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FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1911-1912. BY THE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1913

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 FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT
Public  Schools
—OP   THE   PROVINCE   OP	
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
1911-1912.
BY  THE   SUPERINTENDENT   OF  EDUCATION.
WITH APPENDICES.
THE GOVERNMENT OF
THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by William H. Cl'llin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1913.  3 Geo. 5 Public Schools Report. A 3
PUBLIC  SCHOOLS  REPORT,
1911-12.
To His Honour Thomas Wilson Paterson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg herewith respectfully to present the Forty-first Annual Report on the Public
Schools of the Province.
HENRY ESSON   YOUNG,
Minister of Education.
November, 1912.  3 Geo. 5 Public Schools Report. A 5
PART I.
GENERAL   REPORT.  3 Geo. 5
Public Schools Report.
A 7
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT  OF  EDUCATION,
1911-1912.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., November, 1912.
To the Honourable Henry Esson Young, M.D., LL.D.,
Minister of Education:
Sir,—I beg to submit the Forty-first Annual Report of the Public Schools of British
Columbia for the school-year ending June 30th, 1912.
The total enrolment in all the colleges and schools was 50,170, an increase of 5,045 over
that of the previous year. The number of boys was 25,870, and of girls 24,300. The grand
total actual daily attendance made by all the pupils enrolled was 7,065,776, an increase of
1,142,800. The average actual daily attendance was 37,568, an increase of 5,406. The percentage of regular attendance was 74.88, the highest in the history of the public schools.
COLLEGES.
The enrolment during the year in the McGill University College of British Columbia,
one branch of which is situated in Vancouver and the other in Victoria, was 202. Of this
number 136 were boys and 66 were girls.
The number of divisions, the total enrolment, the total actual daily attendance, and the
percentage of regular attendance in each branch institution are shown in the following table :—
Colleges.
No. of
Divisions.
Total
Enrolment.
Actual
Daily
Attendance.
Percentage
of Regular
Attendance.
6
2
174
28
156.25
26.89
89.79
Victoria	
96.04 A 8
Public Schools Report.
1912
HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in the high schools during the year was   2,151.     Of this number 973
were boys and 1,178 were girls.
The number of divisions, the total enrolment, the total actual daily attendance, and the
percentage of regular attendance in each high school are shown in the following table :—
High Schools.
Armstrong	
Chilliwack	
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster.
Peachland    	
Pentieton	
Revels toke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Summerland	
Vancouver :
Britannia	
King Edward.
Vancouver, North
Vernon	
Victoria	
No. of
Divisions.
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
3
3
6
1
1
2
2
1
1
6
20
2
2
13
Total
Enrolment.
45
59
23
23
12
25
39
20
33
21
53
72
177
14
32
42
34
11
18
206
767
33
28
364
Actual
Daily
Attendance.
34.28
46.78
11.58
15.71
6.01
18.75
30.74
13.92
33.48
18.41
42.67
55. S7
132.17
9.63
23.92
30.68
26.27
8.15
13.58
152.67
585.59
23.95
19.26
290.99
Percentage
of Regular
Attendance.
76.18
79.29
50.35
68.30
50.83
75.00
78.82
69.60
87.66
80.69
77.60
74.67
61.64
74.75
73.04
77.26
74.09
75.44
74.11
76.34
72.57
68.78
79.94 3 Geo. 5
Public Schools Report.
A 9
GRADED  CITY  SCHOOLS.
A graded school consists of at least two divisions, having as its teaching staff a principal
and at least one assistant. The total enrolment in graded city schools was 27,034, and the
actual daily attendance 21,359.    The number of boys enrolled was 14,058, of girls 12,976.
The following table gives the names of the several graded city schools, the number of
divisions in each, the total enrolment, the actual daily attendance, and the percentage of
regular attendance :—
Schools.
Chilliwack	
Cranbrook 	
Cumberland  	
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Merritt	
Nanaimo :
Central	
Middle Ward	
North Ward	
South Ward	
Nelson	
New Westminster :
Boys'	
Girls'	
Lord Kelvin	
Queensborough	
Sapperton	
Phoenix	
Port Alberni	
Prince Rupert  	
Revelstoke:
Central	
Selkirk 	
Rossland :
Central	
Cook Avenue	
Salmon Arm	
Sandon 	
Slocan 	
Trail	
Vancouver :
Aberdeen	
Alexandra 	
Beaconsfield	
Central	
Children's Home. ...
Dawson	
D.L. 301   	
Fairview	
Florence Nightingale
Grand View	
Hastings	
Henry Hudson	
Kitsilano	
Maedonald	
Model	
Number
of
Total
Actual Daily
Percentage of
Regular
Attendance.
Population of
City according
Divisions.
Enrolment.
Attendance.
to Census of
1911.
8
330
256.57
77.75
1,657
10
514
371.20
72.22
2,365
7
358
258.85
72.30
1,237
4
142
102.42
72.11
5
206
162.33
78.70
835
15
707
556.58
78.72
1,287
7
321
242.94
75.68
1,577
3
102
71.77
70.36
9
375
300.23
80.06
3,772
3
154
114.23
74.18
7
288
232.86
80.85
1,663
10
492
388.18
78.89
5
226
168.14
74.39
11
569
448.47
78.81
1
4
238
192.99
81.09
I   8,305
1
55
42.64
77.53
3
178
139.22
78.21
J
13
670
502.81
75.04
4,563
11
508
386.29
76.04
"I
11
477
374.61
78.53
12
541
393.01
72.66
V 13,394
2
59
52.69
89.30
1
7
296
221.66
74.88
J
3
121
90.04
74.41
1,512
1
77
40.97
53.22
7
354
240.56
67.95
4,184
8
304
236.05
77.64
j   3,010
6
217
192.04
88.49
8
374
287.21
76.79
|   2,827
3
152
115.22
75.80
3
132
103.34
78 28
1
15
11.98
79.86
1
35
25.87
73.91
189
4
214
158.07
73.86
1,450
8
484
325.42
67.23
1
16
731
599.06
81.95
2
83
56.19
67.69
17
802
596.94
73.18
2
119
85.18
71.58
15
677
530.94
78.42
3
103
79.53
76.24
14
601
492.87
82.00
8
398
321.26
80.72
11
534
445.25
6
314
238.22
75.86
8
16
403
662
285.71
632.07
70.94
- 100,333
9
374
376.20
1
14
634
516.59
81.48 A 10
Public Schools Report.
