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ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT ON THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1881-82. BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1883

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 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 183
Public Schools Report,
1881-82.
To His Honour Clement Francis Cornwall, Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British
Columbia.
May it Please your Honour :
I beg herewith to respectfully submit the Eleventh Annual Report on the Public Schools
of the Province.
W. J. ARMSTRONG,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
20th January, 1883. Eleventh   Annual  Report
ON  THE
PUBLIC   SCHOOLS
OP  THE   PROVINCE  OF
British  Columbia.
1881-82.
BY  THE
SUPERINTENDENT  OF  EDUCATION.
aSftttij &ppetrtrtceg.
VICTORIA: Printed by Richard Wolfenden, Government Printer,
at the Government Printing Office, James' Bay.
1882.
13 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 185
PART    I.
GENERAL  REPORT. 46 Vic Public Schools Report. 187
Annual  Report
OP  THE
Superintendent  of  Education,
1881-82.
Education Office, Victoria.
To the Hon. W. J. Armstrong,
Provincial Secretary.
I have the honour to submit, for the information of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor,
the Eleventh Annual Report on the condition and prospects of the Public Schools of the
Province of British Columbia.
Ten years have now elapsed since the passage of the first Act establishing the present
system of free education. During that period the sum of $480,395 has been expended for all
purposes of education, distributed as follows:—Salaries of Teachers, $337,297 ; Incidental
Expenses, $28,670; Rents, $2,921 ; Buildings and Furniture, $77,788; Salaries and expenses
of Education Office, $26,765; and Maps, Globes, Books, and Insurance, $6,954. Out of the
amount set down for buildings, about 50 school-houses have been built and other houses temporarily or permanently fitted up as such.
The number of children educated during the same time cannot be accurately ascertained,
but from calculations founded upon the returns of late years it must be considerably in excess
of 6,000, including in this those who have grown up and left school, and those still at school
at the close of the year 1881-82.
A contemplation of these figures cannot fail to show the extent of the interest taken in
education by successive Legislatures and Governments. Schools have been established in
many instances where but two or three families were to be found, and year by year the attempt
has been made to overtake the educational necessities of the rising generation; and were the
children but existent in the different school districts, two, or even three times the present
number could, with little or with no additional expense, be easily accommodated in the public
schools already provided.
For the year 1882-83, provision is made for the salaries of 64 teachers, for incidental
expenses of schools to the extent of $3,555, and for buildings and repairs $6,750, besides the
salaries and expenses of the Education Office, $2,980.
The number of School Districts has this year been increased to 50 by the creation of the
Burton's Prairie and Surrey School districts. Several districts, however, have not their
schools in operation, there being few or no children resident within their limits ; while others
again, from the same paucity of children, barely maintain theirs even with the low average
attendance required by law.
Pupils to the number of 2,653 have been enrolled during the year, with an average daily
attendance of 1,359, the former number exceeding that of the previous year by 82, while the
latter is less than the corresponding one of that year by 8. Various causes have operated
towards keeping down the latter number, among which I may mention the prevalence . f
scarlatina and measles during the year, the flooding of the country below Yale, and the
withdrawal of children of suitable age for work, the many openings in business brought
about by the increasing prosperity of the Province having accelerated such withdrawals. The cost of education for the year, not including buildings and insurances, has been
$49,269.53, an increase of $2,307.84 ; the cost for buildings and insurance has been $9,245.14,
an increase on the previous year of $6,360.76. These amounts make the total cost for all
purposes of education $58,514.67, an increase on the whole of $8,668.60.
The cost of each pupil, based on the number enrolled and on the expenditure for education
proper, has been $18.57, and that based on their average attendance and the same expenditure
$36.25 ; increases on the previous year of 34 cents and $1.90 respectively. The same items,
calculated on the total cost, stand respectively $22.05 and $43.07, increases on the previous
year of $2.67 and $6.61.
Six school-houses have been built during the year—namely, at Yale, Chilliwhack, Langley
Prairie, New Westminster, Esquimalt, and Wellington (wing to old building), and the school-
houses at North Saanich and East-South Saanich have been enlarged. Considerable improvements have also been made in the buildings and grounds at Victoria and Nanaimo. Of the
$52,640 voted by the Legislature under the head of Education, the sum of $3,370.47 remains
unexpended.
I here present an abstract of the statistical information to be found in the accompanying
tables :—
Statistical Abstract.
School population of the Province  Not known.
Increase for the year  Not known.
Number of pupils enrolled in all the schools during the year  2,653
Increase for the year     82
Number of boys enrolled  1,491
Increase for the year     50
Number of girls enrolled  1,162
Increase for the year     32
Average daily attendance for the year   1,358.68
Decrease for the year    8.18
Number of children attending private schools  Not known.
Increase for the year     Not known.
Number of children not attending any school  Not known.
Increase for the year     Not known.
Total enrolment in High School     74
Decrease for the year  2
Number of boys enrolled in High School  39
Increase for the year  2
Number of girls enrolled in High School  35
Decrease for the year  4
Average daily attendance in High School  45.07
Decrease for the year  7.68
Total enrolment in Common Schools     2,579
Increase for the year  84
Average daily attendance in Common Schools  1,313.61
Decrease for the year  .50
Percentage of attendance in all the Public Schools  51.2
Do.                  do.          in the High School  61
Do.                  do.          in Common Schools  51.3
Average daily attendance per teacher in all the Public Schools  22
Do.           do.                      do.             in High School  22J
Do.           do.                      do.            in Common Schools  22   '
Do.           do.                      do.             in tbe Common Schools of  New Westminster, Victoria, and Nanaimo  34
Average daily attendance per teacher in the rest of the Common Schools  15
Number of School Districts  50
Number of School-houses used  50
Do.                    do.                   for High School  1
Do.                    do.                   for Common Schools  49
Do.    of brick builldings  1
Do,    of adobe brick, &c  1 46 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
189
Number of frame or wood buildings  43
Do.    of log buildings  5
Do.    of rented or rent free school-houses  6
Do.    of pupils taught in rented or rent free buildings  151
Amount paid for rent  $285
Number of teachers in all the Public Schools  62
Do.              in High School  2
Do.              in Common Schools    60
Number of male teachers     35
Do.     of female teachers  27
Cost of education for the year  $58,514.67
Increase for the year    8,668.60
Total of teachers' salaries for the year  43,305.95
Increase for the year  2,136.60
Total of incidental expenses for the year  3,430.68
Decrease for the year     153.89
Total of expenditure for building, repairs, fences, &c. (Lands & Works Dept.). 8,618.13
Increase for the year  6,536.30
Total of expenditure for rent  285.00
Increase  115.00
Total of expenditure for insurance  627.01
Decrease for the year  24.46
Total number of teachers employed during the year  68
Total number of teachers employed on permanent staff  62
Schedule of Salaries of all Teachers employed
during the year:
1 teacher at  $110
3    do.      at  90
1    do.     at  85
1 do.      at  83£
2 do.      at  80
1    do.      at  75
6    do.      at  70
20    do.      at  60
6    do.      at  55
28    do.      at  50
1    do.      at  45
Schedule of Salaries of Teachers on permanent
staff:
1 teacher at  $110
3     do.     at  90
1     do.     at  85
1 do.     at  83 J
2 do.      at  80
1     do.     at  75
6     do.     at  70
18     do.     at  60
5     do.     at  55
23     do.     at  50
1     do.     at  45
Average monthly salary of all teachers employed  $       59 69
Do.                             do.                on permanent staff  60 53
Highest salary of a teacher  110 00
Lowest     do.              do.     (one only)  45 00
Estimated value of school sites  12,860 00
Do.                 do.    buildings  76,225 00
Do.                 do.    furniture  3,500 00
Total valuation of school property  92,585 00 190
Public Schools Report.
1882
Comparative Expenses of the Public Schools and Total Expenses of the Province.
Year.
1871*
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879t
1879-80
1880-81
1881-82
Total
Total Expenses of
the Province.
97,691 81
432,082 71
372,618 64
583,355 89
614,658 89
728,310 01
648,783 84
448,835 83
161,715 20
446,575 00
378,778 69
471,920 30
1,385,326 81
Expenses of
School
Department.
2,
25.
39,
38.
38:
44,
47,
43,
22,
47,
46.
49
578 06
435 78
999 89
908 30
891 42
506 11
129 63
334 01
110 70
006 10
960 69
268 63
$446,130 32
Expenditure on
School Buildings.
818,043 50
12,123 98
2,884 38
9,246 04
$42,297 90
Total Expenditure
on
Public Schools.
2,578 06
25,435 78
39,999 89
38,908 30
56,934 92
56,630 09
47,129 63
43,334 01
22,110 70
47,006 10
49,846 07
58,514 67
$488,428 22
Percentage of
Expenses for
School purposes.
2.64
5.9
10.7
6.6
9.2
7.7
7.3
9.7
13.6
10.5
13.2
12.4
9.1
*20tb July to 31st December.    tHalf-year.
Comparative Increase per cent, of Expenses of 1881-82 on those of 1873 :—
Percentage of increase of total expenses      26.6
Percentage of increase of school expenses      46.3
Comparative Statement of the Total Enrolment of Pupils and the Average Daily Attendance
from 1872-73 to 1881-82.
Year.
Number Enrolled.
Average Daily
Attendance.
Percentage of
Attendance.
1872-73
1,028
575
55.93
1873-74
1,245
767
62.48
1874-75
1,403
863
61.58
1875-76
1,685
984
58.39
1876-77
1,998
1,260
63.06
1877-78
2,198
1,395.5
63.5
1878-79
2,301
1,315.9
57.2
1879-80
2,462
1,293.93
52.5
1880-81
2,571
1,366.86
53.2
1881-82
2,653
1,358.68
51.2
Recorded visits of Trustees to Schools  382
Do.         of Superintendent of Education  165
Do.         of Parents and others  2,017
Total number of visits recorded  2,564
Number of Public Examinations, as required by Act, sec. 35, sub-sec. 6  82
Number of Schools opened with the Lord's Prayer  26
Do.                     do.            without            do,              25 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 191
In addition to this Abstract, the following remarks may not be without use :—
Table A.—There is a remarkable similarity between this year and the previous year in
the totals of those studying the different subjects of the school course, the differences generally
being attributable to the influx of those coming to school for the first time. Thus, there is an
increase in 1st and 2nd Readers ; decrease in 3rd and 4th; and again an increase in 5th
Readers. There is also an increase in each of the following subjects :—Book-keeping, Mensuration, Vocal Music, Writing, and Dictation, while the other subjects remain nearly the
same. A careful analysis of the returns of pupils of 1880-81 who have left, and of those who
are new pupils, shows that the 720 pupils who have left individual schools according to the
Table, are subdivided as follows:—10 appear twice; 11 have died; 35 are in private schools
or orphanages; 53 have left the Province, and 164 have migrated to other parts of the
Province and have re-entered in the public schools of those parts. It thus appears that 447 of
these have left school never to return. Making allowances for the manner in which pupils give
their ages, the average age of those who leave school may be considered to be 13| years. Of
the 806 who appear as new pupils in 1881-82, 18 appear twice, 10 are reported as from private
schools, 52 have arrived from outside the Province, and 145 are migrations from other public
schools. Those who may therefore be considered new pupils number 643. The average age
of these may be set down as being nearly 7-J- years.
Table B.—This also shows a remarkable similarity to the corresponding one of the previous year. There are 152 cases of truancy and 1 of expulsion in each of both years, and 6
cases of suspension of pupils in 1881-82 as against 11 in 1880-81. Cases of corporal punishment have decreased from 515 to 444. Visits of trustees have decreased from 419 to 382, and
visits of Superintendent of Education and of parents and others have increased from 125 and
1704 to 165 and 2017 respectively. There is also an increase of 7 in schools opened with the
Lord's Prayer.
Table C—During the year 4 female teachers married and resigned their schools; 9
accepted other schools, and 9 have left the profession or the Province. Two teachers of 1880-81
have died during the year—namely, W. Gordon, teacher of Langley Prairie, and David G.
Armstrong, teacher of Cheam for that year. Here, also, may be recorded the death of John
Pleace, formerly second master in the High School. In this table will be found the names of
trustees and teachers for 1882-83.
Table D.—In this are contained the expenditure for the current expenses and insurance
of each school, and also that for the construction and repair of buildings where such have taken
place.
Table E.—This table contains a summary of the monthly reports of each teacher respecting his school or division of school. The totals necessarily differ in some respects from those
found elsewhere. The smallest number of pupils attended in August (1,666). December
(1,695), February (1,721), and June (1,729); the greatest in May (1,820), October (1,807),
November (1,806). The average daily attendance was lowest in February (1,268), and highest
in June (1,375), and nearly as high in September (1,374). The highest percentage in regular
attendance of those attending was in June, 80 per cent, nearly ; August, 79 per cent. ; and
December, 78J per cent.; and the lowest in February, 73 J per cent. The same percentage for all
the months was 76 per cent.
Table F.—Contains a list of the schools, expenditure, &c, in each Electoral District.
Three columns have been added to those usually given in former years; one showing the
average number of days attended by each child enrolled ; one the average number attending
school in any month, and another the average percentage of pupils in regular attendance. For
the whole Province the average number attending in any month was 1,780, of whom 76 out of
every 100 were in regular attendance (as in Table E).
Table G.—Contains information respecting individual schools with respect to population,
number attending schools, average, &c; and also contains the new columns of the previous
Table. The regular attendance of pupils is highest at Williams Lake, Okanagan, and Clinton,
being 97, 92, and 91 per cent, respectively of those attending; and it is lowest at Langley
(47J per cent.), and at Trenant (56 per cent.) The cost of each pupil on the number enrolled
is lowest at East-North Saanich ($14.74), and highest at Cache Creek ($77.18). The cost of
each pupil on the average daily attendance is lowest at East-South Saanich ($24.95),  and at 192 Public Schools Report. 1882
Craigflower ($26.10); and highest at Cache Creek ($123.61). The highest average number of
days attended by each child enrolled was 150 at Craigflower, and 145 at Williams Lake; the
lowest 35 at Trenant, and 38 at Salt Spring Island. The average number of days attended
by each child enrolled in the whole Province was 103.
Table H.—Contains a short summary of all the expenditure for educational purposes for
the year, as follows;—Salary of Superintendent of Education, $1,500; travelling expenses
of Superintendent of Education, $251.50; school requisites supplied schools and incidental
expenses of Education Office, $325.50 ; two examiners of public school teachers, $200 ; salaries
of teachers and incidental expenses of schools, $46,991.63; and amount expended on school-
houses (Lands and Works Department), $9,246.84 ; total, $58,514.67.
Table I.—Shows the annual expenditure on each school for each of the ten years ending
30th June, 1882, and also the total for each school.
Table J.—Contains a statement of the total expenditure for each of the last ten years
under the different heads of Salaries of Teachers, Incidental Expenses of Schools, Rents,
Buildings and Furniture, Salaries and Expenses of Education Office. It also contains for the
same time the total and average attendance, and the cost of each pupil based upon these.
Table K.—Contains a statement for each of the last ten years of the expenditure connected with the Education Office, including the salary of the Superintendent of Education, his
travelling expenses, incidental expenses of Education Office, &c, &c, the total of each for each
year, and the grand totals.
Table L.—Contains a statement of the annual cost of each pupil for each school for each
of the last ten years based upon total enrolment and on average attendance.
Table M.—Contains the enrolment and average attendance in each school for each of the
last ten years.
Table N.—Contains the reports sent in by trustees respecting the condition of the school
buildings and grounds under their charge, and the uses to which they"have been applied other
than for school purposes. But two buildings are reported as bad. The reports respecting the
grounds and fences are not so favourable. The principal other uses to which school-houses
have been applied have been for church, election, and municipal meetings.
Table O.—Contains a short description of the school property belonging to or used by
each school district and its estimated value wherever it is public property. The valuations are
under rather than over-estimates.
Table P.—Gives the names of the various school districts, with their dates of creation and
their boundaries.
Appendix A.—In this will be found the Rules and Regulations for the government of
public schools in so far as they affect teachers and pupils. These also regulate the days and
hours of teaching, the recesses, and prescribe the days and times that are holidays.
Appendix B.—Contains the Regulations for the Examination of Public School Teachers
for the year 1883 as approved by His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor on 188 .
Appendix 0.—In this are the directions given to trustees respecting the holding of annual
and special meetings in their school districts for the election of trustees or for any other business
in which a meeting of voters is required. Regulations are also prescribed for the guidance of
trustees with respect to the appointment or dismissal of teachers, and with respect to the care
of the school-house and the school property.
Appendix D.—Contains the subjects of examination required for admission to the High
School, regulates the admission, and prescribes the course in each of its two divisions.
Appendix E.—Contains the list of books authorized for use in the High and Public
Schools. In view of the changes about to take place in the reading books of some of the other
Provinces, it is not advisable to propose any change in the series at present in use. Some
changes have, however, been authorized,---as, for instance, in the case of Swinton's New Language Lessons, to replace Lennie's Grammar; Of The World, by J. B. Calkin, to replace the
former Easy Lessons in Geography;  and the School Geography of the World by the same 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 193
author, to replace the Modem Geography and Atlas now in use. The gradual introduction of these and other new books tending to improve the series has been attended with the
happiest effects, and without the outcry as to expense so usual on such occasions. An
improved set of reading charts has also been introduced.
Appendix F.—Contains the list of duly qualified teachers, with the certificate held by
each and the date on which it was obtained. In cases in which a teacher holds two certificates
the highest only is given. There are thus 88 holders of certificates, as follows :—13 hold First
Class, Grade A ; 16 First Class, Grade B; 20 Second Class, Grade A; 19 Second Class,
Grade B; 11 Third Class, Grade A; 8 Third Class, Grade B; and there is one Temporary Certificate (granted to a teacher unable, on account of the impassable state of the
roads on the Mainland, to reach Victoria in time for the Teachers' Examination.)
Appendix G.—Contains a list of those pupils in the various schools who have passed by
examination the standard required for admission to the High School. During the year 9
passed the required standard in the Victoria Boys' School; 7 in the Victoria Girls',; 5 in East-
South Saanich ; 4 in the New Westminster Girls'; 3 in the Nanaimo Boys'; 2 in Craigflower;
2 in Wellington ; 1 in each of the schools of Cedar Hill, Cheam, Chilliwhack, Esquimalt,
Gabriola Island, New Westminster Boys'; 1 from a private school in Victoria ; and 1 from a
private school in New Westminster ; making a total of 40.
Appendix H.—Contains the programme of the examination and the questions set in July,
1882, for the various grades and classes of certificates. At the Teachers' Examination, which
took place at the usual time in July, 34 out of the 36 candidates obtained certificates, the
Examiners appointed for the occasion to act in conjunction with the Superintendent of Education being Dr. Tolmie and Robert Williams, Esq., M.A., Cantab. The following extract from
the report of the Examiners was published in the Government Gazette of 29th July, 1882 ;—
Public School Teachers' Examination, July, 1882.— Certificates Awarded.
First Class A.
Marks.
Newbury, John Cowper    2712
Howay, Alice    2363
Irwin, Joseph   2301
First Class B.
Clarke, Charles E  1794
Murray, Paul  1763
Smith, Isabella  1637
Second Class A.
Mundell, John  1107
Barron, Lizzie A. F  1100
Jones, David  1087
Second Class B.
Williams, Mary  1067
Gardiner, Emily Jane  1039
Kirkland, Maude  1009
Phair, Casper  991
Hanna, R. S  930
Shaw, Alexander  930
Third Class A.
Herring, Jane Howell  900
Davidson, Ann M  880
Wolfenden, Nellie  863
Crosson, Katie  860
Richardson, Alice C  852
Lindsay, Albert E  849
Russell, Alice M  833
Bell, Annette Sophia Matilda  831
Halliday, Marie Felicia  825
Todd, Donald  823
Jones, Florence McNaughton ,  813 194 Public Schools Report. 1882
Third Class B.
Sweet, Margaret Jane ..  739
Reynard, Eva Mary •  717
Smith, Clara P  717
Watson, Elizabeth  694
Shaw, John  693
Irvine, Margaret  693
Norris, Martha J  678
Lawrence, Mary  654
C. C. McKenzie, M.A.; Cantab, j
W. F. Tolmie, v Board of Examiners.
Robert Williams, M.A., Cantab, J
T. B. Humphreys,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
20th July, 1882.
Of these, 23 were educated in the High School and in the public and private schools of
the Province, and 11 were educated elsewhere. While every inducement is held out to persons
educated within the Province to compete for these certificates, no discrimination is made
as against teachers and others who come from outside the Province, and as a consequence a
goodly number of these, though less than half the certificated teachers, are the holders of certificates. The minimum at present required to obtain certificates of the various classes and
grades is low when compared with the standard required in the other Provinces, but the wise
provision in the Act by which first class certificates expire at the end of four years, second
class at the end of three, and third class at the end of one year, and the elasticity of the
present scheme of examination in allowing of the gradual raising of this minimum, will prevent
in the future the anomaly of persons of inferior attainments holding certificates of a higher
class than those to which their attainments would then entitle them. The longer time limit of
his certificate may be said to be one of the direct advantages accruing to the teacher holding a
high certificate. It also makes him eligible to fill certain positions in the larger schools which
the holder of the inferior certificate cannot fill. It would still further tend to encourage the
competition for the higher certificates were a scale of salary established limiting each lower
grade to a certain maximum. As salaries are now voted in the estimates for each school district irrespective of the teacher or his certificate, the holder of an inferior certificate can draw
the full salary attached to any school to which he is appointed, and an injustice thus seems to
be done^to the holder of the high certificate to whose school a smaller salary is attached.
Application for Schools or for the creation of School Districts are still on file from the
following places :—Chemainus, Mayne Island, Shuswap Prairie, Nicola Lake, Okanagan (40
miles from present School), Lower Chilliwhack, Township 12, New Westminster, Quamichan
and Stave River, of which, Lower Chilliwhack, Township 12 New Westminster, and Quamichan are within School Districts already established.
But one amendment has been made to the present School Act. As, however, some
changes might be deemed necessary by the new Legislature, it may not be out of place to
give a synopsis of the Act as it now stands :—
After repealing former Acts, but continuing all existing elections and appointments under
them, the Act of 1879 provides for the setting apart, by the Treasury, of the funds annually
voted for school purposes. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council is empowered to appoint a
Superintendent of Education; to establish a high school in any district where it may be
expedient to do so, to be under the control of the local board of trustees ; to create school districts
wherever 15 children of between 6 and 16 years of age are found; to set apart waste lands
for school purposes in every district; to grant such sums of money as shall defray the current
expenses of schools and the cost of buildings ; to grant sums in aid to such parts of the
Province as have over 7 and less than 15 children of school age ; to appoint, at such remuneration as he shall deem fit, two examiners to act in conjunction with the Superintendent of
Education in examining teachers for certificates, which shall continue for 4, 3 and one years
for 1st, 2nd and 3rd class certificates respectively; such certificates to be granted only to
persona of good moral character; and to temporarily appoint, at a reasonable remuneration, inspectors to visit any public school, and to report to the Superintendent of Education on all
connected with it.
The duties of the Superintendent of Education are then detailed as follows :—
To authorize text-books for use in schools; to make regulations ; to take charge of all
apparatus procured for schools and to furnish them to schools; to establish a separate school
for females in any district where expedient, to be presided over by a female teacher; to visit
schools when required by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council; to examine schools and inquire
into condition of buildings, &c, and to advise as he may judge proper; to see that schools are
managed according to law and to prevent the use of unauthorized books; to suspend certificates, such suspensions or cancellations to be valid when confirmed by the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council, and to release trustees from obligation to employ those thus suspended; to grant
temporary certificates, countersigned by the Provincial Sceretary; to make an annual report
on the public schools, giving full details and recommending improvements; to be responsible
for all money paid through him and to give security; to prepare suitable forms and instructions,
and to cause them to be transmitted to the proper officers; to investigate complaints as to
elections of trustees and to confirm or set aside such elections, and to call for new elections;
and finally to close schools when the average falls below 10.
The Act provides that there shall be 3 trustees in each school district who shall be a
corporation. Disqualifying teachers and clergymen from being trustees, and the latter also
from the offices of teacher and superintendent, it defines that the voters of a school district
shall be resident male householders and free-holders, and that every challenged voter at an
election shall make a declaration of his qualification under a penalty. The following meetings
of voters are to be called :—(1) By the Superintendent of Education upon the formation of
any new school district for the election of 3 trustees to serve until the next annual meeting.
