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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1917-1918 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1919

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 EEPOET
OF   THE
MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS
OF   THE
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FISCAL YEAR 1917-1918
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE  LEGISLATIVE   ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1919.  To His Honour Sir Frank Stillman Barnard, K.C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Proviiwe of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Eeport of my Department
for the fiscal year ending 31st March, 1918, in compliance with the provisions of the
"Public Works Act."
J. H KING,
Minister of Public Works.
Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1919.  PUBLIC   WORKS   REPORT.
REPORT OF PUBLIC WORKS ENGINEER.
Victoeia, B.C., December 9th, 1918.
J. E. Griffith, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.
Sib,—I have the honour to submit the following general report on the operations of the Public
Works Department for the fiscal year 1917-1S:—
Obganization.
At the commencement of the fiscal year a radical change was made in the conduct of the
outside affairs of the Works Department. In place of the Road Superintendents formerly in
charge of almost every electoral district, eight District Engineers, two of whom had previously
been Assistant Engineers in the Department, were appointed to take responsible control of the
eight engineering districts comprising two or more electoral districts, depending upon area,
geographical location, etc. These Engineers are capable, technically trained men and have had
wide practical experience, and the reports submitted by them are based solely upon the individual
merits of the case from an economic-and engineering standpoint.
Few valid complaints as to the administration of their engineering districts having been
recorded, it is to be concluded that the general public has approved of this change, and are, on
the whole, satisfied with the work done throughout the Province.
As assistants to the District Engineers, twenty General Foremen, several of whom had been
former Road Superintendents, and eleven Assistant Engineers, with practical experience in
handling men, were appointed to take charge of the work in one or, in a few cases, more than
one electoral district.
Generally speaking, we have been fortunate in the selection of the outdoor permanent staff.
Since, however, many of these officials were previously unacquainted with the location, conditions,
and requirements of their districts, naturally the most efficient results cannot be expected during
their first year in office, but it Is hoped that our anticipations for success of the reorganization
will be more fully realized next year.
Local foremen directly in charge of all local construction and maintenance work, being
appointed on a daily wage basis during the working season only, are naturally subject to
considerable change. As it is recognized that much of the success of the new mode of handling
the work depends upon these local foremen, it may take some little time to procure the right
men and educate them along the proper lines. The Road and Bridge Bulletins now in course
of preparation should materially assist in our educative aims.
Regarding indoor operations at headquarters, pending the return of the overseas military
members of the Engineering staff, there had been for some considerable time insufficient technical
assistance to properly undertake the routine work, particularly in the Draughting Department.
Hence the additional work connected with the preparation of departmental forms, standard plans
and specifications had perforce to stand in abeyance. However, towards the end of the fiscal
year one of the District Engineers was transferred to the Victoria office, and an effort is now
being made to cope with the arrears of such necessary work. Moreover, with the return to duty
in March, 1918, of the Assistant Public Works Engineer from military service overseas, the
handicap under which the Department was placed for lack of sufficient technical assistance will
eventually be overcome.
Supervision.
Chiefly due to the following reasons, the cost of supervision was higher than was anticipated :
(a) Increased cost of living and meals at hotels, camps, steamboats, etc.; (b) increased cost of
transportation in trains and boats; (c) the heavy cost of furnishing new automobiles for the
Engineers and their assistants and repairing or renewing the existing cars; (d) the extensive
travel that had to be undertaken by the new officials to familiarize themselves with their districts C 6 Public Works Eeport  (1917-18).
and to investigate the accumulated requests for new work urgently required, in addition to
looking into the multifarious matters of long-standing dispute left in abeyance or rejected by
the previous Administration.
Much of the officials' time and interests were in this way and in similar other respects
involved in straightening out more or less important matters which do not show tangible results,
and cannot be definitely expressed on a percentage basis for the aggregate expenditure incurred
in the various public works.
Day-labour.
With the exception of a few bridge contracts and one or two contracts for clearing and
grading, all the work was undertaken under the former system of day-labour. Since our operations are at present confined chiefly to the repair and upkeep of roads and trails and the repair
and renewal of bridges, this system, with all its disadvantages and uncertainties, will necessarily
require to be retained to a large extent, although on an improved basis. It is but fair to state,
however, that labour conditions throughout the Province were far from satisfactory last year,
and therefore particularly detrimental to the success of day-labour. Reports from the District
Engineers agree that the best workmen were employed by corporations, companies, and private
parties at much higher rates than our wage schedule, although same had from time to time been
raised by us in an endeavour to satisfactorily adjust the claims of our workmen. In one of
the northern districts the District Engineer reports " that the better class of men do not prefer
to work for the Government. It does not appear that this condition can be wholly overcome.
Then, too, Ave employ a class of labour which does not usually work in the mines or the mills
(lumber). Our force is made up of the local elements, the odd lots, the' new settlers, men who
prefer Government work, those that dislike underground work, prospectors with only their
assessment-work to do. . . . The lack of young men on account of the war is to a degree
irreparable. It is a young man's country. Older men do their best, but the climate and the
conditions require the young and we feel the lack in our work."
The shorter hours (eight-hour day in place of our nine-hour day) and the more regular
employment connected with such work also attracted many of the former road employees.
Consequently we had to employ what remained on a labour market already depleted through
enlistment. It is worthy of mention that the District Engineers were requested to employ
returned soldiers, and preference was always given to such men physically capable of manual
labour. Where procurable, returned soldiers were given the positions of ferrymen at monthly
salaries.
Good axemen and powdermen were particularly at a premium, as the Overseas Forestry
Corps and the lumber camps devoted to war productions absorbed the bulk of the available
skilled men. Generally speaking, therefore, much less work, and that not always of the highest
standard, was accomplished with the fixed appropriations available than would have been the
case under normal conditions.
It was, however, fully recognized that war-work, including the greater production of crops
and fruits in the agricultural districts, should always take precedence over the Government
road-work. Reference should here be made of the increasing difficulty of obtaining and the
disadvantages of employing private teams. The heavier class of teams were employed at
prohibitive wages at lumber camps, mines, etc., leaving us dependent upon the generally lighter
and sometimes inferior rancher's team. To quote from one of the District Engineer's reports:
" The hired ranch-horse usually is too light and often comes on the job in poor condition, with
shoes all but dropping off, and after a month or six weeks' work is often required on the farm
again, just when most needed."
Such circumstances would therefore appear to justify the continuance, in some districts at
any rate, of the use of Government-owned horses, in order that a more regular, better, and more
economical standard of work could be undertaken. In other districts, however, the supply of
suitable and adequate draught horses is likely to remain a problem difficult of solution, particularly in view of the national demand for increased agricultural production.
It is therefore proposed to more generally introduce the use of tractors, in districts where
the roads will permit of their satisfactory and economical operation, for the hauling of road
and bridge materials, as well as in ploughing and road-grading with the road grader. A series
of hauling experiments on some of our Island highways resulted in the work being undertaken ■ 9 Geo. 5 Public Works Engineer. C 7
by tractor at about 20 per cent, less than by the best team-labour. Further tests are now being
made with different kinds of tractor with a view to the purchase of the more serviceable and
economical types.
Contract-work.
As previously mentioned, contract-work was limited to a few undertakings representing an
expenditure of $11,289.
Until such times as labour conditions improve and the Department is better organized, I am
strongly of the opinion that this system should be greatly extended and should embrace all new
work. With proper plans and specifications and under close and careful supervision, it should
be possible to undertake work as efficiently and certainly more economically by contract than by
day-labour. If contract-work has hitherto failed, the modus operandi rather than the principle
must have been at fault. Cities and municipalities have almost invariably found the contract
system, under proper management, more satisfactory and less troublesome in the long run. We
must soon follow the example of other Provinces in Canada and States in America, where the
contract system has, after some years of varied experiment, proved most efficient.
Materials, etc.
As a natural result of higher wages and shortage of labour, due chiefly to war conditions
and measures, the prices of material advanced in every direction. Merchantable timber used
in ordinary bridge structures increased 36 per cent., while selected Douglas fir for timber trusses
advanced 26 per cent., ironwork in bridges increased 64 per cent., and even ordinary spikes, so
much used in bridge and culvert construction, went up 42 per cent, in price. Owing to the greatly
enhanced price of explosives, 40 per cent, higher than in the previous fiscal year, the use of powder
for clearing and rock-work was practically prohibitive. Steel cable, so much used in the operation of the numerous Provincial ferries, was hard to procure at almost any price owing to the
embargo on the importation of same.
Transportation difficulties also added to the supply problem, as not only were freight rates
increased, but there was a very limited and irregular supply of freight-cars, delivery being therefore very uncertain and unreliable. Hence our construction programme, conservative though it
was, was perforce restricted and the costs of work frequently unavoidably increased beyond our
estimates. Towards the end of the fiscal year a step in the right direction was taken in purchasing in bulk quantities such supplies as explosives for distribution as required throughout
the Province.    It is the intention to extend this system wherever practicable.
For the supply and delivery of the timber for the construction or renewal of the standard
timber trusses, tenders are invariably invited from Coast firms as well as the mills convenient
to the bridge structures. Such competition secures the most favourable prices and usually
ensures the earliest delivery. All bridge materials, including ironwork, obtained from the Coast
are inspected and tested by a competent Materials Inspector. In this way timber of the best
growth and ironwork of workmanlike fabrication are procured for our highway bridges, thus
tending to increased durability and life of such structures.
Road Machinery and Plant, etc.
As will be noted from the detailed statement of the valuation of the machinery elsewhere
recorded, the Department has on hand about a quarter of a million dollars' worth of road and
bridge-building equipment. As much of the plant has been idle for years, chiefly owing to the
decreased amount of construction-work, the surplus plant in one district is either being transferred where required, or where not likely to be necessary for years to come, disposed of to the
highest favourable bidder. Advantage was thus taken of the present high prices to satisfactorily
dispose of three of the steam donkey-engines, together with other equipment. Several donkey-
engines have also been conditionally rented on favourable terms. As the time has arrived for
the more general introduction of labour-saving road machinery, adequate provision has been made
for same in the 1918-19 Estimates. The District Engineers comment favourably upon the
introduction of automobiles for superintendence of the outside work in a more serviceable and
more economical manner.
To obtain some specific and reliable data as to the comparative cost for repairs, renewals,
and depreciation of plant respectively, it is proposed to keep special accounts of all expenditures C 8 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
on the purchase and maintenance of plant. Special note will also be kept of stable equipment
and camp equipment. In this way we hope to segregate such specific expenditures to their proper
accounts, and incidentally be in a position to contrast day-labour with contract operations.
Roaus and Trails.
As will be seen from the details of expenditures, attention was confined chiefly to the
maintenance and repair of existing roads and trails. Comparatively little construction-work
was undertaken, although the requests, individual and collective, for new roads were, even more
numerous than in the previous year. The attitude of the Department was consistently adverse
to the carrying-out of any new work unless same was urgently required to further useful
production or accommodate new industries.
The total mileage of roads and trails at present in unorganized districts is estimated to be
14,623 miles and 8,207 miles respectively. As the mileage had been greatly increased during the
past few years, the Department must be prepared" to spend an increasingly greater annual sum
to properly maintain particularly the main roads in order to protect the initial capital outlay.
The regular upkeep of roads through sparsely settled districts for the express benefit of only
one or two settlers, whose neighbours had abandoned their ranches and. either enlisted or removed
to towns, will continue to be a drain on our financial resources until times become more normal
and the land is more thickly settled. To quote from a District Engineer's report: " Few settlers
are coming in to take the places of the young and strong who have left; consequently, many of
the roads which were built in the 'boom' days have few, if any, settlers adjacent to them. It
is very difficult to decide whether we are justified in even keeping them in repair. If we do not
keep them open, it would look as if we were abandoning the country to its fate. There are many
such roads that should never have been built where they are, but it is difficult to decide whether
they should be abandoned altogether now that settlers have had the courage and initiative to
locate on them. Until the war is over and the tide of immigration starts back there are many
of the roads and trails that will have to be neglected. We considered, however, that it would
not be good policy to allow the trails particularly to become impassable so long as there was any
one living adjacent to them or prospectors likely to use them, and therefore we did our best to
keep them open."
As the building of such settlers' roads is equivalent to advancing credit to the settlers, the
Government has a justifiable right to expect in due course some material compensation. . I am
convinced, therefore, that before undertaking further extensions of settlers' roads, or even
extensive repairs to existing ones, it is imperative that the Lands Settlement Board be more
frequently requested to investigate present and prospective conditions and recommend as to the
nature and extent of any work reasonably justified. In this way unnecessary roads could be
eliminated and a system of really useful roads thereby gradually evolved. Further, it seems
to me that in any future sales of Government lands the Department of Lands should carefully
consider the cost of construction of accommodation roads to, through, and adjacent to such lands.
Under existing conditions there are Government subdivisions with a few widely scattered settlers
who repeatedly appeal to this Department for assistance in opening up such subdivision roads.
Our road appropriations, instead of being diverted to the construction and maintenance of
such roads, should be .almost wholly concentrated upon a comprehensive road system connecting
up all the centres of population and industries. In this connection it is proposed to draft an
Act which can be used as the policy of the Department with a view to bringing down legislation
along those lines in the future. This proposed Act will provide for the proper classification of
roads and a definite system of appropriating funds for the construction and maintenance of same.
It will also include very necessary provision for taking care of main highways through organized
districts. Hitherto Government assistance in or towards the construction or upkeep of such
highways has not been given on any definite basis or on any proper understanding, and generally
with no comprehensive scheme in view. In the past fiscal year the Department contributed
50 per cent, of the cost of improving—usually with hard-surfacing—several recognized trunk
highways.
It was contended that as such highways carry interdistrict traffic (on the Lower Mainland
heavy interurban traffic) it was too much to expect the smaller organized municipalities to
entirely provide for the upkeep of same, especially as with the advent of automobile traffic—
particularly motor-trucks—the roads were increasingly used, and in many instances subjected to 9 Geo. 5 Public Works Engineer. C 9
traffic conditions for which they were not originally constructed. Last year about two miles
of hard-surfacing of trunk roads was undertaken by the municipalities- according to plans and
specifications approved by the Department, whose District Engineers carefully supervised such
work. The largely increased motor traffic, especially that of motor-trucks, has created a difficult
situation which it will be necessary to adequately meet in the near future. Experience has
conclusively proved that "hard-surfacing" is the most practical solution, particularly for trunk
roads contiguous to the larger centres of population. As it will be financially impossible to build
such comparatively expensive roads (that is, as far as the initial expenditure is concerned), it
will be advisable to seriously consider the question of issuing road bonds (preferably serial
bonds) for such more permanent work, the term of the bond to extend over a period of years
equal to the estimated life of the pavement. The question of the heavy truck traffic on roads
in the outlying districts will also require to be specially considered. Particularly in the Grand
Forks District, and between Fairview and Oroville, in the Similkameen District, serious damage
to the main roads was done by motor-trucks. Some remedial action will therefore require to be
taken under the head of " extraordinary traffic " to suitably provide for such a situation, as, of
course, it will be quite impossible under present conditions to pave such roads. While such
special work will greatly increase capital expenditure, it must be always remembered that the
cost of maintenance spread over a period of from ten to twenty years would be correspondingly
reduced. The annual expenditure on maintenance of ordinary roads is becoming increasingly
out of proportion to the less effective services rendered by such roads.
Of the 372,630 square miles in the Province, less than % of 1 per cent, is organized into
municipalities and contains 86 per cent, of the total population. The mileage of roads and trails
previously mentioned is thus practically all located in the 99% per cent, of unorganized territory,
which has a population of about 70,000. Hence in this respect this Province is materially
different from most of the other Provinces. With its widely varying topographical and climatic
conditions, physically it occupies a unique position in the Dominion, rendering the construction
and maintenance of roads a difficult and proportionately expensive undertaking.
In addition to the ordinary road programme, the Department carried out or supervised
works comprising the construction and maintenance of roads and trails, towards which the
Department of. Mines contributed the sum of $93,397.30 from the special " Aid to Mines " vote.
Owing chiefly to the increased activity in mining, such work entailed greater expenditure than
formerly for investigation and supervision, as the Engineers had usually to travel long distances
to prepare reports and estimates thereon, and latterly to oversee the work carried out.
Bridges.
While it was possible to limit the construction and maintenance of roads and trails to
reasonably necessary work, bridges had perforce to be constructed, renewed, or repaired to
meet the wear and tear of traffic and the ravages of floods and storms. Absolutely new construction, however, involved only 1.73 per cent, of the total expenditure on bridges. A large
number of bridges which had outlived their usefulness had to be reconstructed, and where
necessary this was done by substituting standard types where traffic and other conditions
justified same. In the fall of 1917 and the spring of 1918 we were unfortunate in experiencing
a number of unusually severe storms and floods throughout the Province, causing extensive
damage to bridges which had to be replaced, thereby involving unexpected heavy expenditures.
The districts which suffered most severely were Bella Coola, Salmon River (Comox District),
Chilliwack, Omineca, Atlin, and Fort George. In the renewal of such damaged structures the
existing and prospective requirements were fully considered and unnecessary structures either
eliminated or built at more convenient locations.
Some bridge-work was undertaken by contract this year, and it is the intention in future
to have all such work done by contract wherever practicable. The dearth of efficient Bridge
Foremen has been partly responsible for the day-labour work costing more than was anticipated.
Wharves.
The Department controls about ninety wharves, of which sixty-four are on tidal waters and
the remainder on inland lakes (Okanagan) ; although greatly in need of extensive repairs or
entire renewal, work was chiefly confined to urgent repairs on the more used wharves. To
counteract the ravages of the teredo, creosoted piles were used in most of the repairs to tidal C 10 Public Works Eeport  (1917-18).
wharves. But as the cost of such piles is at present about 60 cents per foot on scow at the
creosote plants, their extensive use will be prohibitive. However, in the past few years the
policy has been to carry out as little work as possible on the wharves on the tacit understanding
that the Federal Government would shortly assume control of same. Fortunately, recent negotiations have satisfactorily resulted in tentative arrangements being consummated for relieving the
Provincial Government from the heavy responsibility of maintaining such wharves.
Ferries, etc.
In addition to subsidized steamboats used chiefly on inland waters, the Department now
maintains forty-eight ferries, the majority of which afford free transportation. Of the six new
ferries constructed during the fiscal year, the most important was that at Hall's Landing, on the
Columbia River south of Revelstoke. Traffic conditions have since proved that this ferry was
justified and is now serving a long-felt want.
Traffic returns of every ferry are submitted to the Department monthly, from which data
it will be possible in future to decide as to whether the expense of maintaining certain ferries
is reasonably justified. The elimination of one or two little-used ferries and the amalgamation
of some others unnecessarily close together are questions worthy of consideration in endeavouring
to reduce the increasingly heavy maintenance charges.
River-bank Protection.
Besides the charges made directly to the particular road or bridge specially benefited by
protection-work, a sum of about $30,000 as particularized in the annual returns, was spent on
river-bank protection-work.
The safeguarding of the Government townsites of Golden, Fernie, and New Denver, situated
respectively on the Columbia and Elk Rivers and Carpenter Creek, accounted for the bulk of such
expenditure. Further and heavier outlays on the Columbia and Elk Rivers will be necessary
this year to retain and supplement the work already done. Hitherto river-protection work generally has been somewhat indiscriminately carried out and on no well-defined and comprehensive
scheme. This question will therefore require to be consistently dealt with on some practical
basis, as the amount of money involved will be very large in event of the Government undertaking
to protect private property abutting on the larger rivers subject to the ravages of periodical
freshets. In the past the avowed policy of the Department has been to spend money only where
it was necessary to protect or safeguard roads, bridges, or other Government property, but in
several cases this policy has not been strictly adhered to. Hence the present proposal to undertake such work along local-improvement lines and tax the costs pro rata on the parties or
interests directly benefited is one which commends itself for earnest consideration as a sane
step along the proper lines. Such a method is in vogue in the State of Washington, U.S.A., and
appears to operate satisfactorily.
Co-operation with other Departments.
Mention has already been made of the work done in conjunction with the Mines Department
and the Lands Department. An endeavour was also made to co-operate with the Forestry and
the Agricultural Departments in matters of mutual interest and concern. I should like to see
realized even greater co-operation with all Government departments affected in order to attain
all-round efficiency of administration, both in the indoor and outdoor service. Meantime the
courtesy extended and the assistance rendered by other departments should be recorded.
The co-operation of responsible associations, such as Boards of Trade and Farmers' Institutes,
throughout the Province was also sincerely sought. By explaining to them just what the Department is attempting to accomplish and the difficulties we have at present to contend with, and
inviting their practical co-operation, much good can be and is being accomplished.
Conference.
The Conference of District Engineers held in January last was of material assistance to all
who participated in the comprehensive programme, and the results should be most beneficial
not only to the Engineers, but to the Department, thereby greatly increasing its efficiency.
Special committees then appointed are now engaged in drafting for the Department's approval
standard plans and specifications and forms for keeping proper records of the various works and
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assisting by grants .have been examined, and, where found necessary, suggestions have been made
for their improvement, accompanied by sketch-plans showing the suggested alterations.
In other cases where no local architect has been available, complete sets of plans and
specifications have been prepared and such other assistance that has been found necessary.
The actual cost of running this office, omitting such overhead expenses as office rent and
furniture, is approximately 1.9 per cent, on the work executed, against at least 5 per cent, if
carried out by an outside architect, and is arrived at as follows:—
Work executed.
New school buildings  $ 00,967 50
Alterations and additions to school buildings   4,890 00
Alterations and repairs to Parliament Buildings   9,874 93
Repairs, alterations, etc., to other Government buildings  6,062 00
$111,794 43
Plans prepared for school and Government buildings not carried
out, at 2% per cent, on estimated cost   $ 840 00
Sketch-plans prepared for outside architects, charged on time basis 100 00
Value of work done for Engineering Department, charged on time
basis     495 00
Value of work done for Housing Committee   35 00
Value of work done for Price, Waterhouse & Co  90 00
Value of work done for Comptroller-General   60 00
Value of work done for landscape plans   75 00
$ 1,695 00
Total expenses, including salaries, etc   $ 3,802 00
Less work done on time basis   1,695 00
$   2,107 00
This sum being 1.9 per cent, on the value of work executed, viz., $111,794.43.
Vours obediently,
Henry Whittakicr,
Acting Supervising Architect. 9 Geo. 5 Acting Supervising Architect. C 11
General.
The branch of the Department dealing with roads, bridges, wharves, and ferries has been
dealt with more fully, as that is where the greater part of the reorganization has taken Iplace.
The construction of and repairs to public buildings are dealt with in detail in the report of
the Acting Supervising Architect. We are endeavouring to have all contracts for new buildings
let before September or October, so that advantage can be taken of fine weather, with corresponding economy in cost. It was necessary to increase the wages of the lower-paid janitors and
others, but by a readjustment of the staff the total cost of the work was materially reduced.
Graphs were plotted of the cost of the more important work and the men in charge supplied
monthly with a copy. The curve on cost of janitors clearly indicates the improvement in that
branch of the service. We have endeavoured to use the staffs of the Boiler Inspector and the
Inspector of Electrical Energy in connection with mechanical work on our larger ferries, in
checking up and improving the heating and other mechanical equipment, and in assisting in
alterations in our buildings, and the results have been very satisfactory, thanks to the splendid
co-operation of Mr. Peck, the Chief Inspector of Machinery and Boilers, and of Mr. Roberts,
Inspector of Electrical Energy, and their staffs. An endeavour has also been made where possible
to have repair-work carried out by the Engineers and mechanics in charge.
The details of work carried out in the Departments of the Inspector of Machinery and Boilers,
Inspector of Electrical Energy, the Inspector of Factories, and the Inspector of Dykes are given
in separate reports submitted by the heads of those departments.
In conclusion, this report would be incomplete without sincerely recording the co-operation
invariably extended to me by the various members of the indoor and outdoor staff, without whose
support, encouragement, and assistance the work of the Department could not have been so
harmoniously and efficiently carried out.
Accompanying this report are details of the expenditures on roads, trails, bridges, ferries
and wharves, and public buildings, together with other miscellaneous data relative thereto.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Yours obediently,
A. E. FOREMAN,
Public Works Engineer.
REPORT  OF ACTING  SUPERVISING ARCHITECT.
Supervising Architect's Office,
Victoria, B.C., December 9th, 1918.
A. E. Foreman, Esq., ,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report on the work carried out in this
office during the financial year 1917-18:—
In addition to usual work carried out in this office, such as erection of new school and
public buildings and general upkeep of the Parliament and other Government Buildings, we
have given considerable assistance to the engineering section of the Public Works Department
in the preparation of tracings for the Banff-Windermere Road and sundry other minor works.
Assistance was given Messrs. Price, Waterhouse & Co. in the preparation of an inventory
and valuation of the furniture, etc., in the Parliament and other Government Buildings, and
in many instances the .valuation of the buildings themselves; also to the Parliament Buildings
Housing Committee in the preparation of plans showing the allocation of the various offices,
their staffs, etc.
A complete list of the Government-owned buildings throughout the Province was prepared,
giving description, location, etc., for the Comptroller-General and preparation of sundry forms,
etc., for this official.
A considerable number of landscape drawings were prepared for various buildings from
information supplied by Mr. Gibson, of the Education Department.
At the request of the Hon. the Provincial Secretary and Minister of Education, plans and
specifications prepared by outside architects for schools, hospitals, etc., that the Government was   9 Geo. 5
Road Machinery and Plant.
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Public Works Eeport  (1917-18).
VALUATION OF PLANT, Etc.,
March 31st, 1918.
Electoral District.
Larg-e Plant.
Tools.
$ 752
1,488
2,893
1,003
1,622
657
760
1,372
324
740
2,000
953
2,038
359
1,500
284
1,326
300
2,725
300
690
2,206
648
1,062
3,760
2,870
1,167
66
3,745
1,738
474
2,619
2,091
Camp
Equipment.
Horses and
Harness.
Total.
Atlin	
$ 2,817
1,826
6,295
13,560
11,349
8,167
5.546
6,668
2,035
4,530
12,500
3,618
5,350
8,080
5,000
460
6,700
1,000
16,4.35
2,450
7,240
1,330
3,928
3,100
5,025
5,276
4,100
1,075
6,200
3,349
2,426
$   170
1,061
1,219
235
1,069
80
1,260
2.37
140
250
852
1,349
200
1,000
10
311
100
1,150
13
257
362
953
587
727
428
34
430
82
108
239
688
$ 'l45
1,050
'737
700
25
2,987
3J96
2,380
3^970
220
$ 3,739
4,520
11,457
14,798
14,777
8,824
6,386
9,300
3,296
5,435
14,750
5,423
11,724
8,639
7,500
754
Kamloops    ..       	
11,533
1,400
22,690
300
3,153
9,703
2,340
9,913
7,667
8,622
6,871
100
8,275
2,895
6,782
Trail    	
6,207
Yale  	
2,132
7,337
Totals	
$167,435
$46,532
$15,601
$17,542
$247,110 9 Geo. 5 Works and Buildings. C 15
WORKS   AND   BUILDINGS.
Fumigation Station, Victoria.    (Vote 116—$2,000.)
No expenditure.
Furniture, Government Offices throughout the Province.
(Vote 117—$8,000;  Sup., $400 = $8,400.)
Expenditure, $8,264.97, in the following districts:—
Alberni     $ 10 15
Anyox     115 11
Atlin   7 00
Barkerville     3 25
Clinton   33 00
Cranbrook   1 50
Cumberland     24 00
Golden  112 23
Greenwood     80
Hazelton     7 25
Invermere    64 85
Kamloops  407 58
Kaslo     1 75
Lillooet     127 94
Nanaimo     25
Nelson     156 90
New Westminster    304 80
Nicola i  50
150-Mile House    59 20
Princeton  31 50
Prince George  60 78
Prince Rupert    82 75
Quesnel     12 53
Revelstoke  2 00
Vancouver   403 91
Vernon    189 90
Victoria Court-house    461 71
Victoria Parliament Buildings    5,581 83
Gaols and Lock-ups throughout the Province.    (Vote 118—$15,000.)
Expenditure, $4,849.71, in the following districts:—
Alberni—Clayoquot    $        25 50
Atlin—
Atlin   79 00
Port Nelson    10 00
Cariboo—
McBride   146 00
150-Mile House    12 50
Quesnel     25 00
Vanderhoof   6 85
Columbia—
Golden     15 55
Field   3 85 C 10
Public Works Report (1917-18).
Gaols and Lock-ups throughout the Province—Continued.
Comox—■
Alert Bay    $ 40 64
Cumberland  138 75
Ocean Falls     38 15
Cranbrook—
Cranbrook   9 00
Fort Steele    5 50
Moyie    90
Fernie—■
Coal Creek    3 00
Corbin     1 90
Fernie     79 60
Michel      5 80
Natal     34 50
Fort George—
Fort Fraser     17 50
Fort George     145 00
Fort  St.  John     Ill 75
Lucerne  2 40
Pouce  Coupe     12 00
Vanderhoof   6 85
Grand Forks—Phoenix    8 50
Greenwood—
Greenwood     21 50
Midway     37 40
Islands—Ganges     5 00
Kamloops—
Chase    ,  3 00
Ducks    3 00
Kamloops       . 116 79
Notch Hill   10 00
Kaslo—■
Creston      21 45
Kaslo     4 70
Lillooet—Lillooet     10 50
Nanaimo—Nanaimo    .. . . 199 65
Nelson—Nelson     69 50
Newcastle—Ladysmith  3 86
New Westminster   81 04
North Oakanagan—
Enderby     45 00
Sicamous    1 00
Omineca—
Endako  10 75
Hazelton   ...".  49 S5
Smithers     4 30
Telkwa ...-.  2 00
Prince Rupert—
Kitsalas    5 70
Port Essington    ."  6 00
Prince Rupert    44 25
Vanarsdol     6 00
Revelstoke—Arrowhead     25 9 Geo. 5 Works and Buildings. C 17
Gaols and Lock-ups throughout the Province—Concluded.
Richmond—
Boys' Industrial School  $ 352 35
Girls' Industrial School     448 45
Saanich—Prison Farm     733 26
Similkameen—
Keremeos  375 00
Princeton      3 15
Slocan—
Nakusp     102 50
New Denver   20 45
Silverton  127 85
South Okanagan—
Kelowna     6 40
Penticton  9 50
South Vancouver—Oakalla Prison Farm   882 62
Trail—Salmo     2 30
Yale—
Ashcroft :  61 40
Hope   2 00
North Bend     1 00
Improvement of Government Grounds, Victoria.    (Vote 119—$7,000.)
Expenditure   $ 6,075 59
Improvement of Government Grounds throughout the Province.    (Vote 120—$4,000.)
Expenditure, $3,467.20, in the following districts:—
Alberni     $ 5 65
Ashcroft  2 90
Cranbrook    48 15
Fairview     78 00
Fernie    199 74
Fort Fraser    , . 10 50
Ganges    6 00
Golden       ' 51 49
Grand  Forks     9 20
Hazelton     18 70
Kamloops   47 10
Kaslo     4 25
Merritt   ....  80 46
Nanaimo   98 20
Nelson     34 02
New Westminster    33 45
Penticton  11 50
Prince George     27 40
Prince Rupert  451 06
Revelstoke     181 30
Vancouver   1,919 03
Vernon .. -.  149 10
King Edward Sanatorium, Tranquille.    (Vote 121—$10,000.)
Expenditure    $ 10.000 00
Mental Hospital, Essondale.
(Vote 122—$12,000;  S.W., $1,000;  S.W., $7,000 = $20,000.)
General repairs ($4,000; S.W., $1,000 = $5,000) —
Expenditure    $ 4,692 22 C 18 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Mental Hospital, Essondale—Concluded.
Completion of grading ($2,200) —
Expenditure $    2,197 02
Furniture ($2,000}—
Expenditure          1,796 38
New laundry ($3,800; S.W., $7,000 = $10,800) —
Expenditure         10,793 10
Nursery, Essondale, clearing and breaking New Land.    (Vote 123—$6,000.)
Expenditure    $    5,459 45
Colony Farm, Essondale.    (Vote 124—$4,000.)
Expenditure    $    3,998 15
Mental Hospital, New Westminster.    (Vote 125—$9,000.)
General repairs ($7,000) —
Expenditure    $    3,759 14
New furniture ($2,000) —
Expenditure        1,230 39
Provincial Buildings, London, England  (Completion, Furniture, and Maintenance).
(Vote 126—$23,000; Sup., $9,000 = $32,000.)
Expenditure    $ 31,993 31
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver (Maintenance).
(Vote 127—$3,000; Sup., $250 = $3,250.)
Expenditure           3,248 24
Provincial Normal School, Victoria  (Maintenance).
(Vote 128—$3,000.)
Expenditure    $    2,969 12
Public Schools throughout the Province.
(Vote 129—$106,000; Sup., $94,000 = $200,000.)
Expenditure on grants, buildings, school-desks, etc., $168,944.42.
Grants were made to the following School Boards: Alkali Lake, Bickle, Big Bar Mountain,
Cahilty, Cariboo, Castle Rock, Central Pouce Coupe, Chinook Cove, Christian Valley, Coal Creek,
Courtenay, Deer Lodge, Eagle River, False Bay, Fruitlands, Galloway, Hartley, Ingram Mountain,
loco, Kinnaird, Ladysmith, Meadowbrook, Marron Lake, North Pouce Coupe, North Vancouver
Municipality, Osoyoos, Popcum, Pouce Coupe, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Salmon Bench, Saskatoon
Creek, Savona Road, South Wellington, Springhouse, Sunnyside, Tatalaska Lake, Telegraph
Creek, Trail, Vavenby, and Yahk.
The following school buildings were erected: Abbotsford, Baynes Lake, Bull River Bridge,
Dunderave, Hollyburn, Limit, Princeton, Slocan Junction, and South Wellington.
Repairs to Buildings, Furniture, Fuel, Light, etc, Government House, Victoria (including
Upkeep of Garden).    (Vote 130—$17,000.)
Expenditure ' $14,303 91
Repairs to Government Buildings throughout the Province.    (Vote 131—$20,000.)
Expenditure, $13, 614.58, in the following districts:—
Alberni  $ 101 81
Anyox  5 60
Ashcroft  55
Atlin   82 90 9 Geo. 5
Works and Buildings.
C 19
Repj\.irs to Government Buildings—Concluded.
Barkerville    $ 30 90
Chilliwack      14 00
Clinton    205 40
Cranbrook    80 58
Cumberland  30 70
Duncan  2 75
Fernie  79 60
Fort Fraser   12 65
Fort George  4 00
Fumigating Station (Vancouver)    127 20
Golden     61 05
Grand Forks  32 20
Greenwood     69 82
Hazelton     17 35
Kamloops      1,458 00
Kaslo     144 63
Merritt   135 50
Nanaimo     180 13
Nelson     1,551 76
New Westminster   1,100 10
150-Mile House    40 20
Prince George  73 95
Prince   Rupert    .'  863 09
Princeton  16 30
Queen Charlotte  2 25
Quesnel     41 50
Revelstoke  438 77
Rossland     20 15
Stewart     96 00
Telegraph Creek    72 49
Trout Lake   2 00
Vancouver    5,250 48
Vernon    230 31
Victoria Court-house    931 91
Repairs to Parliament Buildings.
(Vote 132—$12,000;  S.W., $1,000;  Sup., $1,600 = $14,600.)
Expenditure    $ 1.3,854 07 C 20                                     Public Works Report  (1917-18).
-
STATEMENT   OF   EXPENDITURE.
1,902 73
14 15
171 00
340 12
61 74
139 25
5 00
500 55
1,558 77
24 50
16 00
29 50
46 00
110 00
6 50
902 .11
219 36
72 50
7 31
20 00
8 50
468 00   .
