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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING FIFTH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1917

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT
OF the
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF PUBLIC
SCHOOLS AND THE FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF VITAL STATISTICS DEPARTMENT
FOR   THE
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 ST, 1916
THE GOVERNMENT OF
THE PRQIMCE OF BRITISH CUBA.
printed by
authority of the legislative assembly.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty..
1917.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., March 1st, 1917.
To His Honour Frank Stillman Barnard,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twentieth Annual Keport of
the Department of Public Health for the year ended December 31st, 1916.
j. d. Maclean,
Provincial Secretary.  REPORT
OF THE
4
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board op Health,
Victoria, B.C., March 1st, 1917.
Doctor the Honourable J. D. MacLean,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Twentieth Annual, Keport of the Provincial Board
of Health for the year ended December 31st, 1916.
The problems that present themselves to the Board of Health from year to year vary only
in degree. The importance to the community at large of health problems in general is beginning
to be more recognized by those particularly affected, and that is by the average citizen.
The resident of a large city thinks little and cares less about health regulations unless he
or his immediate friends are concerned and they suddenly find that their daily routine at business
or pleasure is interfered with. His attention may have been called to the regulations of the
Health Department and advice given in reference to open windows, exercise, good food, and bad
alcohol, but he usually deems this as the ravings of health faddists and believes that the Health
Department is in no way concerned with matters of less importance than that of preventing
Asiatic cholera or similar afflictions, which are usually given much prominence in the daily
papers.
He forgets that the science of medicine is undergoing a change, and in no branch is the
change more manifest than in the Department of Public Health, or, rather, in the official aspect
of the science of medicine.
The changes as regards the management of health problems that have taken place during
the past few decades are the result of experience gained as our knowledge of conditions increased.
These changes of our treatment of these cases may be summarized by dividing Health Board
activities into periods :—
The first period was that of general sanitation, when the departments were chiefly concerned
with water-supplies, sewage-disposal, street-cleaning, etc.
The second period of quarantine enforcement.
The third period of applied bacteriology. This period showed the beginning of the work in
the prevention of disease.
The fourth period was that of social analysis of disease, chiefly concerned with the congested
masses of poverty-stricken humanity.
Consideration of these aspects of health-work naturally led to the next period, that of
personal hygiene and education, and which is now only beginning. The foundation of this
latest phase of Health Department work is the idea of the prevention of disease as distinctive
from its cure. With the emphasis placed more on the preservation of health and less on the
cure of disease, the public is coming to realize how essential to health is " the futility of treating
the disease and tolerating the cause."
This Department has recognized the great importance of obtaining and maintaining supervision of conditions incidental to the development of a new country, such as is British Columbia.
Legislation has been introduced from time to time giving the Board power to oversee works in
connection with railway development, logging and canning industries, installation of water and
sewerage systems, inspection of hospitals, and especially medical inspection of schools. These
subjects are referred to fully in the reports from Inspectors published with this.
We have endeavoured to show in these reports that the Health Board is appreciative of
the changes that have taken place in regard to the management of health matters. The essential
change is this, and I am quoting from the " New Public Health," by Dr. Hill, Medical Health H 6 British Columbia 1917
Officer of London, Ontario, in which he says: " The old public health was concerned with the
environment, the new is concerned with the individual; the old sought the sources of infectious
diseases in the surroundings of man, the new finds them in man himself."
The health of the Province for the year 1916 has been, on the whole, satisfactory. There
have been during the past two years changes in what I might style the routine of life, owing to,
first, a period of financial depression, and, secondly, conditions incident to the war. We might
have looked for results from such disorganization, but the public have adapted themselves to
the changed conditions, and there has not been, with the exception of measles, any marked change
in the number of deaths from infectious diseases.
Measles.
The annual health report for the State of Ohio states that measles cause more deaths
in Ohio and the United States than infantile paralysis, smallpox, or scarlet fever. Infantile
paralysis is dreaded because of its complications; measles, which has frequent and fatal complications, is treated with the contempt usual to familiarity. While our reports show 1,134 cases
of measles, we know this does not begin to account for existing cases. Secondary cases in a
family are almost never reported. Measles is the most prevalent and one of the most infectious
of acute diseases, and one with which, from a public health point of view, it is most difficult
to deal.
This is mainly due to three facts:—
(1.)  The disease is extremely contagious.
(2.)  It may be transmitted in the pre-eruptive stage.
(3.)  The general public, and even physicians, discount its great importance.
As with other diseases, notification of all cases is of prime importance. To secure complete
and early notification the co-operation of the public is needed. Before this can be secured there
must be a campaign of education. As without the co-operation of an instructed public no progress
is possible, so the prevention of measles depends mainly upon the public itself. After notification
there must be isolation of the patient and quarantine of susceptible exposures. Isolation in
measles need not persist longer than ten days, if all acute symptoms have subsided before that
period elapses. Quarantine of exposures should persist for two weeks. Concurrent disinfection
should be directed towards the destruction of all discharges from the mouth and nose. Terminal
disinfection is unnecessary, because the virus of measles has little resistance and dies rapidly
after leaving the patient. This is in accord with our knowledge that direct contact with a case
is necessary to contract the disease.
As far as schools are concerned, an epidemic of measles may require their closing for two
weeks. If at the end of that time the disease continues to spread, school may be reopened, as
it is evident that factors other than the congregation of pupils is responsible for the spread.
When the school is first exposed it should not be closed until the lapse of a week, and then
discontinued for two weeks. A better plan is to have all pupils examined as they enter school
in the morning, and all children with any symptoms of cold, such as cough, infection of the eyes,
sore throat, running at the nose, etc., excluded. This will accomplish what is most needed; that
is, isolation of all cases in the pre-eruptive stage.
Measles is transmitted by the discharges of the mouth and nose. It has been, shown by
the researches of Anderson and Goldberger that the disease is only capable of being transmitted
during the febrile period. During the first four days, when the symptoms are those of a feverish
cold in the head, the disease is most contagious and at the same time most difficult to guard.
The virus, wiiose nature is unknown, is present in the discharges of the mouth and nose and
in the blood. It has been suggested, but not proven, that there are chronic carriers of measles,
and some observers believe that the discharge from diseased ears following measles may transmit
the disease. Measles is spread by cases during the onset, by cases with eruption which are not
quarantined, and possibly by chronic carriers.
Great care should be given the child during the stage of convalescence and when the rash
is disappearing, as this is the period when bronchopneumonia is most apt to supervene. The
younger the child the more apt is bronchopneumonia to occur. Measles in a child with tubercular antecedents should be looked upon with suspicion. Eye-troubles are not rare, inflammation
of the middle ear is not infrequent, and many cases of deaf-mutism are  traced to measles. Geo. 5 Provincial Board of Health. . H
Parents should remember that in deaths due to measles 25 per cent, occur under one year, 75 per
cent, under five years, and 85 per cent, occur under ten years; and also that as a preventive
measure the following regulations should be strictly observed:—
The patient should be isolated completely until recovered, provided that such isolation shall
not cease before ten days have elapsed from the occurrence of the disease.
The child exposed to the disease shall be quarantined for a period of fourteen days from
the date of the last exposure to the disease.
Infantile Paralysis.
In the early part of the year an epidemic of poliomyelitis, or infantile paralysis, began in
the City of New York, spread to the State of New Jersey, and gradually extended westward.
It is to be regretted that the public press gave very great prominence to this matter and people
became unnecessarily alarmed. There seemed to be only one idea in the minds of the people;
that was, the terrible after effects of this disease, resulting in a very small number of cases
in attacks of paralysis, and demands were made on health authorities all over the continent that
immediate action be taken.
It is a difficult matter to account for the vagaries in the appearance in different localities
of this disease. It is generally accepted that personal contact is the essential factor in transmitting the disease and dissemination followed the routes of travel.
Recognizing this fact, a  conference of the Medical Health  Officers of British  Columbia,
Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, and Montana was called, and a meeting held at Portland.
Oregon.    A representative from the Public Health Service of the United States and representatives from the Western railroads were also present.    While no cases had been reported in the
West at that time, still the matter was fully discussed and the following resolutions passed:—
(1.)  The Surgeon-General of the United States Public Health Service be requested to
notify the State Health Officer of each State and Province represented here of any
person leaving an infected area, destined for such State; giving the name of such
person and the date of leaving the infected area.
(2.)  Railroad Regulations.—That the various railway companies be requested to notify
the State Health Officer of any person holding a ticket from an infected point.
The details of such report to be arranged by the State Health Officer with the
various railway officials.
(3.)  That the various railway companies be requested to notify the State Health Officer
of any sick person on any train entering the State.
(1.)   Sick persons shall be treated according to public health regulations of the State
or Province.
(5.) To keep suspected persons under observation for twenty days.
Some few cases finally appeared in the Western territory, and in British Columbia the
first two cases were reported from Okanagan Falls. These were followed by nine cases from
Vancouver, one case from Kamloops, two cases from Steveston (both Japanese), one from
Victoria, making a total of fifteen cases for the whole Province, with but one fatality—the
child at Kamloops.'
The Public Health Service of the United States undertook, following quarantine being
placed upon any exodus from Xew York, to notify Western points of any passengers who had
left New York or any infected district. We received such notification from time to time, and
people travelling through to British Columbia after arrival were kept under observation.
The occurrence of the disease in British Columbia at no time was of an alarming nature,
nor was there as many cases nor spread over as large a territory as in a previous epidemic
occurring in the Province six years ago.
Anxiety was felt in Vancouver, and at a meeting of the Health Committee of the City
Council which I was asked to attend, and later at a meeting of the School Board of the city,
request was made to the Department for an extension of the school holidays for two weeks.
This was granted more in the belief that the publicity given wTould enable the Department to
enforce regulations which the public would the more intelligently understand. We could either
have kept quiet about it and tried to control it by ordinary measures—notification, isolation, and
quarantine—or we could give the matter wide publicity and seek in that way to accomplish a H 8 . British Columbia 191^
number of things impossible to attain under the other plans. Thus through publicity we could
hope to discover practically all of the eases, a matter of the utmost importance in the control
of all epidemics. Besides this, and equally important, we could hope to educate the people so
that they might observe the precautions which seemed to be indicated.
Children have never been so carefully watched over by parents; never before have the
parents been so mindful of the proper care of food and drink; never before have homes been
kept so clean. It is to be hoped that the education of the public along these lines will be
continued, and that they will begin to realize that the bad effects of infantile paralysis are very,
very small compared with the bad effects following whooping-cough, scarlet fever, and measles.
More defects occur from the latter than the former and the effect upon the children in after-life
is much greater.
Tuberculosis.
A perusal of the vital statistics for 1916 will show that the number of cases reported during
the past year, on the face of it, shows a smaller number than the previous report, but we must
remember that this does not indicate that the percentage of cases to the population is a decrease
at all.    The population has decreased, but the percentage of tuberculosis is, if anything, greater.
From year to year the health authorities have been endeavouring to educate the people to
the fact that tuberculosis is a preventable disease, and have been endeavouring to so organize
the fight against tuberculosis that the enormous sums that have been used in this fight should
be used to better advantage. There is no lack of sympathy or money when needed to treat
advanced cases, the result of these cases becoming so apparent to those around them that the
danger is realized. We, however, realize and are waking up to the fact that the sanatorium
does not in and by itself solve the tuberculosis problem, and that we shall accomplish very little
through our sanatoriums unless at the same time we study closely the needs of the patient
who has not reached the sanatorium stage and of the one who has been discharged from the
sanatorium. We must, on the one hand, make every effort to arrest tuberculosis in its incipiency.
to keep the early case from needing sanatorium care. On the other, we must realize we have
not finished our task when we have discharged the patient from the sanatorium as cured.
When one considers how much money and effort are spent to help people back to health, does
it not seem like throwing all this money and effort into a hole to let an arrested case leave
the sanatorium and embark practically unsupported on a new effort of life, under harder
conditions, that is sure to end in disaster within a year in so large a number of cases?
It has been recognized by those who have studied the problem that the chief source of the
spread of the disease is the advanced infectious case of pulmonary tuberculosis. These cases
should be segregated from their families in some institution as near their home as possible.
This matter was dealt with in our last report by Dr. Vrooman, Medical Superintendent of
Tranquille Sanatorium, in which he recommended that provision should be made at different
points in the Province for the care of such cases.
The Government some years ago made a provision that all hospitals in receipt of Government aid should provide for a limited number of advanced cases, but while this, was good as
far as it went, still it does not reach the incipient cases. These cases can only be reached by
follow-up work in the different centres, the establishment of dispensaries, and especially the
employment of the visiting nurses.
Vancouver City has devoted, under Dr. Underbill's management, a special effort to this work,
with correspondingly good results.
Victoria City lias followed suit, and under the management of Alderman A. Peden. Chairman
of the Health Committee of the City Council, similar steps are being taken and a nurse employed,
with already gratifying results.
Tuberculosis is largely an economic problem. Most tubercular patients eventually become
dependent, and the effect of the present system of stopping of work and sending them to a
sanatorium for a little time and then returning them better, worse, or stationary, without
further systematic supervision, to their original surroundings is not producing, nor will it
produce, satisfactory results.
Under the establishment of special dispensaries, patients in all stages of the disease may
be treated without interruption to work, with no time limit to length of treatment. The reason
patients cannot be induced to stop work for treatment in the incipient stage is not that they A logging
camp's neglected boarding-house, resulting in
the development of typhoid.
Approved by the Provincial Board of Health.     An ideal bunk-house,  with all modern
sanitary conveniences, located on Tod Inlet.  7 Geo. 5 Provincial Board of Health. H 9
do not understand the gravity of their position, but that they and those dependent upon them
cannot live without wages.
Among the advantages of dispensaries over sanatoriums are accessibility to wage-earners,
possibility of continuing treatment as long as desirable, small cost of plant and of treatment,
saving of wages, and large ultimate percentage of apparent arrest of disease.
I would respectfully suggest that the Government should follow up the work it has already
done in regard to the sanatorium, and adopt the recommendations as suggested by Dr. Vrooman
and set forth in our report of last year.
His plan is: First establish in the various cities of British Columbia dispensaries in charge
of trained nurses for the aid of those who are tubercular. This dispensary would be the centre
for anti-tubercular activities, and would be, as it were, a clearing-house for the various types of
cases. Advanced cases would be sent to suitable special hospitals, where they would be made
comfortable and their friends and family would be safe from infection. Early and curable cases
would be sent to the sanatorium. Predisposed children would be sent to open-air schools and
kept under supervision. Doubtful cases would be kept under observation and referred to a
specialist consultant until a diagnosis was made. In charge of these dispensaries and acting
as consulting specialist would be a Chief Tuberculosis Officer. The chief expense of the dispensaries would fall on the municipalities, but the expense of the Medical Officer would, of
course, be Provincial.
Another point which should be taken into very serious consideration is the fact that the
hardships incident to the military campaign seem to have developed a large number of cases of
tuberculosis which were probably latent, and might not have developed under other conditions,
and we are face to face with the problem of making suitable provision for these cases-which are
returning to us from the front.
Smallpox.
Seven cases in all have been reported for the year—five from Nelson, one from Prince
Rupert, and one from Mission (an Indian).    No deaths have been reported.
While the report in this respect is very satisfactory, it is such as may cause overconfidence
among the people and consequent neglect of the preventive measure of vaccination.
In British Columbia, as in other countries, the vaccination is rigidly enforced in times of
epidemic; in the intervals it is only partially enforced, and the number of persons increased who
form the material on which the next epidemic will develop. It is to be regretted that, in spite
of arguments and evidence in favour of vaccination, there still persists in the minds of some
people an opposition to the benefits to be derived. This opposition is gradually dying a natural
death in view of the continued evidence presented from time to time of the benefits to be derived
from the proper enforcement of vaccination. It would be well if we were to adopt the British
system of requiring vaccination certificates as well as birth certificates.
Typhoid Fever.
The number of cases of fyphoid fever for the year shows a very appreciable improvement,
over previous years.    This is largely due to the fact that construction during the past year
on railways has been almost nil.    In 1913, during the period of construction and previous to
systematic inspection of camps by the Department, 700 cases of typhoid fever, with eighty-five
deaths, were reported.    This is a marked contrast to the present figures.
The Department is continually pointing out the advantages and value of typhoid inoculation.
Public opinion has to be educated to the point of appreciation of its values, and unfortunately
it takes years to bring about conviction in the minds of the people that representations made by
the health authorities are genuine and based upon knowledge acquired from scientific investigation and observation.
During the present war the health authorities have been able to demonstrate in an unanswerable way that their teachings in this respect are absolutely sound. Among the millions of men
engaged in warfare inoculation for typhoid has been compulsory, and the result is that the
number of cases of typhoid fever has been negligible, and this in spite of the fact that the men
have been living under conditions that would be most favourable to the development of the
disease.    After an existence of war conditions for nearly three years there has been an entire H 10 British Columbia 1917
absence of typhoid fever, and the fact that the medical reports of the Army very seldom mention
it is surely demonstration enough to convince the most skeptical of the efficacy of the treatment.
The Department is prepared to supply typhoid vaccine free of charge in unorganized
districts, and to furnish the same at prices much below those of the market to municipalities.
During the year plans for the following were examined and approved: Sewerage plans for
Ocean ITalls and Fernie; water, Point Grey and Courtenay. Other applications are under consideration by the Department at the present time.
Applications are being made by mining companies for the privilege of discharging wastage
and tailings into streams, more especially by those who are using the flotation process. The
view taken by the Department when the matter was placed before them was that from the point
of view of the greatest good to the district and to the Province, it is undoubtedly true that no
unnecessary obstacle should be placed in the way of mining development, and in one particular
case the prohibition of the discharge of tailings would eliminate the use of the flotation process,
and possibly prevent the installation of any plant whatever.
This instance may warrant the consideration of the adoption of a general policy such as has
been in use in other parts of North America, which is an attempt to strike a balance which shall
be just and equitable to both interests, between the ideal requirements of sanitary science and
public health, which rigidly insist on the non-pollution of streams, and the urban and commercial
interests, which demand a feasible and economical method of disposal of sewage and mill-waste.
For example, in the case of rivers where the enforcement of the former rule would practically
eliminate the development of wealth-producing industries with their attendant populations, and
where other sources of water-supply are available, even at greater cost, free disposal by dilution
of all wastes is often permitted, provided, usually, that the amount and character of such waste
is such that no nuisance will be created. Such rivers then become sewage or mill-waste carriers,
and raw water from them is not permitted'to be used for municipal supplies.
There may also be involved some compensation of the parties whose existing prior rights
may be affected by those who derive the benefit of the stream as a carrier for waste. In practice
such a policy involves the consideration of each stream or section of stream individually, and
its classification as either one which must be kept unpolluted, or as one into which various
wastes may be discharged up to given limits and in accordance with methods and conditions
which shall be specified.
An application for approval of a cemetery-site at Peachland was approved and arrangements
arrived at with the Indian Department in regard to the burial of Indians on Maria Island.
Careful investigation was made with regard to this latter, and after consultation with the
officials of the Indian Department, the Medical Health Officer, and local residents a change of
location was decided upon.
Approval was given to bake-shop by-laws for South Vancouver and Victoria.
During the year the Department has been approached by those interested, and particularly
the Bread and Cake Manufacturers' Association, with the request that the regulations surrounding the manufacture and sale of bread and cake, and bake-shops, be brought up to date; and the
request has been made that the Department will take this matter up with a view to obtaining
i sufficient information to enable the introduction of efficient legislation.
The Department has done so, and the matter will receive attention which we trust will
result in sound and effective legislation.
. A survey of the dairies in Cowichan District was made by Dr. A. G. Price, Medical Health
Officer.
There were twenty-three analyses of water and one of wine.
Microscopical examinations :   Four specimens of sputum for tubercle bacilli; one for cancer.
It is the expectation of the Department that laboratory-work will be enlarged and facilities
extended to the profession in general throughout the Province.
Four hundred and thirty complete doses of typhoid vaccine, 670 vaccine points for vaccination, and 301,000 units of antitoxin were distributed.
Reviewing the year as a whole, the Department feels it may be congratulated upon health
conditions in the Province, and with the legislation in force and the proper carrying-out of the
provisions of the different Acts we hope for a continuance of the good conditions existing. 7 Geo. 5 Provincial Board of Health. H 11
The authority of the Board is confined entirely to matters Provincial and has nothing to
do with immigration or travellers from outside points. We have, however, always received the
hearty co-operation of the Dominion authorities when necessity arose for dealing with them.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health.
GENERAL  REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Victoria, B.C., February 1st, 1917.
H. E. Young, M.D.,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I beg to submit the Sixth Annual Report on Sanitary Inspection. Owing to
the changed conditions in British Columbia during the past few years, consequent upon the
completion of railroads and the abandonment of construction camps, the sanitary-inspection work
has taken on a somewhat different phase, and with the increased activity in the lumber market
there has been a corresponding activity among the logging camps, many new ones having been
established and older ones enlarged. .
During the past year some 400 visits of inspection have been made to camps and settlements.
The work of inspection has been kept up constantly, two Inspectors being kept on full time and
others employed temporarily as occasion arose.
Fishing, canning, logging, mining, quarries, construction, and industrial works all come
within the purview of the Department, but I regret to say that, owing to the smallness of the
staff and lack of means for visiting outlying points, we have not been able to examine more
than at the best 50 per cent, of the points that should have been attended to.
We are in receipt of letters from the Upper Country asking that the lumber camps be visited,
and also from points along the Coast containing complaints as regards canneries. In addition
to these, there is a constant demand for the services of the Inspectors arising from questions of
water-supplies and sewage-disposal in the smaller municipalities, and I would respectfully suggest
that the Minister would give his very best consideration to the suggestion of an increased equipment and enlarged staff. The importance of the work, especially along the Coast, is such that
means should be afforded for reaching all points along the enormous length of coast-line which
we have in British Columbia. Owing to the uncertainty of steamboat connections for different
points, at least two additional Inspectors should be appointed. The expense involved owing to
delays waiting for the arrival of boats at the different points and the loss of time would be
much more expensive to the Department than if a launch were provided. During the past few
years the charter of a power-boat has enabled us to visit the industrial plants and settlements
located within 150 miles of this office, but owing to the limited time when a suitable boat is
available much of the coastal work has been omitted. The immediate acquisition of a boat
would mean economy with greatly increased sanitary efficiency. I would respectfully suggest
that serious consideration be given to this want of the Department, especially as the season of
1917 will be the big year in the fishing industry.
The significance of sanitary welfare for the industrial worker in the vast " out-of-doors "
is not yet appreciated. Climatic conditions and water-supply at these points are almost ideal,
but these natural advantages are nullified by the lack of observance of the primary rules of