(2) By the trustees for the annual meeting in the last week in June either for the election
of 3 trustees to serve according to the number of votes received by each, for 3, 2 or 1 years,
in the case of a first annual election; or for one trustee to serve in the place of the one
whose term has expired in the case of a second or subsequent annual election. (3) By the
trustees for a special meeting at any time for the election of a trustee to serve the unexpired
term of a resigning trustee or for any other special purpose. All meetings are to commence
at noon, to be presided over by an elected chairman who is to decide all questions of order
and in case of an equality of votes to have a casting vote, and to have their proceedings recorded
by a secretary. At any meeting of voters the chairman is to take the votes by a poll, the
names of the voters are to be recorded by the secretary and the poll is to remain open till 4
p. m. Correct copies of the proceedings signed by the chairman and secretary are also to be
forwarded forthwith to the Superintendent of Education.
At an annual meeting the annual report of the trustees is to be received and decided
upon. The site for a school is to be chosen at a special meeting, and in case of a difference of
opinion between a majority of the voters and a majority of the trustees, the question to be
referred to 3 arbitrators (including the Superintendent of Education), whose decision is to be
final. A trustee may be re-elected with his consent or may resign with the consent of his
colleagues. The trustees of a school district are to appoint one of themselves to be secretary and treasurer, who shall keep a record of their proceedings and an account of the
moneys received and disbursed by the board. They are to take possession of, and have
the care of, all the school property, and to do what they shall judge expedient with
respect to all matters connected with the school-house, grounds and premises; to appoint
the teacher from those duly qualified, and when dismissing him to dismiss him at not less
than 30 days' notice; to visit their school and to see that it is conducted according to the
authorized regulations and with the authorized text-books; to order their teacher to teach
at one part of the district at one time and at another for the rest of the time, and
in case of two such teaching places to locate one school in such a central position as
to benefit the greatest number; to read at the annual meeting their annual school report,
including an account of all moneys received and expended; and to transmit an annual report
to the Superintendent of Education respecting the time the school was kept open, the money
received and expended; to give information respecting the school population and the population under 18; the branches of education taught and all matters relating to education affecting
the district, and the uses to which school buildings and grounds have been applied. 196 Public Schools Report. 1882
The following duties are required of the public school teacher:—
To teach faithfully according to the prescribed regulations; to keep the school register;
to maintain proper order; to send to parents a monthly report respecting each of their children
attending school; to keep a visitors' book; to allow access to the visitors' book and register to
trustees and visitors ; to deliver up those books to the trustees upon his leaving the school; to
hold half-yearly public examinations, and to notify parents and trustees of the same, and
furnish a report of his school monthly, or when required, to the Superintendent of Education,
and verify it by affidavit if necessary; and to give trustees 30 days' notice of his intention to
resign.
The compulsory clauses of the Act require every child between 7 and 12 to attend school
for 6 months in the year, subjecting the parent or guardian for a failure of compliance to a
penalty of $5 for a first and of $10 for any subsequent conviction before a magistrate, upon
the complaint of the trustees or Superintendent of Education or of any person authorized by
them. The following are to be considered valid reasons for non-compliance with the Act:—
That satisfactory instruction is given in some other manner; unavoidable absence; no school
within 3 miles; and that the child complained of has reached a standard of education higher
than that to be attained in the public school.
A penal clause of the Act renders the person disturbing a school meeting or a public
school liable to a fine of $20 and costs upon conviction before a magistrate. The Act also
provides for the establishment of public boarding schools, whose 3 trustees have power to
make by-laws fixing the fees to be paid for board, &c, of pupils, and to sue for, recover
and receive the same. These trustees are to be appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council, and to have all the rights, powers, and duties of trustees of public schools, with the
additional ones rendered necessary by the nature of the school in relation to its being a
boarding school. Subject to the approval of the Superintendent of Education, the trustees
have the power of appointing and dismissing the teacher and employes and of fixing the
wages of the latter.
The Act also makes the general provision that all public schools shall be secular and non-
sectarian; that salaries of teachers shall be paid monthly direct from the Provincial Treasury;
and that all school buildings and lands shall be under the control of the Lands and Works
Department, with the provision that "no public school reserve shall be alienated without the
consent of the trustees of the school district in which such reserve is situate," (the last clause
being the amendment formerly referred to and which was passed in the Session of 1882.)
The following should be a part of the School Act:—
The times of keeping schools open with vacations and holidays;    the hours of teaching;
and the power of trustees with respect to suspended and expelled pupils, and with respect to
the admission or rejection of those under or over school-age.
The following should be more clearly defined:—
The school-age and part of section 30 relating to the duties of trustees.
A re-arrangement of some of the clauses of the Act, especially of those relating to "School
Trustees," "Annual School Meetings," and "Trustees, their powers, responsibilities and duties,"
would be highly desirable, and it would be very advantageous to make the first meeting for
the election of trustees in any district equivalent to the first annual meeting for the same
purpose, and that the trustees elected under it should be elected for 3, 2 and 1 years from the
date on which the annual meeting would have been held. The 10 days' notice of meetings of
voters could also be reduced with advantage, and so also could the time for keeping the poll
open at elections, especially in country places and where there were no more candidates than
the vacancies to be filled.
The sparseness of the population and the desirability of having as many persons as are
interested in education take a part in educational matters, lead me to recommend also that
females be put on the same footing as males with respect to the persons qualified to vote for
trustees or for other matters for which meetings of voters are called. In the carrying out of the
School Act, the construction of buildings, repairs, and all matters connected with the school land
and premises are undertaken by the Lands and Works Department. The Educational Branch
of the Provincial Secretary's Department takes cognizance of all matters purely educational,
and all vouchers for the salaries of teachers and those for the incidental expenses of schools
sent in and certified to by trustees pass through the Education Office, and are paid once a
month from the Provincial Treasury.    All established schools re-open after the midsummer 46 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
197
vacation on the first Monday in August. Newly organized schools also generally do so. The
schools are then in session until the last Friday in June, with the exception of a fortnight's
vacation at Christmas, two days at Easter, and a few other prescribed holidays. Public
examinations of the schools are held by the teachers at Christmas and Midsummer. At the
close of each calendar month every pupil in attendance at a school for that month or part of
it receives a report of his progress and attendance according to the following form or a modification of it:—
Public School.
Class.
Report showing Merit Marks obtained by
during the Month ending
188
Subjects of Study, &c.
Deportment	
Eeading  	
Spelling and Dictation	
Arithmetic—Mental	
Arithmetic—Written	
Geography and use of Globes.
Grammar and Analysis	
Writing	
Book-keeping	
History	
Composition	
Linear Drawing	
Vocal Music	
Merit Marks.
Possible.        Obtained
Days absent     Times late	
Ranks in a class of pupils.
1. By carefully comparing this Report with preceding Reports (if any) the parent or guardian will see
whether the pupil is advancing or retrograding in his respective studies, whether his rank in his class
is becoming higher or lower, and whether his deportment is praiseworthy or the reverse.
2. Parents and guardians are cordially invited to visit the School as often as may be consistent with
their convenience. Whenever the Report is unsatisfactory in any particular, they should make a " special
call" and enquire into the matter. Unity of action, and mutual understanding between teachers and
parents, are the surest guarantees of success in teaching.
3. The pupil will be required to return this Report for inspection (duly signed by his parent or
guardian) not later than the last school day in each month or term.
 Teacher.
I have carefully examined the above Report, and compared it with preceding Reports issued to bearer
during the current year.
 Parent or Guardian.
This report, after being signed by the parent according to the directions and shown thus
signed to the teacher, is finally given into the possession of the parent for future reference.
By this means teacher and parent are in constant communication, and a close relation is established between them tending to the advantage of both, as well as to that of the child. In
addition to these reports to parents respecting individual pupils, a monthly report of the state
of the school or division of the school is forwarded by the teacher to the Education Office and
to the Secretary of the Board of Trustees, according to the following form:— 198 Public Schools Report. 1882
Education Branch op Provincial Secretary's Department.
Monthly Report of Public School for the Month ending 188   .
1. Prescribed school days	
2. Days school was in session	
3. Total daily attendance	
4. Total actual attendance	
5. Average daily attendance	
6. Average actual attendance	
7. Pupils actually attending during month. .
8. Boys „ „ ..
9. Girls
10. Greatest number of pupils present at any
session (A.M. or P.M.)	
11. Lowest ,, ,, ..
12. Highest Register number in use to date..
13. Monthly Reports sent to parents	
14. Expulsion of pupils	
15. Suspension	
16. Truancy 	
17. Corporal punishment of pupils	
18. Tardiness of pupils	
19. „ of Teacher 	
20. Days' absence of Teacher	
21. Visits to school by Trustees	
22. „ ,,      by Supt. of Education..
23. ,, ,,      other persons	
24. Have the Rules and Regulations been
observed 	
I hereby certify to the correctness of the above information.
 Teacher.
N.B.—A copy of this Report shall be forwarded by the Teacher or Principal to the Secretary of the
Board of School Trustees.
The following are the directions given for the  making up of the register and these
monthly reports:—
Directions for making up the Register and the Monthly Reports.
At the commencement of the School year (August), the teacher shall give to each pupil his or her
Register Number for the year or for such part of the year as he or she is enrolled in the school or in the
division of the school. The Register numbers shall be the cardinal numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, &c, consecutively,
and without omission. The same Register Number shall not be given to any two pupils, so that the highest
Register Number in use shall always indicate the number of pupils enrolled.
Each pupil shall be credited with his or her actual attendance only, and no more. A half-day's (a.m.
or p.m.) attendance shall be indicated in the Register by the slanting straight line ( or ^ , and a whole
day's attendance by these lines combined, thus x.
The "Daily Attendance" at the foot of each page of the Register, shall be the number of pupils present
at all during each day; and the Average Daily Attendance for a Month shall be the quotient, to two
decimal places, resulting from the division of the sum of these numbers by the number of days the school
was in session.
Attendance in any month, on the right-hand page of two opposite pages of the Register, shall be the
number of actual days' attendance made by each pupil during the month; and the average of actual attendance for a month shall be the quotient resulting from the division, to two decimal places, of the sum of
these numbers by the number of days the school was in session.
The teacher of each school, or of each division of a school, shall enter the age of each pupil, on his or
her last birthday, in the proper column.
These monthly reports are not a substitute for, nor do they supersede the necessity of the
inspection of schools. Every school, whether inspected or not, is equally bound to furnish the
information they require, and in any event this, though small, is such as cannot in any condition of affairs, and in any system of education, be well dispensed with, and is such as should
be given to some central authority. At such times as opportunity is afforded, schools are
visited and a thorough inspection is made as to the progress and attainments of pupils. This
is done by means of printed questions in the case of more advanced pupils, who are required to
answer in writing, and orally in the case of those less advanced. Every pupil passes under review,
and his standing on the occasion of an inspection is recorded and his proficiency in each branch
of study ascertained. The printed questions are divided into three sets, A, B, C. The A
papers comprise, besides the reading of a piece of prose and one of poetry, questions in mental
arithmetic, in written arithmetic, including fractions, decimals, and interest; geography,
including the outlines of the world, of the British Empire, and more particularly of the
Dominion of Canada ; in grammar, including the analysis and parsing of any ordinary sentence ;
composition, consisting generally of an abstract of some tale read there and then to the pupils;
penmanship, and dictation, including spelling, capitals, and punctuation. The B papers comprise the same series of subjects, but in an easier form and in a less extended degree. The C
papers, comprising the same subjects excepting history, and gauged according to their capacity,
are given to pupils in the 3rd Reader, and to those who can use the pen with a sufficient
degree of ease.    The oral examinations of less advanced pupils consist of reading and such 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 199
exercises in the other subjects of the course of instruction as their several attainments call for.
The results of these inspections are tabulated, and in that form, with remarks generally
advisory or commendatory or otherwise, they are sent to the secretaries of the several boards,
by whom they are handed to teachers to be hung up in their school-rooms in some public place,
such as by side of the time-table of the school.
It is to be hoped that the objective tendency of this kind of inspection, inasmuch as it
concerns itself mainly with elementary subjects, cannot have any other end than that of resulting in the well-grounding of pupils in what will be of practical use to them in after life. The
following remarks of the eminent American orator, Edward Everett, bearing as it does on the
well-grounding of pupils in elementary branches of education, may well bear insertion in this
place :—" To read the English language well, to write with dispatch a neat, legible hand, and
be master of the first four rules of arithmetic so as to dispose of at once, with accuracy, every
question of figures which comes up in practice,—this I call a good education. And if you add
the ability to write pure, grammatical English, I regard it as an excellent education. These
are the tools. You can do much with them, but you are powerless without them. They are
the foundation; and unless you begin with these, all your flashy attainments—a little geology,
and all other ologies and osophies—are ostentatious rubbish."
So far as the quality of the education given in her public schools is concerned, either in
its primary grades or in the higher, the liberality of her system of support of schools, the
character and ability of her teachers, and the thoroughness of the work done in her educational
establishments, the Province cannot, even without taking into consideration the disabilities of
her situation, but have the satisfaction of feeling that she has clone her part well.
While the event is still fresh in the recollection of all, the visit of His Excellency the
Governor-General and Her Royal Highness the Princess Louise to the Public Schools of this
city, on the 27th October, may well find a place in this Report. The following is the account
given of this event in the Daily Standard of the next day :—
" Visit op the Governor-General and H.R.H Princess Louise to the Public Schools.
" One of the most pleasing incidents in connection with the Vice-Regal visit to this
Province was the presence of His Excellency the Governor-General and Her Royal Highness
the Princess Louise at the Public Schools of this city yesterday afternoon.    The hour fixed for
the arrival of the distinguished visitors was three o'clock, but some time previous to that the
children had been arranged in proper order in the principal room of the building in the upper
story.    The room was very tastefully decorated,  the task having been performed by  the
teachers of the primary school assisted by Mrs. T N. Hibben and Mrs. Johnston.    The walls
were festooned with evergreens and on many of the  desks of the pupils bouquets of choice
flowers were placed immediately opposite to the main entrance of the room where the mottoes
" Better Loed ye Cannne Be,"   " Will ye no Come Back Again,"  " Let all the end thou aim'st
at be thy country's, thy God's and truth's,"  " Welcome  Lome  and  Louise."    Over the  dais,
on which chairs had been placed for the distinguished visitors, were the words " Vivat Regina."
Invitations were extended to the  following ladies and gentlemen :—The Superintendent of
Education, the School Trustees,   the Chief Justice,   Hon. Mr. Beaven,   Mrs. C. C. McKenzie,
Mrs. Johnston,   Mrs. Revely,   Mrs. Leigh,   Mrs. J. McKenzie,   Miss Reid,   Miss Crease,   Mrs.
Richardson,   Mrs.   Halliday,   His Worship the Mayor and   Mrs.  Shakespeare,   Miss Emily
Woods, Rev. Mr. Smith and Mrs.  Smith,  Rev. Mr.  Gamble, Miss Crease,  Mrs.  and Miss
Thain, Mr.  and Mrs. Wolfenden,  Mrs. Hibben, Mr. and Mrs. Spencer,  Dr. Tolmie, Mr. B.
Williams and the representatives of the Press.     The number of invitations was limited on
account of avoiding a crush.    Every teacher was allowed to issue an invitation and bring
immediate relatives.    The number of pupils assembled was  602, comprised as follows:—50
from the High School, 302 from the Boys' Department and 250 from the Girls'.    They were
very neatly attired and the orderly manner in which they behaved afforded  evidence of  good
discipline and reflected much credit on the teachers.     The pupils of the High School were
drawn in front of the building and acted as a body-guard to the Vice-Regal party.     Just
before the arrival of the party the boys opened ranks and faced inwards,  their caps  in their
hands.    It was about half-past three o'clock when His Excellency and the Princess arrived,
accompanied by Miss Hervey and members of their suite.    The visitors were received by Hon.
Mr. Beaven, who introduced the Superintendent of Education and the School Trustees, Messrs.
C. M. Chambers, A. Wilson and James Fell.    Mrs. McKenzie, wife of the Superintendent of
Education, and Mrs. C. M. Chambers were also introduced.     Immediately it was  announced
that His Excellency and the Princess were about to enter the room the pupils  commenced
14 singing the National Anthem, continuing until the visitors had taken their seats.    The Superintendent of Education then read the following address :—
" To His Excellency the Bight Honourable Sir John Douglas Sutherland Campbell, Marquis
of Dome, K.T., G.M.G., Governor-General of Canada :
" May it Please Your Excellency :
" On behalf of the Education Department of the Province, of the Board of Trustees and of
the Teachers and pupils of the High and Public Schools of this City, I have the honour
to welcome Your Excellency and Her Royal Highness to these grounds and buildings which
Your Excellency and Her Royal Highness have graciously consented to visit.
"These grounds, the first dedicated to school purposes in the Province, and within whose
boundaries stands the first and last school-buildings, so far erected, will ever form a part of the
historical associations connected with the past of the Province, and the contrast between the
two buildings may fairly serve to represent the progress she has made in education, from the
day of the commencement of her career as a Colony of the Empire to the present time, when
she has taken rank as one of the Provinces of the Dominion of Canada.
" She has had for the last ten years, and in successful operation, a system of Free Schools
and Free Education on a most liberal scale, inasmuch as her general revenue is pledged to
bear the total cost of Education without, as in most States and countries, the subsidiary aid
usually derived from municipalities and other local divisions. In every locality wherein 15
children of school age can be found a School District is created, school buildings are erected
and a teacher is provided by the Provincial Government, and provision is further made for
localities wherein fewer than that number are found.
" The annual appropriations by the Legislature for purposes of Education, School Buildings and Educational Appliances, are limited only by the means of the Province, and have
often exceeded twelve per cent, of the Revenue.
" This High School, the only one of the kind so far instituted, and for whose reception
the uncompleted wing of the building is designed, is the apex of our educational system as
developed up to the present time.
" Though possessing but a scant and scattered population, severely engaged in the struggle
for existence, the Province has yet been able to found throughout the length and breadth of
the land, schools whose course of instruction can vie in its aims and direction with that of
similar institutions elsewhere, and it will be a source of gratification to Your Excellency, as
Governor-General of the Dominion, and to Her Royal Highness, as the daughter of our Most
Gracious Queen, to find that sentiments of loyalty and attachment to Her Majesty's person
are inculcated in the public schools of this far off portion of Her Majesty's realm.
" The honour done us this day will be long remembered by the old and young here present,
and will serve to strengthen the sinews of the Province to bear the strain in the future, as it
has done in the past, of the noble efforts she is making to adapt her institutions to the progressive condition of the age, and we take it as an earnest of the bright day that shall dawn
not only on our educational establishments, but on the Province generally.
"C. C. McKENZIE, M.A. Cantab.,
"Superintendent of Education for the Province of British Columbia.
"His Excellency replied in eloquent language, expressing the pleasure he felt at having
this opportunity of meeting so many young British Columbians. He was glad to see and hear
that the educational system of the Province was so far advanced, and the appearance and
conduct of the children was certainly most creditable. His Excellency referred to the fact
that the requisite school population for the establishment of a school was only 15 here; in
Ontario he believed it was 70 or 75. He also referred to the system of compulsory education
existing in other countries, and he expressed his astonishment at finding such a large and well
appointed bidding as that which he now had the pleasure of visiting. He thanked the
children for the manner in which they had sung God Save the Queen, and concluded by saying
that he hoped before long the Province would be able to boast of a University as well as its
present High School. His Excellency, before resuming his seat, asked that a day's holiday be
given all the pupils of the Public Schools, and further stated that he and the Princess intended to present several prizes, which would be awarded as the Superintendent thought proper.
" The pupils than sang "The Blue Bells of Scotland," in a very creditable manner. 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 201
" The Superintendent of Education then presented the teachers, with whom His Excellency
and the Princess shook hands. The Lord Lome medalists, Master Edwin Castleton, Miss
Nellie Wolfenden, and Master Halliday, were next presented to the Governor-General, and
then Miss Esther Johnston, a pretty little brunette, possibly 12 years of age, approached the
Princess and presented Her Royal Highness with a bouquet of lovely flowers in a holder of
white satin most artistically painted by Mrs. P. T. Johnston. Attached to the holder were
two white streamers on one of which the following words were painted in blue letters:—
"May it Please Your Royal Highness:
" We, the children of the Public School, greet you, and wish to express our delight at
your visit to our city and especially to our schools. We hope the daughter of our beloved
Queen has had a pleasant visit among us and will take away sunny memories of our Island
home.
" The next interesting incident in the visit was the presentation to the Princess of a
splendidly bound Album containing many beautiful photographs and views of this city and
neighborhood. Also artistically arranged specimens of alga?. Many of the views were
sketched by pupils of the schools. The presentation was made by Miss May Hibben, who
read the following address:—
" May it please Your Royal Highness to accept, from the scholars of the High and Public
Schools, this memento of Victorian skill as a souvenir of the visit of yourself and His Excellency the Governor-General to this Province of British Columbia, which has given Her Most
Gracious Majesty's devoted subjects high honour and deep-felt gratification.
" The album was bound by Mr. Robt. T. Williams. Her Royal Highness, having received
the album, stepped from the dais and conversed with Miss Hibben and several of the other
children around her, and evinced a thorough interest in all she saw and heard. The programme terminated very appropriately by Her Royal Highness signing her name in the
visitors' book. His Excellency congratulated Mr. Offerhaus, second Master of the High
School, on the efficient manner in which the pupils had sung, and before leaving the grounds
looked at the old school building and the new one, remarking that the contrast was very great
and stating that the present structure compared very favourably with similar institutions in
other parts of the Dominion.
"His Excellency and the Princess then took their seats in their carriage and were driven
to St. Ann's Convent.
" It was subsequently announced that Monday next will be a holiday for the pupils of the
Public Schools,"
Special Reports on District Schools.
Barkerville.—Salary, $83.33 per month. No inspection. Teacher, J. R. Sterling.
Enrolled: Boys, 14; girls, 16 ; total, 30 ; average number attending in any month, 24 ;
average daily attendance, 20.38; percentage of regular attendance, 87. Four pupils of
1880-81 have left and are replaced by 10 new names on the register. Expenditure, $1,139.08;
cost of each pupil on total and on average attendance respectively, $39.97 and $55.89.
Burgoyne Bay.—Salary, $50 per month. Inspection, 19th May, 1882. Teacher, Geo.
Stainburn, B.A., Cantab; present teacher, A. Dodds. Enrolled: Boys, 17; girls, 9; total,
26; average number attending monthly, 18 ; average daily attendance, 12.95; per centage of
regular attendance, 73J. Four pupils of 1880-81 have left and are replaced by 8 new pupils.
Expenditure, $645.20; cost of each pupil on total and on average attendance respectively,
$24.81 and $49.82. Present at inspection, 15, of whom 2 of the average age of 16 were
examined in the A papers with an average percentage of answering of 56 l-5th; 3 of the
average age of 12 in the B papers with an average percentage of 35 ; and 2 of the average
of 9^ in the C papers with an average percentage of 33. There were also examined orally
in the various branches of study 3 in 3rd Reader, 2 in 2nd Reader, and 3 in the 1st Reader.
The order of the school was good. The pupils showed most backwardness in English grammar.
The two senior pupils are studying algebra, Euclid, mensuration, and book-keeping.
PRO*- *-  LIBRARY
■-•.,:    ■'., ■.■■.„ :; ..-■■, 202 Public Schools Report. 1882
Burrard Inlet (Moodyville). Salary, $55 per month. Inspection, 30th May, 1882.
Teacher to 30th October, 1882, Mrs. Colbeck; present teacher, Miss Kirkland. Enrolled:
Boys, 23 ; girls, 22 ; total, 45; average number attending monthly, 26 ; average daily attendance, 18.50; percentage of regular attendance, 71. Nine pupils of 1880-81 have left, and
are replaced by 12 new pupils. Expenditure, $736.50; cost of each pupil on total and on
average attendance respectively, $16.37 and $39.81. There were 19 present at inspection, of
whom 2 of the average age of 13| years took the A papers, obtaining an average percentage
of 43|; 3 of the average age of 11 the B papers, obtaining an average percentage of 34
and 3 of the average age of 13J the C papers, obtaining an average percentage of 27J.
