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FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF MACHINERY FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31ST, 1916 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1917

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 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
Chief Inspector of Machinery
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 81ST. 1916.
JHE. GOVERNMENT OF
THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY   OF   THE   LEGISLATIVE   ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  BBC. :
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1917.  To His Honour Frank Stillman Barnard,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg respectfully to submit the Fifteenth Annual Report of the Chief Inspector of
Machinery for the year ended December 31st, 1916.
J. H. KING,
Minister of' Public   Works.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1917.  REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF MACHINERY.
New Westminster, B.C., January 2nd, 1917.
The Honourable the Minister of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In accordance with the provisions of the "Boilers Inspection Act," I have the
honour to submit to you the Fifteenth Annual Report of the operation of the steam-boilers
and machinery inspection service for the year ending December 31st, 1916.
The personnel of the service at present consists of the Chief Inspector, twelve District
Inspectors, one clerk, and three stenographers, located as follows: Chief Inspector, four
Inspectors, one clerk, and one stenographer and typist at the head office in New Westminster
for District A; three Inspectors and one stenographer and typist in Victoria for District B ;
one Inspector in Nelson for District C ; four Inspectors and one stenographer in Vancouver
for District D.
Before proceeding with the detail matters of my report, I consider it fitting that I should
refer to the loss we have sustained by the death of one of the members of our staff, Mr.
Herbert Worth.
Mr. Worth was born at Stockton-on-Tees, England, in the year 1870. He received his
education at a private school in that city and was later apprenticed for five years with the
Phoenix Engine Works Company, Stockton-on-Tees. For some years he was chief engineer at
sea in the Atlantic and Eastern Ocean trade, and for two years he was employed in the office
of a French consulting engineer as engineer surveyor.
From France he came to British Columbia, and in May, 1912, he entered the competitive
examinations for Inspector of Steam-boilers and Machinery. On account of his previous
scientific education and wide practical experience, his work during the week of examination
gained for him a position on the staff. He entered our service in July, 1912, on probation,
and as his work was satisfactory he received a permanent appointment in April, 1913.
He was first employed in District B, and in October, 1913, was transferred to District E.
In April, 1916, he was suffering from pleurisy and was for some time in hospital; after this
he continually suffered pain, resulting in serious insomnia. In July he came to Vancouver for
rest and change and appeared to make some improvement, which, however, was only temporary,
as he died suddenly on September 18th.
As soon as it was realized that Mr. Worth's illness was serious the work of his district
was done by this office, the detail of same for the year is therefore included in the District A
report.
The following is a summary of the routine work performed in the office of the Chief
Inspector during the year, exclusive of inspections, engineers' examinations, and the work of
engineer surveying, details of which will be found in the reports of the Inspectors for the
different districts and that of the Chief Engineer Examiner.—
Letters inward   5,198
Letters outward  5,885
Telegrams inward  35
Telegrams outward  27
Inspectors' monthly reports examined  147
New designs examined, calculated, and reported on  65
Amendments to designs examined, calculated, and reported on.... . 34   •
Fees collected for designs  $417
Number of miles travelled by Chief Inspector  7,950
I am pleased again to be able to report that there have been no boiler-explosions during
the year.
The number of accidents to persons and machinery are fully set forth in the District
Inspectors' reports. It will be noted that there were four accidents to persons, one of which was fatal. This
was a case in which the smoke-stack of a small vertical boiler had been supported away from
the boiler while the tubes were being cleaned. The support gave way, the stack falling on a
helper, injuring him so severely that he died shortly after the accident.
Regarding defects discovered, I wish to mention the following as most important:—
Boiler No. 750d, owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, of a type known as
a "logging-donkey," was being tested by hydrostatic pressure, when one of the sheets ruptured
in the direction of its length, details of which are given in Mr. Biggam's report. I learned that
some time prior to the test the stay-rod attached to the cast-iron bracket which is riveted to
the shell-plate near where the rupture occurred had been struck by a log and bent; this
apparently changed the curvature of the plate near the bracket, which change resulted in
transverse movements, caused by variations of steam-pressure, and a serious crystallization of
the plate along the line of greatest movement and a grooving of the plate to such an extent
that only —^ inch of solid metal remained at the time the test was applied. Had this not
been discovered an explosion under steam-pressure would surely have resulted.
It seems almost unbelievable that in these days people do. not realize the danger of
operating steam-boilers without efficient safety-valves and steam-pressure gauges, but our
Inspectors have found during the year three boilers being operated without safety-valves.
Fourteen boilers with safety-valves altogether inoperative. Three safety-valves overloaded
and thirty-two defective in construction. One boiler without a steam-gauge, seventeen steam-
gauges inoperative, and 313 defective.
Amongst the most dangerous defects, forty-four boilers inspected were found to have
fractured plates. Five boilers were damaged by heat due to low water; one by allowing oil
to get into the boiler with the feed-water.
The number of new boilers built for British Columbia was sixty-six, as compared with fifty-
two for 1915; thirty-four of these were built in British Columbia, as compared with seventeen
for 1915.    Twenty-one were built in Eastern Canada and eleven in the United States.
At the loco Refinery five large high-pressure stills were assembled, riveted up, and erected
under our supervision ; the plates having been formed and the rivet-holes made in Eastern
Canada.
With the exception of two, all the new boilers were put into operation during the year.
The number of second-hand boilers imported was twenty-one, as compared with thirty-
five for 1915; fifteen of these were from Eastern Canada and six from the United States.
Boilers inspected for the first time during 1916 number 102; twelve were taken out of
service, being condemned as unfit for further use.
The total number of boilers now on our books is 5,714. Of these, 2,715 received complete
inspection, twelve internal inspection only, and 313 external inspection only; thus leaving
2,674 on which no inspection was made during the year, a large number of these not being in
operation.
The number of plates tested during the year was 282, of which four were rejected as unfit
for use in boiler-construction.
The cruiser "Adanac" was used in connection with inspections in Districts A and D;
all the logging camps operating on the coast-line in these districts were visited. The total
number of miles run was 3,000. The coal-oil used for engine, lamps, and all purposes was 900
gallons ; engine-oil, 32 gallons. The average consumption of coal-oil per mile for all purposes
was 0.333 gallons, and the average consumption was 0.988 gallons per horse-power per hour.
The Imperial Oil Company made application in March to have the working-pressure on
their large stills at loco raised from 73 lb. to 103 lb. per square inch. As they were already
carrying pressure to the limit for the thickness of material in the heads, which were 10 feet
diameter, bumped to a radius of 10 feet, material -| inch thick, I considered any increase in
pressure unsafe, particularly as the temperature of the gas inside the still ran as high as 755°
Fahr. The method of cleaning the stills inside after each charge prohibited the use of through
stays from head to head.
In order to arrive at a safe and intelligent conclusion we took deflections along a line
across the centre of the head, commencing at the caulking-edge of the shell and getting the
movement of the head at right angles to the tangent of the curve, taking the readings at 1-inch
intervals up to 10 inches from the caulking-edge of the shell-plate, and from 10 to 18 inches
at intervals of 2 inches, and from 18 to 30 inches at intervals of 4 inches, and from 30 to 42
inches every 6-inch interval, and at 42 inches, at 52 inches, and at the centre. 7 Gtco. 5
British Columbia.
U 7
We found the deflections to vary very uniformly, both as regards the distance from the
caulking-edge of the shell and also as to the increasing pressure, the maximum hydrostatic
pressure being 150 lb.
The deflections were as follows :—
Test Pressure.
Distance from Shell
Caulking-edge.
Inward Deflection.
Outward Deflection.
150  lb	
150/i   	
Inches.
Zero
.   1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
8
9
10
12
14
16
18
22-
26
30
36
42
52
At centre
Inch.
0.084
0.08
0.075
0.068
0.063
0.044
0.03
0.019
Zero
Inc
h.
150 „                          	
150 ,,  	
150 a   	
150 //   	
150 n   	
150 it   	
110 „   	
150 a   	
Zero
'o-ooi
0.01
150 -/   	
150n   	
150 ,/   	
150 //   	
150 //          	
0.025
0.047
0.064
0.08
150 /,   	
150 //    	
150 »   	
0.1
0.112
0.12
150 //   	
0.115
150 //   	
0.127
150 »   	
0.13
150 «  	
0.139
150 //   	
0.152
Note.—The readings were taken when the pressure was rising and checked up on the
falling pressure to test for permanent set or errors in readings, and when any material
difference was shown two other readings were taken and the results averaged.
The pyrometer and pressure readings during the distillation of one charge were as
follows :—
3.00 a.m.
3.40 a.m.
7.00 a.m.
10.30 a.m.
3.30 p.m.
4.45 p.m.
60 lb. pressure, 650 degrees Fahr. temp.
.65  ., i,        675
.96
.96
.96
.96
696
715
731
755
From the time one charge is put in the still until the fire is extinguished is thirty hours.
From this data we came to the conclusion that on account of the varying pressures and
the varying high maximum temperature the transverse movements should be reduced.
To resist the transverse stresses we decided to rivet two 4- x 4- x |--inch T-bars across
two diameters of the head at right angles to each other, one bar being continuous and the
other attached to the continuous bar by riveted angle-plates. Between these bars we riveted
four T-bars of the same dimensions, the latter reaching only about two-thirds across the head,
one end of every T-bar being, of course, at the caulking-edge of the cylindrical shell. U 8
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery,
1917
Deflection tests are afterwards taken along the line  of maximum  deflection half-way
between two sets of T-bars, which gave the following results :—
Test Pressure.
Distance from Shell
Caulking-edge.
Inward Deflection.
Outward Deflection.
150 lb	
150ji   	
Inches.
Zero.
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
10
12
16
20
24
28
32
38
44
50
At centre
Inch.
0.05
0.05
0.046
0.038
0.03
0.15
0.01
Inch.
150 „    	
150 it   	
150 it   	
150 „   	
150 „	
150 „    	
0.18
150 ,,	
0.043
150 „	
0.066
150 „     	
0.096
150 „   	
0.125
150 »  	
0.129
150 „    '.	
0.124
150 ;,   	
0.14
150 „   	
0.145
150 „  	
0.145
150 „   	
0.14
150 „                                                      	
0.15
These deflections were not considered excessive and a working-pressure of 100 lb. was
allowed.
Mr. Bath, of the Vancouver office, applied for and was granted six months' leave of
absence, commencing January 1st, 1916, in order to visit his father in England, who was at
the time dangerously ill. He died some time after Mr. Bath's arrival, and as soon as the
family affairs were settled, Mr. Bath, who was prior to his appointment as Inspector an
engineer in the Imperial Navy, offered his services again, but as there were no vacancies at
the time he returned to duty at the expiration of his leave of absence.
Many important additions and alterations have been made to the large steam plants
during the year.
The greatest difficulties have been experienced in getting deliveries of new machinery and
material; as a result, many of the manufacturers have been obliged,to import from the United
States second-hand engines and boilers in large units in order to meet the increasing demands
for their product.
There has been a marked improvement in the class of machinery installed, as well as in
the methods of operation, all looking toward the more economical production of power.
As the question of higher efficiency for our steam plants is of impelling interest at the
present time, I have thought it to be in the interest of the service to devote as much time to
this subject as possible during the year.
There was a time when the manufacturers in British Columbia were not interested to any
extent in economy. Everything was new, development rapid, competition not very keen, and
the material resources of the Province seemed inexhaustible, but events transpiring in Europe
have caused us all to see things from a different view-point.
As we get news of the increased efficiency in Great Britain, which has been so phenomenal
as to be almost unbelievable, and as we see that the Mother-country has learned that strength
lay in productive efficiency, we wonder what opportunities we have as part of the Empire to
contribute our portion to this great cause, and as we examine the situation two words are for
ever impressed on our minds—"economy" and "'efficiency"; these apply with overwhelming
force to all departments of life and activity at the present time.