55 00
42 37
194 00
72 50
111 80
10 00
20 25
26 50
17 95
128 00
11 50
45 00
141 00
63 15
75 00
46 00
107 25
32 25
3 00
17 80
281 75
Roads, Streets, Bridges, and Wharves.
Fiscal Year ending 31st March, 1918.
Alberni District.    (Vote 133—$30,700.)
Road—-Alberni   $
,,      Auld's 	
„      Banfleld	
Battv's   	
,,      Beaver Creek 	
,,      Beaver Creek-Bainbridge  	
,,      Beaver Creek Wharf	
,,      Biggs and Crossan 	
,,      Biological   Station   	
Cape  Scott   	
„      Cherry Creek  	
,,      China Creek  	
„      Clauxlet   et al	
„      Drinkwater 	 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 21
Alberni District—Continued.
Road—Green and Illstad	
Guenlet and Wallace 	
Hector's   	
Hillier's	
Hilltown 	
Holberg, No. 33 	
Jenkins   	
Kirkpatrick's   	
Kitsuksis   	
Knight's 	
Lagoon 	
Lake Shore 	
Long Beach 	
Lowry  and  Greig   	
Maggie Lake-Ucluelet  	
Mattuews-Brevis  	
Million  	
Mission    	
Moore's	
Morning Star Creek (bridge approaches)
Morrison's  	
Mud Bay-Long Beach  	
McCoy Lake  	
McKercher   	
McKibbon   	
McNeil and Williams 	
Nanaimo   	
Nanoose  Station   	
North-west	
Pachena  (Keah Bay)   	
Page's 	
Parksville Cross 	
Peninsula-Ucluelet   	
Pillar's   	
Port Alberni-Four-mile Creek  	
Pym et al	
Quatsino (sundry)  	
Quatsino Wagon  	
San Josef Valley 	
School-house 	
Sea Otter Cove, No. 95	
Smith's (Cape Scott, No. 7)   	
Sproat Lake 	
Stanhope and Scott  	
Starkey and  Stewart   	
Station  	
Stewart, Hamil, ct al	
Sundry (east) 	
Sundry (west) 	
Swayne's 	
Tenah 	
Thompson's 	
Thorpe 	
Turner and Rutherford, No. 154	
Vargas Island 	
54 00
16 50
7 25
377 86
25 00
858 71
28 00
49 85
7 65
57 00
64 90
101 50
221 50
104 73
75 75
66 00
38 00
15 00
11 00
151 75
62 00
187 25
196 25
20 50
9 00
20 00
472 09
03 75
431 00
29 25
157 00
155 48
5 50
15 00
469 64
23 00
266 25
127 00
01 00
2 00
55 75
32 73
237 50
102 25
29 00
77 25
63 00
1,322 36
20 75
147 81
23 50
340 50
10 00
247 40
162 95' C 22 Public Works Report (1917-18).
Alberni District—Concluded.
Road—Victoria-Campbell River    $ 9,153 38
Weigle and Jones   296 02
Weigle, Peter    46 00
Wellington Townsite    120 60
Wither's  90 50
Wright's   42 00
Trail—Stranby    180 75
Supervision—Auto Account    $1,217 40
Clerical work        40 00
„           Assistant Engineer     2,034 85 .
 ■       3,292 25
General supplies          1,196 46
Total   $ 30,614 63
Atlin District.    (Vote 134—$21,700.)
Road—Atlin-McKee    $        10 00
„      Atlin-Surprise    '.. 012 50
„      Bear   River     24 00
Big  Horn  50 00
„     Birch   Creek     35 00
„      Bitter  Creek     524 00
„      Boulder   Creek     260 00
Burdette-O'Donnell      40 00
„     Drave    38 50
Fourth of July   !  150 00
Gleanerville-Warm  River     199 85
Glenora     315 00
„      Indian River     25 00
„      Jumper-Stewart's  Landing     288 00
Klehini River Wagon    200 00
Lincoln  Creek  Wagon     .100 00
„      Moose Arm  Wagon     25 00
„      McKee   Creek   .  125 00
O'Donnel River   10 00
Ruby Creek     475 00
Salmon  River     2,356 44
Salmon-Bear  River     264 61
Slate  Creek     50 00
„      Spruce   Creek     447 50
„      Stewart's Landing  75 00
Trail—Dease    ;  333 50
„      Georgia River     52.00
„      Glacier  Creek     226 00
Glenora  90 00
„     Grease  48 00
Illiance     1,381 50
„      Kincolith  (Mill Bay)     550 80
„      Kitsault River   1,012 75
„      Mill Bay    15 05
„      North Fork, Kitsault     24 00
„     Teslin  015 00
Streets—Atlin     87 50
„         Discovery      40 00
Telegraph      95 50 9 Geo. 5 Expenditure. C 23
Atlin District—Concluded.
Bridges—Nos. 17 and 24, Tahltan   $        10 00
South   Fork     16 00
No. 27,  Tooza     7 50
Ferry—Alice Arm   (Kitsault River)     13 50
„      Supervision      4,459 85
.   „      General supplies    2,476 88
Total $ 18,255 73
Cariboo District.
(Vote 135—$38,700; S.W., $3,000 = $41,700.)
Road—Alexandria-Beaver Lake   $        14 75
„     Alexandria Ferry  32 50
„     Alexis Creek-Chilanko Forks    655 72
„      Barkerville, tributary to     960 54
„      Beaver  Lake-Beavermouth     22 75
„      Beaver Valley    323 00
„     Beedy Creek  Valley     11 00
,,      Blackwater-Cottonwood Canyon   26 25
Cariboo   Main  10,888 55
„      Castle Rock    8 00
„     Chilanko Forks-Chezacut    1,077 42
Chilcotin Main     4,204 77
„      Cottonwood-Fraser River   250 90
Cottonwood-Strathnaver    987 81
„      Deacon's     3 50
Dog Prairie     7 00
„     Dragon Lake  10 50
Earley's     7 00
Harpers Camp-Black Creek     1,052 90
„      Hargrave's     73 00
„      Higdon      90 50
„      Keithley Creek     28 00
„      Lot 2560-Lot 3969     321 75
„     Macalister-Quesnel    -.  1,019 25
„      Mission      9 75
150-Mile-Harper's   Camp      1,900 46
158-Mile-Quesnel Forks   2,354 12
Quesnel-Blackwater     939 87
„      Quesnel-Cottonwood     31 50
,,      Quesnel-Dragon Lake    8 25
Quesnel-Nazko    1,908 85
„      Quesnel-Quesnel Forks     1,631 25
Quesnel. Forks-Keithley     377 50
„      Quesnel Lake Dam  10 50
Sawmill     5 00
„      Spanish Creek   10 50
„      Soda Creek-Alexandria    7 00
Soda Creek-Chilcotin   48 25
„      Soda Creek-Meldrum Creek     50 25
Soda Creek-Williams Lake     42 25
„      Upper Horsefly    31 50
„      White's   Landing     21 00
„     Williams Lake-Alkali     10 25
„      Winter     1,732 92 C 24
Public Works Report  (1917-18)
Cariboo District—Concluded.
Trail—108-Mile    i
Willow River 	
Streets—Quesnel   	
Stable Account   	
Wintering horses   	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer  $1,168 40
„ General  Foreman      591 27
Clerical  Work         240 00
„ Auto Account         625 46
General supplies
70 50
472 50
113 27
387 02
75 00
2,625 13
4,736 94
Total  $ 41,094 69
Chilliwack District.
(Vote 136—$18,700;  Sup., $1,200 = $19,900.)
Road—Abbotsford-East Yale  !,
Abbotsford-Huntingdon 	
Abbotsford-Riverside	
Abbotsford   Townsite   	
Abbotsford-West Yale  	
Chilliwack  River	
Columbia Valley  	
Cultus Lake-Vedder  Crossing   	
Huntingdon Townsite   	
Kosikar-Cultus Lake  	
McGrath-Rosedale-Agassiz   	
Rock-bunkers, Gifford   ,	
Rock-quarry, Vedder Mountain   	
Sumas  Mountain   	
Wade's Landing  	
Yale    (Chilliwack-Vedder)    	
Yale (Chilliwack-Rosedale)   	
Yale (east of Rosedale)   	
Yale (Vedder-Prairie)   	
Yale (Aredder-Vye)  	
Vye    :	
Street—Huntingdon City  	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer   $645 95
„ General Foreman      145 92
„ Clerical work      75 00
„ Auto Account  467 83
General supplies ..
Total
48 20
463 13
2,201 48
268 31
2,618 85
410 45
700 35
20 64
191 31
333 63
51 00
68 93
284 97
260 82
90 53
2,139 03
2,361 29
154 90
2,812 79
2,596 45
226 51
26 00
1,334 70
57 36
19,721 63
Columbia District.
(Vote 137—$20,700;  Sup., $200 = $20,900.)
Road—Athalmer and vicinity  $   2,565 24
  16 00
  29 00
  543 35
  86 60
  737 05
  89 00
Athalmer-Wilmer .
Banff-Windermere
Blaeberry-Donald
Brisco  	
Campbell   	
Canal  Flat   	 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 25
Columbia District—Concluded.
Road—Chalmers    $ 110 50
„      Cemetery    15 00
„      Foster Hill-No. 2 Creek   28 00
Foster's Landing-Red Rock   46 50
„      Golden-Blaeberry   552 00
„      Golden and vicinity    1,318 65
Golden-Donald     156 00
„      Golden-Moberly     652 25
„      Holmes and Deakin    491 50
Horse Thief Creek   10 00
„      Invermere and vicinity    27 00
Johnston  115 00
,,      Lower Moberly-Upper Moberly    162 00
Main Trunk  9 00
Main Trunk  (east side)     3,550 39
Main Trunk (west side)  324 75
„      Mitchell     273 00
Moberly-Donald     123 05
Mud Creek grade    10 00
,,      Nine-mile Creek   6 50
„      Olberg and Janson  73 00
„     Palliser     3 50
Paradise Mine  12 00
Red Rock     85 50
Sinclair-Stoddart's Creek    9 00
„      Taggart's Pass   53 00
„     Toby Creek   277 50
„      Toby Creek Cut-off   2,468 47
„      Toby Hill   36 00
„      Upper Toby     50 00
„     West side of Lake Windermere   48 00
„      Wilmer and vicinity  189 75
„     Windermere and vicinity    62 00
Trail—Giant Mine    16 00
Supervision—Assistant Engineer $2,037 02
Auto Account        745 10
Clerical work         225 00
  3,007 12
General supplies     2,461 53
Total   $ 20,S99 70
Comox District.     (Vote 138—$33,700.)
Road—Anderton's    $    235 88
„      Back  137 18
„     Bridges  Cross  24 00
„     Burns and Parkin   72 75
„-     Butcher's     4 00
Cessford   65 25
„     Cliffe's     2 00
„      Comox and John Hardy    753 61
„      Concession, No. 1    47 00
Concession, No. 2    1,035 03
„     Cortes Island   602 59 C 2G
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Comox District—Continued.
Road—Courtenay-Comox  $ 1,614 58
„     Cowie's      " 643 00
„      Creech's    ,  1,599 31
„      Cumbeiiand-Comox     33 50
„      Cumberland-Courtenay   1,381 01
Cumberland-No.  7 Mine  177 00
Cumberland and Roy   253 40
„      Denman Island     426 17
Fanny Bay and Station  316 24
„      Fraser and Harrigan   292 75
,,      Grieve and Rennison    139 33
Hardy Bay  22 00
„      Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour  1,139 03
„      Hawkins and McCluskey    8 00
„      Higgins and Knight   137 75
„     Hornby Island   530 00
Huband     SO 15
„      Kelland, No. 31    27 00
„     Kirby  3 00
Lake Trail-No. 7 Mine  13 00
,,      Lake Trail-Power-house     17 50
Lasqueti Island   308 12
„      Laurence and Briscoe    6 00
„      Lever's     1 00
„      Little River     373 61
„      Lot No. 117   5 00
Lot No. 210   5 50
„      Lund-Powell River    867 60
„      Malcolm River   413 90
„     Marsden-Kilpatrick   256 25
„      Milligan and Parkin   ,  269 99
„      McDonald's     2 00
„      McQuillan's     104 75
„      Nahwitte-Shushartie Bay    79 SO
„      Nimpkish River-Settlement     101 02
Powell River-Grief Point    226 25
„      Powell River-Ocean View    8 10
„      Powell Lake-Olsen Lake    195 50
„     Radford's  6 00
„      Roy's-Cumberland    S3 20
Salmon River   43 10
Sandwick and Bridges    499 20
„      Sharpe and Moore    6 00
„      Shushartie-Cache Creek  16 25
Smith's Cross  109 25
„     Texada Island    1,193 54
„     Torrance     6 00
„      Valdes Island   518 09
Victoria-Campbell River  . 9,906 62
Trail—Cannery     102 50
„      Lake     70 62
„      Main     75 00
„      McKinnell's     22 75
Section 28, Township 33   221 50 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 27
Comox District—Concluded.
Supervision—Assistant Engineer    $2,300 OS
Auto Account  .'    1,032 13
Clerical work           39 30
General supplies
Total
Cowichan District.    (Vote 139—$16,700.)
Road—Bazzett  	
Bench	
Oameron-Taggart	
Cherry  Point   	
Cowichan Lake   	
Cowichan Lake  (south shore)   	
Deloume   -	
Fall's 	
Fisher's   	
Glenore	
Halhed  	
Hall and Hawkins   	
Hillbank  	
Hopkins	
Indian   	
Jackson    	
Koksilah-Riverside   	
Lakeside   	
Old Koksilah   	
Old School-house .	
Old Victoria  	
Rip's   	
Sahtlam	
Shawnigan Lake  	
Shawnigan-Mill  Bay   	
Sheppard   	
Soole	
Thain's  	
Telegraph   	
Victoria-Campbell River  	
Wallick   	
Wilson   	
Trail—Bridge   (Clo-oose)   	
Brown's   (Clo-oose-Nitinat)   	
Cannery    ,	
Silver Mine 	
Avenue—Garland	
Supervision—Assistant District Engineer  $866 97
„ Auto Account       5S4 35
General supplies
3,372
11
2,097
22
$ 33,412
35
$  531
34
124
57
193
75
13
12
1,862
68
230 00
25
00
17 00
106
00
33
79
70
50
34
76
62
50
56
00
171.
02
30
75
3 00
350
74
606
27
25
00
233
50
31
50
209
18
627
00
29
25
85
18
86
70
100
55
131
50
8,317
78
33
00
50 00
47
25
99
00
72
25
82
75
151
00
1,451
32
201
95
Total  $ 16,588 45
Cranbrook District.
(Vote 140—$28,700;  Sup., $300 = $29,000.)
Road—Booth Creek  $ 9 00
Cranbrook  (adjacent)           2,153 09 C 28 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Cranbrook District—Concluded.
Road—Cranbrook-Fort Steele  $ 649 72
,,        Cranbrook-Fort Steele via Mission    205 00
„        Cranbrook-Gateway     439 25
Cranbrook-Goatfell  18 00
„        Cranbrook-Marysville    15 00
„        Cranbrook-McClure's and Kingsmill    370 90
„        Cranbrook-New Lake   14 00
„        Cranbrook-Perry Creek    7 00
Cranbrook-St. Mary River  224 25
Cranbrook-Wycliffe     2,626 70
Gold Creek Settlements   64 50
Ha-ha Creek  ■.  50 00
Kelly Slough  17 63
Kimberley-North Star  248 50
„        Main Trunk  (Cranbrook-Moyie)     3,483 65
„        Main Trunk (Cranbrook-Wardner)     239 35
„       Main Trunk  (Cranbrook-Wattsburg)     1 50
„   ■    Main Trunk   (Moyie-Goatfell)     3,145 45
Main Trunk   (Yahk-Kingsgate)     593 10
Mayook Settlement  834 03
„'      Marysville-Kimberley and Sullivan Mine   1,616 67
„        Marysville-St. Mary Lake  1,256 74
„       Meadowbrook Settlement  739 00
„        Mission-Marysville     293 50
„       Mission-Perry Creek  53 00
„       Mission-Wasa Bridge  47 75
„       Mission-Wesport     13 00
Munroe Lake  284 75
McGinty   42 00
Perry Creek from Crothers  1,233 56
St. Eugene Mine   295 70
St. Eugene-Mission   324 28
St. Mary's Prairie Settlement   612 09
,,       Waldo-Newgate     53
,,       Wasa Bridge-Skookumchuck    109 75
Wauklin School   423 05
Wycliffe-Cherry Creek   43 50
Wycliffe-Marysville   131 54
Wycliffe-Mission   633 77
Trail—Fish Lake     12 00
St. Mary Main   75 00
St. Mary (South Fork)    30 00
St. Mary  (West Fork)     33 59
Upper St. Mary   38 00
Whiteflsh    51 OO
Streets—Moyie  138 55
„          Wardner  31 63
Supervision—General  Foreman    $1,790 68
„ Automobile Account        641 45
Clerical work         569 63
  3,001 76
General supplies     2,020 89
Total  $ 28,996 13 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 29
Delta District.    (Vote 141—$17,700.)
Road—Abbotsford-West Vale    $ 228 75
Hjorth  360 75
Pacific Highway     7,766 79
Rock-hunkers, Cloverdale    80 89
Scott     2,000 00
Yale     5,383 18
Supervision—Assistant Engineer  $917 85
„ General Foreman      120 58
„ Clerical  work         75 00
Auto  Account       522 87
  1,636 30
General supplies    37 57
Total  $ 17,494 23
Dewdney District.
(Vote 142—$31,700;   S.W., $2,700;   Cr. Note, $18.38 = $34,418.38.)
Road—Davis and Tupper  $ 133 35
Deroche     16 50
„        Deroche and Athey   8 00
Dewdney Trunk, Section 1   432 28
Dewdney Trunk, Section 2   6,702 01
Dewdney Trunk, Section .3  1,694 89
Dewdney Trunk, Section 4   1,220 35
Dewdney Trunk, Section 5   202 55
Dewdney Trunk, Section 6  664 70
Dewdney Trunk, Section 7   766 35
Dewdney Trunk, Section 8   869 70
Dewdney Trunk, Section 9   168 50
Fraser River Dyke   184 24
Hammond     196 60
Hatzic  Front     132 70
Hatzic Prairie-Dewdney    363 83
Hatzic Prairie-Sylvester  603 64
Hyde and Buker   234 40
loco    5,314 71
Johnson    ".  13 00
„        Kirkpatrick     3 00
„        Macauley  35 50
Malcolm    24 75
„        Mission Ferry Wharf   .*  8 50
Mission-Stave Lake  378 14
Mission Townsite  2,845 99
McDonald     2 00
McKenney Creek    23 25
„        McNeil, Rennie, and Campbell    639 73
McRae     -    1 00
Newton   3 00
Nicomen Dyke    2,381 02
„        Nicomen Island Trunk     824 85
North Nicomen  276 SO
North of Sunnyside    191 20
Pickles     95 98
River Road (south)  287 05
Ruskin-Stave Falls   81 00 C 30
Public Works Report (1917-18).
Dewdney' District—Concluded.
Road—Sharpe   	
Shook-McEwan	
Silverdale   	
Smith   	
Sterling-Morrison 	
Sunnyside   	
Tremblay	
Whonnock Front 	
Supervision—General Foreman
„ Clerical work  . . . .
,, Auto Account
,599 75
150 00
860 65
General supplies
46 50
12 75
1,881 57
13 00
126 00
56 50
3 00
541 75
2,610 40
638 19
Total  $ 33,954 72
Esquimalt District.
(Vote 143—$23,700;   Sup., $1,500 = $25,200.)
Road—Atkins  .	
Battersby	
Bennett's   	
Brown's   	
Calvert's   	
Colwood  	
Craigflower   	
Deacon's    ..	
Duke's   	
East Sooke  	
Ellison's  	
Finlayson's Arm   .
Fisher's   	
Fitzgerald's  	
Gillespie's   	
Goldstream   	
Coldstream Cross
Gordon River
Happy Valley
Hart's   	
Helgeson's   	
Helmcken    	
Jordan River
Kemp   	
Lagoon  	
Lighthouse   	
Luxton   	
Metchosin	
Metchosin  Cross   .
Miller's 	
Millstream  	
Milne	
Munn's   	
Otter Point 	
Parkinson   	
Phillips   	
Poirier	
155 00
60 00
10 00
340 95
211 S6
2,412 34
1,393 85
29 50
103 05
746 66
126 25
41 50
29 00
167 00
16 25
1,527 28
38 25
193 SO
759 87
1S9 80
47 50
80 00
899 50
1.05 00
10 10
134 50
22 00
863 43
60 75
22 50
340 SI
50
12 00
910 55
337 10
90 00
132 50 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 31
Esquimalt District—Concluded.
Road—Quarantine 	
Renfrew   	
Robinson's  	
Rocky Point  	
Ross-Durrance   	
San Juan  (west)   	
Sanwick  	
Shawnigan Lake  	
Shield's   	
Shirley   	
Sooke   	
Sooke River  	
Sooke  (west)   	
Station  	
Summit 	
Taylor	
Thetis Lake	
Victoria-Campbell River  .
Vancouver Island Trunk
Wright's  	
Young's Lake  	
Avenue—Maple   	
Supervision—General Foreman . .
„ Clerical work  	
",, Auto Account  	
$1,004 20
630 00
712 30
General supplies
Total
Fernie District.
Road—Baynes-Waldo 	
Elko-Morrissey  	
Elk-Prairie   	
Elko-Roosville 	
Elk Valley  	
Elko-Waldo  	
Pernie-Coal Creek	
Fernie-Hosmer  	
Fernie-Morrissey    -.	
Fernie West-Cedar Valley	
Flathead Valley 	
Fort Steele-Bull River 	
Fort Steele-Canal Flats	
Fort Steele-Wasa 	
Fort Steele-Wild Horse	
Gateway Ferry    '.....
Jaffray-Wardner   	
Lizzard Creek Ranches	
Michel-C'rowsnest   	
Michel-Hosmer   	
Michel Prairie (south)   	
South Forks-Elko   	
Waldo-Flagstone   	
Waldo-Gateway   	
Wardner-Bull River 	
(Vote 144—$23,700.)
224 55
122 50
22 50
650 75
1,999 3S
46 00
5 50
85 00
21 00
877 99
1,865 38
470 45
72 75
115 25
437 43
82 50
125 00
10 50
1,741 4S
143 50
67 00
113 42
2,346 50
844 90
$ 25,102
18
$   66
50
1,452
75
7S
25
504
96
5S
75
561
85
1,189
40
2,070
30
3,911 24
3,176
40
249
50
2S0
50
346 95
1,138
86
3
00
303
00
1.94
50
92
75
S46
20
1,216 60
69
25
152
50
376 00
854 00
116 50 C 32
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Fernie District—Concluded.
Road—Wardner-Fort Steele '
„        Wardner-Waldo   	
Wasa-Canal Flats 	
Streets—Elko   	
Natal   	
„ West  Fernie   	
Sidewalks—Bull River   	
Fort Steele 	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer   $1,567 83
„ General Foreman       156 10
„ Clerical work           55 16
Auto Account         794 35
General supplies
75 00
144 00
111 25
52 50
147 00
202 43
68 50
126 81
2,573 44
727 85
Total  $ 23,539 29
Fort George District.    (Vote 145-
3,700.)
Road—Aleza Lake    $
Bearhead    	
Bobtail Lake-Upper Mud River	
Dunster District  	
Engen District         1
Fort George-Blackwater          1.
Fort George-Chief Lake          1
Fort George-Pinker Willow   „    3.
Fort George-Stony Creek          1,
Fort George-Summit Lake          1,
Fort Fraser Extension •        1,
Eraser-Francois Lake, No. 6  	
Gardner Crossing  	
Grande Prairie 	
Greer  Valley   	
Hoffereamp	
Hoffstrim  	
Hulatt District   	
Kelly Settlement          1
Lampitt-Hargreave  	
Longworth   (south)    	
Mud River Valley (south)    -	
McBride          1
McKinnon Crossing   	
Ness Lake  	
Pierce    	
Pinket Settlement 	
Pouce Coupe Crossing 	
Quesnel-Fraser Lake  	
Schafer	
Six-mile-Buckhorn Lake  	
Stuart Lake-Fraser Lake Trail 	
Tsinkut Lake-Cottonwood Creek	
Tsinkut-Stuart  Lake   	
Vanderhoof (south)   	
Vanderhoof-Sturgeon Point   	
West Lake	
648
92
1
62
16
50
577
85
,608
30
,240 42
.331
88
,561
18
,282
44
,366 95
,018
07
826
90
699
50
477
25
154
50
24
50
204
50
988
77
,054
35
150
00
100
11
22
75
,060
90
103
75
785
00
261
25
29 00
239 00
855 38
,028
30
106
85
42
45
93
10
,159 65
199 34
,260
00
73
50 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 33
Fort George District—Concluded.
Supervision—Assistant Engineer   $   336 75
„ General Foreman       5,443 55
Clerical work         722 65
„ Auto Account          694 55
  7,197 50
General supplies     6,S46 14
Total   $ 38,699 09
Grand Forks District.    (Vote 146—$16,700.)
Road—Anaconda-Wellington Camp    $ 45 50
Bear Creek-Pass Creek   1,000 75
Cascade-Fife   762 25
Cascade-Laurier   17 00
„        Cascade-Moody  Creek     51 00
Cascade-Paulson     218 50
„        Christina Lake   (west)     45 00
„        Deep Creek-Boundary-line  376 50
English Cove-Head of Lake   239 00
Fife-Christina Lake  150 50
Fife-Sutherland Creek  , 209 50
Fourth of July Creek    206 00
,,        Granby Addition-Phoenix    34 50
Grand Forks-Carson   (north)  290 00
„  •     Grand Forks-Carson   (south)     562 SO
Grand Forks-Cascade (north)    2,204 00
Grand Porks-Cascade (south)     214 00
Grand Forks-Eholt    39 50
Grand Forks-Franklin    2,020 50
„        Grand Forks-Hardy Mountain  5 00
Grand Forks-Pass Creek   274 65
„        Grand Forks-Summit City   651 50
„        Hartford Junction-Boundary-line    87 50
Mill Creek-Grand Forks   75 00
„        Moody  Creek-Cascade  45 00
„        Morrissey Creek   (east)  401 00
„        Morrissey Creek  (west)     75 0O
,,        Norway Mountain-Paulson    195 S5
„        Phoenix-Greenwood   (north)     398 50
„        Phoenix-Greenwood   (south)     62 00
Phoenix-Summit City   982 10
Supervision—General  Foreman    $1,961 20
Clerical work         455 00
Auto Account         663 10
  3,079 30
General supplies    1,3S7 75
Total   $ 16,406 95
Greenwood District.    (Vote 147—$16,700.)
Road—Anaconda-No. 7 Mine  $ 386 25
Baker Creek   IS 25
Beaverdale Station   19 50
Boundary Creek  157 50
Bridesville-Molson    153 20
3 C 34 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Greenwood District—Concluded.
Road—Camp McKinney-Rock Creek  $ 74 00
Camp McKinney-Sidley    394 37
„        Oarmi-Penticton Trail    30 00
Caron, No.  0  135 75
„        Deadwood-Copper Creek    583 50
Eholt-Summit Camp   42S 00
Fish Lake   3 00
Greenwood-Eholt    61.9 25
Greenwood-Midway  1,293 80
„        Greenwood-Phoenix     563 00
Hartley-Phoenix     100 00
Ingram Mountain    203 25
„        Kerr Creek    155 50
Kettle River Main      2,860 43
„       Kettle River (east side)     184 75
Kettle River (West Fork)     358 25
Letts-Higginbotham     60 00
Link Creek    160 00
„       Long Lake-Jewel Mines    250 75
Lynn Creek '.  469 37
„ -     Midway-Rock Creek    922 75
Myers Creek  113 89
McCarren  Creek     274 75
Nicholson Creek     249 25
Rock  Creek-Myncaster     105 00
Rock  Creek-Nine-mile     1,652 40
Rock Mountain  100 81
„        Rock Mountaiu-Myncaster    93 25
„        Rock Monntain-Bridesville    48 00
Sally     440 90
Sidley Mountain  217 10
Town  Creek   78 50
Supervision—General  Foreman    $1,467 27
Auto Account        644 84
Clerical work         1S3 30
  2,295 41
General supplies     292 36
Total   ? 16,546 04
Islands District.
(Vote 14S—$17,700;   Cr„ $2.30 = $17,702.30.)
Gabrioia Island.
Road—Bay    ? 118 00
„        Centre     53 00
,,        Degnen and Gray's   59 00
Dixon  9 00
„        East   9700
Easthom    7 00
„        Laws     140 00
Main   (west)     94 50
McLay     S7 °0
Palmer's   29 °°
„       Peterson's     9 °0
South End  134 11 9. Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 35
Islands District—Continued.
Gabrioia Island—Concluded.
Road—Taylor  $        75 00
Troop     38 00
General supplies     125 69
Galiano Island (North).
Road—Main  (north)     147 75
General supplies     17 37
Galiano Island (South).
Road—Bluff     10 50
Burril    4 00
Main     56 50
Morgan's     2 00
Retreat Cove     17 25
Shield's     2 00
General supplies    43 90
Trail—North End    292 00
Mayne Island.
Road—David's     20 00
Horton  Bay     28 00
Mayne      185 50
Point Comfort    76 50
Village Bay     115 00
General supplies    Ill 25
North Saanich.
Road—Breed's  61 75
Bullen's     25 00
Centre   294 00
„        Davis     59 00
Deep  Bay  90 50
Downey's  6 00
,,         Downey's   Subdivision     24 00
East  (Bazan Bay)           1,204 13
Marine Drive     245 71
„        Medrona Drive  (new)     39 00
Mount Newton (west)     473 90
School Cross    14 25
Avenue—Beacon      400 88
Beauford     152 25
Henry        72 00
Oakland     61 00
Orchard     37 00
Street—Fourth    48 25
Sidney    -  572 72
General supplies     310 01
Pender Island (North).
Road—Bedwell     '.  378 00
„        Browning Harbour   10 50
Hoosen's      31 00
Hope Bay     43 62
Otter Bay     35 00 C 36 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Islands District—Continued.
Pender island (North)—Concluded.
Road—Port Washington   $ 9 25
Roe's    12 50
General supplies  41 65
Pender Island (South).
Road—Bedwell   94 50
Clam Bay     15 50
Corbet's     96 50
Higg's  20 00
Hope Bay  (Port Washington)     103 52
Otter Bay     43 75
„        Spalding's     15 00
Saltspring Island (North).
Road—Beddis  -.  106 50
Breadwell      26 00
„        Burgoyne    6 37
Canal     10 72
„        Cranberry     452 35
Divide     393 40
Eperon   . .  33 00
Fernwood    :  9S 66
Ganges  (lower)     326 SO
„        Ganges  (upper)     162 75
Hill and Brantford   4 52
Knight's     28 75
Le Page    35 00
„     " Mansell      112 00
Nobbs     27 49
North  End     381 25
Rainbow      120 50
Rosman     1S9 75
Scott     3 62
Stark  54 62
Tripp's          ■   123 50
Vesuvius  91 00
Walker's Hook    140 00
General  supplies     89 72
Saltspring Island (South).
Road—Beaver Point   268 25
Brantford's     10 12
Burgoyne Bay     610 77
Isabel Point     100 50
Mountain    30S 65
General supplies  44 05
Saturna Island.
Road—Boot Bay   •  2S 50
Central  594 00
Deep  Bay  57 75
Taylor's  7 00
Trail—Dyne's    14 00
Lyall Harbour    SO 00
General supplies     207 07 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 37
Islands District—Concluded.
Thetis Island.
Road—Nixon    !
Thetis   	
Wharf    	
General supplies    -.	
Supervision—Government launch  $1,190 21
„ General Foreman       1,320 85
„ Auto Account        185 72
Clerical work       450 00
General supplies
6 25
154 80
14 25
30 07
3,146 78
678 40
Total  $ 16,725 94
Kamloops District.    (Vote 149—$28,700.)
Road—Adams Lake  	
Barriere River 	
Beaton-Fish Lake  	
Blind Bay-Eagle Bay  	
Bulmer-Fraser-Palmer   	
Buse Meadow 	
Campbell Creek 	
Canoe   	
Celista   	
Chase Creek  	
Chase-Squilax 	
Chase Town   	
China Valley	
Clearwater   	
Douglas Lake-Grande Prairie ..
Ducks-Grande Prairie-Falkland
Duck Range  	
Duck Station-Disedero	
Edith Lake  	
Fadear Creek  	
Ferguson-Hazelhurst   	
Harpers Camp  	
Hollis-McLeod    	
Hudson Bay Gulch  	
Kamloops-Nicola   	
Kamloops-Savona     ■	
Kamloops-Shuswap  	
Kamloops-Tranquille   	
Leigh  	
Little Fort-Horse Lake  	
Long Lake 	
Louis  Creek   	
Mamete Lake 	
Martin's Prairie	
Miller-Lazard   	
Moberley-Tappen   	
McLeod Range 	
North Thompson  (east)   	
North Thompson (west)   	
Notch Hill West-Squilax	
339
10
7 65
15S
65
321 00
296
70
118
14
756
54
301
50
615
74
2,122
68
344
04
52
00
548
90
SO
86
86
85
1,341
70
153 59
19
25
3
SO
318
95
46
75
334 60
51
25
154
60
620
34
1,116
00
1,347
24
697
48
90
00
114 00
27
00
1,084
50
16 00
197
IS
ISO
85
48
00
12
44
2,478
73
2,139
78
131
00 Kamloops District1—Concluded.
Road—Notch-Tappen $ 123 25
Old Men's Home   115 50
Oxley Valley   142 25
Peterson-Betts  85 58
Reserve Creek     277 39
Rose Hill (old)     228 76
Rose Hill  (new)     456 87
„        Salmon Arm Municipality  1,505 33
Scotch  Creek     81 00
Seymour  River     76 66
„        Shuswap-Kault-Salinon Arm   .,  129 77
„   .    South Thompson   .'  C65 57
Squilax   402 66
Strawberry Heights  100 CO
Sullivan Valley-C.N.R. Siding   123 05
„       Tappen-Carlin  191 75
Todd-Duck Meadow  135 80
White Lake     31 80
Supervision—Assistant Engineer   $     15 CO
,, General Foreman          986 18
Clerical work        977 03
Auto Account     1,139 60
  3,117 81
General supplies  1,224 38
Total $ 28,090 62
Kaslo District.    (Vote 150—$27,700.)
Road—Ainsworth   (north)    ! $ 85 50
„       Ainsworth  (south)     508 50
Argenta  93 00
Beach     53 25
Burden     4S 62
„        Canning    -  6 50
Canyon City    9 00
Canyon Siding-Gorthill     39 25
Cemetery  14 50
Circle City-Old Gold     29 00
Crawford Bay    82 00
Crawford Creek   1,087 07
„        Creston-Alice Mine    36 25
„       Creston-Erickson    797 00
„        Creston-Goat River   67 50
Creston-Kitchener-Goatfell  1,183 25
„        Creston-Kuskanook   101 75
Creston-Porthill  62S 13
Creston-Sirdar  147 50
Creston-Summit Creek   370 57
Duck Creek  23 00
Ericksoii-Canyon City     11.7 50
Erickson-Porthill    132 15
Florence     30 00
,,        Gardner's   16 25
Hamill Creek     340 12
Hood-Medford     '  " 87 99 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 39
Kaslo District—Continued.
