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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1918 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1919

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 ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN
OF, THE
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1918
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by William H.  Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty,
1919.  To His Honour Sir Frank Stillman Barnard, K.C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of Provincial Game
Warden for the year ending December 31st, 1918.
J. W. de B. .FARRIS,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., February 25th, 1919. Provincial Game Warden's Office,
Victoria, B.C., January 31st, 1919.
Honourable J. W. de B. Farris, E.G., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.   .
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report for the year ending
December 31st, 1918.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
Wm. G. McMYNN,
Provincial Game Warden. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1918.
The year under review marks the third important step in the history of game-protection
in this Province. The Game Department came into existence in 1005, and commencing with
a small appropriation and a limited staff carried on a sporadic but successful effort at game-
protection with the means at its disposal. In 1913 the resident firearms licence was introduced,
which received a ready support from the shooting public. The number of Game Wardens was
largely increased, and the revenue exceeded expectations by increasing from (approximately)
$6,000 in 1912 to $107,000 in 1913. At the last session of the Legislature, in April, 1918, the
" Game Act" was amended to allow of the creation of a Game Conservation Board, which met
with widespread approval, it being readily recognized that a course which had been adopted
with such proved beneficial results in other countries, notably in the United States, clearly
demonstrated the practicability of applying to the conservation and propagation of game a
wider outlook and more varied opinion than could be obtained by individual effort. Provision
was also made for the administration of the Game Department being amalgamated with the
duties of the Provincial Police, and the Superintendent of Provincial Police was created
ex officio the Provincial Game Warden.
So radical a change in the affairs of a Department in which the general public so largely
share was bound to meet with a certain amount of adverse criticism, and considerable skepticism
was expressed as to the success which would attend the enforcement of the game laws by police
officers. The changes, however, were favourably received by the sporting community as a
whole, and resolutions endorsing the legislation foreshadowed were passed by some of the more
important game associations. The creation of a Game Conservation Board was felt to be a
forward step at a time when conservation was of paramount importance, and the opportunities
afforded for the energies of a Game Board representative of the whole Province have amply
demonstrated the successful nature of the change. Co-operation and a clearer understanding
with the Dominion authorities was also necessary for the better working-out of the " Migratory
Birds Convention Act," and the recommendations of the Game Conservation Board resulted in
the establishment of zones for the open seasons for wild-fowl shooting, which practically met
the requirements of the treaty. Migratory non-game birds and insectivorous birds also came
in for a greater measure of protection.
Whilst much had been achieved in the protection of game and the enforcement of the law
in past years, the time had arrived for a more thorough and organized effort. The Deputy
Inspectors of the Provincial Police, and all officers under them, threw themselves wholeheartedly into their new duties, and a fresh impetus was given to the enforcement of the law,
as evidenced by the increase of revenue and convictions. The success, however, of the enforcement of the law should not be measured entirely by the number of convictions recorded, but
rather by the prevention of violations and the attitude of the shooting public. It is becoming
more increasingly recognized that education is the most important factor in all matters pertaining to successful conservation. The system of licensing creates two motives in the mind of
the purchaser—either the licence is bought from a sense of upholding the. Department and
protecting the game, or else it is bought merely as a means of avoiding prosecution. The
latter motive can only be eradicated by fostering and increasing an interest in conservation, and
every educational opportunity should be utilized to impress, not only on sportsmen, but on
boys also, the necessity of protection, the importance of immunity from molestation to game
during the breeding season, and the destruction of vermin preying upon game birds, in which
the shooting public can so largely assist. The farmers, too, should be encouraged to look more
leniently on the "damage to crops" (so commonly exaggerated) by insectivorous or game
birds, for there is proof beyond question that bird-life is one of the most indispensable balancing-
forces of nature.
On the recommendation of the Game Conservation Board, regulations governing the payment
of bounty were revised, and an increase in the bounty payable on cougar was suggested.
Provincial constables were also furnished, in many cases, with suitable weapons and ammunition, and instructed, wherever possible, whilst in the fulfilment of their duty, to assist in the
destruction of predatory animals and birds. S 6 British Columbia. 1919
The amendments to the " Game Act," which are dealt with more particularly under a
separate heading in this report, have opened a new era for game-protection in British Columbia.
The report of the Chairman of the Game Conservation Board, dealing more particularly with
the Lower Mainland and Gulf Islands and the work of this Department during the past year,
contains the following:—
" Upon assuming my duties as a member of the British Columbia Game Conservation
Board last May, I endeavoured to familiarize myself with the existing conditions of the game
of the Lower Mainland and Gulf Islands.
" I found, upon investigation, that the Fraser Valley, the natural habitation of almost all
kind of bird-life, was well stocked with almost all the various game birds that will thrive in
this district, but that there was a marked laxity of public interest in the conservation of these
birds, due, I believe, to the way the game regulations of the Province had been enforced, and
also due to the fact that, although sporting men of the various districts had been contributing
year after year to protection and conservation by their annual firearms licences, yet they had
received very little, if any, of either.
" The change in the manner of protection brought into effect by the amendments to the
' Game Act' just previous was looked upon with disfavour in a great many localities, so that
the prospects for arousing public interest and support were very slight.
" The sentiment regarding the game on the Gulf Islands and inlets adjacent was very
much the same as found in the Fraser Valley.    Violations of the game laws were common.
" I am pleased to report to you that this condition has entirely changed; there has been
a very marked awakening of public interest in the protection and conservation of our bird and
animal life throughout these sections, and the progress of the movement is indeed encouraging.
The game associations have awakened and have taken on new life. To-day they are behind
the authorities for conservation and propagation.