sanitation in the camps. H 12 British Columbia * 1917
I regret to say that the smaller the camp the greater the transgression in regard to sanitation
and the general welfare of the workers. The man or company in a position to operate a large
camp or plant is usually wise enough, although maybe selfishly, to understand that proper living
conditions have a direct influence upon the general disposition of employees, and also upon
financial returns. The poorest sanitary conditions are found in the smaller camps employing
from ten to fifty men. These are the camps requiring follow-up or repeat work, as we find that
employees are extremely loth to complain, and their silence in this respect is often mistaken
for satisfaction by their employer. It is a very common occurrence, when suggestions are made
as regards better ventilation, more light, etc., that the foreman will reply that the men never
complain and are perfectly satisfied, whereas the real reason why objection is not made by the
men is that they do not wish to be classed as fault-finders.
We have found, as regards the food, that there is very little to be desired as to quality and
quantity of the goods provided, although sometimes the surroundings and manner of preparation
are not desirable, but the Inspectors have no difficulty in obtaining the necessary improvement,
and any suggestions for the installation of a trap and vent for the sink or a proper tank for
the disposal of garbage are always cheerfully met.
The work of the Sanitary Inspectors calls for a large allowance of discretion and judgment
on the part of the Inspector in his demands for the observance of the Provincial Sanitary Regulations, and it is impossible to make hard-and-fast rules which are applicable to all points. It
is necessary for the Inspector to deal with each case upon its merits. I am pleased to say that
our staff has given very great satisfaction in this respect, as is evidenced by letters of commendation which the Department receives from points visited.
The regulations, observance of which we insist upon, are not onerous, and are as follows:—
REGULATIONS FOR THE SANITARY CONTROL OF LUMBER, MINING, AND OTHER
CAMPS, SAWMILLS, AND OTHER INDUSTRIES SITUATED IN UNORGANIZED
DISTRICTS.
1. Every employer of labour on any work in any lumbering, mining, construction, or other camp,
sawmill, or other industry situated in any portion of an organized district shall, upon the establishment of each and every camp or work, forthwith notify the Sanitary Inspector of the Province of the
establishment of the same, and when requested to do so shall furnish such particulars as may be
required by the said Inspector.
2. The owner, manager, agent, or foreman of any lumber, mining, or other camp, sawmill, or
other industry located within an unorganized district shall, in connection with every such industry
or works, be responsible for the execution and enforcement of any regulation herein contained or
hereafter to be adopted. - $
3. If in the opinion of the Sanitary Inspector the site of any camp or works is unhealthy or
unsanitary, he may order the removal of such camp or works to some other site to be selected by him.
4. Any house, tent, or dwelling occupied by the employees engaged in any industry located within
an organized district shall contain sufficient cubic feet of air-space for every occupant thereof as may
in each instance be deemed necessary by the Sanitary Inspector, and shall further be provided with
efficient means of ventilation. The floor of every dwelling shall be constructed of boards or planks
or other material equally suitable for the purpose, raised on support at least 1 foot from the ground,
and so made that it shall be tight. Every dwelling other than a temportary tent shall be lighted by
windows so constructed that they can be opened when necessary.
5. The method of ventilation of every dwelling in which a stove or furnace is used shall be such
as will satisfy the Sanitary Inspector. The temperature of the room shall be maintained at from 60
to 65° Fahr., and a shallow pan supplied with water shall be kept on the stove to supply air-moisture.
6. Every camp or works of every industry coming under these regulations shall be equipped with
a wash-house or laundry containing a stove and tubs or shower-bath for bathing purposes.
7. Every camp or works shall be supplied with a building or tent properly constructed and set
apart as a kitchen, and having a dining-room in connection therewith, with proper conveniences for
the cleanliness and comfort of the employees.
S. Proper receptacles must be kept on hand into which all refuse, whether liquid or solid, must
be placed, and such refuse must be regularly destroyed by fire or removed to a safe distance from
any building, and be so deposited as not to create a nuisance or contaminate the drinking-water.
9. Latrines, earth or other closets must be located, constructed, and maintained in a manner
satisfactory to the said Sanitary Inspector or Medical Health Officer.
10. Stables in connection with any camp or works must be located as not to contaminate the
water-supply, and must be not less than 125 feet distant from any dwelling or kitchen. This distance
may be increased at the discretion of the Sanitary Inspector or any Medical Health Officer.
1. The water-supply of any camp or works must be uncontaminated and obtained from a source
satisfactory to the Sanitary Inspector or Medical Health Officer.
12. Printed copies of these regulations may be obtained from the Sanitary Inspector. An insanitary camp where the only salvation from a serious epidemic was isolation and
unusual climatic conditions.
A sanitary camp, quarters for the married employees at Bamberton Cement Works.  7 Geo. 5 Provincial BooVrd of Health. H 13
13. Should the Sanitary Inspector find that any of these regulations are not complied with, he
may, where necessary, take steps to enforce them, and the expense of such action shall be paid by
the employer or his agent.
14. The penalties contained and provided in section 97 of the " Health Act" shall apply to the
violations of any of these regulations.
15. The Sanitary Inspector may, where deemed necessary, obtain the services of any Provincial
constable or constables to assist him in the performance of his duties and to aid in the enforcement
of these regulations.
By order.
PROVINCIAL  BOARD  OF  HEALTH,
Victoria, B.C.
Owing to the dearth of medical men in the Province it was considered advisable to give
such information as was possible as regards first aid, and the Department obtained from St.
John's Amublance Association for distribution in the camps a supply of First-aid Manuals. The
efforts of the Department in this regard have been much appreciated by those in charge of the
isolated camps. Our Inspectors have received first-aid instruction, and in addition the Government has placed upon the statute-books an " Act for the Protection of Workmen engaged in
Industrial Operations," which provides that every employer of labour, employing more than
thirty men and situated more than six miles from the office of a medical practitioner, shall at
all times maintain in or about such industry or works at least one person possessing a certificate
of competency to render first aid to the injured, and also provide a good and sufficient ambulance
box or boxes.
The cuts which accompany this report will give some idea of the changes that are being
brought about in the camps along the Coast.
Canneries.
The inspection of fishing camps, canning and curing establishments forms a very important
link in the chain of your inspection department, especially where located adjacent to cities or
summer resorts.
My first work in this direction was under the direction of the late Dr. C. J. Fagan in 1902.
In those days there were fewer canneries and fewer fishing-boats, the latter being propelled by
oar or sail. The sockeye-catch often exceeded the capacity of the canneries; methods of handling
were somewhat primitive; and the careless disposal of refuse fish and offal brought forth such
protests from those using the neighbouring bathing-beaches and from the Fraser Delta dairy-
farmers that the Provincial Health Board was compelled to take measures to suppress the
nuisance and menace. Sanitary regulations were passed by Order in Council to deal with
the situation, and many prominent canners were proceeded against, and in one or two seasons
many hundred cases of condemned salmon destroyed.
From 1902 to 1908 the work of the Inspector for salmon canneries was arduous. Since that
time, however, there has been a gradual and gratifying improvement in the manner of handling
the salmon.
Sanitary cutting, filling, and canning of the fish by machinery has almost entirely eliminated
the Chinese. Floors, benches, and machinery are steam-sterilized and washed daily. Refuse
fish and offal is conveyed by mechanical means to an elevated and covered hopper-chute, thus
keeping the cannery clear of flies or offensive odour. The contents of the offal-chutes is then
collected into specially constructed well-scows and conveyed to the Fraser River Oilery, where
it is converted into oil and guano. Thus what was originally a nuisance and menace is now
converted to profitable use.
Of late years thousands of tourists visit the Fraser canneries during the fishing season, and
much favourable comment is made in reference to the sanitary methods of British Columbia
salmon-canning. This is further evidenced by the fact that frequently letters from various parts
of the world are received asking for a copy of our cannery regulations, which read as follows:— PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
REGULATIONS   GOVERNING  CANNERIES  AND FISH-PACKING ESTABLISHMENTS.
The accumulation of stale fish, offal, cuttings, blood, refuse, or filth of any description upon the
foreshore, or in or about premises or buildings used for the canning, preserving, or curing of fish, is
prohibited.
Any kind of refuse or offal not conveyed to an oilery or incinerator shall be taken to sea and
dumped not less than three miles from shore, at such time and place as will preyent it being carried
ashore by the tide.
Every owner or person in charge of premises used for the canning, preserving, or curing of fish
shall be held responsible for the sanitary condition of the said premises and the foreshore in the
vicinity thereof, and shall provide suitable bunk-houses and efficient bathing and toilet facilities for
the use of employees.
Every bunk-house or camp attached to or operated in connection with any establishment for the
canning, preserving, or curing of fish, or other food, must be maintained in accordance with the sanitary regulations governing camps.
The interior of every building used by Indians or Orientals must be limewashed or coated with
approved antiseptic at least once immediately preceding the canning season.
The employment of any person afflicted with any skin, blood, or contagious disease of any kind
is strictly prohibited in or about premises used for the canning, preserving, or curing of fish.
By order.
PROVINCIAL BOARD  OF  HEALTH,
Victoria, B.C.
During the past few salmon seasons the Eraser channels near the Sandheads have been
invaded by American fish-canning agents using large covered scows. The fish are gutted, iced,
and transferred to Washington canneries. No provision was attempted to care for refuse and
offal until some action was taken to put them on the same footing as British Columbia canneries.
Another fish industry assuming large proportions are the many fish-curing establishments
operated by Japanese, quite a number being located on the shores of islands adjacent to the east
side of Vancouver Island. These have been responsible for wasp plagues to such an extent as
to ruin the fruit on adjacent fruit-orchards, the only solution being insistence by the Inspector
of observance of regulations.
Many of the principal canners advocated and welcomed the supervision by the Provincial
Board of Health. A few regarded it at first as an interference, but to-day the Inspector is a
welcomed visitor whose chief concern seems to be centred on the condition of foreshore and
bunk-houses.
In conversation with an expert tester representing a British salmon brokerage firm, I
received the information that the knowledge of the fact of Government supervision over the
sanitary conditions of canneries had increased the price and demand for British Columbia
salmon, and that it will and does have preference all over the world.
In the season about to open there will be at least fifty canneries operated between Quathiaski
Cove and the 49th parallel, while the west coast and waters north of Campbell River will account
for another twenty-five canning and cold-storage establishments.
During the past season the work of the Inspectors was as follows : Three hundred and
fourteen visits on sanitary inspection to logging, mining, quarrying, pulp, and other industrial
camps. Nineteen calls were made on the numerous summer resorts located between Pender
Harbour and Vancouver; the drinking-water supply and general sanitary conditions were supervised, and no infectious trouble occurred at these places during 1916. Sixty-six inspection calls
were made on the canning, curing, cold-storage plants, and camps located on the Fraser, Gulf of
Georgia, and adjacent waters. Twenty-seven inspection calls were made on the salmon canneries
located between Campbell River and Prince Rupert.
The sanitary conditions in the Northern Interior of British Columbia have been under the
supervision of Sanitary Inspector H. Avison, whose report is herewith given. The old-style " offal-box " under floor of cannery could
only be emptied at low tide ; odour permeated throughout
cannery.
' Offal-chute."    The modern way, elevated and constructed to allow of ease in emptying
and freeing cannery premises of possible odour.  7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 15
South Fort George,
December Slst, 1916.
/•'. DeGrey, Esq.,
Chief Sanitary Inspector,
Government Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In presenting my annual report for the year 1916, ending on the 31st clay of December,
I beg to report that during the twelve months past I have been continually in this northern district,
with my headquarters at South Fort George.
My district takes in from the boundary of Alberta to the Coast at Prince Rupert and north to
the boundary of Alaska; south on the Pacific Great Eastern construction through the -Cariboo District. There are eight small towns along the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway between Prince
Rupert and the boundary of Alberta, all of which require looking after, as I have scavengers in most
all of these places, especially where the people are using well-water.
I may report that there has been very little railway-construction done in this district this year.
The Pacific Great Eastern is the only line that had any men employed, and they had only three
camps between Prince George and Clinton, employing about 200 men. During the month of August
I made a trip all through the construction camps on that line, and the company was running two
camps between Clinton and the 100-Mile House on the Cariboo Road, and employing about 150 men;
and a few small bridge camps. On this end of the construction Mr. Carleton, the contractor, had
fifty men surface-grading and pile-driving, and I found all the camps in good shape, as they were
tents and they kept moving according as the work was progressing. The contractor on this end
closed down all his camps on November 1st on account of labour shortage and not being able to
operate during the winter.
In regard to other camps, there are a few sawmills working in the vicinity of South Fort George
and one at Central, which I have visited regularly.
I may report that in the Bulkley Valley and the Skeena District there are quite a few mining
camps opening up, and by next summer they will be employing a lot of men. The Rocher Dehoule
Mine is employing 100 men steady; also the Silver Standard Mine is employing fifty men. and there
are several other properties which are opening up and will be employing a lot of men in the near
future.
Granby Bay Milling Company at Anyox are employing about 1,200 men steady; also Alice Arm
will be a large mining camp, as several large properties are opening up.
The Dolly Varden Mine, located eighteen miles from tide-water, will be employing a large force
of men next spring, as the company is doing development-work and had to build a trail eighteen
miles from tide-water to the mine, and as labour has been very scarce it has kept a lot of mining-
property from opening up. Quite a town has sprung up at the head of Alice Arm. There are about
six stores and a large hotel located there already, and I have a scavenger working there at present.
I may report that all the camps that are employing men are in good shape, and the Granby
Camp is making many improvements for the comfort of the men all the time.
I may state that the Municipality of Prince George is installing their water system and will be
working very shortly. As soon as they can supply the town with water, I am going to request the
Mayor and Council to have all the wells in the townsite filled up as these wells are dangerous in the
spring on account of there being no sewerage and the formation of the town is all gravel.
I may report that the only sickness that we had during the whole year was an epidemic of
measles, which was brought into Prince George by an Edmonton family last May, and it spread
rapidly, as we had 150 cases before we got it stamped out. It spread over the three towns and there
were only two deaths, infants under twelve months old. There were a few cases at the Rocher
Deboule Mine, also at Hazelton; brought up from Prince Rupert, as there was quite an epidemic
in that town last spring.
I may state that there is only one hospital in Prince George, and that is run principally as a
maternity hospital for the towns all around. There is an experienced nurse in charge who is paid
by the City of Prince George. The Grand Trunk Railway Company has a hospital in its yards at
Prince George for its employees, and Dr. Ewart has charge of same, and there is an experienced man
in charge. There is another hospital at Quesnel in charge of Dr. Baker, and one at Hazelton in
charge of Dr. Wrinch. Dr. Ewart is the only doctor here at present; two years ago there were five,
but since the war started they have all gone to the front.
We had no cases of contagious disease in the whole district the last twelve months outside of
the measles.
I have, etc.,
Henry Avison,
Provincial Sanitary Inspector.
As may be seen by the report, Mr. Avison has a very large district to cover. He is a
conscientious sanitary officer and has a knowledge of first aid. Mr. Avison is always courteous
yet firm in his demands for compliance with the Provincial Sanitary Regulations.
I would respectfully suggest for your attention the advisability of proposing an amendment
to the " Land Act," to the effect that no townsite for residential purposes shall be accepted for
land registration unless such townsite has been inspected and approved by the Provincial Board
of Health. H 16 British Columbia 1917
Such amendment, however, should be in addition to the introduction of town-planning
legislation. A model Act, upon which municipalities could base their local Acts, is something
very desirable at the present time, and more especially so as 1 am optimistic enough to think
that following the war there will be great reconstructional activity in British Columbia.
In conclusion, I wish to say that the office files will show that the work of the Department
has been carried on in a systematic manner and conditions met as they arise. Enforcement of
the provisions of the different Acts pertaining to this Department is bringing about satisfactory
conditions, not only in reference to camps and canneries, but satisfactory in that the modification
of these conditions is such as to win commendation from those directly interested, and who at
first thought that unnecessary expense was being forced upon them, but now, in view of later
developments and the knowledge of benefits derived, has induced those concerned to frequently
come to us for advice.
! I have, etc.,
Frank DeGrey,
Chief Sanitary Inspector.
HOSPITAL INSPECTION.
Victoria, B.C., January 8th, 1917.
II. E. Young, M.D.,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit for your consideration the Fourth Annual Report on Hospital Inspection
in British Columbia. At the outset it should be explained that up to this time the work has
been chiefly confined to private hospitals and charitable institutions, such as orphanages or homes
receiving occasional aid from the public purse; the large public hospitals receiving the regular
per capita grant, being under the supervision of a Board of Governors, with two of its members
representing the Government, are not visited except through specific complaint or to obtain
information in reference to fever or contagious cases.
There exists at this writing thirty-five licensed private hospitals classed and licensed according to the suitability of building, equipment, and qualifications of those in charge.
Licences to treat medical, surgical, and maternity cases have been granted to the following:—
Kitsilano Private Hospital, 2494 Third Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.
Winnitoba Private Hospital, 1353 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Grandview Private Hospital, 1090 Victoria Drive, Vancouver, B.C.
Bute Street Private Hospital, 786 Bute Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Nicola Street Private Hospital, 916 Nicola Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Harbour View Sanatorium, 370 Second Street East, Vancouver, B.C.
St. Luke's Hospital, 309 Cordova Street East, Vancouver. B.C.
West End Hospital, 1447 Barclay Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Miss Roycroft's Private Hospital, 1036 Haro Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Britannia Mining & Smelting Co.'s Private Hospital, Britannia Beach, B.C.
Coquitlam Private Hospital, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
A'ictoria Private Hospital, 1116 Rockland Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Licences to treat medical and maternity cases have been granted to the following:—
Williamson Private Hospital, 1671 Haro Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Mrs. Jane Webb, 129S Fifty-first Avenue East, Vancouver South, B.C.
Fairview Nursing Home, 975 Broadway West, Vancouver, B.C.
Mrs. Alice C. Witt, 1845 Forty-sixth Avenue East, Vancouver, B.C.
Prince George Hospital, Prince George, B.C.
Miss Rose Down, Battle Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Neal Institute, 245 Fenwick Avenue, Cranbrook, B.C.
Licences to treat maternity cases only have been granted to the following:—
Mrs. E. Rutherford, 2321 Shakespeare Street, Victoria, B.C.
Mrs. Mary Collins Bass, 2625 Prior Street, Victoria, B.C. 7 Geo. 5 Provincial Board of Health. H 17
Mrs. Mary Jane Handley, 1218 Queen's Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Mrs. E. Skelland, 2316 Lee Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Mrs. F. McKenzie, 1787 Second Street, Victoria, B.C.
Mrs. Louisa Bell, 756 Cloverdale Avenue, Saanich, B.C.
Mrs. Louisa Roadley, 360 Battle Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Mrs. M. A. McGuffie, 62S Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Mrs. R. Miller, 20 St. Paul Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Home Private Hospital, Baker and Falls Streets, Nelson, B.C.
Mrs. A. Salmon, Cranbrook, B.C.
Mrs. E. Corbman, 855 Eleventh Avenue East, Vancouver, B.C.
Mrs. M. Winter, 1020 Harwood Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Grosvenor Private Hospital, 129 Twenty-second Avenue West, South Vancouver, B.C.
Licences to treat medical and convalescent cases have been granted to the following:—
Sunnyview Sanatorium, Powers Addition, Western City Limits, Kamloops, B.C.
National Institute, 2102 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.
A number of illegal maternity or lying-in homes have been suppressed in various parts of
the Province during 1916, demonstrating the fact that constant vigilance is necessary in order
to protect the public and bona-flde institutions from the illegal practice of the self-professed
obstetricians who were becoming quite numerous and prominent before the " Hospital Act Amendment Act" was put into force.
Many of the private hospitals are very well patronized, whilst others apparently are barely
able to meet current expenses. As might be expected, the factors necessary for success are
suitable location coupled with good management and support from the local medical practitioners.
The company hospitals are those built and maintained by some of the companies or corporations operating large industrial plants remote from a city or town. These hospitals are
usually well equipped and under the supervision of medical men and nurses. As an instance,
the Britannia Mining and Concentrating Company has a fully equipped hospital at its Beach
Camp with doctor and nurses in charge, whilst at its Tunnel Camp, which is several thousand
feet farther up the mountain, it has recently erected and equipped an emergency hospital with
a certified surgical nurse in charge; thus, if an employee is injured in the mine or adjacent
works, the surgical nurse with first-aid assistants are immediately available, and- the patient
receives treatment according to the nature of injuries or until conveyed to the main hospital
at the Beach Camp (which is really a model town). This company is not an exception in
recognizing the value of .prompt and efficient measures for an injured or sick employee.
Of the charitable institutions listed as homes, orphanages, or shelters, much could be written
of the self-sacrificing and Christian energy being exerted by those in charge, and assisted by
kindred societies and organizations for the protection of orphans or neglected children. The
support by endowment and otherwise given to these institutions reflects very creditably upon
British Columbia as a whole.
Inspection visits were made to the following institutions:—.
Alexander Orphanage, Vancouver, B.C.
Children's Aid Society, Vancouver, B.C.
Monastery of Our Lady of Charity, Vancouver, B.C. •   ,
Orange Orphans' Home, New Westminster, B.C.
Providence Orphanage, New Westminster, B.C.
Quamichan Boys' Protectorate, Quamichan, V.I.
St. Ann's Orphanage and School, Nanaimo, V.I.
St. Mary's Hospital, New Westminster, B.C.
St. Joseph's Hospital, Victoria, B.C.
St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, B.C.
Salvation Army Maternity Home, Vancouver, B.C.
The reports on file in the Department show them to be well conducted.   In a few minor
cases it was necessary to call attention to some slight sanitary defects and lack of fire-protection,
and such instructions given the carrying-out of which would lead to compliance with the terms
of the Act.
Of the larger Government-aided hospitals, the reports of the Governing Boards show them
to be operating under fairly satisfactory conditions.   The Kootenay Lake General Hospital is H 18 British Columbia 1917
being replaced by a modern brick and stone structure. The plans for the reconstruction of the
Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, have been under advisement for some time and some of the work
has already been undertaken. Financial conditions have prevented the carrying-out of the
elaborate plans which were adopted for the new hospital. Work on the Vancouver General
Hospital may be said to be continuous, and latterly there has been built another building to
be used for the housing of returned convalescent soldiers. This is being erected by popular
subscription.
The question of the returned convalescent soldier is a very large one, and in the immediate
future a great many more of these men will be returned, as it has been intimated by the Home
authorities that the space occupied in British hospitals by Canadian soldiers will be required,
and a request made that Canada will do more in this respect in the future.
Ten thousand of these cases to be distributed throughout the Dominion are to be looked for
immediately. Arrangements have been made by the military authorities for the handling of
these cases at their own bases, the different hospitals in the Province, and, in addition, a large
building at Balfour has been requisitioned to accommodate cases of tuberculosis in addition to
those which have already been sent to Tranquille Sanatorium.
The King Edward Sanatorium at Tranquille is also taxed to such an extent that of late
not a single bed was.vacant, and this in spite of the new wing which has just been opened.
The admission of some thirty returned soldiers will explain, to some extent, the crowded
condition. Every visit of inspection finds new equipment being installed for the general
betterment and protection of the inmates.
At Kamloops the Royal Inland General Hospital Governing Board are taking steps to absorb
the Sunnyview Private Sanatorium and also a large private residence for the purpose of isolating
and treating their tubercular cases. The very small number of minor complaints lodged with
this Department in reference to the general conduct of public hospitals in 1916 is a sufficient
guarantee of competent administration of the public hospitals of British Columbia.
I have, etc.,
Frank DeGrey,
Hospital Inspector. 7 Geo. 5 Provincial Board of Health. H 19
MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE.
Victoria, B.C., February 1st, 1917.
II. E. Young, M.D.,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg leave to submit the Annual Report of Medical Inspection of Schools for the
year 1915-16. The changes that have taken place as a result of war conditions and the great
call that has been made on the medical profession has caused considerable disruption in the
work of medical inspection of schools. Many of the medical men have gone to the front, and
others have been asked to cover the districts as fully as possible. The result has been that the
work has been kept up, considering the circumstances, in a gratifying degree.
The number of schools visited, inspections made, and changes as regards the number of
pupils have all been tabulated and are included in the report.
When the question of medical inspection of schools was first brought up, considerable
opposition developed from the school authorities and also from the parents. It was difficult
to impress upon them the importance of this work, although in our national life during the
past few years conservation of everything material has received consideration. Committees
and commissions without number have been formed to look after the assets of the country, and
the benefits arising from these have been fully impressed upon the people by the fact that the