Road—Howser-Argenta  	
Howser-Lardeau    	
Huston   	
Jackson	
Kaslo Creek (North Fork)
Kaslo Creek (South Fork)
Kaslo   (north)   	
Kaslo   (south)	
Kaslo   (South Fork)   	
Lardeau  (North Fork)   . ..
Lardeau (South Fork)   ...
Lindsay   	
Lynchyille   	
Meadow Creek Wagon ....
Mirror Lake  	
Murphy Creek   	
McMurtrie-Stewart 	
Nettie L	
Peters  	
Pilot Bay   ,	
Porthill    	
Queen's Bay-Balfour   	
Samuelson  	
Smith and Peterson  	
Spokane  	
Utica 	
Wadd's  	
Wilmot  	
Winslow 	
Trail—Alpine   	
Beaver   	
Brown Creek   	
Cariboo Creek   	
Cascade Creek  	
Coffee Creek  	
Crawford   Creek   	
Duncan River	
Eight-mile   	
Ethel 	
Eureka   	
Ferguson  (northern)   	
Fidelity   	
Five-mile Creek	
Flint   	
Gainor Creek 	
Gertrude Creek	
Goat River	
Grey Creek 	
Hall Creek	
Howser Lake  (east)   	
Kaslo Creek (North Fork)
Keen   	
La France Creek	
Lake Creek 	
Lardeau River 	
90 75
43 25
13 00
6 62
76 12
609 13
533 30
84 70
315 25
ISO 50
36 25
31 00
440 00
30 00
132 36
100 00
36 50
50 00
87 00
49 62
10 50
600 49
133 63
50 00
296 85
507 00
46 75
296 00
81 00
9 75
5S 00
14 50
5S 50
161 55
ISO S7
9 75
190 84
185 25
13 00
200 80
173 00
74 75
39 00
53 62
46 50
51 50
22 00
49 50
240 76
99 10
27 50
14 50
99 00
58 00
107 25 C 40 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Kaslo District—Concluded.
Trail—Lardeau River (east)   $ 208 00
Leviathan     26 00
Lockhart Creek  98 00
Lucky  Boy     148 12
Meadow Creek   3S 75
Poplar Creek     108 25
Rose's Pass   78 00
Sauca-Boswell     200 00
Scranton      68 24
Silver Cup   47 50
Smuggler    .'  90 00
Spring Creek  32 SO
Stanley   73 50
Tenderfoot Creek     32 50
Trout Lake-Beaton    780 10
Trout Lake  (east)     91 50
Trout Lake-Ten-mile     1,776 83
White Grouse :  39 75
Whitewater    90 00
Woodberry Creek (North Fork)    530 02
Streets—Ainsworth    92 26
Creston  429 58
Kaslo    145 63
„          Lardeau      6 50
Sidewalks—Trout Lake   19 50
Bridge—Foot-bridge, Wakefield Road   34 10
Goat River  •.  4 00
Protection-work—Lardeau River   ,  445 20
Supervision—General  Foreman    $1,472 59
Clerical work         393 40
  1,865 99
General supplies    1,106 29
Total   $ 22,048 42
Lillooet District.    (Vote 151—$28,700.)
Road—Big Bar    $ 870 18
Big Bar-Big Bar Mountain    348 92
„        Big Bar-Empire Valley    1,108 75
Big Bar Ferry    41 00
,,        Big Bar Lake-Beaver Dam  75
Big Bar Mountain (Cross Bar)     278 00
Bonaparte  Valley    104 25
Bridge River     3,643 03
Bridge Creek-Canim Lake  4S 00
Bridge Creek-Horse Lake-Fish Lake    75 00
Buffalo  Lake      117 50
Canoe Creek-Churn Creek  868 84
Cariboo Main    5,080 82
Chilcotin Main   1,078 50
Churn Creek-Hanceville    710 10
Clinton-Alkali   1,113 35
Clinton-Alkali (via Kelly Lake)    189 53
Clinton  Station     140 00
Criss Creek  920 65 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 41
Lillooet District—Concluded.
Road—Deadmau Creek 	
Deadman Creek   (upper)   	
Empire Valley  	
Fog Creek-Criss Creek 	
Fog  Creek-Wilson's   	
Fountain Valley 	
Hat Creek 	
High Bar 	
Jones-Dickey 	
Lillooet-Clinton    ■.	
Lillooet-Lytton  	
Lillooet-Seton Lake   	
Marble Canyon   	
Mound-Loon Lake 	
McKinley-Hamilton-Ogden   	
North Bonaparte 	
North Fork 	
Porter	
Rapbael-Pigeon-Meason  	
Rayson-Beaver  Dam   	
Rayson-Big Bar Lake 	
70-Mil.e House-Green Lake-Porter's Branch
Sheep Creek-Riske Creek  	
Springhonse Prairie-Pigeon   	
Station  	
Upper Big Creek 	
Upper Dog Creek   	
Upper Hat Creek  	
Woods Box-High Bar  	
Trail—Bridge River Canyon  	
Gun Creek 	
Pavilion Ferry 	
Seton Lake  	
West of Fraser  	
Streets—Lillooet   	
Supervision-
-General Foreman
Auto Account .. .
$1,913 00
674 00
General supplies
357 15
42 00
185 75
43 00
50 00
27 00
110 00
73 50
745 75
1,220 90
1,975 11
330 00
118 00
163 85
18 00
217 77
650 38
27 25
130 00
2 35
176 50
9 00
30 00
99 40
344 75
25 00
45 00
24 00
1S6 62
120 00
1 85
51 00
19 00
87 00
32 25
2,587 11
1,562 37
Total  $ 28,634 78
Nanaimo District. (Vote 152—$9,000.)
Road—Bates and others ..
Boundary-line	
Brechin	
Departure Bay
Extension	
Fielding and Hose
Five-acre Lots
Frews et al	
Gordon et al	
Harewood   	
Harewood Mine ...
Holden and Carso .
10 38
42 00
375 92
334 17
31 37
11 00
1,508 94
6S 00
86 00
56 00
144 S2
2 00 C 42 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Nanaimo District—Concluded.
Road—Jingle Pot " $ 156 60-
Marshall's     24 00
,,        Millstream    9 25
McClary Extension    IS 00
„        Nanaimo Lake,  122 95
„        Newcastle Townsite    12 50
Nichol Street Extension  317 92
Northfield  58 00
Old Victoria  58 00
Park  Avenue     3 00
Raine's     30 00
Rosehill Avenue  20 00
South Fork   13 00
South Wellington     606 09
Victoria     272 00
Victoria-Campbell River    3,485 28
Wellington    37 00
Street—Eaton  13 50
Robin :  49 00
Strickland     6 00
Supervision—Assistant Engineer  $426 35
Clerical work    120 00
Auto Account   .    185 SO
  732 15
General supplies  59 00
Total   $ 8,773 S4
Nelson District.    (Vote 153—$2,200.)
Road—Mountain   	
Streets—Fairview  	
,, South Nelson ....
Supervision—Clerical work
General supplies   	
Total
Newcastle District.    (Vote 154—$18,700.)
Road—Adshead   	
Ainscough's   	
Andrew  	
Bennie-Yellow Point .
Brown's   	
Buck's    	
Christie and Wallace
Corso's   	
Crane's   	
Cross  	
Departure Bay 	
East Wellington   ....
Extension    	
Fiddick's   	
Forrester-Trudell ....
Greaves   	
Greenway's   	
102
50
1,866 33
31
00
72
00
104
00
2,175
83
38
75
401
35
74
00
303
30
5
72
502
50
14
25
245
35
26
00
29
50
30
25
390
58
258
75
29
00
126
00
24
50
54 50 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 43
Newcastle District—Concluded.
Road—Haslam's  i
Hemer's   	
Hill-Michael    .'	
Holden-Corso    t. ...
Jingle Pot 	
Juriet's	
Lockner's  	
Morden  	
McNiven   	
Nanaimo Lake  	
Newcastle Townsite  	
Old South Wellington   	
Oyster Bay   ....:..
Paterson  	
Patricia   	
Quesnel-Weaver  	
Roosville   	
South Fork  	
South Wellington   	
Sunias  	
Thomas-Yellow Point  	
Tiesu 	
Victoria   	
Victoria-Campbell River  	
Waterloo	
Westwood   	
Willett   	
Trail—Sutton	
Avenue—Fourth  	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer  $780 40
Clerical  work       100 00
Auto  Account       510 20
General supplies
173 25
478 99
109 25
40 0O
2S1 84
81 75
455 91
121 37
35 OO
57 00
49 50
30 74
7 25
42 25
1,731 29
124 20
15 93
23S 27
246 31
6 00
839 85
35 00
16 50
8,821 72
148 00
17 50
37 00
17 00
10 62
1,390 60
43 25
Total   $ 1S,263 44
New Westminster District.    (Vote 1.55—$8,000.)
Retaining-wall, Fraser Bridge 	
$    7,650 00
Road
North Okanagan District.
(Vote 156—$27,700; Cr., $12.05 = $27,712.05.)
Municipality   	
^rinstron;
Beanpark  	
Bluenose  	
Bowdler   	
B.N. Subdivision  	
Carlin  Orchards   	
Coles Lake (L. and A. Subdivision)
Coldstream Mining 	
Coldstream-Vernon   	
Commonage   	
Coles Lake   	
Creighton Valley  	
Deep Creek 	
341 00
2 50
113 00
15 50
269 90"
4 90
56 60
750 00
27 90
274 10
88 50
375 50
6 00 C 44
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
North OkanaGjVN District—Continued.
Road—Eastside   	
Enderby-Mabel Lake   	
Enderby-Vernon	
Swing's	
Dale's   	
Dure Meadows  	
East Vernon Subdivision ...
Falkhead-Chase   	
Falkhead-Paxton Valley  .. .
Fowler-Willett   	
Glenmary and branches  . ..
Glenemma-Armstrong  	
Grindrod   	
Griudrod-West Benches
Gunter-Allison   	
Haines-Wright   	
Keddleston   	
Knight   	
Long Lake 	
Lumby-Blue Spring Trail  .
Luinby-Creigihton Valley  ...
Lumby-Mabel Lake	
Lumby-Vernon   	
Mabel  Lake   	
Main Trunk   	
Mara-Enderby 	
Mara Lake	
Mara Lake (east side)   ....
Mara Lake (west side)  ....
Mara Station  	
Monk's   	
Morgan's   	
Mowat's   	
Mud Lake  (west side)   ....
Okanagan Landing  	
Okanagan Landing Bench  .
Okanagan Landing Mill  .. .
~ Oyama Fruit Lots 	
Pleasant Valley  	
Riverside  	
Salmon Arm 	
Salmon River	
Sawmill   	
Shuswap-Mabel Lake	
Sigalet   	
Six-mile Creek 	
Spallumcheen Municipality
Sugar Lake 	
Trinity   	
Trinity Valley   	
Tronson	
Vernon-Kamloops 	
Vernon-Kelowna 	
Vernon-Monashee 	
Ward's 	
10 00
233 00
673 65
15 00
11 45
209 00
249 70
1 50
12 00
332 75
30 00
66 00
279 60
2,372 25
19 00
53 00
172 00
20 00
333 00
6 00
6 00
597 50
8 75
1,377 25
60 10
26S 45
56 00
99 00
84 00
55 50
77 45
38 00
2 45
9 80
251 50
87 00
57 00
140 00
2,737 85
267 50
428 25
903 93
0 00
2 50
12 00
22 22
624 60
223 00
11 00
3 78
124 00
1,567 75
1,077 60
2,580 05
69 00 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 45
North Okanagan District—Concluded.
Road-
Trail-
Streets
Waterside	
Westside    	
Whitevale Subdivision ..
Woods Lake Fruit Lots .
-East side of Sugar Lake
Squaw Valley  	
—Lumby  Village   	
Maple 	
Mara    	
Pine   	
Bridge—Branchflower   	
„ Cooke's	
„ Lumby's	
Mara    '	
„ Reiswig  	
„ Shuswap Falls   	
,, Siwash Creek	
„ Six-mile Creek	
„ Trinity    	
„ Upper  Shuswap   	
„ Whiteman 	
-Sicamous  	
piston—Assistant Engineer   $1,825 89
Clerical work         442 36
Auto Account      1,397 45
Ferry-
Supervi
General supplies
Total
North Vancouver District.    (Vote 157—$1.3,700.)
Ro
id—Beasley  	
Bowen Island Trunk
Carter's  (Bowen Island)
Chamberlain   	
Chaster    	
Cowan 	
Crowder  	
Dorman    	
Dougall    	
Eagle Cliff 	
Gibson Landing  	
Gibson-Port Mellon  	
Gibson-Sechelt   	
Grafton  (Bowen Island)
Grant and Glasford 	
Grover Point	
Half Moon Bay	
Ilanbury's   	
Kearton's 	
Langlois  	
Leak   	
Lett  (Gambier Island)   ..
Lye-Lockyer   	
Magee  	
22 00
51 00
50 25
117 00
75 00
231 50
124 50
72 45
1 00
11 50
57 50
16 00
9 50
24 00
32 00
20 00
13 00
13 00
24 00
91 25
13 00
2 50
3,665 70
1,574 48
27,073 21
10 00
281 40
24 00
22 00
21 00
3S2 50
10 00
42 50
18 00
6 00
512 78
6 00
614 S2
36 00
39 50
77 85
12 25
1 50
5 50
35 00
19 50
10 63
81 25
10 00 C 4G Public Works Report  (1917-18).
North Vancouver District—Concluded.
Road—Marris $ 19 00
„        Mason  (new)     1,827 25
Miller  25 00
Moodyville    318 71
McLaughlin   17 50
Old  Cariboo     7 00
„        Pemberton Portage   605 65
Pemberton Valley    1,636 80
„       Porpoise Bay     91 50
Red Roofs (Half Moon Bay)     75 00
„        Reeves     6 75
Reid  125 73
Roberts  Creek    '. _  137 00
Sechclt-North-west Bay   424 25
Selma Park  (new)  50 00
„        Simpson     80 75
Smith's Landing (Howe Sound)    :. 206 SO
Squamish   (lower)  339 13
„        Squamish   (upper)     32 30
„        Squamish Valley    1,301 25
Watson's     2 00
Wollatt's  19 00
Trail—Bargain Harbour   315 00
Gambler Island   30 00
Heeley     25 00
Sakinaw    225 31
Streets—Squamish     78 25
Avenue—Beach  233 15
Drain—Kearton's Ranch  225 50
Flume—Gibson's Landing   66 90
Supervision—Assistant Engineer    $1,3SS 8S
Clerical work   : . .      466 25
Auto Account     37 87
,, Government launch " Sutil"           97 67
Motor-cycle           724 42
  2,715 09
General supplies     152 76
Total  $ 13,695 31
Omineca District.
(Vote 158—$43,700;   S.W., $7,500;   Sup., $2,500 = $53,700.)
Road—Bickles P.O.-McDonald's Landing   $ 15 00
„       Bulkley Bridge-Hudson May Mountain  .. .!  18 75
Burn's Lake-Babine Trail  194 25
,,        Burn's Lake-Francois Lake   336 25
Cheslatta-East End of Ootsa   30 00
Chicken Lake-Steel Mines Trail   52 00
Colley Mountain     2,864 10
Cronin    '  9,95935
Driftwood Creek    138 74
Endako-Francois  Lake  1,085 84
„        Forresdale-Day Lake    58 75
Hazelton-Aldermere    1,099 19
Hazelton-Skeena  Crossing     409 24 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 47
OminecjV District—Concluded.
Road—Heal-Norris    $
Houston-North Bulkley  	
Hubert-Babine   	
Hudson Bay Mountain Sleigh 	
Ilynes Settlement   '	
Keefe's Landing-Ootsa Lake  	
Kispiox Valley 	
Main Trunk   	
Main-Fraser Lake	
Nancy Settlement	
New Hazelton High Level Bridge	
Nine-mile	
Pleasant Valley-Francois Lake 	
Rocher Deboule  	
Salmon River 	
Silver Standard	
Skeena Ferry-Kispiox  	
South Hazelton   	
South Hazelton-Carnaby	
Telkwa-Canyon Creek   	
Telkwa-Canyon Creek-Smithers Bridge Cut-off 	
Telkwa-Chicken Lake   	
Telkwa-Houston Creek   	
Uncha Lake   	
West Francois Lake-Ootsa Lake	
West Side of Bulkley  	
West Side of Skeena River 	
Trail—Copper River	
Groundhog Mountain 	
Manson Creek	
Stable Account   . '	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer   $2,137 70
Clerical work         734 45
General supplies
7 50
2,479 86
60 00
231 27
66 25
3,S35 SO
466 50
339 88
653 47"
404 10
47 23
328 62
37 00
5,923 35
13 75
1,136 54
168 10
495 73
95 00
3,441 99
177 85
370 53
59 55
573 64
4,915 15
60 00
15 00
15 00
1,426 17
1,554 12
4,177 13
2,872 15
970 59
Total  $ 53,6S0 28
Prince Rupert District.    (Vote 159—$49,900.)
Road—Bella Coola Valley   $ 1,117 35
Bohler      329 00
Breckeu ridge-Copper City   115 50
Cedarville-Kitwanga      43 75
Clayton   (north)  733 S5
Clayton   (south)     997 05
Cook-Martin Ranch     5 25
Copper  City-Kitimat     2S 00
Dairy Slough  (Kitsumgallum)     8 75
Firvale    1,049 40
Grant, No. 3  72 OS
Hagenshorg-Saloomt Valley    590 85
Johnston     176 50
Keith Road-Terrace  144 00
Kitsumgallum Lake    1,620 00 Prince Rupert District—Continued.
Road—Kitsumgallum Valley   $
„       Kitimat, No. 1 	
„        Kitwanga A"alley  	
„        Lakelse  Lake   .-	
„        Meanskinisht-Cedarville   	
„        Meanskinisht-Kitwanga, No. 12   	
McLeod, No. 21  	
„        McPherson's	
„        Nadu (Queen Charlotte Islands)   	
Old Masset-New Masset, No. 11	
„        Phillips  Creek	
„       Porcher Island	
„        Port Clement-Meyer Lake	
„        Port Simpson  	
Queen Charlotte-Harmon   	
„        Remo Ferry   	
„        Saloomt    •	
Sewell Shore 	
„        Silver Lake (Queen Charlotte Islands)   	
„        Skidegate-Queen Charlotte 	
Skidegate-Tlell ..        1
„        Smith   	
„        South-easter    ■-	
„        Stowe-Anarko, No. 9  	
,,       Terrace-Copper City 	
„        Terrace Ferry           2.
„        Terrace-Reno    •	
„        Usk-Vauarsdol           3
„        Viger, No. 55   	
,,       Walker   	
„        Welcome Harbour-Dries Bay         1.
„ West  Settlement   	
„        Zymoetz River  	
Trail—Anahim Lake   	
„        Arvidson's-Bella Coola 	
„        Cannery   	
„        Canoe Crossing   	
Cedar River	
Cedarville, No. 11 •	
„        Copper  City   	
„        Copper River     .
„        Crescent-Tasu Harbour 	
„        Gold Creek  	
Green River (Tyee Parke)  	
„        Hardscrabble   	
,,       Kitwanga-Nass  River   	
„        Kitwanga-Skeena Crossing	
„        Laura Mines 	
„        Legate Creek   	
,,        St. Croix Creek  ■	
Trail—Tow Hill-Cape Fife 	
Street—Grafton (Bella Coola)   	
Avenue—Lakelse, Terrace  	
Log-jam—Necleetsconnay River  (Bella Coola)   	
5
25
147
50
49
00
860
90
30
00
233
80
173
55
137
35
14
00
19
00
586
75
207
50
28
00
626
83
12
15
12
25
49
00
150
00
305
50
57
75
,828
10
562
10
574
10
1.27
25
14
00
,409
32
7
00
,692
93
404
S4
313
35
,377
01
805
50
14
00
228
00
49
00
15
00
542
15
133
75
293
10
6
45
582
20
149
30
56
00
2S6
15
101
50
119
oo
56
00
101
50
400
45
52
50
24
50
9
50
171
50
23
00 9 Geo. 5 Expenditure. C 49
Prince Rupert District—Concluded.
Supervision—General Foreman $2,152 65
Clerical work      1,134 12
  3,286 77
General supplies  4,249 87
Total   $ 33,804 10
Revelstoke District.    (Vote 160—$21,700.)
Road—Arrow Lake Subdivision   $ 1 00
Arrowhead Mill   1 00
Arrowhead   (north)     731 98
„        Beaton-Cainborue     257 75
„        Beaton-Comaplix     26 50
Beaton-Deep Water     101 50
Beaton-Trout   Lake     2.437 95
„        Beaton-Trout Lake  (Lower Canyon)     9 75
Big Bend  759 90
,,        Bowie-Sicainous . i  158 62
Bowie-Solsqua      786 26
„        Columbia River (north)     96 50
Columbia River (south)     27 00
Crossing M.B. 440. Arrow Lake    106 79
Crossing M.B. 2864, Shuswap    106 79
Crossing M.B. 3262, Shuswap    106 79
Crossing M.B. 3761, Shuswap    106 79
„        Craigellachie-Malakwa      351 53
Eagle Pass     77 35
Eva and Oyster   60 50
Fish  River     634 98
Goldfinch  22 00
Galena Bay   Ill 75
„        Greeley  Creek     474 05
Halfway  Creek     7S 60
Hall's Landing Ferry     1,103 03
Hall's Landing (north)    _  478 05
Hall's Landing (south)    .' '  58 25
Malakwa-Bain     6 50
„        Malakwa-Craigellachie    31 32
„        Malakwa-Erickson    46 30
Malakwa-Johnston-Ross  23 85
Malakwa-Kirk's     159 36
Malakwa  (local)     185 20
Malakwa Main   9 60
Malakwa   (north)     100 82
Malakwa  (south)     251 75
„       Malakwa-Sederberg  04 25
Malakwa-Solsqua      68 97
„        Malakwa-Somerville    44 50
Malakwa-Tredget    23 50
„        Montana Slough  3 50
Moran's Hill    14 00
„        Power-house     71 10
Revelstoke   (north)      4,120 23
Revelstoke (south)   (east of river)     1,118 19
Revelstoke (south)  (west of river)    151 77
4 C 50 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Revelstoke District—Concluded.
Road—Seven-mile  $ 42 75
,,        Sicamous-Mara  72 75
„        Sicamous-Solsqua    90 35
Taft-Craigellachie    4 00
Trail—Beatrice     255 75
Boyd Creek    241 50
„        Dunveigen    25 09
„        Jordan River    36 00
•    ,,        Keystone Creek    125 75
Kingston Creek     42 00
„        Lexington     38 50
Pinkstone Creek  2 10
„        Rosebery     17 50
Scott     46 50
Scout   19 50
Twelve-mile  Bridge     14 00
Waverley  81 00
Streets—Arrowhead     166 21
Beaton   13 00
Revelstoke     200 04
Bridge— Canyon Creek (Jordan River Road)     43 50
Supervision—General  Foreman    $1,727 62
Clerical work       200 00
Auto Account       325 00
  2,252 62
General supplies • • • ■ 2,101 57
Total   $ 21,699 65
Richmond District.
(Vote 161—$13,700;   S.W., $2,000 = $15,700.)
Road—Fraser Avenue  $   6,292 76
19, 3, 9, 5, Lulu Island        6,640 00
Supervision—Assistant Engineer  $2S6 11
Clerical  work       195 00
,, Auto  Account         76 66
Motor-cycle    149 90
■ 707 67
General supplies   '  59 57
Ro
Total  $ 13,700 00
Rossland District.
(Vote 162—$3,810;   Sup., $100 = $3,910.)
id—Big Sheep Creek   $ 247 25
Columbia-Kootenay  186 00
Crown Point-Violin Lake    27 00
Deschamp  (north)     42 00
Drake and Jones   118 50
Rock Creek    99 00
Rossland-Northport  33 50
Rossland-Peterson   29S SS
Rossland-Stony  Creek   , ' 364 00
Rossland-Trail     1.052 12
Violin Lake   14§ 50 9 Geo.
Expenditure.
C 51
Rossland District—Concluded.
Trail—Rosslaud-Gladstone-Sheep  Lake   . $ 200 50
Supervision—General Foreman  930 25
General supplies    '  120 15
Total   $ 3,867 65
Saanich District.    (Special Warrant, $144.)
Road—Saaiiicnton Bay   $ 143 80
Similkameen District.    (Vote 163—$25,700.)
Road—Allison-Copper Mountain  $      37 25
„        Armstrong  Ferry     107 10
Ashnola     24 00
,,        Beaver Lake  11 50
,,        Boundary Valley   7 00
China Creek    25 75
Copper Mountain  1,642 20
„        Cross, One-mile to Five-mile  5 50
„        Darcy Mountain  87 00
Deer Valley     98 25
Dog Lake  IS 00
,,        Fairview-Keremeos  86 25
„        Fairview-Osoyoos      121 50
Fairview-Penticton, No. 20     1,597 33
,,       Eairview-Rock Creek, No. 21 .,  50 00
„       Fairview-Vaseaux Lake     '6 00
„        Fairview-White Lake  404 50
Five-mile-Princeton    223 00
Granite  Creek     70 00
,,        Granite Mountain    13 00
Hedley-Princeton   1,687 85
„       Hedley-Twenty-mile     15 50
,,        Hembrie Mountain    93 25
„        Hope-Princeton  39 25
,,        Jensen  51 00
Kaleden-Okanagan Falls  136 79
Kaleden Townsite   229 00
„        Keremeos-Hedley    1,376 75
„        Keremeos Junction    360 85
„        Keremeos Station    317 25
„       Keremeos and vicinity :  17 75
„        Kruger. Mountain     38S 75
„        Lowes Subdivision  19 00
Murdock    51 00
Marron Valley    316 63
Myers Flat    173 50
„        McLean Creek    40 50
„        One-mile-Princeton     334 41
„        Osoyoos-Sidley     285 75
„        Osoyoos-Similkameen    243 20
„        Penticton-Carmi     S 75
Penticton-Fish Lake   1,609 91
„        Penticton-Summerland    1,371 55
Pierce     13 00
Princeton-Otter Lake  2,311 05 C 52
Public Works Report  (1917-18)
Similkameen District—Concluded.
Road—Princeton-Stevenson Creek
„        Princeton-Tulameen   	
„        Reid Creek	
,,        Richter Mountain  	
,,        Shingle  Creek   	
„        Similkameen City-Burr  ...
„        South Keremeos   	
.,        South  Similkameen   	
,,        Sterling Creek   	
„        Summers Creek 	
,, Tulameen-Summit City ...
Wide West, No. 91 	
„ Yellow Lake-Sheep Creek .
Trail—Ashnola  	
,,        Hope Mountain   	
Streets—Hedley  	
„ Princeton   	
„ Tulameen   	
Bridge—Coalmont Foot	
Damages—Cote's claim (expenses)
Supervision—General  Foreman   ..
„ Clerical work  	
Auto Account  	
$1,831 80
270 00
1,314 59
31 00
17 75
14 75
41 00
50
50
70
78
275
General supplies
49
727
1,001
116 00
279 85
252 00
5 50
50 75
8 50
162 00
38 25
317 61
165 65
26 00
6 00
3.416 39
1,943 24
Total   $ 25,074 00
Slogan District.    (Vote 164—$23,400.)
Road
-Burton    	
Brouse	
Cariboo Creek   	
Carpenter Creek   	
Cody Creek Wagon	
Columbia River 	
Crescent Bay  	
Deer Park 	
Edgewood-Fire Valley  	
Edgewood-Vernon   	
Faulkner's   	
Idaho Mine 	
Lucky Thought	
Mountain Chief 	
McCormack  	
McGuigan Wagon  	
Nakusp-Box Lake  	
Nakusp  (east)   	
Nakusp 	
New Denver-Rosebery  	
New Denver-Silverton   	
New Denver-Silver Mountain
Noonday  Wagon   	
Ottawa  	
Payne   	
Queen Bess Wagon	
150 00
336 19
465 50
2S 25
45 00
2,559 29
107 50
12 00
903 92
610 65
143 35
100 00
218 00
4 00
200 00
55 00
286 15
390 74
4 00
107 50
624 00
24 50
68 00
25 00
108 00
779 SO 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 53
Slocan District—Concluded.
Road—Sandou-lvanhoe    $
„        Silverton-Four-mile  Creek   	
„        Silverton-Red Mountain   	
„        Slocan River   	
„        Slocan-Beaver Creek	
,,        Slocan River  (west)   	
„        Slocan Star Wagon	
„        Springer  Creek   	
„        Standard Wagon  	
„        Star Wagon   	
„        Ten-mile  Creek   	
,,        Three Forks-Bear Lake  	
„       Three  Forks-Sandon-Cody	
„        West Demars  	
Trail—Carnation  	
,,        Carnstock	
„       Eight-mile   	
,,        Elkhoru   	
„        Eureka   	
„        Evening  Star   	
„        Freddie Lee   	
„        Kitchener    	
„        Kooskanax	
„        Lone Bachelor  	
„        Main Lemon Creek 	
Millie Mac	
Myrtle	
„        New Denver-Three Forks    '
,,        North Fork-Carpenter. Creek  	
„        North Fork-Lemon Creek 	
„        North Fork-Springer Creek 	
Reo   	
„        Robinson Creek	
„        Salmon and Cody  	
Sandon-Reo 	
„        Sandon-Three Forks 	
„        Sovereign 	
,,        Wilson Creek  	
„        Wonderful Queen Bess  	
Streets—Nakusp   	
„ New Denver 	
„ Silverton  	
Sidewalks—Three Forks 	
Bridge approach—Appledale	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer    $   495 95
„ General Foreman       1,179 90
„ Clerical work         303 3S
24
50
3,584
IS
1,112 00
2,458 S6
118 00
69
10
18
50
372
62
170
00
7
00
194
36
127
00
161 20
24
00
450
70
23
00
49
00
10
00
8
00
69 00
24 00
129
00
320
87
8
00
33
00
6
00
129
00
200
98
165
00
44
87
61 00
119 00
20
00
15
00
342
25
151
00
21
00
28
00
201
75
302
42
455
66
136
75
11
70
388
50
General supplies
Total
1,979 23
606 19
$ 23,307 53
South Okanagan District.    (Vote 165—$21,700.)
Road-
Allen ..
Atkins .
Bailey's
3 50
46 50
6 00 C 54 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
South Okanagan District—Continued.
Road—Bathville    $ 64 00
Bear Creek  47 30
,,       Belgo Subdivision  18 00
Bellevue   5 00
Benvoulin      148 25
Black Mountain   107 50
Booth's   ."  42 50
Bulman  31 00
Canyon  Creek  S 00
„        Caraso  31 50
Colin Smith's     5 25
Faulder's     413 00
Fox     11 50
„        Gallagher   9 75
Gellatly  17 00
Gillespie  ;  244 75
„        Glenmore and Branches    212 25
Glenmore  Subdivision   ' 468 50
Glenrosa Subdivision    294 75
Hall's Lauding   406 50
Handcock      53 20
Hardie Lake   217 75
Healey     4 50
Hydraulic Creek    52 50
Joe Ritchie    25 00
K.L.0  1,273 30
K.L.O. Subdivision    32 50
Kelly-Walton   48 00
Kelowna  (east)  120 50
Kelowna Ferry     183 00
Kelowna   (south)     36 25
Lake Shore   148 50
„        Lewis and Bailev    86 25
Lyons     68 25
„        Meadow Valley     1° 78
Mill and Lyons '.  14 00
Mission  187 25
Mission  Creek     152 55
„       Naramata-Penticton     294 75
Nicholson     4 50
North Gulch    288 50
North Naramata    54 00
Oceola   226 00
„        Okanagan  Centre     100 25
Old  Mission     156 25
Peachland  Municipality     519 50
Peachland-Princeton    28 50
Peachland-Westbank  45 50
Powers Creek Trail-First Lake  155 75
Pyman  9 00
„       Rutland  Subdivision     553 75
Salting     91 50
Saw Mill Creek  •  14 50
„       Scottie Creek    59 50
.. „        Simpson's  25 00 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 55
South Okanagan District—Concluded.
Road—S.K.L. Fruit Lots ' i
South Okanagan  	
Spiers    i	
Spring	
Summerland-Peaohland   	
Summerland-Penticton 	
Summerland  Municipality   	
Swamp   	
Thornloe's	
Vernon-Kelowna   	
Westbank	
Westbank Ferry   	
Westbank-Hordie's Lake 	
Westbank-Silver Reef Ranch 	
Westbank Subdivision 	
Westside 	
Williams   	
Woodlawn and Subdivision  	
Woods Lake  	
Streets—Naramata  	
„ Richter   	
Third  	
Avenue—Robinson 	
Bridge—K.L.O	
„ Mission   	
Supervision—General  Foreman    $2,183 55
Clerical work       343 20
„ Auto Account         660 06
General supplies
141 00
107 75
150 00
9 00
1,094 94
380 25
273 50
68 00
6 00
2,714 30
723 00
270 00
9 75
3S 75
6 00
48 00
31 50
20 00
439 50
410 25
55 50
14 50
35 70
32 00
34 00
3,186 81
517 40
Total  $ 18,860 53
South Vancouver District.    (Vote 166—$15,400.)
Road—Fraser Avenue   $    3,313 68
Hastings-Barnet       11.220 00
Supervision—Assistant Engineer $355 21
Clerical work     330 00
„ Motor-cycle     SI 70
General supplies
Total
Trail District.     (Vote 167—$24,500.)
Ro
ad—Boulder Creek, No. 2  	
Bunker Hill   	
Burnt Flat   	
Castlegar-West Robson  	
Columbia Gardens Subdivision
Cottonwood 	
Dundee Mine	
East Robson (north)   	
Emerald Mine   	
Four-mile  	
766
91
SS
50
$ 15,389
09
$   25
00
104
50
500
00
50
00
90
47
00
100
00
71
25
350 00
75
00 0 56
Public Works Report  (1917-181.
Trail District—Concluded.
Ro
ad-
Ti
Fruitvale  Subdivision   	
Granite and branches  	
Harrop and Procter 	
Hudson Bay Cut-off 	
Kootenay River  	
Lost Creek   	
Molly Gibson   	
Nelson-Balfour   	
Nelson-Waneta  	
Pass Creek  	
Peud d'Oreille  	
Porcupine	
Porto Rico 	
Robson  (north)   	
Salmon River 	
Second Relief	
Silver King 	
Six-mile   	
Slocan  River   	
Trail-Castlegar 	
Trail-Central Park  	
Trail-Columbia Gardens  	
Trail-East and East Trail Townsite
Trail-Fort Sheppard	
Trail-Fruitvale   	
Trail-Sayward   	
Trail-Smelter Junction   	
West Robson Boundary-site	
Wild Horse 	
Wilcox Mine 	
Yellowstone	
Ymir Townsite 	
ail-Bayonne   	
Bird Creek	
Boletti's   	
eets—Salmo 	
Str
Supervision-
-General Foreman
Clerical work . . .
Auto Account  ...
$1,113 03
289 60
10 05
General supplies
922 24
1,409 12
222 72
258 75
1,436 35
290 25
150 00
1,287 18
1,594 15
1,254 79
1,34S 50
34 25
190 50
2S 75
115 75
153 75
51 00
152 00
1,181 05
2,192 09
300 00
85 50
163 70
649 50
1,152 95
1,374 56
191 65
1 00
20 00
150 00
1,674 58
55 25
32 50
6 00
100 00
OS 01
1,412 68
1,424 05
Total   $ 24.4S9 46
Vale District.    (Vote 16S—$28,700.)
Ro.
ad—'Agassiz Ferry  	
Ashcroft-Savona    	
Ashcroft-Spences Bridge
Back Valley   	
Bate   	
Cache Creek  	
Cane Valley   	
Chaumox   	
Coldwater   	
Coutlee  	
803 16
74 10
467 00
122 00
130 25
7 30
88 00
35 00
523 25
97 25 9 Geo. 5 Expenditure. C 57
Yale District—Concluded.