The members of our staff realize this to the fullest extent, and are putting it into practice
by giving advice to managers, superintendents, engineers, and firemen as to how they may
proceed at once to reduce fuel consumption and increase the efficiency of the steam plants
under their control.
In cases where coal or oil is used for fuel the management is very ready to act on advice
given, but sawmill-owners say they are not interested in saving fuel, as it costs them nothing;
but when we point out the fact that low efficiency means the purchase and maintenance of a
larger number of boilers they at once become interested. 7 Geo. 5 British Columbia. U 9
There is no enterprise that will reflect more credit on our service than undertaking
properly conducted experimental investigations for the advancement of steam engineering in
our Province. In this connection I wish to thank the Government for supplying us during
the year with flue-gas analysis apparatus, differential draught-gauge, and steam calorimeter;
we have been able to make good use of these in efficiency tests at the New Westminster High
School, Columbian Hospital, Provincial Asylum, and the Canada Products plant at New
Westminster.
At each of these steam plants we have been able to interest the engineering staff in such
a manner as to enable them to increase the efficiency of their plants without the expenditure
of money, and to show that with very small outlay much higher efficiency could be maintained.
To illustrate what is being done in this line I will cite two cases which have come under
my observation. In 1908 a steam plant was designed and erected in Southern California, the
designers giving a guarantee for a ninety-day test under any load curve within the limits of
the rated capacity of the generator, which was between 60,000 and 78,000 kilowatts. On this
load they guaranteed an economy of 170 kilowatt-hours per barrel of oil; weight per barrel
334 lb., oil at 18,500 British thermal units per pound. The contract contained a bonus and
penalty clause.
The test was one of the most elaborate ever undertaken in connection with a steam-power
plant. The expense amounted to many thousands of dollars, eighty men being employed,
representing all interests. The joint committee gave the result of the test as 252.842 kilowatt
hours, as against 170, the contract amount; the designers thereby earning as a result of their
careful scientific work the sum of $363,310.
The same company have just completed a steam plant in Arizona, where they have
effected an economy of 300 kilowatt-hours per barrel of oil. This shows what can be done by
scientific management with all parties working together.
The nations now at war are working in mass production, and that which has been made
a necessity by virtue of the war will in its fundamentals hold good in times of peace. In
order to secure this mass production we need the actual getting together of the heads of the
manufacturing concerns and their employees, particularly those in the engine and boiler rooms.
This department is doing a good work in encouraging the engineers to educate themselves,
not only to the point necessary to pass an examination for a certificate, but to continue their
studies, so that they may become more valuable to their employers and improve their position
in the community.
Education, while the most important, is at the same time the most neglected factor in
the economic operation of a steam plant. Every engineer in charge of a steam plant should
be furnished with the proper instruments to enable him to determine the most economical
method of operation. Opportunity should be offered to men intending to become engineers to
obtain the necessary knowledge; the practical part can be learned at the power plant, but
there are certain fundamental theories of great importance to the engineer which are more
difficult to obtain.
It should be possible, with the co-operation of the educational authorities, the steam-users,
and the engineers, to institute evening classes in the cities specially adapted to the operating
engineer. The lack of such facilities necessitates the importing of almost all engineers for the
larger plants. As a result the British Columbian is discouraged to such an extent that in
many cases he settles down to the lower-grade work without hope of advancement.
Our task appears to be that of arousing a national spirit. Co-operation in everything is
demanded, in education, in the industries, and in citizenship, so that men may be produced
who are capable of serving and advancing civilization. In this connection we hope to do our
share.
Appended you will find a summary of the total work done by all the District Inspectors,
as well as their separate reports in detail.
In conclusion, I desire to thank the Government for its active interest and support of
this office, and also wish to thank all the members of the staff for the efficient manner in
which they have carried out their work during the year.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Peck,
Chief Inspector. TJ 10 Report of Chief Inspectoe of Machinery, 1917
Summary of  Total Work done by District Inspectors in 1916.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers  99
boiler-plates inspected  282
boiler-plates rejected  4
boilers built under inspection in British Columbia  34
high-pressure stills built under inspection in British Columbia  5
boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada     13
boilers built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  8
new boilers inspected built in United States  11
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia  27
new boilers inspected (total)  64
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  15
boilers imported from the United States (second-hand)  6
boilers unclassified  17
first inspections  102
inspections, external and internal  2,479
internal inspections only  12
external inspections only  313
special inspections after repairs  93
visits in addition to inspections  1,186
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  2,518
boilers on which pressure was reduced   77
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  62
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  76
boilers considered unfit for further use...  8
accidents to engines and boilers  27
accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)  3
accidents resulting in personal injury (fatal)  1
investigations  14
inspections completed  2,715
Total horse-power of boilers inspected 132,381. 66
Number of defects observed as per summary  2,619
Number of defects considered dangerous  306
Inspection fees earned $23,879 .54
Inspection fees collected $24,022 .42
Miles travelled by the Inspector  54,130
Letters inward  5,922
Letters outward ,.  7,591
Telegrams inward  78
Telegrams outward  73
Boilers taken out of service  12
Summary of Total Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number. Dangerous..
Boilers without safety-valves             3 3
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative          14 11
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded            9 3
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction            32 7
Boilers without pressure-gauges  1
Pressure-gauges inoperative          17 12
Pressure-gauges defective        313 27
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing  11
n    defective stays          28 2
n    broken rivets           13 1
ii    defective riveting             7 2
ii    broken stays or braces          51 10
n    loose stays or braces  10 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 11
Summary op Total Defects observed.—Concluded.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers damaged by low water	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates	
ii laminated plates....    	
ii burned plates	
ii        blistered plates	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
internal corrosion. ..	
scale or encrustation	
internal grooving	
external corrosion	
defective tubes	
defective feed-water arrangement. .
broken feed-valves	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints .
Number.
7
101
44
3
18
5
147
137
162
6
173
104
21
2
147
19
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks            148
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks '	
Water-columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Connections to water-columns without valves	
Neutral sheets not stayed	
Neutral sheets improperly stayed	
Furnaces out of shape	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Boilers low at front end . .   	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings   	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off    ....
Defects in engines ,	
Boilers without hand-holes	
Boilers without stop-valves     	
Cases of defective steam-pipes	
Unclassified defects	
23
5
7
213
6
2
1
3
24
86
151
15
22
2
7
16
285
Dangerous.
3
18
5
4
17
5
1
8
25
4
20
5
43
4
3
Totals     2,620
1
10
4
8
1
o
29
306
John Peck,
Chief Inspector of Steam-boilers.
Report of the Chief Examiner.
New Westminster, B.C., January 2nd, 1917.
The Honourable the Minister of Public  Works,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you the following report with respect to examination of candidates for engineers' certificates for the year ending December 31st, 1916 :—
During the year I have received 864 applications for examination for the different grades
of certificates. U 12 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery, 1917
On December 31st, 1915, I had on hand 114 applications, making a total of 978. Of
these, 709 have been examined; one sent no fees; eighty applicants had their fees returned,
as their testimonials did not show the necessary service qualifications required by the Act.
This leaves on the "Accepted for Examination " file seventy-four application forms.
Result of Examinations.
Grade.                                No. examined. Passed.                Failed.
Second  28. 16                     12
Third  114 79                     35
Fourth  266 192                     74
Temporary . ,  163 163
Special logging-donkey    67 58                        9
Special logging-locomotive  8 '-6                       2
Special creamery     11 7                        4
Special heating  48 48
Special road-roller  2 2
Special threshing  1 1
Special Doukhobor  1 1
Totals    709 573 136
Examination fees collected by Chief Inspector $2,317 65
Examination fees collected by other Inspectors        237 50
Duplicate certificate fees  90 00
Total  $2,645 15
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Peck,
Chief Engineer Examiner.
Senior Inspector's Report, District A.
New Westminster, B.C., January 2nd, 1917.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New   Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you the following report with respect to work done
by me during the year ending December 31st, 1916 :—
During the year my time was occupied in carrying out the varied work relating to this
office—namely, examining, calculating, and registering designs of boilers, boiler accessories,
pipe plans, etc., and examining engineers.
Appended you will find a list showing the number of candidates for engineers' certificates
who were examined in this district during the year.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Downie,
Senior Inspector, District A. 7 Geo. 5 British Columbia. U 13
Results of Examinations.
Grade.                            No. examined. Passed.                  Failed.
Second      16 10                       6
Third      32 26                       6
Fourth      83 62                     21
Temporary ,      30 30
Special logging-donkey      13 13
Special logging-locomotive        1 . .                         1
Special creamery        4 4
Special traction-engine        1 1
Special threshing         1 1
Special heating          7 7
Totals    188 154 34
Summary of Work done in District A in 1916.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers  50
Miles travelled by the Inspector  345
John Downie,
Senior Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A.
Inspector's Report, District A.
New Westminster, B.C., January 2nd, 1917.
John Peck,  Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the year ending December
31st, 1916.
The work during this period has been of the usual routine character. There were no
boiler-explosions nor serious accidents resulting in personal injury. The majority of the
defects noted were such as usually occur under ordinary working conditions. The most serious
were as follows :—
No. 964, a locomotive boiler, was found with the manifold cracked.
No. 1557, a vertical-tube .boiler, had such an accumulation of scale on the crown-sheet
that the tube-ends were practically destroyed.
Nos. 1769 and 1793 were damaged through low water.
No. H. 8 was bulged on the front course over the fire. This was caused by lubricating-
oil from the feed-pump returning to the boiler through the heating system ; the exhaust being
turned into the coils.
■  No. 1763 was bulged on the rear course through scale accumulating at this point.
No. 830 was found with the back-head plate cracked below the tubes, caused by angle-
irons supporting the lower stays, permitting the plate to become overheated. A vertical-
tubular boiler imported second-hand from the United States was condemned on account of its
generally bad condition.
Ten boilers were inspected for the Provincial Government, but no fees were collected for
these. The usual fees would have amounted to $72.60, and these are credited to the year's
earnings.
From the tabulated report you will see sixteen more boilers were inspected in 1916 than
in 1915, and the prospects are that still more will be inspected this year.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John D. Kay,
Inspector, District A. Remarks.
Assisted at the general examinations.
Summary of Work done in District A in 1916.
Number of boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada  3
ii           new boilers inspected built in British Columbia  6
ii          new boilers inspected (total)  9
ii           boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  3
ii           boilers imported from United States (second-hand)  1
ii          boilers unclassified  2
ii           first inspections  15
ii           inspections, external and internal  285
ii           external inspections only  5
ii           special inspections after repairs  29
ii           visits in addition to inspections  107
ii          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  288
ii           boilers on which pressure was reduced :  8
ii           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  10
ii           boilers repaired under Inspector's direction  14
ii           boilers considered unfit for further use  1
ii           accidents to engines and boilers  7
ii           investigations  4
ii          inspections completed , 290
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  12,686
Number of defects observed as per summary  215
Number of defects considered dangerous  13
Inspection fees earned        $2,386 .00
Inspection fees collected    $2,411.87
Miles travelled by the Inspector  6,593
Letters inward  291
Letters outward  333
Work done by other Inspectors for this District.
Three boilers partly inspected by District D and fees collected by that office.
Summary of Defects observed.
•
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction  3
Boilers without pressure-gauges  1
Pressure-gauges defective  20
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing  1
ii     broken stays or braces  3
ii     loose stays or braces  4
Boilers damaged by low water  2                   1
Defective settings  23
Boilers with fractured plates  8                   1
Boilers with burned plates  2
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets  17
ii     internal corrosion      15
ii     scale or encrustation  29
ii     internal grooving  2
ii     external corrosion      28                   1
ii     defective tubes  6                   3
ii     defective feed-water arrangement  1
Serious leakage around tube-ends  7                    5
Serious leakage in rivet-joints  2
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  5                   1 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 15
Summary of Defects observed.—Concluded.