1912
GRADED CITY SCHOOLS.—Concluded.
Schools.
Vancouver.—Concluded.
Mount Pleasant	
Nelson	
Rhodes	
Roberts	
Seymour    ...
Simon Fraser	
Strathcona	
Tennyson 	
Vancouver, North	
Vernon	
Victoria :
Bank Street	
Boys'	
Douglas    	
Fisguard Street....
George Jay	
Girls'	
Hillside	
Kingston Street .   .
North Ward	
Rock Bay	
South Park	
Spring Ridge  	
West	
Number
of
Divisions.
21
10
8
17
17
14
16
8
15
10
4
11
7
1
10
10
3
7
13
2
8
4
9
Total
Enrolment.
783
466
316
787
805
678
799
381
736
456
193
542
351
66
454
443
156
322
608
58
340
218
356
Actual Daily
Attendance.
810.25
380.94
273.49
605.14
645.64
514.59
628.98
313.09
563.67
352.63
148.83
426.22
253.41
46.25
360.90
365.85
117.57
245.89
486.29
55.04
270.24
160.10
270.90
Percentage of
Regular
Attendance.
81.74
86.55
76.89
80.20
75,89
78.72
81.74
76.58
77.33
77.11
78.64
72.19
70.08
79 49
82.58
75.36
76.36
79.98
94.89
79.48
73.45
76.09
Population of
City according
to Census of
1911.
7,781
2,671
V 31,620
RURAL   MUNICIPALITY   SCHOOLS.
The total enrolment in these schools for the year was 11,174. Of these 5,747 were boys
and 5,427 girls.
The following table gives the names of the several municipalities, the number of schools
in each, the number of divisions, the total enrolment, and the actual daily attendance :—
Municipality.
Burnaby  	
Chilliwack	
Coldstream	
Coquitlam	
Cowichan, North.
Delta	
Kent	
Langley	
Maple Ridge	
Matsqui	
Mission	
Oak Bay	
Peachland	
Penticton	
Point Grey	
Richmond	
Saanich .   	
Salmon Arm ....
Spallumcheen ....
Sumas	
Summerland .   ...
Surrey	
Vancouver, North
Vancouver, South
Vancouver, West
Number
of
Schools.
10
13
1
4
6
10
4
13
9
10
5
2
o
1
4
6
12
4
8
4
1
15
3
7
1
Number
of
Divisions.
20
19
1
5
7
13
5
16
12
13
9
6
3
5
14
12
19
5
13
4
5
16
5
87
1
Total
Enrolment.
594
28
188
169
370
162
413
414
344
267
230
55
232
525
356
812
139
375
121
198
507
222
3,564
23
Actual Daily
Attendance.
598.62
410.25
19.89
99.64
127.89
283.30
112.50
288.45
296.73
232.64
182.71
173.91
45.65
161.04
383.95
257.43
501.96
91.07
272.28
60.02
154.85
317.17
145.96
2,719.21
12.27 3 Geo. 5
Public Schools Report.                                      AH
RURAL
, AND ASSISTED
SCHOOLS.
 .u.	
The total enrolment in these schools for the year was
9,609.    Of these 4,956 were boys
and 4,653 were girls.    In the
following list of rural and assisted schools the names in italics
are "assisted schools":—
Abbotsford,
Carson,
Fairview,
Ainsworth,
Cascade,
Fanny Bay,
Alberni,
Castlegar,
Ferguson,
Albert Canyon,
Cedar, East,
Field,
Aldermere,
Cedar, North,
Fife,
Alert Bay,
Cedar, South,
Fire Valley,
Alice Siding,
Chase,
Flagstone,
Anaconda,
Chase River,
Fort George, South,
Anarchist Mountain,
Chasm,
Fort Steele,
Arrowhead,
Clayoquot,
Foster's Bar,
Arrow Park, East,
Clinton,
French Creek,
Arrow Park, West,
Coal Creek,
Fruitlands,
Ashcroft,
Coalmont,
Fruit vale,
Ashton Creek,
Columbia Gardens,
Gabriola, North,
Athalmer,
Columbia Park,
Gabriola, South,
Atlin,
Colwood,
Galena,
Balfour,
Gomaplix,
Galena Bay,
Banifield,
Comox,
Galiano,
Barnes Creek,
Corbin,
Gambier Island,
Barnston Island,
Cortes Island,
Gerrard,
Barrier River,
Courtenay,
Gill,
Baynes Lake,
Cowichan,
Gillis Bay,
Beaton,
Cranberry Marsh,
Glenbank,
Beaver Creek,
Crawford Bay,
Glenemma,
Beaver Point,
Crescent Valley,
Glenora,
Begbie,
Creston,
Golden,
Bella Coola,
Cultus Lake,
Coldstream,
Bella Coola, Lower,
Curzon,
Grande Prairie,
Bench,
Deadwood,
Granite Siding,
Beresford,
Deer Park,
Grantham,
Big Creek,
Demurs,  West,
Grindrod,
Big Eddy,
Denman Island,
Hall's Landing,
Black Mountain,
Departure Bay,
Happy Valley,
Boundary Falls,
Deward,
Harbledown Island,
Bowen Island,
Dewdney,
Harewood,
Box Lake,
Discovery,
Harper's Camp,
Brechin,
Ducks,
Harrop,
Bridesville,
Duhamel,
Hatzic Prairie,
Brilliant,
Edgewood,
Hazelton,
Briscoe,
Edith Lake.