Road—Coyote Valley  $        12 00
Deadman Creek  120 25
Dillberry      16 00
Five-mile Creek    224 00
„        Harrison Hot Springs    185 35
Highland Valley  2,571 95
Hope-Haig  284 SO
,,        Hope-Popcum     4,104 05
„        Jackson Mountain   18 00
Lytton-Lillooet     1.266 15
Main Trunk     195 10
Mamete Lake    523 71
Mazama P.O.-Kettle Valley Railway "  75 00
Merritt-Hamilton Hill  4 50
Merritt-Middlesboro     63 21
Merritt-Nicola   1,118 68
Merritt-Princeton   318 42
Mill Creek   45 75
Murray  Creek     284 80
McGuire    30 00
Nicola-Princeton     1.276 13
Nicola-Quilcheua-Kamloops    '. 1,012 45
Nicola-Stump Lake   1,072 91
North Lytton     401 15
One-mile  Creek     49 50
„        Pike Mountain    S6 25
Richard's Hill     62 00
„        Spences Bridge-Nicola    2,343 54
Styne Creek     32 50
,,        Summers Creek   164 00
Sunshine Valley   35 00
„       Thacker-Manniug  32 75
Upper Hat Creek  3S1 95
Venables Valley   1.36 00
Walhachin      542 75
Whinney's     31 00
Winch    33 50
Woodward's  00 00
Wright Valley     79 10
Yale  491 20
Trail—Similkameen     151 32
Streets—Ashcroft  667 00
Hope   79 33
Lytton     29 25
Bridge—Eight-mile Creek   6 00
Supervision—Assistant Engineer   $2,531 58
Clerical work           75 00
Auto Account         927 02
  3,533 60
General supplies     2,248 21
Total $ 28,687 42
Keith Road, North Vancouver.    (Vote 169—$1,500.)
Expenditure $    1.500 00 C 58 Public Works Report  (1917-18)
Kingsway-Burnaby Municipality   (Revote).     (Vote 170—$80,500.)
Expenditure $ 80,500 00
Roads, Point Grey.
(Vote 171—$10,000 ;   Sup.. $250 = $10,250.)
Road—Marine Drive   $ 6,198 54
Twenty-ninth Avenue   2,337 50
Street—Imperial     1,402 50
Supervision—Assistant Engineer  $125 00
Clerical work    135 00
  260 00
General supplies     13 44
Total  $ 10,211 98
Road-construction, Interned Aliens.    (Vote 172—$5,000.)
Expenditure    $ 20 65
Strathcona Park.     (Vote 173—$1,000.)
Expenditure    $ 751 25
Observatory Road.    (Vote 174—$1,200.)
Expenditure    ; $ 1,161 60
Main Road, Saanich Paving.    (Vote 175—$50,000.)
Expenditure $ 50,000 00
Assistance towards Dyke, Nicomen Island  (Conditional).    (Vote 176—$10,000.)
No expenditure.
City of Fernie, Grant towards River-protection.    (Vote 177—$2,700.)
Expenditure $ 2,700 00
Location of Roads.     (Vote 178—$5,000.)
Cariboo District $ 2 00
Columbia District   518 95
Cranbrook District    19 25
Esquimalt District     39 75
Fort George District    54 25
Grand Forks District  99 00
Greenwood District  33S 50
Islands District    308 60
Kamloops  District     29 00
Lillooet District   3 00
Omineca District   666 87
Trail District   S50 00
Yale District  367 00
General supplies  57 45
Total   $ 3.353 62
Protection of River-banks.    (Vote 179—$30,000.)
Chilliwack   $ 3,669 62
Columbia     10,781 IS
Fernie   5,949 74
Kaslo  957 54
North  Vancouver  1.211 9S 9 Geo. 5 Expenditure. C 59
Protection of River-banks—Concluded.
Prince  Rupert    $ 161 75
Revelstoke .  214 89
Slocan  . 4,522 87
South Okanagan    112 70
Yale  1,509 16
Total $ 29,091 43
Road Machinery.     (Vote 180—$1,000.)
Dewdney $ 4 20
Esquimalt and Islands     699 60
Lillooet  1 92
North Vancouver  6 25
Yale    45 56
Total  $ 757 53
Wharves generally.    (Vote 181—$25,000.)
Alberni—
Banfield    $ 11 00
Paul's Landing ' , 203 99
Chilliwack—Ferry Landing, Rosedale   27 00
Comox—
Denman Island     270 85
Hornby Island     642 10
Michel Island (float)  885 50
General supplies     368 75
Cowichan—Cowichan Bay     318 40
Dewdney—Mission     524 73
Delta—Barnston Island    195 75
Islands—
Fulford Harbour  369 75
Hope Bay  279 75
Kuper Island    700 54
Mayne Island   606 90
North Gabrioia  86 40
Retreat Cove  (North Galiano)     646 21
Roberts Bay    7 58
Saturna Island  ' 537 67
Second Street, Sidney    3 30
South Gabrioia  25 00
South Pender  49S 99
Sturdy Bay   697 44
Thetis  129 00
Third Street, Sidney  1 40
General supplies  606 15
North Okanagan—
Swing's Landing  146 25
Killiney     387 26
Long Lake   210 97
Nahun  432 41
Oyama     117 23
General supplies    63 70
North Vancouver—
Gibson's Landing  3,984 78
Hopkins    •  90S 95 C 60 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Wharves generally—Concluded.
North Vancouver—Concluded.
Scarboro Beach (float) $        5 00
Snug Cove (Beaver Island)    1.520 35
General supplies     248 15
Revelstoke—Hall's Landing Ferry   3,012 14
Richmond—
Imperial Street  52 50
Woodward's Landing   401 24
General supplies    178 00
Similkameen—Penticton     39 00
South Okanagan—
Naramata     183 40
Okanagan Centre  193 24
Westbank    147 95
General supplies     10 30
Total $ 20.SS6 97
Prince Rupert Wharf.    (Vote 1S2—$13,000.)
Expenditure    $    6,371 S2
Bridges generally.    (Vote 183—$250,000.)
Alberni District.
Beaver Creek   $      250 15
Bruhnell      137 95
Bridge No. 113  45 60
Bridge No. 115   60 55
Cherry Creek    48 93
Englishman's River     25 00
Errington  8 75
French Creek  (Grafton Avenue)     350 34
French Creek, No. 116a    653 58
Goose River, No. 6   50
Loon Creek    72 00
Morning Star Creek    134 00
McCoy Creek, No. IS   31 74
Nanaimo Road '.  11 00
Spruce River    96 27
Tippett's  83 00
General supplies     107 03
Total   $    2,116 39
Atlin District.
Alice Arm    $       585 03
American  Creek     176 00
Bear River    2,634 47
Bitter Creek   24 00
Cranberry River    1,195 00
Fish Creek     52 50
Fletcher Creek  165 00
Glacier   Creek     16 00
Illiance Trail    351 25
Indian River  15 00
Klehini River   127 00
Little Boulder Creek    S7 40 9 Geo. 5 Expenditure. C, 61
Bridges generally—Continued.
Atlin District—Concluded.
Marmot River    $ 106 00
Nahlin  5 00
Quinadah   451 25
Tooya, No. 27  267 00
General supplies     162 15
Total  $ 6.420 05
Cariboo District.
Antler Creek  $ 60 75
Australian Creek   105 47
Blackwater Road  14 00
Burns Creek    3 75
Canyon and Terry Creek  21 00
Chilcotin River  (Alexis Creek)     31 50
Chilcotin River  (Newton's)     424 57
Cottonwood    2.491 32
Four-mile  Creek     199 50
Four-mile Creek (Main Barkerville Road)     30 00
Horsefly River   14 00
Hyde Creek   53 00
Jawbone Creek  3 75
Keithley Creek   18 00
Little Horsefly    30 50
Pine Grove     3 75
Quesnel Lake Dam    262 50
Quesnel River     29 50
Siwash (Chilko River)     30 89
Total   $ 3.S27 75
Chilliwack District.
Chilliwack River   46S 15
Murray   54 75
North of Rosedale  25 45
Rosedale Ferry Road   1,150 10-
Vedder River    4,372 58
West of Abbotsford  1,610 04
Yale Road, No. 4   3 30
Yale Road, No. 24  64 30
Yale Road, No. 25   15 00
Yale Road, No. 20   15 SI
General supplies  58 95
Total  $ 7.838 43
Columbia District.
Athalmer  Swing    $ 64 50
Blaeberry      15 00
Bout's Landing   58 50
Canal Flats  45 85
Carbonate     1 50
Columbia River  (at Brisco)     68 00
Columbia River (at Fairmont)     186 83 Bridges generally—Continued.
Columbia District—Concluded.
Dodds  Creek    $ 103 00
Dutch Creek   953 02
Golden-Fort Steele Road (88 and SO M.P.j    58 50
Horse Creek  725 85
Horse Thief Creek  . .*  3,696 15
Horse Thief Road (at 14% M.P.)     51 75
Horse Thief Road (at 171/2 M.P.)   21 50
Horse Thief Road (at 1S% M.P.)  128 50
Horse Thief Road (at 26 M.P.)     121 50
Jack Pine     25 00
Kicking Horse  143 89
Kootenay River Bridge   86 64
Moberly  Road     107 27
McDonald Creek    126 00
No. 2 Creek     348 05
No. 3  Creek  64 75
No. 3 Road     SO SO
Oberg and Janson Road  25 00
Oglestone  .'  126 00
10iy3 M.P  63 50
103  M.P  43 50
110 M.P  50 00
Sinclair Creek  150 00
Sparkling  Creek     119 90
Spillamacheen     2 50
Toby Creek Bridge  602 05
Toby Creek Cut-off   2,012 05 •
Toby Creek (Seven-mile)  US 50
21 miles north of Wilmer  66 1.0
2114 miles north of Wilmer     31 00
23 miles north of Wilmer   15 50
Washout Creek     1,382 84
Watkins  (52 M.P.)  10 00
Wilmer   17 75
Wilmer (floating)     138 50
General supplies    100 00
Total   $ 12,357 .49
Comox District.
Big Qualicum (3 miles north of)    $ 647 47
Coal Creek   i  14 50
Cook's River   53 40
Courtenay River  1,253 89
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour  84 15
Nahwitte River    21 05
Nile River   62 25
Powell Lake and Olsen Lake (between)    96 40
Quinsam River     122 48
Rosewall River     13 75
Salmon River  1,502 87
School Trail (Tsolum River)    96 50
Tsable River  9S 22
Tsolum River (foot-bridge)    41 00 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 63
Bridges generally—Continued.
Comox D 'strict—Concluded.
Washer, No. 2   $ 97 25
General supplies     36 01
Total $ 4,241 19
Cowichan District.
Barkley    $ 11 50
Beaver Creek  '..-  44 00
Bonsall    103 10
Chemainus River   94 21
Colvin    139 17
Corfield's    .' 2S0 25
Cowichan Lake     68 31
Cowichan Station    42 05
Dodd's  5 50
Duncan Wagon     206 79
Fisher Road  (twin bridges)     432 34
Hall's  584-84
Kelvin  10 50
Koksilah Flats  110 21
Koksilah River     502 09
Lewis     44 70
Millett  70 00
No. 104   55 35
No. 105   10 00
No. 106  190 00
Ransom    ,  44 20
Robinson's  205 69
Salt     88 11
General supplies  143 29
Total ....% 3.4S6 20
Cranbrook District.
Abbott Avenue  $ 20 13
Aldridge   31 50
Alki Creek  141 25
Booth Creek   40 00
Burrows    3 83
Clayton    10 00
Coulee, No. 2  22S 61
Coulee, No. 154    2 00
Coulee, No. 155   53 00
Coulee, No. 158  S 60
Cranbrook-Moyie Road    3 06
Curzon  91 75
Eberts Avenue    30 50
Ewen Creek  5 50
First  Prairie     20 00
Free's  (Gold Creek)     3 50
Glenlilly-Moyie  River  625 47
Goatfell-Moyie River  97 75
Ha-ha Creek, No. 1   67 75
Ha-ha Creek, No. 2   66 50 C 64 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Bridges generally—Continued.
Cranbrook District—Concluded.
Ha-ha Creek, No. 3  $ 66 50
Ha-ha Creek, No. 4  99 25
Ha-ha Creek, No. 5   82 50
Hell-roaring Creek    388 25
High Creek    70 50
Hodgson    :  20 00
Hospital Creek  l  57 55
Jap     37 80
Joseph Creek     177 90
Kelly Slough  35 00
Kimberley (Mark Creek)     688 46
Kingsgate  46 94
Lamb Creek    206 61
Marysville  11 60
Matthew Creek     57 00
Monroe    24 00
Mouth of Little Moyie River   6 50
Myers Ranch (Cherry Creek)     56 00
McConnell's  (Gold Creek)     3 50
Narrows    25 00
North Star Ravine   56 00
Perry Creek     899 16
Rainy Creek    2 00
Ryan    20 00
Smith's  Creek     7 00
St. Mary Lake   92 00
St. Mary River Mission    8,267 63
St. Mary River (McPhee's, between Mission and Wycliffe)     4,837 08
St. Mary River (Wycliffe)     725 61
Swansea   617 75
Tochty      11 00
No.   201     133 50
Valley  Creek     50 00
Victoria Avenue  (Joseph Creek)  250 43
Waldo  Slough     30 50
Ward's (Moyie River)    2,892 18
Westport  (large)   (St. Mary River)  1,509 71
Westport,  (No. 4)    .'  221 25
Westport, Xo. 7    27 57
Westport, No. 9   25 00
Westport, No. 10   13 00
Westport, No. 11   13 00
Westport, No. 12   13 00
Yahk-Moyie Road  79 50
Yahk (over Log Channel)     32 00
General supplies  1,874 53
Total   $ 26,411 96
Delta District.
Canoe Pass $ 4,707 35
Dewdney District.
Anderson    ' $ 20S 13
Durien  (near)     26 00 9 Geo. 5 Expenditure. 0 65
Bridges generally—Continued.
Deirdney District—Concluded.
Hawkins $ 64 00
Hudon  48 00
loco Road    195 50
Kanaka Creek-River Road   1,489 55
Kanaka Creek-D.T. Road, Section 4   22 80
Kanaka Creek-D.T. Road, Section 12  9S5 02
Legacy-Stave Lake    247 61
Martin '.  46 75
Murray-Yale Road    S3 25
McKibbon  194 14
Reaves     155 84
Pitt River    2SS 50
Sapperton-Coquitlain   (temporary)      242 S3
Sharp    ....,  72 01
Stave Lake Road    76 47
Sunnyside Trail   424 78
Upper Coquitlam   116 SO
Whonnock Creek  1,194 65
Total   $ 6,483 23
Esquimalt District.
Atkins  $ 431 10
Coal Creek Hill  1,005 03
Craigflower     1,307 46
East Sooke   '  32 70
Finlayson Arm   186 42
Helmcken      12 50
Jordan River  627 05
Lagoon  23 75
Luxton Road    2 00
Metchosin, No. 1   ,  520 93
Metchosin, No. 3    751 84
Millstream    76 60
Munn's     48 50
Sooke River     10,050 47
Sooke Road   515 39
Vancouver Island Trunk Road (17 M.P.)     27 00
Total  $ 15,618 74
Fernie- District.
Brute Creek  (Elk Valley)    $ 123 50
Bull River   132 50
Cedar Valley Creek   90 00
Coal  Creek     Ill 50
Elkmouth  688 30
Elk River (West Fernie)     212 00
Gateway (Newgate)    1,689 85
Hosmer      1,942 03
Kootenay River (at Fort Steele)  919 02
Lizard Creek     8 00
Michel, No. 2     104 85
Michel, No. 3    6,058 53 C 66 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Bridges generally—Continued.
Fernie District—Concluded.
Michel, No. 4   $ S3 50
Michel (temporary, near No. 3)    144 SO
McDougall Channel     2S6 10
Slough  (near Wardner)     18 82
Waldo Cable   105 00
Wardner  266 36
Wergert Creek   109 25
Wilson Creek    153 30
General supplies     341 25
Total   $ 13,5SS 46
Fort George District.
Bissett Creek (Peace River)    $ 458 25
Blackwater     90 00
Canyon Creek   2S 00
Clear Creek ,  351 90
Cottonwood Creek   113 25
Dore River    568 27
Eagle Creek    126 00
Evans Gulch (stringer bridges)     287 06
Fort Fraser  911 98
Fort George-Blackwater  10 50
Fort George-Willow River Road    311 25
Gardner Crossing    231 SI
Gunn  Creek     298 00
Holmes    97 SO
Moss Creek   210 73
Mud River, No. 1    53 25
Mud River, No. 2  50 00
Mud River, No. 3    43 CO
Murray   127 60
Nechako River  467 30
Necoslie (Stuart Lake)    .'. 16 00
Quesnel-Fraser Lake Road    ,  86 00
Redmond Creek    252 44
Slough  (Mud River)     224 90
South of Pouce Coupe (1 M.P.)     112 75
South of Pouce Coupe (2 M.P.)     39 00
South of Pouce Coupe (3 M.P.)     56 00
South of Pouce Coupe (20% M.P.)     75 00
South of Pouce Coupe (21 M.P.)     75 00
Stony Creek  1,209 32
Tate Creek (Peace River)     325 00
Tsinkut Lake   1,745 04
Tsinkut River  10S 50
Tupper Creek (Peace River)    366 50
Two-mile Creek  ...."  175 00
Vanderhoof    1,799 70
West Dawson Creek   185 50
Wright Creek    150 25
Pouce Coupe   1,123 36
Total  $ 12,961 21 9 Geo.
Expenditure.
C 67
Bridges generally—Continued.
Grand Forks District.
Carson       $ 101 75
Cascade     58 00
Cascade (upper)     165 42
Cascade  (lower)     95 40
Cooper      52 50
First Street  89 25
Fourth Street  1,177 94
Gilpin     1S6 00
Hardy   4 00
General supplies    5 00
Total   $ 1,935 20
Greenwood District.
Blythe   $ 62 SO
Boundary Falls    6 00
Caron     22 95
Ingram    35 00
Kettle River   27 60
Lancashire  21 48
Midway      160 75
Nicholson     3 00
Peanut Point  82 80
Robinson     88 30
Rock Creek   150 40
Williamson Creek    266 17
Williamson's, No. 14    7 00
Williamson's, No.  .15     7 00
General supplies     57 09
Total   $ 99S 34
'islands District.
Central Road   $ 57 05
Divide '(North Saltspring Island)     74 00
Purdy's  (North Saltspring Island)      119 05
Walters   (North  Saltspring Island)  6 50
Total   $ 256 60
Kamloops District.
Barriere (North Thompson River) $ 844 14
Barriere River (12 miles from Barriere)  47 25
Barriere River (at Barriere)     99 61
Chase Creek  863 7S
Ducks     15 00
Kamloops (east)     3,399 73
Kamloops   (west)     587 00
Kinnear     606 09
Savona     127 00
Shuswap (South Thompson River)    91 75
Total  $ 6,681 35 C 68 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Bridges generally—Continued.
Kaslo District.
Albert Creek  $ 94 25
Alma   4 00
Black Fox   3 50
Briggs Creek     7 00
Canning     24 50
Canyon Siding, Nos. 1 and 2   741 75
Cascade Creek    2 00
Coffee Creek, No. 2  70 50
Creston Townsite     7 50
Cutters ("reek   40 00
Dry Gulch    174 25
Fourth of July   101 25
Gerrard     14 00
Goat River, No. 2    6 25
Goat River, No. 4   SO 99
Goat River  (Erickson-Canyon City Road)     49 50
Goat River  (Walker's Crossing)     17 00
Halfway     211 75
Hamill Creek, No. 3   100 00
Hamill Creek, No. 3a    93 50
.    Hamill Creek. No. 4  '75 00
Hamill Creek. No. 5    ■  75 00
Healy Creek  ..    . 7 00
Lardeau River   99 76
Liberty Hill     7 00
Lynchville     58 00
Montezuma , 26 50
Poplar Creek     7 50
Spring Creek       ' 3 00
Stanley   (Kaslo Creek)     37 75
Tenderfoot and Rapid  4 00
Trout Creek     14 00
Trout Lake   7 20
Twelve-mile      76 50
Whitewater   2 50
Woodberry  Creek  80 50
General supplies     77 CO
Total   $ 2,501 70
Lillooet District.
' Big Bar Mountain $ 51 50
Big Bar Creek  19 25
Bonaparte River (between 11 and 12 M.P.)     2,433 40
Bonaparte Road  (north)  270 75
Bridge near 70-Mile House   33 75
Bridge River (mouth of river)  993 51
Bridge River (North Fork)    25 75
Bridge River (North Fork, mouth of)     23 25
Bridge River Road (unnamed creek)     0 CO
Bridge River (South Fork)    ■  191 00
Bridge Creek  (Roe Lake)     100 00
Campbell     1 00
Cayoose Creek  (Marshall Mill)  35 00 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 69
Bridges generally—Continued.
Lillooet District—Concluded.
Cayoose Creek (Station Road)    $ 30 11
Chilcotin  Suspension     1,343 87
Chimney  Creek     31 60
Churn Creek   72 61
Churn Creek Suspension   104 03
Deadman Creek (Bains Flat)  202 90
Dry Gulch  (near Hanceville)     2 00
Dickey Creek    35 00
Empire Valley (at Big Bend)    . 8 00
Empire Valley  (near Coal Point)     40 00
Fifty-one-mile  Creek     44 45
Gold Creek    12 25
Gunn  Creek     3,531 IS
Hanceville    100 00
Hat Creek    47 00
Hat Creek (upper)    744 35
Hatchery Creek    40 00
Lillooet-Clinton Road  (21-22 M.P.)     387 70
Lillooet Suspension  200 00
Lower Chilcotin   3 22
Marble Grange  15 00
Mound Bridge    S 93
Mile Creek 100   12 00
Mile Creek 111   12 00
McKinley-Hamilton Road   27 00
Pigeon's Ranch    13 50
School-house     15 25
Scottie Creek    773 95
Setou Lake Creek   34 00
Sheep Creek  179 06
Strong Creek     12 25
Tyaxon Creek   2,210 18
Upper Dry Creek    6 00
Vedaii-Chilcotin River    2 00
Ward's Ferry Bridge   1 50
General supplies     228 65
Total   , $ 14,717 20
Nanaimo District.
Brechin Foot-bridge   $ 553 74
Chase River .'  211 21
Cook's, No.' 4    127 70
Millstone     135 00
Millstream  :  163 66
Nanaimo River     58 75
Slough Bridge     10 50
General  supplies  98 28
Total  ■ I $ 1,358 84
Newcastle District.
Boat  Harbour    $ 25 00
Brentou, No. 2  83 10 C 70 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Bridges generally—Continued.
Newcastle District—Concluded.
Bush Creek, No. 1   $ 19 00
Bush Creek, No. 2    79 50
Bush Creek, No. 3    87 00
Diamond  Crossing  607 88
Ducks    46 00
First Creek    1,702 44
Haslam Creek    104 S5
Jingle Pot   9 92
Nanaimo River    962 17
Old South Wellington    40 83
Pearson's    58 82
South Forks    '  45 00
Waterworks     169 90
General supplies  100 00
Total  $ 4,141 41
Noi'th Okanagan District.
Ader Hill  $ 5 00
Cook's River '  27 60
Crossman's     10 00
Enderby    1,758 61
Falkland     4 00
Foster's     125 37
Gallagher's     5 55
Gordon's  SS 93
Gray's     IS 00
Grindrod     107 37
Haines     406 20
Hatfield     33 40
Johnson's    3 ,00
Jones Creek  11 75
Mara     26 60
Mara, Main Road, No. 2   22 63
Mara Road, No. 19    19 00
Morgan's     49 75
Miller's     S 50
Monashee Road (32 M.P.)     12 00
Moore's    6 00
Moser's  • • 3 00
Reiswig  50 50
Riverside Road    29 25
Robertson's     \ 50
Ruck's, No. 17    46 50
Ruck's, No. 20    6 95
Shunter's  50 00
Shuswap Avenue South   3 00
Shuswap Falls    85 00
Sigalet     24 00
Skyrme's     66 45
Woods Road   67 00
General supplies     14 64
Total $ 3.19S 05 9 Geo. 5 Expenditure. C 71
Bridges GENERALLYr—Continued.
North Vancouver District.
Butterfleld  (Squamish Road)    $ 21 00
Cheakamus  (Daisy Lake)     562 54
Cheeki   94 98
Cowan (Bowen Island)    IS 00
Gibson-Sechelt     4 50
Grafton   47 75
Lillooet      593 37
Magee   74 40
Marine Drive    340 62
Matthews    290 08
Mission  Creek     2,860 00
Moodyville   52 50
Pemberton  Meadows    .v.. 146 86
Pemberton Portage   456 32
Ryan Slough   221 75
School-house    298 94
Squamish   39 09
Squamish Valley  (2% miles from Squamish)     223 30
Squamish Valley  (11% miles from Squamish)     462 20
Stamish  49 80
General supplies    26 01
Total  $ 0,SS4 07
Omineca District.
Babine Trail (Miles 3 and 4) $ 55 24
Boulder Creek    22 85
Bulkley River (at Hubert)  91 50
Bulkley River (at Hazelton)    284 98
Bulkley River (at Moricetown)     11 50
Bulkley River   (at Smithers)     165 00
Bulkley River (at Telkwa)     1,378 76
Canyon Creek .■ . 247 50
Glacier Creek    22 90
Hazelton-Aldermere Road (Mile 39)     1,443 22
Kispiox   (Mile 9)     479 47
Kispiox (Mile 17)  237 25
Kuldo   . . .  326 47
North Bulkley    165 61
Pleasant Valley (at Mile 81%)    27 50
Pleasant Valley (at Mile SSy3)    43 75
Rocker Deboule    337 50
Rose Lake    52 50
Telkwa River (Santa Marie Road)    75 00
Telkwa River  (Telkwa)     175 00
Wistara     100 00
General supplies     10 00
Total  • $ 5,753 50
Prince Rupert District.
Branns   . , ¥ 93' 75
Canoe Crossing  95 65 C 72 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Bridges generally—Continued.
Prince Rupert District—Concluded.
Cedarville    $      392 00
Clayton's    ■.  207 SO
Copper River  (Mile 30)     250 85
Copper River (Mile 4)     3 50
Fiddler Creek  75 25
Pour-mile  •  2,929 60
Grant's   , . 9 50
Green River    70S 20
Hagensborg   249 95
Hiellen     22 50
Lome Creek    146 00
Meanskinisht     30 90
Meanskinisht-Kitwanga Road  68 00
Meanskinisht Slough     14 00
Saloomt     1,543 35
Sandon River   502 75
Second Crossing (Bella Coola)    25 66
Slough  536 70
Snootchlee. No. 1 ' '  84 40
Snootchlee, No. 2   107 75
Spiller River  10 00
Terrace Ferry Bridge    14 00
Usk-Vanarsdol  Road     1,096 95
Williams Creek    96 00
General supplies     833 42
Total    $ 10,148 43
Revelstoke District.
Beaton Canyon    $      287 SO
Campbell's    45 00
Carries Creek (East Fork)  57 00
Columbia River    1,560 74
Cranberry Creek    5 10
Fish River (at Goldfleld)    117 S2
Gorge Creek  84 50
Greeley  Creek     309 09
Halcyon     55 45
Hall's Landing  265 SS
Illecillewaet  (south)  176 10
Illecillewaet Power-house   23 00
Illecillewaet  (upper)  23 00
Laforme Creek   15 00
Lower Illecillewaet  149 35
Mammoth  Creek '.  1 42
Montana  Slough  8 25
Pool Creek  7 50
Sable  Creek '.. 181 35
Salmon  Creek  172 50
Slough Bridge  (Hall's Landing)     5 00
Slough Bridge (Solsqua)     110
General supplies    621 59
Total $    4,263 54 9 Geo. o                                                 Expenditure.
C 73
V
Bridges generally—Continued.
Richmond District.
 $
24.097
2,170
385
9
10
59
75
69
30
79
Marine Drive  	
Total 	
Rossland District.
Rossland Trail, No. 2  ■	
 $
 $
26,674 12
222 80
27 00
Total 	
 $
249 80
20 00
SS 61
320 55
57 50
22 00
106 72
68 75
19 50
50 50
78 00
39 00
11 00
40 50
39 S5
28 05
132 50
147 97
528 55
129 50
395 11
81 30
40 00
35 14
692 59
Similkameen District.
 $
Hedlev   	
Okanagan, No. 40  	
Wolf Creek, No. 18 	
Total  . .   	
 $
3,173 19
324 S9
504 73
331 77
220 74
17 01
241 71
727 28
60 90
30 30
566 02
101 9S
rSlocan District.
 $ C 74
Public Works Report  (1917-18)
Bridges generally—Continued.
Slocan District—Concluded.
Silverton    $ 3 16
Slocan  River  75 25
Vallican     14 10
Walker  1,093 82
West Arrow Park   13 00
Whatshan     296 46
Winlaw    182 00
General supplies    8 00
Total   $ 4,813 72
South Okanagan District.
Bridge No. 2 on Polo Ground  $ 56 72
Bridge No. 1 on Polo Ground   7 50
Campbell Road     29 78
Canyon Creek   14 71
Casorso, No. 1  52 40
Dry Creek   39 90
Duck Creek, No. 3  97 40
Duck Creek, No. 4  46 00
Fire   1 00
Gallagher   14 00
K.L.O., No. 1    182 48
K.L.O., No. 2   '  192 39
K.L.O., No. 3     39 50
Lake Shore, No. 1   181 24
Lake Shore, No. 2   7S 96
Lake Shore, No. 3  20 71
Lake Shore, No. 4  25 04
Lake Shore, No. 5   21 49
Lake Shore, No. 6   11 00
Lake Shore, No. 7   62 73
Mission  (Lake Shore)     155 40
Mission Road    28 11
Mission '.  172 IS
Mission (old)  94 35
Main Vernon Road   16 00
Mill Creek   226 65
Sandy Gordon  51 70
Sawmill Creek, No. 1  7 50
.Sawmill Creek, No. 2   3 25
Sawmill Creek, No. 3   7 50
Scotty Creek  34 65
Willow.Creek   26 32
General supplies  122 48
Total  $ 2,121 04
Trail District.
Beaver Creek   $ 108 26
Crescent Valley    2 69
Fruitvale    20 45
Granite Road  129 88 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 75
Bridges
Trail
generally—Continued.
District—Concluded.
 $
97 50
3 50
100 03
1,778 28
25 40
302 10
6 75
2S0 05
222 90
381 36
72 50
149 20
39 00
406 44
42 75
31 00
Rock Creek 	
Schofield Creek  	
Trail   	
Yale
Digit
■ict.
Total 	
 $
4,200 04
Ashcroft $    1,298 72
Back Valley     97 00
Canford     3 00
Coldwater     123 45
Deadman's  Creek    911 68
Douglas Lake    104 00
Harrison Hot Springs, No. 1   305 15
Harrison Hot Springs, No. 2   273 45
Highland Valley     137 84
Hope-Popcum     1,080 76
House Gulch (Fish Lake Road)    25 50
Hunter Creek   58 00
Jackson  2 61
Jones  Creek  896 02
Lauder  147 63
Loggan  24 16
Merritt (between Miles 3 and 9)     74 16
Merritt-Princeton Road   256 77
Middlesboro  268 50
Nicola River  (at Merritt)     10 50
North Lytton    '  9 60
Petit  21 18
Popcum-Jones Creek  36 30
Popcum  (west of)     350 77
Richardson Creek    337 25
Savonna-Mamete Lake Road  132 50
Siwash Creek   144 90
Spences     248 56
Sunshine Valley     31 46
Twytten's  397 73
Voight   777 58
Winney Road   ,  15 25
Yale-Hope Road  10 50 C 76 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Bridges generally—Concluded.
Yale District—Concluded.
General supplies    $     441 31
Yale (2% miles west)     135 00
Yale (2% miles west)  246 50
Total  . $    9,435 29
Bridge Inspection          3.64S 70
Total of bridge expenditure  $237,212 64
Bridges.     (Special Warrant No. 7—$1,240.)
Pitt River   $    1,240 00
District Engineers  (Salaries and Expenses).     (Vote 184—$29,000.)
Expenditure     $ 2S.402 67
Subsidies and Maintenance, Steamboats, Ferries, and Bridges.
Barnston IsLj^nd.     (Vote 185—$1,000.)
Expenditure    $      981 25
Canoe River.     (Vote 1S6—$600.)
No expenditure.
, Columbia River, Brisco.    (Vote 187—$150.)
Expenditure    $ 78 35
Columbia River. Coldstream.
(Vote 18S—$180;   Sup., $6 = $186.)
Expenditure    $       185 13
Columbia River, Waterloo.    (Vote 189—$500.)
Expenditure    $      500 00
Francois Lake.     (Vote 190—$2,000.)
Expenditure    $    1,992 58
Eraser River at ALEXjiNDRiA.     (Vote 191—$1,200.)
Expenditure    $    1,140 50
Eraser River at Cariboo Station.    (Vote 192—$3,000.)
No expenditure.
Fraser River jVt Macalister.    (Vote 193—$300.)
Expenditure    $      300 00
Eraser River at Agassiz.    (Vote 194—$3,500.)   .
Expenditure    $    3,500 00
Eraser River at Big Bar.
(Vote 195—$1,050;   Sup., $225 = $1.275.)
Expenditure    $   1,272 65
Eraser River at Chilliwack-HjVrrison.    (Vote 196—$800.)
Expenditure $      S00 00 9 Geo. 5 Expenditure. C 77
Subsidies  and  Maintenance,   Steamboats.  Ferries,  and Bridges—Continued.
Eraser River at Dunster.     (Vote 197—$1,000.)
Expenditure    $    1,000 00
Eraser River at High Bar.    (Vote 198—$1,800.)
Expenditure    $    1,640 90
Eraser River above Lytton.    (Vote 109—$1,000.)
Expenditure    $       575 97
Eraser River at McBride.     (Vote 200—$3,000.)
No expenditure.
Eraser River at Mission.    (Vote 201—$7,500.)
Expenditure    $    5,787 68
Fraser River at Quesnel
(Vote 202—$1,800;   Sup., $700 = $2,500.)
Expenditure $    2,499 15
Eraser River at Soda Creek.
(Vote 203—$1,200;   Sup.. $20 == $1,220.)
Expenditure    $    1,209 45
Fraser River at Twenty-mile Post  (above Lillooet).     (Vote 204—$700.)
Expenditure      $      508 00
Fraser River at Ladner-Woodward.     (Vote 205—$13,500.)
Expenditure    $ 13,465 42
East SujWmerland.    (Vote 206—$1,000.)
Expenditure    .' $    1,000 00
Hall's Landing.
(Vote 207—$3,000;   Sup., $2,500 ; == $5.500.)
Expenditure    $    5,237 14
Kelowna-Westbank.    (Vote 20S—$1,000.)
Expenditure    $    1.000 00
Kootenay River, Lewis.
(Vote 209—$100;   Sup., $23 = $123.)
Expenditure    $       123 00
Kootenay River, Reclamation Farm.
(Vote 210—$1,100;   Sup., $265 == $1,365.)
Expenditure   .' $    1,355 67
Nechako River, Fort Eraser.    (Vote 211—$1,000.)
Expenditure $      959 51
Nechako River. No. 3 Indian Reserve.     (Vote 212—$1,000.)
Expenditure    $      590 43
North Thompson River, Bester, Mosquito Flat.    (Vote 213—$650.)