" The sporting men are keen in their endeavours to help the game officers in the fulfilment
of their duties. This awakening bids fair to place British Columbia in its true light. Show to
the world the value of the great resource we have in both big game and game birds, and make
this Province what it should be—the paradise for true sportsmen.
" The reverse of opinion has been gradually brought about by reason of the attitude taken
by your Department, convincing all that you intended to and would enforce the game regulations
and laws of the Province. >
" The officers have been untiring in their efforts to see that all orders were carried out, and
to bring wanton destroyers of game to their just deserts. Another great factor has been in
showing the sportsmen that something is being done for the propagation of game by the authorities, and that this will be carried on."
Energetic efforts have been made to increase the stock of pheasants, and the principal farm
for raising the same has been started at the Wilkinson Boad Lock-up, Victoria District, where
it is hoped some 4,000 birds will be raised next spring.
The lease on the land at the Horst Farm, in the vicinity of Chilliwack, which had been
formerly used for this purpose, expired at the end of the year; this location, having served its
purpose, has now been abandoned, and there is no doubt that much better results will be obtained
on Vancouver Island. Beyond the Horst Farm there was no provision for game sanctuaries
for birds, and the Board early recommended and arranged for the creation of a game sanctuary
in the vicinity of Victoria, comprising Elk and Beaver Lakes and the watershed surrounding
these waters.
The retiring Provincial Game Warden and Deputy Game Wardens, whose services were
automatically dispensed with at the end of last March by the passing of the amending Bill,
were granted a gratuity in accordance with the length of their service, whilst those whose
services were retained were merged with the staff of the Provincial Police.
Amendments to the " Game Act."
By the 1918 amendments to the " Game Act," which came into effect on April 23rd, 1918,
the administration of this Department was placed in the hands of the Superintendent of Provincial
Police, who became ex officio the Provincial Game Warden, and all Provincial Police officers
became ex-officio Game Wardens. Provision was also made for the appointment of a Chief
Game Inspector, under the direction of the Provincial Game Warden.    A Game Conservation 9 Geo. 5 Report of Provincial Game Warden. S 7
Board was created, consisting of five members, of which the Curator of the Provincial Museum
became ex officio the Secretary and the Chief Game Inspector an ex-officio member. The
remaining three members were appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, and the
Board as constituted stands as follows: Dr. A. B. Baker, of Vancouver, Chairman; F.
Kermode, Curator of Provincial Museum, Victoria, Secretary; F. H. Mobley, M.L.A., of Atlin;
F. A. Dunn, of Cranbrook; B. Gidley, Acting Chief Game Inspector, Victoria.
The Board is required to meet four times in each year, at the times and places designated
by the Minister, to receive and consider suggestions for the conservation, propagation, and
importation of game, and to advise the Lieutenant-Governor in Council upon all matters arising
under the Act.
Other amendments to the undermentioned sections of the " Game Act" provided for:—
Section 9. Inclusion on the protected list of game animals and birds of pigeons and doves
and Western and American robins and thrushes.
Section 10. A reduction in the bag limit, which is now as follows, subject always to seasons
being declared open in that behalf by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:    1 moose; 1 wapiti;
2 caribou; 2 mountain-sheep of any one species, or not more than three in all; 2 mountain-goat;
3 deer of any one species, or not more than four in all; 250 ducks.
Section 24, subsection (a). Altering the farmer's free licence, entitling him to shoot only
on his own land.
Section 24, subsection (e). Alteration in the non-resident big-game licences, the fee being
amended to $25, subject to a schedule of fees for game killed, namely: For grizzly bear, moose,
sheep, wapiti, or caribou, $25 each; for black or brown bear, mountain-goat, or mule-deer, $15
each; for deer of any other species, $5 each.
Section 24, subsection (h). Amending the non-resident angler's licence, and making the
same valid from March 25th to November 15th in each year, in conformance with the Dominion
Fishing Regulations, and amending the fee for this licence to $1 per day up to five days, or $5
for the season.
Section 45, subsection (2). Making pit-lamping a prison offence, without the option of a
fine.
Revenue and Expenditure.
The revenue obtained this year from the sale of firearms licences shows a surplus of
$15,500 over the amount estimated by the Honourable the Minister of Finance as likely to be
received, and this figure is (approximately) $10,000 in excess of the receipts, obtained in 1917-18.
There is also an additional sum of $1,300 which has been collected but only reported to me
subsequent to the date of tabulating this report, which, together with a few miscellaneous
receipts and further collections from the sale of trappers' licences, will bring the total for the
year to over $77,000.
By comparison with last year the figures are as follows:—
Resident licences— 1917.
O.F.L.,  14.020      $35,050.00
G.F.L.,   2.S04          14,320 00
S.F.L., 1,141       11,410 00
Guides, 30     150 00
F.F.L., 4,940	
P.F.L., 2,273   	
 $60,930 00
Non-resident licences—
Big game, 31     $ 3,100 00
Bear, 10    250 00
Anglers,  134     670 00
Weekly bird, 3    15 00
Season bird, 2     100 00
 $ 4,135 00
Miscellaneous receipts     422 50
$65,487 50 S 8 British Columbia. 1919
Resident licences— 191S (to Dec. 31st).
O.F.L.,  16,432      $41,080 00
G.F.L., 2,970        14,850 00
S.F.L.,  1,524        15,240 00
Guides, 27  135 00
F.F.L., 3,200	
P.F.L.,  1,789	
  $71,305 00
Non-resident licences—
Big game, 51    $ 1,275 00
Big game, fees         2,205 00
Bear, 5    125 00
Anglers'  season,  85     425 00
Anglers' daily, 42    42 00
Weekly bird, 2  10 00
Season bird, 3     150 00
  $ 4,232 00
$75,537 00
It will be noticed from the above comparison that the increase is chiefly derived from the
ordinary $2.50 and trappers' licences.