Headquarters,
Britannia Beach,
Edwards Creek,
Hedley,
Britannia Mine,
Eholt,
Heriot Bay,
Burgoyne Bay,
Elko,
Highland,
Burtondale,
Elk Prairie,
Hilton,
Cache Creek,
Ellison,
Hope,
Campbell Creek,
Erickson,
Hope Station,
Campbell Creek, South,
Erie,
Horse Greek,
Campbell River,
Esquimalt,
Hosmer,
Canyon City,
Essington,
Howe Sound,
Carlin Siding,
Extension,
Hume, A 12
Public Schools Report.
1912
Rural and Assisted Schools. -
—Concluded.
Ingram Mountain,
New Denver,
Savona,
Inverness,
Nicola,
Seymour Arm,
Isabella Point,
Nicola, Lower,
Shawnigan,
Jaffray,
Nicomen,
Shuswap,
Kaleden,
Nicomen, North,
Shuswap Falls,
Jiedleston,
Nikrap,
Shuswap, North,
Reefers,
Nob Hill,
Sicamous,
Kelowna, East,
North Bend,
Silver Creek,
Xeremeos,
Northfield,
Silverton,
Rettle River, North,
North Thompson, West,
Similkameen,
Killarney,
Notch Hill,
Simpson,
Kimberley,
No. 7 Mine
Sirdar,
Kitsumgallum,
Ocean Falls,
Soda Creek,
Xoksilah,
Okanagan,
Sointula,
Lac la Ilache,
Okanagan Centre,
Sooke,
Lake Buntzen,
Okanagan Falls,
Sorrento,
Lancaster,
Okanagan Landing,
Spence's Bridge,
Lazo,
Okanagan, South,
Squamish,
Lillooet,
Olalla,
Squamish, Lower,
Little Fort,
Otter Point,
Stewart,
Long Lake,
Oyama,
Summit Lake,
Louis Creek,
Oyster,
Sunnyside,
Lumby,
Oyster, East,
Syringa Creek,
Lund,
Oyster, North,
Tappen Siding,
Lytton,
Parks ville,
Telegraph Creek,
Mabel Lake,
Pender Island,
Three Forks,
Malahat,
Perry Siding,
Three Valley,
Malakwa,
Porcher Island,
Thrums,
Malcolm Island,
Port Kusam,
Trout Lake,
Mara,
Port Moody,
Tulameen,
Martin's Prairie,
Powell River,
Ucluelet,
Marysville,
Princeton,
Union Bay,
Masset,
Proctor,
Valdes Island,
Mayne Island,
Qualicum,
Van Anda,
Meadow Spur,
Quatsino,
Vesuvius,
Metchosin,
Queen Charlotte,
Vesuvius, North,
Metlakatla,
Quesnel,
Waldo,
Michel,
Reiswig,
Wapta,
Michel, New,
Renata,
Wardner,
Midway,
Richardson,
Wasa,
Minto,
Richland,
Watmore,
Mirror Lake,
Roberts Creek,
Wellington,
Mission Creek,
Robson,
Wellington, South,
Monte Creek,
Rock Creek,
Westbank Townsite,
Montrose,
Rock Creek, Lower,
Whaletown,
Morris Valley,
Rocky Point,
Williams Lake,
Mountain,
Roosville,
Williams Siding,
Mount Ingersoll,
Rosebery,
Wilmer,
Moyie,
Rose Hill,
Windermere,
Myers Flat,
Saanich, North :
Winlaw,
Myncaster,
East Ward,
Winn,
MacKenzie,
West Ward,
Wolfson Bay,
Nakusp,
Sahtlam,
Wood's Lake,
Nanaimo Bay,
Salmo,
Wycliffe,
Nanaimo, North,
Salmon River,
Wynndel,
Nanaimo, South,
Salmon Valley,
Yale,
Naramata,
Sandspit,
Ymir.
Needles,
Sand wick, 3 Geo. 5 Public Schools Report. A 13
The total number of teachers employed was 1,353, an increase of 174. Of this number 16
were employed in the colleges, 77 in the high schools, 580 in the city graded schools, 314 in
the rural municipality schools, and 366 in the rural and assisted schools. The percentage of
regular attendance throughout the Province was 74.88.
The expenditure for education proper during the year was :—
Per capita grant to city municipality school districts  $335,203 65
do               rural municipality school  districts  175,846  90
do              rural school districts  80,914 30
Salaries of teachers in assisted schools  113,015 30
do                      Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway Belt 42,340 00
do                     night-schools  5,943 60
Incidental expenses. .  869 25
Grants to school libraries  201   78
Education Office  18,866 47
Free text-books  45,862 56
Inspection of schools  36,545 88
Normal School  18,509 18
Education of deaf and dumb  3,039 39
Conveying children to Central School  1,232 13
Grants towards manual training equipment  969 69
$879,360 08
Less Fees for teachers' certificates  2,945 00
$876,415 08
The cost of construction of new school-houses, furniture, repairs and improvements
generally to school property for the year was $275,299.62. The total cost to the Provincial
Government for all purposes of education during 1911-1912 was :—
Education proper    $876,415 08
Department of Works      275,299 62
$1,151,714 70
In addition to this amount, the incorporated cities, rural municipality and other school
districts spent the following sums over and above the per capita grants received from the-
Treasury:—
Cities or the Fikst Class.