Expenditure    '. $      645 9S C 78 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Subsidies and Maintenance,  SteambojVts, Ferries, and Bridges—Continued.
North Thompson River, Birch Island.    (Vote 214—$650.)
Expenditure    $      649 58
North Thompson River, Chinook Cove.    (Vote 215—$650.)
Expenditure $       628 SI
North Thompson River  (near Hefferly Station.)     (Vote 216—$1,100.)
Expenditure    $      655 65
North Thompson River, Jones.
(Vote 217—$650;   Sup., $30 = $680.)
Expenditure    $       5S5 35
North Thompson River, Little Fort.    (Vote 218—$1,650.)
Expenditure $    1,394 71
North Thompson River (near McClure Station).    (Vote 219—$1,100.)
No expenditure.
North Thompson River, Upper Crossing.    (Vote 220—$1,750.)
Expenditure    $    1,080 25
Shuswap Lake, Sorrento, Scotch Creek.    (Vote 221—$2,000.)
Expenditure    $    1,886 37
South Thompson River, Ducks.    (Vote 222—$650.)
Expenditure    $       644 23
South Thompson River, Pritchard.
(Vote. 223—$750; Sup., $150 = $900.)
Expenditure    $       S92 56
Stuart River, Fort St. James.     (Vote 224—$1,000.)
Expenditure    $      S67 01
Stuart River, Sturgeon Point  (establishing).    (Vote 225—$2,500.)
Expenditure    $    1,003 39
Skeena River, Breckenridge.
(Vote 226—$920;   S.W., $280 = $1,200.)
Expenditure    $    1,082 13
Skeena River Ferry at Copper City.    (Vote 227—$1,300.)
Expenditure    $      750 91
Skeena River at Hazelton.    (Vote 228—$300.)
Expenditure    $      249 82
Skeena River at Kitwanga.    (Vote 229—$1,300.)
Expenditure $      697 07
Skeena River, Meanskinisht-Cedarville.    (Vote 230—$1,300.)
Expenditure $      786 90
Skeena River, Pacific.    (Vote 231—$1,300.)
Expenditure    $      97S 29  C 80 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Miscellaneous—Concluded.
Extra Janitors and Janitors' Supplies.    (Vote 246—$20,000.)
Expenditure    $ 17,629 76
Garage, Victoria  (Chauffeurs' Wages and Expenses, Supplies and Repairs).
(Vote 248—$4,000.)
Expenditure    $    3,679 74
Special Guard, Parliament Buildings.
(Vote.249—$1,500;   S.W., $1,080;   Sup.. $500 = $3,OSO.)
Expenditure $    3,024 00
Special Aid to Mining Industry.
(Chap. 43.)
Alberni District.
Road—Canadian Mineral Claims, Murdoch's Landing $ 388 25
„        Columbian Group. Sproat Lake    397 36
„        Marble Cove Group, Copper Island   _ 323 20
,,        Victoria Group of Mines    lgS 10
Atlin District.
Road—Salmon River    $ 2,883 53
Cariboo District.
Road—Killam Cement Gravel  Mines    $ 1,032 15
,,        Prosperiue Mountain    250 00
Columbia District.
Road—Brisco, No. 3 Creek  $ 91 35
„        Brisco-Lead Queen Mines    1,210 55
Boulder Creek-Sitting Bull     202 08
„        Canyon Creek-Fifteen-mile Creek   170 00
Horse Thief Creek-Gallop Mines   98 00
Paradise  109 00
Pretty Girl Mine-Boulder Creek    4  150 50
Relief Mines-Boulder Creek   150 00
,,        Spillimacheen-Warren Creek    225 00
„        Tennessee-Tarheel Mines  101 00
Toby Creek    421 01
Toby Creek Cut-off   8.507 58
Toby Creek (above Mile 11)     577 15
Trail—Bugaboo     75 00
„        Canyon Creek  55 00
Horse Thief Creek-Mabel R. Mining   201 00
Bridges—Paradise Road   808 40
Comox District.
Road—Valdes Island Copper Co $ 1.575 00
Cowichan District.
Road—Blue Grouse Mines   $ 866 00 9 Geo. 5                                                 Expenditure.
c
81
Special Aid to Mining Industry-
Esquimalt District.
Road—Section 93-East Sooke   	
Trail—Leach River   	
-Contii
ued.
....$
2,625 00
300 00
691 75
2,4S4 75
180 20
150 00
Fernie District.
Grand Forks District.
....$
 $
„        Tarzig's Claims, Norway Mountain   200 00
Greenwood District.
Road—Big Copper and King Solomon $ 198 50
B.C. Mine, Eholt    45 00
Kaslo District.
Road—Cultus Creek  $ 879 70
Eden and Crescent Mine, Coffee Creek   2,397 85
Howser-Argenta   1,966 78
Jackson Wagon   1,274 25
Kaslo Creek (South Fork)    2,499 49
Trail—Elsmere Group, Circle City, and Black Warrior  500 00
Lavina Butte    200 00
Lillooet District.
Road—Gum Creek-Copper Mountain  $ 1,107 70
„        Hautler's Mine-Texas Creek  .125 00
Sucker Creek Hill, B.R  939 71.
Newcastle District.
Trail—Majuba and Sutton  $ 336 15
North Vancouver District.
Road—Bowena Copper Mines   $ 99 01
Trail—Indian River    933 33
„        Squamish River   99 75
Omineca District.
Road—Cronin Winter Sleigh  $ 13,214 65
„       Delta Copper Mines   655 35
„        Howison Creek Mines. Santa Maria Group   14,436 36
Prince Rupert District.
Road—Drum Lummon Mine  .' $ 600 00
Golden Wonder Mine   125 00
„        Hudson Bay Mountain, Coronado Group   199 24
Trail—International Copper Co  875 45
Legate Creek     500 00
Rossland District.
Road—Burlington-Anaconda Mines   $ 826 16
Revelstoke District.
Road—North Big Bend  $ 13,773 10
6 C 82 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Special Aid to Mining Industry—Concluded.
Similkameen District.
Road—Princeton-Copper Mountain    s $ 999 25
Trail—Oregon Group-Hedley  .'.  238 75
Red Star   100 00
Slocan District.
Road—Echo Mine $ 2,434 00
Millie Mack     54 00
,,        Sandon and Reco   483 48
„        Silvertou-Four-mile   585 35
,,        Springer Creek  40 25
Ten-mile  Creek  475 75
Trail—Carnation  300 00
Lightning Peak-Sand Creek   107 25
Trail District.
Road—Emerald Mine    $ 150 50
Eureka Mine  405 66
Trail—Noonday Group  125 00
Ore Hill, Sheep Creek  297 45
„       Reno, Downey Brook Group    3S3 29
Yale District.
Road—Aberdeen Mines   $ 214 30
„        Emancipation Mines   500 00
„        Empress Mine Group   885 00
Highland-Transvaal     373 15
Siwash Creek   246 70
Foot-bridge—Coquihalla  492 68
Total  $ 96,397 30 9 Geo. 5
Expenditure.
C 83
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED.
1st April, 1917, to 31st March, 1918.
Schools.
Work and Tenderers.
Remarks.
Abbotsford—Basement and sanitary service :
Layfield & Tard'iff   	
McWilliam & Munroe 	
Sloan & Harrison	
Baynes Lake—One-room, large :
Jones & Doris	
A.  McLean	
W. J. J. Morrison  	
Corbin—One-room, large:
A. McLean	
W. J. J. Morrison	
Dunderave—Two-room:
T. Carson	
Robertson & Partners	
Granby Bay—Two-room addition :
McWilliam & Munroe  	
Robertson & Partners 	
IIollyburx—Two-room addition :
Rogers & Sutherland 	
Hollyburn—Heating :
Carl  Beek   .	
Central Sheet Metal Works 	
Pease Pacific Foundry, Ltd	
Lunit District—One-room, large :
H. J. Davies 	
W. L. Gibbard ,	
Princeton—Two-room addition :
T. Carson   	
McWilliam & Munroe  	
Layfield & Tardifl.    	
Boeing & Brass	
Wilson & Thomas	
Empress Construction Co	
Slocan Junction—One-room, large :
McWilliam & Munroe 	
School-desks.
Macey Office Equipment Co	
Weiler Bros., Ltd	
Clarke & Stuart 	
. Clarke & Stuart (alternate)    '	
Clarke & Stuart  (alternate)   	
Victoria Furniture Co	
$ 3,800 00
4,512 00
9,540 00
3,870 50
3,800 00
4,S00 00
4,720 00
5,450 00
7.490 00
9,837 00
9.S50 00
13,997 00
7,695 00
1.396 00
1,590 00
1,650 00
3,800 00
4,300 00
12,115 00
12.220 00
12,900 00
13,870 00
15,650 00
15,895 00
3,640 00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Four hours late.
Four hours late.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded. •
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
4,732 50
4,798 75
4,917 50
5,001 25
5,363 25
4,958 25
Awarded. C 81
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Fuel.
(2,240 lb. to the Ton.)
Tenderers.
Nl-'T.
Parliament
Buildings.
Parliament
Buildings.
Government
House.
Victoria
Court-house.
Normal
School.
Victoria.
Hall & Walker 	
Mackay & Gillespie 	
Kirk & Co	
Victoria Fuel Co	
J. E. Painter & Son (received too late)
Per Ton.
$6 75
6 65
6 40
0 25*
6 50
Per Ton.
$7 75
7 05
7 50*
7 75
Per Ton.
$7 75
70
50*
65
S5
TO
65
50*
60
75
Per Ton.
$8 10
7 90*
8 10
8 10
8 10
* Awarded.
Vancouver Court-house and Normal School.
Tenderers.
Lump.
Nut.
Pea.
Slack.
Per Ton.
$7 00
7 25
Per Ton.
$6 00
0 25
Per Ton,
$4 50
4 25
Per Ton.
$3 50
McDonald, Marpole & Co., Ltd	
3 25
Awarded.
Ferry, Arrowhead-Beaton.
J. Fitzsimmons (awarded), $2,400. Passenger rate, $1; freight, 15 cents per 100 lb. for
small shipments, and reduction (not stated) for large shipments.    Only one tender submitted.
Ferry, Eraser River at Agassiz.
J. W. Mcintosh (awarded) ;  W. McGrath.
Ferry, Summerland-Naramj\ta. <
Okanagan Boat Co. (awarded).    Only one proposal submitted.    Same tolls as previous year.
Kelowna-Westbank.
Leonard A. Hayman (awarded). Only one proposal submitted. Tolls same as previous year,
excepting " Cart and wagon loaded, with one horse and driver," which was increased from $1.50
to $2.
Sooke River Bridge.
Tenderers.
Construction.
Removal
of Old
Structure.
Total.
R. Moncrieffi	
Express Construction Co.'
Robertson & Partners  . .
Hodgson & King	
$6,982 00
6,964 00
7,312 00
7,612 00
$400 00
490 00
469 00
808 00
$7,382 00
7,454 00
7,781 00
S,420 00
Awarded.
One-ton Motor-truck  (Vancouver).
Tenderers. Price.
Consolidated Motor Co.  (Maxwell)   (accepted)     $1,385 00
Jamieson, Rolfe & Wallis (Studebaker)     1,900 00
Canadian Pneumatic Tool Co. (Little Giant)  2,500 00
Girls' Industrlvl School, Vj^ncouver—(Drainage).
No tenders received. 9 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector op Machinery. C 85
REPORT OF CHIEF INSPECTOR OF MACHINERY.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
The Honourable the Minister of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In accordance with the provisions of the " Boilers Inspection Act," I have the honour
to submit to you the Sixteenth Annual Report of the operation of the steam-boilers and machinery
inspection service for the year ending March 31st, 1918.
The personnel of the service at present consists of the Chief Inspector, twelve District
Inspectors, one clerk, and three stenographers, located as follows: Chief Inspector, four
inspectors, one clerk, one stenographer and typist at the head office in New Westminster for
District A; three Inspectors and one stenographer and typist in Victoria for District B; one
Inspector in Nelson for District C; four Inspectors and one stenographer in Vancouver for
District D.
The following is a summary of the routine work performed in the office of the Chief
Inspector during the year, exclusive of inspections, engineers' examinations, and the work of
engineer surveying, details of which will be found in the reports of the Inspectors for the
different districts and that of the Chief Engineer Examiner:—
Letters inward     5,987
Letters outward    6,583
Telegrams inward        37
Telegrams outward         29
Inspectors' monthly reports examined        144
New designs examined, calculated, and reported on         68
Amendments to designs examined, calculated, and reported on        70
Fees collected for designs     $424
Number of miles travelled by Chief Inspector  4,335
I am pleased again to be able to report that there have been no boiler-explosions during
the year.
The number of accidents to persons and machinery are fully set forth in the District
Inspectors' reports.
It will be noted that there were three accidents to persons, one of which was fatal. This
was a case in which a logging-locomotive, No. 1832, ran off the track and fell down an incline,
killing the engineer.
Regarding defects discovered, it will be seen from the summary that people still operate
boilers without safety-valves; four such cases having been found, with ten safety-valves overloaded and twenty-nine defective in construction. Under pressure-gauges, twenty-five were
found to be inoperative and 276 defective.
The number of new boilers built for British Columbia was 156, as compared with sixty-six
for the previous year; 113 of these were built in British Columbia, eleven were built under
inspection in Eastern Canada, twelve not built under inspection'in Eastern Canada, and twenty
built in the United States. Of these, 130 were put into operation in British Columbia, the
remainder being exported to France and the United States.
The number of second-hand boilers imported was twenty-four from Eastern Canada, as
compared with twenty-one during the previous year; and thirteen from the United States, as
compared with six for the previous year.
Boilers inspected for the first time during the year number 189; fourteen were taken out
of service, being condemned as unfit for further use.
The total number of boilers now on our books is 5,989. Of these, 2,730 were inspected
internally and externally, fifteen inspected Internally only, and SOS inspected externally only ;
thus leaving 2,936 on which no inspection was made during the year, a large number of these
not being in operation.
The number of plates tested during the year was 346, as compared with 282 for the previous
year.    Fourteen plates were rejected as unfit for use in boiler-construction, as compared with O 86 Public Works Report  (1917-18)
four in the previous year. On account of the difficulty in securing boiler-plate much of the
material tested this year has not been up to the usual quality, and in a large number of cases
the specimens had to be submitted to a series of impact tests and to microscopic tests before we
felt that it would be safe to use them.    This accounts for the large number of plates condemned.
The cruiser " Adanac " was used in connection with inspections in Districts A and D; all
the logging camps operated on the coast-line in these districts were visited. The total number
of miles run was 2,603. The coal-oil used for engine, lamps, and all purposes was 836 gallons;
engine-oil, 17 gallons. The average consumption of coal-oil per mile for all purposes was 0.321
gallon, and the average consumption was 0.125 gallon per horse-power per hour.
In addition to the usual work of this office, we have during the year undertaken extra work
as follows: Reports on various matters for Imperial Munitions Board; supervision of repairs
and operation of the Ladner-Woodward and the Mission Ferries; surveys and reports on the
launch " Faloma " for the Health Department, the " Whistlewing," " Douglas," and " Embree "
for the Forestry Department, and the " Watla" for the Attorney-General's Department, the
latter being handed over by the Game Warden to the Attorney-General's Department and by
the Attorney-General's Department to the Forestry Department. Repairs were arranged for
and supervised on the " Faloma " and the " Watla " ; extensive repairs were carried out oil
the Ladner-Woodward and on the Mission Ferry.
During the year I have been working with the British Columbia University in connection
with the education of returned soldiers to fit them for engineers. Many who held certificates
of low grade before going overseas have taken the course in the University, and have secured
high-grade certificates. Others with little experience have taken the course, and have been
given temporary certificates to operate under Chief Engineers, and have thereby received such
practical training as enabled them to pass examinations for certificates of competency.
Efficiency tests have been carried out at the Mental Hospital, alterations made in the boiler
settings, and some instruments installed, resulting in decided improvement in connection with
this plant.
Active co-operation between this Department and the engineers in various public buildings
is also showing advantageous results. It is expected that during the coming year this co-operation will be continued and that a system of taking and plotting records will be introduced.
Preliminary arrangements have also been made for the Inspectors in our service to undertake
the work of inspection for the Workmen's Compensation Board.
Appended you will find a summary of the total work done by all the District Inspectors, as
well as their separate reports.
In conclusion, I desire to thank you for your active interest in support of this office, and
also to thank the members of the staff for the efficient manner in which they have carried out
their work during the year.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Peck,
Chief Inspector.
Summary of Total Work done by District Inspectors for Vear ending March 31st, 1918.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers   138
boiler-plates inspected   346
boiler-plates rejected   14
boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  113
boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada  11
boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  12
new boilers inspected built in United States   20
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia . ~  77
new boilers inspected  (total)     130
boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)     24
boilers imported from United States (second-hand)     13
boilers unclassified   22
boilers inspected in United States    3
first inspections  ,  1SQ 9 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector op Machinery. C 87
Summary of Total Work done by District Inspectors—Concluded.
Number of inspections, external and internal    2,730
„            internal inspections only     15
„           external inspections only    308
,,            special inspections after repairs   72
„           visits in addition to inspections   1,198
„            boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   2,923
,,           boilers on which pressure was reduced  j  98
,,           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   48
„           boilers repaired under Inspector's directions    63
,,           boilers considered unfit for further use   10
„           accidents to engines and boilers    37
„           accidents resulting in personal injury  (not fatal)    2
„           accidents resulting in personal injury  (fatal)     1
,,           investigations     IS
„ inspections completed     '      3,218
Total horse-power of boilers inspected     161,459.79
Number of defects observed as per summary  2,447
Number of defects considered dangerous    228
Inspection fees earned   $28,848.67
Inspection fees collected      $28,490 72
Miles travelled by the Inspector   62,350
Letters  inward     7,129
Letters  outward  8,690
Telegrams inward     59
Telegrams  outward     73
Boilers taken out of service  14
Summary of Totj^l Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.         Dangerous.
Boilers without safety-valves  4 4
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded   10 4
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction   29 5
Pressure-gauges inoperative   25 14
Pressure-gauges defective    276 15
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing  7
Cases of defective stays    31 3
Cases of broken rivets   5
Cases of defective riveting  13 2
Cases of broken stays or braces   58 4
Cases of loose stays or braces   14 1
Boilers damaged by low water   13 2
Defective settings     97 8
Boilers with fractured plates   63 11
Boilers with laminated plates  1
Boilers with burned plates  24 7
Boilers with blistered plates    7 2
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   116 6
Cases of internal corrosion    161 2
Cases of scale or encrustation   169 7
Oases of internal grooving  6 2
Oases of external corrosion    161 10
Cases of defective tubes    155 7
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement   30 4
Cases of broken feed-valves  22 9
Serious leakage around tube-ends    143 10
Serious leakage in rivet-joints     13 1 C 88
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Summary of ToTAt Defects observed—Concluded.
Nature of Defects.
Number.
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks       160
Defective water-gauges    ,	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Water-columns without blowouts  	
Cases of broken test-cocks 	
Connections to water-columns without valves  	
Neutral sheets not stayed 	
Furnaces out of shape 	
Boilers without fusible plugs  	
Boilers low at front end 	
Oases of serious leakage of fittings 	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off	
Defects in engines   	
Boilers without stop-valves  	
Cases of defective steam-pipes  	
Unclassified defects 	
19
19
4
190
13
1
O
29
70
50
9
17
8
20
182
Dangerous
34
2
11
1
1
1
9
5
24
Totals    2,447
22S
John Peck,
Chief Inspector of Steam-boilen
Report of the Chief Examiner.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
The Honourable the Minister of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you the following report with respect to examination
of candidates for engineers' certificates for the year ending March 31st, 1918:—
During the year I have received 954 applications for examination for the different grades
of certificates.
On March 31st, 1917, I had on hand 268 applications, making a total of 1,222. Of these,
901 have been examined; 235 applicants have had their fees returned, as their testimonials did
not. show the necessary service qualifications required by the Act. This leaves on the " Accepted
for Examination " file eighty-six application forms.
Result of Examinations.
No.
Class. examined. Passed. Failed.
First            9 9
Second          33 17               10
Third     157 103               54
Fourth         358 271               87
Temporary     164 103                  1
Special logging-donkey        127 104               23
Special logging-locomotive           6 5                 1
Special creamery            3 3
Special heating         37 37
Special road-roller           2 2 9 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector op Machinery. C 89
Result of Examinations—Concluded.
No.
Class. examined. Passed. Failed.
Special threshing            4 3 1
Special Doukhobor           1 1
Totals     901               718 18
Examination fees collected by Chief Inspector   $3,257 50
Examination fees collected by other Inspectors   144 50
Duplicate certificate fees   57 50
Total     $3,459 50
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Peck,
Chief Engineer Examiner.
Senior Inspector's Report, District A.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
John Peck, Esq..
Chief Inspector of Machinery, Ncio Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you the following report with respect to work done by
me during the year ending March 31st, 1918:—
During the year my time was occupied in carrying out the varied work relating to this
office—namely, examining, calculating, and registering designs of boilers, boiler accessories, pipe
plans, etc., and examining engineers.
I made two visits to the Upper Country inspecting boilers at Kamloops, and examining
engineers at Revelstoke, Vernon, and Kamloops.
Appended you will find a list of the boilers inspected by me, also a list showing the number
of candidates for engineers' certificates who were examined in this district during the year.
Re designs for year commencing April 1st, 1917, and ending March 31st, 1918; these are
as follows:—
Total designs for the year     138
Total new designs for the year         68
Total design amendments for the year         70
Fees collected for designs     $424
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Downie,
Senior Inspector, District A.
Summary of Work done in District A for Year ending March 31st, 191S.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers   93
boiler-plates inspected  S
first inspections   2
inspections, external and internal   10
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   10
boilers on which pressure was reduced   4
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  4 C 90 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Summary of Work done in District A—Concluded.
Number of inspections completed   10
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   757
Number of defects observed as per summary  10
Inspection fees earned    $11S.95
Inspection fees collected    $118.95
Miles travelled by the Inspector    1,6S0
Summary' of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction    1
Cases of internal corrosion    2
Oases of scale or encrustation  2
Cases of defective tubes   2
Serious leakage around tube-ends   2
Defective water-gauges   1
Total         10
: John Downie,
Senior Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A.
Inspector's Report, Districts,
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st,  1918.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you herewith my report for the year ending March
31st, 1918.
I am again pleased to report that no boiler-explosions have occurred during the year in this
district.
Unfortunately, there was one accident which involved personal injury to the chief engineer
of the plant of the Dominion Evaporators. While feeling the bearings of the fan-engine he
apparently slipped, and his arm, passing through the spokes of a pulley on the shaft, was broken
and wrenched off below the elbow.
Boilers Nos. 123L\., 1769a, and 2015a were damaged through excessive accumulations of
scale on the fire-sheets.
Boiler No. 97a was damaged through' an excess of lime having been fed into the boiler in
an endeavour to arrest pitting on the tubes.
Two old marine boilers were inspected with the object of having them used for stationary
purposes. The tubes of both were pitted through and useless, although the shells and furnaces
were in good condition.    The boilers were ordered to be retubed.
Boiler No. 1216a was damaged by low water. After washing out, some scale had lodged
over the blow-down outlet; the boiler was filled up without closing the blow-down cock, and
when steam was generated the scale blew out, thus allowing the boiler to empty. The tubes at
the back-head were damaged, but were made good by rolling.
Other defects, as noted in the tabulated report attached, were of minor importance and such
as occur in every-day operation.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval.
I have, etc.,
John D. Kay,
Inspector, District A.
Remarks.
Assisted at general examinations. 9 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
C 91
Summary of Work done in District A for Year ending March 31st, 1.91S.
Number of boiler-plates inspected   16
,,            boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  2
„           boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada   1
„           'boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection   1
„           new boilers inspected built in British Columbia   5
,,            new boilers inspected  (total)     8
„           boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  2
,,           boilers imported from United States (second-hand)     2
„           boilers unclassified   4
„           first inspections   16
„           inspections, external and internal   298
„           external inspections only  9
„           special inspections after repairs   22
„           visits in addition to inspections  143
,,           boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   276
,,           boilers on which pressure was reduced   6
„           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  6
„           boilers repaired under Inspector's directions   12
„           accidents to engines and boilers    4
„           accidents resulting in personal injury  (not fatal)     1
,-,           investigations    5
,,           inspections completed    304
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  13,402
Number of defects observed as per summary  175
Number of defects considered dangerous   15
Inspection fees earned    $2,587.05
Inspection fees collected  $2,550.20
Miles travelled by the Inspector  7,858
Letters inward  303
Letters outward  374
Boilers taken out of service  1
Work done by other Inspectors for this District.
Five boilers partly inspected by District D and fees collected by that office.
• Summary of Defects observed.
.Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction 	
Pressure-gauges defective 	
Cases of broken rivets 	
Cases of defective riveting 	
Cases of broken stays or braces 	
Cases of loose stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water  :...
Defective settings  	
Boilers with fractured plates	
Boilers with burned plates 	
Oases of sediment on fire-sheets 	
Cases of internal corrosion	
Cases of scale or encrustation	
Cases of internal grooving 	
Cases of external corrosion 	
Cases of defective tubes 	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement 	
Serious leakage around tube-ends  	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints	
Number.
Dangerous
1
14
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
.   .
14
IS
3
3
7
20
27
2
2
14
9
4
2
4
2
4 C 92      , Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Summary of Defects observed—Concluded.
Nature of Defects. Number.         Dang
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks   3
Defective water-gauges    1
Cases of broken test-cocks   17
Connections to water-columns without valves  1
Boilers without fusible plugs  1
Cases of serious leakage of fittings   3
Defects in engines   2                   1~
Totals       175 15
John D. Kay,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A.
Inspector's Report, District A.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to place before you my report for the year ending March 31st, 1918,
giving details of the work accomplished under the " Boilers Inspection Act," which I trust will
receive your approbation.
I have, etc.,
George C. McGown,
Inspector, District A.
Summary of Work done in District A for Year ending March 31st, 1918.
Number of boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada   2
„           new boilers inspected built in British Columbia   6
„           new boilers inspected (total)  8
„           boilers imported from United States  (second-hand)     1
,,           first inspections   9
„           inspections, external and internal  328
„           external inspections only    *         15
„           special inspections after repairs   11
visits in addition to inspections   73
„            boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   316
„           boilers on which pressure was reduced    5
„           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   9
„           boilers repaired under Inspector's directions   5
„           boilers considered unfit for further use   1
„            accidents to engines and boilers   4
„           inspections completed  333
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  17,296
Number of defects observed as per summary   427
Number of defects considered dangerous   60
Inspection fees earned  $3,229.17
Inspection fees collected   $3,210.95
Miles travelled by the Inspector  7,634
Letters inward   491
Letters outward   506
Telegrams inward   1
Telegrams outward   3
Boilers taken out of service  2 9 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
C 93
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers without safety-valves  	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction	
Pressure-gauges inoperative 	
Pressure-gauges defective 	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing 	
Cases of defective stays  	
Cases of defective riveting 	
Boilers damaged by low water 	
Defective settings  	
Boilers with blistered plates 	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets 	
Cases of internal corrosion  	
Cases of scale or encrustation	
Cases of internal grooving 	
Cases of external corrosion 	
Cases of defective tubes 	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement 	
Serious leakage around tube-ends  	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Defective water-gauges 	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Cases of broken test-cocks  	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Boilers low at front end	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off
Defects in engines   	
Cases of defective steam-pipes	
Unclassified defects   	
dumber.
1.
1
S
21
1
10
1
s
33
1.5
2
21
24
20
2
97
4
5
17
2
8
S
7
14
SS
Dangerous.
1
1
22
1
2
5
21
Totals       427
66
George C. McGown,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A.
Inspector's  Report, Districts A and E.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
John Peck, Esq..
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending March 31st, 1918, for work
done in Districts A and E.
During the year twelve vertical-tubular boilers, one locomotive-type boiler, and twelve return-
tube boilers, 72 inches diameter by 18 feet, were built under my supervision at the Vulcan Iron
Works, New Westminster. All plates used in the construction of these boilers were tested and
each boiler was inspected at least once during construction, and when completed was subject
to the hydrostatic test.
I inspected all the boilers in the Okanagan District from Penticton to Sicamous and along
the Canadian Pacific Railway from Field to Kamloops,' and held engineers' examinations at
Golden, Revelstoke, and Kamloops, making four trips during the year to the Upper Country.. C 94 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
I inspected all the plates for building one 93-foot diameter and one 115-foot diameter tank,
also a large economizer at the Imperial Oil Company's plant at loco.
I assisted you at an evaporation test at the Kamloops Hospital, and inspected Government
boilers at the Court-houses at Vernon and Kamloops and at the Old Men's Home, Kamloops.
The remainder of my time has been occupied in the office, examining and calculating new
boiler designs, making drawings and office records, and assisting in engineers' examinations.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
A. S. Bennett,
Inspector, Districts A and E.
Remarks.
Assisted at monthly engineers' examinations.
Summary of Work done in Districts A and E for the Year ending March 31st, 191S.
Number of drawings and specificatious calculated for new boilers    45
„           boiler-plates inspected  ..,  64
„           boiler-plates rejected     2
„           boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia   25
„           boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  4
„           new boilers inspected  (total)     4
„           boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)     2
,,           boilers unclassified  7
„           first inspections    13
„           inspections, external and internal    154
„           external inspections only   33
,,            visits in addition to inspections  2
„           boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   136
„           boilers on which pressure was reduced    8
„           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   1
„           accidents to engines and boilers  1
,,           investigations    1
„           inspections completed  187
Total horse-pow-er of boilers inspected   6,470
Number of defects observed as per summary    128
Number of defects considered dangerous   IS
Inspection fees earned    $1,631.40
Inspection fees collected     $1,651.15
Miles travelled by the Inspector   6,252
Letters inward  147
Letters outward  320
Telegrams outward  1
Work done for other Districts. i
Inspected and tested one 18-foot diameter x 46-foot digester at Port Alice, Vancouver Island,
for District B.
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Boilers without safety-valves  2                   2
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded  1                   1
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction   7
Pressure-gauges inoperative  9                   6
Pressure-gauges defective   18                   3
Cases of defective riveting   1
Defective settings  2
Boilers with burned plates   2
Boilers with blistered plates   1                 >.. 9 Geo. 5 Cliief Inspector of Machinery. C 95
Summary of Defects observed—Concluded.
Nature of Defects. Number.         Dangi
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets  7
Cases of internal corrosion  S
Cases of scale or encrustation   19
Cases of external corrosion  16
Cases of defective tubes  2
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement   1
Cases of broken feed-valves   2
Serious leakage around tube-ends  1                   1
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks   10                 3
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks   2                   1
Water-columns without blow-outs    2
Cases of broken test-cocks   9
Connections to water-columns without valves  2
Boilers low at front end   2                   1
Cases of serious leakage of fittings   2
Totals     128 IS
A. S. Bennett,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, Districts A and E.
SUMMARY OF TOTAL WORK DONE IN DISTRICTS A AND E FOR YEAR ENDING
MARCH 31st, 1918.
Results of Examinations.
No.
Class. examined. Passed. Failed.
First  9 9
Second '  8 5                 3
Third  61 44               17
Fourth     131 98                33
Special logging-donkey "  42 33                  9
Special creamery   2 2
Special heating     12 12
Special  threshing     4 3                 1
Special  road-roller     2 2
Temporary    45 45
Totals     316 253 63
Summary of Work done.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers   138
boiler-plates inspected    88
boiler-plates rejected    2
boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  27
boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada   3
boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  5
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia  11
new boilers inspected (total)     20
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)    4
boilers imported from United States (second-hand)    3
boilers unclassified    11
first inspections    40
inspections, external and internal   790
external inspections only    57
special inspections after repairs   33
visits in addition to inspections  218 C 96
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Summary of Work done—Concluded.
Number of boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  	
boilers on which pressure was reduced	
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs	
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions	
boilers considered unfit for further use	
accidents to engines and boilers	
accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)
investigations  	
inspections  completed   	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected 	
Number of defects observed as per summary	
Number of defects considered dangerous 	
Inspection fees earned	
Inspection fees collected 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector 	
Letters inward	
Letters outward	
Telegrams inward 	
Telegrams outward	
Boilers taken out of service	
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers without safety-valves	
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction
Pressure-gauges inoperative 	
Pressure-gauges defective	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing	
Cases of defective stays	
Cases of broken rivets	
Cases of defective riveting	
Cases of broken stays or braces 	
Cases of loose stays or braces  	
Boilers damaged by low water 	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates	
Boilers with burned plates	
Boilers with blistered plates 	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets 	
Cases of internal corrosion	
Cases of scale or encrustation 	
Cases of internal grooving 	
Cases of external corrosion 	
Cases of defective tubes  ,	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement	
Cases of broken feed-valves	
Serious leakage around tube-ends 	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Defective water-gauges  	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Water-columns without blow-outs  	
Cases of broken test-cocks 	
Connections to water-columns without valves  	
Boilers without fusible plugs  	
Number.
3
1
10
17
53
1
3
1
8
1
1
4
26
18
5
2
22
63
63
4
51
37
4
.    21
9
4
110
6
7
2
738
23
16
21
1
9
1
6
834
37,925
740
99
$7,566.57
$7,531.25
23,424
941
1,200
1
4
3
Dangerous.
3
1
1
6
6
43 9 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. C 97
Summary of Defects observed—Concluded.
Nature of Defects.                                                                Number. Dangerous.
Boilers low at front* end        10 1
Cases of serious leakage of fittings    5
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off  S 1
Defects in engines   9 3
Cases of defective steam-pipes   14 ■      5
Unclassified defects     S8 21
Total       740 99
John Downie,
J. D. Kay,
G. C. McGown,
A. S. Bennett,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, Districts A and E.
Senior Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report of work done during the last twelve months
in this district. The general details of examination and correspondence applies to the inspectorate
of this office, while appended summary relates to my work outside of the office.
During the year we examined 190 candidates of the various grades; of these, 149 passed
the examination, forty-one failing to attain sufficient marks to obtain the' desired certificate. In
addition to the applications for examinations received after approval at head office, we accepted
forty-nine without being registered and approved at New Westminster. This was principally
caused by the Inspectors meeting applicants in out-of-the-way places in the Province where not
many visits are made, thus preventing undue delay and inconvenience to such candidates. In this
way $144.50 in fees was obtained. During the year engineers were examined each month in
Arictoria, tri-monthly in Nanaimo, at many points along the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, and
also at the following places: Atlin, Anyox, Port Alberni, Courtenay, Port Alice, Cumberland,
Queen Charlotte Islands, Headquarters, Prince Rupert, and Comox.
Approximately 25,000 miles were travelled by the Victoria staff in the course of their duty,
by train, steamer, and sundry other means of conveyance. The work done for this district by
other districts was: Three boilers tested by District D and shipped here, and four boilers by
District A, the Inspectors of that district having inspected them for installation and equipment.
Nearly 300 visits were made to steam plants in addition to the inspections made; therefore
close supervision was made and advice given during the intervals between regular inspections.
During the year the following defects came under my personal observation:—-
Steam. Plant No. 739b.—An accident occurred to the engine, due to priming, the entrained
water in cylinder causing the fracture of the steam-port walls. This was repaired by oxyaCetylene
welding, strengthened by outside clamps.
No. 15'iOb.—This engine was wrecked by the failure of" the crank-pin. which was beyond
repair.    No one was hurt.