Great economy, as compared with previous years, has been practised in the expenditure for
game-protection, and the work of the police has only been charged for where expenses were
Incurred for purely game matters. During the open season special constables were engaged,
particularly for the enforcement of the Act, and their salaries and expenses were consequently
all charged to this Department.    A synopsis of the expenditure to date is as follows:—
Appropriation as per Vote No. 45   r   $35,000 00
Expenditure from April 1st, 1918, to December 31st, 1918—
Salaries      $9,172 44
Expenses of Game Board         637 83
Overhead charges        1,831 01
Expense  accounts     3,638 79
Pheasant-raising     2,156 38
Releasing red deer  151 54
Sundries     70 00
Payments account, 1917  590 88
 18,218 87
$16,781 13
Less bounties paid         3,152 50
Balance on hand    $13,628 63
By comparison with the year 1918-19, an immense saving has been effected in the cost of
game-protection, the result being as follows:—
Revenue. Expenditure.
1917-18      $65,487 50 $55,033 80
1918 (Dec. 31st)        75,537 00 18,218 87
$36,814 93 9 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
S 9
Revenue derived from Sale of Non-resident Licences from April 1st, 1918, to
December 31st, 1918.
Government
Agency.
Telegraph Creek.
Golden	
Fernie	
Cranbrook 	
Vancouver 	
New Westminster
Barkerville	
Victoria 	
Fort George	
Greenwood	
Nanaimo	
Alberni 	
Kamloops	
Duncan	
Nelson	
Princeton	
Grand Forks	
Totals...
No.   Amount.     Fees
275 00
425 00
150 OO
175 00
125 00
50 00
50 00
25 00
51 11,275 00
$1,965 00
115 00
30 00
Spring Bear.
No.   Amount.
$2,205 00
$ 50 00
No.   Amount.
$125 00
.9100 00
'MOO
Weekly Bird.
No.    Amount.
$ 5
Season Angler.
No.
Amount.
i
$ o'6o
ii
55 00
10
50 00
4
20 00
11
55 00
si
155 00
2
10 00
4
20 00
8
15 00
3
16 00
1
6 00
1
5 00
1
5 00
1
5 00
1
5 00
85
$425 00
Daily Angler.
No.   Amount.
S 3 00
1 00
10 00
18 00
5 00
4 00
1 00
$42 00
$2,240 00
545 00
238 00
226 00
210 00
173 00
145 00
255 00
110 00
20 00
20 00
19 00
11 00
5 00
5 00
5 00
5 00.
$4,232 00
Bevenue derived from Sale of Resident Gun Licences.
Government Agency.
Vancouver 	
New' Westminster
Victoria  	
Fort George	
Vernon  	
Nanaimo	
Prince Rupert...
Fernie	
Kamloops	
Nelson	
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Golden	
Cranbrook 	
Revelstoke	
Fairview	
Kaslo	
150-Mile House ..
Alberni 	
Rossland	
Greenwood	
Fort St. John ...
Grand Forks ....
Princeton	
Merritt 	
Fort Fraser 	
Clinton	
Quesnel	
Smithers	
Ashcroft    .
Wilmer 	
Lillooet	
Telegraph Creek.
Anyox	
Atlin	
Yale	
Totals...,
No.       Amount.
1 40
242
931
65
100
268
486
455
559
427
585
639
77
226
100
290
no
66
255
253
235
3
169
193
153
48
81
15
46
137
74
55
1
20
2
20
16.43:.'
$10,350 00
5,605 00
4,827 50
162 50
2,750 00
3,170 00
1,215 00
1,137 50
1,397 50
1,067 50
1,462 50
1,347 50
192 50
565 00
265 00
725 00
275 00
165 00
637 50
632 50
587 50
7 50
422 50
482 50
38-2 50
120 00
202 50
37 50
115 00
342 50
185 00
137 60
2 50
50 00
5 00
50 00
(1*1,080 00
No.  Amount.
623
94
127
217
98
81
260
346
97
107
80
20
123
59
79
44
63
20
40
66
41
11
65
34
31
11
8
25
11
22
17
21
1
22
1
5
3,115 00
470 00
635 00
1,085 00
490 00
405 00
1,300 00
1,730 00
485 00
535 00
400 60
100 00
615 00
295 00
395 00
220 00
315 00
100 00
200 00
330 00
205 00
55 00
325 00
170 00
155 00
55 00
40 00
125 00
55 00
110 00
85 00
105 00
5 00
110 00
5 00
25 00
$14,850 00 1,524
No.  Amount.
106
36
35
257
56
10
98
54
91
40
13
9
60
30
48
10
44
76
18
5
17
84
11
18
29
61
44
43
42
11
18
12
19
7
21
1
1,060
360
350
2,570
560
100
980
640
910
400
130
90
500
300
480
100
440
760
180
50
170
840
110
180
290
610
440
430
420
110
180
120
190
70
210
10
815,240 00  27
Guides.
No. Amount.
S 65 00
5 00
65 00
S135 00
F.F.L.
256
579
28
98
268
75
21
22
615
158
112
162
58
32
66
49
40
48
33
31
66
28
36
17
58
35
87
3,200
P.F.L.
No.
Totals.
272
$14,525 00
27
6,435 00
5
6,877 50
47
3,S17 50
22
3.800 00
3,675 00
160
3,495 00
6
3,407 50
75
2,792 50
165
2,002 50
1,992 50
1,537 50
8
1,307 50
42
1,160 00
85
1,140 00
16
1,045 00
224
1,030 00
9
1,025 00
8
1,017 60
34
1,012 50
68
962 50
902 50
50
857 50
73
832 50
16
827 50
3
785 00
21
682 50
45
592 50
77
590 00
50
562 50
9
450 00
64
367 50
262 50
35
230 00
41
220 00
31
85 00
1,789
$71,305 00 S 10
British Columbia.