There were also examined orally 1 in the 3rd Reader, 5 in 2nd Reader, and 5 in 1st. The
different classes were rather backward in arithmetic, geography, and grammar.
Cache Creek Boarding School. Salaries : Teacher, $75 ; Matron, $50 per month. No
inspection. Teacher, Thos. Leduc ; Matron, Mrs. Schubert. Enrolled: Boys, 13; girls, 10;
total, 23 ; average number attending monthly, 17 ; average daily attendance, 14.36 ; percentage of regular attendance, 84. Expenditure, $1,775.03 ; cost of each pupil on total
and average attendance respectively, $77.18 and $123.61. Eleven pupils of 1880-81 have left,
and there are 4 new pupils.
Returns of Receipts and Expenditure of Boarding School during the year 1881-2, as
reported by the Trustee Board :—
Cash, including balance of account for the year ending 30th June, 1881, received
from 1st July, 1881, to 30th January, 1882         $987 82
Cash disbursed during same time  934 29
Balance in hand  53 53
Total         |987 82 $987 82
Amount due to the school by parents and others      $1,241 59
Amount due by the school to others, not including indebtedness to the Governm't.. 441 84
Balance in favour of the school  799 75
$1,241 59     $1,241 59
Expense Account.
Butter    $140 54
Labour  336 83
Furniture . .\  21 63
Groceries and flour  383 61
Beef  414 27
Vegetables  122 29
Freight and Tolls  79 03
Cow feed  30 00
Wood  216 33
Total $1,744 53
(Signed)       Chas. A. Semlin,     \TrmUei_
,, Chas. Pennie, J
Cedar, North.—Salary, $50 per month. Teacher, Miss McDougall. Inspection, 19th
September, 1881, and 16th May, 1882. Enrolled: Boys, 13; girls, 13; total, 26; average
number attending monthly, 17 ; average daily attendance, 11.95 ; percentage of regular
attendance, 72. Expenditure, $633.96; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance
respectively, $24.38 and $53.05. Five pupils of 1880-81 have left, and are replaced by 7 new
pupils. Present at inspections, 18 and 13. No pupil being competent to pass a written
examination, they were examined orally on 16th May; 3 in 3rd Reader, who read fairly, but
were backward in every other respect, 1 doing pretty well in arithmetic; 6 in 2nd Readers,
read and spelled fairly well; and four were in the 1st Reader.
Cedar, South.—Salary, $50 per month. Inspections, 19th September, 1881, and 16th
May, 1882. Teacher to 30th June, Miss Bell; present teacher, Miss Gardiner. Enrolled:
Boys, 8; girls, 11; total, 19; average number attending monthly, 16; average daily attendance, 10.66; percentage of regular attendance, 69. Expenditure, $625.47; cost of each
pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $32.92 and $58.67. Sixteen pupils of
1880-81 have left and there are 2 new pupils. Present at inspections, 14 and 14. None being
competent to pass a written examination, there were examined orally on 16th May, 1 in 4th
Reader, who was backward in every subject except reading, spelling and dictation; 5 in 2nd
Reader; and 8 in 1st Reader. Cedar Hill.—Salary, $70 per month. Inspections, 1st and 2nd February, and 22nd
June, 1882. Teacher, J. W. Thomson. Enrolled : Boys, 25 : girls, 22 ; total, 47 ; average
number attending monthly, 32 ; average daily attendance, 23.32 ; percentage of regular attendance, 73. Expenditure, $895.75; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively,
$19.06 and $38.41. Twenty pupils of 1880-81 have left, and there are 7 new pupils. Present
at inspections, 20, 22, and 24. On the first occasion, 9 of the average age of 14 examined in
the A papers obtained an average of 56 per cent. ; and one of these, Samuel A. M. Pollock,
passed the standard required for admission to the High School; 1, ten years of age, examined
in the B papers, 30| per cent. ; and 5 of the average age of 11 J, in the C, an average of 38
per cent. On the second occasion, 5 of the average age of 15, examined in the A papers,
obtained 51 per cent.; 2 of the average age of 11, obtained 27 per cent.; and 3 of the average age
of 11, an average of 30| per cent. There were also examined at this time orally, 7 in 3rd
Reader, of the average age of 9, in reading, arithmetic, geography, grammar, dictation and
writing in copy-books; 4, of the average age of 7 J, in 2nd Reader on the same subjects; and
3, of the average age of 5, in 1st Reader. This school has been fortunate for years in the
efficiency with which it has been managed.
Cheam.—Salary, $50 per month. Inspection, 5th June. Teacher to 31st January, 1882,
Miss Trenaman ; present teacher, Miss Andrews. Enrolled: Boys, 17; girls, 16; total, 33;
average number attending monthly, 19; average daily attendance, 11.89; percentage of
regular attendance, 65. Expenditure, $554.71 ; cost of each pupil on total and on
average attendance respectively, $16.81 and $46.65. Ten pupils of 1880-81 have left, and are
replaced by 12 new pupils. Present at inspection, 11 ; of whom 1, Albert Gillanders, 21
years of age, was examined in the A papers with a percentage of answering of 60 per cent.,
thus passing the standard required for admission to the High School. There were examined
orally 6 in 3rd Reader, and 4 in 1st Reader. Several of the pupils of this school were
absent on account of the high water, which then was within a few feet of the school-house, and
which a day or two after compelled the closing of the school for the summer.
Chilliwhack.—Salary, $70 per month. Inspections, 5th and 6th June. Teacher, J.
P. Johnston. Enrolled : Boys, 38; girls, 33; total, 71 ; average number attending monthly,
55; average daily attendance, 40.60; percentage of regular attendance, 71J. Expenditure, $1,416.27 ; cost of each child on total and average attendance respectively, $19.95
and $34.88. Thirteen pupils of 1880-81 have left, and are replaced by 15 new pupils.
Present at inspections, 36 and 24. Of these, 4 of the average age of 14J years were examined
in the A papers, obtaining an average of 65| per cent., Maggie Turner, who had not previously passed, passing the standard required for admission to the High School; 9 in the B
papers, of the average age of llf years, obtained an average of 25 per cent. ; and 2 in the
C papers, of the average age of 12, obtaining an average of 27 per cent. There were also
examined orally, 4 in the 3rd Reader, 8 in 2nd Reader, and 10 in 1st Reader. This result
gives a very inadequate idea of the state of this large and flourishing school, as on account of
the high water on the occasion numbers of the pupils who would otherwise have been present
were absent, and of those who were present the first day 12 or more were absent on the second
day, and as a consequence several subjects of examination were omitted in their case. For the
same reason, the school was closed on 7th June for the summer. No pains is spared by the
teacher, in school and out of school, in improving his pupils. The new school-house is a great
improvement on the old one, and being built further inland is more centrally situated.
Clinton.—Salary, $60 per month. No inspection. Teacher, J. F. Smith. Enrolled :
Boys, 16; girls, 6; total, 22; average number attending monthly, 15; average daily attendance, 14.00; percentage of regular attendance, 91. Expenditure, $760.75. Cost of
each pupil on total and average attendance, $34.58 and $54.34. Four pupils of 1880-81 have
left, and are replaced by 6 new pupils. One evidence of the favourable estimation in which
this school is held is shown by the fact that 11 of its pupils came from a distance to reside at
Clinton and to attend its school.
Colwood.—Salary for 1881-82, $50 per month; none voted for this year. Teacher, A.
E. Lindsay. No inspection. Enrolled : Boys, 7 ; girls, 5 ; total, 12; average number attending monthly, 11 ; average daily attendance, 8.19; percentage of regular attendance, 75.
Expenditure, $347. Cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively,
$28.92 and $42.37.    Twelve pupils of 1880-81 left, and there was but 1 new pupil.    With a 204 Public Schools Report. 1882
diminishing attendance, and without having the prospect of a better one, the trustees thought
it advisable to close the school at Christmas, 1881.
Comox.—Salary, $50 per month. Inspection, 14th September, 1882. Teacher to 30th
June, Miss E. Holloway ; present teacher, Miss Cameron. Enrolled: Boys, 17; girls, 11 ;
total, 28 ; average number attending monthly, 17 ; average daily attendance, 11.24 ; percentage of regular attendance, 67|. Expenditure, $647. Cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance, $23.11 and $57.56. Six pupils of 1880-81 who have left are replaced by 9 new
pupils. Present at inspection, 12 and 11. The result of the inspection was given in last
year's report. In its place the result of the inspection held on 14th September, 1882, is given,
that corresponding with the inspection held in other districts for the year. None of the 11
present being able to pass a written examination, there were examined orally, 2 in 4th Reader, 3
in 3rd Reader, 3 in 2nd Reader, and 3 in 1st Reader. In place of the present central school,
the teacher's time should be divided between a school at the landing and a school still farther
inland than the present one.
Cowichan, North (Agricultural Hall Branch and Central School Branch).—Salary $60
per month. Inspection, 17th May, 1882. Teacher to 31st January, A. Dods; present
Teacher, Miss Storey.
Agricultural Hall Branch.—Enrolled : Boys, 4; girls, I; total, 5 ; average number
attending monthly, 5; average daily attendance,  4.21;   percentage of regular attendance,  84.
Central School Branch.—Enrolled: Boys, 17; girls, 5; total, 22; average number
attending monthly, 13 ; average daily attendance, 9.28 ; percentage of regular attendance, 69.
Expenditure, $647.37; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $29.43
and $47.98. Nine pupils of 1880-81 have left and there are 2 new pupils. Present at inspection, 14, of whom none were able to take the written examination. There were examined
orally 4 of the average age of 12-f in Fifth Reader, who acquitted themselves especially well in
dictation and spelling, 2 in Third, 2 in Second and 6 in First Reader.
The Agricultural Hall Branch was closed in October, 1881, for want of attendance, leaving the Central School Branch in operation, but for the same reason it also was closed at the
end of January, 1882.
The Central School was again re-opened in April with the result of a better attendance,
which has been maintained up to the present time.
Cowichan, South—Salary, $55—(Bench Branch and Kokasailah Branch). Inspection,
18th May, 1882.    Teacher to 31st August, 1881, A. McKenzie; present Teacher, Thos. Clyde.
Bench Branch.—Enrolled: Boys, 12; girls, 2; total 14; average number attending
monthly, 10; average daily attendance 6.31; percentage of regular attendance 64.
Kokasailah Branch.—Enrolled: Boys, 12; girls, 12; total 24; average number attending
monthly, 14; average daily attendance, 10.38; percentage of regular attendance, 71J.
Expenditure, $636.73; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $19.90
and $38.17. Eight pupils of 1880-81 have left and there are 3 new pupils. On the clay of
inspection there were 6 present at the Kokasailah Branch, of whom 2 of the average age of 10 J
years were examined in the C papers and obtained an average of 35 per cent., and 4 in First
Reader were examined orally. There having been an attendance of but 3 at the Bench
Branch on the previous day, and as a visit to the school would have caused a longer delay
than would have justified it, it was not inspected. It has since been closed and a school has
been established at Shawnigan in its place.
Craigflower.—Salary, $60 per month. Inspection 31st August, 1881, 2nd February
and 19th June, 1882. Teacher, J.C.Newbury. Enrolled: Boys, 23 ; girls, 20 ; total 43 ;
average number attending monthly, 37 ; average daily attendance, 30.94 ; percentage of regular attendance, 83. Expenditure, $807.50 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance
respectively, $18.78 and $26.10. Seven pupils of 1880-81 have left and there are five new
pupils. Present at inspection, 30, 24 and 17. Of the 17 who were present in June, 5 of the
average age of 141- examined in the A papers did remarkably well and obtained an average of
70 per cent.; Janey H. Newbury and Herman Tiedemann passing for the first time the
standard for admission to the High School; 5 of the average age of 13, examined in the C
papers, obtained 59 per cent., and did well in every subject except mental arithmetic, and the
rest were examined orally, namely, 5 in Second Reader and 2 in First. The school made a
good showing in every respect except in point of numbers, that deficiency being caused at this
time by the prevalence of measles in 4 or 5 families. 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 205
Denman Island.—Salary, $50 per month.—Inspection, 15th September, 1881 and 1882.
Teacher to 30th June, S. F. Crawford; present Teacher, Miss Halliday. Enrolled: Boys, 16 ;
girls, 7; total, 23 ; average number attending monthly, 15 ; average daily attendance, 10.70 ;
percentage of regular attendance, 74. Expenditure, $691.72; cost of each pupil on total and
average attendance respectively, $30.08 and 64.65. Three pupils of 1880-81 have left, and
there are 2 new pupils. Present at inspection, 14 and 7. The result of the inspection for
15th September, 1881, is given in the Report for 1880-81. At the visit in 1882, corresponding to the visit for the year 1881-82 in other districts, none of 7 present were
able to undergo a written examination. Three in Fourth Reader read very poorly but
did well in dictation and spelling, and fairly in the first four rules of arithmetic. Two were
reading in Second Reader and 2 in First Reader. Two families have left the Island and
reduced the school population. The loss of the boarders under the former teacher has made a
further reduction in the attendance.
Esquimalt.—Salary, $60* per month.—Inspection, 31st August, 1881, 24th and 25th
January, 19th June. Teacher, J. M. Delany. Enrolled: Boys, 40; girls, 21; total, 61;
average number attending monthly 46; average daily attendance, 35.13; percentage of
regular attendance, 76. Expenditure, $1,496.22; cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance respectively, $24.53 and $42.59. Nineteen pupils of 1880-81 have left and are
replaced by 22 new pupils. Present at inspections, 34, 30, 28 and 36. The progress made in
this school during the year may be judged of by the two written examinations. On the first
occasion none were able to take the A papers, but on the second, 3 of average age 14 J did so,
obtaining an average of nearly 64 per cent., and one, Edward Doran, passed the standard
required for admission to the High School. Four of the average age of 13^ years on the first
occasion obtained 45 per cent., and 5 of the average age of 12, on the second, an average of
24 per cent. Six of the average age of 11-J- years took the C papers on the first, but none on
the second occasion. There were also examined orally at these two times respectively, 10 and 13
in Second Reader, 10 and 15 in First Reader. This school, always a large one, is beginning to
show to some advantage and to take the place it should hold among schools of its importance
and numbers. The majority of the children are however very young. A new school building
has been built during the year, and the grounds and premises will soon be worthy of the place.
Gabriola Island.—Salary, $50 per month.—Inspection, 20th September, 1881, and 15th
May, 1882. Teacher, Alex. Shaw. Enrolled: Boys, 14 ; girls, 15; total, 29; average number
attending monthly, 20; average daily attendance, 16.62; percentage of regular attendance,
82. Expenditure, $584.58 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively,
$20.16 and $35.17. This school having been closed for two years has its 29 pupils reckoned as
new ones. Present at inspection, 18 and 18. At the first visit an oral examination of the
school was held, the school having been closed for the two previous years. At the second visit,
one, John Shaw, 18 years of age, examined in the A papers, obtained 60 per cent., and passed
the standard for the High School, 3 of the average age of 15 years, obtained nearly 36 per
cent, in the B, and 5 of the average age of 13, 25 per cent, in the C. There were also examined
orally, 4 in Second and 5 in First Reader. The school has done well and is deservedly popular
among the parents of the children attending it.
Granville.—Salary, $55 per month.—Inspection, 30th May, 1882. Teacher to 30th
June, A. G. Johnston; present Teacher, G. Stainburn, B. A., Cantab. Enrolled : Boys, 27;
girls, 17 ; total, 44 ; average number attending monthly, 31 ; average daily attendance, 24.13 ;
percentage of regular attendance, 77$. Expenditure, $726.59 ; cost of each pupil on total and
average attendance respectively, $16.51 and $30.11. Seven pupils of 1880-81 have left and
are replaced by 14 new pupils. Present at inspection, 31, of whom one of 15 years of age,
examined in the A papers obtained 55 per cent.; 6 of the average age of 11 years, 48 per cent.,
nearly, in the B ; and 4 of the average age of 11 J, 34 per cent, in the C. There were also
examined orally 8 in Third Reader, 2 in Second and 9 in First Reader. The school was very
orderly and its pupils acquitted themselves well throughout.
Hope.—Salary, $50 per month.—Inspection, 8th June. Teacher to 30th June, Mrs.
Flood ; present Teacher, A. McKenzie. Enrolled: Boys, 16 ; girls, 14 ; total, 30; average
number attending monthly, 17 ; average daily attendance, 12.85 ; percentage of regular attendance 73 J. Expenditure, $646.85 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $21.56 and $50.34. Four pupils of 1880-81 have left, and are replaced by 15 new
pupils.    Present at inspection 8, of whom one of the age of 11, examined in the C papers, 206 Public Schools Report. 1882
obtained 35 per cent. There were also examined orally, 4 in Second Reader and 3 in First.
Measles had affected the attendance, several being laid up with it at the time of the examination.    The high water also prevented the presence of several pupils.
Lake.—Salary, $50 per month.—Inspection, 7th February, 22nd June. Teacher to 31st
December, 1881, Mrs. Offerhaus ; present Teacher, Mrs. Bell. Enrolled : Boys, 15 ; girls, 10;
total, 25 ; average number attending monthly, 16; average daily attendance, 11.32; percentage
of regular attendance, 65. Expenditure, $596.99 ; cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance respectively, $23.88 and $52.74. Eight pupils of 1880-81 have left, and there are
5 new pupils. Present at inspection, 8 and 11. Of the 11, 2 of the average age of 12$ years
obtained 33$ per cent, in the C papers. 5 in Third Reader and 4 in First were examined
orally.     The school is well conducted but is not in a flourishing condition.
Langley.—Salary $55 per month.—Inspection, 31st May and 1st June, 1882. Teacher to
30th June, R. H. Holding; present teacher, J. W. Sinclair. Enroled: Boys, 25; girls, 16; total,
41; average number attending monthly, 20; average daily attendance, 9.20; percentage of regular
attendance, 47$. Expenditure $688.05 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance
respectively, $16.78 and $74.79, Ten pupils of 1880-81 have left and are replaced by 15 new
pupils. Present at inspection, 15 and 15. Of the 15, 4 of the average age of 12$, obtained
29 per cent, in the C papers, and 8 in Second Reader and 3 in First were examined orally.
Owing to irregularity and non-attendance, the school is in a very backward state. In fact, to
such an extent had these risen, that the trustees decided to close the school after July, but upon
reconsideration this decision was reversed, with the result that the average daily attendance for
the first quarter of 1882-83 has been 22. High water in May and June seriously affected the
attendance.
Lillooet.—Salary, $60 per month.—No inspection. Teacher, C. Phair. Enrolled: Boys,
13; girls, 9; total, 22; average number attending monthly, 16; average daily attendance,
12.91; percentage of regular attendance, 80. Expenditure, $771.25; cost of each pupil on
total and average attendance respectively, $35.05 and $59.74. Four pupils of 1880-81 have
left and there are 3 new pupils.
Lytton.—Salary, $60 per month.—No inspection. Teacher, Miss Bailey. Enrolled :
Boys, 15 ; girls, 14; total, 29 ; average number attending monthly, 22; average daily attendance, 18.49 ; percentage of regular attendance, 83. Expenditure, $759.77 ; cost of each pupil
on total and average attendance respectively, $26.20 and $41.10. Seven pupils of 1880.81
have left and there are 5 new pupils.
Maple Ridge.—Salary, $60 per month.—Inspection, 1st and 2nd June. Teacher to 30th
June, J. W. Sinclair ; present teacher, P. Murray. Enrolled : Boys, 23 ; girls, 29 ; total, 52;
average number attending monthly, 30; average daily attendance, 18.92; percentage of
regular attendance, 62. Expenditure, $814.60 ; cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance respectively, $15.65 and $43.05. Seven pupils of 1880-81 who have left are replaced
by 7 new pupils. Present at inspection, 21 and 20. Of the 21, one 12 years of age obtained
43 per cent, in the B, and 7 of the average age of 12$, 26 per cent, in the C papers. There were
also examined orally, 2 in Third Reader, 3 in Second and 8 in First Reader. This school has
not maintained its usual good showing either in attendance or in the progress of its pupils.
The school-building is a very small one and, though repaired during the year to the
extent of $50, it is in a very tumble-down condition.
Metchosin.—Salary, $50 per month.—Inspection, 20th June. Teacher to 31st August,
1881, J. C. Titchworth; present teacher, C. E. Clarke. Enrolled : Boys, 14 ; girls, 8 ; total,
22; average number attending monthly, 14 ; average daily attendance, 9.63 ; percentage of
regular attendance, 70. Expenditure, $635.49 ; cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance respectively, $28.88 and $66.00. Seven pujfils of 1880-81 have left and are
replaced by 7 new pupils. Present at inspection, 11, of whom one, 13 years of age, obtained
41 per cent, in the B, and 4 of the average age of 12 years, 43 per cent, in the C papers.
There were also examined orally, 3 in Second and 3 in First Reader. The school is making
satisfactory progress.
Nanaimo (Boys' School and Girls' School).—Enrolled : Boys, 131 ; girls, 107 ; total, 238 ;
average number attending monthly, 156 ;  average daily attendance,  118.73 ;  percentage of 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 20T
regular attendance, 80. Expenditure, $3,962 41 ; cost of each pupil on total and average
attendance respectively, $16.65 and $33.37.
Nanaimo Boys' School.—Salaries : Principal $90, Assistant $60 per month. Inspections,
16th and 19th September, 7th December, 1881 ; 10th, llth, 16th May, 1882. Principal, D.
Jones; Assistant to 31st December, A. Flett; present Assistant, A. E. Lindsay. Enrolled:
Boys, 131 ; total, 131 ; average number attending monthly, 98 ; average daily attendance,
73.30 ; percentage of regular attendance, 75. Fifty pupils of 1880-81 have left and there are
33 new pupils. Present at inspection, 75, 70, 81, 73, 79, 64. At the two examinations held
at the school, the numbers, percentage, ifec., at the first and second times respectively stand as
follows : 16 of the average age of 12$ years, and 9 of the average of 12$ years, obtained 42 and
46$ per cent, in the A papers; 11 of the average age of 10$ years, and 7 of the average age
of 11$ years, obtained 29 and 24 per cent, in the B papers; and 8 of the average age of 10
years, and 9 of the average age of 10 years, obtained nearly 23 and 32 per cent, in the C
papers. There were also examined orally, and partly in writing, 58 and 54 in 2nd and 1st
Readers in the junior division of the school. At the Christmas examination, William Pool,
John Parkin, and Thomas Jones passed the standard required for admission to the High
School.
Nanaimo Girls' School.—Salaries : Principal $70, Assistant $50 per month. Inspection,
16th, 19th, and 20th September, 7th December, 1881; 10th, llth, 12th, 16th May, 1882.
Principal, Mrs. Berkeley; Assistant, Miss Polley. Enrolled : Girls, 107; total, 107 ; average
number attending monthly, 58; average daily attendance, 45.43 ; percentage of regular
attendance, 80. Forty-five pupils of 1880-81 have left, and there are 34 new pupils.
Present at inspection, 47, 48, 52, 49, 59, 38, 45. At the two examinations held at this school,
the numbers, percentage, &c., at the first and second occasions respectively stand as follows :—
3 of the average age of 13$, and 7 of the average age of 14, obtained 50 and 53 per cent, in
the A papers; 6 of the average age of 13, and 5 of the average age of 12, obtained 44 and 31
per cent, in the B papers ; and 7 of the average age of 11, and 7 of the average age of 11,
obtained 32 and 33$ per cent. There were also examined orally, and partly in writing, 32
and 35 in 3rd, 2nd, and 1st Readers in the junior division of the school.
New Westminster (Boys' School and Girls' School).—Enrolled : Boys, 131 ; girls. 81 ;
total, 212; average number attending monthly, 143; average daily attendance, 97.29;
percentage of regular attendance, 77. Expenditure, $5,109 41; cost of each pupil on
total and average attendance respectively, $24,10 and $52.52. The recent appointment of an
assistant teacher in the Girls' School will tend to further promote the efficiency of these schools.
The junior division of the Boys' School, comprising boys and girls, under Miss Herring, has in
this way been relieved of its overflowing numbers.