knowledge acquired has been of inestimable value in arriving at the value of our resources
under war conditions. But, while no limit has been placed upon such efforts, there has been
great carelessness in regard to what should be the really most important of conservation; that
is, the conservation of human life. One has only to look at the rejections of men who, in the
prime of life, have volunteered for military service, and have been rejected for physical defects,
to appreciate the fact that conservation of the greatest asset of the Empire has been neglected.
The work incidental to inspection of our school-children is the first step in giving effect to
the care of the human wealth of the nation, and it was with a view of finding out what benefits
have been derived from the enforcement of the terms of the Act that the Department wrote to
the different men who have been carrying out the work in the districts, asking for au opinion
as to the results obtained now that the Act has been in force for the past few years.
The following letter was addressed to the Medical Officers:—
Dear Sir,—Some six years ago there was passed in the Legislature, for this Department, an
Act providing for Medical Inspection of Schools, and the provisions of the Act have been carried out
as far as this Department is concerned, with the ultimate object of correcting the many abuses which
medical men  know  in  the  past  existed  among  the pupils.
It has not been possible as yet to form any definite opinion of the benefits that have accrued
from the Act, but, as you have been acting in your capacity as examiner for this Department, I
would be very pleased indeed to receive a letter from you giving me your opinion as to what benefits
have accrued under the enforcement of the provisions of the Act. Do you find that latterly examinations show a decrease in the number of cases presenting themselves requiring treatment, and also
do you find that upon your recommendation parents are taking note of such conditions and having
them attended to?
The Department is very desirous indeed of bringing about practical results, and hopes that the
medical men recognize the importance of the work, and also that the benefits to be derived can only
be arrived at by perfunctory examination which cannot in any event produce good results.
The Department is desirous of issuing a statement showing by comparison of the yearly reports
that the institution of medical inspection will bring about an improvement in the physical condition
of the children.
We would be pleased to have a full report from you and an expression of your opinion on the
working of the Act as a whole.
Yours faithfully,
H. E. Youno,
Secretary. H 20 British Columbia 1917
We are in receipt of nearly one hundred replies, and with one or two exceptions there is
no uncertain tone in the nature of the replies to the questions asked. We find the consensus
of opinion is that not only is there a marked improvement in the physical condition of the
children, but that a greater interest is being taken by the teachers in the work, and particularly
on the part of the parents is a desire being shown to carry out the recommendations of the
Medical Inspectors.
In a young and growing Province such as British Columbia isolation of some of the districts
militates against the children all receiving proper special treatment, and in some cases also the
financial condition of the parents precludes the possibility of such recommendations being carried
out, hut it is safe to say that 90 per cent, of the cases requiring attention have been looked after
and have been benefited.
The majority of the medical men are in accord in saying that the decreasing number of
those receiving treatment on their recommendation is due to the fewer children requiring treatment. It is also noticeable that when the opinion of the teachers who have been a number of
years in the same school has been obtained, all say they note a decided improvement in the
physical condition of the pupils the past year or two as compared with conditions at the time
they went to the school.
It would be a matter of regret if the work which has begun under such auspicious circumstances should not be followed up, as experience shows that it is only by keeping a continual
watch and following up the recommendations that results can be obtained. The Department
therefore will have to judge as to the continuance of the work by existing war conditions.
It has been found that early recognition of acute trouble by the teacher and report of the
same to the Medical Inspector has enabled us to check epidemics of diseases which are more
peculiarly noticeable in school-children, and it also enables us to keep our schools in operation
even although there are serious epidemics existing, and in this connection I wish to emphasize
the wisdom of keeping children in school rather than closing schools in the presence of communicable diseases in a community. School contact instances of infection are rare if the system
of school medical inspection is at all adequate, and the presence of the children in the class-room
each day, where they can be systematically observed for symptoms of approaching illness, offers
a far greater degree of safety to the child and protection to other children than can be attained
by allowing them to be in their homes or on the street in indiscriminate contact with other
children.
Such control may be exercised by any community, and the school, instead of being the focus
for the dissemination of communicable diseases, may become, because of its very adaptability
to control, one of the most valuable methods we have of limiting the spread of communicable
diseases in any community.
The Department has noticed that, in connection with the examination by the physician,
greater attention is being given to the sanitary conditions in and around the school, and as a
matter of routine trustees are notified where the report which is returned to the Department
noted conditions that called for improvement.
There is great room for improvement; so much so that the Department felt that if they
could interest the Women's Institutes of the country the local conditions would be looked after,
and the following letter was sent to the Secretaries of the different institutes throughout the
Province:—■
Madam,—In 1910 the Legislature passed an Act entitled " An Act to provide for Medical
Inspection of Schools," and the carrying-out of the provisions of this Act was entrusted to the Provincial Board of Health. Medical men in different parts of the Province were appointed as School
Inspectors, and the work has been carried out from that time as carefully as could be expected.
The introduction of such a measure, of course, required careful attention, and it is not until the
present time that the Department has been able to judge of the results.
The Department has written to all the medical men who have been doing the work, asking that,
as the Act has now been enforced for the past four years, they should express their opinion as to the
benefits that have accrued. The replies that we have received have been such as to cause very great
satisfaction indeed.
The reports are still coming in, but from the large number already received the consensus of
opinion is that the parents understand the benefits that will be derived and are carrying out the
instructions, and all Inspectors report that in a great percentage of cases where the attention of the
parents is called to the existence of defects, measures have been taken to bring about a remedy, the
result being a great decrease in the number of cases requiring treatment. 7 Geo. 5 Provincial Board of Health. H 21
The benefits to be derived from the enforcement of this Act can only be obtained by co-operation
as between this Department with its Inspectors, the parents, and the Board of School Trustees.
The great majority of the Inspectors are giving their best efforts to the work, the parents have
responded splendidly, but we would ask greater co-operation on the part of the trustees, and particularly so with regard to the sanitary conditions of the school and outbuildings.
In section 5 of the Act, copy of which we forward, it is provided that the Medical Inspector
shall examine all school buildings and school surroundings, and shall report to the Board of School
Trustees, fully and in detail, the result of such examinations. This has been done, but I regret to
say that conditions which should not obtain are not remedied, and this Department would ask for the
co-operation of the Women's Institutes throughout the Province.
We are writing to the Secretaries of the different Women's Institutes asking that this matter
be discussed by them, and that their influence be used to see that the recommendations of the
Medical Inspectors in reference to sanitary conditions are carried out, and also to see that the
teachers, upon whom very much depends, be asked to look upon this work as one of great benefit to
the children and to show a corresponding interest in the work.
The Department would be much pleased to hear from you.
I have, etc.,
H. E. Young,
Secretary.
The few replies that we have received have expressed willingness on the part of the
institutes to keep the matter before them, and to co-operate as much as possible with the
Department in bringing to the attention of the local trustees conditions which should be
remedied.
Miss Ravenhill. member of the Advisory Board of Women's Institutes of British Columbia,
has very kindly interested herself in this matter, and wrote to the Secretaries of the different
Farmers' Institutes drawing their attention to the importance of co-operation. I am in receipt
of a resolution from the Shawnigan Lake and Cobble Hill Institutes, signed by Miss Alice
Ravenhill as Secretary, which expresses the sentiments contained in many of the letters received
from Women's Institutes, and at the same time points out some weaknesses of the " Medical
Inspection Act." Her recommendation is that these be remedied, and the resolution is as
follows:—■
" The members of the Shawnigan and Cobble Hill Women's Institute, after careful inquiry
in the district, find that the larger portion of the parents do not feel satisfied with existing
conditions of medical inspection; not only are there many instances in which no report is made
to the parents following the visit of the Medical Inspector, so that they get no information or
opportunity to remedy defects he may find in their children, but where there is but one doctor
in a large district the result of his appointment as Medical Inspector of Schools has been to
deprive the children in whom he finds defects of being brought to him subsequently for treatment,
as a Medical Inspector may not treat the cases he reports.
" The members feel the urgent need of some organization for the treatment of defective
teeth, eyes, ears, and throats. Not only is medical advice costly, so that the poorer families do
not attempt to procure it, to the permanent detriment of their children and to the waste of the
taxpayers' money spent on educational provision the children cannot properly utilize, but, at this
moment, when the importance of rearing a healthy race is of greater moment than ever before,
conditions of faulty teeth, eyes, etc., exist which undermine the children's health and will impair
their adult efficiency."
A careful perusal of the figures in our tables will show that there has not been any serious
epidemic. One thing that will arrest attention is the prevalence of goitre. It is not confined to
any particular locality in the Province, and the Department is doing work with the medical
associations of the Province and with the experts in connection with the Dominion Health
Department in an endeavour to determine the cause. The consensus of opinion seems to be
that it is the goitre of adolescence.
Within the past two months measles have been epidemic throughout the Province, but
conditions have been carefully guarded and the matter is well in hand.
I have, etc.,
N. Locke,
School Nurse. H 22
British Columbia
1917
SUMMARY, 1915.
3
Schools.
Sri
a'S
m
o
'oC
00 003
> co
00     .
>   C
oo  O
Ol oo°
Co ci
ci
00
TO m
co -00
d
CO
6
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p
O =oi
d oo
g §
-oJ ^o
00-*
g s
■SB
a
•9
cd O
30  V
y
-so
t.
0=
oi
oo
£
So
1,933
a
936
a
a
<c
a
a
H
O
*
GQ
57
62
«
31,549
25,523
95
407
515
1,783
2,599
7,971
2,384
429
149
95
Rural Municipality ....
15,758
11,562
396
84
642
272
361
538
1,708
4,748
635
341
66
10
26
22
Rural and Assisted	
13,045
8,079
130
91
403
91
361
831
1,324
2,851
418
358
29
8
5
11
3,912
1,734
21
79
27
25
22
122
450
65
63
244
1
76
1
94
64,264
46,898
2,480
270
2,060
797
1,262
3,124
5,753
16,020
3,500
1,191
128
SUMMARY, 1916.
Schools.
P. Ol
5
a, ooo:
oo   .
r   C
£g
"a
-03
oo loo
oo
.S-d
COT.
d
boo
o <oi
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gs
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00
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■gioS
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2;
27,716
25,254
s
319
a
a
a
a
<
a
a
2,011
O
>
368
63
196
W
Graded City	
93
1,082
351
616
546
2,450
7,581
645
103
Rural Municipality	
12,848
10,469
411
10S
653
257
393
463
1,424
4,656
021
467
290
26
144.
60
Rural and Assisted	
8,927
7,945
163
90
417
104
360
562
1,382
2,529
577
418
11
26
8
53
2,081
1,915
15
92
29
25
9
106
480
56
152
5
1
Grand totals	
51,572
45,583
908
291
2,244
741
1,394
1,580
6,262
15,246
3,265
1,682
674
115
349
216
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected:    1915, 339, at a cost of $5,683.20; 1916, 331, at a cost of $5,653.82.
Schools not inspected :    1915, 97 ; 1916, 117.
Pupils inspected:    1915, 8,079 ; 1916, 7,945, a decrease of 134.
Cost of inspection per pupil:    1915, 73% cents; 1916, 71% cents.
Percentage of defects:    1915, 84.84; 1916, 78.50; less, 6.34.
Medical Inspectors: No appointments. 1915, 62 Medical Inspectors; 1916, 28 Medical
Inspectors.
Medical Inspectors: No reports. 1915, 35 reports from the Medical Inspectors; 1916, 89
reports from the Medical Inspectors.
Graded City Schools.
Cities, 33.    1915:    Reported, 23; not reported, 10.    1916:    Reported, 27; not reported,  6.
No reports from Medical Inspectors at Armstrong, Fernie, and Vernon.    No appointments,
Ladysmith, Salmon Arm, and Enderby.
Pupils inspected:    1915, 25,523, a decrease of 1,083; 1916, 25,254, a decrease of 269. 7 Geo. 5   ' Provincial Board of Health. H 23
High Schools.
High schools, 33. 1915: Reported, 20; increase of 73S pupils inspected. 1916: Reported,
19; increase of 181 pupils inspected.
Rural Municipal Schools.
Municipalities: 1915, 28; reported, 21; not reported, 7. 1916, 2S; reported, 22; not
reported, 6.
No reports from Medical Inspectors at Penticton, Spallumcheen, Sumas, and Surrey. No
appointments, Salmon Arm and Coldstream.
Pupils inspected:    1915, 11,562, an increase of 350; 1916, 10,469, a decrease of 1,093.
Grand Total.
Pupils inspected:    1915, 46,S9S, an increase of 5S6; 1916, 44,583, a decrease of 2,315. H 24
British Columbia
1917
HIGH
Name of School..
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
o
'S-
o
6
te
OJ
a
y,
Qj
o
o
te
B
.2
2
1
a
o
>
a
.2
i>
S>
<D
%
Q
3
2
2
2
3
2
3
.5
A3
OJ
o
a
l
l
„ be
CO   00
a
3
1
'5
No report for 1915-16 term.
No report for 1915-10 term.
G. K. MacNaughton	
W. Dykes	
27
24
45
59
28
58
23
27
24
40
55
28
55
19
3
Enderby   	
No report for 1915-16 term.
No report for 1915-16 term.
Kamloops	
M. G. Archibald	
G. 0. Read	
l
l
....
1
1
W. J. Knox	
1
81
131
244
102
33
48
36
80
115
285
107
27
44
19
3
1
7
1
E. H. McEwen	
Combined with City School
report.
18
1
1
3
2
5
Prince Rupert ,.   ...
J. C. Cade 	
J. W. Coffin	
No report for 1915-16 term.
No report for 1915-16 term.
Salmon Arm	
Vancouver:
Girls'	
Belle H. Wilson	
380
701
243
107
311
153
326
110
107
294
"k
9
18
3
3
2
5
2
3
1
1
1
T. V. Hunter	
6
15
13
'
.1
GRADED CITY
Alberni	
Chilliwack	
Cumberland	
Cranbrook:
Central	
South Ward..
Kootenay Orchard
Duncan   	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kaslo	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Merritt	
Ladysmith	
W. Dykes	
G. C. Read	
M. G. Archibald	
W. J. Knox 	
G. H. Tutill	
H. Shayler	
W. F. Luton	
No report for 1915-16
65
301
323
54
301
275
353
353
73
73
25
184
21
184
3S0
97
364
97
210
210
429
325
377
325
276
term.
269
4
15
60
6
: l
2
..2
1
1
2
8
1
7 1 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 25
SCHOOLS.
o
H
0,
be
=3
a
H
CO
CO
00
a)
a
15
5
3
12
8
2
7
T3
ca
3
oo
H
5
1
0
"0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac-
Disease, etc.).
>
CJ
1
0
02
0
0
ft
0
fc
be
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the past
year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
3
3
Otitis media, 1; acne, 1; wax
in ears, 1
Mitral regurgitation, 1; ische-
ma, 1; contraction right arm,
1
Good	
Yes.
8
5
1
Good	
Unsatisfactory	
Good	
Unsanitary.
2
13
4
6
10
3
Good	
Good	
Yes.
3
Influenza, 16	
Yes.
2
Good	
3
15
39
71
23
5
3
6
28
1
3
10
19
31
1
3
Vaccinated, 52; not vaccinated,
28
Heart murmur, 2;  appendicitis ; acne
Teeth   treated,   217;    tonsils
treated,11; adenoids treated,
11; vaccinated, 160
Nervous,   1;    orthopaedic,   2 ;
cardiac, 2; T. B. hip, chronic,
1; skin, 1; anaemia, 2
Yes.
9
Scarlet fever; rheumatism
Good	
Yes.
18
Good	
Measles, 5	
Yes.
1
1
Good	
Doubtful.
57
101
27
"7
6
5
18
2
Cardiac, 17 ; lung, 2	
Good	
Good	
24
3
Yes.
89
5
24
Cardiac, 8;  orthopaedic spine,
2
SCHOOLS.
6
30
57
20
48
167
4
10
124
45
169
6
40
82'
3
59
8
30
30
33
118
59
48
18
35
1
43
18
198
26
"3'
61
173
96
Cardiac, 1	
Nervous   disease ;   cardiac,  2 ;
pulmonary, 1; wax in ears, 49;
orthopaedic, 2 ; nasal catarrh,
21 ; skin-disease, 22
Anterior poliomyelitis; torticollis
Anterior poliomyelitis; cardiac;
pulmonary; cretinism, 2
Mitral stenosis; rickets, 3:
haemophilia; orthopaedic
nasal polypus
Cardiac ; epileptic	
Wry-neck ; blepharitis, 2 ; strabismus, 2
Vaccinated, 167; not vaccinated, 18
Chorea, 3 ; pulmonary ; heart,
3 ; ichthyosis, 2
Cardiac lesious, 3	
10
Measles.,
Measles..
Measles, i
Measles, 69	
Influenza, 150..
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Poor .
Good.
Fairly good.
Satisfactory
Good	
Good	
Excellent
Satisfactory
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Fair.
Yes.
Yes.
Satisfactory.
Yes.
Yes.
Unsatisfactory. H 26
British Columbia
1917
Graded City
Name of School.
Nanaimo:
South Ward	
Middle Ward	
Quennell	
Nelson	
New Westminster:
John W. Robson.
F. W. Howay	
Herbert Spencer.
Queensboro	
Richard McBride
Lord Lister	
Lord Kelvin	
Phoenix	
Port Coquitlam :
Central	
James Park	
Port Moody	
Prince Rupert:
Borden Street...
King Edward,. •.
Seal Cove.	
Rossland:
Central	
Cook Avenue....
Revelstoke:
Central	
Selkirk	
Salmon Arm	
Kandon	
Trail	
Vancouver :
Aberdeen	
Alexandra	
Bayview	
Medical Inspector.
W. F. Drysdale .
Isabel Arthur.
E. H. McEwen.
W. L. Ritchie..
G. Sutherland .
C. R. Symmes .
J. C. Cade (acting).
J. W. Coffin	
W. H.Sutherland.
No report for 1915-16 term.
W. E. Goram	
Thorn & Coghlin	
F. W. Brydone-Jack.
Belle H. Wilson	
F. W. Brydone-Jack..
School Nurse.
Alice S. Stark .
M. A. McLellan.
A. Jeffers	
M. A. McLellan.
TJ
-r
O
Ol
3
"3
q
0
bb
OS C
o
S
>
X
^i rt
00
00
0
a
"8
o
03
a
0
0
£
£
S
a
O
a
a
110
107
2
160
160
9
1
760
707
24
720
696
7
2
38
5
30
598
325
9
12
4
630
344
20
11
1
393
257
5
97
59
1
520
334
21
5
2
10
292
182
4
5
2
628
292
15
12
182
179
6
1
4
21
126
99
12
4
4
63
53
6
2
3
135
135
1
14
3
188
lfll
3
7
335
317
1
1
11
1
3
35
28
1
1
396
390
3
2
226
220
2
2
292
260
3
61
12
321
295
10
5
43
9
38
445
27
342
"3'
2
16
2
1
341
363
2
1
15
6
14
475
492
4
21
7
18
203
202
8
5
2
12
18
56
20
12
10 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board os Health.
H 27
Schools.—Continued,
0
H
J3
01
Ol
H
TO
q
o
■a
a
01
>
o3
00
oo
a
i
io0
1
s
3
25
63
1
42
102
127
299
6
48
408
8
152
34
119
28
30
99
38
28
58
20
5
25
9
38
08
46
10
81
13
40
81
53
60
54
3
15
16
38
18
2
10
20
10
1
10
10
5
31
75
3
22
154
1
1
3
7
5
8
9
2
2
6
6
2
35
95
12
5
37
90
10
6
10
1
61
188
5
6
36
83
9
2
37
144
113
15
23
37
10
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Vaccinated, 43; not vaccinated,
14; otitis media
Eczema, 6 ; vaccinated, 65 ; not
vaccinated, 92
Infantile paralysis ; eczema, 6 ;
talipes,   2;   vaccinated,   318
not vaccinated, 399
Heart, 4; bright's disease; tali
pes, 1;  chorea, 3;  tubercu
lar hip ; injured knee
Teeth   treated,    84;     tonsils
treated, 15 ; adenoids treated,
15 ; vaccinated, 117
Teeth   treated,   129;    tonsils
treated, 16; adenoids treated,
17; vaccinated, 136
Teeth     treated,     59;    tonsils
treated, 7; adenoids treaied,
9 ; vaccinated, 92
Teeth     treated,     3;     tonsils
treated, 3 ; adenoids treated.
3 ;   vaccinated, 22
Teeth    treated,    72;    tonsils
treated, 12; adenoids treated,
12 ; vaccinated, 107
Teeth    treated,    78;    tonsils
treated, 5 ; adenoids treated,
5 ; vaccinated, 68
Teeth    treated,    28;    tonsils
treated, 15 ; adenoids treated,
15; vaccinated, 65
Cardiac, 1 ;   mitral regurgitation, 1
Unkempt, 3 ; tuberculosis, 1...
Tuberculosis, 1; anasmia, 1; un
kempt, 1
Cardiac, 3 ; nasal polypus, 4
deformed, 2
Pulmonary,    1 ;      cardiac,    1
stutterer, 1 ; tonsilitis, 1
T.B. hip, 1; T.B. knee, 1; nerv
ous, 1
Pulmonary, 1.
Cardiac, 1....
Defect of spine, 1; chest or
wry-neck
Hydrocephalus ; defect of palate ; keratitis
Nervous disease, 4; anaemia, 1:
mitral lesions, 9 ; eczema, 4:
cerumen, 17; def ective speech,
4; rheumatism, 2; facial paralysis, 1
Vaccinated, 47; cardiac, 11:
lung, 6; trachoma
Vaccinated, 52 ; cardiac, I
Vaccinated, 14 ; cardiac, 3.
Acute Fevers which
have occurred   .
during the Past
Year.
Measles, 39 ..
Measles, 30..
Measles, 123 .
Scarlet fever; chicken-pox, 2
Measles, 53; chicken-
pox, 21 ;  mumps,
29; pertussis, 48
Measles, 27 .
Whooping-cough, 3 .
Typhoid, 1; chicken-
pox, 2 ; epidemic
measles, 46
Measles, 77 .
Measles, 107 ; chicken-pox, 3 ; influenza, 1
Measles, 14	
Measles, 44 .
Measles, 14 .
Measles, 135; whooping-cough, 7 ; la
grippe, 1; chicken-
pox, 4
Chicken-pox, 2;
whooping-cough,
18 ; measles, 39 ;
scarlet-fever, 1
Mumps, 1; whooping-
cough, 4; measles,
81
Mumps, 2; whooping-
cough, 14; measles,
45; chicken-pox, 1
Condition of Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Fair	
Fair	
Fair	
Fail-	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Excellent	
JJnsatisfactory
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good
Good
Good
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yres. PI 28
British Columbia
1917
Graded Citv
Name of School.
Vancouver.—Continued:
Beaeonsfield	
Cecil Rhodes, Public	
■Cecil Rhodes, Prevocational.
•Central	
-Children's Aid	
Dawson	
Charles Dickens	
Fairview	
Franklin	
Simon Fraser	
General Cordon	
Grandview	
Hasting-s	
Henry Hudson	
Kitsilano	
Livingstone	
MacDonald	
Model	
Mount Pleasant	
Lord Nelson  	
Florence Nightingale	
Lord Roberts	
Laura Secord	
Seymour	
Strathcona	
Tennyson 	
Medical Inspector.
F. W. Brydone-Jack.
Belle H. Wilson	
F. W. Brydone-Jack.
Belle H. Wilson	
F. W. Brydone-Jack.,
Belle H. Wilson.
F. W. Brydone-Jack.
Belle H. Wils.
F. W. Brydone-Jack.
Belle 11. Wilson	
F. W. Brydone-Jack.
School Nurse.
M. A. McLellan.
M. Ewart	
E. G. Breeze.
A. Jeffers	
M. A. McLellan.
A. Jeffers	
M. A. McLellan.
A. Jeffers
M. Ewart.
M. A. McLellan.
A. Jeffers
M. A. McLellan.
M. Ewart.
A. Jeffers
M. Ewart.
A. Jeffers ...
M. Ewart....
E. G. Breeze.
A. Jeffers ...
E. G. Breeze.
M. A. JlIcLelian.
178
340
340
477
143
754
249
547
166
463
313
403
424
377
298
336
474
580
563
567
765
270
463
627
478
177
316
39
141
736
238
514
166
365
431
372
241
336
466
568
549
556
768
264
464
674
454
m 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 29
Schools.—Continued.
00
OO
H
00
-9
a
oi
3
OO
o
oo
go
a
GO
be
'n
a
'3
CS
49
2
4
81
7
3
11
1
1
142
13
5
38
26
7
215
25
16
69
49
4
131
23
13
70
4
192
10
13
72
15
2
151
92
11
97
71
7
115
21
10
85
16
17
70
60
6
124
73
14
165
20
21
183
90
6
168
118
13
176
106
20
209
115
9
76
67
5
136
13
14
225
14
18
126
19
9
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Vaccinated,   10;    cardiac,   2
lung, 8
Vaccinated,   55;    cardiac,   3
lung, 1
Vaccinated, 6	
Vaccinated,   45;     cardiac,   8
lunge, 4 ; trachoma, 4
Cardiac, 5	
Vaccinated,   82;   cardiac,   16
lung, 10
Vaccinated, 27 ; cardiac, 4.	
Vaccinated    59;   cardiac,   11
lung, 9
Vaccinated,   7;     cardiac,    3
lung, 1
Vaccinated,   35;   cardiac,   10
lung, 10
Vaccinated, 63 ; cardiac, 7..
Vaccinated, 25 ; cardiac, 4.,
Vaccinated, 37 ; cardiac, 7	
Vaccinated,   49;    cardiac,   7
lung, 7
Vaccinated,   66;     cardiac,   9
lung, 12
Vaccinated, 33 ; cardiac, 1.,
Vaccinated, 27 ; cardiac, 8..
Vaccinated,   45 ;     cardiac,   9 :
lung, 10
Vaccinated, 62; lung, 10; trachoma, 10
Vaccinated, 35;    cardiac,   5
lung, 2
Vaccinated, 61 ;   cardiac,   16
lung, 1
Vaccinated, 112; cardiac, 17
lung, 1
Vaccinated, 29 ; cardiac, 2	
Vaccinated,   31;   cardiac,   11
lung, 7
Vaccinated,   91 ;   cardiac,  15
lung, 36 ; trachoma, 2
Vaccinated,   44;    cardiac,   5
lung, 2 ; trachoma, 1
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Whooping-cough, 12:
measles, 13; chicken-pox, 4
Whooping-cough, 7:
measles, 78; chick.
en-pox, 1
Whooping-cough, 9;
measles, 62
Whooping-cough, 8;
measles, 76; chicken-pox, 4
Whooping-cough, 19;
measles, 62
Whooping-cough, 2;
measles, 34; chicken-pox, 13
Mumps, 2; whooping-
cough, 10; measles,
43; scarlet fever, 1
Whooping-cough, 27;
measles, 133; chicken-pox, 6 ; diphtheria, 8
Mumps, 1; whooping-
cough, 3; measles,
86 ; chicken-pox,
36 ; scarlet fever, 1
Whooping-cough, 17;
measles, 90; scarlet
fever
Mumps, 1; whooping-
cough, 9
Whooping-cough, 11;
measles, 84
Whooping-cough, 5;
measles, 34; chicken-pox, 3; scarlet
fever, 1
Whooping-cough, 10;
measles, 54; chicken-pox, 1
Whooping-cough, 17;
measles, 81; chicken-pox, 12; diphtheria,, 1
Whooping-cough, 10;
measles, 64; chicken-pox, 4
Whooping-cough, 16;
measles, 109; chicken-pox, 16; scarlet
fever, 1 ; diphtheria, 2
Mumps ; whooping-
cough, 11; measles,
131
Mumps ; whooping-
cough, 11; measles,
153; chicken-pox
Whoo ping-cough;
measles, 156; chicken-pox, 1
Whooping-cough, 4;
measles, 86
Mumps, l;whooping-
cough, 8; measles,
67; chicken-pox, 1
Whooping-cough, 10;
measles, 29; scarlet
fever, 1
Whooping-cough, 6;
measles, 60; chicken-pox, 14
Condition of Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Goed.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Good, jYes.
Good	
Yes
Yes
Good	
Yes
Good	
Yes
Good	
Yes
Good	
Yes
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes. H 30
British Columbia
1917
Graded City
Name of School.
Vancouver.—Concluded :
Classes for Defectives.
Vancouver, North:
Queen Mary  ..
Lonsdale..
Ridgeway
Victoria:
Beacon Hill	
Burnside	
Bank Street	
Boys' Central	
Girls' Central	
Margaret Jenkins	
Sir James Douglas	
South Park	
Kingston	
Fernwood	
Spring Ridge	
George Jay	
Hillside	
North Ward	
Victoria West	
Rock Bay	
Oaklands	
Quadra	
Cook Street Orphanage ....
Pembroke Street Children's
Aid Home	
Sub-Normal Schools for Defectives	
Medical Inspector.
F. VV. Brydone-Jack.
E. A. Martin.
H. J. Wasson .
School Nurse.
M. Grimmer.
289
221
287
140
169
117
355
423
101
305
317
178
53
138
302
150
337
323
15
271
150
26
17
13
221
287
133
188
128
347
440
96
355
319
156
35
130
279
171
334
335
10
263
153
27
18
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Burnaby, North :
Gilmore Avenue ...
Barnet	
Sperling Avenue...
Howard Avenue .. .
Schou Street	
Kingsway, West...
Nelson Avenue
Inman Avenue	
Riverway,   East ...
Edmunds Street...
Douglas Road	
Hamilton Street...
Kingsway, East....
Second Street 	
Armstrong Avenue
E. J. Foster.
Christie & Morris.
Geo. de B. Watson.
276
254
18
33
32
52
260
15
33
32
52
253
140
140
79
79
54
282
52
282
29
31
29
31
71
69
41
41
30
30 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 31
Schools.—Concluded.
a
o
H
So
"a
4
OJ
oo
H
OJ
>
o
00
oo
B
oo
3
-03
OJ
bo
u
OJ
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
OJ
1
■OJ
m
0"
be
ro
CO
2
sCC
O
is
Soc
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of Building.   State if
crowded, poorl}-
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Ansemic,  1;   loss of concious-
ness, 1;   carious permanent
teeth, 13; discharging ear, 2 ;
defective   speech,  4;   bronchitis,    1;     deformities    of
spine, 5 ; hernia, 1; rhinitis,
1; deformed chest, 1	
Yes.
1=1
35
30
22
13
36
15
49
81
19
57
69
19
3
12
87
23
103
69
2
45
20
3
2
5
1
3
2
2
3
1
Measles ; whooping-
cough
Measles ;  whooping-
cough
Measles ;  whooping-
cough
Good	
17
3
4
5
4
4
6
Good	
T>
4
1
3
3
5
16
2
7
5
18
11
11
9
8
13
9
Yes.
6
5
17
7
lfi
9
2
9
5
9
4
28
8
17
Good....
6
l
9
10
Good	
Good	
Yes.
S
3
Yes.
1">
Good   "...
Yes.
«6
14
3
4
1
1
Yes.
8
Yes.
IS
4
8
1
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
4
Yes.
12
4
Paraplegia 	
i
1
2
5
4
i
1
Yes.
Yes.
13
Yes.
18
2
30
1
6
6
1
1
11
4
4
Yes.
22
Yes.
1
Yes.
15
13
17
2
13
18
5
2
1
4
"2
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
18
Yes.
3
2
Yes.
Yes.
Defective speech	
Yes.
SCHOOLS.
75
116
5
8
13
20
21
6
14
19
25
25
9
20
26
36
3
22
1
94
2
2
11
14
14
22
7
13
1
14
66
4
Cardiac,   1 ;     seborrhoea,    12 ;
eczema,   1 ;   blepharitis,   2;
wax in ears, 2 ;  discharging
ears, 2 ; rhinitis, 3
2
2
1
2
4
2
1
2
3
13
2
1
2
2
8
1
1
8
4
15
Cardiac, 8; pulmonary, 9; orthopaedic, 5
Cardiac, 3; pulmonary, 5; orthopaedic, 2
Cardiac, 2; pulmonaiw ; orthopaedic, 2
Measles, 60;  whooping-cough, 3
Whooping-cough, 4 .
23
Uncleanliness,   2;   pulmonary
T.B., 1; heart-trouble, 2; defective speech; strabismus, 1;
discharging ears, 1; wax in
ears,   2;  nasal   polypus,   1;
miscellaneous, 5
20
2
4
Eczema,   3 ;    seborrhoea, 2; ichthyosis,
2 ; chicken-pox, 2 ;
mumps, 2; whooping-cough, 17
Enlarged thyroid, 1;  discharging ears, 1
Enlarged   thyroid,   1;    heart-
trouble, 1; wax in ears, 3
1
7
Mumps, 21; whoopi'g-
cough, 13; refused
examination, 2
Chicken-pox, 1;
whooping-co'gh, 16
Mumps, 1; whooping-cough, 1
10
3
1
Good....
Good....
Good....
Good....
Good....
Excellent
Good....
Excellent
Excellent
Good	
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes. H 32
British Columbia
1917"
Rural Municipality
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
O
oo
'p.
p.
o
d
fc
Ol
ro
2
CO
OJ
P*
3
°o
6
fc
'C
3
1
oo
Si
00
OJ
00
a
3
>
oo
0J
a
i
i
i
2
oi
0J
00
OJ
'od
a
i
_ t
~ -
rtCc
--C Co
00  «>
.-2,
o
OJ
0J
a
3
1
2
1
2
"i
12
7
6
3
2
4
Jo
'0
c
01
Chilliwack :
15
34
21
17
52
16
21
59
79
121
52
58
58
11
32
36
17
7
14
31
19
16
45
10
15
56
67
112
40
52
56
11
32
36
17
7
3
3
2
3
1
4
i'
i
i
i
2
1
1
3
3
2
4
4
1
1
2
1
l
n
4
9
10
1
1
7
3
No report for 1915-16 term.
J. C Elliott	
8
5
4
6
Coquitlam:
3
2
4
Glen	
Cowichan, North:
W. Dykes	
8
19
16
19
55
23
12
27
22
44
34
136
550
95
28
35
20
18
85
47
74
47
16
27
21
8
29
55
21
18
12
25
16
18
48
65
23
41
78
57
18
65
10
8
19
16
17
36
19
11
22
20
41
31
124
433
90
24
30
15
18
09
43
52
42
14
22
20
8
20
50
21
10
12
20
10
17
46
51
23
35
66
51
13
51
16
1
2
1
i
i
2
2
1
Delta:
6
2
1
4
3
2
1
2
i
9
4
1
1
1
2
7
3
i
2
4
10
17
4
i
i
2
4
1
9
2
4
3
3
1
21
5
4
2
9
2
2.
4
	