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Cases of broken test-cocks    ... 27
Boilers low at front end    ,  8
Unclassified defects  1 1
Totals        215 13
John D. Kay,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A.
Inspector's  Report, District A.
New Westminster, B.C., January 1st, 1917.
John Peck,  Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to place before you the enclosed tabulated report showing the
work to which I have given my strict attention under the " Boilers Inspection Act" during
the year 1916.
I am pleased to report that no fatal accidents have occurred in this district during the
past year, and also that there have been no boiler-explosions in the plants under my immediate
supervision.
A number of small plants have been installed, using second-hand boilers and machinery.
Mining shows increased activity and a number of mines have been reopened in this
district.
Examinations were held at Merritt and much appreciated by the engineers of the Nicola
Valley.
A visit was paid through the Chilcotin country and a boiler at Alexis Creek condemned.
Numerous visits in addition to the annual inspections have been made.
In placing before you this report, I trust that my efforts have been in the best interests
of the public and of the service, and whilst safety has received the first consideration, efficiency
under each separate condition has been given the attention which it must demand.
I have, etc.
Geo.
C. McGown,
Inspector, District A.
Summary of Work done in District A in 1916.
Number of boilers built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  2
ii          new boilers inspected built in United States  2
ii          new boilers inspected (total)  4
ii          boilers unclassified  1
ii          first inspections  5
ii          inspections, external and internal      304
ii          external inspections only  1
ii          special inspections after repairs  15
ii          visits in addition to inspections  64
ii         boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  266
ii         boilers on which pressure was reduced  13
H          boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  7 U 16
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery,
1917
Summvry of Work done in District A in 1916.—Concluded.
Number of boilers repaired under Inspector's directions
h boilers considered unfit for further use	
ii accidents to engines and boilers	
ii investigations	
ii inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary	
Number of defects considered dangerous	
Inspection fees earned	
Inspection fees collected	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Letters inward	
Letters outward	
Boilers taken out of service	
3
2
3
6
304
13,542
'   512
114
$2,759.55
$2,650.80
11,648
512
492
3
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction.
Pressure-gauges inoperative	
Pressure-gauges defective	
Cases of defective stays	
ii      broken rivets	
ii      defective riveting	
Defective settings	
Boilers with burned plates	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
internal corrosion	
scale or encrustation	
external corrosion	
defective tubes	
defective feed-water arrangement	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Number.
11
8
2
24
7
3
1
21
4
13
21
23
28
22
4
15
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks         100
Defective water-gauges	
Cases of broken test-cocks     	
Connections to water-columns without valves	
Boilers low at front end     	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off	
Defects in engines	
Boilers without stop-valves	
Cases of defective steam-pipes,	
Unclassified defects	
Totals
5
28
1
18
13
10
20
1
3
106
512
Dangerous.
8
10
1
1
11
7
34
1
1
1
7
1
2
21
114
Geo. C. McGown,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A. 7 Geo. 5 British Columbia. U 17
Inspector's Report, District A.
New Westminster, B.C., January 1st, 1917.
John Peck,  Esq.,
Chief Inspector cf Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the year 1916.
The Imperial Oil Company, loco, has built five new high-pressure shell stills, two high-
pressure tube stills, and four low-pressure stills, all under my supervision, during the year.
I assisted you to make some very extensive tests on the 10-foot diameter bumped heads of the
high-pressure tube stills,, in order to determine the amount of deflection which takes place
under the pressure and the very high temperatures at which the stills are worked, and from
the results of these tests the heads were afterwards strengthened by riveting on the T-irons.
All the tanks at loco which come under the Customs Department have been inspected and an
official number given to each.
Thirteen return-tube boilers have been built under my supervision at the local boiler-
works.
I made two trips to the Upper Country during the months of September, October, and
November, and inspected several plants ; also held engineer's examinations at Revelstoke,
Kamloops, Vernon, and Kelowna, and also inspected the new low-pressure heating plant at the
Kamloops Court-house.
I assisted you to make drawings for the cement setting of the new 72-inch diameter
return-tube boiler installed at Provincial Government Mental Hospital at Essondale, and
made several trips to the plant during the construction of the foundations and installation of
the boiler.
When not on inspection-work my time has been fully occupied with the calculation,
examination, and registration of designs for boilers, examinations of engineers, and general
office-work.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval, »
I have, etc.,
A. S. Bennett,
Inspector, District A.
Summary of Work done in District A in 1916.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers  49
ii boiler-plates inspected  177
ii boiler-plates rejected       1
ii boilers built under inspection in British Columbia  13
it high-pressure stills built under inspection in British Columbia  5
ii boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada  , 3
ii new boilers inspected (total)  8
ii boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  1
ii boilers unclassified, low-pressure stills  4
n first inspections  13
u inspections, external and internal  62
ii external inspections only /  12
ii visits in addition to inspections  23
ii boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  59
n boilers on which pressure was reduced       '5
ii boilers unsafe without extensive repairs .  1
ii boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  1
u inspections completed  49
2 U 18 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery', 1917
Summary of Work done in District A in 1916.—Concluded.
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  2,853
Number of defects observed as per summary  23
Number of defects considered dangerous  3
Inspection fees earned        $927.70
Inspection fees collected        $966 .65
Miles travelled by the Inspector  2,516
Letters inward  70
Letters outward  150
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number. Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction  1
Pressure-gauges defective             7 2
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets  3
ii      internal corrosion  1
ii      external corrosion  5
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks            2 1
Cases of broken test-cocks  4
Totals          23 3
Remarks.
I inspected two boilers for Provincial  Government at Vernon Court-house and one at
Kamloops Court-house, the inspection fees amounting to $19.20, not charged.
A. S. Bennett,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A.
Summary of Total Work done in Districts A and E in 1916.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers      65
ii .         amendments  34
ii           boiler plates inspected ,  177
ii           boiler plates rejected  1
ii           boilers built under inspection in British Columbia  13
ii          high-pressure stills built under inspection in British Columbia  5
ii          boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada  6
ii          boilers built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  2
ii          new boilers inspected built in United States  2
ii          new boilers inspected built in British Columbia  6
n          new boilers inspected (total)  21
ii          boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  4
ii          boilers imported from the United States (second-hand)  1
ii          boilers unclassified  7
ii          first inspections  33
ii          inspections, external and internal  666
n          external inspections only  29
ii          special inspections after repairs  44
ii          visits in addition to inspections  205
n          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  626
ii          boilers on which pressure was reduced  26
ii          boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  18
ii          boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  18
ii          boilers considered unfit for further use  3
ii          accidents to engines"and boilers  10
ii          investigations  10
n          inspections completed  669 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 19
Summary of Total Work done in Districts A and E in 1916.—Concluded.
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary.
Number of defects considered dangerous. . . .
Inspection fees earned	
Inspection fees collected	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Letters inward	
Letters outward	
Boilers taken out of service	
30,513
781
130
5,306.40
6,419 17
20,952
949
1,055
3
Summary of Total Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative .	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction.
Boilers without pressure-gauges	
Pressure-gauges inoperative	
Pressure-gauges defective	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing	
ii     defective stays	
ii      broken rivets	
ii      defective riveting  . . .
ii      broken stays or braces	
n      loose stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates	
Boilers with burned plates	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets    	
ii      internal corrosion	
ii      scale or encrustation	
ii      internal grooving	
ii      external corrosion	
ii      defective tubes	
ii     defective feed-water arrangement	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints .
Number.
11
12
1
2
52
1
7
3
1
3
4
2
44
6
33
37
55
2
61
28
5
22
2
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks        107
5
4
69
1
26
13
10
20
1
4
..     -119
Defective water-gauges
Water-columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Connections to water-columns without valves	
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off.
Defects in engines	
Boilers without stop-valves	
Cases of defective steam-pipes	
Unclassified defects	
Totals.
781'
Dangerous.
1
10
1
1
1
1
14
12
36
1
1
1
7
1
2
22
130
John Downie,
John D. Kay,
Geo. C. McGown,
A. S. Bennett,
H. Worth,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, Districts A and E. U 20 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery, 1917
Senior Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., January 1st, 1917.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year 1916. This covers the general
supervision of work done in District B and includes details of examinations held, with list of
the different grades of examinations for which the applicants appeared. It also details my own
inspections.
During the past year the number of candidates examined was somewhat in excess of the
previous year, being 148 for all grades ; of those, 108 passed and 40 failed to obtain the desired
certificate.
Examinations were held by the Inspectors in all parts of this district to which their duty
took them, including Anyox, Rocher Deboule, New Hazelton, Smithers, Prince George,
McBride, Atlin, Cumberland, Alberni, Union Bay, and the Queen Charlotte Islands.
Examinations were also held at least every month in Victoria and at intervals of three months
at Nanaimo.
I append a list of the different grades for which the candidates were examined, and there
are still on hand some fifteen applications for examination. The following did not present
themselves when duly notified : Six third class, seven fourth class, and two for special logging.
During the past year my time has been much occupied in attending to details of office-
work, correspondence, inquiries, visitors, etc., but when opportunity occurred I attended to
any pressing inspections required while my colleagues were engaged in the more distant parts
of this district.
Those inspections entailed nearly 3,000 miles of travel and total 226 inspections and 217
hydrostatic tests.
Five new boilers were built under my supervision in the local boiler-shops.
I also made over 200 visits to steam plants in operation or to test plates, and looked over
the workmanship of the new boilers referred to.
I am pleased to report but few accidents occurring in this district. Those reported to this
office were as follows :—
In January, at plant No. 642b, engineer while working on the fuel-conveyor gear on his
boilers got caught and lost the thumb of his left hand.
In February, at plant No. 1773b, draught vibration caused the smoke-box door fastenings to
loosen; the door swung open under back-draught and the engineer was burnt on hands and face.
In April there was a fatal accident at steam plant No. 1098b. This is a vertical boiler
attached to a hoisting-engine; some helpers were assisting the engineer to remove the uptake
and stack, so that he could sweep the tubes. During this operation a shore or support slipped,
the uptake swung around and fell off the boiler, and crushed a helper so severely that he died
shortly afterwards. Investigating this accident, I concluded it was an unfortunate mishap,
and that no serious fault could be attributed to any one.
In June, at steam plant No. 1051b, an employee was severely scalded by a steam-jacketed
copper boiler or pan, the inner wall of which collapsed under the steam-pressure and ruptured;
the emitted steam, projecting the boiling contents over the unfortunate operator, resulting in
his detention for a considerable period in the hospital. The cause was the thinning of the
bottom of the pan by the friction of long-continued stirring, thus unwittingly reducing its
strength.
In November steam-heating plant No. 1925b was badly damaged through shortage of
water. This is a sectional cast-iron steam-boiler, in which the water got too low by drain on
the system being accidentally left open in the night. A janitor, noting there was no water in
the glass, turned on the water from the city main, resulting in the overheated sections being
rendered useless through fracture. As the boiler had evidently been empty or practically so,
there was no steam to produce an explosion. The engineer was off duty when this occurred,
so no blame could be attributed to him. 7 Geo. 5 British Columbia. U 21
In addition to the fees earned and tabulated, I inspected and tested certain steam plants
for the Provincial Government in sundry of their institutions, for which no charge was made;
those total 599 horse-power, fees equalling $79.10, and were six in number. I also supervised
construction, inspected and tested one return-tube boiler, which, on completion, was shipped
to District D, where the fees would be collected.
During the summer I was pleased to note a revival of general industry. This was more
especially noted amongst the lumber-mills, some of which resumed operation after being in
disuse for two years. More of the coal-mines have been kept busy, so that all those steam
plants have been in continuous operation. The logging industry with its numerous smaller
steam plants has been quite active; the Railway Department having taken over the supervision of the standard railway locomotives, we have been relieved from the necessity of
inspecting them.