New Westminster Boys' School.—Salaries : Principal, $90 per month ; Assistant, $50
per month. Inspection, 14th and 15th December, 1881 ; 29th May, 13th June, 1882. Principal, C. D. Rand, B.A. ; Assistant, Miss Herring. Enrolled: Boys, 131 ; girls, 32; total,
163 ; average number attending monthly, 94 ; average daily attendance, 72.09 ; percentage of
regular attendance, 77. Forty-one pupils of 1880-81 who have left are replaced by 57
new pupils. Present at inspection, 68, 82, 72. At the examinations held at this school,
the numbers, percentage, &c, stand as follows for the first and second occasions respectively :
11 of the average age of 12$, and 8 of the average age of 12$, obtained 40 and 46 per cent, in
the A papers; 7 of the average age of 11, and 12 of the average age of 11, obtained 21 and
31$ per cent, in the B papers ; and 10 of the average age of 10, and 7 of the average age of
11$, obtained 18 and 27 per cent, in the C papers. There were also examined orally in the junior
division of the school 45, comprising boys and girls, in the 3rd,- 2nd and 1st Readers. Considering the withdrawal towards the close of the previous year of the best scholars, the school
shows the great progress it has made. At the Christmas examination, J. W. Bell passed the
standard required for admission to the High School.
New Westminster Girls' School.—Salaries : Principal, $60 per month ; Assistant, $50
per month. Inspection, 14th, 15th, and 16th December, 1881 ; 29th May, 13th June, 1882.
Principal, Miss M. Williams; Assistant from August, 1882, Miss A. Howay. Enrolled :
Girls, 49 ; total, 49 ; average number attending monthly, 33; average daily attendance, 25.20;
percentage of regular attendance, 76. Thirty pupils of 1880-81 have left, and there are
24 new pupils. Present at inspection, 26, 28, 27. At the two examinations held at this
school, the numbers, percentages, &c, stand as follows for the first and second occasions
respectively ;—8 of the average age of 14 years, and 5 of the average age of 14, obtained 59$ 208 Public Schools Report. 1882
and 59 percent, in the A papers; 8 of the average age of 13, and 12 of the average age of 13$,
obtained 29$ and 28 per cent, in the B papers ; and 10 of the average age of 10$, and 10 of
the average age of 11, obtained 37 and 29$ per cent, in the C papers. At the Christmas
examination, Katie Clute, Gertrude McBride, Bessie Johnston, and Marion DeBeck, passed
the standard required for admission to the High School. The senior class of the school has
been very thoroughly taught, and more especially so in English grammar and composition.
Nicola Valley (East End Branch and West End Branch).—Salary, $60 per month.
No inspection.    Teacher, C. J. Hamilton.
East End Branch.-—Enrolled : Boys, 13 ; girls, 11 ; total, 24 ; average number attending monthly, 17 ; average daily attendance, 11.33 ; percentage of regular attendance, 66$.
West End Branch.-—Enrolled : Boys, 10 ; girls. 4 ; total, 14 ; average number attending monthly,   8;   average  daily  attendance,   5.81 ;   percentage  of  regular  attendance,  72.
Expenditure, $768.72 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively,
$23.30 and $44.85. Nine pupils of 1880-81 have left and are replaced by 10 new pupils.
High water and the washing away of a bridge compelled the closing of the West End Branch
during the month of June.
North Arm.—Salary, $50 per month. Inspection, 28th August, 1882. Teacher to 31st
January, 1882, Mrs. Bell; present teacher, Miss Sweet. Enrolled: Boys, 14; girls, 14; total,
28; average number attending monthly, 12; average daily attendance, 8.43; percentage
of regular attendance, 71. Expenditure, $637.28; cost of each pupil on total and
average attendance respectively, $22.76 and $75.60. Five pupils of 1880-81 who have left
are replaced by 14 new pupils. Present at inspection, 11 ; of whom 3 of the average age of
13$ years obtained 31 per cent, in the C papers ; and 4 in 2nd and 4 in 1st Reader were
examined orally. The school was held up to 31st January on the mainland in an almost uninhabitable building, but at that time it was removed to Lulu Island. It is now held in the
Municipal Hall at a rental of $5 per month.    The attendance is now somewhat better.
Okanagan.—Salary, $50 per month. No inspection. Teacher to 30th June, Miss
Coughlan; present teacher, R. S. Hanna. Enrolled: Boys, 10; girls, 13; total, 23; average
number attending monthly, 17 ; average daily attendance, 15.86 ; percentage of regular attendance, 92. Expenditure, $629.25 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance
respectively, $27.36 and $39.67. Two pupils of 1880-81 who have left are replaced by 3 new
pupils. It has been found very difficult to supply the vacancy in this school caused by the
resignation of Miss Coughlan, no one being willing to undertake its duties at a salary of $50.
Prairie.—Salary, $50 per month. Inspection, 31st May and 1st June, 1882. Teacher,
G. H. Sluggett. Enrolled: Boys, 15; girls, 14; total, 29; average number attending monthly,
21; average daily attendance, 13.61; percentage of regular attendance, 67. Expenditure,
$1,014.71 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $35 and
$74.55. Four pupils of 1880-81 who have left are replaced by 6 new pupils. Present at
inspection, 11 and 19. Of the 19, 3 of the average age of 11 examined in the C papers
obtained an average of 50 per cent.; and there were examined orally 2 in 3rd Reader, 9 in
2nd, and 5 in 1st. A new school-house has been built here, replacing the one burned down
the previous year.
Quesnellemouth.—Salary, $60 per month. No inspection. Teacher to 30th June, A.
McKenzie ; present teacher, none. Enrolled : Boys, 15 ; girls, 6 ; total, 21 ; average number
attending monthly, 13; average daily attendance, 9.94; percentage of regular attendance, 77.
Expenditure, $768 ; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively,
$36.57 and $77.26. This school being a newly organized school has its 21 pupils reckoned as
new. Since the resignation of the late teacher, no one has been found willing to accept the
vacant school, the cost of living, travelling expenses, and the small number of children being
the deterrent causes.
Saanich, North.—Salary, $70 per month. Inspection, 8th and 9th of February, and
18th August, 1882. Teacher, B. H. Smith, M.A. Enrolled : Boys, 26 ; girls, 22; total, 48 :
average number attending monthly, 36 ; average daily attendance, 26.69 ; percentage of regular
attendance, 74. Expenditure, $1,089; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $22.68 and $40.80.    Fifteen pupils of 1880-81 have left, and there are 12 46 Vic Public Schools Report. 209
new pupils. Present at inspection, 25, 25, and 10. On the 8th and 9th February the school
was examined orally—viz., 4 in the 4th Reader, 15 in 3rd, 3 in 2nd, and 6 in 1st Reader. In
the August examination, that corresponding with the examination in other districts, the school
was temporarily held at the Agricultural Hall while the school-house was being enlarged. Of
the 10 present, 2 of the average age of 12 obtained an average of 41 per cent, in theB papers,
and there were examined orally 1 in 4th, 2 in 3rd, 2 in 2nd, and 3 in 3rd Reader. The
merging of the two day-about schools into one central school during the past year will soon
have the effect of improving the attendance as well as the attainments of the pupils.
Saanich, East-South.—Salary, $70 per month. Inspection, 7th and 8th February, 17th
August, 1882. Teacher, S. D. Pope, B.A. Enrolled: Boys, 35; girls, 32; total, 67; average
number attending monthly, 49; average daily attendance, 39.56; percentage of regular attendance, 84. Expenditure, $987.25; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $14.74 and $24.95. Fourteen pupils of 1880-81 have left, and there are 12 new pupils.
Present at inspection, 42, 39, 40. The results of the first and second examination respectively
stand as follows:—11 of the average age of 14 years, and 7 of the average age of 13, obtained
averages of 61 and 65 per cent, in the A papers ; 6 of the average age of 13, and 3 of the
average age of 13| obtained averages of 48 and 48 per cent, in the B papers; and 6 of the
average age of 12§, and 4 of the average age of 12-f, obtained 47 and 59 per cent, in the C
papers. There were also examined orally 11 and 11 in 3rd Reader, 6 and 4 in 2nd Reader,
and 3 and 10 in 1st Reader. Carey Pope and Walter Thomson passed the standard required
for admission to the High School on the first occasion, and Emily Mitchell, Fred. Turgoose,
and Hattie Pope on the second. This school is a credit to the teacher and the people of the
district.    The school-house has been recently enlarged.
Saanich, West-South.—Salary, $50 per month, Inspection, 9th February and 22nd
September, 1882. Teacher to 30th June, Miss McNaughten; present teacher, S. F. Crawford.
Enrolled : Boys, 26 ; girls, 13 ; total, 29 ; average number attending monthly, 26 ; average
daily attendance, 17.97; percentage of regular attendance, 71$. Expenditure, $677.62;
cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $17.37 and $37.71.
Seven pupils of 1880-81 have left, and there are 5 new pupils. Present at inspection, 12, 14.
None of those present on the first occasion were able to pass a written examination, those who
might have taken the papers being absent on account of the inclemency of the weather. On
the 22nd September, of the 14 jiresent, 4 examined in the C papers obtained 23$ per cent.,
and there were examined orally 1 in 3rd, 4 in 2nd, and 5 in 1st Readers.
Salt Spring Island.—(North Settlement Branch and Central Settlement Branch).
Salary, $60 per month. Inspection, 7th March. Teacher to March, 1882, S. G. Lewis;
present teacher, J. Shaw.
North Settlement Branch.—Enrolled: Boys, 0; Girls, 6; total, 6; average number
attending monthly, 5; average daily attendance,  3.80; percentage of regular attendance, 68.
Central Settlement Branch.—Enrolled: Boys, 12; Girls, 4; total, 16; average number attending monthly, 12; average daily attendance, 6.95; percentage of regular attendance, 63.
Expenditure, $506.75; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $23.03
and $47.14. Present at inspection, none. Having been notified by the trustees that they had
dismissed the teacher, and intended to close the school until there was a prospect of better
attendance, I. visited the school for the purpose of examining it before it closed. Although the
teacher's services might have been utilized for a month after the notice of his dismissal was
given him, the children ceased attending as soon as the fact became known. These two day-
about schools are now merged into a single school, and the attendance has risen to a daily
average of over 16.    Several families have recently settled on this part of the Island.
Sooke.--Salary, $50 per month. Inspection, 20th June. Teacher, Miss H. Jackson.
Enrolled: Boys, 13; Girls, 13: total, 26; average number attending monthly, 16; average
daily attendance, 10.51; percentage of regular attendance, 66. Expenditure, $639.96; cost of
each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $24.61 and $60.90. Four pupils of
1880-81 who have left are replaced by nine new pupils, Present at inspection, 10, of whom
one, 15 years of age, and who had previously passed the High School examination, obtained
nearly 85 per cent, in the A; two, of the average age of 11$, an average of nearly 68 per cent,
in the C papers. There were also examined orally, 1 in 3rd, 2 in 2nd, and 4 in 1st Readers,
Tho school is doing well except in point of numbers. 210
Public Schools Report.
1882
Sumass.—Salary, $50 per month. Inspection, 24th August, 1882. Teacher, Miss Pollard.
Enrolled: Boys, 21; Girls, 19; total, 40; average number attending monthly, 26; average daily
attendance, 17.60; percentage of regular attendance, 66. Expenditure, $619.19; cost of each
pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $15.48 and $35.18. Four pupils of 1880-81
who have left are replaced by 18 new pupils. Present at inspection, 22; of whom one, 11
years of age, obtained 51 per cent, in theC papers; and there were examined orally, 2 in 4th,
4 in 2nd, and 15 in 1st Readers. This school being in the flooded country was not inspected
in June. The water carried away its outhouses and fences, and had it risen slightly higher,
would, no doubt, have carried away the school-house also.
Trenant.—Salary, $50 per month. Inspection, 22nd and 23rd August, 1882. Teacher
to 30th November, 1881, Miss Norris; present teacher, Miss A. J. McDougall. Enrolled:
Boys, 12; Girls, 10; total, 22; average number attending monthly, 13; average daily attendance, 8.87; percentage of regular attendance, 56. Expenditure, $372; cost of each pupil on
total and average attendance respectively, $16.91 and $41.47. Seven pupils of 1880-81 have
left, and there is one new pupil. Present at inspections, 12 and 13; of the 13, one, 15 years
of age, obtained 54$ per cent, in the A; two, of the average age of 13$, an average of 32 per
cent, in the B, and three, of the average age of 11$, an average of nearly 41 per cent, in the C.
There were also examined orally, 3 in 3rd and 4 in 1st Readers. The school was closed for
want of attendance at the end of November, but was re-opened on 1st May, 1882, with a
better result.    It makes a very creditable showing of the few pupils it has.
Victoria Schools (High School, Boys' School, and Girls' School).—Teachers, 12. Enrolled:
Boys, 391; Girls, 329; total, 720; average number attending monthly, 523; average daily
attendance, 410.09; percentage of regular attendance, 78$. Expenditure, $13,514.84; cost of
each pupil on total and average attendance respectively, $18.77 and $32.70.
High School.—Salaries: Principal, $110; Second Master, $85 per month. Teachers:
Principal, J. H. McLaughlin; Second Master, R. Offerhaus. Visits, 34. Enrolled: Boys, 39
Girls, 35; total, 74; average number attending monthly, 52; average daily attendance, 45.07
average percentage of regular attendance, 88. Twenty-seven pupils of 1880-81 have left, and
there are 25 new pupils. The semi-annual examinations of the school were held at the usual
time, at Christmas and Midsummer, and of which the results are given in the following tabulated form :—
Number
Examined.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Age.
Average percentage of
Answering.
Promoted.
22
15
10
11
13
7
9
18
9
16
16}
14J
14
48
43J
43§
44f
19
Do.             June, 1882.
29
22
5
4
Junior Division. Christmas, 1881.
Do.          ' June, 1882.
The average attendance has not been as high as for the previous year, owing to the unusual
number of those who have entered into the various avocations of life. In addition to the
usual subjects of the course, Greek (an optional subject) has been taken up as a study by eight
pupils. Good progress has also been made in the study of French. The introduction of
German would be very desirable, especially in the case of those of that parentage.
Both departments of this school have been very efficiently conducted, and the conduct and
deportment, and general progress of the pupils has been such as to reflect credit upon teachers
and pupils.
Boys' School.—Salaries : Principal, $90; 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Assistant respectively,
$80, $70, $60 and $50. Teachers : Principal, J. McKenzie ; 1st Assistant, J. A. Halliday ;
2nd Assistant, J. H. Thain ; 3rd Assistant, Miss Gowen; 4th Assistant to 30th June, Mrs.
Leigh, present 4th Assistant, Miss E. Holloway. Visits 32. Enrolled : Boys, 352 ; total,
352; average number attend in,■;■ monthly, 258; average daily attendance, 205.00; percentage
of regular attendance, 80. 114 pupils of 1880-81 have left and there are 88 new pupils.
The semi-annual examinations were held at Christmas and Midsummer, of which the results
are given in the following tabiiiated form :— 46 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
211
Average
No. Examined.
Average Age.
Papers.
percentage
of Answering.
No. Promoted.
34
13
A
47
6
1st Division, Christmas,  1881.
39
US
B
39
1
2nd     do.             do.           do.
39
10|
C
44
7
3rd      do.             do.           do.
52
9
D
37
6
4th     do.            do.          do.
48
?l
E
66
4
5th     do.            do.          do.
12
14
A
51J
3
1st Division, 1st Class, June, 1882.
9
13
-     47
1
Do.     do.     2nd   do.          do.
20
12
B
61
M
2nd     do.     1st    do.           do.
13
12 nearly
49
Do.     do.     2nd   do.           do.
24
11}
C
56
}l3{
3rd     do.     1st     do.          do.
18
10£
Hi
Do.     do.     2nd   do.           do.
28
28
94
8i
D
M
H
4th     do.     1st     do.          do.
Do.    do.     2nd   do.           do.
55
7
E
78J
13
5th     do.                             do.
The following passed the standard required for admission to the High School, at Christmas, 1881 :—Edward Hayward, head of the school; W. Duck, Thos. Gore, C. C. Lane, R.
Langley and W. McLaughlin ; and at Midsummer, 1882—Edwin Smith, head of school; Fred.
Jackson and W. T. Williams, or 9 for the year 1881-82. Much attention has been given to
penmanship and great improvement has been made in it under Mr. Thain's very efficient
teaching. The increase of the school in popular favour has over crowded the lower division
of the school and it will no doubt soon be necessary to have a 5th assistant teacher. The
grading of the school is improving year by year. The general interests of the school are very
well attended to by the Principal, Mr. McKenzie, no trouble or pains being spared by him in
all matters tending to its good.
Girls' School.—Salaries : Principal, $80 ; 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Assistants respectively,
$70, $70, $55, $45. Teachers : Principal, Miss E. A. Williams ; 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Assistants respectively, Mrs. Chandler, Mrs. Caldwell, Miss Richardson and Miss Lizzie Smith.
Visits, 26. Enrolled: Girls, 352; total 352; average number attending monthly, 212 ; average
daily attendance 160.02 ; percentage of regular attendance, 75$. Eighty pupils of 1880-81
have left and they are replaced by 80 new pupils, The semi-annual examinations of the
school were held simultaneously with those in the boys' school, with the following result:—
Average
No. Examined.
Average Age.
Papers.
percentage
of Answering.
No. Promoted.
28
14
A
46
2
1st Division, Christmas, 1881.
26
12
B
48
4
2nd      do.          do.         do.
39
104
0
34
i
3rd       do.           do.         do.
26
94
D
28
4
4th        do.           do.         do.
32
8
E
64
2
5th        do.           do.         do.
15
14
A
m
5
1st Division, 1st Class, June, 1882.
8
13
54
6
Do.     do.       2nd   do.           do.
18
12
B
60
9
2nd    do.      1st    do.          do.
9
13
48
6
Do.     do.      2nd   do.           do.
26
11
C
49
8
3rd    do.       1st    do.           do.
15
10J
824
0
Do.     do.      2nd   do.          do.
34
11
D
31
8
4th    do.       1st    do.           do.
12
9
22
5
Do.    do.      2nd  do.          do.
17
8
E
86
14
5th    do.                                do.
The following passed the standard required for admission to the High School, at Christmas,
1881 : Emma Wood, head of school, and Shirley V. Leigh; and at Midsummer, 1882 : Elizabeth Jane Workman, head of school, Helen Louisa Bailey, Cordelia M. Sims, Anne Louisa
Storey and Alice Williams, or 7 for the year 1881-82.
The grading of the school is improving, and very thorough and efficient teaching in the
ordinary branches of study as well as in vocal music and linear drawing is done in most of its
divisions.
Wellington.—Salaries, Principal, $60; Assistant, $50. Inspections, 16th September,
8th December, 1881, llth and 12th May, 1882. Principal to 30th April, 1882, F. Carmichael;
present Principal, J. Mundell; Assistant, Miss F. M. Jones. Enrolled : Boys, 66 ; girls, 57 ;
total, 123 ; average number attending monthly, 75 ;   average daily attendance, 52.61;   per- 212 Public Schools Report. 1882
centage of regular attendance, 71. Expenditure, $2,072.35 ; cost of each pupil on total and
average attendance respectively, $16.85 and $39.39. Twenty-three pupils of 1880-81 who
have left are replaced by 56 new pupils. Present at inspections, 44, 49, 63 and 64. The
results of the first and second examinations respectively, stand as follows : 6 and 7 of the
average ages of 13 and 11$ years obtained 52 and 40$ per cent, in the A ; 9 and 8 of the
average ages of 10$ and 10$ obtained 23$ and 20 per cent, in the B, and on the last occasion,
11 of the average age of 10 years obtained 19 per cent, in the C. There were examined orally
36 and 40 in Second and First Readers. The reading of the pupils in the junior department of
the school was of a much better character than in the senior. The penmanship of the school
bears the stamp of good training. At the first examination, Jennie Ramsay and Edna Wall
passed the standard required for admission to the High School. The addition of a wing to the
old building has doubled the accommodation.
Williams Lake.—Salary, $60 per month. No inspection. Teacher, H. Bird. Enrolled:
Boys, 20 ; girls, 4 ; total, 24; average number attending monthly, 17 ; average daily attendance, 16.41 ; percentage of regular attendance, 97 ; expenditure $755.75 ; cost of each pupil
on total and average attendance respectively, $31.49 and 46.05. No pupils of 1880-81 have
left and there are 4 new pupils.
This school has the highest percentage of regular attendance of any school in the Province,
those attending at any time being seldom or never absent.
Yale.—Salary, $60 per month. Inspection, 9th and 12th June. Teacher to 30th June,
J. Boag; present teacher, J. Irwin. Enrolled : Boys, 36; girls, 29 ; total, 65 ; average
number attending monthly, 34; average daily attendance, 27.46; percentage of regular
attendance, 80. Expenditure, $1,432.75; cost of each pupil on total and average attendance
respectively, $22.04 and $52.17. This school not having been in operation for a year, has its
65 pupils reckoned as new ones. Present at inspection, 35 and 32. None were able to pass a
written examination. There were examined orally, 15 in Third Reader, of whom 3 read well,
5 indifferently well and 7 badly (some of them very badly). In dictation, spelling and
punctuation, 2 did well and the rest badly. In the other subjects of the course they were very
backward. The 15 in Second and 5 in First, were also backward with 2 or 3 exceptions.
Arithmetic seemed to be the principal subject taught in the school, but with a very poor
result. Considering the proximity of most of the children to the school-house, the number of
those who were unpunctual on the days of the visit was greater than it should have been.
The former school-house having been burned down, the school was closed for a year and until
the present building was erected.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
0. C. McKenzie,
Superintendent of Education.
Education Office,
December 2nd, 1882. 46 Vio. Public Schools Report. 213
PART   II.
STATISTICAL  RETURNS. 214
Public Schools Report.
1882
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Public Schools Report.
225
TABLE H.
Education Branch of the Provincial Secretary's Department.
 o	
Expenditure for the Year ending 30th June, 1882.
Salary of Superintendent of Education $1,500 00
Tra\ elling Expenses of Superintendent of Education        251 50
School Requisites (Maps, &e.) and Incidental Expenses        325 50
Examiners of Public School Teachers       200 00
      2,277 00
Amount Expended on Public Schools (Educational Department)       46,991 63
Amount Expended on Public Schools (Lands and Works Department)        9,246 04
Total Expenditure     358,514 67
TABLE I.—Comparative Annual Expenditure in School Districts,
from 1872-73 to 1881-82.
School Districts.
1872-73.
1873-74.
1874-75.
1875-76.
1876-77.
1877-78.
1878-79.
1879-80.
1880-81.
1881-82.
Total.
§ 602 50
340 00
1,112 50
§ 625 00
697 63
695 00
7,065 73
430 00
8 434 63
560 00
600 00
2,227 52
574 00
S 720 00
560 25
610 50
6,871 33
718 75
8 815 00
640 00
650 00
1,616 60
640 00
* 892 25
452 50
660 00
1,700 00
436 43
9 726 05
556 87
615 50
1,450 00
544 57
1,249 20
587 62
746 04
1,575 00
630 00
§1,250 00
629 12
206 25
1,981 15
644 25
590 00
896 25
618 89
695 12
770 50
629 87
627 00
740 00
697 00
777 05
640 00
819 75
5 25
674 41
566 13
646 12
81,139 08
645 20
736 50
1,775 03
633 96
625 47
895 75
554 71
1,416 27
760 75
347 00
647 00
647 37
636 73
807 50
691 72
1,496 22
534 68
726 59
646 85
596 99
9  8,452 71
5,459 20
7,192 29
26,262 36
5,251 96
1,215 47
Cedar Hill	
2,173 25
888 25
1,115 75
450 00
660 00
10 50
37 00
7;o oo
710 00
660 00
780 00
940 75
764 25
929 00
682 75
7 00
657 00
457 00
607 00
797 50
S55 00
647 50
960 00
780 00
699 68
640 00
390 00
640 00
770 00
910 53
640 75
768 62
545 91
625 50
619 75
749 37
711 00
776 50
297 25
780 50
643 00
718 13
739 22
885 25
74S 52
748 75
841 13
754 74
773 38
598 50
3,216 12
2,133 78
830 75
65 00
755 00
655 00
829 22
582 75
708 81
640 50
464 50
576 00
687 75
635 75
677 50
620 55
618 50
539 25
633 50
413 00
623 10
459 10
662 00
715 00
676 13
670 69
5 25
575 00
5,486 64
2,121 63
713 75
513 46
598 97
876 75
669 16
785 87
708 50
484 00
647 87
795 00
690 00
785 12
626 73
710 05
55 25
711 60
553 25
649 50
300 00
711 29
1,637 57
762 25
761 25
5 25
668 25
3,741 IS
2,585 39
781 75
251 62
664 50
615 65
10,381 50
4,928 00
Chilliwhack	
Clinton	
395 00
1,514 75
630 00
60 50
620 00
787 00
709 25
400 00
780 00
7,938 69
6,474 66
3,914 56
1.171 62
1,190 00
805 50
1,889 50
7,083 24
Cowichan, North	
Cowichan, South ....