3
1
1
21
Esquimalt, Lampson Street	
Kent:
E. W. Boak 	
12.
Robt Elliott    	
4
2
2
Harrison Hot Springs	
Langley:
6
2
7
4
3
2
1
i
1
2
2
3
Langley Fort, Div. 1 and 2..
Glen Valley	
i'
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
3
2
....
1
"i
i
i
"4,
i
1
1
2
1
1
2
6-
Otter	
1
Maple Ridge:
Maple Ridge, Senior	
Maple Ridge, Junior	
1
1
4
2
1
1
2
„
	 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
II 33
Schools.—Continued.
"5i
c
o
H
be
j=|
H
0=
00
CO
01
OJ
a
2
2
3
3
2
9
6
68
19
23
20
1
"3'
T3
C
3
bo
to.
ro
'O
O
1
1
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
r-
OJ
coco
d
be
OJ
&
|
s
o
bu
C
S
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
3
Good	
3
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
2
Good	
Yes.
3-
Good	
Good	
Yes.
1
Yes.
4
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
8
2
1
i
1
1
9
4
3
4
Yes.
4
4
Yes.
14
Yes.
3
Good	
Ye-.
8
1
Good	
Seating poor	
Good	
Ventilated poorly.
Good	
Yes.
5
1
3
Yes.
2
1
2
1
Yes.
4
1
1
Unsatisfactory.
1
1
2
3
6
3
20
8
4
8
8
8
9
43
40
30
10
12
4
24
10
14
15
3
12
8
2
5
14
6
4
7
3
2
23
18
15
24
26
30
11
18
9
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
Unsatisfactory....
Good..
Yes.
6
Yes.
3
Torticollis, 1 	
Good	
Yes.
2
Good	
Good	
Good.
Yes.
16
1
Whooping-cough ...
Yes.
Yes.
2
3
1
1
1
Yes.
9
1
1
Good...
Yes.
8
Unsatisfactory....
Good.
Unsatisfactory.
Yes.
8
9
4
10
5
1
5
2
2
German measles ....
Measles, 6; chicken-
pox
Measles; scarlet fever
Fair	
Unsatisfactory....
Good	
Yes.
31
3
1
4
20
2
4
2
23
15
Yes
10
3
Good	
4
Good.
16
i'
2
i
1
2
Good	
Yes.
8
14
Whooping-cough, 5 .
Whooping-cough, 10
Whooping-cough, 4 .
Whooping-cough, 4 .
Yes
7
1
Good	
1
2
Unsatisfactory.
Unsatisfactory.
n
2
1
Whooping-cough, 3 .
5
2
Unsatisfactory...
Good	
Unsanitary.
15
1
Whooping-cough, 2 .
3
Good..   	
Good..
|>
4
4
1
Cretin, 1	
Measles, 18; whooping-cough, 10
Good	
Unsatisfactory....
Good
2
Unsanitary.
3
13
2
1
6
5
4
4
1
1
2
Good
10
Good
6
Measles, 22	
in
1
10
9
4
2
Measles, 23; chicken-
pox, 11
Good.
Yes.
4
Good
10
2
Good	
Yes. H U
British Columbia
1917
Rural Municipality
Name of School.
Matsqui:
Aberdeen	
Bradner, Division 1	
Bradner, Division 2	
Clayburn, Division 1	
Clayburn, Division 2	
Dunach	
Glenmore	
Jubilee	
Matsqui, Division 1	
Matsqui, Division 2	
Matsqui, Division 3	
Mount Lehman, Division 1
Mount Lehman, Division 2
Peardonville 	
Poplar	
Ridgedale, Division 1 ..   ..
Ridgedale, Division 2	
Mission :
Mission City	
Silverdale	
Hatzic	
Ferndale	
Oak Bay:
Monterey	
Willows	
Peachland;
Peachland	
Trepanier	
Penticton   	
Pitt Meadows;
Pitt Meadows 	
Richardson	
Point Grey:
Queen Mary	
Shaughnessy	
Lord Kitchener	
Kerrisdale	
Eburne	
King George V	
McGee High	
Prince George	
Richmond:
Bridgeport	
Steveston	
English	
Mitchell	
Lulu	
Trites	
Saanich:
Cadboro Bay	
Cedar Hill	
Craigflower	
Elk Lake	
Medical Inspector.
A. J. Stuart.
M. W. Thomas.
W. Buchanan.
H. McGregor .
G. Morse	
School Nurse.
No report for 1915-16
A. Low'rie .
No report for 1915-16
W. G. Hepworth.
C. Denton Holmes .
No report for 1915-16
21
30
19
25
15
24
10
16
22
15
23
21
20
12
25
177
32
47
346
108
82
16
term.
57
term.
167
195
226
102
110
222
91
47
34
10
12
121
term
18
23
17
22
12
22
10
10
22
25
13
21
21
15
10
18
161
28
41
7
330
106
62
13
220
101
110
222
91
47
34
16
12
16
73
107
I 2
3
17  S
19  19
13
19 17
18 ; 2
6 | 1 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 35
Schools.—Continued.
eg
p
O
H
Si
P
m
op
OJ
OJ
H
OJ
a
7
4
6
3
4
3
3
2
tn
■O
CO
01
3
■a
So
Jo
"co
W
'0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
p
OJ
>
OJ
CS
coco
d
.if
OJ
6.
£
i
p
So
s
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
4
10
Whooping-cough, 16;
measles, 2
Whooping-cough, 4 .
Good.
Yes.
9,
Good	
Yes.
9,
1
Yes.
15
Good	
9,
Yes.
1
Whooping-cough, 2 .
Yes.
1
Good	
Good	
Yes.
1
Yes.
3
6
2
6
4
3
Yes.
4
Measles, 2; chicken-
pox, 10
Yes.
1
Good	
Good	
Good.
Yes.
3
4
Yes.
Whooping-cough, 5 .
Good	
Yes.
Poorly heated	
Poorly heated ....
Good	
Yes.
3
5
67
16
20
5
50
30
4
19
35
46
25
37
25
23
23
17
85%
85%
85%
85%
85%
85%
6
27
36
35
2
"3'
15
10
3
7
14
7
19
8
5
7
2
1
22
3
5
4
1
Yes.
16
Unsatisfactory	
Unsatisfactory....
Good	
Satisfactorv	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
94
Yes.
4
Yes.
20
Infantile paralysis, 1; anaomia, 2
Measles; chicken-pox
Measles; chicken-pox
Yes.
10
3
2
1
1'
32
12
Yes.
Yes.
Measles, 9; chicken-
pox, 4
Measles, 6; influenza,
2; pertussis, 3
Measles, 57; pertussis, 10;   influenza,
12; chicken-pox, 5;
mumps,   1 ;    conjunctivitis, 1
Scarlet     fever,     1 ;
whooping-cough,
1; measles, 30 ; influenza, 9
Measles, 4; pertussis,
6; influenza, 17
Measles, 15; pertussis,  11;   influenza,
17; chicken-pox, 15
Measles, 3;  mumps,
9; chicken-pox, 3
Measles,   56 ;   influenza, 1; pertussis,
1; chicken-pox, 5;
acute conjunctivitis, 3
Epidemic of measles
Yes.
22
29
14
35
21
26
22
31
12
8
3
2
1
1
Nervous,  1;   kidney,  1;   pul-
monarv, 3 ; cardiac, 1	
Nervous,   3;     pulmonary,   3 ;
cardiac, 4
Nervous,  3;   cardiac,  2;   pulmonary, 1; skin, 1
Nervous,  2;   cardiac,  3;   pulmonary, 4; skin, 2; mastoid,
3 ;   orthopsedic,  2 ;    chronic
conjunctivitis, 1
Nervous, 4 ; cardiac, 2 ; skin,
1; rheumatism; orthopaedic,
2; purpura hemorrhagica, 1
Nervous, 2; orthopaedic, 2; cardiac, 2; T.B. hip, chronic, 1;
skin ; anaomia, 2
Nervous,  1;   cardiac, 1;   pulmonary, 2
Right-hip disease, 1; blepharitis, 5 ;   nasal catarrh, 2
3
3
1
5
4
5
Excellent	
Fair; crowded	
Overcrowded; unsatisfactory
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
19
1
1
1
20
6
Fair	
Satisfactorv	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Excellent	
Excellent	
Excellent	
Excellent	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
9
7
1
2
2
Excellent.
Yes.
17
7
3
2
Yes.
7
5
5
Yes.
4
Yes.
1
Yes.
1
Yes.
3
3
3
3
Yes.
15
1
3
Measles, 1	
Yes.
1»
Yes. H 36
British Columbia
1917
Rural Municipality
Name of School.
Saanich.—Concluded:
Gordon Head	
Keating	
Tolmie	
Royal Oak	
Tillicum Road	
Strawberry Vale
Prospect Lake	
Saanichton	
MacKenzie Avenue .
North Dairy	
West Saanich	
Spallumcheen	
Salmon Arm	
Sumas	
Summerland;
Summerland	
Central	
Garnet Valley	
Surrey	
Vancouver, North :
Capilano	
North Star	
Lynn Valley	
Keith Lynn	
Vancouver, West:
Hollyburn	
Dundarave	
Caulflelds   	
Vancouver, South :
Lord Selkirk	
Tecumseh	
Carleton	
General Wolfe	
General Brock	
Sir Alex. Mackenzie.
Walter Mowberly	
Sir Wm. Van Home.
Sir Richard McBride
Sexsmith	
Champlain	
Connaught	
Norquay	
Secord	
Medical Inspector.
C. Denton Holmes.
No report for 1915-16 term.
No report for 1915-16 term.
No report for 1915-16 term.
F. W. Andrew	
No report for 1915-16 term.
R. V. McCarley	
F. Stainsby.
T. V. Hunter .
School Nurse.
Helen Bone .
45
57
403
49
39
57
22
34
128
83
45
21
160
31
66
30
15
444
242
494
293
258
378
139
19
199
101
40
44
366
39
39
53
19
32
96
79
42
17
141
43
81
31
16
405
394
363
222
478
261
229
344
121
10
43
180
94
14
14 3
18 2
10 12
5 2 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Boakd of Health.
H 37
Schools.—Concluded.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Eczema of hands, 1...
Acne, 1; eczema, 1...
Lame after accident .
Lame after paralysis .
Eczema, 1; acne, 1.
Acne, 1 ..
Acne, 1 ..
Psoriasis .
Skin, 2	
Skin,   5;   pulmonary, 1 ;   cardiac, 1
Skin, 2	
Infantile paralysis, 2.
Blepharitis, 1	
Asthma, 1; tubercular hip-
joint, 1; cardiac, 1; anterior
poliomyelitis
Tubercular disease of spine, 1..
Nervous, 2 ; cardiac, 5.
Cardiac, 3 .
Nervous, 2; pulmonary, 1; car
diac, 3
Cardiac, 8 ; orthopaedic, 6 ....
Cardiac, 2	
Cardiac, 7	
Cardiac;, 3; orthopaedic, 1.
Cardiac, 2     	
Cardiac, 5	
Cardiac, 3	
Pulmonary,   1;     cardiac,    2
orthopaedic
Cardiac, 1	
18
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Scarlet fever.
Mumps	
Chicken-pox.
Whooping-cough .
Whooping-cough .
Measles, 2	
Measles, 37; whooping-cough, 31;
mumps, 2
Measles, 56; whoop-
ing-cough, 28;
mumps, 1
Measles, 10	
Mumps, 1; measles, 3
Diphtheria, 3; measles, 59; mumps, 1;
whooping-c o u g h,
13; chicken-pox, 1
Measles, 31; whooping-cough, 6;
chicken-pox, 2
Measles, 12; whooping-cough, 2;
chicken-pox, 1
Measles, 6; whooping-cough, 4
Measles, 20; whooping-cough, 6;
chicken-pox, 1
Measles, 22; whooping-cough, 15
Measles, 25; whoop-
ing-cough, 6;
chicken-pox, 1
Measles, 7; whooping-cough, 12;
chicken-pox, 1
Measles, 65; whooping-cough, 4;
chicken-pox, 16
Measles, 42; whooping-cough, 2
Measles, 4; whoop-
ing-cough, 4;
chicken-pox, 13
Measles, 29; mumps,
1; whooping-cough
4; chicken-pox, 13
Measles, 14; whooping-cough, 9
Measles, 4; whooping-cough, 1
Condition of Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory ..
Satisfactory ..
Satisfactory ..
Satisfactory ..
Satisfactory ..
Satisfactory ..
Satisfactory ..
Crowded . ...
Satisfactory ..
Unsatisfactory
Fairly good ..
Good	
Fair	
Good	
Crowded	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good.	
Poorly lighted
Poorly lighted.
Poorly lighted.
Poorly lighted.
Good	
Unsatisfactory.
Poorly lighted.
Poorly lighted.
Poorly lighted.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Needs repairing.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes. H 38
British Columbia
1917
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a>
O
ft
p
a
o
d
te
£
s
o
'5.
a
o
d
te
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.2
0
te
Is
0
s
0)
CJ
CO
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a
p
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1
w
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2
_ bi
OS 9
rfCcO
fc-S
1S
0J
0J
o
2
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110
24
9
42
22
8
36
term.
20
20
22
IS
24
20
103
16
term.
15
22
20
10
term,
term.
10
17
15
14
term.
14
term.
65
8
18
term.
17
18
14
22
27
term.
19
13
25
10
10
7
10
12
29
21
38
17
50
16
19
26
30
14
14
18
16
110
22
9
34
18
7
14
19
19
19
18
20
8
64
9
13
24
16
10
9
13
12
14
14
63
4
12
14
18
14
21
26
17
9
22
9
9
8
10
12
18
19
64
1
49
16
19
16
25
14
10
18
16
3
E. H. S. McLean
1
1
1
l
2
1
. 3
1
4
4
1
1
R, B. White	
No report for 1915-16
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
No appointment for 1915-16
E  H. S. McLean	
term.
2
1
1
1
1
1
No appointment for 1915-16
term.
No report for 1915-16
Atlin	
1
No appointment for 1915-16
term.
1
l
M. Callanan	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
M. G. Archibald	
1
1
"s
8
1
1
1
E. H. S. McLean	
No report for 1915-16
1
12
l
2
3
10
Beaufort	
No report for 1915-16
2
Blanche Swan     	
No report for 1915-16
Belford 	
E. M. Sutherland	
3
A. G. Price	
2
1
1
1
M. G. Archibald	
1
4
2
2
1
C. M. Kingston	
S. Petersky	
No report for 1915-16
Big Bar	
8
Big Eddy	
E. H. S. McLean	
2
Blind Bay	
M. G. Archibald   	
2
1
1
l
l
l
2
3
5
2
1
No appointment for 1915-16
term.
9
5
"t
25
1
W, H. Mclntyre	
25
No  appointment for 1915-16
W. Dudley	
term.
5
1
F. W. Green	
Blanche Swan	
1
1
M. G. Archibald	
1
1
W. F. Shaw. .
5
2
2 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 39
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
p
o
H
■a
CJ
bo
£
Q
CJ
CO
H
CJ
o
CJ
"cj
a
50
4
4
2
3
2
3
1
1
6
9
8
3
10
5
1
2
3
2
4
3
2
7
6
45
•a
p
3
■8
00
bo
Ir
a
'c
a
1
'0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
S
u
>
o>
oi
VI
6
a>
B
i
9
boC
d
3
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
27
Mumps; measles....
Good	
Unsanitary.
Good.
i
i
5
1
4
1
Good..   .
Yes.
2
Tonsilitis, 1 	
Good.,
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Unsatisfactory	
Good	
1
1
1
Yes.
Good. .
Yes.
3
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good...
Yes.
1
1
6
2
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory ,
Yes.
Yes.
1
Yes.
3
Good	
Yes.
2
'
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Good	
3
2
4
Chicken-pox, 3	
Yes.
Unsatisfactory....
Unsatisfactory	
Good	
9
7
1
1
30
Yes.
1
2
Yes.
Cardiac, 1; tuberculosis, 1; wax
in ears, 18 ; nasal catarrh, 7 ;
blepharitis, 1; eczema, 1
2
Unsatisfactory....
Yes.
Yes.
4
4
10
5
8
12
11
4
2
4
5
6
4
2
6
5
23
"3'
4
4
3
3
4
2
3
1
Ventilated by windows
Good.
Satisfactory ..
Fair ventilation...
Unsanitary andun-
eatisfactoryin all
conditions
Light and ventilation poor
Average	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactorv	
Good.
Good.
Chicken-pox,    2;
whooping-cough, 2
Yes.
Unclean, 2 ;  deafness, 1 ;  deformities, 1; pharyngitis, 7
Unclean, 3 ; refused exams, 2,.
Yes.
[ed.
9
Yes.
7
2
1
Yes.
1
Unclean, 1;   cardiac, 1 ;   conjunctive, 1;  deformities, 1;
defective speech, 1
Yes.              ' [ed.
Yes.
2
Good *.	
Satisfactory	
Ventilation      and
light poor
Unsanitary	
Crowded	
Unsatisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
4
"9'
Yes.
4
9
Yes.
Unsanitary.
39
10
2
2
11
3
4
1
5
1
1
Measles (Beach)
1; unsatisfactory
Slig
1
"9
ht    	
9
1
Yes.
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
1
Yes.
Bronchitis, 2; mitral incompetence
Whooping-cough ... H 40
British Columbia
1017
Rural and Assisted
Name of School.
Canyon City..
Cape Scott—
Carlin Siding.
Carson	
Cartier Mountain.
Cascade 	
Castledale.*	
Castlegar	
Canford	
Cedar, East	
Cedar, North	
Cedar, South	
Chase	
Chase River	
Chanmaux	
Cherry Creek Valley
Chilco	
Chimney Creek	
Christina Lake	
Chu Chua  	
Clayoquot	
Clinton	
Clearwater..
Clo-oose....
Coal Creek..
Coalmont	
Cobble Hill	
Columbia Gardens.
Columbia Park....
Colwood	
Comaplix	
Comox	
Concord 	
Copper City	
Copper Creek	
Corbin	
Cortes Island	
Cokato	
Courtenay	
Cowichan	
Cowichan Lake ...
Craigellachie	
Cranberry Marsh..
Crawford Bay ....
Crawford Creek...
Crescent Valley...
Creston *	
Criss Creek	
Cultus Lake	
D'Arcy Mountain .
Deadwood 	
Deep Cove	
Deep Creek	
Deer Park	
Demars	
Denman Island...
Departure Bay....
Dewdney	
.Diamond Crossing
Discovery	
Divide	
Dragon Lake	
Duck Range	
Duhamel	
Edgewood	
Edith Lake.
Eholt	
Medical Inspector.
G. B. Henderson	
No appointment for 1915-16
A. K. Connelly	
C. M. Kingston	
E. H. S. McLean.	
C. M. Kingston	
No  appointment for 1915-16
J. M, Macmillan	
G. H. Tutill	
0. G. Ingham	
W. Scatchard	
W. H. Mclntyre..
P. A. McCaffrey..
A. D. Morgan
W. H. Stone	
W. K. Feare	
C. M. Kingston ..
M. G. Archibald..
W. S. Dixon	
S. Peterskv.
M. G. Archibald	
No  appointment for 1915-16
W. IL Workman	
T. O. Campbell ..
A. G. Price	
Thorn &Coghlin.
J. F. Grant	
E. H. S. McLean	
J. E. Montgomery	
J. C. Elliot	
S. Traynor	
H. R. Fort	
A. G. Beale	
W. H. Shaw	
Bonnell & Corson	
J. E. Montgomery	
A. G. Price	
No appointment for 1915-16
E. H. S. McLean	
Ross Fraser    	
Geo. Read	
E. H. S. McLean	
L. E. Borden	
G. B. Henderson	
H. R. Fort	
J. C. Henderson	
T. C. Campbell	
C. Arnott   ..
G. Cummings	
W. H. Keith	
No appointment for 1915
J. S. Macpherson	
Henry Meadows.	
O. G. Ingham	
Alex. Stuart	
W. F. Luton	
E. H. Harrison.	
Ross Fraser	
G. R. Baker	
M. G. Archibald	
L. E. Borden	
J. E. H. Kelso	
School Nurse.
term.
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
N. Locke .
term.
N. Locke	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
Blanche Swan .
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
term.
M. G. Archibald..
C. Arnott	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
p
OJ
ci
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—
'5,
P.
O
O
O
fc
O
fc
27
24
31
14
20
10
30
21
19
16
term.
12
12
16
9
50
43
30
24
87
86
77
63
term.
15
15
9
9
14
14
16
13
13
13
17
17
40
36
14
10
143
136
10
10
19
16
20
18
15
12
24
19
term.
50
50
13
13
10
8
term.
34
31
term.
term.
100
80
44
39
13
13
17
13
36
34
16
13
29
18
114
110
term.
14
11
term.
34
31
term.
16
11
18
14
43
43
16
15
41
37
33
41
term.
9
6
term.
17
15
17
17
19
15
16
18
10
10
_  or.
a -
B  cO
M
10 7 Geo
5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 41
Schools.—
■Continued.
0
H
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OJ
5
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oo
OJ
OJ
H
OJ
OJ
OJ
ft
4
2
•3
a
at
O
-a
$
Jj
w
'0
0
2
2
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
aj
0
d
bo
"-3
P.
2
u
0
•s
be
H
i2
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Fair.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Inadequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes; cesspits
unsanitary.
Adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Adequate.
Good.
Unsanitary.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Un satisfactorv.
Fair.
Yes.
Good.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Good; 1 poor.
Good.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Satisfactory.
Unsatisfactory.
Good.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
2
7
6
1
3
8
nated, 12
Vaccinated, 8; not vaccinated, 4
Good	
Satisfactorv	
Good	
Crowded,      light
poorly
Good	
Good	
2
13
5
42
22
8
4
2
2
8
3
26
5
17
6
8
6
5
3
15
3
2
22
30
9
4
1
"2'
12
2
3
7
24
9
17
23
1
ir
1
1
4
2
Thyroids, 26	
Nephritis, 1; otitis media, 1...
3
Diphtheria	
Heated poorly	
Good	
1
20
8
2
3
6
2
1
Vaccinated, 4; not vaccinated, 9
Good	
Good	
Fair	
Ventilated poorly.
Fair; heated poorly
Acute pharyngitis, 1; cardiac
murmur, 1
Unclean, 1; squint, 1; cardiac, 2;
anaemia, 1; pharyngitis, 3 ;
blepharitis, 1; inguinal hernia ; defective eyelid
9
1
Cardiac, 4 ;   nervous,  1;   pulmonary, 1
3
1
1
2
2
Excellent	
Good	
Measles, 2 ; la grippe,
6; whooping-cough
1; mitral lesions, 1
Measles, 2	
3
1
3
Excellent	
"i
Fair ; no fence.. ...
Unsatisfactory	
Unsatisfactory....
Good	
Excellent	
Good ,
Average	
Verv good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
2
21
6
3
1
Whooping-cough, 10
9
6
3
4
2
9
1
2
Influenza, 1 	
6
2
1
1
4
1
1
4
1
1
2
1
1
Measles, 2	
20
2
Hip-disease, 1	
9
Good	
Good	
Satisfactorv	
Excellent 	
Satisfactory	
9
9
1
2
Measles	
Measles, 2	
15
10
1
10
1
...,
Whooping-cough ...
2
8
5
9
3
1
6
1
Slight chorea,  1;   hydrocephalus
Good	
2
Good	
5
1
1
Good	 H 42
British Columbia
1917
Robal and Assisted
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"3
a
tn
(S
'S
d
te
-d
a
1
X
41
'P.
3
£
d
fc
p
_o
P
p
is
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00
a
00
>
CJ
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ft
1
1
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a
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6
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03
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<!
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
term.
term.
25
30
8
23
25
10
17
17
112
21
term.
15
23
15
term,
term.
18
20
18
16
63
26
50
11
60
38
15
14
9
12
9
14
term.
term.
27
11
12
78
term.
15
8
141
11
71
23
10
24
17
20
24
248
term.
26
9
12
term.
31
17
IS
58
term.
12
term.
9
25
27
8
20
24
9
15
17
89
20
14
22
13
16
20
18
14
61
23
46
11
42
35
9
8
9
12
9
6
25
9
IS
68
15
8
133
10
60
12
9
20
8
20
23
189
20
9
10
27
12
18
58
11
9
2
Elko..
6
1
No  appointment for 1915-16
term.
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
"l
1
2
1
1
3
1
3
No report for 1915-16
P. D. van Kleek 	
2.
1
1
3
1
3
1
Field	
Fife	
E. H. S. McLean	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
1
1
1
3
3
1
2
1
1
1
5
2
2
i
i
1
1
3
6
4
6
1
No  appointment for 1915-16
term.
1
'i'
1
1
3
3
2
No appointment for 1915-16
term.
i
10
Ross Fraser	
Blanche Swan	
1
l
3
5
3
G. Read 	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
i
l
2
1
Gill      	
4
Columbia Coast Mission	
1
P. D. van Kleek	
4
10
i
10
35
No report for 1915-16
Golden	
l
2
8
i
1
1
3
7
1
2
2
11
3
2
1
1
2
1
"i'
1
E. H. S. McLean	
J. F. Grant	
2
Happy Valley	
2
1
2
7
' i
2
7
W. K. Feare	
No report for 1915-16
2
2
R. W. Large 	
No report for 1915-16
1
Headquarters	
1
2
1
9
Heffiey Creek	
No report for 1915-16
W. F. Shaw	
No report for 1915-16
Highland	 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 43
Schools.—Continued.
to
3
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no's
p
o3
3
00
&
.OJ
J
m
OJ
|
'o
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
>
oi
d
hjo
OJ
p.
00
o
f
bo
p
«
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during; the Past
Year.
Condition of Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
13
19
4
4
13
7
6
2
16
42
4
8
15
1
1
3
2
2
Whooping-cough ...
Influenza, 6	
Ventilation      and
light pool-
Excellent 	
Satisfactory	
Good	
3
3
Yes.
Yes.
7
1
Good	
Yes.
2
Heated poorly	
Satisfactory	
Unsatisfactory....
Ventilated poorly.
Improved	
Good	
Good.
2
Yes.
6
12
"i'
Yes.
Yes.
8
5
Yes.
3
Yes.
Yes.
1
Vaccinated,    6;     not    vaccinated, 10
Good	
Good	
Yes.
1
10
15
4
33
4
12
10
2
3
3
1
20
3
1
40
4
Healthful	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
11
4
3
"5'
Nasal catarrh, 1; blepharitis, 5;
peresis of right arm
Blepharitis, 5
Yes.
Good	
Satisfactory.
7
4
3
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Unsanitary.
Eczema, 1; cerumen, 1; mitral
lesion, 1
Fair.
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
2
2
.
Good	
Fair	
Yes.
2
Unsatisfactory.
Good	
Crowded	
Good	
Good	
Good,	
Good	
Yes.
9
1
None.
Yes.
Unsanitary.
1
42
1
Yes.
i
9
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
15
2
35
4
6
7
4
7
3
42
2
2
4
16
7
11
6
3
1
Cardiac, 2 ; chest deformity, 2.
Yes.
3
1
No.
20
4
Scoliosis, 5;   nervous, 1;   cardiac, 1; lardosis, 3
Good	
Fair	
Good	
Yes.
2
Fair.
Yes.
8
]
1
7-
1
2
1
Good	
Good	
Good    (water    in
pump unsanitary)
Good	
Yes.
5
7
1
2
4
Yes.
Yes.
3
4
2
Yes.
2
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Good.
1
La grippe (several)..
Satisfactory	
Yes.
2
Yes.
6
1
2
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
9
3
Yes.
4
Scarlet fever, 1	
Excellent	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
5
2
1
Tonsilitis, prevalent.
Good	
Yes. H 44
British Columbia
1917
Rural and Assisted
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
*d
0
fa
a
d
k5
a
£
S3
M
DO
ft
a
o
d
te
7
12
11
39
18
11
68
166
7
10
7
6
30
6
32
16
14
20
17
8
13
10
14
16
10
15
8
30
32
28
16
6
8
42
22
9
25
17
11
26
13
53
8
19
28
28
8
17
17
35
11
29
22
21
3
1
Is
a
&
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OJ
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ft
o
forty
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00
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ct ~
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Hillier             	
8
12
12
40
18
11
term,
term.
78
166
7
10
7
term.
10
30
15
32
term,
term.
16
16
22
19
term.
12
13
10
term.
21
term,
term.
17
11
15
13
term.
30
term.
32
31
term.
17
13
8
56
term,
term.
22
12
25
term.
18
11
30
13
53
9
33
35
32
10
17
28
35
11
31
22
term,
term.
26
Hilltop 	
10
1
1
4
1
3
1
1
10
9
2
1
2
1
5
2
Hilton
A. C. Nash	
No  appointment for 1915-16
J. C. Elliott	
term.
9
1
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
1
2
10
3
F. Inglis    	
35
W. H. Keith	
1
C. Arnott           	
1
No report for 1915-16
VV. H. Wood	
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
3
2
3
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
R. B. White	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
Columbia Coast Mission	
P. S. McCaffrey	
2
W. J. Knox	
1
No report for 1915-16
Kettle River, N	
1
1
T. C. Campbell	
P. W. Green	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
Kitsumgallum	
Koch Siding	
L. E. Borden	
1
1
D. W. Dykes	
1
1
Lake Buntzen	
G. H. Worthington	
J. F. Grant	
Columbia Coast Mission	
No report for 1915-16
2
1
1
1
1
1
Lasqueti Island	
No report for 1915-16
1
H. A. Christie	
M. G. Archibald	
No report for 1915-16
1
1
2
1
3
8
2
R. W.Irving	
W. F. Shaw 	
H. R. Fort 	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
4
4
3
1
1
2
4
5
W. S. Rhycard	
3
1
1
No report for 1915-16
g
A. C. Nash   	
1
"g"
3
"*
3
1
5
1
E. H. S. McLean	
2
2
5
9
W. F. Shaw	
W. H. Keith	
........
M. G. Archibald	
1
....
1
....
1
3
2
2
1
4
2
2
1
3
1
2
4
1
2
"l
1
"l
1
1
2
N. J. Paul	
9
No appointment for 1915-16
term.
R. W. Large	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 4f
Schools.—Continued.
00
p
O
H
TOGO
g)
jig
OJ
OJ
H
OJ
CJ
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a
2
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23
12
3
40
45
5
1
1
5
29
-a
p
3
tj
OJ
fcc
cola
l
l
l
GO
'O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
§
1
o
1
s
a
Eh
O
a
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of Building.    State if
crowded, poorl}-
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Vaccinated, 5; not vaccinated 7
Good	
Yes.
5
Good	
Yes.
2
Measles, 1	
Yes.
o
Yes.
14
42
4
ii
4
Yes.
Scarlet fever, 2   	
Satisfactory.
Yes.
2
Good	
11
Yes.
5
Yes.
Unsatifactory.
Yes.
Good	
15
3
8
7
2
1
1
9
2
10
4
5
6
6
10
18
8
3
5
20
12
4
9
7
7
o
1
2
8
3
1
"i'
Yes.
Yes.
Squamous by eczema ; pediculosis (several)
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Influenza, 6	
Yes.
1
Vaccinated, 2; not vaccinated, 6
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Fair	
Good	
"3'
1
2
9
4
Good	
Yes.
1
1
3
Left lateral, curvature of spine
Ventilated poorly.
Good    	
Good	
Yes.
1
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
9
5
1
5
Orthopaedic, slight; defects, 2.
2
Heated poorly....
Unsatisfactory....
Yes.
Yes.
Ventilated        and
heated poorly
Heated poorly	
Excellent 	
Good	
2
1
Satisfactory.
Yes.
Measles	
3
Yes.
9
4
2
13
19
9
2
3
2
3
Yes.
Diphtheria	
Yes.
Yes.
i
4
2
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Unsatisfactory.
Unsatisfactory.
2
22
Influenza; measles, 4
2
1
Yes.
Yes.
5
2
16
2
15
1
Excellent 	
Satisfactory ......
Good	
Yes.
7
l
Yes.
1
1
Yes. H 46
British Columbia
1917
Rural and Assisted
A
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
OJ
'p
S
a
d
te
■d
a;
a
3
o
d
te
27
42
7
36
11
9
6
65
11
8
32
68
61
12
40
13
71
6
20
19
12
33
12
52
34
15
16
10
31
14
30
24
19
29
32
6
8
9
20
14
21
5
11
115
10
32
41
19
10
8
10
s
GO
ft
p'
0
>
CJ
0
<0I
0
bi
p
00
01
M
00
>
CJ
00
°S
ft
— ii
03 p
a •-•
□3 -C
fc "rf
GO   g
o3ffl
CO
GJ
ft
'0
S3
-p
Mill Creek	
W. Dudlev	
32
49
8
36
term.
12
9
6
65
term.
13
15
45
term.
100
70
13
46
13
80
6
25
22
13
14
term.
12
term.
57
35
25
22
10
term,
term.
31
15
term.
47
26
term,
term.
21
35
term,
term.
34
6
14
15
23
17
27
9
11
117
10
32
42
20
11
term,
term.
8
term,
term,
term.
10
Minto	
7
4
4
4
3
4
1
3
3
No report for 1915-16
M. G. Archibald.  ..
J. S. Burris	
1
1
3
2
5
2
Mount Ingersoll	
Bonnell & Corson	
No appointment for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
term.
M. G. Archibald	
1
3
2
Movase	
No appointment for 1915-16
term.
1
4
3
Myers Flat	
No report for 1915-16
..
Closed.
Closed.
1
2
"3'
5
2
3
2
9
2
4
G. H. Tutill	
3
1
1
1
1
1
Columbia Coast Mission	
No report for 1915-16
Nob Hill	
North Bend	
P. S. McCaffrey	
No report for 1915-16
1
1
Northfield...
1
9
Notch Hill,  Upper	
9
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
3
1
Okeover Arm	
Okanagan 	
W. H. Shaw ....".	
1
R. B. White	
No report for 1915-16
2
1
1
6
H. G. Williams..
2
Olalla	
1
A. J. Schilistra	
W. D. Calvert	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
W. F. Luton	
1
2
1
1
1
1
6
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
H. A. Christie        	
Miss Blanche Swan..
1
2
4
5
2
1
1
2
4
1
4
No appointment for 1915-16
T. C. Campbell	
term.
9
Qualicum Beach	
1
1
1
H. P. Cox	
1
1
J. T. Wright	
G, R. Baker	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
A. C. Nash           	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
1
E. H. Kelso	
Richlands	
W. H. Shaw	
A. C. Nash	 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Boaed of Health.
1
H 47
Schools.—
-Continued.
oo
P
O
frH
•P
0)
CO
E
_C0
P
a
35
5
1
6
1
9
"«'
6
3
7
18
11
2
2
2
12
1
3
5
6
2
2
13
3
4
5
1
2
1
11
2
2
1
1
6
4
1
12
2
4
6
1
OP
GJ
0J
H
CJ
GJ
CO
a
23
26
1
5
2
11
8
7
5
21
6
19
1
15
1
5
1
11
9
4
8
4
4
3
3
3
9
2
14
4
12
18
6
2
8
8
2
4
3
1
6
4
6
3
3
2
4
■3
3
3
-c
CJ
bo
Or
*P
GO
'0
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
>
GJ
«
CJ
32
6
bjj
00
P.
S
s
O
C*
bu
p
3
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated,   poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Unsanitary.
Unsanitary.
Good.
Unsanitary.
Yes.
Yes.
Unsatisfactory.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Fair.
Yes.
Yes.
Unsatisf actor v.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Unsatisfactory.
Unsatisfactory.
Yes.
Yes.
Good.
Unsatisfactory
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Unsatisfactory.
Fair.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Unsanitary.
Yes.
Yes,
Yes.
Measles	
Good	
13
3
Wax in ears, 9 ; skin-disease, 7;
otitis media, 1
3
•
Good	
2
2
Cardiac, 1; squamous, eczema, 3
Good	
Satisfactorv	
Good	
Unsatisfactory-....
Good	
2
2
3
6
6
1
9
5
2
Unsatisfactory....
Good	
1
Measles	
Measles; diphtheria.
Satisfactorv	
Good	
Unsatisfactory....
Good '	
fair	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactorv	
Satisfactory	
Unsatisfactory....
Good	
1
7
"5
3
2
i
2
1
i
3
1
Epidemic of measles.
Measles	
Good	
curve and cleft palate
Good	
Satisfactorv	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Unsatisfactory	
Satisfactorv	
Excellent	
Good	
3
2
5
2
1
Influenza, 9	
Whooping-cough, 4 .
Measles,  3;   whooping-cough
Influenza, 4	
Chicken-pox	
"7'
1
1
2
La grippe, 2	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactorv	
Unsatisfactory....
Satisfactorv	
Poor	
Satisfactorv	
Good	
6
2
5
1
2
Vaccinated, 60; not vaccinated,
57; mitral regurgitation
Good	
Scarlet fever, 4	
Good	
Good             	
Unsatisfactory....
Unsanitarv	
Good	
Good	
Good	
1
9
2
3
1
2
Measles (teacher) ... H 48
British Columbia
1917
Rural and Assisted
Name of School.
Riondel	
Roberts Creek..
Robson	
Rocky Bay	
Rocky Creek .,.
Rocky Point	
Roe Lake	
Rogers Pass	
Roseberv	
Rose Hill	
Royston	
Rutland.
Sahtlam	
St. Elmo	
Salmo 	
Salmon River	
Salmon Valley	
Sandspit	
Sandwich	
Sayary Island	
Savona	
Sea Otter Cove	
Sechelt	
Seton Lake Creek.,
Seymour Arm ....
Shawnigan	
Shuswap 	
Shuswap Falls	
Shuswap, North .
Shutty Bench....
Shoal Bay	
Shoreacres	
Sicamous	
Sidnej7	
Silver Creek	
Silverton	
Similkameen	
Sirdar	
Skidegate	
Slocan Junction	
Slocan City	
Smithers	
Soda Creek	
Solsqua ,
Sooke	
Sorrento	
Sparkling Creek	
Spences Bridge	
Squamish	
Standard Mine	
Stewart 	
Stellako 	
Strandby	
Sullivan Valley	
Suunyside	
Sunnybrae	
Summit Lake	
Syringa Creek	
Taft	
Tappen Siding	
Tappen Valley	
Telegraph Creek	
Taghum	
Three Forks	
Three Valley	
Thrums	
Thurlow	
Tranquille.	
Trapp Lake 	
Trout Creek, Upper..
Trout Lake	
Tulameen ,
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
No report for 1915-16
Geo. Read	
F. Inglis	
No appointment for 1915-16   term
Columbia Coast Mission
C. Arnott	
J. F. Grant	
No appointment for 1915-16 i term.
J. B. Gallagher ., !No report for 1615-16
N. Locke
J. E. Brouse.
R. W. Irving	
G. K. MacNaughton.,
Knox & Campbell.
W. Dvkes	
J. C. Elliott	
G. E. Rehberger .
P. D. van Kleek..
No report for 1915-16
N. Locke .
J. T. Wright	
K. E. Crompton	
W. F. Shaw	
H. R. Fort	
No appointment for 1915-16 j term.
F. Inglis 	
H. A. Christie	
No  appointment for 1915-16
A. G. Price	
W. Scatchard	
A. C. Nash	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-15
No report for 1915-16
A. K. Connelly	
Geo. Read	
Columbia Coast Mission.
A. K. Connelly...
W. G. Cumming .
A. K. Connelly...
J. E. Brouse	
A. J. Schilistra	
G. B. Henderson	
J. T. Wright	
L. E. Borden	
J. E. Brouse	
C. C. G. McLean	
S. E. Mostyn Hoops	
A. K. Connelly	
W. D. Calvert	
W, Scatchard	
(Closed.)
No appointment for 1915-16
N. J. Paul	
J. E. Brouse	
No appointment for 1915-16
W. R. Stone 	
No appointment for 1915-16
M. G. Archibald	
0. Morris.	
A. K. Connelly	
J. S. Macpherson	
No appointment for 1915-16
E. H. S. McLean	
A. K.Connelly	
W. Hughes	
L. E. Borden	
W. E. Gomm	
E. H. S. McLean.
Columbia Coast Mission .
M. G. Archibald	
F. W. Andrew ...
E. H. S. McLean.
T. 0. Campbell ..
term.
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
term.
term,
term.
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
term.
No report for 1915-11
N. Locke   	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
term.
19
12
29
18
term,
term.
15
20
9
24
45
19
11
term,
term,
term.
17
16
14
34
8
13
17
10
10
21
12
47
35
58
term.
19
term.
22
65
38
26
18
term.
16
30
20
17
14
term,
10
term.
10
28
16
term,
14
10
10
39
term.
18
11
17
term.
10
15
14
20
8
8.
14
10
8
10
S
42
32
53
18
58
20
14
23
20
12
12
9
12
27
13
12
16
10
16
18
7
17 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board op Health.
H 49
Schools.—Continued.
o
EH
OJ
bo
X
CJ
OJ
H
GJ
*CJ
a
6
2
3
15
1
5
2
12
12
6
7
8
12
5
4
8
2
7
4
3
9
7
6
2
2
2
1
3
6
2
15
3
5
2
7
9
1
4
-P
,P
'CO
3
-p
bo
is
'p
a
6
'i'
l
GO
"3
C5
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
a
a
S
as
d
'-+3
P.
o
I
bo
a
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
1
Unsatisfactory....
Excellent	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Excellent	
Unsatisfactory....
Good	
Fair	
Good	
Good	
Excellent	
Good	
6
Chorea, 2 (slight)	
Yes.
6
Yes.
"
Yes.
4
9
4
1
3
1
Chorea, 3; eczema, 1;  worts,
1; wax in ears, 5; defective
speech, 1
Chorea, 1; pulmonary, 2; cardiac, 1
1
2
Yes.
S
5
Chicken-pox, 6;   influenza, 25
Yes.
Yes.
S
10
4
5
3
5
4
4
1
Yes.
8
Measles	
Yes.
Yes.
Unsanitary.
Yes.
9
Yes.
r
1
Nervous, 1; enlarged thyroids, 4
5
Scarlatina, 1	
Yes.
1
Measles;   whooping-
cough
Yes.
3
8
1
Yes.
1
3
Good	
Excellent	
Satisfactory	
Unsatisfactory....
Good	
Yes.
3
2
Yes.
9
Yes.
4
Yes.
14
3
4
13
4
Yes.
4
Irregular heart-action; chronic
bronchitis ; tuhercular hip
1
Satisfactory.
Yes.
2
1
1
1
7
5
2
6
Unsatisfactory....
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Unsanitary.
Yes.
in
ii
4
4
1
4
1
3
2
5
3
4
4
1
1
Unsatisfactory.
Yes.
5
Yes.
3
Defective heart-action, 2	
2
Scarlet fever, 1	
9
Satisfactorv	
Good.
Yes.
Yes.
4
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good...
Yes.
in
Yes.
6
Yes.
3
Yes.
Yes.
3
Good.
Yes.
in
5
4
4
10
4
2
1
2
5
2
Good	
Excellent	
Good	
9
Yes.
9
Pulmonary T.B., 2	
Typhoid, 1..   .
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Unsatisfactory....
Good |
Yes.
3
3
2
Whooping-cough ...
	