As many of the engineers have joined the overseas forces, a shortage of certificated men
was felt by some of the steam-users last summer, but the number of candidates examined and
granted certificates, I think, has now made up the shortage then felt.
The prospects for general business activity during 1917 looks favourable, and I believe
that the majority of the steam plants in this district will be continuously in operation.
In conclusion, I would express satisfaction at the efficient assistance rendered by my
colleagues in this office, and at the harmonious and satisfactory conditions prevailing between
the steam operators and the staff of Inspectors.
I have, etc.,
S. Baxter,
Senior Inspector, District B.
Engineers' Examinations.
Number of applications for examinations  72
Number of applications for re-examination  17
Number of applications approved  65
Examination fees  $225
Results of Examinations.
Class.                                        No. examined.      Passed. Failed.
Second  3 2                   1
Third     35 20                 15
Fourth  88 67                 21
Temporary  42 42
Logging-donkey  10 10
Special heating  12 12
Special logging-locomotive  1 1
Special creamery  1 1
Totals    192 155        -       37
Remarks.
Examinations were held frequently in Victoria office, at least once each month, also every
three months at Nanaimo. In the more outlying parts of this district examinations were held
at Alberni, Union Bay, Prince Rupert, Anyox, Rocher Deboule, New Hazelton, Smithers,
Prince George, McBride, Atlin, and Cumberland.
Applications for examination on hand end of December : Third-class, 6 ; fourth-class, 7 ;
logging, 2; total, 15.
Summary of Work done in District B in 1916.
Number of boiler-plates inspected   27
ii          boiler-plates rejected  1
ii          boilers built under inspection in British Columbia  5
ii         boilers built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  1
n         new boilers inspected (total)  1 U 22
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery,
1917
Summary of Work done in District B in 1916.—Concluded.
Number of boilers unclassified     	
first inspections	
inspections, external and internal	
external inspections only	
special inspections after repairs ,	
visits in addition to inspections	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test	
boilers on which pressure was reduced	
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs	
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions ....
boilers considered unfit for further use	
accidents to engines and boilers	
accidents resulting- in personal injury (not fatal).
accidents resulting in personal injury (fatal).
investigations
inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary
Number of defects considered dangerous....
Inspection fees earned	
Inspection fees collected	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Letters inward	
Letters outward , .
Telegrams inward	
Telegrams outward	
Summary op Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction	
Pressure-gauges inoperative	
Pressure-gauges defective	
Boilers damaged by low water	
Defective settings	
Cases of internal corrosion ,	
ii      scale or encrustation	
ii      external corrosion	
ii      defective tubes    	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Neutral sheets not stayed .	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off .
Defects in engines	
Unclassified defects	
Number.
2
1
16
1
1
1
10
7
14
3
4
36
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
213
11
7
205
' .     217
7
7
10
1
2
3
1
3
226
12,296
113
13
51,942.10
12,077.35
2,908
2,356
3,026
30
23
Dangerous.
1
1
1
3
Totals.
113
13
S. Baxter,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B. 7 Geo. 5 British Columbia. U 23
Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., January 1st, 1917.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending December 31st, 1916.
During the year I found that most of the steam plants I inspected were in a satisfactory
condition, being well looked after, and the defects observed were of a minor character.
The following return-tube boilers were found to be damaged.
Boiler No. 1711b was found to be bulged in the shell close to the front head and the
head-seam strained. This was due to a pan of lime being left in the boiler. Twenty of the
rivets were renewed (several of them being cracked) and the seam recaulked.
Boiler No. 699b was badly burnt and bulged near the middle circumferential seam, due
to a deposit of loose scale.    This boiler was patched.
Several donkey-boilers were found to have furnace stay-bolts broken, of which all were
renewed.
This year I have inspected steam plants on Vancouver Island, Prince Rupert, Atlin,
along the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway as far as McBride, and on several islands adjacent to
Vancouver Island.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
L. Duckitt,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B.
Remarks.
During the year I assisted with and held examinations in Victoria, Nanaimo, Cumberland, Prince Rupert, Atlin, and various places along the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway as far
as McBride, details of which will be given in Mr. Baxter's report.
Summary of Work done in District B in 1916.
Number of boilers built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  4
ii          new boilers inspected (total)  4
H          boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  3
ii          boilers unclassified  2
ii          first inspections  9
M          inspections, external and internal  245
ii          external inspections only  42
ii          special inspections after repairs  6
ii          visits in addition to inspections  110
ii          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  265
n          boilers on which pressure was reduced  6
ii          boilers unsafe without extensive repairs     2
ii          boiler's repaired under Inspector's directions  12
ii          boilers considered unfit for further use  1
it          accidents to engines and boilers  1
ti          inspections completed  287
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  11,720
Number of defects observed as per summary  151
Number of defects considered dangerous      34
Inspection fees earned     $2,251.30
Inspection fees collected     $2,226.10
Miles travelled by the Inspector  6,946
Boilers taken out of service  3 Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.         Dangerous.
Pressure-gauges inoperative  7                   7
Pressure-gauges defective  49
Cases of defective stays  1
ii      broken rivets  2                    1
ii      broken stays or braces  13                    9
Defective settings  2                   1
Boilers with fractured plates  1                   1
ii          burned plates  2                   2
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets  2                    1
ii      internal corrosion  11
ii      scale or encrustation  5                    2
ii      internal grooving  2
ii      external corrosion  10
ii     defective tubes  11                   1
ii      defective feed-water arrangement  1
Serious leakage around tube-ends  2
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks    ... 6                   3
Defective water-gauges  1                    1
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks  3                   3
Water-columns without blow-outs  1
Boilers without fusible plugs  6
Boilers low at front end  10
Cases of serious leakage of fittings  1
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off  2                   2
Totals  151                 34
Remarks.
During the year I inspected and tested five boilers with a total horse-power of 341 for the
Provincial Government; the fees, amounting to $62.40, were not charged as per instructions.
L. Duckitt,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B.
Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., January 1st, 1917.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you my report of work done during the year 1916.
My work has taken me all over Vancouver Island and along the Coast of the Mainland
from Smith Inlet north to Anyox, and also over the Queen Charlotte Islands.
At Anyox the Granby Bay Company had been so forcing their boilers that in one instance
at least a serious accident nearly resulted. With the additions which the company has made
to its steam plant, I look for much improvement in the future.
Last year I suggested that return-tubular boilers with lap-seams be so made that the edge,
where grooving would take place, could be clearly seen. Again I would draw attention to
this point. At one plant I had the utmost difficulty in stating with certainty that grooving
was developing on account of the seam being almost on a level with the tubes. 7 Geo. 5 British Columbia. U 25
With one exception only, I made a hydrostatic test on every boiler whose inspection has
been completed.
I failed to complete the inspection of eleven boilers, due to no water being available for
the hydrostatic test.    No certificates have been issued for these boilers.
In one case I had to order a safety-valve of lock-up type to be attached to a boiler where
the safety-valve had been tampered with by a person other than the engineer.
Besides inspection-work, I assisted with engineers' examinations in Victoria and conducted
such at many outlying places.
Enclosed is a detailed list of the work done, which I trust will meet with your approval.
I have, etc.,
John Clark,
Inspector of Boilers, District B.
Summary of Work done in District B in 1916.
Number of new boilers inspected built in United States  2
ii          new boilers inspected (total)  2
n          boilers imported from United States (second-hand)  1
ii          boilers unclassified .•  1
ii          first inspections  4
ii          inspections, external and internal  254
ii          external inspections only (all cast-iron heating-boilers)    28
ii          special inspections after repairs  4
ii          visits in addition to inspections  23
ii          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  242
ii          boilers on which pressure was reduced  12
ii          boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  17
ii          boilers repaired under Inspector's directions . ,  4
ii          boilers considered unfit for further use  2
ii          accidents to engines and boilers         4
ii          investigations  3
ii          inspections completed  243
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  13,774
Number of defects observed as per summary  322
Number of defects considered dangerous  15
Inspection fees earned     $2,250. 75
Inspection fees collected     $2,232. 75
Miles travelled by the Inspector  7,762
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative  1                    1
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded  3
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction  2
Pressure-gauges inoperative  3
Pressure-gauges defective  48
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing  3
ii     defective stays  10
ii     broken rivets  6
ii     defective riveting  2
ii      broken stays or braces '.  6
Defective settings  12
Boilers with fractured plates  2
ii        laminated plates      1
ii        burned plates  2                   2
ii        blistered plates  5                   4
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets  19                   5
ii      internal corrosion  27 U 26
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery,
1917
Summary of Defects observed.—Concluded.
Nature of Defects.
Cases of scale or encrustation	
internal grooving	
external corrosion	
defective tubes    	
defective feed-water arrangement
broken feed-valves	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings.	
Boilers without hand-holes	
Cases of defective steam-pipes	
Totals.
Number.
36
2
36
16
1
1
14
4
2
4
34
11
o
322
Dangerous.
1
1
15
John Clark,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B.
Summary of Total Work done in District A in 1916.
Number of boiler-plates inspected  27
boiler-plates rejected       1
boilers built under inspection in British Columbia  5
boilers built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  5
new boilers inspected built in United States  2
new boilers inspected (total)  7
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  3
boilers imported from United States (second-hand)  1
boilers unclassified  4
first inspections       15
inspections, external and internal  712
external inspections only  81
special inspections after repairs  17
visits in addition to inspections  338
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  724
boilers on which pressure was reduced  25
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  26
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  26
boilers considered unfit for further use  4
accidents to engines and boilers  7
accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)    3
accidents resulting in personal injury (fatal) ,       1
investigations  3
inspections completed  756
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  37,790
Number of defects observed as per summary  586
Number of defects considered dangerous ._  62
Inspection fees earned     $6,444.15
Inspection fees collected     $6,536 . 20
Miles travelled by the Inspector  17,616
Letters inward  2,356
Letters outward  3,026
Telegrams inward  30
Telegrams outward  23
Boilers taken out of service  3 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 27
Summary of Total Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative	
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction    	
Pressure-gauges inoperative	
Pressure-gauges defective	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing    ...
ii      defective stays	
ii      broken rivets	
ii      defective riveting	
ii      broken stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates	
it laminated plates	
ii        burned plates	
ii blistered plates	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets    	
ii      internal corrosion	
ii      scale or encrustation ,	
ii      internal grooving	
ii      external corrosion	
ii      defective tubes	
ii      defective feed-water
ii     broken feed-valves.
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Water-columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Neutral sheets not stayed	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off.
Defects in engines     	
Boilers without hand-holes	
Cases of defective steam-pipes	
Unclassified defects	
arrangement
Totals.
Number.        Dangerou
1
1
3
4
1
11
8
113
1
3
11
8
1
2
19
9
1
1
22
4
3
1
1
5
4
5
4
21
6
39
42
2
4
1
56
2
34
2
2
1
30
1
4
11
4
9
1
3
3
1
70
1
8
21
6
1
3
2
1
1
2
4
1
1
586
62
S. Baxter,
L. Duckitt,
John Clark,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, District B U 28
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery,
1917
Inspector's Report, District C.
Nelson, B.C.* January 1st, 1917.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report for the year ending December
31st, 1916 :—
I am pleased to say that no accidents resulting in personal injury occurred in this district
during the year, and only a few defects were discovered that were actually dangerous. A
number of boilers were slightly damaged by scale and mud, and one was badly damaged by oil
entering the boiler with the feed-water. A number of engineers think that oil can be removed
from the feed-water by allowing a part of the water to overflow, or by filtering it through coke
or other substance, but in the majority of cases there is enough oil left in the water to damage
the boiler.
The rear heads of two boilers were found to be cracked in the segment under the tubes.
This was caused by the accumulation of scale between the angle-iron and the head, where it
was hard to get at. The steam-pipe from the header to the steam-feed gave way at an elbow
when steam was turned on, and at another mill one of the sections of the gunshot feed cracked,
and it was decided by the man in charge that the steam should be turned on a little so that
they could find out the extent of the fracture, with the result that a piece of cylinder was
blown out, but fortunately no one was hit by the fragment.