1919
Enforcement of the Law.
A noticeable increase in the number and variety of convictions for violations of the game
laws is the outstanding result of the nine months' work of the Provincial Police, and there has
been more widespread control of all kinds of shooting throughout the Province than could
possibly have been achieved by the Game Wardens previously employed.
A comparison of statistics for the years 1917 and 1918 demonstrates at a glance these
results.
Recapitulation.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Suspended
Sentences.
Cases withdrawn.
Cases  dis-
inissed.
Guns confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
1918.
27
107
22
137
159
3
5
2
7
i3
5
5
S   440 00
2,901 00
194
S
9
13
S3,341 00
1917.
111
97
#
4
10
$3,763 50
In the more settled districts where good roads are to be found and in the vicinity of the
large towns the ever-increasing use of the automobile is revolutionizing the methods of obtaining
shooting. Districts formerly inaccessible to hunters with limited time to indulge in this sport
can now be readily reached for week-end shooting by aid of the car. Unfortunately, whilst
improving the opportunities for sport, this method cannot but react unfavourably upon the
game birds, as opportunities for illegal shooting both in and out of season are greatly facilitated.
The use of automobiles as a means of pit-lamping is also frequent, but with the long-
advocated amendment in operation, making this practice a prison offence, a determined effort-
has been made to put a stop to it. Three convictions, resulting in gaol sentences of thirty days
each, have been obtained on Vancouver Island, and it is to be hoped these examples will act
as a deterrent to others.
A stricter enforcement of the law has been put into execution in the northern part of the
Province. Telegraph Creek, where for years past the Indians have done much as they pleased,
was visited early in the year by the Acting Chief Game Inspector, and two convictions were
obtained against persons having moose-meat in their possession out of season. An officer was
subsequently stationed at this place, and a more strict watch is being kept on the exportation
of big-game trophies. Other successful and important prosecutions to be noticed are three cases
of persons " allowing dogs to run deer," this being one of the most difficult offences to prove;
and one case of " removing trails legally set," which resulted in the conviction of an Indian (son
of a chief), and for which a fine and gaol sentence was imposed. Two convictions for trapping
out of season, in which heavy penalties were imposed, were obtained in the Columbia and Fort
George Districts, both entailing considerable arduous work on the part of the officers making
the arrests.
Just prior to and during the greater part of the open season for game birds a number of
special constables were temporarily employed to assist the regular police in their work, and the
most favoured shooting districts were thoroughly combed for hunters who had risked not taking
out their licences.
The work of the force may be more particularly summed up in the following extracts
from the Chairman of the Game Conservation Board, the Deputy Inspectors, and Chief
Constables:—
Chairman of the Game Conservation Board.
"I am pleased to report to yon that all the officers in this district (Lower Mainland and
Islands adjacent) under your supervision have been untiring in their efforts to enforce the
game laws, and have shown extreme courtesy in assisting me to gather any information I
required, and have assisted always in our endeavours for the protection and conservation of
game." 9 Geo. 5 Keport of Provincial Game Warden. S 11
Acting Chief Game Inspector.
" In the districts visited by me, which included Telegraph Creek, Kamloops, Clinton, and
the Lower Mainland, also Vancouver Island, I find that game conditions under the new regime
are exceptionally good. I must say that the enforcement of the ' Game Act' during the year
1918 has given the greatest satisfaction to the sporting public.
" On Vancouver Island complaints of hunting deer with head-lights seems to be the chief
complaint, regardless of the fact that a prison term must be imposed without the option of a
fine. In my dealings with the Provincial Police I have found them always ready to give every
possible assistance when requested.
"During the past hunting season a greater number of special constables than usual have
been put on, with the result that the prosecutions have been more numerous than usual."
The Deputy Inspector,  Vancouver.
" A considerable portion of this district lies on the Gulf of Georgia and the Islands adjoining, aud with the exception of the ' Watla' launch we have no other craft available for this
work. This boat, however, with the officers on board, have done good work, which well justifies
keeping her in commission for this branch."
The Deputy Inspector, Kamloops.
" A game-conservation was effected in this way: that, where previously there was one man
acting as Game Warden, this year there were constables all over the district, and in addition
I was enabled, through having a car, to cover as much ground in a week as a man on horseback
would cover in a season, and in my patrols I found, in conversation with ranchers and others,
that they were more than satisfied with conditions generally."
The Deputy Inspector, Fernie.
" With the exception of a few instances, the ' Game Act' throughout the whole division has
been fairly observed by the citizens themselves. Thanks are due, to a great extent, to the
activity of the Bod and Gun Clubs throughout the division. The police have in every instance
followed instructions and have investigated complaints without delay."
The Deputy Inspector, Fort George.
" Regular patrols are carried out from time to time, and constables have been advised that
game-protection forms an integral part of their duty. Ordinary patrols are supplemented by
special investigations under the ' Game Act' as occasion demands. Personnel is further
augmented by four duly appointed special officers resident in remote districts, remunerated only
when departmentally employed."
The Chief Constable, Golden,
" Prosecutions so far have been few, owing, in a great measure, to the scarcity of men
in the country. The Kootenay, which is the most important big-game area in the district, if
not in the Province, has been systematically patrolled by the Wardens, and all hunters checked
up as to licence, etc. Considerable difficulty has been experienced in the Kootenay, owing to
bridges having been washed out by the high water last season, making fording of streams
necessary and in many cases dangerous. The British Columbia-Alberta boundary has also
received attention, Constable Farey having been in that section since October until driven out
by snow about November 7th. During that time he worked in conjunction with the National
Park Game Wardens and patrolled south as far as Kananaskis Pass."