Yes.
9
Yes. H 50
British Columbia
1917
Rural and Assisted
Name of School,
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
a
"8
d
te
■d
o>
.5
«
X,
5
'o
d
te
3
i
"■3
a
OJ
E*
O
O)
0>
ft
a
.2
>
0
01
p
be
c
5
M
0
Oo
o>
ft
— bo
eO_P
0 CJ
O
GJ
0
'5
p
GJ
-P
<
Turtle Valley	
13
12
12
14
62
term.
53
23
20
20
term.
56
11
term.
11
term,
40
53
138
25
24
term.
41
10
24
term,
term.
term.
term.
term.
34
term.
19
26
24
36
10
n
12
14
57
50
23
15
15
56
11
10
30
49
134
24
15
27
9
22
32
16
25
18
36
n
1
2
1
7       7
4
W. F. Shaw	
No report for 1915-16
'e'
1
W. H. Stone 	
6
T. C.Campbell	
No report for 1915-16
i
6
2
2
1
"2
"5'
1
2
2
5
1
1
1
1
3
Waldo	
3
H. R. Fort	
2
Wapta..  .                        	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
6
24
4
3
W. H. Mclntyre	
6
25
..
4
W. F. Shaw	
J. E. II. Kelso 	
No report for 1915-16
6
1
"2
2
2
M. G. Archibald	
9
9
L. E. Borden	
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
term.
No report for 1915-16
term.
No report for 1915-16
No report for 1915-16
1
1
1
No appointment for 1915-16
No appointment for 1915-16
A. C. Nash	
F. W. Green	
No report for 1915-16
Wycliffe	
Yale	
P. S. McCaffrey	
5
3
6
2
"i"
2
1
1 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 51
Schools.—Concluded.
p
o
H
-P
P
H
GJ
GO
H
GJ
oS
CO
GO
GJ
o
5
6
7
5
36
5
17
8
2
15
6
1
9
3
26
7
CO
p
o3
3
-P
GO
bo
£
"p
GJ
'8
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
p'
GJ
P
U2
d
to
GJ
P.
s
o
bo
p
s
Acute Fevers
which have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
lentilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Good	
Closets.     State
if clean and
adequate.
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
10
30
Waxinears, 5; nasal catarrh, 2;
skin disease, 6
Good...
Yes.
10
Good	
Yes.
11
Good	
Yes.
6
6
Good	
3
2
"8
10
6
Good	
Good	
Unsatisfactory.
14
2
2
2
1
Yes.
Yes.
4
Good	
Measles (epidemic)..
Measles (several)....
Good....
Yes.
25
2
1
4
1
2
2
Unsatisfactory ...
Good	
Unsatisfactory.
Yes.
5
Satisfactorv	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
3
4
4
6
3
6
16
19
[tory.
3
Yes.
4
1
Yes.
6
"2
4
1
1
5
Cleft palate, 1 ; curved spine, 1
Influenza, 6; whooping-cough, 20
2
Yes.
6
Yes.
3
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Mitral    systolic    murmur,   a
sequel; chorea, 1
Inflammatory   rheumatism, 1
Yes. H 52
British Columbia
1917
REGISTRAR'S REPORT UNDER THE VITAL STATISTICS  ACT.
Victoeia, B.C., March 5th, 1017.
H. E. Young, Esq., M.D.,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith please And tabulated returns of Vital Statistics for the year 1916.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Yours obediently,
MUNROE MILLER,
Deputy Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages.
Following is the Forty-fourth Annual Report of Births, Deaths, and Marriages in this
Province for the year ending December 31st, 1916, in accordance with the " Vital Statistics
Act " :—
As a preliminary the following list of offices of District Registrars of Births, Deaths, and
Marriages is inserted, showing the manner in which they are grouped for the convenience of this
office, and full returns received from the various groups for 1916:—
Victoria Division—
Victoria City.
Cowichan.
Esquimalt.
Oak Bay.
Saanich.
New Westminster Division-
New Westminster City.
Burnaby.
Coquitlam.
Fraser Mills.
Ladner.
Langley.
Maple Ridge.
Mission.
Matsqui.
Port Coquitlam.
Port Moody.
Pitt Meadows.
Sumas.
Surrey.
Outside.
Chilliwack City.
Chilliwack Township.
Chilliwack, outside.
Nanaimo Mining Division—
Nanaimo Division.
Nanaimo, outside.
Alert Bay.
Gomox-Cumberland.
Comox, outside.
Nanaimo Mining Division-
Ladysmith.
Beaton Group—
Beaton.
Cranbrook.
Fernie.
Golden.
Kaslo.
Nakusp.
Nelson.
New Denver.
Revelstoke.
Rossland.
Slocan City.
Trail.
Trout Lake.
Wilmer.
Alberni Group—
Alberni.
Atlin.
Bella Coola.
Clayoquot.
Fort Fraser.
Hazelton.
Fort St. John.
Hudson Hope.
Pouce Coupe.
Porter's Landing.
Prince Rupert.
Quatsino.
Queen Charlotte.
-Concluded. 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 58
Alberni Group—Concluded.
Stewart.
Telegraph Creek.
Asheroft Group—
o4.shcroft.
Barkerville.
Fort George.
Tete Jaune Cache.
Clinton.
Lillooet.
Quesnel.
150-Mile House.
Tale.
Fairview Group—
Fairview.
Fairview Group—Concluded.
Greenwood.
Grand Forks.
Kamloops.
Nicola.
Princeton.
Vernon.
Vancouver Division—
Vancouver City.
South Vancouver.
Point Grey.
North Vancouver.
West Vancouver.
Unorganized.
Richmond.
Births.
Deaths.
Marriages.
Victoria	
1,516
647
3,866
1,094
196
1,086
329
1,107
654
233
1,506
453
77
443
127
394
516
119
1,454
311
Fairview	
54
299
94
322
9,841
3,887
3,169
It is thought that the difficult proposition of ascertaining the actual number of residents
in the Province, short of a census (and even that is unsatisfactory, if not unreliable), has been
overcome by basing calculation on the attendance of children at the public schools. The
proposition follows :—■
Whole school attendance of the Province, 64,570.
Vancouver school attendance   14,717 x 6% = population of   95,660
Victoria school attendance      5,617 x 6y2 = „ 36,510
South Vancouver school attendance     4,324 x 6% == „ 28,106
Total      24,65S x 6y2 = „ 160,276
Remainder of Province, school attendance 39,912 x o1/-?, — „ 219,516
64,570
Natural increase, births over deaths
379,792
3,5S8
383,380
The figures given show a shrinkage in the population of a little more than 12,000 from the
number assumed last year, which is easily accounted for when we take into consideration the
number of brave men who have gone to do battle for their country and the upholding of our
system of civilization, as opposed to one of centralization of all power, without check—a sure
foundation for tyranny and oppression.
Also at this time, as in all periods of depression, a great number of our Chinese population
(some thousands) have chosen the opportunity for a visit to their native land—not with a view
of remaining there, for each one has provided himself carefully with authority to return.
It will be noted that, in arriving at the population of Victoria, Vancouver, and South
Vancouver—the places of greatest population in the Province—it has been assumed that each
child of school age represents or stands for 6.5 of the population of those places, whilst for
the balance of the Province they are allowed but 5.5.    The reason given for the difference is H 51
British Columbia
1917
based on the fact that the places enumerated are seaports, as well as termini of various railway
and navigation lines, and, as such, have a greater floating population than all other portions of
the Province.
If the assumption is correct, and it is believed to be so, the population figured on school
attendance is 379,792, to which is to be added the natural increase of births over deaths, 3,58S,
giving a total of 383,380, which will be used as a basis for arriving at the rates per thousand in
the various tables.
This Department is under obligation to the military authorities for the compilation of the
population of the Province, which is herewith submitted; not that we agree with the figures so
much as to show that others are making diligent inquiries in this direction.
In the figures submitted by this Department the Indian population has not been recognized
because of lack of returns pertaining to the wards of the Federal Government.
Census Statistics, British Columbia.
(Compiled by Captain C Tweedale, D.I.O., M.D. No. 11, December 31st, 1916.)
Nationality.
French . ...
Russian ....
Italian	
Belgian	
Greeks	
Doukhobors.
Chinese .. .
Japanese ...
Hindu ....
Germans ...
Austrian . ..
Other aliens
Total
Repor
ing
to Police.
1,050
2,039
19,500
300
5,850
812
16,800
14,000
1,500
585
203
1,493
1.173
5,903
19
Interned.
382
320
18
Total number of aliens, including Hindus      69,832
Native Indian population         26,000
Balance of population as per Government statistics, 1916   (including
United States citizens)     285,739
Approximate total population of British Columbia at December
31st, 1916    381,571
The above statistics are compiled from information supplied by the various Consuls, societies,
corporations, large employers of labour, police, Government departmental records, and well-
informed individuals, and may be taken as fairly accurate.
Assuming that our estimate of population is correct, the following shows the rate per
thousand for the Province as well as specified places :—
Registrations— 1016. 1915.
Births       9,839       10,516
Deaths        3.8S7 3,832
Marriages        3,169 3,393
16,895
17,741
16,895
A decrease of          846
.Rate per thousand—
Province—
Births     9,839 = 25.68
Deaths      3,887 = 10.14
Marriages     3,160 =  8.27 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board op Health.
H 55
Rate per thousand—Concluded.
Vancouver—
Births   ;   2,383 = 28.07
Deaths      1,240 = 12.96
Marriages     1,353 —13.08
Victoria—
Births     1,106 = 30.29
Deaths    _      533 = 14.59
Marriages    '      420 = 12.59
South Vancouver—
Births        421 = 14.97
Deaths         112 =  3.94
Marriages   ,      110 =  3.91
Remainder of Province—
Births   !   5,626 = 25.63
Deaths      2,002 =  9.16
Marriages     1,387 =   6.31
Against births registered for the Province for 1916    9,839
we have deaths under one year       802
a percentage of 8.15.
In this statement the number of still-births plays uo part because they are counted both as
deaths and births, thus one offsets the other; still, it may not be out of place to point out that,
of the S02 deaths under one year of age, 202 were still-births, or 25.18 per cent, of the infantile
mortality; of which we find chargeable to the divisions of Vancouver, 137; to Victoria, 27; and
to New Westminster, 19; leaving a balance of 19 to be distributed among the remaining divisions
of the entire Province.
Following is a classified list of deaths occurring in British- Columbia for the years 1912
to 1916, inclusive :—
General diseases	
Diseases   of   nervous  system  and  organs  of
special sense	
Diseases of the circulatory system	
Diseases of the respiratory system	
Diseases of the digestive system	
Non-venereal   diseases of   the   genito-urmary
system and annexa    	
The puerperal state	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue	
Diseases of boues and organs of locomotion..
Malformations	
Diseases of early infancy	
Old age	
Affections produced by external causes	
Ill-defined—including executions	
Totals	
1912.
1913.
1914.
1915.
1916.
984
997
856
895
936
356
404
358
336
389
446
501
403
479
456
513
458
345
340
494
302
300
329
260
224
185
238
207
163
206
51
53
65
50
50
16
12
13
/
15
3
1
3
22
9
42
51
00
600
765
579
526
438
56
68
66
70
80
666
717
642
583
473
113
97
72
71
68
4,313
4,619
3,974
3,832
3,887
933
368
457
430
283
200
54
12
1
36
581
68
616
84
4,125
Re typhoid fever, there are twenty-four returns of deaths, six less than last year, located
as follows: Victoria, 5; Vancouver City, 3; New Westminster, 3; Kamloops, 2; Kaslo, 2;
Nicola, 2; Point Grey, 1; Nelson, 1; Cranbrook, 1; Ladysmith, 1; Vernon, 1; Princeton, 1;
and Grand Forks, 1.
There has not been one return received giving smallpox as cause of death.
Whooping-cough, 42 deaths, distributed as follows: Trail, 8; Rossland, 3; Revelstoke, 2;
New Westminster (outside), 2; Vancouver City, 5; South Vancouver, 3; Comox, 1; Nanaimo, 3;
North Vancouver City, 3; Victoria City, 1; Ladysmith, 1; Asheroft Group, 2; Vernon, 5; Kamloops, 2 ; and Grand Forks, 1. H 56
British Columbia
1917
Diphtheria and croup, S deaths, at the following places: Ladysmith, 1; Saanich, 1; .ilert
Bay, 2; Vancouver City, 2; Fernie, 1; and Golden, 1.
Influenza, 38 deaths, at the following places: Trail, 1; Chilliwack, 1; Vancouver City, 11;
Point Grey, 1; Nanaimo, 2; Victoria City, 11; Asheroft Group, 1; Vernon, 2; Nicola, 1;
Kamloops, 1 ; New Westminster City, 4; Telegraph Creek, 1; and Fort Fraser, 1.
Cancerous affections—
1
Alberni 	
Trail   3
Rossland    2
Revelstoke   3
Nelson  5
Kaslo     1
Golden    1
Fernie  5
Cranbrook   2
Burnaby  5
Chilliwack  8
New Westminster  (outside)... 8
New Westminster City    12
Vancouver City  86
Point Grey    2
South Vancouver  12
Richmond  1
North Vancouver City  2
Comox     3
Nanaimo   	
Saanich   	
Oak Bay  	
Esquimalt  	
Cowichan	
Victoria City ..
Ladysmith	
Asheroft Group
Vernon 	
Nicola 	
Kamloops	
Grand Forks ...
Greenwood   ....
Fairview  	
Prince Rupert  .
Hazelton   	
Atlin	
9
1
51
2
1
(i
1
5
2
1
5
1
Total      259
Cancer is steadily increasing. In 1914 there were 195 deaths; 1915, 221 deaths; 1916, 259
deaths; showing an increase of 26 for 1915 over 1914, 38 for 1916 over 1915, and 64 for 1916
over 1914—an average of 34 per annum. This, in the face of a diminishing population, might
be deemed worthy of consideration.
Tuberculosis, all forms-
Victoria City  	
Cowichan    	
Esquimalt  	
Qak Bay 	
Saanich   	
65
4
1
Vancouver City     143
South Vancouver  	
Point Grey  	
North Vancouver City ...
North Vancouver District
AVest Vancouver 	
Vancouver (outside)   ....
Richmond   	
159
New Westminster City  14
Chilliwack   3
Burnaby  4
Burnaby (outside)    13
34
Fort Fraser  	
■->
2
Prince Rupert 	
Fairview  	
       4
Greenwood   	
o
Kamloops   	
     32
Vernon  	
     11
Asheroft Group	
       4
       4
Nanaimo   	
        8
Alert Bay 	
       1
Comox   	
        1
Cranbrook 	
        4
Fernie   	
       4
Nelson   	
Revelstoke 	
'0
Slocan City	
     1
2
Trail  	
9
o
103
Total      367 7 Geo. 5 Provincial Board of Health:. H 57
As compared with 425 for 1915, a falling-off of 58, being 9.44 of all deaths and 0.96 per
thousand of population.
The receipts for the office amount to $1,204.50 for the year. This is a slight decrease from
last year and does not represent by any means the work done by the Department, as in the
matter of certificates of births, deaths, and marriages for " military purposes " it was determined by the Government that all such certificates should be issued free of charge.
These were necessary for the purpose of enlistment, and demanded by the Government for
the purpose of separation allowances, and also by the Patriotic Fund. Between 4,000 and 5,000
were issued.
Re marriage returns: Attention is called to a statistical table introduced for the first time,
wherein is set forth the places of birth of the contracting parties. This will be an interesting
table to watch, in this : In the birth registration form there has been inserted a column giving
the place of birth of father and mother of child. It has been asserted that a great portion of
the infantile mortality is attributable to ignorance on the part of the mothers. Let us watch
the tables and determine which nation and which class is best qualified to become mothers of
coming generations.
The work of the Vital Statistics Department has been wonderfully increased in many ways.
First, by the great number of certificates required for military purposes; in some cases registrations being taken and certificates issued for whole families, it having been assumed by the head
of the family that " the doctor attended to all such matters" ; by others, " that it was not
considered necessary."
Another source of labour is entailed through checking church registers re marriages. A new
form of church register has been issued, and from the great majority of the different religious
bodies their old books have been placed at the disposal of the Government for the purposes of
checking, and where a return has been overlooked a copy is supplied, which is taken as a delayed
registration, thus enabling this Department to supply at short notice what, up to the present, it
was unable to do. It is regrettable that in some cases our request for the use of old registers
has been held in abeyance, but the fact remains that the Government must have the books in
question either per favour or by legislative enactment.
Another source of additional work was occasioned by the amendment to the Act which
virtually created au Indian Department. Every Indian Agent in British Columbia has been
made a District Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, as well as a Registrar under the
" Marriage Act," in both cases for Indians only. AU necessary books, special forms printed, and
other accessories have been placed with the Agents and returns have begun to arrive. Were it
not that this report would be made too long the correspondence in connection with this matter
might well be introduced.
Yet, in justice to the staff (three), it is but fair to enumerate a portion of our work:
Letters answered, 3,852; notices received of marriage licences issued, 2,500; doctors' notices of
births received (Victoria Division only), 1,500; certificates of registrations of death issued, 611;
to which must be added regular indexing of returns, as well as the indexing of all returns from
1872, which latter may be considered as nearly half done.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
MUNROE MILLER,
Deputy Registrar, Births, Deaths, and Marriages. H 58
British Columbia
1917
BIRTHS, 1916.
Mining Division.
Ainsworth—
Kaslo	
Arrow Lake—
Nakusp	
Atlin—
Atlin 	
Asheroft—
Asheroft	
Alberni—
Alberni	
Bella Coola—
Bella Coola	
Cariboo—
Barkerville	
Fort George	
Tete Jaune Cache
Clayoquot—
Clayoquot	
Clinton—
Clinton	
Fort Steele—
Cranbrook 	
Fernie   	
Greenwood—
Greenwood	
Grand Forks—
Grand Forks	
Golden-
Golden	
Kamloops—
Kamloops	
Liard—
Porter's Landing	
Lardeau—
Beaton	
Lillooet—
Lillooet	
Nicola—
Nicola	
Nelson—*
Nelson	
New7 Westminster—
New Westminster	
Burnaby.  	
Chilliwack	
Outside	
Nanaimo—      »
Nanaimo	
Alert Bay	
Comox	
Ladysmith	
Osoyoos—
Fairview	
Omineca—
Hazelton	
Fort Fraser 	
Portland Canal—
Stewart	
Peace River-
Fort St. John	
Hudson Hope	
Pouce Coupe	
Quesnel—
Quesnel	
150-Mile House ...'...,
Quatsino—
Quatsino	
Queen Charlotte-
Queen Charlotte City
Revelstoke—
Revelstoke	
Similkameen—
Princeton	
Slocan—
New Denver	
Slocan City Division—
Slocan City	
Stikine—
Telegraph Creek	
Skeena —
Prince Rupert	
Carried forward ,
Registrations in 1916.
Male.
17
8
32
5
78
106
54
42
IS
15S
5
22
131
256
97
187
13
129
30
27
4
6
14
5
3
10
65
6
10
2
Sex not
given.
12
17
1
7
18
7
l>
17
S
3
12
73
137
43
39
23
168
3
3
33
104
1S2
113
88
148
168
13
76
31
31
Total
Registratioxs.
17
4
64
5
15
1
2
84
1,823
16
34
15
2
79
13
3
IS
151
243
97
81
41
326
9
8
55
235
438
210
143
303
365
26
205
61
81
9
7
12
129
11
25
181
3,761
29
47
16
4
82
36
4
16
139
397
81
98
41
369
250
143
431
350
27
183
71
Births in 1916.
1
2
9
13
16
6
25
126
23
29
9
1
198
Male.
4,147
9
7
1
6
14
7
31
4
86
44
32
15
120
177
61
61
112
137
12
99
20
79
1,475
12
12
1
39
7
3
S
50
112
30
31
20
129
1
24
S7
127
80
48
112
124
12
59
29
24
16
14
3
11
1
Sex not
given.
Total Births.
1916.
1915.
21
21
19
30
2
2
12
23
26
33
12
12
2
70
11
2
67
28
3
3
13
12
118
198
123
288
74
72
63
78
35
33
249
245
8
- 4
4
12
41
65
194
191
304
141
99
224
289
211
110
347
261
24
158
49
304
17
148
59
46
60
40
10
41
25
1
7
6
26
5
13
11
5
5
11
105
20
110
9
21
19
28
2
7
2
1
143
171
2,865
3,349 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 59
BIRTHS, 1916—Concluded.
Mining Division.
Brought forward....
Trail Creek—
Rossland    ...
Trail	
Trout Lake—
Trout Lake	
Vernon—
Vernon 	
Vancouver—
Vancouver City	
North Vancouver	
North Vancouver District
South Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Point Grey	
Unorganized	
Richmond	
Victoria—
Victorfa City	
Cowichan	
Esquimalt	
Oak Bay	
Saanich	
Windermere—
Wilmer	
Yale-
Yale 	
Totals	
Registrations in 1916.
Male.     Female.
48
47
2
222
1363
87
21
312
7
66
34
87
570
51
31
33
91
12
12
1,823
49
53
232
1322
79
19
267
9
73
52
67
533
50
31
20
103
Sex not
Total
Registrations.
1916.
97
100
166
40
579
16
139
86
154
1106
101
62
53
194
21
20
4,147
476
2791
154
62
723
23
154
72
155
1003
123
106
48
238
Births in 1916.
1,475
32
44
992
66
18
238
5
56
27
74
416
44
24
29
64
12
9
3,797       3,670
Female.
1,390
47
1
999
70
16
183
6
60
45
419
42
26
16
86
Sex not
given.
Total Births.
2,865
65
91
337
1992
136
34
421
11
116
72
131
836
86
50
45
150
21
14
3,349
35
86
363
2311
133
55
595
23
121
65
139
820
39
191
20
21
Hudson Hope—No returns received tor September, October, November, and December.
Porter's Landing—No returns received for October, November, and December.
Tete Jaune Cache—No returns received for November and December.
Trout Lake—Return for November, 1916, only.
Telegraph Creek—No return received for December. H 60
British Columbia
1917
DEATHS, 1916.
•c
o
■- a
-Oo
a
oo
Mining Division.
i%
P
f.
Jr
OS
oi
s
oS
oS
cS
S
C
rt
3
S
00
oo
ioo"
a
(3
Oi
>.
0>i
o
o
11.
OO
Oo
£
p=
OJ u
i-1
o
=
fi
oo
fc?
CO
IQ
o
o
(00
o
oo
o
iii
o
"0
o
OP
o
O
00
O
OO
•A
^
OJ
-Jl
O
O
H
m
Ainsworth—
Kaslo	
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
2
11
3
14
10
Arrow Lake—
Nakusp .-	
3
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
8
8
Atlin—
Atlin                       	
2
2
1
3
7
1
8
1
Asheroft—
1
2
1
2
1
1
6
2
8
9
Alberni—
2
4
1
1
3
1
7
5
12
18
Bella Coola—
Bella Coola	
1
1
9
3
1
4
9
Cariboo—
1
4
19
0
4
...    ..
1
9
2
4
2
15
6
21
3
1
2
4
11
2
Clayoquot—
Clinton—
1
1
1
9
1
3
9
Clinton	
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
9
1
10
8
Fort Steele-
Cranbrook '	
7
2
9.
3
7
h
4
7
1
2
3
29
14
43
42
33
1
2
3
1
7
9
14
7
5
3
1
1
60
27
87
81
7
Greenwood-
6
3
1
1
....
4
3
2
3
2
2
1
19
9
28
24
Grand Forks-
7
1
1
2
4
2
2
4
2
2
1
10
18
28
26
2
Golden—
Golden	
4
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
2
15
3
IS
26
Kamloops -
Kamloops	
20
9
7
4
4
19
27
22
17
IV
13
11
1
1
112
60
IV 2
165
Liard—
Lardeau—
2
1
2
1
3
2
Lillooet—
2
1
2
1
5
1
6
10
Nicola—
7
1
1
6
4
2
1
14
8
22
22
Nelson—
Nelson	
9
1
4
2
3
5
15
13
13
5
3
1
51
23
74
70
New Westminster—
25
2
9
1
4
10
27
27
40
27
29
17
1
129
83
212
225
(i
Burnaby 	
12
3
2
1
1
2
1
6
4
8
5
2
29
18
47
49
2
9
1
1
2
3
4
1
o
2
8
9
4
36
11
47
56
(2h
Coquitlam ^
^
Fraser Mills	
1 ■ ■
1
13
1 21
Langley	
i
Maple Ridge	
1 is
1   6
29
3
4
7
13
18
12
17
15
12
11
3
3
94
53
147
\ 10
ii
I' 2
1   7
Port Coquitlam j
Port Moodv	
1   8
Sumas	
1   8
I 27
Outside )
x 5
;
Nanaimo—
Nanaimo	
161      5
5
1
2
13
16
13
15
li
8
6
1
72
42
114
162
3
1
2
1
1
3
11
11
9
10
5
1
1
3
2
"?
9
3
12
4
20
1
9
9
6
5
3
2
1
2
62
13
22
11
84
24
66
21
Osoyoos—
5
1
1
4
5
4
4
4
3
21
10
31
21
Omineca—
3
1
I ..
II ..
3
4
3
2
2
3
3
1
1
1
1
17
5
4
4
21
9
12
7
Portland Canal-
1
1
1
1
Peace River—
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
4
11
Quesnel—
1
2
3
1
2
1
12
2
14
12
1
i
2
2
6
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
Carried forward	
234
40
34
24
41
111
165
172
157
150
116
68
6
23
888
453
1341
1383
30 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 61
DEATHS, 1916—Concluded.
73
3
s
Mining Division.
■~i
£ o
ra-oO
oo
£
3
oS
c*5
00
I
a
0J
CD
CO
eS
oi
OJ
>.
0*.
>>
>i
o>.
i^s
S*s
a
5
00
Co
CO
S bu
IN
ioo
o
o
CO
o
o
o
rtl
O
o
U0
o
OO
Ir
SB
O
O0
73
c
0
0
OJ
0
c
O
0O
234
ro
40
oo
34
+0
24
O
41
o
(00
111
O
OO
165
o
I*
172
o
uo
157
o
CD
150
0
116
O
00
68
g
6
il
23
s
888
00
453
OJ
0
H
1341
1383
CO
Brought forward	
30
Quatsino—
1
1
1
5
Queen Charlotte—
2
9
1
1
1
5
10
10
1
Revelstoke—
Revelstoke	
6
1
1
1
6
9
5
4
5
2
2
27
15
42
50
Similkameen-
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
13
3
16
13
Slocan—
1
3
3
3
7
3
10
8
Slocan City Division—
1
2
1
1
3
2
5
Stikine—
1
1
2
1
Skeena—
10
1
3
11
11
4
4
4
1
3
41
11
52
71
Trail Creek-
14
15
1
4
3
3
1
1
1
5
2
5
2
2
5
7
4
"2
3
1
2
1
i
25
23
20
17
46
40
27
21
4
Trail 	
Trout Lake-
Vernon—
Vernon   	
26
4
6
3
2
11
11
15
20
21
18
3
4
2
92
54
146
130
2
Vancouver—
288
16
56
1
29
1
20
1
36
90
144
6
168
4
129
2
131
4
105
1
35
6
2
749
20
490
16
1
1240
36
1127
[74
115
u
4
2
2
2
1
7
4
11
39
5
i
2
11
1
2
5
2
i
1
1
1
3
2
4
9
i
10
10
1
1
6
5
14
5
3
4
5
6
3
13
1
6
2
5
4
1
1
59
3
21
23
29
63
1
17
10
9
1
112
4
38
33
32
122
3
41
28
81
15
10
8
3
1
Victoria—
102
7
1
3
6
ii
l
13
2
51
2
2
58
2
4
65
6
3
74
2
4
57
5
3
51
10
4
43
1
3
3
6
322
24
21
211
. 12
5
533
36
26
464
38
29
•>.h
1
1
1
"i
3
2
5
4
I
5
4
6
1
5
4
1
i
12
27
V
13
19
40
23
63
13
1
Windermere—
1
3
1
b
b
6
Yale-
2
802
121
1
108
i
70
104
298
3
451
3
486
I
450
1
413
348
175
22
37
9
2450
3
1435
2
12
3887
14
3832
Totals 	
201 H 62
British Columbia
1917
MARRIAGES, 1916.
Mining Division.
a
.2
"3
ft,
o
o
ft
m
d
<y
>>
V
1
1
49
o
s
"o
O
a
OS
S
O
PS
1
P?
d
t
OJ
.g
^3
to
o
+3
no
CJO
OJ
l~
SOD
S
o
o
1
.2
03
n
S
0
c
OJ
O
OJ
0
CO
■S-2
a &
1
TO   «
•§•=
H
1
1
2
7
5
d
0
S3
CO
a
0
OJ
0
OO
cs
H
<
a
CO
-d
OJ
rj
+0
OJ
1
0
H
Ainsworth—
i
3
Arrow Lake—
2
Atlin—
Atlin              	
i
3
3
3
Asheroft—
3
1
1
1
15
Alberni—
9-
Bella Coola—
1
1
Cariboo—
1
3
1
3
1
2
3
1
2
24
26
11
20
4
32
9
1
4
Clayoquot—
1
2
Clinton—
5
11
1
2
2
12
6
5
3
5
2
12
3
5
2
4
5
1
3
15
6
3
11
Fort Steele-
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
43
65
Greenwood—
23
Grand Forks—
34
Golden —
Golden	
13
Kamloops—
5
2
79
Liard—
Lardeau—
Lillooet—
3
5
39
68
14
20
23
24
3
Nicola—
1
18
25
17
5
15
19
1
2
7
30
4
7
12
14
6
18
3
3
12
1
4
15
1
6
1
9
Nelson—
2
2
2
' i
1
3
2
5
79
New Westminster—
New Westminster	
1
167
37
2
2
1
1
2
"2
2
1
1
41
1
66
Nanaimo—
Nanaimo	
1
72
2
5
2
5
1
3
2
1
5
3
"2
9
11
9
6
5
20
Ladysmith	
Osoyoos—
2
2
1
1
26
18
Omineca—
2
2
10
8
Peace River—
1
1
1
1
6
3
2
9
Quesnel—
1
8
1
Quatsino—
1
3
Queen Charlotte—
1
5
1
Revelstoke—
1
3
1
5
1
11
1
1
3
1
1
1
IS
7
6
44
Similkameen—
Slocan—
10
11
Slocan City Division—
1
Stikine—
155
137
75
99
10
30
2
19
1
420
1
2
95 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 63
MARRIAGES, 1916—Concluded.
Mining Division.
"a
ft
C
co
'a
&
155
13
1
3
Ol
£
OJ
£
137
4
2
-5
o
■s
53
75
6
5
3
oj
"o
Q
a
OS
g
o
H
99
1
6
-too
ft
«
10
2
3
30
4
1
i3
O
oi
be
0J
oV>
O
a
2
co
0
o
a
0J
e
10.
o
JO
o
19
00
•g.2
a «s
S|
o a
si
is
a
"S
_c
o
Si
o
d
fc
1
s
c
col
CO
9
•d
CO
'E
oo
i-o
ro
ro
a
00
•a
«q
l
401
O
H
420
25
17
9
951
Skeena—
55
Trail Creek-
Trail 	
35
24
Trout Lake—
Vernon—
22
236
13
3
26
14
218
4
4
36
1
10
2
54
1
1
1
2
9
103
4
1
10
1
1
2
2
55
4
2
25
2
1
33
5
3
46
1
66
513
12
2
35
1
11
1
1
170
6
5
15
7
1
3
4
1
3
8
6
126
Vancouver—
1,252
40
10
3
110
3
3
1
1
102
4
16
13
10
2
2
626
3
1
1
30
4
1
14
Victoria-
36
17
4
9
5
6
3
420
11
2
2
3
1
2
' 1
1
26
33
3
26
Windermere—
2
Yale-
Yale .
4
1,319
6
Total	
496
263
198
48
78
12
89
5
10
9
8
8
3,169 H 64
British Columbia
1917
MARRIAGES CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO PLACE OF BIRTH OF BRIDEGROOM AND BRIDE.
Place of Birth.
Number of
Marriages.
Place of Birth.
Number of
Marriages.
Groom.
Bride.
Groom.
Bride.
Canada	
United States of America
Scotland	
234
48
77
12
27
7
2
2
2
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
England	
United States of America
Wales	
Ireland	
France 	
162
162
72
5
18
3
2
4
2
1    -
1
4
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
446
-       	
Germany	
"   :;;:::::::;;;;;■
u
„   	
"  	
Italy	
Norway	
Sweden 	
South Africa	
Belgium	
Switzerland	
British Guiana	
Bermuda	
"	
"  	
West Indies	
Straits Settlements	
Falkland Islands	
South Africa	
New South Wales	
Total	
428
Scotland	
United States of America
Canada 	
Wales	
66
14
81
2
7
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
184
Ireland    	
England	
22
12
1
19
6
2
1
1
I
2
1
1
;:
Canada	
United States of America
Total	
India	
Russia	
Germanv	
Norway	
France	
Straits Settlements .....
	