Examination for engineers were held in the Fernie, Cranbrook, Grand Forks, Princeton,
and Nelson, and most of the candidates who were notified came up for examination. In this
district a number of the candidates keep moving from one place to another and do not get the
notice to come up for examination in time.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
Andrew Sutherland,
Inspector, District C.
Results of Examinations.
Class. No. examined.
Second  4
Third  6
Fourth  26
Temporary         3
Special logging-locomotive ,  4
Special Doukhobor ,  1
Totals      44
1
5
20
3
4
1
Failed.
3
1
6
34
10
Summary of Work done in District C in 1916.
Number of boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada	
boilers built in Eastern Canada not under inspection	
new boilers inspected built in United States	
new boilers inspected (total)	
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)	
boilers imported from United States (second-hand)	
first inspections	
4
1
2
7
1
4
12 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 29
Summary of Work done in District C in  1916.—Concluded.
Number of inspections, external and internal	
n external inspections only	
ii special inspections after repairs	
ii visits in addition to inspections	
ii boilers subjected to hydrostatic test	
ii boilers on which pressure was reduced	
ii boilers unsafe without extensive repairs
ii boilers repaired under Inspector's direction.
ii accidents to engines and boilers	
ii. investigations ,	
ii inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary	
Number of defects considered dangerous.
Inspection fees earned	
Inspection fees collected	
Miles travelled by the Inspector    .
Letters inward	
Letters outward	
Telegrams inward	
Telegrams outward	
Boilers taken out of service (during the year four boilers were sent to Alberta).
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects!
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction .
Pressure-gauges defective	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing	
ii      defective stays	
ii      broken rivets	
ii      broken stays or braces	
ii      loose stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates	
ii burned plates	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
ii      internal corrosion    	
n      scale or encrustation	
ii      external corrosion	
ii      defective tubes	
ii      defective feed-water arrangement	
ii      broken feed-valves	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Water-columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Connections to water-columns without valves	
Neutral sheets not stayed	
Furnaces out of shape	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Boilers low at front end '	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings   	
Defects in engines	
244
5
12
149
238
10
5
19
7
1
249
16,349
418
16
$2,710.14
$2,709.05
7,629
345
385
29
31
umber.        Dan
gerous.
5
1
66
7
5
2
3
6
2
32
3
6
1
7
1
36
2
5
42
1
15
15
10
1
1
10
1
1
1
18
3
3
1
1
2
47
5
2
3
9
35
4
1 Summary of Defects observed.—Concluded.
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Boilers without stop-valves  6 : .-
Cases of defective steam-pipes  5
Unclassified defects :  1
Totals        418 16
Andrew Sutherland,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District C.
Senior Inspector's  Report, District D.
Vancouver, B.C., January 2nd, 1917.
John Peck,  Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B. C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report for 1916 (see tabulated report):—
During the year there were three accidents reported. The Vancouver Lumber Company
had one boiler damaged by overheating, and Pacific Coast Pipe Company and Pacific Great
Eastern Railway Company had one each damaged by low water. These were the only accidents, either to boiler or engineers, reported during the year.
We have had numerous calls to inspect second-hand boilers that had been discarded, as
the high prices available, if boilers could pass for a reasonable pressure, was a great temptation
to the second-hand dealer. In some cases old marine boilers that had been practically
condemned by Marine Inspector were placed on our books by parties who had in mind the
disposal of same for stationary purposes. The "Inspection Act" in these cases has undoubtedly
proved its worth in protecting the public from the dealers who would have taken advantage
of the scarcity of new boilers to unload these old ones on the purchasers, who had to have
boilers at any cost.
The prospects for 1917 are much brighter than at beginning of 1916, and I trust that
conditions will continue to improve from now on.
All of the above is respectfully submitted.
I have, etc.,
George O. Madigan,
Senior Inspector, District D.
Results of Examinations.
Class. No. examined.
Second  5
Third  31
Fourth  61
Temporary  67
Special logging-donkey  44
Special creamery  6
Special logging-locomotive        2
Special heating • 23
Totals    239 186 53
Passed.
Failed
3
2
20
11
35
26
67
35
9
2
4
1
1
23 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 31
Summary of Work done in District D in 1916.
Number of boilers built under inspection in British Columbia.
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia . . .
new boilers inspected (total),	
first inspections	
inspections, external and internal	
external inspections only	
special inspections after repairs	
visits in addition to inspections	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test	
boilers on which pressure was reduced	
inspections completed ,	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary	
Number of defects considered dangerous	
  1
 , .. .. 1
  1
  1
  19
  4
  2
  3
  20
  1
  23
  900.8
  38
  2
Inspection fees earned        $184. 30
Inspection fees collected
Miles travelled by the Inspector.
Letters inward	
Letters outward	
Telegrams inward   	
Telegrams outward	
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves defective	
Pressure-gauges defective	
Defective settings	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Cases of broken test-cock handles	
ii     serious leakage of fittings, stop-valves, etc	
ii     defective steam-pipes corroded thin	
Unclassified defects (broken braces to frame of donkey)	
Number.
2
7
1
1
2
$75.35
500
2,272
3,125
16
12
Dangerous.
Totals.
39
George O. Madigan,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
Inspector's Report,  District D.
Vancouver, B.C., January 2nd, 1917.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit for your consideration report for the year 1916.
No serious accidents to persons have happened, although one or two boilers were damaged
by oil.
Owing to Mr. Bath being away on leave, there was somewhat more outside work to attend
to this year than last.    With the  " Adanac " at my disposal from July until the middle of U 32 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery, 1917
September (when Mr. Bath again returned, I inspected 155 logging-boilers situated in sixty-
two different camps. These camps were situated in that section extending from Mackenzie
Sound to Toba Inlet.
With the exception of about half dozen boilers, all were subjected to hydrostatic test, as
well as an external and internal examination ; slots were also cut in the seams of those boilers
with lap-joints, but no fractures were noticed. The few boilers not subjected to test were
exempted because of lack of water and assistance to get them ready. From what could be
seen and learned, one would receive the impression that the year 1916 was a satisfactory one
for the logger. The principal defects noted were those due to leaky main steam stop-valves,
and to the large amount of leakage between the stop-valve flange and the boiler. The former-
does not offer very much difficulty to overcome, as in a general way the valve can be fairly well
plugged by putting a piece of packing between the valve and seat (except as in one case the
water leaked out between the valve-seat and body of sheet), but the latter caused a very
considerable loss of time in inspection. It becomes necessary in this case to remove the valve
bodily from the boiler and either put new packing between them or put on a blind flange—a
repair not so easy of accomplishment, as it would seem. Usually the nuts are burnt on, and
studs crystallized and broken by the usage they get at the time, and before, due to the
necessity of renewing the packing at frequent intervals. Perhaps, if these valves were properly
bedded down to the boiler in the first place, much less trouble would be encountered, but as
long as dependence is put on packing, I am afraid we must expect this nuisance to exist.    ,
There was also a case or two of broken stays and a considerable number of defective steam-
gauges. These latter get hard usage on a logging-boiler and are continually being replaced by
new ones. The usual leakage of tubes at top end was noticed, tubes, like other parts of a
logging-boiler, being subjected to rough treatment, by rolling and expanding excessively, by
being left exposed to the weather when shut down, and by being subjected to rapid cooling
and heating when in operation.
In conclusion, I wish to thank you for your help and assistance as in the past, extended
so generously when required, and to assure you of my continued loyalty in the future.
I have, etc.,
Percy A. Goepel,
Inspector, District D.
Summary op Work done in District D in 1916.
Number of boiler-plates inspected  3
ii           new boilers inspected built in British Columbia  4
ii          new boilers inspected (total)  4
ii          boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  7
ii          boilers unclassified (Foster's superheater) , 4
ii          first inspections  15
ii          inspections, external and internal  420
ii          internal inspections only       3
ii          external inspections only  7
ii          special inspections after repairs  15
n          visits in addition to inspections      201
ii          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  404
ii          boilers on which pressure was reduced  6
ii          boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  7
ii          boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  6
ii          accidents to engines and boilers '  2
ii          inspections completed  411
Total horse-power of boilers inspected     20,594.80
Number of defects observed as per summary  444
Number of defects considered dangerous  58
Inspection fees earned     $3,394.89
Inspection fees collected     $3,238 .00
Miles travelled by the Inspector  4,325
Telegrams inward      3
Telegrams outward  7 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 33
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers without safety-valves, with sufficient area	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction	
Pressure-gauges defective	
Cases of defective riveting	
ii      broken stays or braces	
Boilers with fractured plates	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
ii      internal corrosion	
ii      scale or encrustation	
ii      external corrosion	
n     defective tubes	
ii     defective feed-water arrangement	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges ,	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings        122
Unclassified defects (leaks between stop-valves, flanges, and boilers).
Number.
Dangerous
3
3
4
2
52
6
4
2
2
1
13
3
56
8
3
18
1
30
5
20
8
2
2
54
4
9
3
1
1
8
3
3
122
8
36
2
Totals.
444
58
Percy A. Goepel,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
Inspector's Report, District D.
Vancouver, B.C., January 2nd, 1917.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have pleasure in forwarding you my report for the period of time, July 2.4th to
December 31st, 1916, which I trust you will find satisfactory.
During this time I have come across nothing of any special importance; all the steam
plants, both log-haul and stationery, were found in a very satisfactory condition.
I   have, etc.,
F. Bath,
Inspector, District D.
Summary op Work done in District D in 1916.
(From July 24th to December 31st, 1916.)
Number of inspections, external and internal  220
ii          external inspections only (mostly donkey-boilers)  10
ii          visits in addition to inspections  20
ii          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test. . .  204
ii          boilers on which pressure was reduced  2
3 U 34
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery,
1917
Summary of Work done in District D in 1916.—Concluded.
Number of inspections completed.      227
Total horse-power of boilers inspected.         9,234
Number of defects observed as per summary  66
Inspection fees earned  $1,716 . 60
Inspection fees collected    $1,801. 55
Miles travelled by the Inspector       1,694
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded. . . .
Pressure-gauges defective	
Cases of defective stays     	
ii      broken stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water .	
Boilers with fractured plates	
Boilers with laminated plates  . . .
Cases of internal corrosion	
ii      external corrosion	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Unclassified defects ...    	
Totals
Number.
3
8
1
13
1
1
2
4
5
22
1
2
3
Dangerous.
         66
F. Bath,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
Inspector's Report, District D.
Vancouver, B.C., January 2nd, 1917.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my annual report for 1916.
In regard to what has come under my personal notice, the past year has not been
uneventful from the Inspector's and boiler-maker's standpoint. I allude to boiler No. 750d
and its failure under hydrostatic test. As this case is under investigation by the Chief
Inspector, I only propose to make a few observations in a general way. Roughly, the dimensions were : Diameter, 54^ inches; length, 9 feet 10 inches; thickness of plate, T7¥ inch;
style of longitudinal seams, lap and trebled riveted; B.C. Registered Design 1109. The
arrangement of the longitudinal seams was unusual, in that the seams were directly opposite—
one to each side. In the case of a logging-engine boiler, which requires to be securely stayed
in the fore-and-aft direction, the correct position for one of the stay-brackets would unavoidably conflict with the longitudinal seam of the top plate. This is what happened, and to
minimize the error the troublesome bracket was put just as close to the seam as possible. It
appears to me as a point to determine, whether this stout cast bracket in locally stiffening the
seam, really weakened it, or whether the bracket created severe secondary stresses through its
not having been carefully fitted to the contour of the boiler-shell, or whether the intermittent
stresses on the stay set up by the operation of the whole machine caused the grooving to an 7 Geo. 5 British Columbia. U 35
extent  which  left barely -^ inch of solid plate directly opposite the bracket.    There is, of
course, the question of quality of plate at the point of failure, which can easily be settled.