No. 11/92b.—This boiler was seriously overheated and bulged over the combustion-chamber,
caused by exfoliation of scale from the tubes owing to a change of the feed-water. A quiescent
portion of water-circulation permitted its accumulation almost below the main steam-outlet.
I had the damaged portion cut out and patched inside, and directed the insertion of a long
dry-pipe to make the steam-liberation more diffused.
Another accident was narrowly averted by the prompt aetion of the engineer. A large
Corliss engine, the governor of which, being driven by bevel-gear and having the pins securing:
7 C 98 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
one of those bevel-pinions sheared through by the sudden acceleration of speed, was gaining
dangerous rapidity when the engineer shut off main stop-valve and prevented damage.
No. 207b.—This mishap was at a steam " nigger " in a sawmill. The piston overreached and
burst off the cylinder-head. Steam was shut off and cylinder repaired. Fortunately, no one was
scalded by escaping steam or hurt by flying portions.
No. 421b.—This was a large mill engine with a 9-inch shaft which broke in the middle of
the main bearing, causing the smashing of the cylinder and piston. Cylinder was 24 x 30 inches
and considerable steam escaped before the valves could be closed. Engine is over twenty years
old and has had hard and trying work right along with fluctuating loads, which caused crystallization and fatigue of metal.
Boilers Nos. 120k and 1206.—These were bulged by overheating caused by oil getting into
feed-water. Boilers were repaired and suitable oil separators and filters installed to prevent
further ingress of oil.
No. 639b.—This was a resaw engine which gained undue speed owing to a break-down of the
governing-gear. A cast-iron pulley burst owing to the excessive speed attained, and a portion
of it was hurled against a steam-pipe, fracturing same. The escaping steam added to the
confusion, but no personal harm was sustained by any one.
One fatal accident was reported. This was in connection with logging-locomotive No. 1832b.
The engine got off the track and rolled down an incline, killing the engineer. Apparently there
was no fault with condition of the steam plant, which would make it appear that defective track
w7as the cause of the trouble.-
Among the boilers put out of service by the Inspection Department of this district were
two put afloat, one sent to the Yukon, and others discarded and cut up for scrap.
I  inspected  six  boilers  for  the  Provincial  Government,   totalling  578  horse-power,  with .
accruing fees of $136, which account was not presented for payment.
I might suggest that this office get the use of a good-powered launch for the early summer
months in order that the boilers from Smith Inlet north to Prince Rupert, as well as those in the
Queen Charlotte Islands, could be inspected with a greater degree of dispatch than now obtains.
At the present time we almost depend entirely on the irregular arrival of the larger steamers,
as there is great difficulty in getting launch-owners—principally fishermen—to take Inspectors
from steam plant to steam plant. I believe there are available and suitable launches belonging
to the Government that might be used for this work.
The following appended summary gives the defects noted, office-work done, etc.
In conclusion, I would state that I believe the present year will see greater industrial
activity, with a consequent increase of work. During the past year greater returns were obtained
than I estimated at the beginning of 1917. I would also acknowledge the able and efficient
assistance of my colleagues in this office in connection with the work of this district.
Trusting that the foregoing report will be satisfactory,
I have, etc.,
S.   BjVXTER,
Senior Inspector, District B.
Engineers' Examinations.
Number of applications for examinations   57
Number of applications for re-examination  11
Number of applications approved   49
Examination fees   $144.50
Summary of Work done in District B for Yej^r ending March 31st, 1918. .
Number of boiler-plates inspected   11
,,           boiler-plates rejected   1
„    : -     boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  5
boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada  2
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia  '....  2
„           flew boilers inspected  (total)  4
„           boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  3
boilers imported from United States (second-hand)  1
',.           boilers unclassified  2 9 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery-.
C 99
Summary of Work done in District B—Concluded.
Number of first inspections	
„ inspections, external and internal  	
,, external inspections only  	
• „ special inspections after repairs  	
„ visits in addition to inspections 	
„ boilers subjected to hydrostatic test	
„ boilers on which pressure was reduced'	
„ boilers unsafe without extensive repairs	
„ boilers repaired under Inspector's directions .
„ accidents to engines and boilers 	
„ accidents resulting in personal injury (fatal)
„ investigations  	
-   „• • ;        inspections  completed    ;..
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary	
Number of defects considered dangerous	
Inspection fees earned	
S
51
5
7
199
24S
9
4
19
10
1
4
254
16,023
176
27
$2,266.05
Inspection fees collected   $2,549.45
Miles travelled by the Inspector 	
Letters   inward	
Letters  outward	
Telegrams inward	
Telegrams  outward    ,	
Boilers taken out of service	
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction 	
Pressure-gauges inoperative 	
Pressure-gauges defective	
Cases of loose stays or braces	
Defective settings  	
Boilers with fractured plates  	
Boilers with burned plates	
Boilers with blistered plates 	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets 	
Cases of internal corrosion   	
Cases of scale or encrustation	
Cases of external corrosion   :	
Cases of defective tubes  	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement 	
Serious leakage around tube-ends 	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Defective water-gauges  	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks  	
Cases of broken test-cocks 	
Boilers without fusible plugs  	
Boilers low at front end 	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off ...
Defects in engines 	
Cases of defective steam-pipes  	
Unclassified defects   	
Number.
2
1
29
1
11
1
3
i
i
9
5
12
4
1
20
7
1
o
45
5
1
6
1
4
1
o
6.226
2.743
3.264
30
26
6
Dangerous.
1
1
Totals
     176 27
S. Baxter,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B. C 100 Public Works .Report  (1917-18).
Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., April 1st, 191S.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending March 31st, 191S.
During this year I inspected steam plants on Vancouver Island, and at every place from
Smith Inlet to Prince Rupert, the Queen Charlotte Islands, and the west coast of Vancouver
Island, and found the majority of these plants in a satisfactory condition.
The following is a list of the most serious defects observed:—
Return-tube Boilers.—No. 860b was badly burnt and bulged through shortness of water, and
as large repairs were necessary this "boiler was discarded. Nos. 726b, 857b, and 859b were burnt
and bulged, due to a layer of zinc on the sheet above the fire which had been placed in hangers
to prevent pitting and had fallen to the bottom of the boiler. Nos. 2088b, 2096b, and 781b were
burnt and bulged, due to scale. No. 366b and vertical No. S04b were found to be in such poor
condition that they were condemned.
One sawmill engine was wrecked, due to the crank-pin breaking.
The one fatal accident which occurred is given in Mr. Baxter's report.
Trusting my report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
L Duckitt,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B.
Summary of Work done in District B for Year ending March 31st, 1918.
Number of new boilers inspected built in United States   2
new boilers inspected (total)     2
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)    1
first inspections    3
inspections, external and internal    302
external inspections only    10
special inspections after repairs   1
visits in addition to inspections •  61
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   267
boilers on which pressure was reduced  11
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   1
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions    7
boilers considered unfit for further use  5
accidents to engines and boilers   3
accidents resulting in personal injury  (fatal)     1
inspections  completed     312
Total horse-power of boilers inspected      17,574.1
Number of defects observed as per summary   1S1
Number of defects considered dangerous   27
Inspection fees earned   $2,950.80
Inspection fees collected   $2,835.20
Miles travelled by the Inspector  8,161
Boilers taken out of service   3
Summary of Defects observed. i
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction   2
Pressure-gauges inoperative   7 7
Pressure-gauges defective   48
Cases of defective stays    3
Cases of broken stays or braces   11 2
Cases of loose stays or braces  1 9 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. C 101
Summary of Defects observed—Concluded.
Nature of Defects. Number.         Dangerous.
Boilers damaged by low water   2                   1
Defective settings   4                   1
Boilers with fractured plates    1                   1
Boilers with burned plates    9                   2
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets  5.
Cases of internal "corrosion  13
Cases of scale or encrustation    12                   3
Cases of external corrosion   15                   2
Cases of defective tubes   14
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement   2
Serious leakage around tube-ends  4                   4
Serious leakage in rivet-joints  1                   1
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  .,  5                   1
Defective water-gauges    2                   1
Boilers without fusible plugs   ,  8
Boilers low at front end  7
Cases of serious leakage of fittings   3
Defects in engines  1                   1
Cases of defective steam-pipes    1
Totals   ,  181                 27
L.   DUCKITT,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B.
Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—1 have the honour to submit my annual report for the year ending March 31st, 1918.
I believe that possibly the main cause of the more serious defects which have come under my
notice has been the excessive forcing of boilers with oil-fuel. In very many plants where oil-fuel
is rised, bulging or burning of the plate has taken place. I would strongly recommend that a
boiler be allowed to evaporate no more than a fixed quantity of water. It seems quite out of
reason that good boilers should be quickly spoiled and, at the same time, a distinct element
of danger introduced.
Very many cases of broken stays presented themselves. I have always thought that the
factor of safety on screwed stay-bolts should not be less than twelve.
The main shaft of a hoist owned by the Western Fuel Company, Nanaimo, gave way in the
main bearing. This would seem to have been caused by " fatigue," the shaft being over thirty
years old. From this and from some other observations, it would seem wise to apply our
ordinary boiler-plate tests to portions cut from the shells of some of the older boilers in the
Province in order that we may note just what the plates' properties are.
I applied the hydrostatic test to 307 boilers and completed inspections on 308 boilers.
I partially inspected eleven more boilers which were not in use.
My work "has taken me to many plants on Vancouver Island, to Anyox, the Nass River, and
from Prince Rupert inland to the borders of Alberta. Besides the ordinary work of inspection,
I conducted engineers' examinations in Prince Rupert and also assisted in such in Victoria.
This has been a busier year than last, as will be shown by the'e'nclosed detailed list of work
done, which I trust will meet with your approval.
I have, etc.,
John Clark,
Inspector of Boilers, District B. C 102
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Summary of Work done in District B for Year ending March 31st, 1918.
Number of boiler-plates inspected (old boiler)     1
.,           boiler-plates rejected    1
„           boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada .  3
new boilers inspected built in United States  4
„           new boilers inspected (total)   7
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)    5
first inspections  12
,,           inspections, external and internal    317
„           internal inspections only ".  4
,,           external inspections only  (cast-iron heating-boilers)     38
„           special inspections after repairs  7 ,  2
visits in addition to inspections   20
..           boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   307
boilers on which pressure was reduced   10
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs     > 15
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions   -....-.  2
.,           accidents to engines and boilers  -5
„           investigations   ...:..,.... 6
„           inspections completed  308
Total horse-power of boilers inspected .     17.537.9
Number of defects observed as per summary .  259
Number of defects considered dangerous   13
Inspection fees earned   $2,959.05
Inspection fees collected  ,',   $2,948.60
Miles travelled by the Inspector  7,986
SumMjVry of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Number.
Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction
Pressure-gauges defective 	
Cases of defective stays  	
Cases of broken rivets	
Cases of defective riveting 	
Cases of broken stays or braces 	
Boilers damaged by low water 	
Defective settings  	
Boilers with fractured plates  	
Boilers with laminated plates 	
Boilers with burned plates 	
Boilers with blistered plates	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets 	
Cases of internal corrosion  	
Cases of scale or encrustation	
Cases of external corrosion 	
Cases of defective tubes  	
Serious leakage around tube-ends  	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints  	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks '.	
Cases of broken test-cocks 	
Boilers without fusible plugs 	
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings 	
46
13
1
1
14
1
1
1
17
20
2S
19
17
14
5
3
6
1
23
1
5
1 9 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
C 103
Summary of Defects observed—Concluded.
Nature of Defects.
Defects in engines	
Cases of defective steam-pipes
Number.
1
Dangerous.
1
Totals       259
13
John Clark,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B.
SUMMARY OF TOTAL WORK DONE IN DISTRICT B FOR YEAR ENDING MARCH 31st,
1918. j
Results of Examinations.
No.
Class. examined.
Second '.  7
Third  33
Fourth     86
Special  logging-donkey  10
Special creamery  1
Special heating    4
Temporary    49
Passed.
Failed.
3
4-
21
12
01
.    25-
10
1   '
4
49
Totals
190
149
41
Summary of Work uone.
Number of boiler-plates inspected   .<	
,, boiler-plates rejected  	
„ boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia
„ boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada ....
„       '   new boilers inspected built in United States ,	
„ new boilers inspected built in British Columbia 	
„ new boilers inspected  (total)   	
„ boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)   	
„ boilers imported from United States (second-hand)  	
„ boilers unclassified  	
„ first inspections   ".	
,, inspections, external and internal	
„ internal inspections only 	
„ external inspections only   .:....,,........... ,.
„ special inspections after repairs 	
„ visits in addition to inspections	
,, boilers subjected to hydrostatic test 	
„ boilers on which pressure was reduced 	
„ boilers unsafe without extensive repairs 	
„ boilers repaired under Inspector's directions 	
,, boilers considered unfit for further use 	
accidents to engines and boilers 	
„ accidents resulting in personal injury (fatal)  	
,, investigations  	
„ inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected 	
Number of defects observed as per summary 	
Number of defects considered dangerous 	
Inspection fees earned  	
Inspection fees collected 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Letters inward 	
$8.
$8.
12
2
5
5
6
.    2
13
.,    9
1
2
23
670
4
53
10
280
822
30
20
28
5
IS
2
10
S74
51,135
616
67
175.90
333.25
22,373
2,743 C 101
Public Works Report  (1917-18)
Summary of Work done—Concluded.
Letters outward	
Telegrams inward	
Telegrams outward	
Boilers taken out of service
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction	
Pressure-gauges inoperative 	
Pressure-gauges defective 	
Cases of defective stays 	
Cases of broken rivets 	
Cases of defective riveting	
Cases of broken stays or braces 	
Cases of loose stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water	
Defective settings  	
Boilers with fractured plates  	
Boilers with laminated plates 	
Boilers with burned plates	
Boilers with blistered plates  	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets 	
Cases of internal corrosion	
Cases of scale or encrustation	
Cases of external corrosion 	
Cases of defective tubes	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement	
Serious leakage around tube-ends  	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Defective water-gauges  .	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Oases of broken test-cocks  	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings 	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off
Defects in engines	
Cases of defective steam-pipes	
Unclassified  defects	
Number.
2
6
S
123
16
1
1
25
2
4
.19
9
1
13
2
23
42*
45
46
35
3
3S   .
6
15
9
3
6S
14
13
10
1
6
3,264
30
26
9
<
Dangerous.
Totals
616
07
S. Baxter,
L. Duckitt,
J. Clark,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers. District B. 9 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. C 105
Inspector's Report, District C.
Nelson, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending March 31st, 1918, and I am
pleased to say that there were no boiler-explosions and no accidents resulting in personal injury
during that time.
Several return-tube boilers were damaged by mud on the fire-sheets, and in two cases part
of the damaged plates had to be cut out. Quite a number of these boilers were found to be low
at the front eini, and this generally happens where the boilers are supported by lugs resting on
the brickwork. Apart from the difficulty of keeping a boiler in its proper place, the riveting of
a heavy bracket on a lighter plate should not be encouraged.
During the year examinations for engineers were held in different centres in the district,
and most of the candidates who were notified came up for examination.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval.
I have, etc.,
Andrew Sutherland,
Inspector, District C.
Results of Examinations. ,
No.
Class. examined.
Second     8
Third ,  19
Fourth       24
Special logging-donkey  3
Special Doukhobor  1
Temporary  5 5
Totals       60 51 9
^ Remarks.
There were on file in my office on March 31st, 1918, the following application forms: Second
Class, 1, notified twice; Third Class, 4, notified twice; Fourth Class, 8, notified once; special
Doukhobor, notified once.
Summary of. Work done in District C for Year ending MjVrch 31st, 1918.
Number of boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada   2
boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  3
new boilers inspected built in United States   3
.,           new boilers inspected  (total)  8
„            boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)  4
boilers imported from United States  (second-hand)     4
,,           boilers unclassified    2
,.           firstr inspections  ,. 18
,,           inspections, external and internal  257
„           external inspections only    3
special inspections after repairs  3
,,           visits in addition to inspections   134
„           boilers subjected to hydrostatic test '  253
„           boilers on which pressure was reduced  S
„           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   1
„           boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  0
,,           boilers considered unfit for further use  1
accidents to engines and boilers   7
assed.
Failed.
6
2
15
4
21
3
3
1 C 10G
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Summary of Work done in District C—Concluded.
Number of inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary
Number of defects considered dangerous . . .
Inspection fees earned	
Inspection fees collected 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector  	
Letters inward 	
Letters outward 	
Telegrams inward	
Telegrams outward	
Boilers taken out of service	
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction
Pressure-gauges defective  t. .. .
Causes of insufficient staying or bracing	
Cases of defective stays	
Cases of broken rivets  ,
Cases of broken stays or braces 	
Cases of loose stays or braces	
Defective settings ■'.	
Boilers with fractured plates .G	
Boilers with burned plates ... rV ,	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
Cases of internal corrosion 	
Cases of scale or encrustation 	
Cases of external corrosion 	
Cases of defective tubes	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks ..-..■	
Defective water-gauges '	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Water-columns without blow-outs  	
Cases of broken test-cocks 	
Connections to water-columns without valves	
Neutral sheets not stayed 	
Furnaces out of shape 	
Boilers without fusible plugs .•	
Boilers low at front end 	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings ..:	
Defects in engines ,	
Boilers without stop-valves  	
Cases of defective steam-pipes  	
\umber.
1
5
52
3
10
41
5
4
34
• 5
46
33
21
8
22
17
1
4
2
51
3
1
2
10
45
6
1
260
17,737
447
12
$2,818,70
$2,606.82
6,166
319
380
10
23
1
Dangerous.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Totals     447
12
Andrew Sutherland,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District C. 9 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. C 107
Senior Inspector's Report,  District D.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—Enclosed please find my annual report for year ending March 31st, 191S.
During the year there have.been only three accidents to engines reported.    One at Peers &
Anderson's shingle-mill, when strap on crank end of connection-rod of Corliss engine broke and
wrecked the engine beyond repair." This was investigated by yourself and found to be a case of
" death from natural causes," or, in other words, of old age;  no fault being attached to any one
connected with the plant.  -.-  ;' ■"   •'•    -v,ii\-<<  r>:~,::\    : •.•.
The other accident happened at Rainy River Pulp & Paper Company's mill. The-engineer's
report of same was sent to you in August, 1917.
The crank-shaft of main engine at Vancouver Hotel plant w*«i found broken by engineer
after shutting down, although it had given no indication of anything wrong while running.
In July I visited the plant of the Moore Logging Company-, Wickersham, Washington, who
wished to bring their equipment over to this side if it could-pass inspection. I inspected three
log-haul boilers, but found they, were not good enough for the pressure required by owners;, they
were therefore not brought in.i*ir1 £■:. ■■-■' '•'-'  -.^- -■■   '
In November tite crown-sheet of jjifei 1 locomotive at Rock Bay came down through the heads
of stays, being;burnt off in fire-box; .'Ninety new stays were put in to repair'same.
Outside of the foregoing the .woriv has* been, a matter of routine, most of my time being spent
in the office arranging work for Inspectors and keeping records.
I have, etc.,
■a?, '-3-  '<(-'     •■-.-■■-. George O. Madigan,
■'..'■<•■<      - Senior Inspector, District D.
Summary- of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 191S.
Number of boiler-plates inspected  10
., boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  5
boilers unclassified (inspected in U.S.A.)    3
., first inspections  8
■„ inspections, external and internal  6
„ external inspections only  2
visits in addition to inspections  34
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  8
boilers on which pressure was reduced   1
accidents to engines and boilers   3
accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)    1
inspections completed  7
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   366.1
Number of defects observed as per summary  2
Inspection fees earned       $113.10
Inspection fees collected, $193.80;   total for District D  $10,019.40
Miles travelled by the Inspector   233
Letters inward  3,120
Letters outward  3,846
Telegrams inward   8
Telegrams outward  13
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. .    Number.        Dangerous.
Defective settings           1-
Cases of external corrosion           1
Total         2
George O. Madigan,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D, C 108 Public Works Report   (1917-18).
Inspector's Report, District D.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith my report for the year ending March 31st, 1918.
As far as the number of inspections is concerned, the year has not been greatly different
from other years, but in respect to new boilers there is a marked difference. It is now practically
impossible for the private individual to obtain new boilers. This has resulted in an inflated price
for second-hand boilers, which throws a good deal more responsibility upon this Department.
In spite of this, no boiler accidents have happened in this Department through which any lives
have been lost.
For the first time in the history of the Department acetylene-welded tubes were allowed.
The first set welded in this city were by no means an unqualified success. Not so much on
account of the weld, but because the tubes themselves were unfit for welding. Of about 200
tubes, at least half were condemned after welding on account of pitting. Had our office been
asked to examine and cast out tubes unfit for welding, a considerable amount of expense would
have been saved the persons interested. Six of the welded tubes gave out at the weld when
subjected to hydrostatic test. The effect of acetylene-welding of tubes should be carefully watched
after the boiler is in use. I would suggest that where the weld is conveniently placed in vertical
or locomotive boilers, that hand-hole plates be cut opposite them for that purpose.
Every lap-seam boiler that I have examined during the year has had a slot cut across the
seam, but no cracks were located.
Twelve cannery retorts were built under inspection during the year. Deflection tests were
made upon flat heads and doors of tanks built to the conventional form. A deflection of % inch
in centre was found to be common. This was reduced to y± inch by proper bracing and reducing
the surface exposed to steam-pressure (15 lb.).
Two new digesters for pulp-manufacture were installed—one at Powell River and one at
Mill Creek—both built and erected by the Williamette Iron & Steel Company, of Portland, Ore.
At the end of the year the shell of a boiler in the old Pacific Coast mill fractured in a
longitudinal direction for about 7 inches from the stop-valve flange towards the manhole. The
fracture was discovered under hydrostatic test. The flange of stop-valve was small in diameter
compared to those at present in use, and as there was considerable overhang of steam-piping
supported from the roof of a building not too stable upon its foundations, it threw a severe
strain upon the shell of boiler where the flange was riveted on. It seems probable that considerable fretting action also took place here, due to vibrations of the pipe-line, which would hasten
the action. Small cracks extended from edge of flange in all directions, although the main one
was in a longitudinal direction.
Trusting you will find this report satisfactory and thanking you for your assistance in the
past,
I have, etc.,
Percy A. Goepel,
Inspector, District D.
Summary of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 1918.
Number of boiler-plates -inspected    69
„           boiler-plates rejected  1
boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia . ..  28
boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  2
. ..           new boilers inspected built in United States   4
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia  18
new boilers inspected (total)   32
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)    4
.,           boilers unclassified    3
„           first inspections  35 9 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
C 109
Summary of Work done in District D—Concluded.
Number of inspections, external and internal  405
„            internal inspections only ....."  4
„           external inspections only  15
„           special inspections after repairs   17
„           visits in addition to inspections  258
,,           boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  376
„           boilers on which pressure was reduced  5
„           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   7
„           boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  7
„           boilers considered unfit for further use   1
„           investigations   <  1
,,           inspections completed  392
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  18,565.01
Number of defects observed as per summary ...... 122
Number of defects considered dangerous  23
Inspection fees earned  $3,228.70
Inspection fees collected  ,  $3,003.00
Miles travelled by the Inspector  3,400
Telegrams outward  '.  1
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number. Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction  2                   1
Pressure-gauges defective  15                    1
Cases of defective riveting  3                   2
Defective settings   3
Boilers with fractured plates    3                '3
Boilers with burned plates  1
Boilers with blistered plates  2
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   36
Cases of internal corrosion  7                   1
Cases of internal grooving   1                   1
Cases of external corrosion  :  6                   4
Cases of defective tubes  14                   3
Serious leakage around tube-ends  13                   4
Serious leakage in rivet-joints ,  1                     1
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks   1
Cases of broken test-cocks    2
Furnaces out of shape  ■       1
Cases of serious leakage of fittings  _  10                   1
Unclassified defects     1                   1
Totals       122 23
Percy A. Goepel,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D. C 110 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Inspector's Report, District D.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 191S.
John Peck, Esq., ,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have pleasure in forwarding you my report concerning the extent of work done
during the past year.
It may be noted that the majority of my inspections has taken place in logging camps
located on the Coast between Vancouver and Seymour Inlet, the number of camps visited being
119, with a total number of 343 log-hauls. Steam plants other than logging were visited, and
totalled seventeen, with fifty boilers operating. The remainder of my inspections took place in
Vancouver.
I regret that owing to various delays beyond my control it was necessary to carry on the
work late into the season, and also that at least ten logging camps were left without inspection.
I am pleased to inform you that the launch " Adanac " worked on the whole fairly satisfactorily, more especially during the latter part of the trip; but there are indications that the
engine needs a thorough overhaul, one being, the difficulty in keeping up the oil-pressure in the
crank-case, due no doubt to looseness of the bearings.
I am also pleased to be able to report that only one accident resulting in personal injury
took place in connection with logging-boilers. In this case the crown-sheet stays pulled through
,the sheet. On investigating I could find no signs of overheating, nor were any broken stays
found. The accident was to a very old locomotive in the British Columbia Mills Timber &
Trading Company's camp at Rock Bay. The fireman, in jumping off the engine at the time of
the trouble, broke his arm.
The logging industry during the past year was exceedingly busy, but with the exception of
two or three large camps, all the camp-owners complained of a shortness of men, including
engineers.
The enclosed tabulated form shows the result of my year's work in detail, which I trust you
will find satisfactory.
I have, etc.,
F. Bath,
Inspector, District I).
Summary of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 1918.
Number of boiler-plates inspected   23
,,            boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  0
„            boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  I.
„           new boilers inspected built in United States   4
„           new boilers inspected built in British Columbia   3
„           new boilers inspected (total)  9
boilers imported from United States (second-hand)    2
„           boilers unclassified   1
„■          first inspections    14
„           inspections, external and internal    377
„           external inspections only    "25
„           special inspections after repairs  ,. 1
visits in addition to inspections   28
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test ,.  382
„            boilers on which pressure was reduced  S
„           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  1
„           boilers considered unfit for further use  1
„           accidents to engines and boilers   1
_,,           investigations  1
„            inspections completed  448
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   19.042 9 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
C 111
Summary of Work done in District D—Concluded.
Number of defects observed as per summary
Number of defects considered dangerous
Inspection fees earned 	
Inspection fees collected 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Telegrams inward	
Telegrams outward	
Boilers taken out of service 	
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction
Pressure-gauges defective 	
Cases of defective stays 	
Cases of broken rivets 	
Cases of defective riveting	
Cases of broken stays or braces ,
Cases of loose stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water 	
Boilers with fractured plates	
Cases of internal corrosion	
Cases of external corrosion 	
Cases of defective tubes 	
Serious leakage around tube-ends  	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges  	
Cases of broken test-cocks 	
Boilers without fusible plugs • .......
Boilers low at front end 	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings 	
Defects in engines 	
Boilers without stop-valves	
L'nclassified defects   	
s'umber.
4
2
23
1
1
1
28
1
1
13
2
17
O
60
o
13
.1
13
1
15.
1
217
2
$3,666.00
$3,615.70
5,400
.-■   4
■e
i
Dangerous,
o
Totals        217 2
F. Bath,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
Inspector's Report, District D,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1918.
John Peck. Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir.—I have the honour to submit my report of inspection-work done during the year ending
March 31st, 1918, also the enclosed tabulated statement.
Apart from the great scarcity of material for boiler-construction, which scarcity was accentuated as the year progressed to its close, there is nothing to report of especial public interest.
Certain modifications of conventional practice in respect to the testing and approving of boilerplate might be referred to at some length ;   however, this matter will probably be fully cared for by yourself. On the whole, a more charitable attitude had to be taken in regard to the
quality of steel as judged by the standards of less strenuous times. The same applies to used
boilers, also faulty tubes, the scarcity of the latter having been more pronounced than plate.
About fifty vertical-tube boilers were built to the order of the Imperial Munitions Board for
service overseas. There were also a few second-hand boilers inspected prior to export to the
United States. These inspections were, of course, incidental to the war, and in no sense to be
regarded as indicative of a future export trade in machinery. There may be just a little satisfaction in the fact that the Munitions Board, as well as a few steam-users in the United States,
took advantage of our modest facilities for the inspection of their purchases. It is good to know
that our efforts are appreciated to this extent.
During the year I found what is probably the last remaining suspect of boiler design 1319.
Suspicions that grooving at longitudinal seams would have taken place were well founded.
About V16 inch material only remained to hold the boiler together. As an exactly similar case was
investigated by the Chief Inspector two years ago and afterwards fully referred to in that year's
Annual Report, no further action—save scrapping the boiler—was considered necessary.
The examination of candidates for engineers' certificates takes up a lot of time in the office.
Roughly, two weeks in every alternate month of my time were so occupied. There has been no
dearth of aspirants for certificates, and it seems in the nature of a paradox that complaints
should be made now and then of the paucity of certificated men. In the lower grades the work
was fair; in the higher, not at all good. The presumption is that capable and good men had
transferred their activities to the more urgent work elsewhere.
Recognizing fully an indebtedness to you for the continuance of generous counsel and support,
I have, etc.,
Fred. Biggam,
Inspector, District D.
Summary of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 1918.
.Number of boiler-plates inspected   144
„           boiler-plates rejected    9
„           boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  42
„           boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada  1
boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  1
„            new boilers inspected built in United States  3
„      \    new boilers inspected built in British Columbia      <        43
„           new boilers inspected  (total)     48
„           hoilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)    3
„           boilers imported from United States (second-hand)     3
„           boilers unclassified    3
„           first inspections    48
,,           inspections, external and internal  225
„           internal inspections only   7
„           external inspections only    153
„           special inspections after repairs   S
„           visits in addition to inspections  246
„           boilers subjected to hydrostatic test ,  344
„           boilers on which pressure was reduced  23
„           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   3
„           boilers repaired under Inspector's directions    1
„           boilers considered unfit for further use  1
„        '  inspections completed  403
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  16,689.68
Number of defects observed as per summary  303
Number of defects considered dangerous  25
Inspection fees earned ,  $3,279.70
Inspection fees collected   $3,206.90
Miles travelled by the Inspector (approximately)     1,354 9 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Macfiinery.
C 113
Work done for other Districts.
The plates for four digesters to be installed at Quatsino (District B) Pulp & Paper Mills
were inspected. T.S. marks were located, also mill numbers. The Provincial inspection-stamp
was imprinted at several points on every plate.
Work done by other Inspectors for this District.
The following fees, though not collected, are included in the earnings for the year:   Courthouse, $22.20;  Normal School, $18.20;  University, $5 ;  total, $45.40.
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers without safety-valves	
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction	
Pressure-gauges defective 	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing	
Cases of defective stays	
Cases of broken stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water ,	
Defective settings  	
Boilers with fractured plates	
Boilers with burned plates 	
Boilers with blistered plates	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets 	
Cases of internal corrosion	
Cases of scale or encrustation 	
Cases of internal grooving 	
Cases of external corrosion	
Cases of defective tubes  	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement 	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Defective water-gauges  	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Cases of broken test-cocks 	
Connections to water-columns without valves	
Boilers without fusible plugs 	
Cases" of serious leakage of fittings	
Unclassified defects   	
Number.
1
2
4
10
4
7
1
4
7
15
1
1
1
42
15
1
7
45
2
14
5
2
4
13
7
1
4
S3
Dangerous.
1
1
2
5
Totals        303
25
Remarks.
Nothing occurred worthy of special mention during the months of January, February, and
March, 1918.    A memorandum accompanying my annual report for 1917 forwarded to- the head
office takes note of conditions of inspection-work for the period April to December, 1917.
Fred. Biggam,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
SUMMARY OF TOTAL WORK DONE IN DISTRICT D FOR YEAR ENDING MARCH 31st,
1918.
Results of Examinations.
No.
Class. examined.
Second     10
Third      44
Fourth     117
Special logging-donkey     72
Passed.
Failed
3
7
23
21
91
26
5S
14 Results of Examinations—Concluded.
No.
Class. examined. Passed. Failed.
Special logging-locomotive       6 5 1
Special heating       21 -    21
Temporary      65 64 1
Totals     335 265 70
Summary of Work done.
Number of boiler-plates inspected   246
„           boiler plates rejected   10
„           boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  SI
„           boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada  1
„           boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  4
.,           new boilers inspected built in United States  11
„    -      new boilers inspected built in British Columbia   64
„           new boilers inspected  (total)     89
„           boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)    7
„           boilers imported from United States (second-hand)  5
„           boilers unclassified    10
„           first inspections   105
„           inspections, external and internal  1,013
„           internal inspections only    11
„           external inspections only  195
„           special inspections after repairs   26
„           visits in addition to inspections   566
„           boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   1,110
„           boilers on which pressure was reduced  37
,,           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   11
„           boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  ....-  8
„           boilers considered unfit for further use  3
„            accidents to engines and boilers   3
„           accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)    1
„           investigations    2
„           inspections completed     1,250
Total horse-power of boilers inspected    54,662.79
Number of defects observed as per summary  . 644
Number of defects considered dangerous   50
Inspection fees earned $10,2S7.50
Inspection fees collected $10,019.40
Miles travelled by the Inspector (approximately)     10,3S7
Letters inward   3,126
Letters outward  3,S46
Telegrams inward   12
Telegrams outward  20
Boilers taken out of seiwice ,  1
Summary of Defects observed. .
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Boilers without safety-valves         1 1
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded         6 3
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction          S 3
Pressure-gauges defective        48 6
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing         4
Cases of defective stays        8 2
Cases of broken rivets          1 ■ •         i 9 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
C 115
Summary of Defects observed—Concluded.
Nature of Defects. Number. Dangerous.
Cases of defective riveting  4                   2
Cases of broken stays or braces  29
Cases of loose stays or braces  1
Boilers damaged by low water  5
Defective settings    11                   1
Boilers with fractured plates  31                   5
Boilers with burned plates   2                   1
Boilers with blistered plates   3                   1
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   37
Cases of internal corrosion  51                   2
Cases of scale or encrustation  15
Cases of internal grooving   2                   2
Cases of external corrosion   31                   6
Cases of defective tubes  62                   3
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement   15                   4
Cases of broken feed-valves   1                   1
Serious leakage around tube-ends   74
Serious leakage in rivet-joints    3
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks   18
Defective water-gauges    3                   1
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks    5                   4
Cases of broken test-cocks    28
Connections to water-columns without valves  7
Furnaces out of shape   1
Boilers without fusible plugs    2
Boilers low at front end   2
Cases of serious leakage of fittings  29                   1
Defects in engines  1
Boilers without stop-valves    3
Unclassified defects     92                   1
Totals    644                 50
George O. MadigjVN,
Percy A. Goepel,
Fred. Bath,
Fred. Biggam,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, District D. C 116 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
LIST OF REGISTERED DESIGNS.
List of Boiler Manufacturers, with their Number of Approved and Registered Designs.