The Chief Constable, Clinton.
" The provisions of the ' Game Act' have been strictly enforced throughout the district.
The Indians are the worst offenders and are the hardest to catch, owing to the size of the
sub-districts and the length of time for information to reach the police." S 12
British Columbia.
1919
Prosecutions.
No. of
Cases.
Description of Offence.
Fines and Penalties
imposed.
4
2
5
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
12
2
1
3
1
2
7
1
1
2
1
1
1
48
1
6
7
2
1
3
1
1
1
2
January 1st, 1918, to March 31st, 1918.
Game in possession during close season  	
Venison on premises of a restaurant  	
Exceeding bag limit on deer  	
Trapping without a licence  	
Hunting wild-fowl from power-boat in tidal waters	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence	
Carrying firearms without a licence  	
Furnishing  false  information   	
Pump-gun not plugged   	
Killing grouse during close season  	
Game in possession during close season  	
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Carrying firearms without a licence  	
April 1st, 1918, to December 31st, 1918.
Venison in possession during close season  	
Killing deer during close season   	
Killing   fawns    	
Fawn   in   possession   	
Allowing dogs to run deer 	
Game on premises of a shop  	
Game in cold storage  	
Killing female moose   	
Moose-meat in  possession  illegally   	
Killing  caribou during  close  season   	
Caribou-meat in  possession  illegally   	
Killing mountain-goat during close  season   	
Killing bear without a licence  	
Killing pheasants  during close  season   	
Pheasants  in  possession  illegally   	
Killing grouse  during close season   . %	
Grouse  in  possession  illegally   	
Hunting ducks during close season   	
Ducks in possession illegally   	
Hunting wild-fowl from power-boat in tidal waters  	
European partridge in possession illegally  	
Hunting illegally with farmer's free licence   	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence 	
Carrying firearms without a licence   	
Hunting during close season  	
Trespassing in pursuit of game on a game reserve  	
Trespassing in pursuit of game  	
Trapping  during close  season   	
Boy under sixteen carrying firearms illegally	
Pump-guns not plugged	
Carrying firearms in auto illegally  '.	
Refusing to stop auto   	
Furnishing false information  	
Insectivorous birds in possession illegally  	
Firearms and head-lights in possession  (pit-lamping)   	
Removing traps legally set.    (Fine $200 and one month, or three
months in all, in gaol)   	
Killing grouse during close season   	
Game in possession illegally  	
Killing deer during close season  	
Killing mountain-goat during close season  	
$195 00
25
oo
50
00
25
00
25
00
50
00
10 00
25
0(1
35
00
$440 00
2 months in gaol.
1 month in gaol.
Suspended sentence.
Withdrawn.
$ 100
00
150 00
200
00
25
00
205
00
75
00
5
00
250
0(1
20 00
250
00
60
00
50
(IO
50
00
125
oo
35
no
75
00
130
00
5
00
1
00
20
00
5
00
5
00
75
00
365
00
5
00
75
00
75
00
350
00
5
00
30
00
50
00
5 00
5
00
20
(10
?2,901
00
30 days in gaol each.
3 months in gaol.
2 weeks in gaol.
3 months in gaol.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence. 9 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
S 13
Prosecutions—Concluded.
No. of
Cases.
Description of Offence.
Fines and Penalties
imposed.
2
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
3
1
1
1
167
Carrying firearms without a licence  	
Carrying firearms in auto illegally  	
Carrying firearms without a licence   	
Killing deer during close season   	
Caribou-meat in premises of a shop  	
Killing willow-grouse during close season  	
Willow-grouse in possession illegally  	
Refusing to stop auto 	
Permitting licence-badge to be used  	
Trespassing in pursuit of game   	
Using another person's licence-badge   	
Hunting without a licence   	
Pump-guns not plugged  (warrants for arrest issued)
Caribou-meat in  possession  illegally   	
Bear-meat in possession illegally  	
Carrying firearms without accompanying badge
Game in possession illegally	
Trespassing in pursuit of game   	
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Guns confiscated.
Guns confiscated.
Withdrawn.
Withdrawn.
Withdrawn.
Withdrawn.
Withdrawn.
Noxious Animals.
Supplementary appropriations for the payment of bounty were required to dispose of the
applications up to March 31st, 1918, but, as the price of coyote-pelts had greatly increased during
the past few years, changes in the Bounty Regulations were introduced this year, which came
into force on July 1st, 1918.    Under these regulations the bounties payable are as follows:—
Each  cougar    Mature, $15 00; young, $7 50
Each timber-wolf   Mature,   10 00; young,   5 00
Each coyote  Mature,     2 CO; young,   1 00
Each big-horned or snow owl  	
Certain restrictions were imposed with regard to the obtaining of these bounties.
In the case of wolves, the whole pelt, together with a statutory declaration, must be sent
to the Curator, Provincial Museum, for verification before payment of bounty is made.
Bounty on coyotes can only be claimed on those killed in the Province west of the Rocky
Mountains, and the pelts must be surrendered to the Government, together with the application
for bounty, within thirty days of the date of the certificate.
Owls on which bounty is claimed must have been killed in the Electoral Districts of Comox,
Alberni, Newcastle, Nanaimo, Cowichan, Esquimalt, Saanich, Islands, Richmond, North and
South Vancouver, Dewdney, Delta, and Chilliwack.
The result of these regulations, as intended, was a great falling-off in the number of
applications for bounty. It was obviously unreasonable for the Government to pay a bounty
of $2 on coyotes when pelts of these animals were fetching anywhere from $12 to $20. At the
same time, as many summer pelts are practically worthless, the opportunity was afforded for the
presentation of these skins for bounty.