Two log-haul boilers of the same design have come under my notice since the mishap to
750d—namely, 901d and 907d. In the inspection of 901d I collaborated with Mr. Bennett,
and although slots were cut in the seam adjacent to the stay-bracket, and the seam thoroughly
pounded, no sign of grooving could be detected by either of us. With regard to 907d, this
boiler was inspected some two months ago, and was subjected to the same drastic usage as
90Id, without- showing anything to doubt the soundness of the plate through the entire thickness of T7g- inch. All these three logging-boilers had been used clearing Shaughnessy Heights,
and, as their official numbers indicate, were built about the same time, or during 1908.
Boilers 901d and 907d are again at work and at the former working-pressure of 165 lb., whereas
750d is so much scrap-iron. If investigation shows the plate of 750d to be actually good
material, then 901D and 907d require careful watching for the rest of their working-days.
Hailing at some length referred to the most noteworthy incident of my year's work, it only
remains to mention two instances of damage, due to shortness of water, to complete the record.
Boiler 1455d, return tubular, had fifty tubes damaged owing to an uncertificated night
engineer's ignorance of the water-column and how to read it. Boiler H18d, a heating-boiler,
was slightly damaged at lower girth-seam, due to lowness of water, caused by the leakage of
blow-down valve overnight.    Nearly all the tubes in this boiler had to be rerolled.
The enclosed tabulated statement, if compared with that of last year, shows a considerable increase. This office was understaffed for the first six months of the year, owing to Mr.
Bath's absence. More work had to be accomplished, and at times the pressure was heavier
than what could be efficiently carried as a normal condition. It affords District D some
satisfaction to reflect that, in spite of that, no work was either neglected or avoided.
Thanking you for consistent support and considerate counsel and direction throughout
the year under review,
I have, etc.,
Fred.  Biggam,
Inspector, District D.
Summary of Work done in District D in 1916.
Number of boiler-plates inspected  75
ii          boiler-plates rejected. .  2
ii          boilers built under inspection in British Columbia  15
ii          boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada  . 3
ii          new boilers inspected built in United States  5
ii           new boilers inspected built in British Columbia  16
ii          new boilers inspected (total)  24
ii          boilers unclassified    2
ii          first inspections  26
ii          inspections, external and internal        198
ii          internal inspections only    9
ii          external inspections only  177
ii          special inspections after repairs  3
ii          visits in addition to inspections  270
n          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  302
ii          boilers on which pressure was reduced  7
ii          boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  6
ii         boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  7
ii          boilers considered unfit for further use  1
ii          accidents to engines and boilers  1
ii          inspections completed  380
Total horse-power of boilers inspected     18,342 .06
Number of defects observed as.per summary  286
Number of defects considered dangerous  38
Inspection fees earned     $3,123.16
Inspection fees collected ....  .   $3,243.10
Miles travelled by the Inspector (approximately)  1,414
Boilers taken out of service  2 U 36
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery,
1917
Work done for other Districts.
Visited King-Beach Manufacturing Company's plant at Mission,  December 20th, 1916,
and inspected manhole doors of boiler 926a (2474d) for District A.
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety valves inoperative	
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction	
Pressure-gauges inoperative	
Pressure-gauges defective	
Cases of defective stays	
ii      broken stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water       	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates	
Cases of internal corrosion ......   	
11      scale or encrustation	
11      external corrosion	
ii      defective tubes	
ii      defective feed-water arrangement	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints    	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Boilers low at front end	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off
Unclassified defects	
Number.
Dangerous
2
2
3
3
5
3
4
4
15
11
4
11
• . .
1
1
2
1
13
2
49
5
6
7
1
2
1
6
2
2
1
3
5
2
1
11
2
1
2
1
124
3
Totals.
286
38
Fred. Biggam,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
Summary of Total Work done in District D in 1916.
Number of boiler-plates inspected    	
boiler-plates rejected   . . .	
boilers built under inspection in British Columbia . . .
boilers built under inspection in Eastern Canada
new boilers inspected built in United States	
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia	
new boilers inspected (total)	
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand).
boilers unclassified (Foster superheaters)	
first inspections	
inspections, external and internal	
internal inspections only ,	
external inspections only	
special inspections after repairs	
visits in addition to inspections	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test	
boilers on which pressure was reduced	
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs	
boiler's repaired under Inspector's directions	
78
2
16
3
5
21
29
7
6
42
857
12
198
20
494
930
16
13
13 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 37
Summary of Total Work done in District D in 1916.—Concluded.
Number of boilers considered unfit for further use  1
ii          accidents to engines and boilers   3
ii          inspections completed ,  1,041
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  49,161, 66
Number of defects observed as per summary       834
Number of defects considered dangerous  98
Inspection fees earned  $8,418.85
Inspection fees collected  $8,358 .00
Miles travelled by the Inspector  7,933
Letters inward  2,272
Letters outward  3,125
Telegrams inward  19
Telegrams outward  19
Boilers taken out of service  2
Summary of Total Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Boilers without safety-valves  3 3
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative  2 2
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded  6 3
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction  11 5
Pressure-gauges inoperative  4 4
Pressure-gauges defective  82 18
Cases of defective stays  5
ii      defective riveting  4 2
n     broken stays or braces  26 1
Boilers damaged by low water  2 1
Defective settings  3 1
Boilers with fractured plates   27 5
ii             laminated plates  2
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets  57 8
ii      internal corrosion      56
ii      scale or encrustation  23 1
ii      external corrosion  41 5
ii     defective tubes  27 9
ii      defective feed-water arrangement  4 3
Serious leakage around tube-ends       84 6
Serious leakage in rivet-joints,  12 4
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  12
Defective water-gauges  6 2
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Cases of broken test-cocks  27
Boilers without fusible plugs  7
Boilers low at front end  4
Cases 6f serious leakage of fittings  128 8
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off  2 1
Cases of defective steam-pipes  3
Unclassified defects ....«-  164 6
Totals        835 98
George O. Madigan,
Percy A. Goepel,
F. Bath,
Fred. Biggam,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, District D. U 38 Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery, 1917
LIST   OF   REGISTERED   DESIGNS.
List of Boiler Manufacturers, with their Number of Approved and
Registered Designs.
Alley & McLellan, Glasgow, Scotland  1
Allbright-Nell Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
American Radiator Co. of Canada, Toronto, Ont  25
American Hoist & Derrick Co., St. Paul, Minn., U.S.A  26
American Locomotive Co., New York., U. S. A  6
Ames Iron Works, Oswego, N. Y., U.S.A  5
Atlas Engine Works, Indianapolis, U.S.A  1
Averling & Porter, Rochester, England  1
Avery Co., Peoria,  111., U.S.A  2
Babcock & Wilcox, Renfrew, Scotland  21
Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, U.S.A        20
B.C. Marine Railway Co., Vancouver and Victoria, B.C  4
Beatty, M., & Sons, Ltd., Welland, Ont  15
Bird Machinery Manufacturing Co., Toronto, Ont  1
Bell, Robert, Engine & Threshing Co.,   Ltd., Seaforth, Ont    5
Brown Hoisting Co., Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A  2
Bros., William, Minneapolis, U.S.A  7
Brownell, The, Co., Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A  3
Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Bucyrus Co., South Milwaukee, U.S.A  20
Buffalo Steam Roller Co., Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A  1
Canadian Allis-Chalmers, Ltd.,  Toronto, Ont  2
Canada Foundry Co., Toronto, Ont  22
Canada Iron Corporation, Ltd.,  Midland, Ont  6
Canadian Talbot Boiler Co., Vancouver, B. C      1
Case, J. I., Threshing Co., Racine, Wis., U.S.A  22
Casey-Hedges Co., Ltd., Chattanooga, Tenn., U.S.A   1
Canadian Locomotive Co., Kingston, Ont  5
Clyde Iron Works, Duluth, Minn., U.S.A  9
Climax Manufacturing Co., Corry, Pa., U.S.A     ,  6
Clayton, Son & Co., Leeds, England      1
Columbiana Boiler Works Co., Ltd., Ohio, U.S.A  4
Continental Iron Works, New York, U.S.A  1
Cochrane & Co., Annan, Scotland      1
Davenport Locomotive Works, Davenport, Iowa, U.S.A  13
Decarie Safety Boiler Co., Vancouver, B. C  4
Diamond Boiler Works, Minneapolis, U.S.A      1
Doty Engine Works, Goderich, Ont      6
Dutton Co., C. H., Kalamazoo. Mich., U.S.A  7
Empire Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C  9
Erie City Iron Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  5
Farquhar Co., A. B., York, Penn., U.S.A  7
Foden, Ltd., Sandback, England  2
Frost Manufacturing Co., Galesburgh, 111., U.S.A  36
Garr, Scott & Co., Richmond, Ind., U.S.A  1
Gem City Boiler Works, Dayton, Ohio, U.S. A  1
Georgian Bay Engine Works, Midland, Ont  1
Goldie-McCulloch Co., Gait, Ont  48
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Co      2
Gray, Andrew, Marine Iron Works, Victoria, B. C  8
Great Northern Railway, Winnipeg, Man    .... 2
Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont       11
Hamilton Manufacturing Co., Wm., Peterboro, Out  1
Heisler Locomotive Works, Erie, Pa., U. S. A      7
Holt Manufacturing Co., Stockton, Cal., U.S. A      2
Houston, Stanwood & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Imperial Oil Co., Sarnia, Ont  6
International Engineering Works, Amherst, N.S  32
Inglis Co., John, Toronto, Ont  6
Industrial Works, Bay City, Mich., U.S.A  2
Jenckes Machine Co., Ltd., St  Catharines, Ont  93
Keeler, E., Co., Williamsport, Pa., U.S.A  1
Kelly Springfield Road Roller Co., Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Kewanee Boiler Co., Kewanee, 111., U.S.A  15
Keystone Driller Co., Beaver Falls, Pa., U.S.A  2 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 39
List op Registered Designs.—Concluded.
Leonard & Sons, E.,  London, Ont	
Leffell & Co., James, Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A	
Liggerwood Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.A	
Lima Locomotive & Machine Co., Lima, Ohio, U.S.A	
Lyons Boiler Works, DePere, Wis., U.S.A .'.
Manitowoc Iron Works, Manitowoc, Wis., U.S.A.	
Mann's Patent Steam Cart & Wagon Co., Leeds, England	
Marine Iron Works, Victoria, B.C	
Marion Steam Shovel Co., Marion,  Ohio, U.S.A	
Marion Osgood Co., Marion, Ohio, U.S.A	
Marsh & Henthorne, Belleville, Ont	
Matheson & Co., J., Ltd., New Glasgow, N.S	
Marshall & Sons Co., Ltd., Gainsborough, England	
Mainland Iron Works, Vancouver, B.C	
Macdougall Co., John, Caledonian Iron Works, Montreal, Que. ..
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que    	
Nagle Engine & Boiler Works, Erie, Pa., U. S. A	
Nicol Boiler Works, Vancouver, B.C •.,.
Napanee Iron Works, Napanee, Ont	
North Shore Iron Works, North Vancouver, B.C	
Oil City Boiler Works, Oil City, Pa., U.S.A	
Orr & Sembower, Reading, Pa., U.S.A	
Pennsylvania Boiler Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A	
Porter Co., H. K. Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A	
Poison Iron Works, Toronto, Ont	
Puget Sound Iron & Steel Works, Tacoma, Wash., U.S.A. .. -.
Risdon Locomotive & Iron Co., San Francisco, Cal., U.S.A	
Robey & Co., Lincoln, England	
Ross & Howard Iron Works, Ltd., Vancouver, B.C	
Ruston-Proctor Co., Lincoln, England	
Sawyer-Massey Co., Ltd.,  Hamilton, Ont	
Standard Iron  Works, Vancouver, B.C	
Sterns Co., Erie, Pa., U.S.A ."	