7,075 74
6,482 98
8,840 67
2,876 25
1,278 75
320 00
530 00
660 52
697 50
913 00
672 63
697 50
570 00
600 00
608 00
555 26
660 00
530 00
317 00
30 00
770 00
730 00
570 00
500 00
735 25
600 00
2,677 16
2,301 55
810 00
698 00
560 00
650 00
710 00
580 00
1,180 00
791 00
660 00
510 00
645 25
620 25
648 75
2,373 75
2,465 50
778 00
717 00
520 00
640 00
1,430 00
610 60
770 00
827 50
650 00
695 00
640 00
250 00
640 00
2,940 00
2,130 00
770 00
8,639 77
4,455 21
6,641 63
8,808 97
6,004 96
3,487 62
920 84
379 00
714 44
645 00
670 00
727 50
709 98
958 32
760 00
765 74
5 25
651 25
3,610 05
2,910 08
756 80
566 87
646 06
631 97
688 05
771 25
759 77
814 60
5 25
635 49
3,962 41
5,109 41
768 72
637 28
629 25
1,014 71
768 00
1,089 00
987 25
677 62
506 75
639 96
7,474 43
8,012 27
6,929 83
5,570 91
1,626 60
1,032 00
3,811 76
2,676 38
690 00
2,063 76
1,870 00
6,739 24
Nanaimo	
New Westminster ...
33,882 82
26,203 72
6,209 77
1,520 77
5,134 84
560 00
700 00
546 63
645 25
820 00
448 32
5,309 87
768 00
Saanich, North	
Saanich, East-South .
500 00
1,386 37
649 85
1,000 00
280 00
900 00
175 00
1,034 00
427 00
1,360 00
691 75
900 00
615 25
779 00
786 75
909 00
748 58
889 00
1,095 36
756 25
533 51
661 00
5,963 18
10,144 62
1,772 98
Salt Spring Island ...
617 50
1,361 12
650 00
675 00
620 00
610 00
498 75
661 25
414 i<3
640 00
759 50
608 25
740 26
600 00
632 50
614 25
2,437 75
7,905 19
771 85
691 75
584 08
646 25
540 00
507 00
227 97
2,470 50
7,260 14
672 75
736 25
630 04
832 00
74 75
638 29
75 00
2,583 54
8,035 06
775 25
6,250 91
7,043 21
2,879 51
1,214 75
833 50
772 50
475 00
522 50
180 00
357 00
757 00
602 50
700 00
2,390 25
6,936 00
700 00
647 00
484 42
11,735 95
768 75
757 81
60 09
5 25
619 19
372 00
13,514 84
2,072 35
755 75
1,432 75
5 25
6,131 98
3,885 64
Victoria High School
Victoria Public do.
7,199 00
6,624 50
6,409 17
760 00
29,814 48
976 25
7,497 20
1,513 56
Yale	
680 50
1,033 00
917 00
400 00
908 75
545 25
780 00;
250 00
808 12
	
689 78
5 25
739 50
5 25
8,049 40
1,216 25
1 226
Public Schools Report.
1882
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Public Schools Report.
1882
TABLE 0.—Description and Estimated Value of  School Property.
Districts.
Barkerville	
Burgoyne Bay.
Burrard Inlet.
Burton's Prairie.
Cache  Creek	
Cedar, North.
Cedar, South.
Cedar Hill ...
Cheam	
Chilliwhack.
Clinton ..
Colwood
Comox.
Cowichan, North
Cowichan, South.
Craigflower
Description of Lands.
School-house rented from B.  C. Express Co., at
$10 per month	
One acre given by Mr. Sparrow for school purposes. School-house built by Government,
with some aid from settlers, in 1873	
School-house erected by Government in 1873. The
site belongs to the mill proprietors, and is not
yet conveyed to the school trustees	
Twenty acres donated by Messrs. Campbell &
Parke for boarding school purposes. School-
house built by Government in 1873 ; was enlarged in 1875	
Pour acres Government land. School-house and
teacher's residence built by the Government,
aided by settlers, in 1874, are on Mr. Stove's land
School-house built on Railway reserve	
Two acres—one donated by Dr. Tolmie, and the
other purchased by the residents from the
Bishop of Columbia. School-house built by
Government in '1872. Teacher's residence
erected in 1876, for which the teacher pays
$7.50 per month rent	
One acre given by Mr.  Nelmes.
built by Government in 1875..
School-house
Half-acre given by Mr. J. Kipp, in exchange for
old school site, also given by him. New school
house built in 1881 ,	
Two town lots—School Reserve,
built by Government in 1873 ..
School-house
One acre donated by Mr. A. Peatt for public
school purposes. School-house built by Government in 1875	
One acre given by the Bishop of Columbia for a
school site. School-house erected by Government in 1873	
One hundred acres of Government land on which
school-house was erected in 1872	
Half-section of land was applied for by Trustees,
but not granted on account of Railroad Belt
Reservation. One school-house built in 1881.
The other school-house is built on the Nanaimo
road, near the junction of Kelvin creek with
the Kokasailah river	
Five acres granted by the Puget Sound Company
marked on the official map as a "School Reserve." School-house and teacher's residence
built by the Hudson Bay Company in 1854.
Cost afterwards refunded by Colonial Government. The building was thoroughly repaired
in 1872 by the Government	
Carried forward.
Approximate
value of
Land.
50
100
750
900
Approximate
value of
Buildings.
500
750
7,400
500
125
750
1,500
Total value.
500
750
7,400
500
125
1,500
1,500
500
500
700
750
800
800
750
600
600
600
700
150
150
250
50
2,250
16,625 17,525 46 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
281
TABLE 0.—Description and Estimated Value of School Property.— Continued.
Districts.
Description of Lands.
Approximate
value of
Land.
Approximate
value of
Buildings.
Total value.
$   900
160
$16,625
250
800
500
$17,525
Denman Island	
School-house built by Government on unsuvveyed
land in 1878	
410
School-house built in July, 1881, on Government
800
Two acres donated by Mr. John Kemp.    School-
house and teacher's residence erected by Gov-
500
School building and site the property of Hastings
Mill Company.    Used for school purposes free
School-house built by Government on part of  lot
750
600
400
600
700
750
One fourth acre given by the late Mr.  Bailey;
School-house built by the Vancouver Island
600
School-house built on unsurveyed land by Gov-
400
Half-acre given by the  H. B. Co.      School-house
built by the British  Columbian Government,
600
700
Half-acre given by Mr. H. Dawson.   School-house
500
400
1,000
3,750
3,000
3,5001
2,500/
800
500
School-house built by Government on unsurveyed
land in 1874	
400
One acre given for public school purposes by the
late Mr. John Whittey.    School-house erected
1,000
4,000
3,650
.   8,500
Boys' school—Two town lots given by Vancouver
Coal Company ; school-house erected by Gov-
250
650
2,500
Girls' school—Five town lots purchased from the
Vancouver Coal Company.    School erected by
New Westminster..
Six acres of ground—School reserve.     School-
house built in  1865 by  the   Government of
New school-house built in 1882	
Two school-houses—one near the junction of Cold-
water with the Nicola, and the other about a
800
One acre donated by Mr. W. Smithson.    School-
750
750
4,460
37,425
41,885
16 282
Public Schools Report.
1882
TABLE O.—Description and Estimated Value of School Property.—CbrerfMcieti.
Districts.
Prairie	
Quesnellemouth.
North Saanich..
South Saanich, East.
South Saanich, West,
Salt Spring Island.
Sooke.
Stanley.
Sumass .
Surrey,..
Trenant.
Victoria.
Wellington.
Williams Lake.
Yale...	
York	
Description of Lands.
Amount brought forward.
School-house burnt down in 1880; re-built in 1881.
One-half acre given by Messrs. Cudlip & Clarke.
One acre given by Mr. Richard Johns for a public
school site. School-house erected by Government in 1873	
Two acres donated by Mr. Turgoose for public
school purposes. School-house built by Government in 1873, and teacher's residence removed from old school site and rebuilt in 1876.
One acre given by Mr. George Stelly, and one by
Mr. J. Sluggett. School-house built by Gov,
eminent in 1880. Teacher's residence built by
the settlers	
One hundred acres granted by the Government of
the day for public buildings. School-house
erected on this land by the Government, aided
by the settlers, in 1863 or 1864	
The other school-house built in the same way, on
an acre of ground given by Mr. G. Baker for
school purposes	
One acre given for a public school site by Mr. J.
Muir, sen. School-house erected by Government in 1872	
Assembly hall of Welsh Mining Co.  used as a
school-house ; rent free	
Half-acre donated by Mr. Geo. Chadsey. School
house built by Government, aided by the set
tiers, in 1872	
Half-acre given by Mr. Shannon.
Approximate
value of
Land.
$4,460
Approximate
value of
Buildings.
One hundred and sixty acres—School Reserve.
School-house built by Government in 1874	
Ten acres at the head of Yates street, granted by
the Honourable the Hudson Bay Company,
marked on the official map as a "School Reserve." High School building erected by the
Hudson Bay Company in 1851 or 1852, the cost
afterwards defrayed by the Colonial Government.    Public School (brick) erected in 1875..
Wing (brick) built for High School in 1882	
800
Two town lots given by the Coal Co. School
house erected by Government in 1874. Enlarged in 1881 at a cost of $750	
Building belonging to Mr. Hamilton ;   rent free.
Fitted up as a school-house at a cost of $300. ..
Two town lots—School Reserve.     School-house
burnt down in 1880, rebuilt in 1881	
School-house built by Government, on unsurveyed
land, in 1874	
Total.
$37,425
500
850
2,000
750
300
300
750
750
500
JTotal value.
$41,885
500
7,500
100
12,860
25,000 \
4,500/
1,500
700
400
76,225
850
2,000
750
300
300
750
750
1,300
37,000
1,500
800
400
1,085 46 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
233
TABLE P.—District;   dates of creation ; boundaries.
Districts.
Barkerville ...
Burgoyne Bay
Burrard Inlet	
Burton's Prairie
Date of creation.
28th- June, 1881 ..
3rd October, 1873.
27th June, 1870
26th April, 1882
Cache Creek	
Cedar and Cranberry,
South
Cedar and Cranberry,
North
27th May, 1880.
llth February, 1874....
Name changed from Cedar and re-defined, 27th
May, 1880.
Boundaries.
Circle within radius of 3 miles from Court House, Richfield.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at a point
about midway between the head of Ganges Bay and
Beaver Point, on the South side; thence running Westerly, along the summit of the Otter Range, to the seashore ; thence following the shore line, Southerly, to the
point of commencement, and including Moresby, Russell, and Portland Islands.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference
of a circle whose centre shall be the school-house on the
North side of the said Inlet, and whose radius shall be
a distance of three miles from such school-house; excepting always any of the land on the South side of the
Inlet.
Commencing at a point where the line between Sections
22 and 23, Township No. 17, intersects the right bank
of Fraser River; thence due North for a distance of two
miles 33 chains, more or less, to a point on the First
Correction Line, being the North-west corner of Section
35, Township No. 17; thence East, along said Correction Line for a distance of seven chains and forty links,
more or less, to the South-west corner of Section 2,
Township No. 18; thence due North, for a distance of
three miles, to the North-west corner of Section 14,
Township No. 18; thence true East, for a distance of
six miles; thence true South, for a distance of three
miles, to the South-west corner of Section 2, Township
No. 21; thence due West, along the First Correction
Line for a distance of seven chains sixty-three links,
more or less, to the North-west corner of Section 35,
Township No. 20; thence due South, for a distance of
four miles; thence due West for a distance of six miles,
to the South-west corner of Section 14, Township No.
17; thence due North, along the line hetween Sections
14, 15, 22, and 23, Township No. 17, for a distance of
one mile twenty-five chains, more or less, to its intersection with the left bank of Fraser River.
Not defined.
Commencing at the South-west corner of Cranberry District; thence East, along the Southern boundary of
Cranberry and Cedar District, to the coast line; thence
North-west, along the coast line, to the North-east
corner of Section 12, Range 5, Cedar District; thence
West, along the section line, to the North-west corner
of Section 12, Range 1, Cranberry District; thence
South, along the Western boundary of Cranberry District, to the point of commencement.
Commencing at the North-west corner of South Cedar
and Cranberry School District; thence East, along the
Northern boundary of said District, to the shore line;
thence North-west, along the shore line, to the mouth
of Chase River; thence South to the North-east corner
of Section 20, Range 4, Cranberry District; thence West
along the Northern boundary of Cranberry District, to
its North-west corner; thence South, along the Western
boundary of Cranberry District, to the point of commencement. 234
Public Schools Report.
1882
TABLE P.—Districts ; dates of creation ; boundaries,—Continued.
Districts.
Date of creation.
Boundaries.
Cedar Hill .
25th June, 1869
Boundaries altered 1st
June, 1878.
Re-defined 27th May,
1880.
Cheam
26th November, 1874
Chilliwhack.
10th August, 1874.
Clinton..
Colwood.
25th June. 1869...
3rd October, 1873.
Comox	
Cowichan, North
Cowichan,  South
Craigflower	
30th July, 1870.
16th June, 1870.
16th June, 1869.
23rd July, 1870.
Boundaries   altered  1st
June, 1878.
Commencing at the South-east corner of Section 10,
Victoria District; thence Northerly, along the Eastern
boundary of Sections 10, 81, 14, and 50, to the Southern
boundary of Section 82; thence Easterly, along the
Northern boundaries of Sections 49 and 64, to the
Saanich Road; thence in a Northerly direction, along
said Road, to the boundary line between Victoria and
Lake Districts; thence following said boundary, in a
North-easterly direction, to the sea shore at Cordova
Bay; thence following the shore line, in a Southerly and
South easterly direction, to the South-east corner of
Section 11; thence in a Westerly direction, following
the Northern boundary of Victoria School District, to
the point of commencement.
Commencing at a point at the North-east corner of Chilliwhack School District, on the Fraser River; thence in
a Southerly direction along said boundary, passing Elk
Creek Bridge, to the Mountain Range; thence in an
Eastern direction along said Mountain Range, about
seven miles, to a point due South of the Indian village
at Cheam; thenee in a Northerly direction to the Fraser
River at Cheam; thence in a Westerly direction down
said River to the point of commencement.
All that tract of land within the lines commencing at a
point at the North-eastern boundary of Sumass School
District; thence Southerly, following said boundary, to
base of the Sumass Range of Mountains; thence Northeasterly along the said Range, for a distance of about
six miles; thence in a Northerly direction, crossing Elk
Creek Bridge, to the Fraser River; thenco Westerly to
the point of commencement.
Not defined.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the
North end of Parson's Bridge ; thence following Rowe
Stream to the boundary line between Sections 97 and
98; thence in a Northerly direction, along the Eastern
boundary of Section 98, to the boundary between Highland and Esquimalt Districts; thence Westerly, along
said boundary line, to the North-west corner of Section
14; thence South-westerly, to the South-east corner of
Section 100; thence in a South-easterly direction, to
South-west corner of Section 51; thence along the section line, between Sections 50 and 51, to the shore at
Royal Bay; thence North-easterly, along the shore line
to the Southern end of Parson's Bridge; thence along
the said bridge to the point of commencement.
All that piece of land known on the Official Map as the
District of Comox.
The Districts of Somenos and Comiaken and those por-
tions of the Quamichan and Cowichan Districts which
are situated North of the Cowichan River.
The District of Shawnigan, and those portions of the
Cowichan and Quamichan Districts which are situate
to the South of the Cowichan River.
Commencing at the South-west extremity of Cedar Hill
School District and following the Western boundary of
said district to where it strikes the Southern boundary
of Lake School District; thence along the boundary of 46 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
235
TABLE P.—Districts; dafes of creation ; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
Denman Island.
Esquimalt	
Gabriola .
Granville
Hope
Lake .
Date of creation.
17th August, 1877.
22nd October, 1870.
10th August, 1872
12th February, 1873 ..
25th February, 1871
25th June, 1869
Boundaries altered 1st
June, 1878.
Re-defined 27th May,
1880.
Lake La Hache.
30th July, 1875.
Boundaries.
said district to the North west corner of Section 116;
thence along section line, between 116 and 117, West,
to the line between R. 1 W. and R. 0 W., South, to the
boundary line between Lake and Esquimalt Districts;
thence West, to the North-east corner of Section 98,
marked on the Official Map as "Government Reserve ;"
thence along the East line of said Reserve and Mill
River to Parson's Bridge; thence along the water line
of Esquimalt Harbour, South-easterly, to the Southwestern corner of Section 26, Esquimalt District ;
thence in a straight line to the South-western extremity
of Section 10; thence along the Southern boundary line
of said section to Victoria Arm; thence North to the
point of commencement.
All that tract of land known as Denman Island.
All that piece of land included within the following limits,
viz.: Commencing at the western extremity of the south
boundary line of the Craigflower School District; then
southerly and easterly along the shore line of Esquimalt
Harbour and Fuca Straits, and northerly along the water
line of Victoria Harbour to the south-eastern extremity
of the said Craigflower School District; then along the
southern boundary line of the said district to the point
of commencement.
The Islands of Gabriola and Mudge.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference
of a circle whose centre shall be the school-house on the
South side of Burrard Inlet, and whose radius shall be
a distance of three miles from such school-house; excepting always any land on the North side of said Inlet.
All that piece of land comprised within a circle having a
radius of three miles from the Court House.
Commencing at the North-east corner of Cedar Hill School
District, being a point where the boundary line between
Victoria and Lake Districts intersect the sea shore at
Cordova Bay; thence in a South-westerly direction, following the Northern boundary of Cedar Hill School
District, to the North-east corner of Section 50, Victoria
District; thence Westerly, along the Southern boundary
of Section 82, to Colquitz stream; thence following said
stream, in a Northerly direction, to its intersection with
the Northern boundary of Section 1, Lake District;
thence Westerly, along the Northern boundary of Section
1, to its North-west corner, being a point on the Eastern
boundary of Section 22; thence in a North-westerly
direction, across Section 22, to the North-east boundary
of Section 116; thence Westerly, along the Northern
boundary of Section 116, to the Western boundary of
Lake District; thence North, along said boundary, to
the South-west corner of Section 127 ; thence East, along
tho Southern boundary of Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58,
to the South-west corner of Section 53; thence North,
along the Western boundary of Sections 53, 54, and 55,
to the Southern boundary of South Saanich District;
thence East, along said boundary, to the sea shore;
thence following the sea shore, in a South-easterly direction, to the point of commencement.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of six miles in length from the
school-house, situate at the 114 mile-post on the Cariboo
Road as the centre of such circle, 236
Public Schools Report.
1882
TABLE P.—Districts ; dates of creation ; boundaries.—Continued.
Districts.
Langley
Lillooet 	
Lytton	
Maple Ridge
Matsqui ..
Metchosin
Nanaimo	
New Westminster
Nicola Valley ...
Date of creation.
30th April, 1871
22nd October, 1870 ..
20th November, 1869
31st July, 1874 .;....
8th April, 1871.
30th July, 1870
4th June, 1870
31st July, 1874
North Ann
17th August, 1877
Boundaries.
Starting on the left bank of the Fraser, at the extreme
North-west corner of the town site of Derby; thence in a
right line Southerly, 4-g- miles; thence Easterly, parallel
with the river, 6 miles; thence in a right line back to
the river and acrosis the Fraser, and also extending a
distance inward of half a mile ; thence down the right
bank of, and parallel with, the river, as far as Kanaka
Creek; thence down said creek to its confluence with
the Fraser at a point directly opposite the old Government buildings at Derby.
A radius of three miles from the Court House.
A radius of two miles from the Court House.
All that tract of land included within the lines commencing at the South-west corner of Section 3, Township No.
9, New Westminster District; thence in a Northerly
direction to the North-west corner of Section 34, Township No. 9, aforesaid; - thence in an easterly direction
to the North-east corner of Section 32, Township No.
12; New Westminster District; thence in a Southerly
direction to the point of intersection with the Langley
School District; thence following the Western boundary
of the Langley School District to the Northern boundary line of Townships 8 and 11, New Westminster
District; thence Westerly to the point of commencement.
Not defined.
The whole of the District of Metchosin according to the
Official Map, together with that portion of Esquimalt
District adjoining thereto which lies outside of the
boundary of the Craigflower School District.
AH that piece of land included within a circle having a
radius of three miles from the Court House.
A radius of two miles from Lytton Square, New Westminster.
Bounded on the East by a line drawn North and South
from the residence of William Charters in Nicola Valley,
and extending on each side of the Nicola River to the
natural boundaries of Nicola Valley; on the West by a
line drawn North and South from the residence of Byron
Earnshaw, and extending on each side of the Nicola
River to the natural boundaries of Nicola Valley afore-
t-aid, said Western boundary being about nine miles distant from the Eastern boundary; and on-the North and
South by the natural boundaries of the Nicola Valley.
Commencing at North-west corner of Lot 314, Group 1;
thence due North to Southern boundary of Lot 320;
thence North-westerly along the Northern boundary of
Muscjuiam Indian Reserve to Western boundary of Lot
320, Group 1; thence due North to North-west corner of
Lot 320; thence following Southern boundary of the
Hastings Saw Mill timber lease to North-west corner of
Lot 336, Group 1; thence due West along the Northern
boundary of Lots 336 and 337 to the North-cast corner
of 337; thence due South to the Northern boundary of
Lot 330 ; thence due West to the North-east corner of
Lot 258, Croup I; thence due South along Eeastern
boundary of Lot 258 to Norrt Arm of Fraser River, 46 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
237
TABLE P.—Districts; dates of creation; boundaries.— Continued.
Districts.
Date of creation.
Boundaries.
Okanagan
Prairie
31st July, 1874.
26th November, 1874
Quesnellemouth
14th April, 1881
Saanich, North.
Saanich, East-South
30th August, 1872	
Boundaries altered 3rd
October, 1873.
Re-defined 27th May '80
30th August, 1872	
Boundaries altered 3rd
October, 1873.
Re-defined 27th May '80
Name changed from
South Saanich.
Saanich, East-South
27th May, 1880
Then commencing at North-east corner of Section 15,
Block 5 North, Range 5 West, due South, to Range
line between Blocks 4 and 5 North; thence following
the said Range line, due West, to North Arm, Fraser
River, including Sea Island.
Commencing at a point at the mouth of Mission Creek ;
. thence Northerly along the shore of Okanagan Lake a
distance of five miles; thence Easterly a distance of five
miles; thence Southerly to Mission Creek; thence
Westerly to point of commencement.
Commencing at a point on the North-east corner of Section
13, Township 8, New Westminster District; thence in a
Westerly direction, three miles; thence in a Southerly
direction to the 49th parallel; thence in an Easterly
direction six miles along said parallel; thence in a
Northerly direction, about nine miles; thence in a
Westerly direction, three miles, to the point of commencement.
Commencing at the junction of the left banks of the
Fraser and Quesnelle Rivers, and running thence due
West a distance of one mile; thence due North six
miles; thence due East three miles; thence due South
six miles; thence due West two miles, to the point of
commencement.
All that portion of the Saanich Peninsula, lying to the
North of South Saanich District, as shown on the official
map, and known as the "North Saanich District."
