
14
2
1
1
2
i
i
4
4
1
4
3
T
1
i
2
2
25
1
18
l
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
1
1
1
i
l
l
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
l
7
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
2
3
1
9
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
3
5 A 116
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
S3
_o
Cj
CJ
cj
5
cause of death.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Cj
CJ
B
cj
CJ
CJ
O
cj
>CJ
O
C-J
u
A
a;
>i
O
o
m
105
VANCOUVER CITY— Concluded.
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System—Concluded.
Diarrhoea and enteritis (2 vears and over)	
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
2
F.
M.
F.
108
109
110c
113
114
115A
117
1
117a
119
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
1
120
120a
123
124
124a
126
130
132
133b
1
135
VII.—The Puerperal State.
137
137a
137d
139
142
VIII.—Diseases of the Skin and of the Cellular Tissue.
145a
1
3
2
4
20
13
1
1
1
150
X.—Malformations.
2
4
1
20
11
151
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy-.
151b
Still-born	
153a
153c
153d
158e
1
154
XII.—Old Age.
155
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
157
159
161
169
1
1
169a
172
173
175
175a
181
182
184
186
187a
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
65
1
7
70
6
7
10
8
8 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 117
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
Cj
CJ
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cj
CJ
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©
0.0
CJ
CJ
o
io
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©
Cj
©
©
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s
CJ
©
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70 to 80 years.
cj
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1
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1
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6
1
9
1
1
1
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1
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1
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1
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4
1
1
1
1
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1
1
5
3
11
8
1
3
4
2
1
2
2
1
17
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
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5
14
1
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1
1
1
1
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1
1
1
1
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1
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2
1
1
1
1
1
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1
2
1
1
3
2
4
20
13
1
1
1
9
3
2
1
1
i
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
3
1
2
4
.    1
20
11
5
6
40
24
1
1
1
1
3
4
3
2
2
1
1
4
2
10
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
8
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
2
1
•>,
2
1
2
1
1
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
61
2
2
2
1
15
26
48
1
33
2
4
35
18
55
26
63
37
27
16
9
15
1
2
"
3
13
400
281
681 A 118
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
.2
A
A
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Rertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
OS
<8
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S
S
P
A
<M
O
A
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o
CM
03
Qy
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©
O
US
6
SOUTH VANCOUVER.
I.—General Diseases.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
28
40
41
46
1
50
64
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
77a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
78
1
78 a
79
89
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
91
2
2
92
1
92a
109
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
120a
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
126
151
S3.—Diseases of Early Infancy.
1
3
1
153a
Still-born	
4
153b
XII.—Old Age.
186
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
■   1
187a
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
6
7
3
3
1
1
28
37
41
43
50a
64
67
VANCOUVER DIVISION—POINT GREY.
I.—General Diseases.
Tuberculosis of the lungs..   	
Syphilis	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum, intestines, rectum.
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the breast	
Diabetes mellitus	
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy.
General paralysis of the insane .. 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 119
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
o5
03
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O
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A
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CJ
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M.
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2
1
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1
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1
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1
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1
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1
1
3
1
1
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4
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1
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1
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1
1
2
1
2
3
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1
4
6
1
1
22
30
52
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
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1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
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1
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1
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1 A 120
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
to
H
O
gj
o
A
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Eertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
A
a
A
O
cj
CJ
o
IN
5 to 10 years.
77a
VANCOUVER DIVISION—POINT GREY-Concluded.
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.       •
M.
F.
M.
F.
M. '
F.
M.
F.
79
79 b
8lB
81c
87
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
-
1
89
1
92
102
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
104
1
1
HOB
113
120a
VI.—NON-VENEREAL  DISEASES  OF  GENITO-URINARY  SYSTEM AND  ANNEXA.
142
VIII.—Diseases of the Skin and of the Cellular System.             m
146
IX.—Diseases of the Bones and Organs of Locomotion.
XI.—Diseases of Early Infancy.
Still-born                                            	
1
1
153b
1.54
XII—Old Age.
157
XIIL —Affections produced by External Causes.
5
1
28
NORTH VANCOUVER CITY.
I.—General Diseases.
45
77a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
79
81c
91
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
113
V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
119
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa. 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A 121
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
A
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2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
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1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
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1
3
4
4
3
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23
9
32
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
f
1 A 122
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
d
to
5
A
5
S
JO
S
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
u
A
B
V
C
A
cp
CM
O
A
o
u
A
V
o
o
151
NORTH VANCOUVER CITY— Concluded.
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
M.
1
1
F.
M.
"i
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
15lB
154
XIL—Old Age.
159
XIIL—Affections produced b.y External Causes.
187
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
2
i
1
2S
NORTH VANCOUVER DISTRICT.
I.—General Diseases.
43
50
66
II.—Diseases of Nervous System and Organs of Special Sense.
120a
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
X. ^Malformations.
1
1
2
151
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
154
WEST  VANCOUVER.
XIL—Old Age.
42
VANCOUVER—OUTSIDE.
L—General Diseases.
77a
III.—Diseases of the Circulatory System.
92
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
119
VI.—Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System and Annexa.
1
151
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
1 9 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
A" 123
JUNE  (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Continued.
A
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O
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A
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1
2
1
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1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
	
1
14
3
17
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
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1 A 124
British Columbia
1919
CAUSES OF DEATH, JANUARY TO
6
to
a
.2
eS
o
53
A
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second International
Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
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A
01
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A
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o
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m
169a
VANCOUVER—OUTSIDE— Concluded.
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
170
173
174
175b
1
1
1
8
RICHMOND.
I.—General Diseases.
2
1
1
40
42
81c
III.—"Diseases of the Circulatory System.
91
IV.—Diseases of the Respiratory System.
1
103
"V.—Diseases of the Digestive System.
1
105
110
1
1
153b
XL—Diseases of Early Infancy.
169
XIIL—Affections produced by External Causes.
189
XIV.—Ill-defined Diseases.
5
3
1
1 9 Geo. 5                                            Board of Health.                                                 A 125
JUNE   (INCLUSIVE), 1918—Concluded.
10 to 20 years.
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1918.
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