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FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1915

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 FIRST ANNUAL REPORT
PEOYINCIAL  INDUSTEIAL
SCHOOL FOE OIELS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT
THE GOVERNMENT OF
THE PRCV1HCE OF BRITISH COLUMBia,
printed by
authority of the legislative assembly.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by William H. Ccllin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1915.  To His Honour Frank Stillman Barnard,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg to  submit  herewith the  First Annual  Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  the
Provincial Home for Girls.
W. J. BOWSER,
A ttorney- General.
Attorney-General's Office,
Victoria, B.C., January 21st, 191,5. ,
S 3  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
Honourable   W. J. Bowser, K.C.,
Attorney-General,  Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the Honourable Members of the Legislature
of British Columbia the first Year-end Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Girls
from February 1st to November 30th, 1914.
Although the Superintendent, Matron, and janitor commenced their duties on February
1st, the institution was not furnished or in shape to receive any girls for some weeks after that
date; in fact, the first inmate came to us on February 28th and the first members of the
staff commenced their duties on March 1st, 1914.
Official Opening.—The institution was officially opened by the Honourable the Attorney-
General on Friday, April 3rd. At this function we had a large and representative gathering,
and a number of citizens, both civic, legal, ministerial, and representatives of the different
women's societies, delivered addresses, after which the Honourable the Attorney-General, in a
comprehensive address, described the work for which the institution had been erected, gave
some figures as to the cost of the same, described the Government's policy of prison reform,
and declared the building officially opened, after which it was inspected by any and all who
cared to go through the different departments.
Number of Inmates received.—Since the opening and up to November 30th, 1914,
twenty-two girls have been received from different parts of the Province, all of whom are still
inmates of the institution.
Length of Sentences.—The majority of the girls have been committed, under section 6 of
the "Industrial Home for Girls Act," to an undefined period of not less than two years, while
one has a sentence of seven years.
Age of Girls at Commitment.—Twelve years, 2 ; thirteen years, 1 ; fourteen years, 7;
fifteen years, 10 ;  sixteen years, 2.
Nationality.—Seven are of Canadian descent, four of English descent, four of American
descent, two of French descent, one of Scotch descent, one of Irish descent, one of Swedish
descent, one of Italian descent, and one of Newfoundland descent.
Countries where born.—Twelve were born in Canada, six in America, two in England,
and one each in Scotland and Sweden.
Charges under which committed.—Incorrigibility, 16; vagrancy, 3; unlawful escape, 2;
associating with a criminal, 1.
Although it is a little difficult to say very much owing to the short time we have been in
operation and have had sufficient girls to make any real arrangement, yet very satisfactory
progress is being made in the different departments of work, and at present girls are being
instructed in the following branches :-—
Cooking.—We aim, as much as possible, at giving each girl a period in the kitchen,
some of necessity longer than others, as they have had less experience before entering the
institution.
Bread-making.—This also comes under the supervision of the cook, and already we have
several girls who can make first-class bread, and all the bread used in the institution is made
in our own bakery.
S 5 S 6 Industrial School for Girls, 1915
Plain Sewing and Fancy Work.—In this department we make all the working dresses,
skirts, aprons, and part of the underclothing worn by the inmates; also endeavour to teach
girls some fancy work.
Laundry.—The girls, of course, do all the laundry-work, both washing and ironing'for
the institution and their own personal work as well.
First Aid.—All the girls in the institution are in the First Aid class; this is held once
a week, and is of great interest to the girls and will be very helpful to them in after-life.
Day-school.—Although nothing was done until April 27th owing to the small number of
girls in the institution, I am pleased to report very good progress indeed in this branch. At
the present time twenty girls attend school, the junior classes in the morning and the seniors
in the afternoon. This arrangement leaves the senior girls to do the bulk of the work in the
morning and the juniors for the balance and lighter work in the afternoon.
We find some of the girls very much behind in their studies, while others are far more
advanced. At present we have one girl in the First Reader, seven in the Second Reader,
and twelve in the Third Reader, with three or four of them proposed for promotion after
Christmas.
Health.—I am pleased to report that, with one exception, that of a girl who is suffering
from an old nerve trouble of long standing, there has been nothing more than minor illness
during the last year amongst the girls, and up to the present we have not had to make use
of the hospital accommodation of the institution.    Long may it remain so.
Library.—We have a small library from which a collection of useful and moral books are
supplied to the girls for reading purposes. Each girl is allowed one book per week if she
desires it, but if not finished with it at the end of the week she is allowed to retain it longer.
Many kind friends have also sent in from time to time a supply of magazines and periodicals
which has been much appreciated.
Playgrounds.—During the summer months the girls were allowed all the outdoor exercise
possible, and while the grounds were of necessity very incomplete, we hope to be able to do
more on this line next year. We also expect to add gardening and the care of small fruits to
our outdoor work next summer. It may be of interest to know that we produced over forty
sacks of potatoes this year. We are also looking forward to the time when we will have a
properly equipped gymnasium in connection with the institution.
Keligious Services.—We are endeavouring to help the girls mentally arid spiritually as
well as physically. Each Sunday afternoon from 3 to 4 o'clock in the assembly-room we have
a Gospel service conducted by representatives from different churches and societies, and on
each alternate Wednesday evening at 4.30 arrangements have been made for the Catholic
clergy to have a service with the Catholic girls in the reception-room, so that all are having
attention in spiritual matters.
Concerts and Entertainments.—We have also had some special entertainment on week-
nights on several occasions. The bandmaster of the Salvation Army Band brought out a
dozen instrumentalists on one occasion and gave us an hour of musical entertainment. At
another time he gave us a gramophone service. The Epworth League of the city, under the
leadership of Mr. Stewart, provided another evening's entertainment, while the Salvation
Army Songsters and League of Mercy Workers were the entertainers on two other occasions.
Our engineer, Mr. A. 0. Allen, contributed an evening on the phonograph. In addition to this,
the girls get up a concert amongst themselves about every three weeks. 5 Geo. 5 British Columbia. S 7
The following are the present staff of officials :—
Superintendent—T. H. Collier.
Matron—Mrs. Collier.
Engineer and Janitor—A. 0. Allen.
First Assistant and Nurse—Mrs. K. McNaughton.
Needlewoman and Laundress—Miss Emma Bailey.
Cook—Miss C. A. Pain.
Teacher—Miss L. C. Day.
All of which I submit most respectfully.
T. H. COLLIER,
Superintendent.
Vancouver, B.C., December 7th, 19 If.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by William H.  Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1915.

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