Commencing at the North-east corner of the Lake School
District; thence West, along the Southern boundary of
South Saanich District, to the South-west corner of
Section 18, Range 3 E; thence North, along the said
range line, to the South-east corner of Section 12, Range
2 E. ; thence West, along the Southern boundary of
Section 12, R. 2 E, to its South-west corner; thence
- North, along the range line, to the South-west corner of
Section 4, Range 2 E.; thence West, along the Southern
boundary of Section 4, Range 1 E., to its South-west
corner; thence North, along the range line, to the Northwest corner of Section 1, Range 1 E.; thence East, along
the Southern boundary of North Saanich, to the sea
shore; thence following the sea shore, in a Southeasterly direction, to the point of commencement.
Commencing at the North-west corner of the Lake School
District; thence East, along the Southern boundary of
Sections 127, 83, 68, and 58, to the South-west corner
of Section 53, Lake District; thence North, along the
Western boundaries of Sections 53, 54, and 55, to the
Southern boundary of the East-South Saanich School
District; thence West, to theNorth-west cornerof Section
56, Lake District; thence North, following the Western
boundary of the. East-South Saanich School District, to
its intersection with the Southern boundary of North
Saanich District; thence West, along said Southern
boundary, to the sea shore at Saanich Inlet; thence
Southerly, along the shore line of Saanich Inlet and Tod
Creek, to the South-west corner of South Saanich District; thence South, along the Western boundary of
Sections 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, Lake District, to
the point of commencement. 238
Public Schools Report.
1882
Salt Spring Island
Sooke 	
Stanley   	
Stuart's Lake	
Sumass	
Surrey	
30th July, 1870
23rd May, 1872...
17th August, 1877
17th August, 1877
13th October, 1871
28th July, 1882...
Trenant
3rd October, 1873
Victoria
25th June, 1809
Boundaries altered 1st
.June, 1S78.
Re-defined 27th May,
1880.
All that piece of land known on the Official Map as Salt
Spring or Admiral Island.
The same as those defined on the Official Map of the
District of Sooke.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of three miles in length from
the Court House, Stanley.
All that tract of land included in a circle which may be
described with a radius of six miles in length from Fort
St. James on Stuart's Lake.'
On the North, the Fraser River and Atehelitz Reserve; on
the West, the North-eastern boundary line of the
Sumass Lake and the Sumass River, to its confluence
with the Fraser; on the South and East, the base of the
Sumass Mountain Range.
Commencing at a point on the 49th Parallel of North
Latitude, being the South-west corner of Section 3,
Township 7, New Westminster District; thence true
North, along the section line, for a distance of 10 miles,
to the North-east corner of Section 21, Township 8;
thence true West, along the section line, 9 miles, to
the North-west corner of Section 19, Township 2;
thence true South, along the Township line, for a distance of 3 miles 70 chains, more or less, to the North
shore of Mud Bay; thence in a Southerly and Southeasterly direction, along the shores of Mud Bay and
Semiahmoo Bay, to a point on the 49th Parallel of
North Latitude, being the South-east corner of Section
1, Township 1; thence true East, along the said
Parallel, for a distance of three miles, to the point of
commencement.
All that tract of land within a line commencing at the
Southern bank of Fraser River, opposite Tilbury Island;
thence running due South in prolongation of the dividing
line of Ranges 4 and 5 West, Blocks 4 and 5 North,
New Westminster District, to the sea shore at Boundary
Bay; thence South-westerly, along the shore line, to the
49th parallel of latitude; thence along said 49th parallel
to the sea shore at Robert's Bay; thence along the shore
line, Northerly, to Pelly Point, at the mouth of Fraser
River; thence along the said Southern bank of the
Fraser River to the point of commencement.
Commencing at the South-east corner of Section 10, Victoria District; thence Easterly, along the shore line, to
the North-west corner of Section 5; thence East, along
the Northern boundary of Section 5, to the North-east
coiner of said Section; thence South-easterly, in a direct
line, to the North-west corner of Section 75; thence
Easterly, along the Northern boundary of Sections 75
and 76, to the North-east corner of Section 76; thence
North, along the Eastern boundary of Sections 25 and
26, to the North-west corner of Section 28; thence East,
along the Northern boundary of Sections 28 and 11, to
the North-east corner of Section 11; thence Southeasterly, along the Eastern boundary of Section 11, to
the sea shore at Oak Bay; thence following the shore
line, in a Southerly, Westerly, and Northerly direction,
to tin; North-west corner of Section 3. 46 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
239
TABLE P.—Districts; dates of creation ; boundaries.—Concluded.
Districts.
Date of creation.
Boundaries.
Wellington	
2nd May, 1874	
27th May, 1880	
25th June, 1869	
31st July, 1874	
Yale	
ing at a point at the North-west corner of Wellington
District, on the shore line; thence in a Southerly direction, along the Western boundaries of Wellington and
Mountain Districts, to the section post between Sections
8 and 9, Range 1, Mountain District;  thence Easterly
along said section line, to the South-east corner of Section
9, Range 7 ; thence Northerly to the boundary line of
Mountain District; thence Easterly, along the Northern
boundary of Mountain District,  to  the  sea  shore  at
Departure Bay; thence Northerly and Westerly, along
the shore line, to the point of commencement.
All that tract of land embraced within the circumference
of a circle whose centre shall be the 150-Mile Post on
the Cariboo Road, and whose radius shall be a distance
of seven miles from such mile post.
Not defined.
York   	
Township No. 19, New Westminster District.  46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 241
PART   III.
APPENDICES.  46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 243
APPENDIX  A.
Rules and Regulations fob the Government op Public Schools in the
Province of British Columbia.
1. The hours of teaching shall be from 9 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3.30 p.m.,
from April to September, inclusive; and from 9.30 a.m. to 12 m., and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
from October to March, inclusive.
2. There shall be a recess of fifteen minutes in the middle of each morning's work during
the whole year, and a recess of ten minutes in the middle of each afternoon's work in the six
months from April to September, inclusive.
3. Every Saturday, Sunday, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Queen's Birthday, Dominion
Day, and Thanksgiving Day shall be a holiday.
4. There shall be two vacations in each year. The Summer Vacation shall include the
time from the last Saturday in June to the first Sunday in August; and the Winter Vacation
shall continue for the two weeks preceding the first Monday in January after the new year.
5. Teachers shall be paid their usual salaries during the vacations and holidays ordered
in Rules 3 and 4 only.
6. Young children, not being of school age, shall not be allowed to accompany teachers
or pupils.
7- It shall be the duty of every teacher—
1. To keep the school register with care and to call the roll previously to beginning the
regular school work each morning and each afternoon.
2. To inquire into and record all cases of tardiness and absence of pupils.
3. To send to each pupil's parent or guardian a monthly report stating the number of
times he was absent, the number of times he was late, his deportment, his progress
in each branch of study, and his rank in his class.
4. To be present in the school-room at least fifteen minutes in the morning, and five
minutes in the afternoon, before the time prescribed for commencing school, to
observe punctually the hours for opening and closing school, and not to allow recesses
to exceed, the specified time—that is, from the time study ceases and commences again.
5. To keep a Visitors' Book (which he shall ask the trustees to provide), and to enter
therein the visits made to his school, and to allow any visitor who so chooses to
make therein any remarks suggested by his visit.
6. To receive visitors courteously and to afford them every information.
7. At all times to give to the trustees access to the registers and visitors' book, and to
deliver up the same to their order upon his ceasing to be employed by them.
8. At the end of each half-year to hold a public examination of his school, of which
notice shall be given to the trustees, and to the parents through the pupils.
9. To furnish to the Superintendent of Education, monthly or when desired, any
information which it may be in his power to give respecting anything connected with
the operations of his school or in anywise affecting its interest or character,
10. To teach diligently and faithfully.
11. To classify the pupils according to their respective abilities.
12. To practice such discipline as may be exercised by a kind, firm, and judicious
parent in his family, avoiding corporal punishment, except when it shall appear to
him to be imperatively necessary; and then a record of the offence and the punishment shall be made in the school register for the inspection of trustees and visitors. 244 Public Schools Report. 1882
13. No teacher shall compel the Services of pupils for his own private benefit or
convenience.
14. Por gross misconduct, or a violent or wilful opposition to authority, the teacher
may suspend a pupil from attending school, forthwith informing the parent or
guardian of the fact and the reason of it; but no pupil shall be expelled without the
authority of the trustees.
15. When the example of any pupil is very hurtful, and reformation appears hopeless,
it shall be the duty of the teacher, with the approbation of the trustees, to expel
such pupil from the school; but any pupil under public censure who shall express to
the teacher his regret for such a course of conduct, as openly and explicitly as the
case may require, shall, with the approbation of the trustees and teacher, be readmitted to the school.
16. Subject to the arrangements of the Board of Trustees, to see that the school-house
is kept in proper order in respect of cleanliness, heating, and ventilation, and
especially that the school-room is ready for the reception of pupils at least fifteen
minutes before the time for opening the school.
17. To have a care that the yards and outhouses are kept in order, and that the school-
house and premises are locked at all proper times, and to exercise vigilance over the
school property, the buildings, outhouses, fences, apparatus, books, etc., so that they
may not receive unnecessary injury, and to give prompt notice in writing to the
Secretary of the Trustees of any such injury.
18. To keep in a conspicuous place in the school-room a Time-table, showing the order
of exercises for each day in the week, and the time devoted to each per clay.
19. Not to be absent from the school without the permission of the Board of Trustees,
unless in case of sickness, in which case the absence is to be immediately reported to
the Secretary. N. B.—All absences, with reasons for the same, shall be reported
monthly to the Superintendent of Education.
20. In schools where more than one teacher is employed, to attend all meetings of the
teachers called by the Principal. It shall be the duty of the Principal of a school to
convene a meeting of the teachers associated with him at least once a month, for
conference respecting all the departments of the school.
21. To assist the Superintendent of Education in examining and classifying pupils.
22. To make an affidavit, when required, as to the correctness of the statistical and
other information given by him to the Superintendent of Education.
23. Not to detain any pupil in school during the hour's intermission at noon.
24. To require all pupils, except those detained for punishment, to pass out of the
school-room at recesses and at dismission, and to dismiss pupils so detained previous
to leaving the school.
25. To make himself familiar with the Rules that relate to his school duties.
8. The Principal of a school shall have a responsible supervision over the time-tables,
exercises, methods, and general discipline pursued in all its lower grades.
9- No pupil shall be admitted to any public school who has been expelled from any
school, unless by the written authority of the Trustees.
10. No person shall be admitted into, or continue in, any school as a pupil, if he is
afflicted with, or has been exposed to, any contagious disease, until all danger of contagion
shall have passed away, as certified in writing by a medical man.
11. Any school property that may be wilfully injured or destroyed by any pupil is to be
made good forthwith by his parent or guardian.
12- It is required of each and every pupil:—
1. That he come to school clean and tidy in his person and clothes; that he avoid
idleness, profanity, falsehood, deceit, and quarrelling and fighting; that he be kind
and courteous to his fellows, obedient to his instructors, diligent in his studies; and
that he conform to the rules of the school. 46 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
245
2. That he present to the teacher an excuse from his parent or guardian for tardiness
or absence from school.
3. That he be present at each examination of his school, or present a satisfactory excuse
for absence.
4. That he do not depart, without the teacher's consent, before the time appointed for
closing the school.
5. That he be amenable to the teacher for any misconduct on the school premises, or in
going to and returning from school.
6. That he come to school with the prescribed school books and school requisites; but,
in case of his inability to comply with this rule, the teacher may, under special
circumstances, supply the necessary books free of cost; but every such case must be
forthwith reported to the Superintendent of Education.
13. The highest morality shall be inculcated, but no religious dogmas or creed shall be
taught. No exercise of a religious character in opening and closing school is allowed, except
the Lord's Prayer upon the permission of the Board of Trustees.
23rd December, 1881.
C. 0. McKenzie,
Superintendent of Education.
APPENDIX B.
Regulations   for the   Examination of Public   School  Teachers in the   Province   of
British Columbia for the Year 1883.
 o	
[Approved by His Honour the Dieutenant-Governor, 9th January, 1883.]
1.—Time and Places of Examination.
1. The examination of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the Public
Schools shall commence on Thursday, the 5th July, 1883, at 1 p.m.
2. The examination shall be conducted according to the following schedule :—-
Date.
July 5, Thursday...
„ 6, Friday...}
,, 1, Saturday ...
„ 9, Monday	
,, 10, Tuesday	
,, 11, Wednesday
,, 12, Thursday...
,, 13, Friday	
,, 14, Saturday ...
„ 16, Monday	
Subject.
Mental Arithmetic.
Writing  ,
Arithmetic	
Grammar	
English History	
Natural Philosophy....,
Algebra 	
Ancient History	
Practical Mathematics.
Optional Subjects ,
Morning.
10 to
10 30
10.30 t
o 12.30
10 to
12.30
10 to
12.30
10 to
12 30*
10 to
12.30
10 to
12.30
10 to
12.30
10 to
12.30
10 to
12.30 J
Subject.
Seating, &c, and Reading
Spelling	
Composition
Geography.
Education & Art of Teaching
Mensuration	
Book-keeping	
Euclid	
English Literature
Latin	
Afternoon.
1 to —
2 to 2.30
2.30 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 5
2 to 4.30 f
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
* The examination of 2nd and 3rd Class Candidates ceases.
I The examination of 1st Class B Candidates ceases.
J The examination of 1st Class A Candidates ceases. 246 Public Schools Report. 1882
3. The examination shall take place at Victoria, and such other place or places as the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall appoint.
II.—Notice and Testimonials.
1. Every candidate for examination shall send in to the Superintendent of Education, on
or before 1st of June, 1883, a notice stating the class and grade of certificate for which he is
a candidate (and if necessary his selection of one of the subjects of examination numbered 20,
21, 22), and the description of any certificate he may already possess.
2. Every candidate's notice of intention to be examined must be accompanied by such
testimonials certifying to the temperate habits and good moral character of the candidate as
shall be satisfactory to the Examiners.
III.—Rules to be Observed by Candidates during Examination.
1. Candidates must be in their allotted places before the hour appointed for the commencement of the examination.
2. No candidate shall be allowed to leave the examination room within one hour of the
issue of the examination paper in any subject; and, if he then leave, he shall not be permitted
to return during the examination of the subject then in hand.
3. No candidate shall be permitted, on any pretence whatever, to enter the examination
room after the expiration of an hour from the commencement of the examination.
4. The order to stop writing must be obeyed immediately.
5. No candidate shall give or receive assistance of any kind in answering the examination
questions. He shall neither copy from another himself, nor allow another to copy from him.
He shall not take into the examination room anything from which he might derive assistance
in the examination. He shall not talk or whisper. Detection in the breach of these Rules
will render the candidate liable not only to the loss of the whole examination then in progress,
but also to the withdrawal or forfeiture of his certificate at any time afterwards, should the
discovery be then made that these Rules have been broken by him.
6. Every candidate shall use the distinguishing number assigned him by the Examiners
in place of his name, and shall write this number distinctly at the top of each page of his
answer papers. He shall not write his name or initials, or any particular sign or mark of
identification other than this distinguishing number.
7. Candidates, in preparing their answers, will write on one side only of each sheet.
8. Every candidate, preparatorily to his surrendering his answer papers to the Examiners,
shall arrange them in the order of the questions; shall fold them twice, neatly and evenly, in
the direction of the ruled lines ; and shall write the subject of the examination paper on the
outside sheet, but not his distinguishing number.
9. After the answer papers are once handed in, no candidate shall be allowed to make
any alteration of any kind in them.
IV.—General  Conditions.
1. Candidates must furnish satisfactory proofs of temperate habits and good moral
character.
2. No male candidate shall be less than eighteen years of age, and no female candidate
less than sixteen.
V.—Certificates of Qualification.
The following shall be the classes and grades of certificates :—
1. Temporary certificate.
2. Third Class, Grade B, certificate.
3. Third Class, Grade A,      ,,
4. Second Class, Grade B,    „
5. Second Class, Grade A,   ,,
6. First Class, Grade B,        „
7. First Class, Grade A,       ,, 46 Vic Public Schools Report. 247
VI.—Value and Duration of Certificates.
1. A temporary certificate, valid till the next examination of teachers, shall entitle the
holder to teach temporarily in any school.
2. A Third Class Certificate valid for one yea^ shall entitle the holder to teach in any
Public School in which one teacher is employed, or as an assistant in one in which more than
one is employed.
3. A Second Class Certificate, valid for three years, shall entitle the holder to hold any
position in any Public School.
4. A First Class, Grade B, certificate, valid for four years, shall entitle the holder to
hold any position in any Public School, or to act as an assistant in a High School.
5. A First Class, Grade A, certificate, valid for four years, shall entitle the holder to
hold any position in any Public or High School.
VII.—Second Class and Third Class Certificates.
Subjects of Examination.
1. Reading.    To read intelligently and expressively.
2. Writing.' To write legibly and neatly, and to understand the principles of writing as
given in Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's copy-books.
3. Spelling.    To be able to spell correctly.
4. Arithmetic. ■ To be thoroughly familiar with arithmetic, and to be able to work
problems in the various rules.
5. Mental Arithmetic. To show readiness and accuracy in solving problems in mental
arithmetic.
6. Geography.    To have a good knowledge of the geography of the world.
7. Grammar. To answer any question in Swinton's or in Morell's Grammar; and to
analyze and parse any English sentence.
8. History.    To have a good knowledge of the history of the British Empire.
9. Composition. To be familiar with the forms of letter-writing, and to be able to write
a prose composition on any simple subject, correctly as to expression, spelling, and punctuation.
10. Education. To have a thorough knowledge of the approved modes of teaching the
various subjects of the school curriculum, and to be well acquainted with school management—
including school buildings and arrangements, classification of pupils, formation of time-tables,
and modes of discipline, and to be familiar with the School Act and Regulations, especially
respecting the office of teacher.
VIII.—First Class, Grade B, Certificate.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class certificates.
11. Book-keeping.    To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration.    To be familiar with the principal rules for the mensuration of surfaces.
13. Algebra. To understand the principles relating to simple and quadratic equations,
and the solution of problems giving rise to such equations.
14. Eulicd.    Books I. and II., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy. To be acquainted with the properties of matter, and with the
elementary principles of statics.
17 IX.—First Class, Grade A, Certificate.
Subjects of Examination.
1 to 10, as for Second Class and Third Class certificates.
11. Book-keeping.    To understand book-keeping by single entry and double entry.
12. Mensuration.    To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
13. Algebra.    To know the subject as contained in the authorized text-book.
14. Euclid.    Books I., II., III, IV., Defs. of V., and Book VI., with problems.
15. Natural Philosophy. To have a good knowledge of Statics, Dynamics, and Hydrostatics.
16. English literature.
17. Ancient History. To have a general knowledge of Ancient History from the
Creation to the Fall of Rome.
18. Practical Mathematics. To be versed in right and oblique angled trigonometry, and
to have a fair knowledge of land surveying and navigation.
19. Latin. To be able to translate and parse the following: Gfisar, DeBello Gallico,
Books I., II., and III.; Horace, Odes, Book I., and Ars Poetica ; Virgil, .^Eneid, Books I., II.,
and III.
20. Greek. To be able to translate and parse the following: Xenophon, Anabasis,
Books I., IL, and III.; Homer, Iliad, I., II., and III.
21. French. To be able to translate and parse the following : Voltaire, Histoire de
Charles XII., Books I., II., and III.; Corneille, Le Cicl.
22. Natural Sciences.    To have a fair knowledge of one of the natural sciences.
Candidates shall be allowed to select one of the subjects numbered 20, 21, 22, in which to
be examined.
X.—Conditions  of Obtaining Certificates.
1. For a temporary Certificate. A candidate for a temporary certificate must give satisfactory information as to his character and scholastic qualifications, and must forward an
application from a Board of School Trustees desiring his services as teacher.
2. For a Third Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 40 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
3. For a Third Class Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 50 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 30 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
4. For a Second Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
5. For a Second Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 70 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to the subjects of examination for second and third class
certificates, and 40 per cent, at least of those attached to each subject.
6. For a First Class, Grade B, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and grade, 50
per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to the
subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade. 7. For a First Class, Grade A, Certificate, a candidate must obtain 60 per cent, of the
total number of marks attached to all the subjects of examination for that class and grade, 50
per cent, at least of those attached to each of the subjects of examination for second and third
class certificates, and not less than 40 per cent, of the total number of marks attached to all
the subjects of examination peculiar to that class and grade, provided always that he obtain at
least 40 per cent, of the marks attached to the Latin paper.
XI.—Fixed Standard Marks of Value attached to Subjects of Examination.
Marks.
1. Reading     50
2. Writing    100
3. Spelling    100
4. Arithmetic    200
5. Mental Arithmetic    100
6. Geography   200
7. Grammar    200
8. History (English)   200
9. Composition    200
10. Education  200
11. Book-keeping  200
12. Mensuration  200
13. Algebra  200
14. Euclid :  200
15. Natural Philosophy  200
16. English Literature  200
17. Ancient History  200
18. Practical Mathematics  200
19. Latin  200
20. 21, 22.    Greek or French, or one of the Natural Sciences  200
XII. Candidates who fail to obtain First Class Certificates shall not be awarded marks
for answers to the papers set for those certificates.
APPENDIX C.
Chapter 1.
School Meetings in School Districts.
1.—Notice of Meetings.
1.  The notice, calling an annual or special meeting, may be signed by School Meetings,
the  secretary by direction of the trustees, or by a majority of the trustees
themselves.    Copies of such notices shall be put up in at least three of the
most public places in the district, at least ten days before the time of holding
the meeting.
II. Proceedings at Annual Meetings.
1. The senior or other trustee present shall, at the proper hour (12 o'clock), Annual School Meetings,
call the meeting to order, and request the voters present to appoint a chair-how 01'8'amzed-
man and secretary from among themselves.
The chairman, on election, shall at once take the chair, and shall preserve
order and decorum, and shall decide, questions of order, subject to an appeal
to the meeting. The chairman's power of voting shall be limited to the
casting vote. In case of an equality of votes, the chairman must give the
casting vote.
The secretary shall record in writing all the votes and proceedings of the
meeting.
2. The following shall be the order of business at the meeting :— Order of business at
° Annual Meetings.
(1.) Calling the meeting to order. 250 Public Schools Report. 1882
(2.) Election of chairman and secretary.
(3.) Reading of trustees' annual report, including statement of .receipts
and expenditure.
(4.) Receiving and deciding upon trustees' report.
(5.) Election of trustee to fill the vacancy at the end of the past year.
(6.) Election of trustee or trustees to fill any other vacancy.
(7.) Any other business of which due notice has been given.
Rules of Order to be 3. The following rules of order should be observed at the meetings :—
observed at Annual °
(1.) Addressing Chairman.—Every voter shall rise previously to speaking, and address himself to the chairman.
(2.) Order of Speaking.—When two or more voters rise at once, the
chairman shall name the voter who shall speak first, when the other
voter or voters shall next have the right to address the meeting in
the order named by the chairman.
(3.) Motion to be read.—A voter may require the question or motion
under discussion to be read for his information at any time, but not
so as to interrupt a voter who may be speaking.
(4.) Speaking twice.—No voter shall speak more than twice on the same
question or amendment without leave of the meeting, except in
explanation of something which may have been misunderstood, or
until every one choosing to speak shall have spoken.
(5.) Voting.—The chairman shall take the votes by poll; and the names
of all voters who may present themselves shall be recorded; such
poll to remain open till four o'clock, when the chairman shall
declare the result.
(6.) Voters.—In case objection is made to the right of a person to vote,
the chairman shall require the person whose vote is questioned to
make the declaration provided by law; after making it, the vote
must be received and recorded without further question; but if such
person refuses to make such declaration, his vote is to be rejected.
(7.) Protests.—No protest against an election or other proceedings of
the meeting shall be received by the chairman. All protests must
be sent to the Superintendent of Education within twenty days at
least after the meeting.
(8.) Adjournment.—A motion to adjourn a school meeting shall always
be in order, provided that no second motion to the same effect shall
be made until some intermediate proceedings shall have been had.
(9.) Motion to be made in writing (if required) and seconded.—A motion
cannot be put from the chair, or debated, unless the same be in
writing (if required by the chairman), and seconded.
(10.) Withdrawal of Motion.—After a motion has been announced or
read by the chairman, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the
meeting; but may be withdrawn at any time before decision by the
consent of the meeting.