New Westminster   % 196,975 17
Vancouver    1,271,135 87
Victoria       220,706 59
Cities of the Second Class.
Cranbrook	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Vancouver, North.
Vernon	
Cities of the Third Class.
Chilliwack..
Cumberland.
Duncan	
Enderby....
Greenwood..
12,491 43
14,026 51
7,014 42
24,081 92
9,136 11
17,410 63
15,256 96
15,628 83
10,484 12
82,779 45
11,454 22
8,692 04
3,245 40
1,194 51
3,125 18
3,727 60 A 14 Public Schools Report. 1912
Cities of the Third Class.—Concluded.
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Merritt	
Phoenix	
Prince Rupert.
Salmon Arm..
Sandon	
Slocan	
Trail	
Rural Municipalities.
Burnaby	
Chilliwack	
Coldstream  	
Coquitlam....   ...
Cowichan, North..
Delta	
Kent	
Langley	
Maple Ridge	
Matsqui	
Mission	
Oak Bay	
Peachland	
Penticton	
Point Grey	
Richmond	
Saanich	
Saanich, North
Salmon Arm	
Spallumcheen	
Sumas	
Summerland	
Surrey	
Vancouver, North.
Vancouver, South.
Vancouver, West..
Other School Districts.
Rural districts and assisted schools	
$  1,824 38
18,249 46
2,834 60
5,819 77
8,688 60
424 55
539 00
437 90
27,968 39
50,929 28
7,688 50
764 70
2,426 97
4,771 28
6,766 34
3,338 00
5,555 43
5,082 35
3,695 42
3,212 35
24,667 15
2,556 00
5,267 93
15,435 34
10,413 35
10,182 25
300 00
3,738 40
8,739 90
942 32
11,221 47
6,957 61
16,708 09
411,406 73
24,691 40
87,961 60
$2,730,773 77
1,151,714 70
Amount expended by the Provincial Government     1,151,714
Grand total cost of education $3,882,488 47
The grand total cost of education for the year 1910-1911 was $2,641,522.09.
The cost to the Government of education proper in the several electoral districts was:—
Alberni  $   13,751 90
Atlin  3,362 60
Cariboo  5,585 25
Chilliwack  27,010 10
Columbia  8,636 20
Comox  25,443 95
Cowichan  11,631 40
Cranbrook  9,220 95
Delta  25,409 40
Dewdney      20,314 25
Esquimalt  7,906 20
Fernie  19,135 25
Grand Forks  8,268 70
Greenwood  5,268 20
{The) Islands  7,424 95
Kamloops  27,820 65
Kaslo   6,750 70
Lillooet  2,904 05
Nanaimo  19,050 75
Carried forward       $  254,895 45 3 Geo. 5
Public Schools Report.
A 15
Brought forward   $  254,895 45
Nelson City  10,196 34
Newcastle  16,290 30
New Westminster City  22.233 35
Okanagan      48,222 18
Revelstoke  13,919 25
Richmond ,  84,937 50
Rossland City   6,673 30
Saanich     13,428 45
Similkameen  10,111  15
Skeena  16,593 90
Slocan  12,053 70
Vancouver City (including Hastings)  149,885 00
Victoria City  52,210 00
Yale  13,563 55
Ymir  25,177 80
$ 750,391 22
The following table shows the cost to the Provincial Government of each pupil on enrolment and on average daily attendance during the past ten years :—
Year.
Cost of each
pupil on
enrolment.
Cost of each
pupil on
average actual
daily
attendance.
1902-03	
$16 20
16 07
15 82
14 66
13 57
13 94
14 70
15 36
15 86
17 47
$24 27
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r>                                                                                                                   > 3 Geo. 5
Public Schools Report.
A 25
The gradual growth of the schools, as well as the cost of maintaining the same,  is fully
shown by the record of attendance and expenditure given in the following exhibit : —
Comparative Statement op Attendance and Cost of Public Schools from
1872-73 to 1911-12.
Year.
Number
of School
Districts.
Aggregate
enrolment.
Average
actual daily
attendance.
1872
1873
1874-
1875.
1876
1877-
1878-
1879
1880
1881
1882-
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888-
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896-
1897
1898
1899-
1900.
1901-
1902-
1903
1904-
1905
1906-
1907-
190S-
1909
1910
1911
73 ..
74 .
75 ..
76 .
77 ..
78 ..
79 ..
80 . .
81 ..
82 ..
83 ..
84 . .
85 ..
86 ..
87 ..
88 .
89 ..
90 ..
91 ..
92 ..
93 . .
94 ..
95 . .
96 ..
97 ..
98 ..
99 ..
1900
01 . .
02 ..
03 ..
04 . .
05 ..
06 ..
07 ..
08 ..
09 ..
10 . .
11 . .
-12...
37
41
41
42
45
45
47
48
50
59
67
76
86
95
104
109
123
141
154
169
178
183
193
199
213
224
231
245
257
268
+252
•|-248
+257
£167
189
197
211
§211
§328
1,02.8
1,245
1,403
1,685
1,998
2,198
2,301
2,462
2,571
2,653
2,693
3,420
4,027
4,471
5,345
6,372
6,796
8,042
9,260
10,773
11,496
12,613
13,482
14,469
15,798
17,648
19,185
21,531
23,615
23,903
24,499
25,787
27,354
28,522
30,039
33,314
36,227
39,822
45,125
50,170
575
767
863
984
1,260
1,395.50
1,315.90
1,293.93
1,366.86
1,358.68
1,383.00
1,808.60
2,089.74
2,481.48
2,873.38
3,093.46
3,681.14
4,333.90
5,134.91
6,227.10
7,111.40
7,785.50
8,610.31
9,254.25
9,999.61
11,055.65
12,304 32
13,438.41
15,098.28
15,564.25
16,357 43
17,060.93
18,859.41
19,506.23
20,017.02
23,195.27
25,350.63
28,094.16
32,163.24
37,567.88
Percentage
of
attendance.