Chili	
	
■
■
71
Wales	
Scotland	
16
3
2
9
1
31
United States of America
Total	
Mexico	
Sweden	
Italy	
2
1
2
1
6
16
2
2
4
1
2
1
1
1
167
52
Ireland	
Scotland	
Norway	
France 	
Austria	
New Zealand	
India	
Canada	
England	
261
Australia	
New Zealand	
Scotland	
United States of America
1
1
1
6
3
4
1
1
18
Italy	
France 	
Hungary	
Canada	
England 	
United States of America
2
1
1
1
15
3
1
24
	
Total
Total	
1 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 65
Marriages Classified according to Place of Birth of Bridegroom and Bride.-
Concluded.
Place of Birth.
Number of
Marriages.
Place oi
Birth.
Groom.
Bride.
Groom.
Bride.
Marriages.
Norway	
1
2
5
1
2
6
1
1
8
3
United States of America
7
United States of America
Total	
8
q
22
25
Italy	
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
3
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
i
i
i
2
1
2
1
1
1
4
61
Ireland	
France 	
United States of America
Australia	
England	
Scotland	
Italy	
Sweden 	
(Janada	
Barbadoes	
United States of America
1
1
United States of America
1
1
New- South Wales	
1
1
1
1
1
.
1
9
1
Roumania	
Hungary	
England	
Canada	
England	
United States of America
England	
1
1
1
«     	
United States of America
2
1
Scotland	
2
1
Sicily	
1
United States of America
Italy	
1
Canada	
Wales	
Norway	
England	
United States of America
England	
Canada	
Holland	
England	
Canada   	
England	
Not given	
1
1
United States of America
Scotland	
United States of America
United States of America
Switzerland	
West Indies	
1
1
1
1
1
Total	
61
Bridegroom and Bride
aorn in same Country.
Number of
Marriages.
Bridegroom and Bride
)orn in same Country.
Number of
Marriages.
2
14
3
635
2
1
409
11
2
1
2
1
6
1
Brought forward
Austria	
Belgium	
Canada	
Italy	
26
7
Holland	
United States of America
Total.  	
217
1,090
1,557
Note.—Total number of marriages 3,169. H 66
British Columbia
1917
PRELIMINARY TABLES,   SHOWING TOTALS  OF  DEATHS  FOR  DIVISIONS.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
April.
42
1
i
5
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Totals.
Victoria Division.
66
2
3
1
5
36
3
2
2
5
50
1
6
2
6
57
3
2
2
4
56
5
1
37
5
4
2
3
33
2
4
1
4
42
2
1
2
2
49
46
5
4
2
41
6
2
1
2
27
1
1
1
2
533
36
26
19
40
Totals	
77
48
65
49
68
62
51
44
57
62
32
654
Nanaimo Division.
14
2
8
3
13
10
2
4
2
8
ii
6
io
1
5
2
12
2
8
5
2
7
'e
2
9
3
6
1
8
2
5
2
15
2
5
11
8
4
114
11
84
24
Totals 	
27
20
18
19
17
21
15
15
19
17
22
23
233
Vancouver Division.
152
5
8
5
'•2
1
145
14
7
2
1
i
95
17
2
1
3
118
94
13
2
6
2
2
2
109
12
2
3
5
1
2
4
91
6
4
3
1
1
2
1
92
5
1
1
i
3
102
5
6
2
i
5
91
6
5
6
2
94
4
2
6
3
5
72
12
3
1
io
4
103
13
2
2
i
1
5
1,240
112
38
36
11
4
33
32
Totals 	
173
170
23
4
6
11
121
138
109
103
121
110
114
15
6
4
7
102
127
1,506
New Westminster Division.
34
4
2
15
13
3
4
19
14
8
5
11
22
5
1
15
43
8
5
5
12
11
1
1
11
17
3
3
15
19
5
6
9
22
4
12
14
3
6
10
212
47
47
New Westminster (outside)	
147
Totals	
55
44
39
38
30
24
38
39
32
38
33
453
Asheroft Group.
i
3
i
5
2
i
i
i
i
2
3
i
1
5
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
4
3
3
1
3
2
2
2
2
2
3
1
i
"2
i
1
2
i
i
9
5
3
15
7
2
10
3
'3
i
1
2
8
21
4
10
6
14
150-Mile House	
2
Yale	
12
8
7
10
10
4
7
7
3
77
Fairvietv Group.
i
19
1
1
9
32
3
4
1
22
2
10
42
i
4
21
2
2
22
2
5
1
11
2
2
9
3
3
4
13
1
1
14
1
2
2
10
3
13
4
2
10
5
ii
7
2
i3
4
1
12
i
2
20
io
6
3
4
8
1
8
4
3
10
i
18
31
28
28
172
22
16
146
Totals	
55
32
39
31
32
39
33
42
30
30
443
Alberni Group.
1
'a
i
1
1
i
1
'8
i
i
i
1
i
4
3
i
2
'i
i
2
6
12
1
1
1
1
2
3
i
1
3
2
3
5
2
1
i
i
6
i
1
2
i
2
'5
5
i
3
1
'2
'i
i
i
1
2
3
1
1
1
i
6
1
2
'5
12
Atlin 	
8
4
3
9
21
4
52
1
10
1
2
4
14
11
9
17
10
17
8
8
9
8
127 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 67
Prelijiinaby Tables, Showing Totals of Deaths foe Divisions—Concluded.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
April.
4
4
1
i
2
1
2
2
2
2
May.
June.
1
6
7
6
1
5
1
4
5
1
July.
Aug-.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Totals.
Beaton Group.
11
9
2
1
8
3
7
1
4
'tis
1
4
7
'3
4
2
1
9
i
1
7'
1
5
4
3
i
1
7
9
1
2
8
4
6
4
4
2
2
1
10
1
4
1
'2
'6
1
1
1
6
i
3
4
2
25
10
1
i
3
4
4
1
6
37
302
2
6
1
2
5
3
5
1
3
2S
307
4
8
1
6
1
4
6
1
4
2
2
1
2
2
'7
2
1
4
5
3
43
87
18
Kaslo	
14
S
74
10
42
45
5
Trail	
40
5
Totals	
46
43
33
21
35
36
27
37
26
394
419
389
344
294
356
316
272
303
297
288
3,887 II 68
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
fc
_o
sS
CO
cs
CO
O
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
1 to 2 years.
2 to 5 years.
5 to 10 years.
10 to 20 years.
1
Victoria Division—Victoria City.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
8
1
10
14
1
20
27
28
2
1
1
2
29
30
30a
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
30b
30c
31
34
1
39
39A
39b
390
40
41
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum, intestines,
42
43
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
46
47
50
1
I
54a
55a
1
60
II.-DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
1
1
63a
1
66
71
2
5
1
77
III.-DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
77a
78
1
1
T
784
78b
79
80
81
1
81B
82
85
1
1
87
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
89
i
90
91
2
1
2
3
i
1
92
92A
92b
93
94
96 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 69
DEATH, 1916.
00
eo:
CO
>>
O
CO
O
O
CO
s-
cO
OJ
C
m
O
O
r
cO
0
3
O
0-
OJ
0
00
0
0
0,
coo
OJ
D
>
O
=5
03
ce
0.
cO
101
0-.
O
CC
O
O
Or
CD
O
Ci
O
s
90 and upwards.
>
'So
0
OJ
to
<
Total by Sexes.
CO
OJ
'bio
O
00
X
CJ
W
X.
oi
O
a
"rt
0
H
M.
F.
3
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
1
1
8
2
3
1
32
2
2
4
1
1
4
1
1
F.
4
...„.
1
3
M.
F.
5
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
11
1
3
3
2
1
6
1
3
10
6
6
1
3
1
2
12
44
2
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
12
2
5
2
3
1
2
7
1
1
i
1
5
17
2
1
1
1
2
1
"i'
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
7
5
2
9
7
I
5
2
1
1
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
24
1
2
1
3
1
1
9
i
18
3
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
4
4
2
6
1
4
3
1
13
37
1
6
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
5
3
2
1
1
1
3
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
4
2
2
1
2
i
1
2
2
2
5
3
2
1
"i'
1
23
1
1
6
8
1
"j"
1
2
2
1
4
3
1
1
4
1
6
19
2
1
3
4
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
5
1
2
2
2
"i'
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
5
18
6
2
1
1
3
1
4
1
3
2
11
2
2
1
3
37
2
1
2'
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
2
i
1 H 70
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
fc
o
o
cc
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
o
a
o
BD
5
S3
in
c
tn
©
O
10 to 20 years.
102
Victoria Division—Victoria City.—Continued.
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
M.
1
F.
M.
F,
M.
F.
M.
F.
It.
F.
103a
104
1
108
1
1
109
113
114
117
117b
117c
118
Other diseases of the digestive system (cancer and tuberculosis excepted)
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-UIj&INARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
1
119
1
119a
120
120a
122
124
126
135
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
135a
137
137b
142
VIII.— DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND OF THE CELLULAR TISSUE.
150
X. —MALFORMATIONS.
9
1
3
1
XI.—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
151a
4
1
3
3
1
1
14
13
153a
Stillborn	
11
14
154
XII.—OLD AGE.
155
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
157
159
160
167
1
169
172
174
175
1
179
186a 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 71
DEATH, 1016—Continued,
20 to 30 years.
cO
OJ
o
o
o
09
cO
CO
O
IfO
O
+o
O
-ri
ed
OJ
O
CO
O
o
LOO
5
o
It
o
o
OO
oo
ce
00
o
00
O
o
Or
80 to 90 years.
■p
P.
Col
o
CO
'Ec
o
00
QJ
<
Total by Sexes.
R
O
>
%
o
a
x
0J
A
oo
cd
co
Q
"a
40
O
H
11.
F.
M.
F.
III.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
2
1
3
5
F.
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
2
1
1
1
5
3
3
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
3
2
1
1
i
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
5
9
4
1
1
i
2
1
i
2
2
1
7
2
2
1
1
1
12
2
1
l
1
2
2
3
1
1
2
1
l
l
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
12
9
i
1
4
1
3
3
1
1
14
13
8
5
7
4
1
1
11
14
9
1
1
1
25
27
1
1
3
8
3
1
17
1
1
i
l
2
1
6
1
l
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
i
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
l
1
3
i
1 H 72
British Columbia
i9n
CAUSES OF
6
fc
c
o
ci
CO
en
CO
UO"
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
1 to 2 years.
cO
OJ
>i
O
©
o
10 to 20 years.
187
Victoria Division—Victoria City.—Concluded.
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
o\t.
F.
M.
F.
189
52
50
1
2
3
3
5
6
8
5
28
Victoria Division—Cowichan.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
40
48
64
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
71
2
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
79
81
85
91
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
92
92a
119
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA.
120a
151
XI.—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
1
1
153a
153b
-   1
154
XII.—OLD AGE.
158
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL  CAUSES.
185
186a
4
3
1
28
Victoria Division.—Esquimalt.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
40
41
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum,  intestines,
61A
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
64
76a 7 Geo. o
Provincial Board of Health.
H 73
DEATH, 1916—Continued,
20 to 30 years.
30 to 40 years.
3
>.
o
o
O
O
50 to 60 years.
60 to 70 years.
70 to 80 years.
3
0J
O
COO
o
I
00*
V
s
p.
S
ci
o
CO
'3j
+o
O
Co
fcc
<
v.
olQ
O
c
OJ
'So
o
•A
Total Deaths.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
4
F.
iM.
I
F.
M.
2
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
8
1
322
F.
1
9
1
1
22
36
22
31
24
59
15
34
23
34
17
26
3
29
17
1
2
3
211
533
1
1
1
2
1
2
4
1
1
1
i
l
1
1
2
2
2
4
2
1
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
2
l
5
1
1
1
1
•      1
1
1
l
i
9
1
1
i
i
■l
1
1
1
1
1
l
i
l
l
i"
1
l
2
1
1
/
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
2
4
1
6
4
1
24
1
12
36 H 74
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
fc
a
o
"et
O
S
cS
s
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
1 to 2 years.
a
IO
©
OJ
5 to 10 years.
10 to 20 years.
77a
Victoria Division—Esquimalt.—Concluded.
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
78
78a
91
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
92
93
1
97a
108
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
142
VIII.—DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND OF THE CELLULAR TISSUE.
151b
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
169
XIII.— AFFECTIONS PRODUCED  BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
175
189
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
^
1
1
1
39b
Victoria Division—Oak Bay.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
43
46
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
56
66
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
78
HI.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTE.M.
79
1
81
115a
V.-DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
119
VI. -NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA.
137a
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
154
XII.-OLD AGE. 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 75
DEATH, 1916— Continued.
a
a
o
CO
o
©
CM
cl
©
'J'
O
o
CO
40 to 50 years.
GJ
9
©
o
cO
OJ
>,
o
l>
O
O
CO
70 to 80 years.
80 to 90 years.
V
cO
0=
TJ
CO
O
Co
oo'
OJ
>
bio
o
OJ
i*
<
Total by Sexes.
01
'bio
o
c
Total Deaths.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
2
1
1
2
2
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
4
4
1
2
3
1
2
1
2
21
5
26
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
9
1
1
1
I H 76
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
	