(11.) Kind of motion to be received.—When a motion is under debate
no other motion shall be received, unless to amend it,.or to postpone
it, or for adjournment.
'(12.) Order of putting Motion.—All questions shall be put in the order
in which they are moved. Amendments shall all be put before the
main motion, the last amendment first, and so on. 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 251
(13.) Reconsidering Motion.—A motion to reconsider a vote may be made
by any voter at the same meeting; but no vote of reconsideration
shall be taken more than once at the same meeting.
4. The poll at every election of a trustee shall not be kept open after four close of Meeting,
o'clock in the afternoon.
5. At the close of the proceedings, the chairman and secretary should sign Transmission of Minutes,
the minutes, as entered by the secretary in the minute book, and the secretary
of the board of trustees must forthwith transmit a correct copy of such
minutes, signed by himself, to the Superintendent of Education.
6. As far as possible, special school meetings shall be conducted in the Special School Meetings,
same way as annual school meetings.
Chapter II.
Powers and Duties of Trustees.
(These are defined in the " Public School Act, 1879.")
The following regulations are further prescribed for the guidance of
trustees:—
1. Notice of the appointment of a teacher to a school should be given him Appointment of Teacher,
in writing, such notice specifying the day on which his duties as teacher
commence.
2. Notice of intention to dismiss a teacher should be given him in writing, Dismissal of Teacher,
at least thirty days before such dismissal is to take place.
3. Notice of the appointment or dismissal of a teacher should be forthwith superintendent of Edu-
transmittecl to the Superintendent of Education, with the date on which the cation t0 be notified of
..      -i,i n.    . appointment or dismissal
appointment or dismissal takes effect. of Teacher.
4. Trustees should appoint one of their number whose duty it should be to Care of school-house,
see that the school-house is kept in good repair.    He should  see that the
windows are properly filled with glass; that at the proper season, the stove
and pipe or fireplace are in good condition, and that suitable wood or coal is
provided; that the desks and seats are in good repair ; that the outhouses
are properly provided with doors and kept clean ; that the blackboards are
kept painted, the water supply abundant, and that everything is provided
necessary for the comfort of the pupils and the success of the school.
5. No public school-house or school plot,  or  any building,  furniture, or Dse of sCh00l-house
other thing pertaining thereto, should be used or occupied for any other purpose than for the use or accommodation of the public school of the district,
without the express permission of the trustees as a corporation, and then only
after school hours and on condition that all damages be made good, and
cleaning and sweeping properly done.
(The teacher has charge of the school-house on behalf of the trustees. He
has no authority to use the school-house other than as directed by them, or
to make use of it at any other time than during school-hours without their
sanction. At the request of the trustees he must at once deliver up the
school-house key to them.)
6. It is the duty of the trustees to decide what incidental expenses they Expenses of school,
shall incur for their school, but they are required to submit such matters
(Public School Act, 1879, sec. 7, sub.-sec. 3; Revenue Act, 1879, sec. 36,)
to the Government for approval.
Extract from Revenue Act, 1879."
" 36. Before an account is paid by the Deputy-Treasurer, or finally placed to the
credit of a Sub-Accountant or any other person in repayment of an advance, or in
accounting for any portion of revenue by charging the amount to the head of service,
the Auditor must examine the account and endorse thereon the head of service, number
of vote, or authority to which the sum or sums is chargeable, marking his initials
against the total amount to certify to its correctness and that a warrant has been
issued."
June, 1S79. APPENDIX  D.
Chapter 1.
Subjects of Examination for Admission to the High School.
1. Spelling and Punctuation.—To be able to spell and punctuate correctly any passage
in the Fourth Reader or Spelling Book.
2. Writing.—To write neatly and legibly.
3. Arithmetic.—To be able to answer questions in numeration, notation, the four simple
and compound rules, reduction, vulgar and decimal fractions, proportion, simple interest and
percentage, and in mental arithmetic.
4. Grammar.—To know the principal grammatical forms and definitions; to be able to
analyze and parse any ordinary sentence, and to be able to write a short narrative, description,
or familiar letter in proper form.
5. Geography.—To have a good knowledge of the earth's planetary relations, of the
general principles of physical geography, and of the outlines of the maps of Europe, Asia,
Africa, America, Oceanica, and of the British Empire, and more particularly of that of the
Dominion of Canada.
6. History.—To know the different periods and the outlines of English History* as contained in Collier's History of the British Empire (Junior Class Book.)
Chapter II.
Course of Study in the High School.—Junior Division.
1. English Language.—Review of elementary work in orthography, etymology, syntax,
and analysis of sentences ; derivation of words ; rendering of poetry into prose ; composition,
including the framing of sentences, familiar and business letters, and abstracts of passages in
readers, themes, and generally the formation of a good English style ; reading ; dictation; and
elocution, including the learning by heart and recitation of selected passages from standard
authors.
2.—Mathematics.
(a.) Arithmetic, including simple and compound rules, vulgar and decimal fractions,
proportion, interest, percentage in its various applications, and square root.
(b.) Algebra, including elementary rules, factoring, greatest common measure, least
common multiple, square root, fractions, and simple equations of one, two, and
three unknown quantities.
(c.) Euclid, Books I., II., with easy exercises.
(d.) Mensuration, including lengths of lines, and areas of plane figures.
(e.) Natural Philosophy, including proportions of matter, composition and resolution of
forces, centre of gravity, mechanical powers, pressure of liquids, specific gravity
and modes of determining it; the thermometer, barometer, siphon, common pump,
forcing pump, air pump.
3. Modern .Languages.—French—grammar and exercises.
4. Ancient Languages.
(a.) Latin—grammar and exercises.
(h.) Greek  -grammar and exercises (optional.) 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 253
5. History.
(a.) Leading events of English History.
(b.) Roman History to the death of Augustus.
6. Geography.—A fair course of elementary geography, mathematical, physical, and
political. Map geography generally—that of Canada and that of the British Empire more
particularly.
7. Book-keeping and Writing.
(a.) Single entry and principles of Double Entry.
(b.) Practice in writing according to the principles contained in Payson, Dunton, and
Scribner's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of Music.
9. Natural Science.
(a.) Elementary Botany.
(6.) Elementary Physiology.
Senior Division.
1. English Language.—The subject generally, including derivation of words, composition,
rendering of poetry into prose, abstract of selected passages, critical reading of portions of the
works of standard authors, themes, and generally the formation of a good English style.
2. Mathematics.
(a.) Arithmetic generally, with duodecimals and metrical system.
(b.) Algebra, quadratics, equations, surds, proportion, progressions, permutations, and
combinations, Binomial theorem, cube root and properties of numbers,
(c.) Euclid, Books I., II., III., IV.; definitions of Book V. and Book VI., with exercises.
(d.) Trigonometry, plane trigonometry.
(e.) Mensuration, volumes and areas of surfaces of solids and surveying.
(/.) Natural philosophy, statics, hydrostatics, and clynamics.-
3. Modern Languages.—French—grammar and exercises.
4. Ancient Languages.
(a.) Latin—Csesar, Book I.; Virgil, Book, I.
(b.) Greek—Grammar; Xenophon, Book I. (optional).
5. History.
(a.) English History—the special study of the Stuart and Brunswick periods.
(b.) Roman History, especially from the death of Augustus to the close of the reign of
Romulus Augustulus.
(c.) Grecian History—especially from the Persian War to the death of Alexander the
Great, both inclusive.
6. Geography.—Ancient and modern.
7. Book-keeping and. Writing.
{a.) Single and double entry.
(b.) Practice in writing according to the principles contained in Payson, Dunton, and
Scribner's copy-books.
8. Music.—Elements of Music.
9. Natural Science,
(a.) Geology.
(b.) Astronomy. 254
Public Schools Report.
1882
Chapter III.
Regulations for Admission, &c, into High School.
1. Teachers of the Public Schools, who have already obtained certificates as teachers, may
be admitted to enter the High School as pupils without being required to pass the usual
entrance examination.
2. In order that a candidate may obtain admission to the High School, the aggregate of
his marks must amount to at least 60 per cent, of the total marks assigned for all the subjects
of examination, and at least 30 per cent, must be obtained in each subject. Candidates will
not be admitted who fail to gain 50 per cent, of the parsing and analyzing questions in the
grammar paper.
3. The examination shall be conducted on paper, but candidates may be subjected to
additional viva voce examination in such subjects as shall be thought proper.
4. Pupils of Public Schools in a School District having a High School, after passing a
satisfactory examination and being declared eligible for promotion from the Public to the High
School, shall not be received as pupils in the Public Schools of such District.
5. Pupils entering the High School must take the prescribed course of studies.
6. Pupils shall be arranged ill classes corresponding to their respective degrees of proficiency, and each pupil shall be advanced from one class or division to another with reference
to attainments as shown by examination, without regard to the time he may have been in such
class or division.
7. The regulations respecting the duties of pupils in Public Schools apply to pupils in the
High School, and must be obeyed by the latter.
8. Any pupil absenting himself from the Superintendent's examination, or any portion of
such examination, shall not thereafter be admitted into the High School except by the authority
of the Trustees, given in writing; and the names of all such absentees shall be forwarded by
the Principal to the Superintendent of Education.
This rule shall be read to the school at a suitable time just before the examination at the
closo of each half-year.
APPENDIX  E.
Books  Authorized  for  Use  in  Public  and  High   Schools.
Canadian First Reader, Part I.
Canadian First Reader, Part II.
Canadian Second Reader.
Canadian Third Reader.
Canadian Fourth Reader.
Canadian Fifth Reader.
Canadian Advanced Reader.
Swinton's New Language Lessons.
The World (J. B. Calkin).
School Geography of the World (J. B. Calkin).
Elementary Arithmetic (Smith & McMurchy).
Mental Arithmetic, by J. A. McLellan.
Advanced Arithmetic (Smith & McMurchy).
Outlines of General History (Collier).
British Empire (Collier).
British History (Collier).
Algebra (Part I), Colenso.
Euclid, Book I (Young).
Euclid, Book II (Young).
Book keeping (Fulton & Eastman).
Canadian Spelling Book.
MoroH's Essentials, English Grammar, with Exercises.
Pott's Euclid, six Books.
Todlmnter's Mensuration.
Tyndall's Natural Philosophy.
Bain's English Composition and Rhetoric.
English Grammar and Composition (Swinton).
Ancient Geography (Pillans).
Science Primers—Introductory, Chemistry, Physics,
Physical Geography, Geology, Astronomy, Physiology, and Botany.
Ancient History (Schmidt).
White's Grammar School Texts, Latin.
White's Grammar School Texts (Greek).
Bryce's First Latin Book.
Bryce's First Greek Book.
Liddell & Scott's Greek Lexicon.
Riddle's Latin Dictionary.
Smith's smaller Latin Grammar.
Curtius' Greek Grammar.
Initia Graca (Smith).
Principia Latina, Part I (Smith).
Latin Prose Composition (Arnold).
Greek Prose Composition (Arnold).
The Chemistry of Common Things (Dr. Macadam).
Trigonometry for Beginners, by Todhunter.
Elementary Statics, by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Hydrostatics, by J. Hamblin Smith.
Elementary Dynamics, Wormell.
Collier's History of Rome.
Collier's History of Greece.
De Fivas' Grammaire des Grammaires.
De Fivas' Elementary French Reader.
Chambers' Practical Mathematics.
Common School Education, by James Gurrie (for the
use of Teachers). 46 Vic.                                 Public Schools Report.                                        255
APPENDIX F.
List of Duly Qualified Teachers.
First
Class,
Grade A.
Pope, S. D., A.B., Queen's College, Kingston,
McKenzie, John, July, 1880.
Ontario, July, 1880.
Williams, Miss E. A, July, 1880.
Smith, B. H, M.A., University of New Bruns
Struthers, A. W.,                ,,
wick, July, 1880.
Thomson, J. W., July, 1881.
Stainburn, Geo., B.A., Cantab, July, 1880.
Johnston, J. P.,           „
McLaughlin, J. H, July, 1880.
Howay, Miss Alice, July, 1882.
Newbury, J. C, July, 1880 and 1882.
Irwin, J., July, 1882.
Rand, C. D, B.A., July, 1880.
First
Class
, Grade B.
Kaye, James, July, 1880.
Smith, Miss Lizzie, July, 1881.
Halliday, J. A.,      ,,
Delany, J. M.,                  „
Leduc, Thos.,          „
Carmichael, F. A.,           „
Offerhaus, R,         ,,
Titchworth, J. C,             ,,
Chandler, Mrs. L. D., July, 1880.
Hamilton, C. J.,               ,,
Stirling, J. R., July,  1880.
Clarke, C. E, July, 1882.  '
Lewis, S. G.,             ,,
Murray, P.,            „
Irwin, A.                    „
Smith, Miss Isabella, July, 1882.
Second
Class
, Grade A.
Cameron, Miss Agnes D., July, 1880.
Offerhaus, Mrs. M., July, 1880.
McDougall, Miss Archena J.,    ,
Sinclair, J. W.,                       ,,
Johnston, A. G.,                           ,
Sluggett, G. H., July, 1881.
Go wan, Miss AC,                    ,
McKenzie, A.,            ,,
Dods, Archibald,                        ,
Andrews, Helen,        „
Crawford, S. F,
Berkeley, Mrs. L A, July, 1881.
Williams, Miss Mary                 ,
Airth, Mrs. J. E,               „
Holding, R H,
Mundell, J., July, 1882.
Flett, Alfred,
Barron, Miss Lizzie A. F., July, 1882
Smith, J. F.,                                ,
Jones, David, July, 1882.
Second
Clas
3, Grade B.
McNaughten, Miss C, July, 1880.
Storey, Miss M. V, July, 1881.
Irvine, Miss Christina,          „
Jackson, Miss H.,             ,,
Colbeck, Mrs.,                          „
Phelps, W.,
Pollard, Miss Annie,             ,,
Caldwell, Mrs. L. M.,      „
Bailey, Miss A. S.,
Gardiner, Miss Emily J., July, 1882,
Hollo way, Miss Emily,         ,,
Kirkland, Miss Maude,             „
Thain, J. H, July, 1881.
Phair, C,                                    „
Clyde, Thomas,        ,,
Haima, R. S.,                            „
Polley, Miss A. J.,   „
Shaw, A.,                                   ,,
McDougall, Miss E. E., July, 1881.
•
Third
Class
Grade A.
Herring, Jane Howell, July, 1882.
Russell, Alice M., July, 1882.
Davidson, Ann M.,                „
Bell, Annette Sophia Matilda, July, 1882.
Wolfenden, Nellie,                „
Halliday, Marie Felicia, July, 1882.
Ci'osson, Katie,                        ,,
Todd, Donald,                           ,,
Richardson, Alice G.            „
Jones, Florence McNaughton, July, 1882.
Lindsay, Albert E.,              „
' 256 Public Schools Report. 1882
Third Class, Grade B.
Sweet, Margaret Jane, July 1882.
Reynard, Eva Mary, „
Smith, Clara P., „
Watson, Elizabeth, ,,
Shaw, John, July, 1882.
Irvine, Margaret, ,,
Norris, Martha J., July, 1882.
Lawrence, Mary, „
Temporary Certificate.
H. Bird, August, 1882.
APPENDIX G.
List of Successful Candidates for Entrance to the -High School.
Christmas Examinations, 1881.
Victoria Boys' School.—W. McLaughlin, C. C. Lane, Edward Hayward, Wm. Duck,
Thomas Gore, Arthur R. Langley.
Victoria Girls' School.—Emma Wood, Shirley V. Leigh.
Cedar Hill School.—Samuel A. M. Pollock.
Nanaimo Boys' School.—William Pool, John Parkin, Thomas Jones.
New Westminster Boys' School.—J. W. Bell.
Do. Girls' School.—Katie Clute, Gertrude McBride, Bessie Johnston,
Marion DeBeck.
East-South Saanich School.—Carey Pope, Walter Thomson.
Wellington School.—Jennie Ramsay, Edna Wall.
Private School, Victoria.—Wm. Munro.
Midsummer Examinations, 1882.
Victoria Boys' School.—Fred. Jackson, Edwin Smith, Wm. T. Williams.
Victoria Girls' School.—Elizabeth Jane Workman, Cordelia M. Sims, Alice Williams,
Anne Louisa Storey, Helen Louisa Bailey.
Chilliwhack.—Maggie Turner.
Cheam.—Albert Gillanders.
Craigflower.—Janey Newbury, Herman Tiedemann.
Esquimalt.—Edward Doran.
Gabriola.—John Shaw.
East-South Saanich.—Emily Michell, Hallie Pope, Fred Turgoose.
Private School, New Westminster.—Joseph B. Magnone.
Summary for the Years 1880-81.
Victoria Boys' School, 9 ; Victoria Girls' School, 7; East-South Saanich, 5; New Westminster Girls'School, 4; Nanaimo Boys'School, 3; Cedar Hill, 1; Craigflower, 2; Wellington, 2;
Cheam, 1; Chilliwhack, 1; Esquimalt, 1; Gabriola Island, 1; New Westminster Boys' School, 1;
Private Schools, 2.—Total, 40. 46 Vic.
Public Schools Report.
257
APPENDIX H.
Programme of Teachers' Examination held in July,  1882.
Date.
July 5, Wednesday.,
,,    6, Thursday |
,,    1, Friday  	
,,    8, Saturday	
,,   10, Monday	
„ 11, Tuesday ....
,, 12, Wednesday.
,, 13, Thursday...
„   14, Friday	
„ 15, Saturday....
Subject.
Spelling ,
Writing ,
Arithmetic	
Grammar ,
English History	
Natural Philosophy.,..
Algebra 	
Ancient History	
Practical Mathematics.
Optional Subjects ,
Morning.
10 to 10.30
10.30 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30*
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30
10 to 12.30 J
Subject.
Seating, &c, and Reading
Mental Arithmetic.
Composition 	
Geography.,
Education & Art of Teaching
Mensuration	
Book-keeping	
Euclid	
English Literature
Latin 	
Afternoon.
1 to —
2 to 2.30
2.30 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
2 to 5
2 to 4.30 f
2 to 4.30
2 to 4.30
* The examination of 2nd and 3rd Class Candidates ceases,
t The examination of 1st Class B Candidates ceases.
1 The examination of 1st Class A Candidates ceases.
Rules to be Observed by Candidates during Examination.
1. Candidates must be in their allotted places before the hour appointed for the commencement of the examination.
2. No candidate shall be allowed to leave the examination room within one hour of the
issue of the examination paper in any subject; and, if he then leave, he shall not be permitted
to return during the examination of the subject then in hand.
3. No candidate shall be permitted, on any pretence whatever, to enter the examination
room after the expiration of an hour from the commencement of the examination.
4. The order to stop writing must be obeyed immediately.
5. No candidate shall give or receive assistance of any kind in answering the examination
questions. He shall neither copy from another himself, nor allow another to copy from him.
He shall not take into the examination room anything from which he might derive assistance
in the examination. He shall not talk or whisper. Detection in the breach of these Rules
will render the candidate liable not only to the loss of the whole examination then in progress,
but also to the withdrawal or forfeiture of his certificate at any time afterwards, should the
discovery be then made that these Rules have been broken by him.
6. Every candidate shall use the distinguishing number assigned him by the Examiners
in place of his name, and shall write this number distinctly at the top of each page of his
answer papers. He shall not write his name or initials, or any particular sign or mark of
identification other than this distinguishing number.
7. Candidates, in preparing their answers, will write on one side only of each sheet. 258 Public Schools Report. 1882
8. Every candidate, preparatorily to his surrendering his answer papers to the Examiners,
shall arrange them in the order of the questions; shall fold them twice, neatly and evenly, in
the direction of the ruled lines; and shall write his number and the subject of his examination
paper on the outside sheet.
9. After the answer papers are once handed in, no candidate shall be allowed to make
any alteration of any kind in them.
By order of Board of Examiners.
C. C. McKenzie,
Superintendent of Education.
QUESTIONS SET AT THE TEACHERS' EXAMINATION, JULY, 1882.
Reading.    (For all classes and grades.)
Wednesday, 5th July, 1 p. m. Total marks, 50.
(For all classes and grades.)
Spelling.
Thursday, 6th July; 10 to 10.30 a. m.    Total marks, 100.
Spell the following words correctly. Five marks will be deducted .for every word incorrect or omitted:—Akommodate, antartik, kindergautten, deffammashun, inflammashun,
filipp (with the finger), fillip (proper name), dettrement, vaksinashun, vassellate, approcksimmate,
appertenans, gold ayteen carrots fine, kollum, kommizerate, harrass, embarrass, kristal, clivizible,
dizese, immakkulate, innaugerate, nich, noch, oponent, opinyun, koller-boan, zeflir, sollilloquiz,
obsequiz, pavilyun, vermilyun, akkowstix, o de kolone, dabree, vurdegrees, vikownt, sudo-proffit,
newkleus, trissillable.
(For all classes and grades.)
Writing.
Thursday, 6th July; 10.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 100.
1. Describe different methods of teaching the art of writing.
2. Give three tests of good writing, and state on what these qualities depend.
3. Discuss the questions of proper posture and proper penholding.
4. How would you proceed to train the muscles of the arm and fingers ?
5. What advantage is derived from requiring pupils to trace the letters ?
6. In what respect is writing a mental, and in what respect a mechanical operation?
7. What difference is there between this branch and other branches of education 1
8. What progress may be expected to be made where the pupil is given a copy and simple-
required to imitate it?
9. Analyse and classify the small letters.
10. Analyse and classify the capital letters. 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 259
(For all classes and grades.)
Mental Arithmetic.
Thursday, 6th July; 2 to 2.20 p.m.    Total marks, 100.
[No erasures or alterations are permitted.]
1. A steamer can run 15 miles an hour down river, but only 6 miles up river; how long
will it be in returning the distance it runs down in 3 hours?
2. Divide 31 oranges between two boys, giving one 9 more than the other.
3. A has 4 times as much money as B, and both have $29; how much has each?
4. A person gives away 2-fifths of his money to a friend, 75 cents,  to another, and then
had $1.50 himself; how much had he at first?
5. What is the least fraction that added to the sum of 1— and 24 will make the result a
6 °
whole number?
6. How much cloth at 3s. and 6d. a yard can be bought for 3J guineas?
7. Reduce to its lowest terms gg
8. How much water must be added to 20 gallons of brandy at $5 a gallon,  to make the
mixture worth $3 a gallon?
9. A can do a piece of work in 2| days, B in 8 days, and C in 2 days; how long will they
take to do it working together?
10. What will be the price of 17 articles at 87J cents, each?
11. Find the least number which divided by 4, 5, and 6, leaves 3 for a remainder.
12. The remainder is 11, the dividend 154, and the quotient 11; what is the divisor?
13. How many yards in 19 pieces of cloth each containing 119 yards?
(For all classes and grades.)
Composition.
Thursday, 6th July; 2.30 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
Write on one of the following subjects:—
1. On more varied employment for educated females.
2. On the present position of educators, indicating the countries where college and school
teachers are best remunerated.
3. Give account of the incidents of some pleasure trip you have enjoyed, with description
of scenery.
(For all classes and grades.)
Arithmetic.    Mr. R. Williams.
Friday, 7th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Find the L. C. M. of the numbers 6, 8, 9, 21, 24, 27, 35,
Reduce to its lowest terms =™
2652
2. Find the value of | X 2§ X^X 6f
and of . 3 7     - "6
9t-4i 260 Public Schools Report. 1882
3. Reduce 502 yds. 2 ft. 6=- in. to the fraction of a mile, and find the value of .0145 acres.
4. Divide .018565 by 7.9, and 18.565 by .00079.
5. Find the vulgar fraction equivalent to 5.2916, and reduce - to a decimal.
6. If 5 men can reap a field 800 ft. long and 700 ft. broad in 3J days, of 14 hours each,
in how many days, of 12 hours each, will 7 men reap a field 1800 ft. long and 960 ft. broad?
7. Find the simple interest on $385 for 3 years 7 months and 10 days at 6 per cent,  per
annum.
8. Find the true discount on $806.62 due  4 years hence, without grace, at 6 per cent,
per annum, simple interest.
9. Three soldiers, A, B, and C, divide 770 cartridges in the following manner:—as often
as A takes 4, B takes 3, and as often as A takes 6, C takes 7; how many will each have?