There have been many complaints about the increase of cougars, and it would appear to
be advisable to provide a higher bounty for their destruction, with a view to encouraging people
to make a more determined effort to reduce the quantity of these animals, which make havoc
among domestic animals as well as game.
The Chief Constable at Fort George reports that cougar have been seen more frequently in
his district than heretofore.
Dr. Gordon Hewitt, Secretary for the Dominion Advisory Board on WTild-life Protection in
Canada, reported to the Game Conservation Board that the former had under consideration
the effectual treatment of predatory animals, particularly in the Bridge River District. He
further stated that the Advisory Board on Wild-life Protection, after going fully into the matter
with the authorities of the Biological Survey of the United States Department of Agriculture, had come to the conclusion that the bounty system will not succeed in ridding any territory of
predatory animals.    Certainly all evidence seems to tend to this conclusion.
Very few bounties on coyotes have been claimed, and the total amount paid for bounties
since April 1st, 1918, to date represents a trifle over $3,000. This includes applications for
bounties on coyotes up to July 1st, before the new regulations came into force.
The Game Conservation Board has made a recommendation, largely supported by gun
clubs and private individuals, for a bounty on crows. The Chairman, writing on conditions in
the Lower Mainland, says :—
" Throughout this portion of the Province crows are proving the greatest menace to our
bird-life. Songbirds in this district are fast decreasing, and it is an undeniable fact that the
crows' activities are increasing, and some strong efforts must be made to secure a reduction in
their number."
Open Seasons.
A meeting, which was widely advertised, for discussion as to the most suitable dates for
the open seasons was arranged by the Game Conservation Board, and held in Victoria on July
29th, 1918. Sportsmen throughout the Province were invited to be present at this meeting
or to forward to it their recommendations. A considerable number of local sportsmen attended
the meeting, and resolutions were passed which were subsequently considered and largely
adopted by the Board in framing their recommendations to the Executive Council, when the
following open seasons were determined upon:—
Moose    Sept.   1-Dec.   15. In Atlin, Fort George, Omineca, Cariboo, and Columbia
Electoral Districts.
Caribou*   Sept.   1-Dec.   15. Throughout the Province.
Mountain-sheep    Sept.  1-Nov.  15. North of the main line of the G.T.P.
Mountain-goat    Sept.   1-Dec.   15. Throughout the Province.
Bear Co June 30, '19. Throughout the Province.
Deerf Sept. 14-Dec. 15. Throughout the Province.
Northern. Eastern. Western,
Ducks,  snipe,  and plover Aug. 15-Nov. 20   Sept.   2-Dec.   8  north  of  Sept. 21-Jan. 5 on Main-
C.N.R.;   Sept.   14-Dec.       land ; Nov. 2-Feb. 7 on
15 south of CN.R. Vancouver   Island   and
Islands adjacent.
Geese and Brant Aug. 15-Nov. 20   Sept.   2-Dee.   8  north  of   Sept. 21-Jan. 5 north of
CN.R.;   Sept.   14-Dec.       51st parallel; Nov. 16-
15 south of CN.R. Feb.  21 south  of 51st
parallel.
Blue Grouse Aug. 15-Mar. 31   Sept. 14-Oct. 31 south of   Sept. 14-Nov. 3.
CN.R.
Ruffed or willow, Frank- Aug. 15-Mar. 31   Sept. 14-Oct. 31 south of
lin, and Ptarmigan CN.R.
grouse
Prairie-chicken       Sept.    14 - Sept.    21    in
Grand Forks and Green-
w o o d Electoral Districts.
Quail      Oct. 26-Nov. 8 in Similka-   Oct. 26-Nov. 26 in Esqui-
meen Electoral District. malt, Saanich, and
Islands Electoral Districts.
Pheasants       Oct. 26-Oct. 28 in South  Oct. 26-Nov. 26, except in
Okanagan    Electoral       Alberni   and   Comox
District;   Oct.   26 Nov.       Electoral Districts.
8 in Similkameen Electoral District.
European partridges          Nov. 25-Nov. 26 in Delta
and   North   Saanich
Electoral Districts only.
Foxes Nov. 1-Mar. 15, '19.    Throughout the Province
All other fur-bearing ani- Nov. 1-Apr. 30, '19.    North of C.P.R. and in Columbia Electoral District,
mais
Ditto    Nov. 1-Mar. 31,'19.    South   of   C.P.R.,   including   Vancouver   Island   and
Islands adjacent.
4 Except in Queen Charlotte Islands and Rainbow and Hatchie Mountains,
t Except in Queen Charlotte Islands. 9 Geo. 5 Report of Provincial Game Warden. S IC
The Province was divided into three zones for the purpose of conforming to the Dominion
Regulations of the " Migratory Birds Convention Act," and the limitation of three and a half
months' open season for wild-fowl shooting was adhered to.
The main divisional lines of the three districts were the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
separating off the Northern District, and the Summit of the Cascade Mountains dividing the
Eastern and Western District, Vancouver Island comprising part of the latter.
Mountain-sheep were kept on the protected list south of the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway. No open season was allowed for grouse in the Eastern District north of the
main line of the Canadian Northern Railway, or for willow-grouse in the Western District.
The season for deer opened and closed throughout the Province on the same date, a measure
which had long been advocated, and great care was taken by the Board in fixing the opening
dates, wherever possible, to commence on a " Saturday," in order that sportsmen of every class
might have an equal opportunity of getting out on the opening day.
The breeding season for game birds was an excellent one, and good sport seems to have
been noted in practically all lines of shooting. The Spanish influenza is reported from many
districts as having deterred hunters from making full use of the open seasons, and this applied
particularly to trappers. The usual regrettable accidents, due to the careless handling of
firearms, have to be reported, and one particularly distressing case occurred of two men being
lost in the Malahat District (one of whom died from exposure) when comparatively close to
assistance. Parties headed by the Chief Game Inspector located the survivor and subsequently
the body of his companion.