Sumner Iron Works, Everett, Wash., U.S.A	
Swift & Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A	
Taylor, Forbes & Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C	
Thew Automatic Shovel Co., Lorraine, Ohio, U.S.A	
Toronto Iron Works, Ltd., Toronto, Ont	
Twohy Bros. Co., Portland, Ore., U.S.A. .•	
Union Iron Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A	
Vancouver Engineering Works, Vancouver, B.C	
Victoria Machinery Depot Co., Victoria, B.C	
Vulcan Iron Works, New Westminster. B.C    	
Vulcan Iron Works, Seattle, Wash., USA	
Vulcan Iron Works, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., U.S.A	
Waterous Engine Works, Brantford, Ont	
Washington Iron Works, Seattle, Wash., U.S.A	
Western Dry Dock & Ship Building Co., Ltd., Port Arthur, Ont.
Wickes Boiler Co., Saginaw, Mich., U.S.A	
Williamette Iron & Steel Works, Portland, Ore., U.S.A	
36
1
4
20
2
2
3
8
35
5
10
10
1
1
3
9
1
2
1
41
1
19
3
10
1
2
1
2
31
7
15
1
1
1
1
30
5
1
1
31
70
33
37
1
1
61
32
1
3
List of Makers who have Registered and Approved Boiler Accessory Designs.
Spring Safety-valves.
6
in.
1
5
in.
1
4i
in.
1
4
in.
1
3
1
2
Si
in.
"i
3
in.
2
4
2
2
1
1
2*
in.
5
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
4
1
2
in.
5
li
in.
3
in.
3
1
in.
2
%
in.
2
in.
American Steam Gauge & Valve Co., Boston, Mass., U.S.A	
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
Crane Co., Chicago, III., U.S.A	
1
1
1
2
3
2
2
J. E. Lonergan & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A	
James Morrison Brass Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont...
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
6
1
4
V
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
T. MoAvity & Sons, St. John, N.B	
1
1 Main Stop-valves.
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A      3
Canadian Locomotive Co., Ltd., Kingston, Ont  3
Crane Co., Chicago,  111., U.S.A  6
G. M. Favis Regulator Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  11
Lunkenheimer Co., Cincinnati, U.S.A  2
Montreal Locomotive Works, Ltd., Montreal, Que  3
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Pemberthy Injector Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont  2
Steam-gauges.
Asheroft Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S. A  5
United States Gauge Co., New York, U.S.A  2
Blow-off Cocks and Valves.
American Locomotive Co.,  New York, U.S.'A  1
Crane Co., Chicago,  111., U.S.A  4
Engineering Specialties Co., Toronto, Ont      4
Homestead Valve Manufacturing, Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A  2
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  3
Lunkenheimer Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. A    2
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que      ... 1
Safety Apparatus.
Kilkenney Automatic Safety Appliance Co., Walla Walla, Wash  1
Water-gauge Fittings.
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montral, Que    .   ... 1
McAvity & Sons, T., St.  John, N.B  1
Canadian Locomotive Co., Kingston, Ont        1
James Morrison Brass Manufacturing, Ltd., Toronto, Ont  2
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que  1
Penberthy Injector Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont  4
Test-cocks (or Valves).
American Locomotive Co., New York, U. S. A  1
Canadian Locomotive Co., Kingston, Ont  1
J. I. Case Threshing Machine Co., Racine, Wis., U.S.A.     1
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que  1
James Morrison Brass Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont  2
T. McAvity & Sons, St. John, N.B  1
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Penberthy Injector Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont  2
Superheaters.
Power Specialty Co., New York, U. S. A  3
Economizers.
B. F. Sturtevant Co., Boston, Mass., U.S.A  1
Combined Check and Feed Valves.
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  3 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 41
ENGINEERS WHO OBTAINED CERTIFICATES  IN 1916.
Second Class.
Bolton, J. P  10,686
Campbell, James  10,874
Challinor, Edward  10,725
Barney, Ernest  10,795
Graebar, J. P  10,655
Johnson, D. A  10,424
Milne, Robert  10,533
McMillan, John  10,913
Oram, W. J  10,701
Robertson,  A. J  10,924
Shaw, J. T  10,578
Smith, H. R  10,465
Smith, D. P  10,707
Steele, Robert  10,753
Taylor, D. J. H  10,467
Taylor, J. Y. H  10,546
Third Class.
Allen, Joseph            10
Anderson, Alexander   10.
Bain, John      10
Bailey, Richard    10
Baxter, Edward.
Barker, R. H. F....
Boyd, H. H	
Brown, J. B	
Brooks, W. H	
Burnell,   W. S. .....
Carbonneau, Joseph.
Charles, A. H	
Clement, W. H	
Clark, W. T	
10,
10,
10
10,
10
10.
10,
10,
10
10
Coulson, W. H    10,
Coulthard, J. H   10.
Darling, Henry    10,
Ellis,  William".       10
Farrell,  P. P    10
FitzGerald, Ernest    10,
Freeman, F. G    10,
Gavin, Peter    10.
Gale, H. E    10,
Gamlen, Harry   10,
Gonor, Henry      10,
Hare, Michael      10.
Halcrow, Robert  10,
Harris, John '  10,
Hamilton, A. A  10
Haughton, John  10,
Heacock, J. H  10,
Hirst, J. H  10,
Hinds, J. E  10,
Hoggard, John      10
Hutchison, Harry      10.
Irving, J. N. W  10
Koufmann, N. C  10,
Large, Eugene  10,
Lancaster, E. T  10,
Leacock, W. C  10,
729 Logsdon, Frank  10,800
679 Mahy, Edwin....     10,521
303 Mathieson, Olav  10,695
395 Meldrum, J. G  10,802
503 Murray, Thomas  10,427
722 McKenzie, W. A  10,315
McLeod, David  10,400
568 Nash, Alexander  10,622
872 Orme, Alexander  10,702
687 Ovens, J. S  10,346
569 Oxley, Arthur  10,358
876 Parker, William  10,373
454 Profit!, I. E  10,626
878 Rankin, Arthur  10,402
571 Reeve, John  10,478
879 Ridgway, Fred  10,280
596 Safford, A. H  10,320
472 Scott, William      . 10,643
732 Segneboen, Harold  10,658
304 Smith, R. R  10,432
771 Smith, Robert  10,659
332 Somerville, Robert.  10,322
356 Stedham, S. B  10,298
513 Steele, R. R  10,323
365 Strong, Elmer  10,376
295 Stannard, P. S  10,752
604 Todd, J. E  10,377
605 Tuyttens, Ivo  10,350
690 Tweedie, N. E. L  10,759
734 Ulrich, George  10,783
Upton, A. E  10,547
308 Verdon, J. B  10,761
368 Watson, Frederick  10,808
344 Weaver, W. A  10,567
272 Witmer,  Alban  10,763
691 Woods, F. F  10,326
899 Wrightman,  P. S  10,405
902 Wright, J. H  10,953
903 Young, J. D  10,284
905
Fourth Class.
Abbott, Frank  10,437
Allen, Matthew  10,469
Anderson, H. C...  10,342
Bartram, F. A  10,449
Baker, Alfred  10,554
Barker, F. C  10,680
Bales, J. F  10,681
Barnett, A. E  10,865
Beam, Emerson  10,504
Bettschen, Frederick  10,793
Bentley, J. A  10,866
Bennett, John  10,955
Blackburn, John  10,685
Bowes, James  10,588
Battye, Oscar   10,864       Brooks, C. E   10,505 U 42
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery,
1917
Brown, John	
Brook, Reginald	
Bragg, F. L	
Burr, J. B	
Burns, Alex	
Cardinell, T. W	
Charters, W. A	
Charlton, Joseph	
Charters, A. F	
Clear, Frank	
Clark, Lewis	
Clarkson, John	
Connon, W. G	
Corrigall, D. B	
Davies, Meth..	
Davidson, T. E	
Demuth, J. F	
Divers, H. C	
Dolgner,  P. A	
Donaldson, William..
Duncan, Alexander...
Edgley, 0. C	
Edwards, W. A	
England, D. H	
Escott, Evan	
Fosolan, Hans	
Garrard, H. R	
Gaston, John	
Gardner, Henry	
Glover, George	
Gowan, Eugene	
Graham, Thomas...   .
Gray, George	
Greenhill, James	
Graham, J. S	
Gudmundsen, H. A...
Gwyer, W. T	
Habo, Alexander	
Hayes, J. B	
Hawley,   C. M	
Hall, Harry	
Hadley. G. U	
Harston,  J. R	
Harper, A. J	
Harling, N. H	
Hanbury, H. J	
Harrington, Timothy.
Hayes, L. E	
Hetzler, CD	
Hennessy, Richard. . .
Heap, Harry	
Hilton, H. W	
Hopkins, F. W. L....
Hodgson, G. F	
Hodgson, Nelson	
Horloch.C. G	
Huntley, W. H	
Huff, A. G	
Huey, J. W	
Jamison, G. W	
Jeboult, R. C	
Johnson, W. S	
Camano, Michael	
Kelso, Thomas	
Kerr, Duncan	
Kinnaird, J. R	
Knox, P. C	
Lade, F. L	
Lacey, Frederick	
Laird, Levi	
Lee, 0. E	
Fourth Class.—Continued.
10.506 Leeming, Arthur.
10,589 Leek, M. C	
10,870 Lee, Samuel	
10.328 Logan,  W. E	
10.507 Loney, F. R	
10.508 Many, Edwin	
10.268 Malcolm, Andrew	
10,364 Mathieson, Thomas ...
10,875 Manning, W. F. C...   .
10,594 Miller, Alex	
10,794 Mitchell, G. W	
10,877 Morgan, David	
10.456 Morin, J. R	
10,471 Moore, J. W	
10,597 Morgan, A. C	
10,880 Murphy, W. S	
10,768 McAllister, Donald... .
10.815 McArthur, F. R	
10,883 McAstocker, T. H. .. .
10,731 McCarthy, F. A	
10,331 McCawley, J. M	
10.457 McDonald, H. A	
10.458 McDonald, Andrew...
10.816 McEachern, J. E	
10,885 McGillivray, John
10,512 Mcintosh, John	
10.418 Mcintosh, I. D	
10.602 MacKenzie, C. E	
10,727 McKinnon, John	
10.887 McKinnon, Archibald
10,306 McKenzie, K.F	
10.390 McKav, Donald	
10,474 McMaster, P. H.   .   .
10,550 McPhail, Thomas....
10.888 McPhee, Stewart ....
10.419 Neilson, A. S	
10.391 Parrott, James	
10.269 Parkes, G. A	
10,333 Parker, V. L	
10,367 Parker, R. W	
10.397 Peterson, John	
10.398 Pearson, Augustus...
10.420 Petrowitz, Robert	
10.461 Pease, C. A	
10.603 Pearson, J. G	
10.637 Pimm, S. A	
10,733 Phillips, William	
10,772 Playle, W. 0	
10,422 Radford, H. C	
10,609 Redstone, N. E..   ..
10.817 Renaud, Albert	
10,343 Rogers, David	
10.270 Robinson, Wilbert.. ..
10,310 Roberts, William .. .
10,895 Robinson, James....
10,806 Ross, William	
10.271 Russell, W.J	
10,517 Samuels, A. E	
10,797 Scholes, James	
10.638 Scherbauer, Louis... .
10,640 Seggie, George	
10.462 Sherman, John	
10.692 Sharpe, H. H	
10,555 Simpson, Jackson. ...