55.93
61.60
61.51
58.39
63.06
63.49
57.19
52.56
53.16
51.21
51.36
52.88
51.89
55.50
53.75
48.54
54.16
53.89
55.45
57.80
61.85
61.72
63.86
64.00
63.29
62.64
64.13
62.41
63.93
65.11
66.76
66.16
68.94
68.39
66.63
69.62
69.97
70.54
71.27
74.88
Expenditure
for education
proper.
$36,763
35,287
34,822
44,506
47,129
43,334
*22,110
47,006
46,960
49,268
50,850
66,654
71,151
79,527
88,521
99,902
108,190
122,984
136,901
160,627
190,558
169,050
189,037
204,930 32
220,810 38
247,756 37
268,653
284,909
312,187
365,492
397,003
414,383 43
433,005 17
418,227
407,937
464,473
532,809
612,052
715,733
876,415
77
59
28
11
63
01
70
10
69
63
63
15
52
56
08
04
59
83
73
80
33
18
25
46
10
17
15
46
07
85
78
84
74
59
08
*Half-year.
-(-Including only those in which a school was in operation during the year.
JThe consolidation of  school districts by the formation of  rural  municipality  districts reduced the
number from 257 in 1905-06 to 167 in 1906-07.
§Including assisted schools with defined boundaries. A 26
Public Schools Report.
1912
The following is a list in tabular form of the number of teachers employed during 1911-12
in the various electoral districts of the Province; the number of male and female teachers is
also shown as well as the class of certificate held :—
Alberni	
Atlin	
Cariboo	
Chilliwack	
Columbia	
Comox	
Cowichan	
Cranbrook 	
Delta	
Dewdney	
Esquimalt	
Pernio ...   	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
(The) Islands  ....
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Lillooet	
Nanaimo	
Nelson  	
Newcastle  	
New Westminster
Okanagan	
Revelstoke	
Richmond	
Rossland  	
Saanich	
Similkameen	
Skeena	
Slocan 	
Vancouver	
Victoria	
Yale	
Ymir	
Academic.
6
3
3
2
5
3
2
3
3
6
7
21
5
16
6
2
2
4
3
103
24
2
7
260
First
Class.
1
9
2
4
1
5
8
4
2
10
5
2
1
2
2
1
16
19
2
29
2
4
2
5
1
89
28
2
3
269
Second
Class.
1
2
15
2
12
4
3
3
2
2
8
13
7
6
13
21
6
72
4
12
3
6
76
39
371
Third
Class.
9
1
9
7
2
19
8
4
3
2
2
3
17
1
1
10
1
7
9
11
8
24
1
6
3
2
7
3
9
8
14
218
Temporary.
1
2
13
3
15
3
4
10
11
5
11
2
6
13
5
2
4
3
5
4
14
4
22
"l
6
6
8
19
4
7
14
235
Male.
Female.
5
14
2
1
2
5
12
38
3
9
7
32
8
11
3
15
7
39
6
31
2
13
7
26
4
11
5
4
4
10
11
38
4
6
1
4
8
24
6
10
4
21
17
32
28
58
7
18
32
131
3
10
3
22
4
12
9
14
5
14
82
208
30
74
8
17
12
30
351
1,002
Total.
19
3
7
50
12
39
19
18
46
37
15
33
15
9
14
49
10
5
32
16
25
49
86
25
163
13
25
16
23
19
290
104
25
42
1,353 3 Geo. 5 Public Schools Report. A 27
INSPECTORS'  REPORTS.
HIGH SCHOOLS.
Victoria, B.C., November 4th, 1912.
Alexander Robinson, Esq.,
Superintendent of Education, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the following report on the high-school work of the Province for
the school-year ending June 30th, 1912 :—
The attendance of high-school students, both in the high schools and in the superior
schools, was considerably greater than in any former year. This necessitated the opening of
a high school at Penticton, raising Abbotsford and Creston to the status of superior schools,
and adding five more teachers to the regular high-school teaching staff and one to the superior-
school staff. Consequently, at the close of the school-year, there were twenty-four high
schools in operation, with seventy-seven regular teachers, and ten superior schools, with twelve
teachers doing high-school work.
The management of these schools throughout the year was good, both on the part of
trustees and teachers. Probably nothing contributed more to their success than the
infrequency of change of teachers. In the ten superior schools not a single change occurred ;
in the twenty-four high schools, with their seventy-seven teachers, only six failed to teach for the
entire year. This permanence in tenure of office speaks well for the care exercised by the
trustees in selecting teachers, and for their treatment of them after they are engaged. It
also speaks well for the faithfulness and ability of the teachers employed.
Almost without exception I have found the relations existing between teachers and
trustees most cordial. The latter are not slow to recognize real merit in their teachers, and
are becoming readier year by year to give unmistakable evidence of it—an increase in salary.
The teachers, on the other hand, almost universally, manifest an appreciation for the support
of their Boards in their faithful endeavours to do good work.
Despite the growing interest in high schools, however, I regret to report that the
accommodation and equipment, of many of the smaller ones especially, are still far from
satisfactory. Library books, chemical and physical apparatus, and even drawing-models and
a good English dictionary are still needed in a few instances.
In a number of districts School Boards are contemplating the erection and equipment of
modern schools. I should like to urge, in this connection, the desirability of obtaining the
best school desks possible. Those now commonly in use, even in our best-furnished schools, I
consider poor. In only two high schools, Golden and Rossland, have I seen desks and seats in
which the student seemed comfortable.