10. A man sold a house for $675 and thereby lost 10 per cent.; what per cent,  would he
have gained if he had sold it for $870 ?
11. A person buys goods amounting to $1,500, and agrees to pay $250 down,  $300 in 4
months, and $950 in 9 months; when may he fairly pay the whole at once?
12. Find the square root of .00134689, and the cube root of 18609625.
(For all classes and grades.)
Geography.
Friday, 7th July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. What is the true figure of the earth, its mean diameter and its circumference?
2. Name the country which is the centre of the dry hemisphere and the nearest land to
the aqueous hemisphere.
3. Explain the terms—solstice, equinox, affluent, confluence, estuary, and latitude;
4. State the effect of the sun's rays in tropical regions and the result on the air.
5. Off what coast does a remarkable stationary fog occur; what causes it?
6. How is the formation of clouds effected?    In what zone does the greatest quantity of
rain fall?    Name some regions where rain never falls, and account for this in any one case.
7. Describe shortly the food and clothing of man in each zone.
8. Who  are the following and where found:—Copts,   Maoris,   Magyars, Fellahin, and
Gauchos?
9. In what mountains do the Rhone, Rhine, Ebro, "Vistula, and Petchora, respectively rise?
10. Into what seas do the Danube, Po, Spey, Garonne, and Thames discharge their water?
11. What European sea is not subject to tides, and which is Salter than the ocean?
12. Near what gulf, lake, and river is St. Petersburg?
13. Where does the Jordan rise?    Describe its course to the sea.
14. How is Sumatra separated from Malacca; Celebes from Borneo; Java from Sumatra;
15. How was the tract of land in Africa called the delta formed; and why so called?
16. How is James' Bay situated?    Where does the Ohio empty itself?    How is Cuba
separated from St. Domingo?
17. Of what is Australia singularly destitute?    Name four of its rivers. 46 Vic Public Schools Report. 261
18. Give the situation of—Mount Erebus,  the Blue  Mountains,  Mount Egmont,  and
Mount Hecla.
19. Give the boundaries of Canada, specifying the British Columbian part more particularly.
20. Write a short geographical description of British Columbia.
(For all classes and grades.)
Grammar.
Saturday, 8th July; 10 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.    Total marks 200.
1. Analyse :—Thrice is he armed who hath his quarrel just, and he but naked, though
locked up in steel, whose conscience with injustice is corrupted.
2. Parse fully the words in italics in question 1.
3. Write out the tenses of the Indicative Mood, Active Voice, of the Verb 'to do.'
4. Give the possessive cases (sing, and plural) of :—Baby, child, tooth, woman, deer, thief,
chimney, hero, fox and he.
5. What parts of speech are :—yes, but, that, by far, the better, regarding, notwithstanding, amen, good-bye, adieu.
6. Correct where necessary, giving reasons for correction :—(a) They that honour me I
will honour, (b) The flower smells sweet, (c) Are you stronger than him ? (d) No data
were given, (e) Neither of those four boys can swim. (/) Divide the land between us three.
(g) Let you and I go.    (A) I do not deny but he has merit.
7. Divide into syllables, spell as pronounced and accentuate:—Corps, provost-marshal,
antipodes, extempore, piano-forte, architect, figure, route, epitome, theatre, horizon, mischievous, formidable, tremendous, vice (in the sentence—to be captain vice J. James resigned),
volume, and column.
8. Give the derivation and meaning of any 5 words in question 7.
9. Punctuate and place capitals in proper places, &c, in :—lightly theyll talk of the spirit
thats gone and oer his cold ashes upbraid him but little hell reck if they let him sleep on in
the grave where a briton has laid him
(For all classes and grades.)
Education and the Art op Teaching.
Saturday 8th July; 2 to 4.30 p. m.    Total marks 200.
1. At what age did you commence to teach ? What previous preparation or training did
you receive and for what period ? Which work on education do you consider the best and to
what educational journal do you subscribe ?
2. What do you understand by the Phonic system of teaching reading ?     Name some of
1 the chief difficulties attending this system in teaching younger children.   Which system do you
prefer or use, and why ?
3. How would you utilise the school room to teach geography to beginners ?
4. How would you prove to children that the last divisor is the G.C.M. of two given
numbers, e.g. 169, 312?
5. How would you arrange desks and seats in your school-room so that the light might be
most beneficial to yourself and your pupils ?
6. Do you or would you send a pupil home for any cause ? Could not such cases be dealt
with otherwise ? 262 Public Schools Report. 1882
7. Upon what personal qualities of the teacher does good discipline depend ?    How would
you act in the case of a child's disobedience ?
8. Draw out a time-table for a country school of 30 children.
9. Show how you would proceed to teach a class to tell the time by a clock or watch.
10. Should drawing be a branch of elementary education and to what extent ?     Would it
be beneficial to any other branch of education 1
11. What is rote work ?    State its effect upon the mind and the acquisition of knowledge,
Should it be discarded and if not, in what cases ?
12. Choose some object and give the outline of a lesson upon it,
(For all classes and grades.)
British History.
Monday, \0th July; 10 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.    Total marks 200.
1. How did the English Parliament evolve, and when was its organization distinctly
defined ?
2. When did the introduction of Bills by the Commons commence.
3. Explain what is meant by the maxim that "The King can do no wrong."
4. State fully what are the three estates of the realm.
5. In whom is vested the power of creating Peers ?
6. What is the business of the two houses of parliament ?
7. Name the two first battles gained in the Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) by Sir Arthur
Wellesley.
8. Briefly sketch the career in the Peninsula of the British General Sir John Moore, and
name the other General (a Briton) who some fifty years earlier, died almost as Moore did.
9. State what you know of the military and civil career in India of the late Sir James
Outram.
10. Mention the circumstances of Daniel O'Connell's public career, and the supposed
consequences of his acts.
11. Give account of the doings of Albert of Saxe Gotha, late Prince Consort.
12. Sketch the domestic history of Queen Victoria's reign, briefly alluding to reforms,
inventions, and discoveries, and naming the statesmen who have shown most elevation of
moral tone.
(For First Class, Grade B.)
Mensuration.—Mr. R. Williams.
Monday, 10th July; 2 io 4.30 p. m.   Total marks 200.
1. The radius of a circle is 7 ft.;   from a point 12 ft. from the centre a straight
line is drawn to touch the circle; find the length of this line to 2 decimal places.
2. A country is 500 miles long; find length of map representing the country on the
scale of one-eighth of an inch to the mile.
3. The height of a circular arc is  15 inches, and the chord of half the arc is 4 ft. 6
in.; find diameter of the circle.
4. The circumference of a circle being 3y times the diameter, find the diameter of
a circle whose circumference=10 chains. 5. A plank is 18 in. broad, how long must it be in order that its area may be a
square yard.
6. The diagonal of a square court is 30 yds., find cost of gravelling the court at the
cost of 1 shilling for 9 sq. yds.
7. Find the height of a parallelogram whose area is 3J acres, and base=242 yds.
8. Find area of triangle whose sides are 105, 116, 143.
9. A B C D is a quadrilateral: A B^=845 ft. B C=613 ft. C D=810 ft. A B is parallel to C D and the angle at A is a right angle; find the area.
10. The circumference of a circle is half a mile;   find the area in sq. yds.    Given
cire.      _ 22
diameter     i j
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Mensuration.—Mr. R. Williams.
Monday, 10th, July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks 200.
[1 to 10 as per First Class, Grade B.]
11. Find in cubic ft. and inches the volume of a triangular prism the sides of whose
base are 7, 15 and 20 inches, and height = 45 in.
12. The slant side of a right circular cone is 41 ft. and the height is 40 ft.; find the
volume.
13. Find in lbs. the weight of a spherical shot of iron 6 inches in diameter, supposing a cubic inch of iron to weigh 4.2 ounces.
14. The area of the curved surface of a right cylinder is 6 sq. ft. and the circumference of the base is 3 ft. 9 in.; find the height.
15. The area of the curved surface of a right circular cone is 650 sq. inches, and the
slant height is 25 in.; find the circumference of base.
16. Find the volume of a sphere, when its surface is equal to that of a circle 4 ft. in
diameter.
17. The length of a cask is 20 inches, the bung diameter is 16 in. and the head
diameter 12 in.; find its volume in gallons.
(For First Class, Grade B.)
Natural Philosophy.   Mr. R. Williams.
Tuesday, llth July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. If two forces acting at right angles to each other be in the ratio of 1 : -j/3, and
their resultant be 10 lbs., find the forces.
2. If the forces P and 2 P act upon a point, and the angle between them be 4-3rds
of a right angle, find the magnitude of their resultant.
3. Resolve a force of 12 lbs. into two forces, of which one is at right angles to it,
and the other makes an angle of 30 degrees with it.
4. In a straight lever, when the pressure on the fulcrum is 99 lbs. and the arms of
lever are as 4 : 7, find the weights.
5. A square and a triangle have the same base;  find the altitude of the triangle,
that the centre of gravity of the two may lie in that base.
6. Name the mechanical powers, and find the relation between P and W in the
single movable pulley, the strings not parallel.
7. Find the relation between P and W in the inclined plane, P acting parallel to
the plane.
What power acting parallel to a smooth plane inclined at an angle of 30 degrees is
necessary to sustain a weight of 4 lbs. on the plane?
18 264 Public Schools Report. 1882
8. Explain limiting friction, and state its laws.
What is meant by the co-efficient of friction?
Find its value in the case of the inclined plane.
9. The two arms of a lever are equal and form two sides of a square, the fulcrum
being at their intersection: two equal forces act at their ends along the remaining
sides:   find pressure on the fulcrum.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Natural Philosophy.   Mr. R. Williams.
Tuesday, llth July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. ' Total marks, 200.
[1 to 9 as for First Class, Grade B.]
10. A body moving with uniform acceleration describes 570 feet in the eighth
second: find the acceleration.
11. If a mile per minute be the unit of velocity, and a yard the unit of space: find
the unit of time.
12. A body is projected with a velocity of 60 feet per second, in a direction making
an angle of 30 degrees with the horizon: find its velocity at end of half a second.
13. State the conditions of flotation.
Find the specific gravity of a material such that a cylinder formed of it four inches
long, floats in water with three inches immersed.
14. A mixture is formed of equal volumes of three fluids; the densities (a, b,) of
two are given, and also the density (c) of the mixture: find the density of the third
fluid.
15. If the sum of the readings on a Centigrade and Fahrenheit thermometer be 60,
find the reading on each.
(For First Class, Grades A and B.)
Book-keeping.
Tuesday, llth July; 2 to 5 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
From the following details make appropriate entries in Cash Book, Journal, and
Ledger, showing the profit or loss in your business, and a Balance Sheet exhibiting the
true state of your affairs:—
Commenced business with cash, $6,000.
Deposited in Bank of B. C, $5,760.
Bought of A. merchandise, $5,163.
Sold B. do. $3,030.
Drew on Bank of B. C. cheque for $1,020,
Received from B, his acceptance of my draft No. 1, $372; his promissory note No,
2, $636; bill on C, No. 3, $632, and cash $546. Accepted 2 bills drawn by A, No. 1
payable to D $1,323, and No. 2 payable to his order $866.
Paid E.'s salary as clerk, $120.
Received payment of B.'s bill No. 1, $372.
Paid bill No. 1, A, by cheque on Bank B. C, $1,323.
Lost a bank note, value $50.
Discounted at Bank of B. C. bill No. 2, B, $636; discount $4, proceeds $632.
Paid bill No. 2, A, $866.
Settled with A as follows:—Charged him with mdse. short $4; paid him cash $938;
endorsed him bill No. 3 on C $632; and gave him my note No. 3, due in three months,
for the balance, $1,400.
Took for family use mdse. $73, cash $233.
Drew balance of account from Bank of B. C. $3,417.
Received interest from the Bank $43.
Due E. on account of salary $90.
Balance of mdse. on hand as per inventory $2,604. 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 265
(For First Class, Grade B.)
Algebra.—Mr. R. Williams.
Wednesday, 12th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Multiply a; + 2yi -f- 3z* by x — 2yh -\- 3zi, and divide a -4- b by a* + U.
2. Find the L. C. M. of x — 1, x2 — 1, A3 — 2, and x2 — 4 ;
and the G. C. M. of 6a:2 -f- 13a; + 6 and 8a;2 + 6a; — 9.
3. Simplify ^ ,    }. r + ~  and        W'h
x + i/x2 — 1  ' x — -/a;2 — 1        t/2 + 3 t/J
g
4. Find the Square Root of 1 — ax* — ~ a?x -f- 2a3a; 2 4- 4a*a;2
5. Find the Square Root of 94 —42 j/5.
6. Solve the following Equations :—
1      ,     2 3 x*+xy + y* = 37~
x + 3 ' x + 6    X + 9 x+y
2/2 = 37|
F + f-41
a;+!=20£
y+J-a*
-l/a; — -j/a + x = y -
7. A party at a tavern had a bill of £4 to pay between them, but two having
sneaked off, those who remained had each 2 shillings more to pay ; how many were
there at first.
8. A. and B. engaged in trade, A. with $275, B. with $300. A. lost half as much
again as B., and B. had then remaining half as much again as A.: how much did each
lose ?
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Algebra.—Mr. R. Williams.
Wednesday, 12th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
[1 to 8 as for First Class, Grade B.]
9 If y = tbe sum of two quantities, of which one is constant, and the other varies
inversely as x, and when x = 2, y = 0 ; when x = 3, y = 1, find the value of y when
x = 6.
10. Find the sum of the series ^ -j- i + & + &c- to 8 terms.
11. Insert two Harmonic Means between 6 and 24.
12. At an election where every voter may vote for any number of candidates not
greater than the number to be elected, there are 4 candidates and 3 members to be
chosen; in how many ways may a man vote ?
13. Expand (1 — 4a;)-4 to 5 terms.
14. If 14a; — by = 7 ; find the least positive integral values of a; and y.
15. Transform 1000000 from the quinary to the septenary scale. 266 Public Schools Report. 1882
(For First Class, Grade B.)
Euclid.    Mr. R. Williams.
Wednesday, 12th July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Give Euclid's definition of a line, straight line, plane angle,plane rectilineal angle,
surface, plane surface.   Write down the postulates.   State the meaning of the word axiom.
2. If a straight line fall upon two parallel straight lines, it makes the two interior
angles on the same side equal to two right angles.
3. If a side of a triangle be produced, the exterior angle is equal to the two interior
and opposite angles, and the three interior angles are equal to two right angles.
4. If the square described on one side of a triangle equal the squares on the other
sides, the angle contained by these two equals a right angle.
5. If a straight line be divided into two equal parts, and also into two unequal parts;
the rectangle contained by the unequal parts, together with the square of the line
between the points of section, equals square of half the line.
6. Describe a square that shall be equal to a given rectilineal figure.
7. Divide a straight line into three equal parts.
8. Describe a circle which shall pass through two given points, and have its centre
in a given straight line.
9. Prove that the squares of the diagonals of a parallelogram are together equal to
the squares of the four sides.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Edclid.   Mr. R. Williams.
Wednesday, 12th July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 100.
[1 to 9 as for First Class, Grade B.]
10. Distinguish between the angle of, and the angle in, a segment of a circle. When
are segments of circles similar.
11. Draw a straight line from a given point, either without or in the circumference,
which shall touch a given circle.
12. The opposite angles of any quadrilateral figure inscribed in a circle are together
equal to two right angles.
13. Inscribe an equilateral and equiangular quindecagon in a given circle.
14. Explain the word homologous as used in proportions ; also the words allernando,
invertendo, and componendo.    Define similar rectilineal figures.
15. Parallelograms about the diameter of any parallelogram are similar to the
whole and to one another.
16. Describe a circle of given radius which shall pass through two given points.
17. Describe a square in a given right angled isosceles triangle.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Ancient History.
Thursday, 13th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Briefly sketch the career of Lycurgus the Spartan lawgiver.
2. And of Solon.
3. Do. Epaminondas.
4. Do. Socrates.
5. Do. Phocion.
6. Do. Demosthenes, the orator.
7. Do. Philip of Macedon. 8. Who was the most able Roman  General in Italy opposed to Hannibal, ere P.
Cornelius Scipio, the Younger, commanded.
9. State what you know of the career of the Roman reformers, the Gracchi brothers.
10. Condense an account of the doings of the Emperor Vespasian.
11. And of his son Titus.
12. Give the character and acts of the Emperor Antoninus Pius.
13. Do the same regarding the Emperor Marcus Aurelius.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
British Literature.
Thursday, 13th July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Name the translator into Latin verse of the Psalms of David, and mention his
other literary works.
2. Name the author of the Pilgrim's Progress, and concisely relate the chief events
of his life.
3. DO the same for the author of Gulliver's travels, remarking on his other literary
productions.
4. And for the author of Robinson Crusoe.
5. Contrast the condition of authors generally about the time of Queen Anne, with
that of the same class of late.
6. Write about the beginnings of newspapers and serials, and also of parliamentary
reporting, naming the London printer, conspicuous last century, as an employer of
reporters.
7. State what you know of modern reporting for the press.
8. Relate the origin of the first three quarterly reviews, mentioning the opinions
advocated by each one, or the political party of which it became the organ.
9. Fill up the time allotted by remarks on your favorite authors of the nineteenth
century.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Practical Mathematics.
Friday, 14th July; 10 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.    Total marks 200
1. On a given straight line A B, 6 in. in length describe a regular hexagon and find
its area.
2. Given the hypothenuse 1 foot and one of the sides '   ' ~\      of   a   right   angled
•" \/ 2
triangle; contract the triangle and measure its other parts.
3. In a right-angled triangle, the hypothenuse is 4 and one of the oblique   angles
18°; find the other angle and the two sides.
4. In a triangle the sides are 160, 80 -j/3 and 80; find the angles.
-    t-. ^,     ,    Sin A + Sin B tan J (A + B)
5. Prove that -—--——— = ;—~—~
Sm A — Sin B tan J (A — B)
6. Find the area of a quadrilateral, whose opposite sides are 5, 6 and 7, 8, and the
inclination of whose diagonals is 45°. 268
Public Schools Report.
1882
7. Make a rough plan of the field ABC and calculate its area from the following
entry in a field-book, the measurements being given in links. The chain-lines are all
within the field.
20
520 A
40
300
0
0
©c
0
560 C
20
450
10
200
20
0
QB
0
600 B
40
250
0
0
N 45 W
©A
8. Show how to cut off any portion from a triangular field by a line drawn from a
point in one of its sides.
9. Given the major axis 10 of an ellipse, the minor axis 7, describe it and find its
area.
10. A ship leaves a place in latitude 10° 35' N. and longitude 178° 20' W. and after
sailing S.W. for some time the-differences of latitude and longitude were found to be 750
and 250 miles.    Find the latitude and longitude of the place arrived at.
1.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Latin (Virgil).   Mr. R, Williams.
Friday, 14th July; 2 to 4.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
Translate:—
Nee procul hinc Rhesi niveis tentoria velis
Agnoscit lacrymans : primo qua} prodita somno
Tydides multa vastabat csede cruentus :
Ardentesque avertit equos in castra, priusquam
Pabula gustassent TrojaB, Xanthumque bibissent.
Parte alia fugiens amissis Tro'ilus armis,
Infelix puer atque impar congressus Achilli,
Fertur equis, curruque hasret resupinus inani, ,
Lora tenens tamen: huic cervixque comseque trahuntur
Per terram, et versa pulvis inscribitur hasta.
Scan the last five lines.    Narrate the story about Rhesus.    Give the other name of
Tydides.   What was Xanthus?
2. Translate:—
Vix ea fatus est senior, subitoque fragore
Intonuit laavum, et do ccelo lapsa per umbras
Stella facem ducens multa cum luce cucurrit.
Illam, summa super labentem culmina tecti,
Cernimus Idsea claram se condere sylva,
Signantemque vias; turn longo limite sulcus
Dat lucem, et late circum loca sulfure fumant. 46 Vic. Public Schools Report. 269
Give the present and perfect indicative, the supine and the present infinitive of all
the verbs and participles in the above extract, if such parts exist. Give also the
nominative singular of each noun.
(Horace.)
1. Translate:—
Ieci, beads nunc Arabum invides
Gazis, et acrem militiam paras
Non ante devictis Sabteas
Regibus, horribilique Medo
Nectis catenas? quse tibi virginum,
Sponso necato, barbara serviet?
Puer quis ex aula capillis
Ad eyathum statuetur unctis
Doctus sagittas tendere Sericas
Arcu paterno?
Give the name of the above metre, and write out its Scheme.
2. Translate:—
Ignotum tragicee genus invenisse CamenEe
Dicitur et plaustris vexisse poemata Thespis,
Qui canerent agerentque peruncti fsecibus ora.
Post hunc personte pallroque repertor honestas
iEschylus et modicis instravit pulpita tignis,
Et docuit magnumque loqui nitique cothurno.
Successit vetus his Comoedia, non sine multa
Laude; sed in vitium libertas excidit, et vim
Dignam lege regi.
Name the Greek Dramatists whose plays have reached us, and the names of their
extant dramas.
Explain the duties of the Chorus in Greek plays.
Distinguish between the Old, Middle, and New Comedy of the Greeks.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
French.   (Optional subject chosen.)
Saturday, 15th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30p m.    Total marks, 200.
Render into French the following sentences :—
1. I have told you that health constitutes the happiness of the body, and goodness
that of the soul.
2. The law that God has deeply engraven on my heart instructs me in everything
I owe to the Author of my being, to my neighbour, and to myself.
Translate the following from Voltaire's history of Charles XII., of Sweden:—
"II y a peu de souverains dont on dut ecrire une histoire particuliere. En vain la
malignite ou la flatterie s'est exercee sur presque tous les princes: il n'y en a qu'un
tj'es-petit nombre dont la memoire se conserve; et ce noinbre serait encore plus petit si
Ton ne souvenait que de ceux qui out ete justes."
And from Corneille's "Cid," the subjoined:—
"Juste Ciel, d'ou j'attends mon remede,
Mets enfin quelque borne au mal qui me possede
Assure mon repos, assure mon honneur.
Dans le bonheur d'autrui je cherche mon bonheur
Cet hymenee a trois egalement importe ;
Rend son effet plus prompt, ou mon ame plus forte."
Give the feminines of the adjectives—beau, vieux, nouveau, fou. What is the masculine of beau and fou before a vowel or h mute. State the feminine of the nouns—
Chretien, Juif, ami. 270 Public Schools Report. 1882
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Physiology.    (Optional subject chosen.)
Saturday, 15th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. Name the chief constituents of the atmosphere, also mentioning its minor constituents.
2. How is the air rendered impure ?
3. What suspended impurities are common in the air ?
4. What contaminations are found in the air of marshes and in that of cellars ?
5. What is tho effect of inhaling air containing organic impurities ?
6. What is the general effect upon the body of impure air ?
7. State what you know about the sources of ill health.
8. Name some formidable diseases, long deemed unpreventable, that, by latter-day
sanitary measures, have been greatly circumscribed in tlieir ravages.
9. When do the agencies of health become sources of disease ?
10. What diseases are produced by the breathing of impure air, already vitiated by
respiration ?
11.' Succintly define the scope of human physiology, and show how a general
knowledge of its principal facts and deductions is of inestimable value to parents, as well
as to all educators.
(For First Class, Grade A.)
Chemistry.    (Optional subject chosen.)
Saturday, 15th July; 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.    Total marks, 200.
1. State the composition of nitro-glycerine.
2. And of dynamite, mentioning the disadvantages of the former for practical
purposes.
3. How are explosions in coal mines caused, and how prevented?
4. Give one or more instances mentioned in history, of death, in confined places, by
exhaustion of oxygen in the air or by inhaling of carbonic acid gas produced in such
places by burning fuel.
5. What, in the economy of nature, are some of the uses of oxygen,
6. Of hydrogen,
7. Of carbonic acid gas,
8. And of nitrogen ?
9. What are the great natural sources of oxygen, and of carbonic acid gas?
10. Mention the properties of ozone.
11. What gas is neither colourless, inodorous, nor invisible, and to what uses has
it been applied by man ?
12. Explain what is meant by 'chemical equation,' giving an example.
VICTORIA : Printed by Richard Wolfexden, Government Printer,
at the Government Printing Office. James' Bay. 

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