10.693 Sinclair, CE	
10,515 Skelly, D. F	
10,900 Skinner, Joseph	
10,520 Smith, S. W	
10,613 Smith, G. H	
10,774 Sommers, A. J	
10,276 Spencer, Thomas	
10,641
10,775
10,904
10,615
10,907
10,277
10,616
10,801
10,908
10,698
10,776
10,312
10,617
10,803
10,910
10,777
10,313
10,463
10,488
10,524
10,619
10,525
10,620
10,399
10,744
10,345
10,621
10,316
10,529
10,778
10,911
10,912
10,914
10,530
10,915
10,700
10,347
10,623
10,624
10,703
10,279
10,704
10,318
10,805
10,335
10,394
10.806
10,779
10,642
10,359
10,657
10,348
10,403
10,489
10,923
10,925
10,375
10,706
10,281
10,807
10.928
10.541
10,749
10,431
10,928
10,321
10,579
10,544
10,631
10,580
10,750 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
TJ 43
Fourth Class.—Concluded.
Sparling,   A. M	
Spangler, Manford. .
Stoekwell, Charles . .
Stirling, F. S. M....
Stewart, Charles....
Sweeney, M. L	
Tait, Robert	
Tocquec, Emile	
Trainor, John	
Turnbull, H. G	
Tuyttens, Raymond.
Turley, J. J	
Tucker, F. W	
Usher, J	
Varney, Frank	
VanKuyk, P. C....
Vilac, L. J	
10,751 Virtue, S. A	
10,934 Wade, CF	
10,285 Webster, G. L	
10,466 Westmorland, Frank. .
10,819 Whaite, Henry	
10,755 Whittaker, W. R	
10.936 Wilson, Robert	
10.937 Witherow, S. J	
10.938 Wilson, William	
10,433 Williams, M. C	
10,644 Winterbottom, Samuel.
10,710 Woods,  Alexander	
10,758 Wright, W. M	
10.939 Yeatman, F. C	
10,360 Young, A. J	
10.940 Zaharoff, William	
10,712 Zaccarelli, Louis	
Anderson, A. J  ...
Atchison, A. J... .
Bart, Louis	
Black, W. E	
Browne,  R. H.   ...
Carlile, L. A	
Cliffe, G. J	
Clark, CE	
Copland, James....
Cyr, P. J	
Day, J. S	
Donnelly, J. J.....
Duncan,. Roy	
Duncan, G. A	
Elder, Lyle	
Fraser, 6. G	
Gustafson,  Frank, .
Harrow, William...
Hanson, C. B	
Hill, E. E	
Hilton, James	
Hodge, E. A    .
Jamison,  G. W. .. .
Keane, M. J	
Kiel, J. F	
Lamphear, Bert
Lee, R. W	
Lemoine, J. E	
Long, H. M	
Masse, Eli	
Morrison, Malcolm.
Morrison, Thomas..
Special Logging-donkey.
10,584 McDonald, A. R	
10.558 McDonald, D. J	
10,721 McGregor, J. St. C. .
10,956 McNeil, J. A	
10,871 0"Flynn,J. D	
10,267 Oliver, Samuel	
10,329 Pembroke, David ...
10.416 Pigeon, Charles	
10.559 Prendergast,  W. J. .
10,595 Puttkamer, Andrew.
10,649 Roberts, J. E	
10,881 Ross, N. D	
10.417 Savoie, Leon	
10,598 Savard, Pierre	
10,559 Sherreitt, R. B	
10.572 Smith, Walter	
10.573 Smith, Ira	
10,606 Smith,  M.I	
10,639 Stewart, J. M	
10,515 Sumner, Richard.   ..
10,736 Sweet, H. B	
10.564 Templin,  Karl	
10,551 Turnbull, Albert
10,518 Waite,  T. J	
10.486 White, J. M	
10,739 Wilson, M. E	
10,614 Anderson, Alvin....
10,906 Christensen, Carl . . .
10,556 Delora, M. J	
10.487 Marsden, W. J	
10.565 Oliver, Samuel	
10,741 Roberts, J. E	
Special  Creamery.
Carter, J. N. . . .
Hawkes, C. R. .
Holden, Osborn.
Knight, W. F.
10,654
10,607
10,369
10,275
Plumsteel, I. I....
Ramsay, John....
Vander Wall, Wil.
Special Heating.
Alexander,'H. E. .
Beckman, C E...
Biasotti, Charles..
Binch, R. H	
Bindon, F. C. D. .
Blaauw, Meinhart.
Bond, Sydney
Brewer, George. ..
Burgess, CE	
10,863       Butcher, Frank	
10,S67 Crossman, James. ..
10,470        D'unlop, John	
10.586 Everett, Joseph	
10,684       Firth, J. G	
10.587 Fletcher, H.G	
10,730        Fox, William	
10,415 Goebert, Frederick.
10,590        Griffiths, Mark	
10,942
10,944
10,434
10,548
10,378
10,664
10,283
10,549
10,947
10,948
10,950
10,765
10,952
10,713
10,635
10,406
10,954
10,392
10,527
10,439
10,566
10,429
10,919
10,553
10,575
10,627
10,746
10,577
10,540
10,337
10,362
10,748
10,543
10,545
10,933
10,480
10,754
10,756
10,481
10,325
10.634
10,665
10,762
10,448
10,767
10,653
10,909
10,918
10,430
10,287
10,440
10,941
10,766
10,726
10,884
10,796
10,600
10,601
10,886
10,728
10,514 U 44
Report of Chief Inspector of Machinery,
1917
Hart, Harry	
Harvey, E. H	
Home, T. H	
Jack, W. S	
Johnson, J. H	
Johnson, W. T	
Jones, Edward	
Knight, C. W	
LeCrom, Joseph	
Littlewood, George.
Mackie, William...
Maohin,  CJ	
Mottley, CP	
Morton, Andrew. ..
McKinnon, H. F.   .
Special   Heating.—Concluded.
10,421 Nightingale, Robert.
10,891 Parkins, J. F	
10,957 Plant, Charles	
10.611 Robinson, V. G	
10.612 Roe, Gerald	
10.737 Silvester, W. T	
10,799 Smith, James	
10.738 Stephens, M.M	
10,740 Sturmy, J. R	
10,286 Stevens, A. S	
10,297 Tha, John	
10,311 Trent, John	
10.742 Traynor, William...
10.743 Wallace, J. B	
10,372 Williams, CF	
Special Threshing.
Grieve, W. A.
Davies, Thomas
Special Road-rollek.
....   10,396        Tomkinson, Arthur .
Special Doukhobor.
10,917
10,745
10,922
10,557
10,747
10,929
10,931
10,633
10,781
10,782
10,970
10,708
10,709
10,943
10,764
10,460
10,757
Navokshonoff, Peter      10,334
Adams, J. B	
Allen, J. C	
Armstrong, J. W.
Ashmore, H. E...
Barry, Michael ..
Bain, W. A	
Baird, Alex	
Beach, Harry	
Beniteau, F. T	
Bell, W. H	
Bell, Thomas ....
Begbie, Peter	
Bennett, William.
Bickford, C F....
Black,  H. L	
Blow, Edmund....
Boscott, John	
Boyd, J. P	
Brookes, James
Bridges, E. C	
Brown, Andy	
Bunoz, E. M	
Bulman, Thomas. .
Bush, P. H	
Burick, Peter	
Byford, Horace...
Calnon, F. H	
Carter, J. N	
Chapman, David..
Chiffey, W. H....
Cianci, Tony	
Clarke, G. W	
Clark, E, D	
Cole, P. M	
Coutanche, Alfred.
Connelly, James ..
Costen, Thomas ..
Crossman, James..
Crute, W. A	
DeFehr, Isbrand. .
Dickie, James ....
Temporaries.
10,858 Dickson, James	
10,839 Downey, Jeremiah   .. .
10,483 Dunne, W. J	
10.841 Duminie, Joseph	
10.441 Dunell, Bernard	
10,718 Dyer, L. J	
10.958 Eagle,  E. H	
10,263 Enright, Joseph	
10.442 Evans, Walter	
10,492 Farmer,  J. G	
10.669 Farrell, P. P	
10.821 Fawkes, M. M	
10.842 FitzPatrick, J. D	
10.645 Fisher, John	
10.646 Flanders, A. C	
10.784 Gardiner, W. S	
10.809 Gevurtz, Philip	
10.810 Giddens,  H. J	
10,410 Gleave,  Richard	
10.843 Goebert, Frank	
10.959 Goodyear, Charles	
10,663 Graham, Samuel	
10,667 Grannis, Frank	
10.670 Harris, W. J	
10.822 Hannon, L. C	
10.823 Harvey, J. H	
10.443 Hawksworth, William.
10,491 Hannah, W. J. C...   .
10,652 Hamilton, W. T	
10,860 Hadevis, Louis	
10.785 Harvey, A. J	
10,266 Hopkins, F. W. L	
10.844 Home, D. M	
10,382 Home, T. H	
10,820 Hood, W. B	
10.845 Hober, J. W.. :	
10,961 Hughes, J. H	
10,288 Hutchinson,  E. C	
10.786 Hughes, C H	
10,386 Ingle,  M. A	
10.824 Jackson, R. S	
10,859
10,860
10,301
10,444
10,445
10,825
10,846
10,719
10,962
10,826
10,671
10,963
10,811
10,827
10,264
10,964
10,861
10,289
10,847
10,265
10,383
10,828
10,969
10,290
10,379
10,380
10,484
10,493
10,494
10,787
10,848
10,270
10,354
10,381
10,647
10,672
10,673
10,829
10,965
10,407
10,830 7 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
U 45
Temporaries.—Concluded.
Jack, W. S	
Johnston, John	
Johnston, C B	
Kihn, William	
Knox, G. M	
Laing, David	
Lawless, J. J	
Levy, Henry	
Lee, J. E	
Lome,  A. 0	
Lowrie, John	
Lumb, J. W	
Makinson, George.. ..
Mahon, E. C	
Mellor, Henry	
Meighen, A. E	
Medrich, John	
Miller, David	
Mills, W. T. E	
Moran, Joseph	
Morrow, P. C    .
Montey, Edmund
Murch, Tom	
Munroe. David	
Myers, J. P	
McDonald, John	
McDonald, William..
Mcintosh, Alexander.
McKay, W. J	
McKay, Donald	
Neale,  Wallace	
Oliver, William	
Owens, A. E	
Parkinson, Sam	
Parcells, William
Paterson, William
Pearcey, G. E  	
Phillips, H. J	
Prentis, E.' H	
Price, Fred	
Proctor, Mark	
10.966 Price, Charles  10,814
10.674 Quinn, William  10,855
10.831 Rankin, Arthur  10.299
10,291 Rennie, Robert  10,384
10,651 Reid, J. A  10,497
10.387 Reusch, D. D    10,498
10.967 Richardson, Windsor  10,717
10.715 Roberts, W. P ...  10,300
10.849 Ross, Edward  10,412
10.675 Roseland, H. C  10,856
10.676 Rusk, Lee  10,835
10.716 Sam, David  10,485
10.495 Salisbury, Arthur  10,499
10.832 Sanguineti, David  10,789
10,361 Scafe, W. G  10,553
10,792 Scully,  Henry  10,836
10.850 Seigel, W. J '. . .. 10,339
10.851 Simmons, M. A  10,648
10.968 Smith, Charles  10,500
10,562 Snetsinger, G. R  10,385
10,812 Spink, Victor  10,857
10.852 Strachan,  D. A  10,352
10,788 Stewart, John  10,790
10,840 Stewart,  Robert  10,791
10,971 Swanson, J. H  10,340
10,542 Taylor, C F  10,408
10.853 Tapella, Thomas  10,563
10.833 Thompson, Frank  10,813
10,446 Usher, John  10,501
10,583 Wattie, J. A  10,552
10,409 Watson, W. J  10,582
10.496 Wall, G. H  10,678
10.854 Wishart, James  10,302
10,666 Widdiss, W. W  10,662
10,714 Wilson, B. S  10,837
10,862 Woodman, H. S  10,292
10,581 Wooding, Frederick  10,341
10.834 Woodruff, 0. B  10,502
10.388 Workman,  Wallace  10,658
10,411 Young, Verner. ...'.  10,838
10,677
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty,
1937.

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