Game.
Dealing with the game animals and birds in detail, the following particulars are based upon
the reports received from the officers in charge of the various districts and from the Chairman
and members of the Game Conservation Board:—
Moose and Caribou.—In the Atlin Electoral District moose and caribou appear to be about
normal in most localities, but owing to the extreme depth of snow last winter, and the long
period it stayed on the ground, the loss was considerable, beyond the slaughter by man, which
was somewhat facilitated by the deepness of the snow. In the Peace River District the moose
have suffered considerably at the hands of the Indians.
The Deputy Inspector at Fort George reports that during November several dead moose
and caribou were discovered, which, upon examination, showed lung-trouble. Pneumonia is a
common disease amongst horses in the extreme North, but it is to be hoped it will not become
prevalent amongst the big game. This officer, reporting on a patrol of the Ootsa and Francois
Lake District, states that moose there were very plentiful.
Moose appear to be plentiful in the northern part of the Lillooet District and are spreading
into the south-eastern part. Reports about caribou are equally good, particularly in the vicinity
of Barkerville. In the Columbia District moose are numerous at the headwaters of the Kootenay
River.
Wapiti.—Reports from the Kootenay show that a small herd of elk is pasturing around
the south end of the Elk Valley Game Reserve, and a larger herd is known to be in the vicinity
of the headwaters of the White River. Reports of killing elk out of season on this reserve
were investigated, and evidence found that this had taken place, but it was not possible to obtain
proof against any parties, as settlers near the game reserve are very disinclined to assist, and
there is little doubt that they break the law themselves from time to time. It is very necessary
to station an officer in the vicinity of this reserve for at least a portion of the year.
An effort to obtain a short open season for elk, limiting the bag to the killing of one bull,
was made by a few sportsmen. The request, however, was refused by the Game Conservation
Board, as there had been no reports of an increase in the quantity of elk to warrant such a
course, and, besides, the Board considered that after so long a closed period it would have been
unfair to sportsmen then absent at the war to allow an open season.
The Elk liberated at Bridge River appear to be doing well. Two small claims for damages
were paid by the Department to Indians for damage done by these animals to their crops. This
is an unavoidable feature of liberating half-domesticated animals for propagation purposes,
and one which has been experienced in the State of Wyoming, where the principal effort to
preserve the elk has been attempted. S 16 British Columbia. 1919
Mountain-sheep.—In the North the severity of last winter drove the bands to accessible
spots where they became an easy prey to the Indians. In all portions of the Province where
they are to be found they were reported to be somewhat scarcer. It was considered advisable
by the Game Conservation Board that the season should only be open for sheep north of the
main line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, thus affording the Lillooet and Ko^teUay
Districts an opportunity to recuperate.
The Chairman of the Game Conservation Board, in reporting his trip through Eastern
British Columbia and Northern Alberta, wrote as follows:—
" The greatest menace to our big game is from the Indians crossing into the moose and
sheep districts of East Kootenay; their method of procedure being to surround a mountain and
commence what is known as a ' drive.' This means driving the game to the top of the
mountain and then slaughtering everything possible. The Indians, especially the Chilcotin
tribe, situated on the Fraser River near Alkali Lake, do more harm in this section in one season
than all true sportsmen could do in years.
" At the junction of the Chilcotin and Fraser Rivers is a considerable area of land that
has been the home of Rocky Mountain sheep for ages. Six years ago, to my personal knowledge,
there were perhaps two or three hundred sheep in this section; during this visit I was creditably
informed that there were not more than thirty or forty sheep in all, the Chilcotin Indians depleting the herds. I would very strongly recommend this district being made a reservation, and
the whole district from Canoe Creek to Williams Lake on the east of the Fraser River, and
from Gang Ranch to Chimney Creek on the west of the Fraser River, being made into an
organized district, so that the Game Department can control the hunting, especially by Indians."
The regulations with regard to sheep appear to have met with approval, the only objections
being from professional guides, whose interests in reality were being protected, although they
may have lost a few hunting-parties for one season.
Bear.—The Game Conservation Board has recommended that the present open season all
the year round for bear be terminated on June 30th, 1919, and that a short close season be
effective until the fall hunting begins. Grizzlies are one of the chief attractions to many nonresident hunters, and this protection should be afforded to so valuable an asset to our big game.
Mr. A. Bannon, of Portsmouth, Ohio, whilst on a spring bear-hunt in the North, killed an
unusually interesting bear, which he describes as having a full coat of long silky hair, black
as coal, except on the sides, where it was a beautiful grey. It also had the usual brown markings
about the face of a black bear, and the whole make-up was undoubtedly that of the ordinary
black-bear species.   Two or three fur-buyers pronounced it a Glacier bear.
Deer.—Successive hard winters with increasing depredation of predatory animals have
materially reduced the deer in northern and middle portions of British Columbia. In the
Lillooet District, west of the Fraser River, formerly one of the finest game territories, including
the Yalakom Game Reserve, mule-deer have been greatly depleted by cougars and Chilcotin
Indians. The latter are an annual source of trouble, and this district should be declared
organized, which would assist the police in giving better game-protection here.
In the lower portion of the Province deer seem to be normal in quantity. It is increasingly
difficult, however, to ascertain what number of Coast deer are killed during the open season,
where hunting is easily accessible from the larger cities and towns. The Acting Chief Game
Inspector reports as follows:—
" With regard to the deer, the season has been what one might call only fairly good. At
one time it was fairly easy to get an estimate of the number of deer brought in, as most of
them were brought in on the trains; now about 90 per cent, of the deer are brought in by
automobile, which makes it impossible to get an idea of the number."