Notwithstanding the fact that 1911-12 may be considered a banner year for high-school
work in the Province, there were a few defects in high-school activities that call for some
consideration.
The interest of students in athletics is not as it should be. The love of true, manly
sport seems limited to the few. The many feel they do their part nobly when they turn out
to cheer the few who play. Exercising nothing but their lungs and vocal organs, they still
are prone to pose as genuine athletes. All this I regard as unfortunate. It is bad for, all,
tending to the unwholesome lionizing of the few, while it robs the many of the benefits they
might reap on the field of sport, shoulder to shoulder with their fellows.
Many of our more thoughtful teachers are recognizing that athletics should be encouraged
more and be made more general among students. In their endeavours in this direction they
have met with some success, bat inter-school games have been few and not in all cases
satisfactory. Nor will they be satisfactory till the true sportsman spirit, that admires clean,
skilful play even in opponents, is more in evidence. When our students, under wise leadership, learn not to be unduly elated by victory, nor unduly cast down by honourable defeat,
they will be ready to win a victory from or suffer a defeat by a neighbouring school with a
magnanimity that will ensure happiness in the great game of life. A 28 Public Schools Report. 1912
Closely allied with athletics may be mentioned the cadet movement. It is now in its
infancy, but will assume greater proportions in the near future. I am anxious to see it
conducted on rational lines.
During the past year I have observed the weak points, referred to above in connection
with athletics, existing in a most aggravated form in the cadet movement. Too few students
are actively connected with it; and the few who are are, in many instances, neglecting more
important activities for it. This defect, which is a serious one, must be remedied at once, as
it can be under wise supervision. When intellectual attainments, as well as physical fitness,
are insisted upon as qualifications for an officer in a cadet corps, one will no longer find officers
with scholastic records of which a boy of medium ability should be ashamed.
I am not particularly apprehensive that some militant power will, in the near future,
attempt to put an end to our Empire as a world power, providing we have the decency to be
civil and reasonably respectful to our neighbours ; still I should like to see every British youth
so trained as to be a lover of peace while a tower of strength should ever a foe cross our
path.
With this end in view, a few hours should be spent each week by every male student in
physical exercise and military drill under proper instructors. Time so spent will help our
students both mentally and physically.
Another line of student activity that calls for more general encouragement in our high
schools is public speaking. The literary and debating society well conducted may become a potent
factor in the mental awakening of many a student who might otherwise be unawakened. In
a few of the high schools last year, notably Revelstoke, North Vancouver, and Victoria, good
work was done along these lines as a result of the untiring and unselfish leadership of
teachers.
In concluding this report, it gives me much pleasure to again bear testimony to the
faithful and efficient work done by the teachers during the past year. A more earnest band
of capable men and women it would be difficult to find in any walk of life. That the value
of their services may be more and more appreciated by those in a better position to show
appreciation than I is my hope for them.
The general tone of the schools throughout the year was, in the main, satisfactory. The
vast majority of the students manifested an earnestness and steadfastness of purpose that
augurs well for their future success. The gradual growth of their mental powers as they pass
from grade to grade has been a source of great satisfaction to both their teachers and myself.
With continued efforts along the lines of what is now being well done for our students,
and with an energetic and intelligent endeavour to remove present defects, the high and
superior schools of this Province are destined to become an ever-increasing force for good.
I have, etc.,
J. S. Gordon,
Inspector of High Schools.
INSPECTORATE No.  1.
Victoria, B.C., November 25th, 1912.
Alexander Robinson, Esq.,
Superintendent of Education,  Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the following report on the public schools of Inspectorate No. 1
for the school-year ending June 30th, 1912:—
Rural Schools.
At the close of the year there were eleven rural schools in operation. Of these only
three—Esquimalt, Happy Valley, and Otter Point—had modern school-houses, but, with the
possible exception of Esquimalt, there was no congestion in any. However, with the continued growth of the districts close to Victoria, it will not be long before large modern
buildings will have to replace the present small out-of-date ones. 3 Geo. 5 Public Schools Report. £9
The District of Esquimalt has lately become a rural municipality, and I have no doubt
the Muncipal School Board will adopt, without delay, a policy that will meet the growing
demands upon school accommodation.
In the majority of these schools I found the teachers doing faithful work and securing
fair results.
Rural Municipality Schools.
The year under review was one of marked progress in the Municipality of Saanich. To
increase and better school accommodation the ratepayers voted, in May, a sum of money
which was supplemented by a generous grant from the Provincial Treasury, making, approximately, $90,000 available for sites and buildings. After more or less delay, work has
commenced, and to-day there are being erected or about to be erected within this municipal
school district eight new school-houses. Even this provision has not been sufficient to meet
the rapid increase in certain parts, and the Board will have to provide at once some relief to
the overcrowded conditions at Craigflower.
By joint action of Saanich and Oak Bay Municipal Boards, provision was made in the
estimates of the year for the introduction of manual training in all the schools of these districts.
As a result of this action the present term opened with an instructor in charge of five
centres, to four of which he helps to convey the boys from six ungraded schools. The Saanich
Board can, therefore, claim the distinction of being the first to introduce manual training into
the purely rural schools of the Province.
The rapid settlement of the Oak Bay district was also attended with the problem of
school accommodation. At the present time the School Board is working out a policy to
place before the ratepayers which will provide for all the needs of this municipality for some
time to come.
I am pleased to report that the general work observed in the class-rooms was fairly
satisfactory. Some teachers failed to arouse much enthusiasm in the work, and two were
utterly unable to secure good control. The Entrance pass lists in both districts were commendable, but in one ungraded school these results were secured at the expense of nearly all
the junior pupils. The practice of devoting too much time to senior pupils is altogether too
common in ungraded schools.