6
fc
ti
o
eS
OJ
CC
CO
3
»
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
CM
O
o
5 to 10 years.
10 to 20 years.
159
Victoria Division—Oak Bay.—Concluded.
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1S9
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
	
1
7
Victoria Division—Saanich.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
1
9
28
40
44
50
64
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
66
79
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
80
89
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
2
1
91
1
96
103a
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
120
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEX A.
150
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
1
1
2
1
153a
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
Stillborn	
153b
2
154
XII.—OLD AGE.
159
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
169
170
175
187a
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
10
3
1 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 77
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
F.
1
12
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
2
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
4
1
1
*
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
3
2
3
2
3
2
1
1
27
13
40 H 78
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
te
a
.2
o
£
a
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
1 to 2 years.
oo
oo
O
ON
5 to 10 years.
10 to 20 years.
l
New Westminster Division—New Westminster City.
I.— GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
20
1
28
1
30
1
1
41
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum, intestines,
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
,50
55A
56
(32
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
1
71
1
7G
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
1
|
1
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
1
1
1
2
V.-DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
1
1
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA.
120a
126
139
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE. 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 79
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
CO
eo
o
-r
o
o
OO
cO
o
co
O
o
^01
s
o
ooo
O
3
ci
at
o
o
o
ooo
cO
Co
O
GO
O
O
OJ
c
Co
O
s
CO
S
Oi
ti
cO
o
COO
3
%
o
CO
cf.
Total by Sexes.
ti
CO
'So
"o
oo
OJ
w
J
eo
s
'rt
o
Sri
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
M.
F.
1
M.
1
1
1
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
7
1
1
1
F.
1
3
2
i
3
1
4
2
2
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
12
2
1
1
1
1
l
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
l
i
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
5
1
1
1
1-
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
7
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
2
3
10
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
3
6
2
13
]
1
12
2
1
i'
5
1
3
1
6
2
1
1
4
1
16
29
1
1
1
2
i
9
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
10
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
"i'
....
1
5
1
1
4
9
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
2
5
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
2
5
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 H 80
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
a
o
oo>
COCO
cK
cO
3
cause of death.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Co
1 to 2 years.
2 to 5 years.
5 to 10 years.
10 to 20 years.
142
New Westminster Division—New Westminster Citv.—Concluded.
VIII—DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND OF THE CELLULAR TISSUE.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
140
IX.—DISEASES OF THE BONES AND ORGANS OF LOCOMOTION.
1
150
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
2
161a
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
2
1
6
2
151b
1
153a
Stillborn	
153b
2
164
XII.-OLD AGE.
166
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
167
169
172
1
175
175A
186
187
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
189
2
189a
13
12
2
2
1
3
1
28
30
34
40
41
-16
50A
54A
61
03a
64
66
67
68
78
79
81a
New Westminster Divisionv-Nkw Westminster (outside).
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
Whooping cough        	
Tuberculosis of the lungs..	
Tuberculosis meningitis	
Tuberculosis of other organs	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum, intestines,
rectum	
Other tumours (tumours of the female genital organs excepted)	
Diabetes mellitus	
Ansemia, pernicious	
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF SPECIAL
SENSE.
Simple meningitis	
Acute poliomyelitis	
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy..
Paralysis without specified cause.
General paralysis of the insane...
Other forms of mental alienation .
Epilepsy..	
Convulsions of infants	
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
Myoearditis	
Acute endocarditis	
Organic diseases of the heart,
Mitral regurgitation	 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 81
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
a)
S
©
CO
o
-u
o
55
cO
V
o
m
o
o
CO
CO
cO
35
o
ICO
q
o
co
OJ
O
CO
O
o
ICO
ed
00
O
I0r
O
O
CD
5
CO
0
00
0
0
80 to 90 years.
-OOFS
TO-
a
eg
O
CO
Age not given.
oi
00
OJ
oO
>l
*c0
O
B
*
'Si
0
ti
00
OJ
1
aj
0
ro
O
E-i
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
3
1
F.
3
1
2
2
,
2
1
6
2
2
1
2
1
2
6
	
2
3
4
1
2
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
mn:
6
1
1
13
1
14
13
14  1 25
15
21
6
19
10
10
7
9
1
129
83
212
2
3
1
2
1
2
1
4
1
1
7
10
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
2
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
i
"2
1
1
2
2
1
3
4
I
1
1
1
2
3
1
2
8
1
2
2
2
4
2
3
4
8
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
5
1
3
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
9
1
2
3
2
3
1
1
4 H 82                                                British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
te
a
o
a
5
1
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
cs
rl
00
ti
P
1 to 2 years.
eS
OJ
in
O
too
cO
o
o
100
10 to 20 years.
89
New Westminster Division—New Westminster (Outside).—Concluded.
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
M.
F.
1
1
2
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
91
1
1
2
92
92A
114
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
119
VI.—NON-VENEREAL  DISEASES   OF   GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA.
119a
1
137
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
1
1
1
2
4
2
1
1
3
XII.—OLD AGE.
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED  BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
1
1
1
1
175
1
189
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED  DISEASES.
1
15
14
1
2
1
3
4
3
New Westminster Division—Burnabv.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
43
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
1
66
71
3 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 83
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
no
'&j
o
00
K
OJ
20 to 30 years.
30 to 40 years.
eo
O
ICO
O
oo
O
50 to 60 years.
cO
p
o
o
o
coo
CO
cl
00
o
c/J
o
O
80 to 90 years.
V
3
2.
eS
O
COO
Age not given.
CO
X
CO
CK
J?
OJ
O
H
Total Deaths.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
4
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
"i'
1
4
5
8
1
7
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
4
.
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
4
2
1
2
1
4
1
9
2
1
5
3
3
1
3
4
2
3
4
2
3
1
6
1
1
2
6
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
6
1
3
2
11
5
14
4
1
11
6
5
11
1
6
8
10
5
3
2
1
94
53
147
1
1
1
i
i
2
3
l
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
l
l
i
3
1
1
i
l
l
l
i
3
3
3 H 84                                                  British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
te
c
.2
1
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
cs
h.
0J
■a
D
|
CM
O
cO
V
io
o
CM
5 to 10 years.
10 to 20 years.
77a
New Westminster Division—Burnaby.—Concluded.
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
79
,,
81
•
89
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
91
92
92A
97a
1
1
1
104
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
2
1
119
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEX A.
150
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
1
152A
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
153a
153b
Stillborn           	
2
1
154
XII.-OLD AGE.
167
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
1
169
7
5
3
....
2
1
1
10
New Westminster Division—Chilliwack.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
28
40
43
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
64
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
71
1
1
79
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
80
91
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
1
1
92
1
104
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
1
1
1
109
1
113
• 7 Geo
. 5
Provincial Board
of Health.
H 85
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
C
3
P
©
-31
o
©
CO
*
©
m
o
©
50 to 60 years.
Clj
eeC-
p
O
O
O
CD
70 to 80 years.
0-
oi
0J
>)
O
COO
O
O
00
90 and upwards.
p
■a
o
ti
CO
be
<
THal by Sexes.
c
OJ
>
'&:
o
00
10)
oO
CO
a
'ej
O
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
1
M.
1
1
F.
i
M.
2
2
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
3
3
1
F.
2
5
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
4
a
2
5
3
5
1
1
1
29
18
47
1
1
2
4
1
3
6
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
1
2
2
2
i
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
l
2
I
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
- H 86
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
fc
g
'-3
s
«
'1
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
c0
p
CM
O
+o
3
ico
O
OO
CO
CO
o
o
ICO
c3
©
CO
o
-U
o
119
New Westminster Division—Chilliwack.—Concluded.
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
120
120a
151
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
151B
1
153b
1
154
XII.—OLD AGE.
166
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
1
1
169
170
171A
186
4
5
1
1
1
1
3
8
Nanaimo Division.—Nanaimo City.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
3
10
20
28
1
31
1
40
41
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum, intestines,
44
50
50A
64A
66
62
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
64
71
1
1
1
76
1
77a
HI.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
78
1
79
80
81
89
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
3
1
"i"
1
1
1
1
91
92
92a
94
97a '
98
102
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
104
1
109
1
113
114 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 87
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
cS
p
OOO
-co
o
I
oo
a
p
o
o
o
CO
CCO
p
U
O
rJ
3
eg
f*o
O
CD
O
o
no
60 to 70 years.
cO
p
o
00
o
o
80 to 90 years.
■03
CO
Q,"
t)
ti
CO
O
CJ
c
'So
o
CO
00
loo
<
Total by Sexes.
a
00
'So
o
R
OJ
W
£
(5
o
M.
F.
M.
F.
Al.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
3
F.
1
1
2
1
3
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
7
1
7
2
4
	
 '-
11
3
36
47
3
1
3
i
1
1
1
5
1
4
1
1
I
2
1
1
2
2
2
i
2
1
7
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
1
5
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1      	
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
l
l
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
2
2
1
1
3
3
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
3
1
1
i
i
2
1
3
3
3
4
4
1
1
l
6
3
3
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 H 88
British Columbia
1911
CAUSES OF
d
fc
CO
o
<j3
CJ
IB
co
CO
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
p
1 to 2 years.
cO
p
o
OO
ci
p
O
o
io
10 to 20 years.
120a
Nanaimo Division—Nanaimo City.—Concluded.
VI.—NON-VENEREAL  DISEASES  OF  GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANN EX A.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
122
131
135
VII.— THE PUERPERAL STATE.
137
138
151
XI.-DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY'.
1
1
3
1
152a
154
XII.—OLD AGE.
157
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED  BY' EXTERNAL CAUSES.
167
169
1
170
171a
173
176
186
189
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
3
13
2
3
1
4
1
2
9
Nanaimo Division—Alert Bay.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
2
1
34
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
169
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY' EXTERNAL CAUSES.
169a
186
189
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
3
....
8
Nanaimo Division—Comox.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
20
28
40a
42
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
52
J
/
/ 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 89
DEATH, 1=316—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
30 to 40 years.
40 to 50 years.
cl
O
CD
O
O
60 to 70 years.
cO
p
o
00
o
o
10-
ed
O
Co
o
■o
00
90 and upwards.
p
'So
o
a
00
bo
Total by Sexes.
6
'So
o
s
X
0J
ce
oi
0J
P
"eo
O
H
M.
1
F.
iM.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
1
F.
1
M.
F.
1
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
3
1
F.
2
1
1
2
1
3
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
6
1
1
3
1
1
0
2
9
2
1
2
1
9
3
1
1
1
2
8
6
1
1
3
1
12
4
3
5
10
5
10
3
8
4
2
10
1
72
42
114
2
1
1
2
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
11
11
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 H 90
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
fc
e
_o
gi
00
9
"co
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
CO
p
Ol
O
40
rH
2 to 5 years.
5 to 10 years.
3
CJ
c=
oo
o
61
Nanaimo Division— Comox.—Concluded.
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
M.
F.
1
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
64
1
71
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
79
81
81A
91
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
1
1
92
1
92a
96
97a
108
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
113
HS
Other diseases of the digestive system (cancer and tuberculosis excepted)
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
1
119
1
120a
126
140
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
151
XI—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
1
151a
151b
1
1
153b
158
XIII—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
167
1
1
169
1
1
169a
170
171a
172
173
173A
175
189
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
1
5
5
3
2
1
3
9
28
30a
39b
46
51
Nanaimo Division—Ladysmith.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
Typhoid fever	
Whooping cough.. 	
Diphtheria and croup	
Tuberculosis of the lungs	
Tubercular peritonitis 	
Cancer of ossophagus !	
Other tumours (tumours of the female genital organs excepted).
Exophthalmic goitre	 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 91
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
3
P
o
CO
o
©
a
P
©
o
©
es
OJ
>o
O
iO
o
o
el
CO
>.
CO
CD
O
oo
O
CO
p
o
Or
O
oo
O
70 to 80 years.
cO
p
§
p
Q
00
e3
is
Pr
ti
-03
S
ed
O
'So
o
ti
00
UO
<
CO
O
p
'So
o
X
CO
00
000
c3
CO
C
o
H
<N
CO
ICO
CO
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
2
1
4
2
F.
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
1
1
3
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
7
1
5
1
6
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
4
1
2
5
7
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
5
1
4
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
15
5
2
8
1
1
6
5
3
1
3
2
2
ft
11
2
62
22
84
1         1      1
      1      1
      1      1
..11            2 1        3
       1      1        1
       1             1        1
       1             1        1
       1      1        1 H 92
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
fc
_o
CO
CO
cti
"co
cc
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
OJ
00
o
ro
Cj
o
Ol
5 to 10 years.
E
e3
P
i.
o
O
78A
Nanaimo Division—Ladysmith.—Concluded.
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
79
91
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
1
92
1
131
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
1
137
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
137a
151
VIII.— DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
2
153b
154
XII.—OLD AGE.
•
189
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
5
1
1
1
1
1
92
Beaton.
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY' SYSTEM.
Pneumonia	
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Hernias, intestinal obstructions	
XI.—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
Non-assimilation of food	
1
Cranbrook.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
28
40
43
50
1
54a
61
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
64
68
70
71
1
76 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 9?
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
a
V
©
o
©
OI
5
P
©
o
©
CO
©
IS
o
©
a*
8
o
o
ico
CD
C-
O
o
00
70 to 80 years.
a
©
©
o
i
V
r*
ft
P
-a ,
d
<B
%
o
a
fccD
<!
OJ
o
H
c
OJ
>
■a
o
c
OJ
0=
dl
Q
o
P
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
P.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
I
1
9
1
1
2
1
9
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
——
13
11
24
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
l
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
1 H 94
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
fc
c
o
oo
CO
cti
£
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
OJ
|
1 to 2 years.
P
o
P
©
o
■+3
10 to 20 years.
78
Cranbrook.—Concluded.
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
79
81
108
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
113
117
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
1
119
137
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
137b
142
VIII.—DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND OF THE CELLULAR TISSUE.
151
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
1
1
1
151A
151b
153b
2
V
154
XIL—OLD AGE.
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
175
186
1
5
2
2
1
9
Fernie.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
1
20
1
28
30
2
35
41
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum, intestines,
43
50
56
64
11.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
71
1
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
78
78a
79
1
89
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
91
1
3
92
3
1
92a
1
97a 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 95
DEATH, 1916—Continued,
cO
p
o
CO
O
OJ
O
OO
30 to 40 years.
p
O
ICO
O
O
rtl
cO
p
o
CD
O
o
CO
p
O
c
o
CD
5
o
CO
O
O
eo
O
CO
o
+o
o
CO
90 and upwards.
Age not given.
Total by Sexes.
c
p
'Sid
o
ti
y.
OJ
CC
I
OJ
A
o
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
1
2
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
4
2
1
1
F.
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
9
9
3
3
1
6
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
29
14
43
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
5
1
1
1
4
2
9
9
1
1
1 H 96
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
fc
§
O
a
1
o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
eO
00
13
CO
p
3
p
oo
o
2 to 5 years.
5 to 10 years.
10 to 20 years.
103a
3   Fernie.—Concluded.
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
103b
1
104
1
109
1
119
VI.—NON-VENEREAL diseases of genito-urinary
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
120A
132
134b
VII.— THE PUERPERAL STATE.
137b
140
150
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
1
1
1
151
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
2
1
1
1
2
2
151b
152
152b
153a
Stillborn ".	
5
153b
155
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY  EXTERNAL CAUSES.
160
167
1
1
169
171a
173
175
186
189
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
19
14
1
~
~
2
3
1
CT.
9
Golden.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
39B
78
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
1
92
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
109
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
118
Other diseases of the digestive system (cancer and tuberculosis excepted)
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA.
120a 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 97
DEATH, 1916— Continued,
20 to 30 years.
3
p
*i
o
cc
ed
p
O
io
o
o
cO
00
0^
o
CD
o
o
60 to 70 years.
p
o
GO
o
o
ir
80 to 90 years.
V
eO
ti.
ti
OO
3
o
COO
Age not given.
ao
OJ
oc
CO
VJ
,o
-rf
o
H
ti
'So
o
ti
y.
VI
d
"it
OJ
a
o
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
11
2
1
1
3
2
1
1
5
7
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
5
2
1
11
2
1
1
1
9
1
6
3
5
7
3
2
3
1
6
1
60
27
S7
1
1
1
■
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 H 98
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
te
c
.2
S
CB
CS
Q
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
P
OJ
c
D
*
o
to
to
o
O-l
©
o
5
OJ
©
tM
O
©
151
Golden.—Concluded.
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
M.
1
1
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
151A
169
XIIL-AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
1
173
175
186
187
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
1
3
189
2
2
1
1
1
Kaslo.
L—GENERAL DISEASES.
6
40
64
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
66
69
91
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
1
142
VIII.—DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND OF THE CELLULAR TISSUE.
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
162
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
2
1
71
165
169A
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
Convulsions of infants	
IV.— DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
Pneumonia	
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA.
Bright's disease	
XI. -DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
Congenital debility icterus, and sclerema 	
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
Other acute poisonings ,	
Traumatism in logging camp, sawmill, etc. 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 99
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
CO
cl
0*.
o
CO
o
ro
O
OO
p
o
o
OJJ
o
CO
COCO
O
IO
o
o
p
o
CD
O
o
c3
CO
0*.
o
t~
o
oo
O
CD
70 to 80 years.
80 to 90 years.
CIO
to
d
5=
g.
IS
c3
©
CO
d
00
>
'So
o
OJ
bo
<!
oo
■A
OJ
OQ
i?
O
EH
H
OJ
'So
o
fl
0J
Or
j:
oo,
cS
OJ
B
'cO
ro
O
B
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
F.
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
15
3
18
1
1
2
2
i
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
j
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9.
1
1
1
3
1
2
11
3
14
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
8 H 100
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
te
a
3
eg
o
S
|
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, PariSj 1909.)
u
V
>>
c
a
o>
>>
CM
o
p
O
BS
P
©
o
10 to 20 years.
1
Nelson.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
28
28a
30
1
40
43
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
46
50
1
53
54A
64
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
1
1
71
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
78a
79
81
81a
89
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
1
91
92
96
102
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
2
1
i
117
VI.— NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
120 a
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
1
2
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
XII.—OLD AGE.
XIII. -AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
i'
1
170
8
1
1
1
3
2 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 101
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
O
o
o
CO
40 to 50 years.
00
p
00
-O
D
CO
Oh
eO
OJ
>.
o
t~
o
o
CD
70 to 80 years.
cO
CO
f-o
O
CO
O
O
00
-03
e3
g.
C
cO
O
CO
ti
p
'Si)
c
ti
OJ
bo
<
0J
A
0J
CC
.0?
o
p
ti
p
"5d
o
c
A
OJ
02
ci
a
"cO
O
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
2
1
1
2
F.
1
2
i
1
2
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
"l
1
1
2
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
6
I
1
1
2
1
1
1
I
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
3
1
3
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
I
l
1
2
2
1
"i"
2
2
l
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
l
1
3
1
1
1
l
1
1
2
1
9
1
l
I
2
2
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
51
9
1
I
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
9
l
3
1
4
1
12
2
2
1
4
9
6
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
23
74 H 102
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
te
s
o
CJ
S3
a
Q
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
r-<
U
0)
a
P
1
P
O
03
IQ
o
Cl
oi
©
o
©
C-3
o
©
2S
New Denver.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
56
79
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
91
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
98
109
V.-DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
120 a
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND  ANNEXA.
138
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
173
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
	
28
29
39c
40
61
64
77a
79
80
91
95
96
103
104
109
120
122
I.
Revelstoke.
-GENERAL DISEASES.
Typhoid fever ,   	
Whooping-cough	
Tuberculosis of the lungs ,	
Acute miliary tuberculosis	
Cancer of the tongue	
Cancer of the prostate gland ■	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver.
II.
-DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
Simple meningitis	
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy..
Paralysis without specified cause.
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
Myocarditis	
Organic diseases of the heart.
Angina pectoris	
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
Bronchopneumonia	
Gangrene of the lung	
Asthma	
Other diseases of the respiratory system (tuberculosis excepted).
-DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Other diseases of the stomach (cancer excepted).
Diarrhoea and enteritis (under 2 years)	
Hernias, intestinal obstructions	
VI.-
-NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
Bright's disease	
Other diseases of the kidneys and annexa. 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 103
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
t-
c0
p
o
o
o
CO
p
o
ICO
o
O
50 to 60 years.
s-
ecO
OJ
0*i
O
Jr
O
O
CD
CJ
8
o
o
80 to 90 years.
90 and upwards.
ti
0J
"So
o
c
bo
<
OJ
A
VI
o
H
'So
o
c
X
00
OQ
S
OJ
a
o
H
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M-
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
]
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
7
3
10
1
2
2
3
1
2
2
1
5
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
i
1 H 104
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
§
1
1
C/J
cO
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
3
p
OJ
to
ti
1       CO
3
p
oo
O
3
P
o
CM
OQ
rf
o
o
oo
io
et
P
©
O
©
137b
Revelstoke.—Concluded,
VII.-THE PUERPERAL STATE.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
151b
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
152
1
164
XII.—OLD AGE.
155
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
165
169
1
173
175
4
2
~
1
-
1
1
-
~
-
8
ROSS LAM).
i— GENERAL DISEASES.
1
1
1
18
1
40
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
50
64
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
71
1
78
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
78A
79
1
81
81A
89
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
91
3
i
92
92A
1
1
103a
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
104
i
108
115
119
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
142
VIII.—DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND OF THE CELLULAR TISSUE. \
7 Geo. 5                               Provincial Board of Health.                                   H 105
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
Or
CO
CO
o
rtl
o
o
CO
CO
p
o
IO
o
-31
CO
p
o
CD
o
CD
60 to 70 years.
70 to 80 years.
c3
O
Oo
O
+0
o
CO
90 and upwards.
Age not given.
oi
A
OJ
VI
lo
o
H
s
0J
'So
40
O
A
OJ
OO
oi
OJ
a
"ei
O
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
2
1
3
4
2
4
5
1
4
1
2
2
../.
~
27
15
42
3
3
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
,   4
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
	
....
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
-
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
• H 106                                                 British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
i
.2
g
s
"55
53
©
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
co-
00
-3
00
u
1 to 2 years.
00
cO
OJ
io
o
oo
cO
p
o
o
io
n
35
©
OI
O
©
151
Rossland.—Concluded.
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
151C
1
Stillborn	
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL  CAUSES.
3
1
170
-
173
189
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED  DISEASES.
7
7
1
2
1
1
1
28
Slocan City.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
108
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Trail.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
Whooping-cough	
3
2
1
1
1
1
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
1
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
1
1
71
2
81
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
IV.— DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
109
117
1
119
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA. 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 107
DEATH, 1916— Continued.
et
P
©
CO
o
©
CM
et
©
©
CO
5
s
©
o
©
P
©
©
©
ncj
ei
0)
8
O
©
<5
Sj
r>l
©
00
o
©
en
et
P
©
©
O
I
Jr
cS
Q.
s
o
CO
Age not given.
OJ
A
OJ
OQ
-Co
c
H
c
OJ
'Si
o
A
CO
00
"ca
CO
O
o
B
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
4
1
1
1
3
4
1
3
1
1
25
20
45
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
5
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
9
2
2 1
H 108                                                 British Columbia                                                    1917
CAUSES OF
cC?                     Classification No.
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
cS
p
OO
o
2 to 5 years.
w
s
p
©
rH
o
+3
>o
10 to 20 years.
Trail.—Concluded.
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
150
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
1
151
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
1
3
151B
153b
174
XIII.— AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
175
1
181
186
4
11
4
2
1
1
64
WlIoMEE.
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
79
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
1
1
	
28
38
40
50
78
79
81
138
167
169
Alberni.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
VII. -THE PUERPERAL STATE.
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
A
' 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 109
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
s
CO
©
O
o
CO
40 to 50 years.
coco
8
o
O
IO
1
P
©
o
©
©
at
tu
©
00
o
©
80 to 90 years.
T3
o             CO
•a
o
CO
c
CO
>
'Sio
o
ti
OJ
bo
<:
Total by Sexes.
n
OJ
'So
~o
c
A
Co
VJ
Total Deaths.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
5
4
1
1
1
1
1
23
17
40
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
3
1
5
5
2
2
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
7
5
12 H 110
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
fc
ti
o
cO
o
ed
"35
oo
of
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.     *
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
coo
p
00
•a
s
to
1 to 2 years.
s-
p
in
O
CM
et
P
©
O
3
u
©
o
20
Atlin.
I.-GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
42
96
IV.— DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
120
VI. -NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
168
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL  CAUSES.
170
175
92
Bella Coola.
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
120a
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
151a
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
178
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
	
89
Clayoquot.
IV—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
92
159
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
-
1
10
Fort Feasee.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
28
77a
III.-DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
153b
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Bo.vrd of HEoVlth.
H 111
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
s-
co
p
O
CO
o
+0
o
OO
CO
p
o
o
o
CO
OJ
O
ICO
O
1
P
©
©
©
©
O
+C3
o
©
co
et
P
©
CO
O
©
OO
ei
O
COO
o
oo
O
00
TOO
cl
ti.
ei
o
COO
.  >
'Si
o
OJ
fco
Total by Sexes.
B
OJ
'Sib
00=
O
ti
A
VI
ci
00
a
o
EH
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
7
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
	