Alley & McLellan, Glasgow, Scotland   1
Allbright-Nell Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
American Radiator Co. of Canada, Toronto, Out  30
American Hoist & Derrick Co., St. Paul, Minn., U.S.A  26
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A  6
Ames Iron Works, Oswego, N.Y., U.S.A  5
Atlas Engine Works, Indianapolis, U.S.A  1
Averting & Porter, Rochester, England  1
Avery Co., Peoria, 111., U.S.A  2
Babcock & Wilcox, Renfrew, Scotland  21
Badenhausen Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. .. .•  4
Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, U.S.A  20
B.C. Marine Railway Co., Vancouver and Victoria, B.C  5
Beatty, M., & Sons, Ltd., Wetland, Ont  15
Berg Machinery Manufacturing Co., Toronto, Ont  1
Bell, Robert, Engine & Threshing Co., Ltd., Seaforth, Ont. >  5
Brown Hoisting Co., Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A  2
Bros., William, Minneapolis, U.S.A  7
Brownell, Co., The, Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A '  3
Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Bucyrus Co., South Milwaukee, U.S.A  20
Buffalo Steam Roller Co., Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A  1
Canadian Allis-Chalmers, Ltd., Toronto, Ont  2
Canada Foundry Co., Toronto, Ont  22
Canada Iron Corporation, Ltd., Midland, Ont  6
Canadian Northern Railway, Winnipeg, Man  3
Canadian Talbot Boiler Co., Vancouver, B.C  1
Case, J. I., Threshing So., Racine, Wis., U.S.A  22
Casey-Hedges Co., Ltd., Chattanooga, Tenn., U.S.A  1
Canadian Locomotive Co., Kingston, Ont  5
Canadian Western Manufacturing & Supply Co., Calgary, Alta  1
Clyde Iron Works, Duluth, Minn., U.S.A  9
Climax Manufacturing Co., Corry, Pa., U.S.A  6
Clayton, Son & Co., Leeds, England . .  1
Columbiana Boiler Works Co., Ltd., Ohio, U.S.A  4
Continental Iron Works, New York, U.S.A  1
Cochrane & Co., Annan, Scotland  1
Davenport Locomotive Works, Davenport, Iowa, U.S.A  13
Deearie Safety Boiler Co., Vancouver, B.C  4
Diamond Boiler Works, Minneapolis, U.S.A  1
Doty Engine Works, Goderich, Ont. ..'  6
Dutton Co., C. H., Kalamazoo, Mich., U.S.A  7
Empire Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C  9
Erie City Iron Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  5
Farquhar Co., A.B., York, Penn., U.S.A  7
Foden, Ltd., Sandback, England   2
Frost Manufacturing Co"., Galesburgh, 111., U.S.A  36
Garr, Scott & Co., Richmond, Ind., U.S.A  1
Gem City Boiler Works, Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Georgian Bay Engine Works, Midland, Ont  1
Goldie-McCulloch Co., Gait, Ont  49 9 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. C 117
List of Boiler Manufacturers—Continued.
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Co  2
Gray, Andrew, Marine Iron Works, Victoria, B.C  S
Great Northern Railway, Winnipeg, Man  2
Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont  16
Hamilton Manufacturing Co., W., Peterboro, Ont  1
Heaps Engineering Co., Ltd., New Westminster, B.C  4
Heisler Locomotive Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A. ...:  7
Holt Manufacturing Co., Stockton, Oak, U.S.A  2
Houston, Stanwood & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A '  1
Imperial Oil Co., Sarnia, Ont  6
International Engineering Works, Amherst, N.S  33
Inglis Co., John, Toronto, Ont.   7
Industrial Works, Bay City, Mich., U.S.A  3
Jenckes Machine Co., Ltd., St. Catherines, Ont  93
Keeler, E., Co., Williamsport, Pa., U.S.A  1
Kelly Springfield Road Roller Co., Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Kewanee Boiler Co., Kewanee, 111.,U.S.A  15
Keystone Driller Co., Beaver Falls, Pa., U.S.A  2
Leonard & Sons, E., London, Ont  36
Leffell & Co., James, Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Lidgerwood Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.A  4
Lima Locomotive & Machine Co., Lima, Ohio, U.S.A  20
Lyons Boiler Works, DePere, Wis., U.S.A  2
Manitowoc Iron Works, Manitowoc, Wis., U.S.A  2
Mann's Patent Steam Cart & Wagon Co., Leeds, England  3
Marine Iron Works, Victoria, B.C  8
Marion Steam Shovel Co., Marion, Ohio, U.S.A  35
Marion Osgood Co., Marion, Ohio, U.S.A  5
Marsh & Henthorne, Belleville, Ont  10
Matheson & Co., J., Ltd., New Glasgow, N.S  10
Marshall & Sons Co., Ltd., Gainsborough, England   1
Mainland Iron Works, Vancouver, B.C  1
Macdougall Co., John, Caledonian Iron Works, Montreal, Que  3
Mechanical Manufacturing Co., Ghicago, 111., U.S.'A  1
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que  9
Murray-Latta Machine Works, Vancouver, B.C  1
Nagle Engine & Boiler Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  1
Nicol Boiler Works, Vancouver, B.C  2
Napanee Iron Works, Napanee, Ont  1
North Shore Iron Works, North Vancouver, B.C  41
Northern Aluminium Co., Toronto, Ont  3
Oil City Boiler Works, Oil City, Pa., U.S.A  1
Orr & Sembower, Reading, Pa., U.S.A  19
Pennsylvania Boiler Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  3
Porter Co., H. K., Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A  10
Poison Iron Works, Toronto, Ont  1
Puget Sound Iron & Steel Works, Tacoma, Wash., U.S.A  2
Risdon Locomotive & Iron Co., San Francisco, Gal., U.S.A  1
Robey & Co., Lincoln, England  2
Ross & Howard Iron Works, Ltd., Vancouver, B.C  '31
Ruston-Proctor Co., Lincoln, England  7
Sawyer-Massey Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont  15
Seattle-Astoria Iron Works, Seattle, Wash., U.S.A  1
Standard Iron Works, Vancouver, B.C  1
Sterns Co., Erie, Pa., U.S.A  1
Sumner Iron Works, Everett, Wash., U.S.A  1 C 118
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
List of Boiler Manufacturers—Concluded.
Swift & Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
Taylor, Forbes & Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C  30
Thew Automatic Shovel Co., Lorraine, Ohio, U.S.A  5
Toronto Iron Works, Ltd., Toronto, Ont  1
Twohy Bros. Co., Portland, Ore., U.S.A  1
Union Iron Wprks, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  38
Vancouver Engineering Works, Vancouver, B.C  74
Victoria Machinery Depot Co., Victoria, B.C  33
Vulcan Iron Works,' New Westminster, B.C  3S
Vulcan Iron Works, Seattle, Wash., U.S.A  1
Vulcan Iron Works, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., U.S.A  1
Waterous Engine Works, Brantford, Ont  63
Washington Iron Works, Seattle, Wash., U.S.A  37
Western Dry Dock & Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Port Arthur, Ont  2
Wickes Boiler Co., Saginaw, Mich., U.S.A  4
Williamette Iron & Steel Works, Portland, Ore., U.S.A  6
List of MjiKERS who hayi Registered and Approved Boiler Accessory Designs.
Spi'ing Safety-valves.
American Steam Gauge & Valve Co., Boston, Mass., U.S.A	
Ashton Valve Co., Boston, Mass., U.S.A	
Consolidated Safety Valve Co., New York, U.S.A	
Crane Co., Chicago, HI, U.S.A	
Crosby Steam Gauge & Valve Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A	
E. Leonard & Sons, London, Ont	
J. E. Lonergan & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A	
James Morrison Brass Manufacturing Co , Ltd., Toronto, Ont.
Letson & Burpee, Ltd., Vancouver, B.C	
Lunkenheimer Co., Cincinnati, U.S.A	
T. McAvity & Sons, St. John, N.B	
Ruston, Proctor & Co., Ltd., Lincoln, England	
International Engineering W0rks, Amherst, N.S   	
Waterous Engine Works, Ltd., Brantford, Ont	
2i
Main Stop-valves.
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A  3
Canadian Locomotive Co., Ltd., Kingston, Ont  3
Crane Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  6
G. M. Favis Regulator Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
Heisler Locomotive Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  1
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  11
Lunkenheimer Co., Cincinnati, U.S.A  12
Montreal Locomotive Works, Ltd., Montreal, Que  3
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Pemberthy Injector Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont  2
Steam-gauges.
Ashcroft Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A.
United States Gauge Co., New York, U.S.A	
Blow-off Cocks and Valves.
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A	
Crane Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A       4
Elliott Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A       1
Engineering Specialties Co., Toronto, Ont       4
Homestead Valve Manufacturing, Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A       2 9 Geo. 5                              Chief Inspector of Machinery.                                    C 119
List of Makers of Boiler Accessories—Concluded.
Blow-off Cocks and Valves—Concluded.
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  3
Lunkenheimer Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A  6
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que  1
Safety Apparatus.
Kilkenny Automatic Safety Appliance Co., Walla Walla, Wash  1
Water-gauge Fittings.
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  1
McAvity & Sons, T., St. Johv, N.B  1
Canadian Locomotive Co., Kingston, Ont '.  1
James Morrison Brass Manufacturing, Ltd., Toronto, Ont  2
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que  1
Pemberthy Injector Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont  4
Huyette, Paul B., Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A  1
Test-cocks (or Valves).
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Canadian Locomotive Co., Kingston, Ont '.  1
J. I. Case Threshing Machine Co., Racine, Wis., U.S.A  1
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que  1
James Morrison Brass Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont  2
T. McAvity & Sons, St. John, N.B  1
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Pemberthy Injector Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont  2
Huyette, Paul B., Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A  1
Superheaters. )
Power Specialty Co., New York, U.S.A  3
Economizers. >
B. P. Sturtevant Co., Boston, Mass., U.S.A  1
Combined Check and Feed Valves.
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  3 C 120
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
ENGINEERS WHO OBTAINED CERTIFICATES.
(Year ending March 31st, 191S.)
First Class.
Armour,  Robert      11275
Bee, Wm. Neill    11825
Bescoby, F. Ernest  11216
O'Neill, John   11318
Oram, William John   11781
Osborne, James Q	
White, William	
Williams, G. Treharne	
Wirtanen,  Gustaf Wilhelm
Second Class.
Alexander, Frank Edward    11547
Carlsen, Alfred L. L  11403
Clay, Charles Henry    11510
Clift, Harry  11557
Edwards, George Henry    11155
Giger, Albert  11645
Greig, Robert Ferguson  11474
Hay, Albert James  11302
Hortin, Arthur   11706
Hunter, James Lees	
Johnston, John 	
Montador, Andrew	
Robson, Edward  	
Sayle, Charles Robert	
Smith, Joshua	
Thornton, Robert Donaldson
Watson, Frederick   	
Third Class.
Alcock, Robert  11822
Annand,  John Brown     11549
Atkinson, David Simpson  11550
Atkinson, Frederick William  11903
Battershall, Arthur E  11351
Bannister, Stewart  11471
Barr, Alexander     11981
Beck, William  11217
Bentham, Harry   11278
Beebe, Augustus Roy  11960
Black, Herbert Linton  11905
Brown, John  .  11142
Burr,   James   Benjamin      11355
Byrnell,   Ohas.  Fletcher     11728
Caswell, Andrew M  11221
Carliton,  George Henry     11357
Cowell,  Robert  J  11636
Cuttle,  Percy Mortimer     11226
DeWitt, Elmer William    12009
Dick,   George     11347
Donnelly,  Norman     11228
Douglas,   John     11473
Dowling. Alex. James     12019
Drew, Thomas Mitchall    11805
Dunnett, George    11153
Dunwoodie, Ernest Herbert  11920
Eceles, James Henry   11731
Engen,  Ole K.     11157
Eyton, Charles Beresford  11922
Ford,  Robert Ernest     11923
Gibbard,   Walter     11231
Gowan,   Eugene     11833
Hain,  John     11169
Houston, John Robinson     11301
Hardy, Frederick    11572
Hale,  Richard  Henry     11811
Haynes, Walter James    11964
Henriksen,  Edward  11393
Henderson,  Horace Fildes     11647
Henderson,   Robert  Law     11929
Higgins,  James Arthur     12063
Hockey, Thos. Henry    11305
Hutton,  John  Stephen   	
Johnston,  George   	
Kalnin,  Paul Harold   	
Keith,   John   	
King, William James George
Kirkpatrick,  John A	
Kobler,   Victor   	
Lewis, Emery  	
Lord, Leslie Donald	
Lockie,  George   	
Maryiani,  Mike   	
Mayhue,   Ernest  D	
Matson,   Edward Alfred   	
Morgan, John  Sidney   	
Mnrris,   William   F	
Morrin,  Joseph  Ralph   	
Moore,  Thomas  Ronald   	
McBride,   Henry   	
McDougall,  James Reid   	
McGillivray, John Wesley  . . .
McHugh,  Frank   .	
Mcintosh,  Ira  David   	
McKnight,  William   	
McLean, Ulric Gordon  	
McLaughlin,   Joseph   	
McLean, James Henry 	
McPhail,   Thomas   	
Parrott,   James   	
Parker, Thomas  	
Pearson,   Augustus    	
Perin,   Chas.   August   	
Plowright,   Edward   	
Publicover,  Wesley  Sinclair   .
Robertson, James M	
Robertson,  Wm. Creighton   . .
Sallis,   Arthur    	
Seely,  Wesley  White   	
Smith, James Forbes   	
Smith,   Alexander   	
Smith, Thomas James	
Snikkar,   Arthur   	
Spavin,   William   	
11319
11343
11262
11344
11812
11990
11375
11738
11600
11785
11519
11613
11988
12027
11707
11238
11369
11877
11839
11776
11240
11373
11413
11374
11514
11586
11587
12072
12132
11844
11969
11477
11246
12075
11944
11247
115S9
11945
11946
11737
11949
11322
12077
11380
11195
1119S
11784
11664
11469
11603
11721
11815
-11333
11742 9 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
C 121
Third Class—Concluded.
Stirling, Franklin S. M  11250
Stansfield, Leopold    11425
Statham,  John Roland     11786
Sutherland,   George Fraser     11470
Thomas, Morris Ashbury    11853
Todd, James William     11479
Tumilty,  Thomas     11609
Turner,  Chas.  Heber     11854
Turner, Chas. Edward     11971
Varney,   Frank      11391
Vance,   Thomas   Law   . . .
Walsh Patrick   	
Wagner, William Edgar  .
White,   George   	
Winter, Herbert Charles
Willis,   Joseph   	
Wilson,   William   	
Wilson,  John   	
Wilson,  John James
Williamson,   Walter
Fourth Class.
Adams,   Harry  B  11546"
Adams,   James  11979
Aiken,   Samuel     12013
Alton,   George  Leslie     11350
Alcock, Fredk. George  11902
Anderson,  Albert     11548
Andrews, Evelyn M  12114
Andrews, John    11135
Arnold, Lewis F  11823
Bannister,  iStewart     11276
Barr,   Alexander  11694
Baker,  Derby  E  11824
Bennett,   William      11136
Beaton, William John   11633
Beacham,  Fred.  Edward     11870
Bell, Henry Bruce    11872
Bickford, Chas. Francis    11137
Bizek, Gust    11904
Bolderston, Thomas William  11218
Boulanger.   Wilfrid     11551
Bowers,   Warner  Robinson     11552
Boyes, Richard    11553
Boyle,   James     11635
Boag, Pettigrew Mathew    11862
Bourn,  Ernest William     11906
Bourn,   Arthur   Fredk  11907
Bradley, Philip Edward     11143
Bradshaw, Thomas    11219
Bronson,   George     11280
Bruce,   William     11283
Brown,   Charles   Corrie     11284
Brenan, Henry Stewart    11436
Brown,  George    '. . . . 11437
Browning, Albert Horace  11695
Bradley,   Joseph   Richard      11727
Browen,  Joseph     11757
Brown,   William      12049
Burke,   Daniel   Francis     11354
Buckner, James Edward  11438
Burns,  Henry Martin     11506
Bull,  Edward     11910
Calverly,   Walter     11202
Carlson, Clarence George  11285
Caryula, Matthew Jalmer    11698
Campbell,   Henry  Lamont     11982
Chapman, David   11359
Childs, Henry Morpeth   12015
Clegg, Alindon Roy    11148
Clark, Alexander Craik   11360
Cleaver, Harry    11556
Copland, James    11149
Covey,  Guy Elliott     11224
Coupland,  John William     11361
Cory, Thomas    11760
Cox,  Fred     11761
Cook, Edward    11828
Cornell,  William     11913
Cowling,   William   	
Cram, James	
Crocker, David   	
Croaker,  George W	
Craven,   George   	
Cuffalo,   Joseph   	
Culliton, William F	
Cuthbert, James E	
Daly,   Alfred    	
David, Thomas  	
Devenny, George Laing
Dewitt,  Roy   	
Diller,   Stehman   	
Dodshon,   Charles    	
Doig, Stewart O	
Doughty, Henry Edward . . .
Duncan, William Richard . .
Duff,  Alexander   	
Eldridge, John	
Ellis,  George  	
Enderson,   Lewis   	
Epperson, Ira C	
Fatch, Joseph Gilbert ....
Eawkes, Matthew Mann . .
Ferris, Rowland Rodney . . .
Eenton,  Edgar Clinton
Fillier,  James   	
Filas, Stephen	
Fleet, Thomas	
Forester, Henry Edward . ..
Franklin, John  	
Frame,  William   	
Gatehouse, Edgar	
Garthorne, Arthur Rudston
Gallant, Alfred  	
Gibbs, Carl Franklin	
Gibson, Henry Edward
Gibbs, Robert John	
Gilley,   Walter  A	
Gibbs, William George  ....
Goodale, Jesse A	
Goebert, Frederick  	
Goldsmith,  James Lyall   . ..
Grier, Ernest A	
Grandy, George Franklin . .
Graw, Ernest Albert	
Greyor, George  	
Grant, William Watson  . ..
Hartman, Robert  	
•Hannah, William Jas. C.  . .
Hammond,   Henry   	
Hadfield, Victor	
Hallander, Samuel	
Harper,   George   	
Hall, Robert  	
Harrigan, Chas. C	
Hasund,  Sigurd   	
11856
11612
11957
11260
11454
11615
11616
11746
1195S
12012
12016
11225
11439
11730
11914
11558
11559
11917
11227
11962
11639
11762
11763
11294
11564
11565
11566
11806
11732
11296
12020
11641
11733
11764
11298
11734
11642
11885
11765
11409
11161
11924
11702
11767
11832
11162
11163
11643
11925
12022
11232
11646
11817
11164
11234
11299
11927
11986
11170
11236
11300
11365
11570
11809
11810
11835
11928 C 122
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Fourth Class-
Harms, Peter William      11965
Halsall, Joseph    12060
Henriksen, Edward      11303
Henderson, Robert      11576
Heater, Peter Ernest   12023
Hilton, Charles    11304
Hillier, John Morris    11931
Howarth, John       11578
Hogg, William      11771
Hoicka, August Ilmari   11836
Holbrook, Peter Eli   11966
Hutton, William John   11512
Hunter, William Smith    11837
Hughes, Eddie Beverly     11875
Hurbert, William George      12066
Hutchinson, Hugh Burns     12160
Jamison, James Wesley    11648
Jemson, Stanley   12216
Johnson, Chas. B   11368
Jones,  Douglas Alexander      11581
Jones, Thomas    11649
Jones, Morton Samuel    11650
Johnson, Roscoe N   11838
Johnston, Alexander   11S76
Johnston, Edward Arnold    11907
Johnston, Isaac Mvron     11991
Jobling, Henry    12026
Rettteson, Elmer   11652
Kelly, Alexander George   11774
Kelly, Philip Darton      11775
Kean, James     11934
Kemp, William     11936
Ketteringham, Mark P   11937
Lamont, L. Fred ,    11370
LeValley, Donald Harvey    11239
Leask, George     11307
Lean, Bernard William      11371
Legault, Oscar   11411
Lemoine, Joseph E   11940
Lloyd, Lionel Percy Hart      11179
Low, Chas. Cecil     11242
Louis, Eugene     115S4
Loo, Edwin    11841
Lovering, Edward      11995
Lomas,  Andrew Barker       12069
Lyon, Alexander    11475
Marks, William John   11711
Marrion, Thomas James  . . .    11735
Macy, Walter E   11842
Macey, Edgar James     11941
Makinson, George     11968
Maginnis, Willis   12032
Mee, William   11777
Miller, John Andrew    11656
Mitchell, James   11843
Morris, James E   11657
Montey, Edmund    11714
Montgomery, Warren Edmond   11997
Muller, Sidney Victor     11185
Muir, Joseph Edward Lewis     111S6
McCoy, Donald Stewart     11376
McDonell, John R   11416
McGregor, John Dawson   11659
McGraw, John William   11715
Mclntyre, Harry Edward      11716
Mclrwin, William   11845
McKenzie, Alex. B   11189
M'cKean, Robert    11315
McKitch, Michael Thomas     11377
McKinnon, Dan   11378
-Continued.
McLean. William    11590
Nankivell, Joseph Wm.  11999
Newbury.  Thomas  11591
Nimmo, Erskine  11316
Nisbet, Alexander    11478
Nielson, Niels Jacob    11948
Nomber, Gustavus Honorius    11317
Oliver, George  '.  11248
Olsen, Oscar Sylvan  11249
O'Neil. Charles    12034
Orr, Harry  11419
Owen, Frank   11320
Owens, Richard Maurice  11593
Partington, William  11395
Parker, Robert Carlyle    11465
Park, Harold   11594
Patterson, Robert John  11S46
Parker, Robert  12000
Peterson, Anton  U7S2
Peterson, Swan   11970
Potter, John Charles   11323
Postlethwaite, Frank    11381
Porter,  Jos.  Elliott     11662
Price, Jack Rtoland    11324
Proudlock, Thomas  . . 1144S
Prior. Thomas Albert    11783
Ray, John Ernest  11597
Ralph, John  12001
Reiben, Alex. F  11325
Robinson, Douglas Ramsay  11199
Roberts, William  11422
Robinson, James Rufus    11674
Rowan. James E  11719
Rutherford, Andrew    11663
SaBis, Arthur  .  11601
Sadler, Thomas John  11S49
Scafe, Walter Gordon   113S3
Scouter, Wilbert Harold  11384
Scott, Willard Charles     11739
Scott, William George  11740
Selberg, Axel   11950
Sheldon, Glen C .'  11602
Sherreitt, Rowland Browne    12003
Silver, James Laidlaw  11385
Smith, Wesley Jacob  11255
Smith, Fredk  11331
Smith, James    11741
Souve, William A  11334
Sotham, Walter Geoffery    11450
SorensOn,   Charles  11451
Stewart, Donald Cameron  11852
Steel, Andrew  11952
Stannard, Arthur Reuben  12006
Strutters, Robert   12008
Sutherland, Alex  11257
Sullivan, Charles  113S6
Sugdeni, Thomas Henry   11865
Sweet, Jay  11335
Switzer, Peter Edgar  113S7
Swan, George,   11723
Swanson, Brore S  11953
Taylor, John James   11388,
Tait, Robert Ernest   11955
Tenhant, Hugh    1166S
Thompson, Howard Arnold   11340
Thanen, Lars D  11452
Thomas, Albert Isaac  11453
Thomas, Herbert Howard  11881
Tomlinson, Thomas Richard   11427
Turvey, Jack    11341 9 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
C 123
Underbill. Thomas Ward
Alpond.  Edward Russell  .
Wade, Hugh Edward
Wattie, James Alexander
Watson, John W	
Watchorn, Robert H.
Westwood, Benjamin Ira
Wetmon, Roland	
Whyte, John McCylmont
Fourth Class—Concluded.
  11956 Williams, Edward Chester
  11107 Williams, Fred William   ..
  11108 Williams, John   	
  11670 Williamson, Walter  	
  12037 Winters, John Oscar	
  120S5 Winger, Harold N	
  11614 Young, Fredk. William . . .
  12011 Zepp, Ralph Peter	
  11342
Adams, T. II	
Adams, W. R	
Aho, Joe	
Aitken, John	
Allen, D. J	
Andrews, T. G. ...
Archibald, M. J. . .
Audet, Wilfred ....
Ayres, Baker	
Ball, Thomas  	
Bannister, F. R.  . .
Barry, Joseph   ....
Barnwell, H. S.
Batcheldor, W. R.
Beacham, F. E. . . .
Beale, W. A	
Beck, "A. R	
Belgrove, Edward .
Berg, G.  B	
Birch, Frank	
Blackmore, W. K.
Bodey, J. F	
Bond, R. M	
Biooth, J. H	
Boothroyd, Joseph .
Boseo, Antonio ....
Boyd,  J. P	
Bradner, J. W.  . . .
Bradley, J. C	
Brayue, Charles .. .
Brewer, J. C	
Bulman, T. R. ...
Buswell, T. R. . . .
Byrnell, Charles . .
Carson, James ....
Carter, Melville . . .
Cerles, Albert   ....
Chase, Fred	
Chatters, Henry . .
Chisholm, D. T. . .
Churchill, James . .
Cockrill, Thomas ..
Corrigan, Peter . . .
Crossley, J. F.
Cusack, Sarah A. .
Currie, William . ..
Dann, A. E	
Diment, Fred	
Diment, Jack	
Dolan, P.  J	
Dommett, A. J.
Dunn, John  	
Elliott,  R. B	
EmersOn, Samuel ..
Ferris, F. G	
Freeman, H. M.  . .
Gardiner, J. A.
Garrett, Henry  . ..
Temporaries.
11455 Garrity, James  ....
11534 Gieschon, J. A	
11431 Gladstone, James  . .
11267 Graham, R. H	
11799 Green, J. G	
11541 Hall, Walter  	
11S92 Halliday, Albert  . ..
11524 Hellan, Paul   	
11481 Holmes, R. H	
11400 Holliday, Jonathan  .
11867 Hunter, Thomas  . . .
11482 Hunt, Henry  	
1203S Huffman, J	
11432 Humphries, Edwin  .
11483 Jancouski, F. R. ...
11818 Jamieson, Frank . . .
11402 Johnson, Leo	
11268 Jones, K. T	
1149S Kelly, T. A	
11624 Kennedy, Alexander
11675 Kennedy, W. T.  . . .
11747 King, W. A	
11460 La Rose, William . .
11542 Laurence, W. M. ...
11401 Lee, William 	
11800 Loonier, Percy	
11532 Lockwood, Walter ..
12039 Luekovitch, Anton  .
11676 Lyons, Ross	
11620 Macalpine, J. K.   . .
114S4 Mahon, E.  C	
11397 Mandeville, Frank  .
11677 Marsh, Enoch  	
11485 Marsh,  Ralph   	
11348 Mathers, Thomas   . .
1167S Mearne, Stewart  . ..
11458 Mears, Edward	
11495 Meyland, Christian .
11486 Milnes, F. C	
11396 Money, D. H	
11691 Moore, Arthur	
11753 Morris, Mark	
11868 Mueller, Fritz  	
11895 Murray, John ..	
11679 Munn, CD	
11754 MacDonald, Maud F.
11487 MacMartin, A. K. . .
11399 MacMillan, G. H. . .
1174S M'cCandlish, W. B. .
11690 McLaughlin, Martin
11269 McRoberts, William
11533 Nelson, Samuel	
11503 Nicholson, Peter  . . .
11535 Nickerson, James .. .
11499 Oakes, L. J	
11749 Oleson, C. F	
11270 Owens, Owen -.	
11488 Parks, H. E	
11206
11265
11345
11113
11672
11788
11619
11429
11680
11972
11625
11525
11500
11623
11899
114S9
11536
11973
11207
11692
12041
12044
11S96
12043
11724
11123
11520
11974
11543
11632
11210
11681
11461
11859
11800
1120S
11900
11272
12040
11501
11496
11083
11682
11271
11521
11819
11750
11528
11801
11751
11491
11537
11802
11626
11684
11884
11975
11494
11627
11755
11492
11861
11541
11803
11538
11028 C 121
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Temporaries—Concluded.
Peake, P. Wi	
Pease, A.  II	
Pitman,  E.  W	
Prentis, William  . .
Reid, John   	
Reid, John	
Roberts, S. D	
Robertson, Edward
Robicheau, Pascal .
Robinson, W. F.
Rollins, Joseph  . . .
Rosman, Lewis
Ross, W. B	
Salmi, Frank	
Schindler, Joseph   .
Severn, G. E	
Simpson, John ....
Sjoquist.  A. E.   . . .
Smith,  B.  J	
Snider, L. P	
Statham, R. J.
Street, James	
Swanberg, Gus ....
Switzer, Edgar ....
12042 Taulbot, A. S	
11274 Tergeson, Wallace .
11685 Thomas, A. J	
11502 Thomas, John  	
11398 Thomson, Jaimes . .
11629 Titus, C, H	
11630 Tomkinson, Arthur
11529 Tooker, W. A	
11545 Ulrich, John	
11133 Vael, Fred	
11686 Vogel, G. H	
11621 Wallace, David  . . .
11209 Warner, D. B	
11456 Warren, W. L.   . . .
11752 Wells, H. O	
11539 Westcott, H. L.   ..
11462 Williams, S. H. ...
116S7 Williams, Walter  .
11897 Wilson, J. B	
11497 W.isener, L. H.  . . .
11530 Williams, Harry . .
11631 Woods, J. B	
11.804 Young, Peter	
11.211
Special Logging-donkey.
Allen, E. G	
Alien, R, T	
Atchison, R. S.  ..
Black, R. W	
Blow, Frederick ..
Brown, H. E	
Brown, W. J. ...
Cameron, Archie .
Carlson, Charles .
Chalmers, R. W. .
Churchill, iS. G.
Clausen, J. C. ...
Cobban, J. R.  ...
Coggin, O. C	
Crawley, H. W. .
Davenport, J. L.  .
Doan, G. W	
Dumaresq, A. J. .
Edwards, P. D.
Essbn, N. F	
Forbes, O. G. K.
Giglio, Ernesto ...
Gillies, William ..
Green,  Herbert  . .
Green, R. N	
Hadden, John ....
Hale, J. W	
Ball, William ....
Hamel, Al	
Benderson, B. W.
Jamiieson, Berton .
Joyce,  H.  V	
Kennedy, A. J. . .
Lambeth, T. M. ..
Lavoilette, James
Livingstone, J. S.
Macldox, Clarence
Macaigne, !N. E. .
Margison, W. M. .
Martin, J. A	
Mathews, C. H. ..
Matson, George ..
Mattson, Wilhelm
Mattson, Victor ..
11214 Miller, W. F	
11693 Monks, John	
11215 Montico, Luigi	
12047 Moorh'ouse. J. E.
11826 McClurg, Robert . ..
11908 McDonald, Norman
1190S McElroy, Howard ..
12118 McGee, John  	
11911 McGargle, Thomas  .
11509 McGregor, J. F.   . . .
11286 McLean,. D. M	
11729 Nicholson, Lorne  . .
11288 Nixon, W. W	
11912 Olesion, Ole	
11637 O'Neal, C, W	
11918 Orcutt, E. O	
11440 Palmer, C, A	
11511 Perkinson, W. E.  . .
11S63 Pidcoek, Harry	
11567 Pierce, W. J	
1205S Piercy, R. F	
11984 Bine, Leslie  	
11363 Pleas, R.  M	
11768 Roberts, Nels	
11834 Rogers, V. D	
11569 Sayre, William  . . .
11575 Schuppel, F. W. T.
11235 Scruggs, Alfred
11366 Sewell, W. J	
11791 Sheppard, B. B.
11792 Shipley, L. E	
11933 Sidle, Robert  	
11813 Slider, Sylvester- . ..
11840 Simons, A. W	
12030 Sims, R. M	
11412 Smith, A. P	
11244 Smith, C, O	
11S86 Smith, Melville
11309 Spencer, Grover ....
12070 Spiers, Alan	
11243 Stelp, Julius	
11414 Sutton, E. S	
11513 Tapella, Thomas . . .
11887 Tapley, F. S	
11893
1197S
11434
11433
11688
11212
11531
12408
11725
11435
11820
11898
11622
11976
11128
11821
11540
11493
11213
11689
11S94
11977
11349
11778
11996
11814
11523
11314
1165S
111S8
11417
11588
11779
11418
11707
11780
11447
11592
12035
11251
11660
11252
11848
11661
11516
122S5
11794
11S90
11459
11720
11200
11327
11065
11329
11254
11850
11851
11330
11666
11951
12004
11891
120S4
12036
11722
113S9
11336 9 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. C 125
Special Logging-donkey—Concluded.
Taylor, G. W    11667 White, John  11798
Tretheway, E. A    11203 Wikberg,   Gus     11480
Vaughan, E. E   11428 Wilson, J. D  11264
Vaughan, V. C   11796 Witt, Otto    11959
Veeburg, Lawrence :   11816 Wooldridge, R. A  11619
Vilac, Louis    11521 Woolsey, E. G  11266
Wakefield, C, F   11797 Wren, J. S  11673
WarnO'ck,  Martin       11259 Zamoskia, Joseph  11346
Special Logging-locomotive.
Duncan, Roy   11295 McDonald, D. J  11245
Joyce, B. V   11773 Wohlstrom, John  11817
Kenny, Ralph   11651
Special Threshing.
Knox, G. M   11993 Mufford, A. E  11313
Martin, Benry    11415
Special Road-roller,
Atkins, Thomas   11504 Tait, R. E  11795
Special Creamery.
Batey, II. S   11980 Keene, Letitia R. A  11864
Bolden, Lewis    11705
Special Beating.
Allen, J. C   11S66 LockSe, Robert  11372
Barnhart, D. T    11869 IJowden, Joseph  11655
Blow, Edmund    11505 Lumb, J. W  115S5
Boscott, John   11634 Meighen, A. E.  11712
Bunoz, Emile Marie   11457 Miller, David   11713
Bush, P. II   11507 Munro, David  11470
Calnan, F. H   11220 Newstr'om, H. A  11947
Carr, Amos   11697 Phillips, II. J  11596
Dickson, James      11562 Prentis, E. B  11194
Duiminie, Joseph  11229 Price, Charles     11421
Ford. P. B   11831 Richardson, Windsor    11517
Gardiner, W. S   11790 Robbins, David    11407
Gleave, Richard   11703 Roberts, W. P  11718
Harris, W. J. H   11704 Sanguineti, David  11468
Bartmann, Rev. Father J   11364 Thimblely, B. E  11390
Barvey, J. B   11573 Thompson, Frank    11607
Hughes, J. H    11.579 Usher, John  1125S
Learmonth, James   11583 Woodman, H. S,  11617
Levy, Henry    11654
Doukhobor.
Virgin, G. J   11392  9 Geo. 5 Inspector of Electrical Energy. C 127
REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY.
Provincial Inspector of Electrical Energy,
Vancouver, B.C., December 6th, 1918.
Hon. J. II. King,
Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour of submitting to you a report of the inspections made under the
" Electrical Energy Inspection Act" for the fiscal year ending March 31st, 1918.
Distribution  Systems, Transmission-lines, Power Plants, and Sub-stations Inspected.
British Columbia Electric Railway Co., Ltd. (Mainland and Vancouver Island).
Western Power Co.
Granby Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co., Anyox.
City of Prince Rupert.
West Kootenay Light and Power Co.
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co., Trail.
Canada Copper Corporation, Princeton.
Princeton Coal Co.
Daly Reduction Co., Eedley.
City of Nelson.
Prince Rupert Dry Dock, Prince Rupert.
Victoria Lumber and Manufacturing Co., Chemainus.
High -potential Transmission-lines.
On the whole, the transmission-lines were found to be in good condition, although some of the
existing lines operating in the limits of the cities (particularly in the City of Vancouver) are
so located that they are liable to hamper and endanger city firemen while performing their duties.
One case was reported where firemen were out practising, when the aerial truck came in contact
with a 34,000-voit line, resulting in two of the men being seriously burnt. In most instances,
however, an arrangement exists between the fire departments and the power companies whereby
the lines are immediately killed on request by telephone or otherwise. In this particular case
no request was made to have the line disconnected. Previous to the outbreak of the war, plans
were prepared and arrangements made to remove certain sections of these lines and adopt
an underground system. Owing to the considerable advance in price of and the difficulty of
obtaining material, this has been held in abeyance until the termination of the war, when the
matter will be reopened.