Victoria City.
Accommodation and Equipment.
The school population of Victoria continued to grow rapidly, and notwithstanding the
efforts of the School Board to keep pace with this increase, the accommodation was insufficient
and overcrowded conditions prevailed. It is not my intention, to report at length upon the
measures taken to relieve and provide against such conditions. The purchase of new sites
and the erection of modern buildings involve large expenditures. Already the ratepayers of
Victoria have voted considerable money, and will be called upon to vote further sums in order
to provide proper education facilities. A building permit was taken out this month for a
new high school costing $416,750. To this must be added the cost of site, furniture, and
equipment, which will bring the total cost in the neighbourhood of $500,000. This is a large
amount to be expended on one school, but I think the School Board is to be commended for
its efforts to provide the very best facilities for high-school work. I am not so sure that so
great an effort is being made in behalf of the elementary schools.
Including the estimated cost of two buildings about to be erected, the total expenditure
on public schools for the past ten years on account of sites, buildings, furniture, and equipment amounts to, approximately, $400,000. In view of this it is rather interesting to note
that last month 3,978 pupils attended the city public schools, and 426, including McGill students,
attended the high school. I may add, further, that 1,110 pupils were enrolled in the Eourth
Reader classes of the city schools during the year under review. Of these, 654 are still
attending the public schools; 110 are attending the high school; 50 girls have left school and
are at home; 33 girls and 125 boys have left school and are at work in the city; 54 are now
attending private schools; 67 have left the city; and 17 remain unaccounted for. Besides, 60 Third
Reader pupils havealso left school and areeither at homeor at work, while 15areattending private
schools. Thus, while 110 of last year's pupils are now in attendance at the high school, there
are 337 who, though still residing within the city, have left the public schools and will prob- A 30 Public Schools Report. 1912
ably never attend the high school. I mention these facts not to cast any reflection on the
work of the high school, but to point out that, as the majority of school children receive their
education in the elementary schools, the most important function of School Boards is to
provide satisfactory accommodation and efficient instruction in these elementary schools. I
trust, therefore, that the Victoria Board will adopt, in the present year, some comprehensive policy that will reduce the size of many of the classes and do away with the necessity of
carrying on work in basements, in rooms badly lighted and ventilated, and in such buildings
as are in use at Hillside, Spring Ridge, and Rock Bay. Further, I hope that such policy will
include up-to-date furniture and equipment in all schools. It seems hardly fair that the older
schools should continue with obsolete furniture until it is necessary to erect a new building.
At the time of writing there are fifty-six rooms not furnished with modern single desks, and
many schools are badly in need of an adequate supply of dictionaries, maps, globes, and other
appliances. It astounded me to find that twenty-three divisions teaching geography had no
serviceable globes. A few thousand dollars would provide up-to-date furniture and equipment
for all.
On page 58 of the Manual recently issued it directs that school-rooms should be
thoroughly scrubbed once a month. In the majority of Victoria schools, according to information received from principals, the floors are scrubbed but twice a year. Possibly these
conditions tend to make the teaching of hygiene more effective by a process of negative
illustration.
Teachers and School-work.
An adequate staff of efficient teachers is the sine qua non of successful work in all schools,
and the expenditure of large sums of money on buildings does not accelerate educational
progress unless at the same time competent men and women are in the class-rooms. Indeed,
I am not so sure that it would not be better policy to erect less expensive buildings and to
expend more money on equipment and in paying salaries that would command the services of
thoroughly capable teachers. Although tbe great majority of teachers are devoted to their
work, they do not place themselves altogether in the missionary class, but look for a fair
return in this world for professional service rendered. The laws governing ordinary commercial
practice apply equally in the employment of teachers, and the best salaries are necessary to
secure the best teachers, more especially as the supply at the present time is somewhat limited
compared with the demand. Notwithstanding the salary increases made during the year, it
was a significant fact that the Board had not an assistant whom they chose to promote to a
principalship vacant at the close of the year. In the matter of applicants for positions, the
best available should always receive first consideration. The Victoria trustees have in their
employ an educational expert, the Municipal Inspector, whose duty it is to locate and point
out the weak spots in the schools, and in the matter of appointments I consider the Board
should be governed absolutely by his advice.
My time in the Victoria schools was taken up almost entirely with inspecting and testing
the quality of the work in the class-rooms. As a result, I am pleased to report that, with the
exception of a comparative few, I found the teachers conscientious, painstaking, and working
hard for the advancement of their pupils. In a number of instances the classes were in charge
of experienced teachers who had excellent control and did very effective work. But in striking
contrast to these were a few whose work was wretched. I regret to say that some of these
failures are still on the staff, though they have had ample opportunity to prove their worth
and have utterly failed to secure satisfactory results. It is difficult to estimate the disastrous
effects of retaining in a school one or two incompetents. Their classes are promoted to other
divisions whose teachers have to correct habits of discipline, slovenly manual work, and to
cover again the work of the lower grade, with the result that their own particular limits of
work are not taught thoroughly, and without that foundation essential to satisfactory progress,
the pupils are passed on to the higher grades, where many flounder about for years in a struggle
to qualify for the high school.
In the Senior Grade classes there were over 900 pupils in attendance at the close of the
year. As the work of this grade should be overtaken in two years, it seemed reasonable to
expect that a fair proportion would be enrolled in the Senior Pourth classes, and of these a
fair percentage would complete the elementary school-work and qualify for the high school.