1
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1 H 112
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
te
c
.2
rf
o
«
1
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
et
e
Ti
a
0
p
p
Ol
o
2 to 5 y-ears.
OO
p
O
o
icO
10 to 20 years.
155
Fort Fraser.—Concluded.
XIII.— AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
169
175A
178a
-
1
1
30
Hazelton.
L—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
39a
42
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
66
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
79
108
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
117
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
Other diseases peculiar to early infancy	
2
1
153b
XIII.— AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
173
175
3
—
1
108
Pouce Coupe.
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
187
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
1
1
—
1 7 Geo
.   0
Provincial Board
of Health.
H 113
DEATH, 1916— Continued.
CO
p
©
CO
o
©
CM
cO
p
o
m
o
O
CO
eO
p
O
io
o
O
cO
p
o
CD
o
o
io
cO
p
o
0^
o
o
CO
a
Oi
©
00
o
55
5
00
>0
O
OO
o
00)
O
CO
cO
is
ti.
ti
cO
O
CO
a
P
'bo
o
C
0J
bo
<
00
A
oi
oQ
-Co
O
H
c
p
'bo
o
c
A
0J
W
3
OJ
O
"ci
+o
O
H
1
1
1
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
.M.
1
1
1
1
5
F.
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
4
9
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
>
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
1
2
2
1
2
3
3
2
1
1
17
4
21
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
4
8 H 114                                                 British Columbia                                                    1917
CAUSES OF
d
te
a
o
ct
1
5
28
30
41
48
56
64
68
71
77a
78
84a
89
cause of death.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
5
p
c
a
et
O)
<M
o
+3
et
P
m
O
CM
cc
oi
O
O
ICO
10 to 20 years.
Peince Rupeet.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Mi
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum, intestines,
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
1
1
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
2
91
1
92
118
119
126
132
140
145a
150
151
153b
155
166
169
172
173
175
175A
178a
181
186
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Other diseases of the digestive system (cancer and tuberculosis excepted)
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
VIIL—DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND OF THE CELLULAR TISSUE.
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
1
1
1
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
2
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
3
7
1
• 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 115
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
dies
r->
O
CO
O
O
OO
CO
p
o
m
o
o
CO
cO
r
©
o
o
s-
cO
CO
>.
o
CO
o
o
io
cO
p
o
Cr
o
o
CO
cO
p
o
CO
o
o
eO
O
Co
o
1
90 and upwards.
Age not given.
OJ
A
V2
2
40
o
CO
'So
o
00
00
OO
-CO
00
ft
-is
o
H
M.
F.
M.
2
F.
"i"
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
3
F.
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
4
1
4
2
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
3
1
....
1
4
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
11
1
7
4
4
4
4
1
3
3
41
11
52 H 116
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
3
c3
CO
cti
cS
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
ed
OJ
>-.
OJ
C
P
ed
OJ
Ol
O
cc-
CO
0>o
CO
O
OO
5 to 10 years.
3
o
OO
O
o
10
Quatsino, Queen Charlotte, Stewart, and Telegraph Creek.
L—GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
.M.
F.
M.
F.
27
71
II.-DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
1
79
HI.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
122
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
153a
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
Stillborn 	
1
164
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
1
1
. 1
167
169
2
1
2
1
1
6
Ashcroft, Barkerville, Fort George, Tete Jaune Cache, Clinton,
Lillooet, Quesnel, 150-Mile House, and Yale.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
Measles	
1
2
1
8
10
1
20
28
1
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum,  intestines,
1
41
64
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
66
71
1
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
1
79
85
91
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
2
92
97a
104
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
1
109
120
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
140
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE. 7 Geo. 5                               Provincial Board of Health.                                   H 117
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
cO
o
p
o
CO
CO*
CO
o
iO
O
O
CO
p
o
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70 to 80 years.
ed
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1
5
2
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M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
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M.
F.
M.
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1
1
1
1
1
1
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1
1
1
3
1
1
2
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1
1
1
2
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1
1
	
8
6
14
2
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3 H 118                                                 British Columbia                                                    1917
CAUSES OF
6
te
p
_o
et
O
a)
et
5
150
151
152
152B
153a
154
155
157
159
163
165
166
169
170
172
175
175a
175b
176
178a
182
186
189
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
ed
p
O
oo
cd
p
ico
o
oo
OJ
PCI
o
O
ed
OJ
>.
o
oo
O
O
ASHCROFT,   BARKERVIl
x.—a
Congenital malformation (sti
XI.—DISEAS
Congenital debility icterus, a
Other diseases peculiar to ea
Asphyxia, caused by milk in
Stillborn	
lb, Fort George, etc.—Concluded.
[ALFORMATIONS.
M.
F.
1
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
ES OF EARLY INFANCY.
2
1
1
1
1
XII.-OLD AGE.
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED  BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
Suicide by hanging or Strang
1
1
1
Traumatism by other crushii
1
1
2
11
XIV.—ILI
Cause of death not specified
,-DEFINED  DISEASES.
1
8
3
1
1
1
2
3
28
35
40
40A
43
78
78a
79
91
92
103a
108
109
117
119
120
120a
Fairview.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
Cancer and other malignant
Cancer and other malignant
III.—DISEASES Ol
f THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
Endocarditis following rheui
Organic diseases of the heart
IV.—DISEASES Ol
     1	
? THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
1
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Appendicitis and typhlitis
Hernias, intestinal obstruct!
Simple peritonitis (non-puer
VI.—NON-VENEREAI
SYST
1
1
o DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
EM AND ANNEXA. 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health,
H 119
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
5
P
©
CO
o
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cl
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>>
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1
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Total by Sexes.
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ed
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M.
F.
M.
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F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
3
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
7
1
4
2
	
7
1
6
4
7
1
5
1
3
3
60
17
77
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
2
6
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 H 120
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
te
a
.2
"el
o
m
-Eo
d
3
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
1 to 2 years.
ed
p
O
Ol
Cod
o
£>
o
o
10 to 20 years.
Fairview.—Concluded.
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
M.
1
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
151b
XI.-DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
153b
1
154
XII.—OLD age.
170
xhl—affections produced by external CAUSES.
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED  DISEASES.
3
1
2
1
36a
40
77a
79
120a
137b
151b
153b
172
173
175
Greenwood.
1.—GENERAL DISEASES.
Tuberculosis of the lungs	
Tuberculosis not specified	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver.
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy	
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
Myocarditis	
Organic diseases of the heart.
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
Bronchopneumonia.
Pneumonia	
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Appendicitis and typhlitis	
VI.—NON-VENERAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND  ANNEXA.
Uremia.
VII.— THE PUERPERAL STATE.
Eclampsia.
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
Non-assimilation of food .
Premature	
XII.-OLD   AGE.
Senilty.
XIII.— AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
Traumatism by fall	
Traumatism in mines and quarries	
Traumatism by other crushing (railroad, landslides, vehicles, etc.).. 1
7 Geo. 5                                Provincial Board of Health.                                     H 121
DEATH, 1916—Continued,
20 to 30 years.
30 to 40 years.
40 to 50 years.
50 to 60 years.
ed
p
, cp
O
o
0O
70 to 80 years.
ed
p
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O0
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90 and upwards.
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M.
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M.
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1
1
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1
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1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
——
3
1
3
2
3
1
3
1
2
1
21
10
31
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
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1
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1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
9
19
28 -
H 122
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
c
_o
ed
CO
cti
"co
CO
ed
6
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
1 Under 1 year.
1 to 2 years.
ed
IO
O
O-l
oi
a
p
o
O
ICO
10 to 20 years.
i
Grand Forks.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
If.
F.
8
1
41
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum,   intestines,
42
51
64
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
66
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
78
79
1
89
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
91
1
92
117
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
1
120
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
137a
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
150
X. —MA LFORM ATIONS.
1
2
151B
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
152
1
1
.
153A
Stillborn	
XIIL-AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
169
1
175
3
4
1
1
2
1
Kamloops.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
-
1
6
1
"i°
1
1
1
8
10
14
18
20
28
1
1
30
1
38
40
40A
42
44
50
1
51
56
„                 ,                                                                     ,                       . 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 123
DEATH, 1916— Continued.
CO
00
>i
O
o
O
CM
30 to 40 years.
ed
OJ
0*.
o
ICO
o
o
-c"
cd
ed
p
O
CO
O
O
ICO
cd
p
o
Cc-
CI
o
CO
70 to 80 years.
80 to 90 years.
90 and upwards.
Age not given.
p
VI
£
o
c
CO
L>
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C
A
CO
V2
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"cd
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I
M.
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1
M.
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F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
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1
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1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
10
18
28
1
2
1
2
1
1
"ii'
"i"
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2
2
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
18
3
1
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1
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6
4
6
7
2
2
29
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
2
1
1
I
1
1
1
1 H 124
British Columbia
191'
CAUSES OF
d
I
1
cti
"55
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
COCO
>.
OJ
■a
s
CO
cd
p
coo
O
ed
0J
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O
CM
cd
©
o
ico
ed
O
CM
O
+o
O
61
Kamloops.—Continued.
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
63a
1
64
66
70
71
1
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
78a
78b
1
79
80
81
8lA
82
85
1
87
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
89
1
1
91
2
1
92
1
92a
96
103
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
104
1
1
1
1
1
109
1
114
115
1
119
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA.
120
120a
123
137
VIII. -THE PUERPERAL STATE.
142
VIII.—DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND OF THE CELLULAR TISSUE.
150
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
151
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
151B
151c
152
152a
1
1
153b
154
XII.—OLD AGE. 7 Geo. 5                                Provincial Board of Health.                                     H 125
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
30 to 40 years.
ed
O
iO
0
©
50 to 60 years.
O0
CO
p
O
0-
o
o
CO
70 to 80 years.
80 to 90 years.
cl
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Age not given.
as
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H                  0
l     i
1       a
;         3
Li             o
2                 H
M.
F.
M.
F.
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1
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
2
1
3
6
1
F.
1
1
1
2      ...
i
1
1
2
1
3
1
4
6
1
1
2
3
1
9
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
3
9
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
9
1
1
5
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
8
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1     1
3
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
4
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
4
2
1
1
2           i
2
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
1
1
1
2
1
■   2
2
1
1
1
2
	
2
1
\ H 126
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
i
10
40
79
81
91
92
104
117
169A
179
6
te
.2
3
a
tn
a
O
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
ed
p
0J
rti
C
D
CO
ed
p
coo
O
2 to 5 years.
cd
p
o
o
io
10 to 20 years.
157
Kamloops.—Concluded.
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
160
165
169
170
173
175
176
189
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED  DISEASES.
10
10
2
7
4
3
2
2
3
1
I.
Nicola.
-GENERAL DISEASES.
Typhoid fever	
Influenza   	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver.
II.
-DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
Convulsions of infants	
IIL~DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
Organic diseases of the heart	
Diseases of the arteries, atheroma, aneurism, etc.
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
Bronchopneumonia.
Pneumonia	
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Diarrhcea and enteritis (under 2 years)..
Simple peritonitis (non-puerperal)	
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY
SYSTEM AND ANNEXA.
Acute nephritis	
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
Congenital malformation (still-births not included)	
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
Other diseases peculiar to early infancy	
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
Traumatism in logging camp and sawmills..
Effects of heat	
Other external violence	 t
7 Geo. o                                Provincial Board of Health.                                     H 127
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
cd
OJ
oO
o
=1
oo
30 to 40 years.
CO
5
o
IO
O
o
50 to 60 years.
cd
p
o
o
o
CO
70 to 80 years.
80 to 90 years.
90 and upwards.
Age not given.
A
00
VI
£
"cd
o
H
ti
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A
VI
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cd
00
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H
M.
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1
M.
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M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
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Hot.
F.
M.
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M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
6
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
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1
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1
5
1
1
1
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7
14
1
13
1
19
3
1
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4
1
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4
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11
1
60
2
8
12
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112
172
1
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1
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3
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1
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2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
•?,
3
1
2
1
	
1
14
8
22
-
« H 128
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
c
0
cd
cti
cd
s
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
ed
p
■coo
c
D
cd
p
(00
o
M.      F.
2 to 5 years.
5 to 10 years.
10 to 20 years.
1
Princeton.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
CM.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
54a
56
64
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
j
71
1
1
....      1
j
8lA
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
92a
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
117
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
!
1
154
XII.—OLD AGE.
157
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL  CAUSES.
167
1
1
1
1
....;   1
1
1
Vernon.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
6
1
8
1
3
1
10
14
28
30
34
35
35a
39b
40
41
Cancer and other malignant tumours of  the  peritoneum,  intestines,
42
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
50
1
50a
51
54a
2
1
61
II.—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
63a
1
64
1
2
71
1
77a
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
1
79
81A
82
1
85 7 Geo, 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 129
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
i*
ed
O
rt1
O
O
40 to 50 years.
ed
p
O
CO
o
o
io
60 to 70 years.
cd
CO
>t
o
CO
O
o
80 to 90 years.
-03
ed
Cs
ti.
T-0
cd
o
O0
t>
'to
o
ti
OJ
to
<
Total by Sexes.
c
'So
OO
o
CO
A
OJ
VI
£
"cd
OJ
0
"cd
o
H
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
....
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
18
3
	
16
1
1
1
2
2
1
5
1
i
3
1
1
i
i
2
1
2
1
1
.......
2
7
1
1
1
l
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
l
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
1
1
i
1
2
1
1
1
6
2
1
i
i
l
3
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
2
12
1
1
2
1
1 H 130
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
fc
o
n
O
cti
ed
O
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
ij
cd
p
-ti
5
cd
CM
O
2 to 5 years.
5 to 10 years.
cd
p
o
o
oo
O
89
Vernon.—Concluded.
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
M.
1
F.
M.
1
F.
i
1
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
91
92
1
92a
93
1
96
97a
1
102a
V.-DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
108
109
113
115
119
VI.— NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA.
•
120
120a
1
123
124
126
130
135
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
136
150
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
151
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
158A
Stillborn '	
153b
154
XII.—OLD AGE.
165
XIII.—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
167
1
169
1
170
172
	
175a
178a
186
187
XIV— ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
1
14
12
2
2
4
2
1
2
2 7 Geo. 5
Provincial BOoVRD of Health.
H 131
DEATH, 1916— Continued.
20 to 30 years.
ed
O
rtl
O
O
CO
cl
0*o
O
o
o
50 to 60 years.
60 to 70 years.
70 to 80 years.
s-
ed
O
Co
O
o
CO
90 and upwards.
p
"Sij
oo
O
0J
bo
<
Total by Sexes.
ti
'u
o
A
OJ
Vj
£
ed
"cd
o
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
3
1
3
F.
3
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
5
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
	
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
92
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
7
1
13
	
1
4
10
5
7
15
6
14
4
3
6
3
1
2
54
146 H 132
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
1
ti
ed
O
5
M
s
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
1
coo
o
cd
p
0
00
p
O
O
CO
cd
p
0
CM
O
O
i
Vancouver Division—Vancouver City.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
6
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
9
1
1
10
1
1
14
18
3
1
1
1
2
20
1
27
28
2
4
28a
1
29
1
2
' 3
1
1
30
1
1
1
2
1
1
30a
31
32
3
1
34
35
1
35a
36
1
1
37
2
37a
Syphilis, congenital 	
2
39
39a
39b
39c
40
.
40a
41
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum, intestines,
1
42
	
1
43
44
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
46
50
61
5lA
1
52
1
1
54a
1
1
55
65a
56
61
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF SPECIAL
SENSE.
4
.._..
1
61a
1
62
634
64
2
4
1
1
65
66
68
69
1
2
1
"3
71
9
3
72
74
76
1
1
77
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
77a
i'
1
1
78
9
78a
1
78b
79
1
81
82
85
1
1 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 133
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
cd
p
o
CO
o
Q
OO
id
3
o
IO
0O
rj
p
10
0
0
■ro
ed
O
co
O
O
IO
oj
cd
p
O
0-
O
40
O
CO
0
00
0
0
0-
cd
p
OJ
0
000
/j
90 and upwards.
CO
00
'So
00
a
00
aj
to
Total by Sexes.
00
p
'So
0
fl
A
oo
■i
ed
GJ
P
.3
0
H
M.
F.
M
3
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M
F.
M.
F.
M.
3
3
3
1
5
4
2
8
2
64
4
5
13
3
F.
3
1
1
1
2
1
6
4
5
2
1
1
2
1
1
4
11
7
1
1
11
1
1
22
9
1
"3'
1
1
18
2
2
2
4
1
24
1
2
10
12
1
3
9
2
8
4
2
5
1
1
88
5
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
i
7
3
i
1
1
23
3
1
1
1
1
7
6
1
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
10
3
11
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
8
1
6
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
9
4
7
14
6
1
4
2
7
1
I
1
1
6
i
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
5
1
3
2
3
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
3
20
1
7
1
1
1
5
"2
2
4'
2
1
18
14
1
6
2
6
1
4
3
4
1
2
1
1
i
1
1
1
10
1
2
3
1
1
3
1
1
11
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
15
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
3
1
1
6
6
3
1
2
32
3
3
1
1
11
1
2
2
1
36
9
2
3
14
14
6
1
8
8
3
1
1
1
3
1
0
2
1
32'
2
2
4
4
4
4
10
2
8
1
1
4
2
1
1
64
3
1
1
1
3
6
1
1
6
17
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
24
5
1
3
6
2
4
4
2
1
3
5
1
"3
1
2
2
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
2
1
4
12
1
6
2
5
1
4
1
1
1
60
14
3
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
"i'
1
2
3
2
2
1
6
2
2
2
3
1
3
3
1
3
1
1
1
20
16
10
1
1
1
1
..   1
1
 1
1 H 134
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
2c
§
1
J
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
cd
p
OJ
C
P
1 to 2 y-ears.
2 to 5 years.
ed
p
O
O
id
cd
p
0
00
0
0
87
Vancouver Division—Vancouver City.—Continued.
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
89
1
1
1
90
91
13
2
1
10
3
2
8
1
"2
3
1
2
4
1
3
1
"2
2
i
2'
1
92
92A
1
92b
93
94
1
95
96
97a
1
1
1
2
98
102
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
103b
104
5
2
3
1
105
107
108
1
1
1
1
109
1
112
t
113
117
4
117a
1
117b
IIS
Other diseases of the digestive system (cancer and tuberculosis excepted)
VI.— NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA.
2
1
1
i
119
1
120
1
123
130
132
134
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
140
VIII.—DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND OF THE CELLULAR TISSUE.
1
IX.—DISEASES OF THE BONES AND ORGANS OF LOCOMOTION.
150
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
10
9 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 135
DEATH, 1916— Continued.
20 to 30 years.
o
rf
O
o
CO
cd
p
o
co
o
o
^11
cd
CO
O
CO
O
O
ICO
10.
cd
p
o
o
o
CO
cd
p
o
X
o
oo
o
to
cd
p
o
OO
o
40
o
CO
cd
ti,
cd
o
CO
'bo
o
CO
bo
«i
OJ
JO
VI
£
Id
"o
H
eg
'.&
0
fl
A
00
V2
£
cd
CO
A
"cd
40
O
H
M.
F.
1
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
2
3
F.
1
7
J
25
22
10
2
.'   "2"
1
2
13
2
3
1
3
1
2
3
3
2
3
1
10
1
1
9
2
11
5
2
3
4
1
4
3
i
2
3
2
2
2
3
1
2
4
2
2
32
32
15
2
4
1
67
4
4
1
1
1
54
25
4
1
2
1
4
2
3
1
4
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
2
11
3
4
4
1
24
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
7
1
1
8
11
1
1
1
1
7
8
3
5
6
2
1
9
6
2
24
1
1
2
"i
1
3
3
1
1
1
9
• 1
1
1
1
11
4
1
i
1
1
6
i
1
1
1
f
7
2
1
1
2
3
1
•y
1
1
2
6
2
4
g
16
1
1
2
11
1
1
1
2
1
!'-6
"i'
3
1
2
3
1
1
1
10
T
l
3
7
6
3
39
1
1
1
2
3
1
3
4
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
3
2
3
i
1
1
1
i
i
1
2
1
1
1
*
i
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
10
3
1
1
1
1
9
2 /
19 IT 136
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
©
te
p
o
cS
S
S
D
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
to
ed
OJ
>,
0J
TO
ti
P
cd
p
oo
o
ed
Co
>>
io
o
cd
o
I-T
o
Sh
cd
p
O
OO
o
o
151
Vancouver division—Vancouver City.—Concluded.
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
M.
2
1
12
3
1
F.
7
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
151A
151B
9
3
1
1
66
12
2
152
152a
153
153A
Stillborn	
59
9
153b
154
XII.—OLD AGE.
155
XIII. — AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
157
159
160
161
165
1
166
1
.167
3
1
2
1
1
169
1
1
169A
170
1
171A
172
1
1
173 a
1
1
2
175
1
1
183
185
186
187
XIV.—ILL-DEFINED DISEASES.
1
154
134
35
1
21
17
12
10
.10
16
20
Vancouver Division— South Vancouver.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
1
1
1
1
40
41
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum, intestines,
...
42
45
Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs, and of organs not
...
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
1
64
69
1
71
1
i
1 1
•
7 Geo
. 5
Province
ll Board
of Health.
•
H 137
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
Cd
CO
o
o
O
CO
to
cd
p
O
m
o
o
CO
ed
O
LO
o
CO
cd
p
o
CO
p
o
vO
ed
p
O
O
-co
O
CO
cd
p
O
CO
O
o
t-
cd
p
O
CO
O
O
CO
V
cd
a
-03
C
cd
o
OO
p
'bo
O
bo
OJ
A
OJ
m
£
"ed
O
H
CO
CO
'bio
O
ti
A
VI
£
40
cd
CO
a
9
1
23
6
1
115
21
18
4
4
1
2
1
2
1
8
9
13
4
1
7
1
3
17
1
3
5
2
4
.M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
2
1
14
3
1
F.
7
"'9'
3
1
1
56
12
8
59
9
10
4
4
1
2
1
2
1
6
8
13
4
1
6
1
2
16
1
1
4
2
1
1
2
1
3
5
7
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
5
1
1
3
2
1
1
2
2
4
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
2
1
3
2
1
1
i
1
1
1
1
1
46
1
76
2
56
34
96
48
125
43
83
55
60
45
17
18
3
3
l
1
749
490
1
1,240
1
1
2
2
3
1
5
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
6
1
3
1
2
1
2
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
l
3
1
1
2 H 138
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
te
a
o
+p
o
«
3
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
cd
o
ed
p
CO
O
OO
cd
p
o
o
CO
10 to 20 years.
77a
Vancouver Division—South Vancouver.—Concluded.
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
M.
1
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
78
78a
1
81
82
89
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
1
1
90
91
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
92
94
104
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
1
117b
119
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA..
1
120a
150
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
Congenital malformation (still-births not included)	
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
1
2
1
9
4
3
1
6
1
154
XII.—old age.
XIIL—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED  BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
175
1
6
25
14
2
3
5
2
1
Vancouver Division—Point Grey.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
10
1
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
78
79
81A 7 Geo. 5                               Provincial Board of Health.                                   H 139
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
3
Ol
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O
o
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O
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O
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80 to 90 years.
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2
M.
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2
M.
F.
M.
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5
1
1
1
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6
1
2
11
2
3
1
1
2
1
13
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
5
2
1
15
5
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
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8
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59
53
112
1
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1
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.
. II 140
British Columbia
1911
CAUSES OF
6
s
o
cd
CO
eg
^ed
S
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Under 1 year.
ed
p
too
o
2 to 5 years.
s-
et
l>
>>
©
o
ci
P
©
Cl
O
©
91
* Vancouver Division—Point Grey.—Concluded.
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
92
119
VI.—NON-VENEREAL DISEASES OF GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM
AND ANNEXA.
1
120a
152a
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
1
1
4
153a
Stillborn	
2
153b
154
,        XII.—OLD AGE.
157
XIIL—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
165
1
167
1
169
1
2
1
3
7
1
8
Vancouver Division—North Vancouver City.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
1
2
28
30
77a
\
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
79
80
90
IV.— DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
91
Bronchopneumonia	
2
2
2
1
1
92
.   92a
105
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
1
109
117a
1
134
VII.—THE PUERPERAL STATE.
150
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
1
151
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY'.
1
153A
Stillborn	
1
3
153b
157
XIIL—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
10
6
1
1
1 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 141
DEATH, 1916—Continued.
20 to 30 years.
30 to 40 years.
cd
O
O
O
50 to 60 years.
60 to 70_years.
■d
ro
OC
O
OO
c-
80 to 90 years.
90 and upwards.
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VI
£
cd
a
it
O
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M.
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3
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1
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1
1
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1
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3
2
3
3
9.
4
1
21
17
38
1
2
3
1
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1
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9
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
1
4
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
1
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20
16
36 H 142
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
d
0
cd
CO
ea
s
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
ed
00
n
-   S
1 to 2 y-ears.
cd
p
io
O
oo
OO
ed
O
O
oo
10 to 20 years.
28
Vancouver Division.—North Vancouver District.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
79
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
92
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYgTEM.
1
118
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Other diseases of the digestive system (cancer and tuberculosis excepted)
XL—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
l
153
1
1
153A
Stillborn	
i
157
XIIL—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED  BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
169
1
175
2
2
1
1
169
170
Vancouver Division—West Vancouver.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
Tuberculosis of the lungs      	
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Other diseases of the intestines	
XIIL—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
Accidental drowning
Traumatism by- firearms .
14
43
77a
78
80
81a
92
92a
118
Vancouver Division—Richmond.
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
Dysentery   	
Cancer and other malignant tumours of the breast.
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
Pericarditis	
Myocarditis	
Acute endocarditis ..
Angina pectoris	
Mitral regurgitation
IV.— DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
Acute bronchitis..
Pneumonia	
Lobar pneumonia.
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Other diseases of the digestive system (cancer and tuberculosis excepted)
VII.-THE PUERPERAL STATE.
Puerperal hemorrhage	 7 Geo. 5
Provincial Board of Health.
H 143
DEATH, 1916— Continued.
ct
OJ
©
CO
o
©
55
30 to 40 years.
*
©
ClO
p
©
Bj
©
o
©
p
o
p
CO
ed
00
CO
00
o
co
>
80 to 90 years.
90 and upwards.
OJ
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00
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£
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1
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1
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2
1
1
1
1
1
1
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2
2
1
2
1
1
1 H 144
British Columbia
1917
CAUSES OF
6
te
a
o
'■§
1
Co
cd
5
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Second
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1909.)
Sh
ed
p
r.
CO
-03
G
P
ed
p
oo
o
ro
2 to 5 y-ears.
5 to 10 years.
to
cd
CO
>.
O
CM
O
o^
O
151
Vancouver Division—Richmond.—Concluded.
XI—DISEASES OF EARLY INFANCY.
M.
2
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
152
1
1
1
1
153a
Stillborn., t                                           	
1530
169
XIIL—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
1
1
4
1
1
172
3
5
2
1
1
64
71
91
92
93
159
169
169a
172
173
174
178a
Vancouver Division—Vancouver (Outside).
I.—GENERAL DISEASES.
Tuberculosis of the lungs	
IL—DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ORGANS OF
SPECIAL SENSE.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy.
Convulsions of infants	
III.—DISEASES OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.
Angina pectoris	
IV.—DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
Bronchopneumonia.
Pneumonia	
Pleuris
risy.
V.—DISEASES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Peritonitis, gastric nicer perforated	
VI.—NON-VENEREAL   DISEASES   OF   GENITO-URINARY SYSTEJI
AND ANNEXA.
Brigbt's disease 	
VII.— THE PUERPERAL STATE.
Puerperal hasmorrhage	
X.—MALFORMATIONS.
Congenital malformation (still-births not included) 	
XIIL—AFFECTIONS PRODUCED BY EXTERNAL CAUSES.
Suicide by- firearms	
Accidental drowning	
Traumatism in logging camp or sawmill.
Traumatism by fall    	
Traumatism in mines and quarries	
Traumatism by machines	
Exposure	 7 Geo. 5                               Provincial Board of Health.                                   H 145
DEATH, 1916—Concluded.
20 to 30 years.
ed
o
rJH
o
o
CO
40 to 50 years.
tH
cd
p
o
CO
o
o
ed
[>0
O
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o
o
CO
70 to 80 years.
ed
O
OJ
o
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CO
cd
i
a
ti
cd
c:
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ti
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'5
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32
Prir
ted
by "tf
rILLI0
IM  E
. Oc
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
llin. Printer to the Kin
1917. .
?'s  5
Io
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Vlajesto
T.
1

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