A number of high-potential wire crossings with telephone and other signalling systems were
inspected and approved. A special protective cross-arm was designed by the British Columbia
Telephone Company for use at crossings to subscribers' premises. After certain improvements
recommended by the Department were made, this special cross-arm has been installed in several
places and is giving satisfaction. It eliminates expensive crossings and is effective. A number
of decayed poles supporting the above lines were condemned as being unsafe.
The protection of private telephone-lines installed on transmission-line poles is being given
close attention, and the Department is now insisting that adequate protection be given at all
points where a telephone is installed. The number of break-downs reported in transmission-
line conductors were few. In one instance a 34,000 line broke and fell on a building. This was
caused by leakage, which eventually burnt the cross-arm and the top of the pole. This line ran
along the water-front, and was subjected to deposits of salt and smoke from the large number
of mills in the vicinity. The company operating this line was notified by the Department that
the line was considered to be a hazard and was condemned. A new line was constructed through
another district, and it was finally arranged that one circuit only should be used on the defective
line, which was to be used only in case of emergency. No trouble has been experienced since
the changes were made. C 128 Public Works Report  (1917-18).
Distribution Systems.
The majority of the distributing systems built during the last five years are well constructed,
and are well designed in the way of affording protection to linemen so far as climbing-space is
concerned. In the congested districts of the cities a number of the older lines are no doubt
hazardous, and great care must be exercised in working on them. This is particularly so in
cases where lane-construction has been adopted, and which has been continually added to from
year to year. Some lanes in the City of Vancouver are very congested, making it impossible for
the fire department to erect ladders. Conditions were improved recently, due to a number of
circuits being removed from the Main Street Sub-station and connected to the Haro Street.
Nevertheless, the Department is convinced that more improvements will have to be made in
the near future. I may say that after an interview with the chief engineer of the company, a
report was made and plans prepared providing for a large section of underground construction.
This scheme was again handicapped by the outbreak of war. The only way in which all these
hazards can be removed is by providing an underground system. This matter will be considered
again after the termination of the war.
A number of fire-alarm and police-patrol systems are installed on lighting-poles, and instructions were issued to have all the boxes permanently grounded. This was objected to by the City
of Vancouver, the reason given being that it was liable to interfere with the fire-alarm system;
in fact, past experience has proven this to be so. I am, nevertheless, satisfied that the boxes
should all be grounded in order to give ample protection to the public. The Department is now
corresponding with other cities on the continent to see what action has been taken in the matter.
Where possible, these circuits are strung on telephone-poles. Instructions are being issued to
have the secondaries of all transformers not exceeding a potential of 150 volts grounded.
Rules and regulations are being prepared covering overhead electrical construction, which
will be submitted for approval in the near future.
Generating Stations and Sub-stations.
During the inspection of these plants close attention was given to the following:—
Protective Grounding.—The regulation calling for the grounding of non-current-carryiiig
parts, such as frames of generators, motors, transformers, switchboard-frames, oil-switches, was
found to be closely adhered to in the larger plants. In some of the smaller installations ground-
wires were occasionally omitted or installed in an unsatisfactory manner. In some cases it was
difficult to check the continuity of the wires, which, in addition, were not adequately protected.
In one industrial plant a fatal accident occurred, due to a ground-wire from a starting compensator being connected to a water-pipe. During alterations in the plant the water-pipe was
disconnected from the main, thereby isolating the compensator, which was defective, from ground.
Another matter which added to this hazard was the fact that an insulated platform had been
removed.
Guarding of Live Parts.—Care has been taken in every instance to provide protection for
persons near exposed current-carrying parts, such as bus-bars and other conductors, as well as
the" terminals of generators, motors, and transformers.
Floor Openings and Stairways.—In a few. cases instructions were issued to protect floor
openings and -stairways.
Insulated Platforms.—It was found necessary in several instances to insist on the providing
of insulated platforms and mats.
Working-space about Electrical Equipment.—The regulation governing the working-space
around electrical equipment was found to be well observed.
Protection to Men working on Lines and Supply Equipment.—The larger electric power-supply
companies have a very efficient method of protecting linemen working on high-potential lines.
The chief load-dispatcher has full control over the entire system. In the event of it being
necessary to disconnect a line or part of the equipment, the workman in charge applies to the
chief operator to have that particular section killed. The chief operator directs the proper
person to open all switches and disconnectors, at the same time tagging the switches with a
card indicating that the men are at work. The workman in charge is then notified by the chief
operator that the specified section of the line has been disconnected and that he may proceed to
work.    The lines remain disconnected until the workman in charge reports the completion of 9 Geo. 5
Inspector of Electrical Energy.
C 129
the work and that the line is clear. One accident was reported from a small plant, where the
operator in charge neglected to tag the switch and pull out the disconnectors. For some reason
which has not been explained he threw in the main switch, causing a generator which was
connected to a water-wheel to revolve. A workman who was attending to the nozzles of the wheel
was seriously injured.    This accident was the result of carelessness.
500-volt Direct-current Commercial Power.
The following regulation was issued during the year and has been rigorously enforced:
" Lighting and power wires will not be permitted on the same circuit with trolly-wires with a
ground return, except in electric railway-cars, electric car-houses, power-houses, passenger and
freight stations connected with the operation of electric railways."
Temporary permits were granted to two concerns fulfilling contracts for the Imperial
Munitions Board.
2,200-volt Installations.
A number of these were connected up during the year. On inspection it was found necessary
to make several recommendations with regard to protection of exposed parts, the grounding of
non-current-carrying parts, and the provision of disconiiecting-switches. Owing to the difficulty
of obtaining suitable lead-covered cable, consent was granted in three cases to use rubber-covered
wire, provided that it was adequately protected. A number of tliese installations were for work
in connection with the production of war supplies, so that it was absolutely necessary that no
delay should take place. In all public buildings the 2,200-volt supply is given to transformers
installed in fire-proof vaults, the majority of which were found to be satisfactory.
A number of industrial plants and public buildings were inspected, a list of which is appended.
In cities and some municipalities these plants are also inspected by the local Inspectors. It was
found that the civic by-laws and regulations are being well enforced and observed. In outlying
districts the Department found it necessary to make numerous recommendations.
May I be permitted to express my appreciation for the assistance and co-operation given by
all the civic and municipal Inspectors.
Electrolysis.
A few complaints were received concerning damage done by stray currents to underground
cable and water mains. On referring the matter to the company responsible, I found that plans
were already arranged for the installing of additional feeders, etc., to overcome at least a portion
of the trouble. The company realized that damage was being done, and was anxious to remedy
the trouble. A number of improvements were made recently, and up to the present no further
complaints have been received.
Accidents. i
The following accidents were reported during the year; all were investigated and detailed
reports have already been submitted:—
Trade or Industry,
Locality.
Date.
No.
Remarks.
Smelter employeee*....
Sub-station helper	
Lineman	
Engineer's assistant ...
Trail	
Westminster	
Britannia Beach ..
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Trail	
June 18th, 1917.
Oct. 4th, 1917...
Oct. 5th, 1917...
Feb. 24th, 1918..
Feb. 28th, 1918..
March 11th, 1918
March 11th, 1918
March 16th, 1918
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
Electrocuted.
Burnt by switch.
Slipped off platform while raising transformers.
Caught in Pelton wheel.
Threw shoulder out of joint in closing bus-structure doors.
Aerial ladder coming in contact with high-voltage line ; severe
burns.
Touched high-voltage wire in smoke-treater plant.
Climbed over fence on to window and touched 40,000-volt wire.
Boy*	
Vancouver	
*Fatal.
In addition to the above, the Department has acted in an advisory capacity in connection
with the various Government Buildings.
Respectfully yours,
D. P. Roberts,
Inspector of Electrical Energy.
9 C 130 Public Works Report (1917-18).
APPENDIX.
" ELECTRICAL ENERGY INSPECTION ACT "—INSPECTIONS, 1917.
Canadian Breweries   Vancouver.
Alberta Lumber Co  Vancouver.
Rat Portage Lumber Co  Vancouver.
Vancouver and District Joint Sewerage Board .... Vancouver.
Birks Building  Vancouver.
Wallace Shipyards    North Vancouver.
Vancouver Gas Co  Vancouver.
Wood, Vallance & Leggat    Vancouver.
Royal Crown Soap Works    Vancouver.
Coughlan's Shipyards  Vancouver.
Vancouver Block   Vancouver.
Pacific 'Coast Pipe Co  Vancouver.
Pacific Steel Products Co  Lulu Island, near Marpole.
Hotel Hazelwood   Vancouver.
B. John Shingle Mill   Fraser Valley.
Irwinton Apartments   Vancouver.
Gray Building    Vancouver.
Pacific Box Co  Vancouver.
Credit Foncier Building  Vancouver.
American Can Co  Vancouver.
Anderson & Lindstrom Tie Mill  Sperling.
Burnaby Municipality, arc-lights  (B.C.E. Rly. Co.)
National Biscuit Co  Vancouver.
Vancouver Vinegar and Pickle Co  Vancouver.
Asahi Rice Mill  Vancouver.
Mainland Iron Works  	
Lemon-Gonnason Mill  Victoria.
Victoria Machinery Depot  Victoria.
Esquimalt Municipality  Esquimalt.
Drysdale's Mill  Victoria.
Brunette Lumber Mills   New Westminster.
University Buildings   . . . . '.  Vancouver.
Mulhplland's Tie Mill  Fraser Valley.
Sid. B. Smith's Mill  .'.. Fraser Valley.
Clayburn Brick Co  Clayburn.
Chilliwack Evaporating and Packing Co  Chilliwack.
Dominion Creosoting Co  North Arm, Fraser River.
Cliff-Lomond Canning Co  Steveston.
JUranby Consolidated M. & S. Co  Anyox.
Prince Rupert (City)    Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert Dry Dock  Prince Rupert.
Canadian Fish and Cold Storage Co  Prince Rupert.
British Pacific Engineering Co	
Canada Lumber Co  Vancouver.
B.C. Laundry (Canadian Laundry Co.)    Vancouver.
M. P. Cotton Co  Vancouver.
Tanaka & Kanada  Ladner.
Richmond Municipality (B.C.E. Rly. Co.)  	
B.C. Sugar Refinery   Vancouver.
French Complex Ore Reduction Oo  Nelson.
West Kootenay Power and Light Co  Nelson.
City of Nelson   Nelson. 9 Geo. 5 Inspector of Electrical Energy. C 131
"Electrical Energy Inspection Act"—Inspections, 1017—Concluded.
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co  Trail.'
Victoria Brick Works  Victoria.
Sir John Jackson Co. (Contractors)    Victoria.
Victoria Chemical Co  Victoria.
Victoria Lumber and Manufacturing Co  Chemainus.
Foundation Co., Shipyard  Victoria.
Cameron-Genoa Mills   Victoria.
City of Chilliwack  Chilliwack.
Chas. W. Tait's Mill   Fraser Valley.
Empress Botel   Hope.
Canada Copper Corporation  Princeton.
Princeton Coal Co  Princeton.
Daly Reduction Co  Bedley.
Rerrie's Mill   Warhoop, Eraser Valley.
Salmon River Lumber Co.  (B. John)     Fraser Valley.
Beaver River Lumber Co  Fraser Valley.
South Shore Lumber Co  Vancouver.
Western Canada Shipyards   Vancouver.
Vulcan Iron Works  Vancouver.
New Westminster Construction and Engineering Co. New Westminster.
Rogers Building  Vancouver.
M. B. King Lumber Co  Newton.
Birks Building  Vancouver.
Swift Canadian Co '. Vancouver.
Imperial Oil Co  Vancouver.
Metropolitan Building   Vancouver.
Robertson-Hackett     Vancouver.
Morrison Wire and Nail Co  Vancouver.
World Building  Vancouver.
Lee Building  Vancouver.
Vancouver Ice and Cold Storage Co  Vancouver.
Standard Bank Building  Vancouver.
Alcazar Botel   Vancouver.
Shell Co. of California ...;  Vancouver.
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co  Vancouver.
Mainland Ice and Cold Storage Co  Vancouver.    .
Pacific White Lead Co  Vancouver.
Westminster Breweries ,  New Westminster.
Vancouver and Districts Joint Sewerage Board   Vancouver.
Canadian Northern Rly. Depot  Vancouver.
Chilliwack Telephone Co	
B.C. Electric Rly. Co	
Western Power Co. of Canada, Ltd  Vancouver.
B.C. Telephone Co  Vancouver.
City Eire and Police System  Vancouver.
Court-house  Vancouver.
Oakalla Prison Farm   Burnaby.
City of Victoria Street-lighting System. Victoria.  9 Geo. 5 Inspector op Factories. C 133
REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., March 31st, 1918.
Hon. J. H. King,
Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour of submitting herewith the annual report of the Factory Inspection
Department for the fiscal year ending March 31st, 19IS. -
In submitting this annual report, I am unable to compile a complete account of the activities
of this Department owing to the fact that no detailed records were kept of the work performed
prior to my taking over this office in June last. Under the different headings which follow, an
effort is made to present the most important phases of the work in such a manner as to furnish
real information to yourself and those directly interested.
In taking over the administration of this Department, I found in its files that orders had
been issued during the preceding nine years for safeguarding of dangerous machinery, improvement in ventilation, sanitation, toilet facilities, and other provisions required by the Act, but
that no attempt had been made on reinspection to enforce the carrying-out of these instructions.
Therefore a great many of the employers and managers apparently had gained the impression
that the orders of the Department of Factory Inspection were not to be taken seriously. I am
now pleased, however, to be able to report that this old impression is being supplanted by the
impression that the British Columbia Department of Factory Inspection is sincere and thorough
in its work of enforcing the law on the basis of reason and common-sense. Furthermore, I have
no hesitation in saying, and I invite contradiction when I make the statement, that there is not
an employer in the Province of British Columbia who caii honestly deny that this Department
has been reasonable and fair in the enforcement of the Provisions of the Act, and that no
partiality has been shown.
Child-labour.
The law prohibiting the employment of boys under fourteen and girls under fifteen years of
age in most cases has been complied with, although in several instances we found that children
were holding positions through false representations regarding their age being made by themselves and their parents.
In justice to the employers, I might say that in suspicious cases this office was generally
consulted. A great deal of difficulty was experienced during the year in enforcing this section
of the Act, as many pleas were made from mothers of children whose husbands were serving in
overseas forces and who needed the monetary assistance.
The matter of prevention of child-labour is an important one, and requires constant watchfulness on the part of the Inspector, as I am satisfied that if there were any laxity on our part
many of the factories would employ children under age, and many parents would be ready and
willing to sacrifice their little ones. It is only by constant surveillance that child-labour can be
kept down to the minimum, as at present.
Bours of Labour.
Notwithstanding that the hours of labour for female employees are set out very clearly in
the " Factories Act," investigations disclosed the fact that the statutory hours of labour were
being exceeded by many employers since the beginning of operations, many of whom were in
business before the Act was in force. This was not altogether the fault of the employers, as
it was found that a great many were ignorant of the provisions of the Act regarding the statutory
hours of employment, and had been informed by the previous Inspector that they were conforming
with the Act.
A considerable portion of the time of this Department has been taken up in explaining and
enforcing this particular provision of the Act, owing to several firms, such as garment-manufacturers, etc., offering the excuse that they were in competition with firms in Eastern Provinces
engaged in the same line of industry, and whose employees are allowed by law to be employed
for a longer period than is allowed by the British Columbia " Factories Act."    The excuse was C 131 Public Works Report (1917-18).
also advanced that contracts for goods were entered into specifying certain dates for delivery;
the employers being under the impression that, if from any cause the orders were unable to be
completed in the time.specified, all that was necessary was to make application to this Department for permission to work their female employees an unlimited number of hours.
The disorganizing of the staff, when females would cease work at the end of eight hours, was
another source of complaint regarding the enforcement of this particular provision of the Act
put forward by many employers whose employees consisted of male and female operators. On
one occasion written notice was served on an employer that this provision of the Act must be
complied with, and we found, on making a subsequent inspection, that the girls had been replaced
by Oriental labour.
In several cases employers have fought strenuously against our 'instructions to comply with
the provision of the Act relating to the hours of female employment, and appealed from our
decision to the Bon. the Minister of this Department direct.
Numerous complaints have been received from different sources regarding the hours of
employment of children, young girls, and women engaged in the business of fish-canning and
fruit-packing, as the public generally are not aware that it is permissible under the Act to
employ children, young girls, and women in these industries. It is further provided that the
limitation upon the hours of labour, the hours of commencement and cessation of work shall
not be binding upon the employers of any child, young girl, or woman engaged in this occupation
during the respective seasons. The hours of labour in these particular plants depend almost
entirely upon the capacity of the plant and the amount of raw material on hand.
Overtime Permits.
Numerous requests were made to this office during the year for overtime permits. Investigations, however, were made in all cases, and resulted in only four of these being issued. These
permits had apparently been issued heretofore without any restrictions as to period of hours of
employment per day, or as to the hours of commencement and cessation of work, notwithstanding
the fact that the Statute expressly prohibits the employment of girls for more than nine hours
per day, or before the hour of 7 o'clock in the morning or after 8 o'clock in the evening, while
working under this exemption. The explanation, of the hours as set forth in the Act in this
connection was a disappointment to many employers of female help.
Sanitation.
Owing to the increased activity in many of the large industrial plants throughout the
Province, it was found that in a great many cases the toilet accommodation provided the
employees was very unsatisfactory, both as regards the location of these conveniences and the
number provided. After going into this matter very thoroughly, this Department is able to report
the installation of some 200 toilets of a most up-to-date and sanitary character during the year.
We find our greatest difficulty in this matter in small places, as the sanitary and safety
precautions are very often disregarded, and the idea seems to prevail that anything will do
where there are only a few employed. In these places we have very often found that separate
toilets have not been provided for female employees, and in some cases where employers were
instructed that this provision must be made they would attempt to brush the subject aside by
stating: " Oh! they are used to it; they don't mind it." Remarks of this nature are not a
■reflection on the workers, but rather an indication of what kind of a man such an employer is.
Our tours of inspection during the past nine months has shown us that it has not occurred
to some employers that proper separation of sexes and strict privacy are essential to good morals.
The most objectionable violation of the law in this connection that came to our notice during
inspections was in three instances, where white girls were using the same toilets as their Oriental
employers.    Needless to say, this was ordered to be immediately discontinued.
It seems tojbe a difficult matter to have toilets kept in a clean condition. It requires constant
attention, for there are always some employees who damage and otherwise cause the toilets to
become unsanitary and filthy, and the responsibility cannot always be fairly placed upon the
factory-owners.
Ventilation.
Instructions are issued by this Department for the removal by mechanical means of dust,
gases, fumes, or other impurities which are inhaled by the employees to an injurious extent. 9 Geo. 5 Inspector of Factories. C 135
Several installations of this nature, some on a large and some on a small scale, have been ordered
to be provided in factories throughout the Province.
Acting on instructions from this Department, one of the large plants installed a blower
system at a cost of $5,000. Before this blower system became a part of this company's equipment, it was found impossible to fully man the plant owing to the extremely dusty nature of the
work carried on therein. In conversation with the superintendent following the completion of
the contract, he stated that since the blower system had been installed the labour situation
affecting the plant had been entirely reversed, and conditions were improved to such an extent
that, instead of being unable to man the plant, he was in possession of a waiting-list.
The proper installation of a mechanical exhaust system is a very important matter, as the
success of the fan not only depends upon its speed and its proper proportioning to the work, but
also upon the system and piping of the hoods in order that they will give the greatest efficiency.
After the completion of the installation of the blower system in some of the buildings of
this city, we found ia making tests that the installation was entirely inadequate. Although the
fan was of adequate capacity, owing to faulty construction of the main ducts it failed to give the
required velocity of air.
Lighting.
Our manufacturers have been somewhat tardy in seeing the beneficial side of good lighting.
It is only lately that employers have recognized the fact that good lighting increases production
and decreases accidents. Very often, however, good lighting is confined to certain sections of a
plant. There are many places in factories, particularly in the ground floor of sawmills, where
little or no attention is given to illumination. When it is realized that most sawmills in the
Province generate their own electricity for lighting purposes, it is hard to understand the laxity
displayed on the part of some of the owners and managers of these plants in not having sufficient
lighting provided. In several cases the Inspector had to be furnished with a lantern in order
that a proper inspection could be made, notwithstanding the fact that electric generators form
a part of the equipment of these plants.
An instance can be cited where from purely economic reasons sufficient lighting had not been
provided, with the result that a fatality has to be recorded owing to that neglect.
In general, good lighting in factories and workshops not only facilitates the work direct, but
is of the greatest indirect value because of the feeling of security given the workers. Such being
the case, it naturally follows that the Inspector, while making his official visit, will carefully
scrutinize the system of lighting in force, and numerous orders have been issued to install more
lights at certain designated points.
While this Department has set no standard for this very important provision, nevertheless
we have at all times insisted that proper illumination must be provided.
ELEVjiTORS.
This Department being responsible for the inspection of freight and passenger elevators in
factories, hotels, and shops of more than two stories in height, it naturally follows that a considerable amount of our time has to be devoted to this portion of our work, in order to safeguard
the operators and that portion of the public who are daily required to use this form of conveyance.
When making an inspection of an elevator, the cables supporting the car and counter-weights
are carefully examined, and if the wires are cracked or badly worn they are ordered to be
renewed. The safety devices on the machine and elevator are thoroughly inspected and-subjected
to a practical test, in order to determine as to whether or not they will perform what is required
of them in case of an emergency.
Projections in the shaftway, which form a shear with the platform of the car, are a frequent
cause of accidents, and when conditions are such that these are not guarded against by the car
enclosure a smooth bevelled guard is required to be placed under all such projections.
The operation of elevators by inexperienced and unauthorized persons is largely a contributing factor in connection with a number of elevator accidents reported to this office. This
was forcibly and sadly illustrated in the case of a young errand-boy who, for purposes of pleasure,
was using the freight-elevator in one of the large buildings of this city, resulting in his being
crushed to death between the platform of the car and the floor. This was the only fatality
occurring in elevators coming under our jurisdiction during the year. Safeguarding Machinery.
Since assuming office in June last, this very important part of our duties has received our
special attention. Notwithstanding the fact that this Act had been in force for some nine years,
it was soon realized that very little had been accomplished in the way of safeguarding dangerous
machinery, essential to the protection of workmen. Report of accidents reaching this office goes
to prove that injuries to employees of a preventive nature were happening all too frequently.
Many proprietors and operators of even the largest and oldest established plants throughout the
Province had never made any serious attempt to eliminate hazards in connection with their
industry.
Firm methods were therefore necessary to convince the employers that our instructions
must be complied with, but we are pleased now to be able to record that a marked improvement
has taken place, and many have made expenditures amounting to thousands of dollars in installing safety appliances through recommendations of this Department. There is still a great deal
of work to be accomplished, however, but we expect, through continuance of co-operation with
employers and employees tbroughout the Province, to have the factories of British Columbia
compare favourably with those of any other on the continent.
It has been the policy of this Department not to request anything in safeguarding that
is not practical, and the installing of which we do not understand, and to always give the
manufacturers the benefit of experience and ideas gathered at other plants.
Acting in conjunction with the Workmen's-Compensation Board, we are enforcing the Safety
Rules and Regulations which have been adopted by that Board to come into effect on June
16tn, 1918.
Accidents.
The files of this office show that a very limited number of employers have previously
conformed with that portion of the Act relating to the reporting to this office of all accidents
disabling employees for a period of six days or more. As the Workmen's Compensation Board
are now supplied with a report of all these accidents, and as they immediately notify this office
if an investigation is necessary, we have not been enforcing this requirement of the Act.
Complaints.
Most complaints are received at this office by telephone, some through the mail, while many
are made in person. In the majority of cases the informant does not care to reveal his or her
name, fearing probable exposure and possible dismissal, as might happen to an employee who
enters a complaint against his or her employer with reference to violations of some particular
portion of the Act.
It has been the policy of this Department to immediately follow up all complaints, and
encouragement has been given to employees to report any violation of the Act; at the same
time assuring them that any information given would be treated strictly confidential.
In conclusion, I wish to remark that the work of enforcing the. laws of this Department has
been carried on with only one motive in mind—that of carrying out the Intentions of each law
impartially.
In many cases where some of the orders issued by the Department appeared rather stringent,
and exceptions were taken by the recipients of such orders, they have been invited to meet in
conference at this office to discuss all alleged grievances. In every case the matter was subject
to a sound debate, which invariably resulted in a better understanding between the Department
and the owner of the business, and in securing his co-operation.
I wish to thank you yourself, sir, and also the Deputy Minister, for the hearty encouragement
and assistance that you have both given me in the performance of my duties.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
R. J. Stewart,
Inspector of Factories. 9 Geo. 5
Inspector of Dykes.
C 137
REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF DYKES.
Office of the Inspector of Dykes,
Victoria, B.C., December 24th, 1918.
Hon. J. H. King,
Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report for the current year relative
to the maintenance and management of the dyking-works in the Chilliwack, Matsqui, Maple
Ridge, Coquitlam, and Pitt Meadows Dyking Districts.
The following table shows the maximum freshet heights of the Fraser River for the years
designated, as recorded by gauge-readings at Chilliwack, Matsqui, and Pitt River. These readings
represent the height above low-water mark at Pitt River near its mouth, which is approximately
6.80 feet above low-water at the Sand-heads.
Chilliwack.
Matsqui.
Pitt River.
Date.                    H.W.
Date.
H.W.
Date.
H.W.
1894
„    27	
2	
July    5 )
June    2 (
„     18	
36.80
32.95.
31.75
29.30
33.80
29.45
29.00
26.35
26.95
30.45
32.15
30.05
27.65
27.65
28.05
31.25
28.40
31.05
30.50
24.00
31.15
30.60
31.85
26.37
22.85
20.90
19.00
23.65'
18.80
17.35
13.95
14.55
18.85
21.45
19.25
16.95
16.70
20.75
17.35
20.35
18.45
12.75
20.70
19.90
21.40
June    6   ....     ...
„     28	
3	
July    6	
June 18 	
,,     12	
14.75
1900..
1901..
1902 |
1903
*    27	
3	
Julv    6	
June 18   	
n       11
12.00 •
10.-75
9.75
12.75
1904
9	
„     11	
9	
July   13	
June    5	
„     14	
„     16	
9.82
1905..
1906 j
n      12	
n        9	
July -13	
„     12	
„      9   	
8.75
7.70
July   12	
7.40
1907..
June    5	
„     15	
9.70
1908
,,     16	
n    17	
May  31	
June 17	
„     19	
11.50
1909.
„     18	
1	
a      12	
„     19	
*     27	
„     16	
23
May  29    	
June 29 	
„     11       	
10.20
1910 j
1911..
May  30	
June 12	
„    16	
„     18 and 19
„     26	
n     15	
„     2.1	
May  29	
June. 28	
.,    12	
„    19	
8.90
8.80
10.70
1912..
1913..
1914..
1915..
1916..
1917..
1918..
„     26	
ii    15	
„    22	
May  29	
June 28 '.....
a      12	
,,    23	
9.20
11.00
10.10
7.90
11.50
10.70
„    2.3	
11.80
By reference to the above table it will be seen that the freshet of 1918 was the highest
during the last fifteen years, with the exception of that of 1908, which was about the same height.
The freshet seasoii commenced at an earlier date than usual, the sluice-gates at Matsqui
closing on May 2nd, the reading on the river-gauge being 9.90. The river continued to rise
gradually until May 19th, the end of the first rise, when it reached 15 feet on the gauge. On
May 29th the gauge-reading was 11.20, when the second rise began, and continued until it reached
the maximum freshet height, 21.40, on June 29th. On August 15th the water had dropped to
9.90 on the gauge when the sluice-gates opened. The gates at the Pitt River pumping-station,
however, on account of the effect of the tide, did not open until August 31st.
10 C 138
Public Works Report  (1917-18).
The following is a detailed statement of Maintenance Account from October 1st, 1917, to
September 30th, 1918 :—
Service.
Fuel on hand Oct. 1st, 1917	
Fuel purchased during 1918	
Electric power purchased during 1918
Wages    	
Repairs and supplies	
Insurance	
Annual payment to 1937 on cost of
renewing pumping plant	
Annual payment on cost of electric
pumping plant	
Telephone service	
Credit by fuel on hand Sept.  30th.
1918	
Credit by sale of belts	
Total cost of pumping.
Maintenance and Management of
Dykes.
Repairs, including wages of caretaker
Brushing dyke	
Fencing	
Furnishing caretaker's house	
Tenders for sluice-gates	
Repairing sluice-gates	
Patrolling dyke'during high water. .
Repairs to dyke  	
Bounty paid on rats	
Annual payment to 1945 on cost of
concrete sluices	
Expenses re tax sale  	
Printing and stationery	
Postage stamps	
Telegrams and telephone messages..
Advertisements re pasturage	
Plant	
Salary of Inspector of Dykes, proportionate amount	
Travelling expenses of Inspector of
Dykes, proportionate amount ....
Salary of clerks and extra clerical
work, proportionate amount	
Collector's commission and exchange
on bank drafts	
List of registered owners in city-and
municipality	
Expenses, Court of Revision	
Premium on guarantee bond, proportionate amount	
Total expenditure.
Dyking District.
Chilliwack
| 89 00
133 1.3
288 50
81 31
152 53
$744 47
60 00
$684 47
$968 50
212 60
195 50
399 57
9 00
146 96
52 69
12 87
925 44
95 40
1,048 08
332 54
15 00
4 00
8 80
Matsqui.
$2,102 40
1,362 55
143 97
187 50
659 66
4 55
$4,460 63
$4,460 63
772 18
112 50
36 00
135 70
65 55
69 85
79 87
8 69
11 70
497 64
90 72
562 08
3 00
4 80
$5,111  42   $6,910 91
Maple
Ridge.
$ 764 80
511 14
598 81
70 00
1,262 25
20 45
$3,227 45
50 00
Coquitlam.
$ 90 00
549 64
723 00
532 58
35 00
1,294 00
2.3 20
^3,247 42
90 00
$3,177 45
$679 49
332 20
53,157 42
$285 00
181 90
77 26
27 00
40 00
631 25
8 00
66 07
10 56
14 90
14 00
4 98
408 48
43 59
459 94
134 75
55,921 77
597 69
8 00
25 42
33 48
8 79
1 91
156 60
17 64
186 04
Pitt Meadows.
Tract No. 1 Tract No. 2
171 35
361 50
49 45
17 50
412 25
$1,012 05
$1,012 05
$108 97
6 00
140 13
11 54
22
4 31
6 79
70
57 12
5 71
64 82
54
,418 90
$ 211 02
303 00
39 35
17 50
686 51
$1,257 38
! 1,257 38
$101 02
148 27
125 00
127 68
9 04
4 40
1 45
2 95
66
54 72
4 04
60 92
50
,898 03 9 Geo. 5                                       Inspector of Dykes.                                            C 139
Statement showing the Annual Amount of Capital Charge asd the Annual Assessment
thereon ;   the Amount assessed on Maintenance Account for Year ending September
30th;, 1918;  and also the Rate per Acre.
Chilliwack.
Matsqui.
Maple Ridge.
Coquitlam.
Pitt Meadows.
High Land.
Low Land.
Tract No. 1
Tract No. 2
Total capital charge
$200,000 00
$125,000 00
$26,980 80
$10,322
$100,415 20
$57,988 00
$17,815 32
$15,165
$17,052 62
$15.3318
$852 63
Capital  charge   per
acre.   	
Annual   assessment
on capital charge.
Maintenance Charge.
On lands assessable
on an acreage basis
On lands subject to
$10.4844
$12.2434
. $17.3764
$17,913
$10,000 00
$6,250 00
$1,349.04
$5,020 06
$2,899 40
$890 77
14,725 14
386 28
$6,907 28
.3 63
$1,245 03
18 74
$1,263 77
$4,644 25
13 75
$4,445 16
428 24
$1,418 90
$1,898 03
Total maintenance
charge	
1
$5,111-
12
30
38
38
hS
$6,910 9
$4,658 00
$4,873 40
3,154.81
82.19
3,237.00
$1,418 90
$1,898 03
Acreage    assessable
on an acreage basis
Acreage   subject  to
minimum rate . .
Total acreage	
Rate per acre, capital charge	
Rate per acre, maintenance 	
Total rate per acre
18,877.
207.
10,208.98
0.62
2,604.90
9.0.3
2,613.93
5,773.90
4.93
5,778.83
1,174.78
1,112.22
19,084.
5
10,209.60
1,174.78
1,112.22
$0 5
0 2
$0 61-A
0 67A
$0 51A
0 47A
$ 0 99T%
$0 86A
0 80-A
$0 89-A
1 41
.$0 75^
1 20/,
$0 76/5
1 70/,
$0 77A
$1 28j!)5
1 67, \
2 30A
1 96A
2 47T\
Annual Tax Sale.
Owing to the general financial depression prevailing on account of the war, only those lands,
the assessments for which were delinquent for the year 1915, were exposed for sale.
Arrears outstanding.
The following is a statement showing approximately the net amount of arrears outstanding
in each of the dyking districts for the years 1914-15 and 1916-17.    The arrears for 1914 and 1915
are. made up, principally, from delinquent dyking assessments on streets in municipalities which
are not subject to tax sale;   these arrears include also some lands which are exempt from sale
under the provisions of the " Military Service Act."
Chilliwack.
Matsqui.
Maple Ridge
Coquitlam.
$1,930 65
8,452 02
Pitt No. 1.
Pitt No. 2.
Arrears for 1914 and 1915.. , .
Arrears for 1916 and 1917... .
Totals	
$ 139 30
2,344 26
$2,483 56
$   42 58
4,698 26
$   78 37
7,037 27
$ 43 34
2,434 49
$364 89
$4,740 84
$7,115 64
$10,382 67
$364 89
$2,477  83
- C 140 Public Works Report (1917-18).
River-protection Work.
Besides the menace to the safety of the dyke on account of the increased accumulation of
log-jams at a point about two miles below the upper ejid of the Chilliwack Dyke, referred to in
last year's and former reports of the Inspector of Dykes, the gradual encroachment by the river,
extending from the upper end of Camp Slough down-stream for a distance of about 2,000 feet,
seriously threatens the safety of the dyke at a point where the dyke is nearest to the river-bank.
According to measurements taken at different times since 1905, when the distance from the
centre line of dyke to the-river-bank was 325 feet, the total encroachment amounts to 208 feet,
or to a point 117 feet from the centre of the dyke, leaving a margin of only about 90 feet between
the toe of the dyke and the toil of the river-bank. As the erosion from March, 1917, to December,
1918. amounted to 33 feet, while that for the three years prior to 1917 was only 25 feet, it would
appear that this encroachment of the river is gaining at an increased ratio, which renders it
necessary that steps be taken as soon as practicable for carrying out adequate works of protection
in order to safeguard the dyke.
Before a decision can be arrived at as to the best method to adopt for carrying out the
work or an estimate of the cost be formed, it will be necessary to have a survey made, showing
soundings and cross-sections of the river-bank between Camp Slough and Greyell Slough, a
distance of about 2,500 feet. River-protection work will also be required in the near future at
a point about half a mile below the upper end of the Matsqui Dyke, where the latter runs parallel
to the river for a distance of about 1,000 feet. The average distance at present between the
outside of the dyke ditch and the river-bank is about 150 feet. The river has encroached for
an average width of about 100 feet along this stretch during the last ten years, and is still
encroaching.
In order to secure the safety of the dyke, the-bank of the river for a length of 1,000 or
1,200 feet will have to be protected, and for the purpose of obtaining data as to the nature and.
cost of the work required a survey will be necessary.
Respectfully submitted.
E. A. Wilmot,
Inspector of Dykes.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by William II.  Cullix^  Printer to the Kind's Most Excellent Majesty,
1019.

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