The Entrance returns for 1912 showed a pass list for Victoria of 132 pupils, and schools with
about 200 pupils in the Pourth Reader (Junior and Senior), averaging fourteen years of age, 3 Geo. 5 Public Schools Report. A 31
passed less than thirty, rather too small a proportion. Several of the classes in this grade
were in charge of incompetents, nearly all males, but the great majority were taught by
efficient teachers who laboured earnestly, but who were unable to obtain satisfactory results,
mainly on account of defective classification. The fact stood out prominently that there were
many pupils in Junior Fourth classes who lacked an adequate grounding in the work of the
Intermediate Grade. Of course, it must not be overlooked that the rapid growth of the city
caused overcrowding, which resulted in a great deal of faulty classification; but, making due
allowance for special conditions, I was unable to understand why a school should have five
Senior Grade classes and only two Intermediates, and in all the schools twenty-nine in the
Fourth Reader and just thirteen in the Third Reader. The situation seemed to be brought
about from the fact that both teachers and principals failed to realize that Intermediate
Grade work could not be done thoroughly in one year, and consequently there was not a
proper distribution of time among the three grades. This difficulty has been removed by the
hints and suggestions contained in the more detailed Course of Study recently issued.
The tone and standing in a number of class-rooms were excellent and the general average
fairly satisfactory, but the general efficiency would be greatly increased if the Board would
make bold to replace a few weak teachers by thoroughly competent ones. Reading in the
Junior Grade was not sufficiently extensive and not enough attention was given to purity of
vowel-sounds. Pupils of widely different attainments read together instead of being properly
classified. Spelling throughout was excellent. A great deal of time was devoted to this
subject, but probably the same standard might be attained in less time if the subject were
taught more systematically. The work examined in drawing, in free-hand and brush-work,
was of a high order, but some of the geometrical work was lacking in quality and accuracy.
Writing generally was weak, and the fact was too often overlooked that careful supervision
of all written exercises in the Junior and Intermediate Grades is absolutely essential to
produce neat and legible writing in the Senior Grade. Very often this supervision was
restricted to the writing lesson only. In only two schools did I find satisfactory work in
geography, and the Third Reader and Junior Fourth classes were particularly lacking in
definite and exact knowledge. In primary arithmetic I think too much time was spent in
mechanical drill and not enough in concrete teaching. The Senior Grade pupils showed
proficiency in written work, but were deficient in mental arithmetic. There was also room
for improvement in accuracy in the work of Second and Third Reader classes. Composition
was probably the weakest subject in the schools. In the Junior Grade a satisfactory
foundation must be laid, but I observed a number of classes in which systematic training in
oral language work, followed by the writing of correct simple sentences, was neglected. In
the Senior classes not enough attention was given to the character of the composition in
written exercises in history, geography, and literature.
In two or three of the schools I found what were called " Batavia " teachers, who had
charge of no division, but whose duty was to teach backward pupils from all divisions. I can
readily see that good results may be accomplished in this work ; but, as one writer says, " The
only hope of dealing successfully with backward classes or backward individual pupils lies in
committing them to the hands of the best teacher available, whose experience and skill will
enable him to awaken the interest of the pupils, stir their dormant intellects into action, and
give them heart in the work." The practice in Victoria seems to be to place these pupils
under teachers who either have had little or no experience, or who have failed to succeed in
the class-rooms.
In conclusion, I may say that there are on the Victoria staff quite a number of young
teachers with limited experience. Nearly all of these are anxious to do their work well and
ready to accept suggestions and profit by advice. To young teachers criticism may appear
harsh, but defects must be pointed out in order to be corrected.
I have, etc.,
George H. Deane,
Inspector of Schools. INSPECTORATE NO. 2.
Victoria, B.C., November 15th, 1912.
Alexander Robinson, Esq.,
Superintendent of Education, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the following report on the public schools of Inspectorate No. 2 for
the school-year ending June 30th, 1912 :—
This inspectorate comprises the schools in the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway Belt, the
schools on the west coast of Vancouver Island, and those on Salt Spring, Mayne, Pender,
Galiano, Gabriola, and Denman Islands. Every school was in operation, and, in all, 120-
teachers were employed.
During the year schools were opened for the first time at Nob Hill, Headquarters, and
No. 7 Mine, in the Comox District. The school at Nikrap, also in the Comox District, was
closed owing to the transference of many of the families to the Headquarters District. A new
division was opened at Courtenay, two at Nanaimo, one at Ladysmith, and two at Duncan.
New school buildings were erected by the Provincial Government at French Creek, Port
Alberni (two rooms), Nob Hill, Headquarters, Denman Island, and South Wellington.
Provision was also made for the erection of two modern, eight-roomed buildings, one in
Nanaimo and one in Duncan. The French Creek and Nob Hill Districts were raised to the
status of regularly organized schools districts. New Alberni became a city school district of
the third class, and its name was changed to Port Alberni. The Duncan schools were
separated from the Rural Municipality of North Cowichan and organized as a city district of
the third class.
Probably in no inspectorate in the Province are the generosity of the Provincial Government and the parsimony of districts towards the expense of conducting the schools more
marked. Suggestions made to Boards of Trustees which necessitate the raising of funds to
provide for the simplest equipment and sanitary arrangements for their schools are frequently
parried by unwarrantable requests for gratuitous grants from the Provincial Treasury. While
this is not universally true, yet these conditions have existed for so long a time in many parts
that one is forced to think that these school-rooms will remain impoverished and unwashed
until all support be withdrawn and the schools closed, pending definite promises from the
districts for the immediate remedy of these evils. These conditions are not attributable to
the financial inability of the districts, for over forty regularly organized school districts, not
a few of which are located in wealthy sections, have received their buildings, their desks, most
of their text-books, and their teachers' salaries in full from the Provincial Government. Yet,
withal, when an annual meeting is called to vote sufficient funds to keep the school building