Wild-foivl—The limitation for wild-fowl shooting to three and a half months, under the
" Migratory Birds Convention Act," raised serious difficulty in meeting the requirements of all
districts. This especially applies to the Coast, where weather conditions greatly vary the
advent of the birds. Recommendations and opinions differed radically as to what periods were
best for shooting in each zone, and subdivisions of the zones fixed were found to be necessary.
In the Northern District the season was opened on August 15th, but a subsequent amendment to the Game Regulations for geese was adopted, to allow of a different period on that
part of the Coast to the north of Vancouver Island, which formed part of the Western District. 9 Geo. 5 Report of Provincial Game Warden. S 17
Some dissatisfaction was expressed by hunters in the Comox Electoral District at the lateness of the geese season on Vancouver Island, but this season was fixed at the express wish
of the sportsmen attending the open meeting.
In the Eastern District a subdivisional line was taken by the Canadian Northern Railway,
the season to the south of this line opening on September 14th, twelve days after the territory
to the north of it.
The Chairman of the Game Conservation Board, reporting on the wild-fowl shooting in this
district, writes as follows:—
" Ducks and geese have been plentiful from Clinton, to Springhonse Mountain, or all that
part in Lillooet east of the Fraser River. The season there is short, really only lasting from
September 15th to November 1st, as after that they leave on their southern flight; this flight
passing between the Cascade and Selkirk Mountains, and then to Eastern Washington, Idaho
Mountains to the Gulf of Mexico."
And referring further to the Lower Mainland:—
" Ducks throughout the entire valley of the Fraser have been very plentiful this season,
affording excellent sport. The shortening of the open season under the ' Migratory Birds
Convention Act,' although at first meeting with a great deal of disfavour in this Province, has
proven to be of great benefit, and the sportsmen are realizing that it will be of still greater
benefit from year to year. We have excellent breeding-grounds tributary to the Fraser River,
and the shortening of the season will make it favourable for ducks to remain at these points
undisturbed, and consequently will greatly increase the number of local birds."
An innovation was made by the Game Conservation Board in fixing the bag limit to twenty
ducks per day, and, on the whole, birds seem to have been plentiful this year.
Grouse.—The Game Conservation Board, following a resolution passed by the sportsmen,
recommended a close season for willow-grouse on the Western District, as the stock of birds
had been reported low, even though the breeding season had been a favourable one.
All reports from the Eastern District indicate that grouse are scarcer in the Interior, despite
two previous close seasons. To the south of the Canadian Northern Railway an open season,
was allowed for all grouse, except prairie-chicken, but the actual railway-line proved too sharp
a line of demarcation, and it has been suggested that the Dominon Railway Belt be used as n
subdivisional line. In the same manner the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway line affected settlers
in that immediate locality. The Deputy Inspector at South Fort George comments on it as
follows: "The Grand Trunk Pacific main line as a boundary demarcation between Northern
and Eastern Division seems too arbitrary."
Prairie-chiclcen.—A short season for two weeks in the Greenwood and Grand Forks Electoral
Districts was the only shooting allowed for prairie chickens. In the Interior encouraging reports
have been received as to their increase. The Chairman of the Game Conservation Board, who
recently visited Mr. Lawton, the Chief Game Guardian of Alberta, with a view to co-operating
with him on all game matters relating to the two Provinces, states that Mr. Lawton has kindly
consented to allow this Department to take what is considered necessary of both species of
prairie-chicken from Alberta next spring, with a view to improving our own stock, which has
been seriously reduced by too much inbreeding.
Quail.—These dainty little birds were very abundant on Vancouver Island, and a liberal bag
limit, which was fixed at twenty per day, has not seriously depleted their number. Quail are
also reported plentiful and doing well around the southern end of the Okanagan Valley.
Pheasants.—In allowing hen pheasants to be shot for the first time since these birds were
introduced, the Game Conservation Board ultimately settled a much-discussed policy. Whilst
admittedly a number of young hens have been killed, any damage in this respect to the stock
has been greatly offset by the killing-off of a percentage of old hens, and thus checking inbreeding.
Moreover, the pheasant is an " imported" bird, and both eggs and young birds are easily
purchasable. The former bag limit of six birds per day was adhered to, with the revision that
two of such birds were allowed to be hens. The Chairman of the Game Conservation Board
dealing with this matter, writes as follows:—■
" Pheasants were very plentiful everyhere in the Fraser Valley, and also on all Gulf Islands
where land was cultivated.    I   have   made   careful   investigations   since   the   closing of the
pheasant season, November 26th, with a view of ascertaining what stock is left for breeding,
and I find that there are still plenty of birds,  and I believe that the open season for hen
2 i S 18 British Columbia. 1919
pheasants will prove highly beneficial, especially as your Department will be in a position to
liberate a large quantity of new birds next summer. There is now in the pens at Oakalla
quite a number of birds that will not be needed for breeding and can be liberated as soon as
information is gathered as to where they are most needed."
For the first time an open season of three days for cock pheasants only was allowed
in South Okanagan, where reports indicated that pheasants had been doing well and the cocks
were getting too numerous. From such information as could be gathered it appears that about
100 birds were killed.
European Partridges.—In the Delta District, on the Lower Mainland, these birds are not
doing so well as on Vancouver Island, and the introduction of some fresh blood is advisable.
Not many birds appear to have been shot in North Saanich during the two days' open season,
although they were quite plentiful both there and in South Saanich.
Red Deer.
The Game Conservation Board decided to liberate the English red deer which had been
kept in captivity at the Oakalla Prison Farm since their arrival from New Zealand in the spring
of 1914. During June last they were accordingly sent to Queen Charlotte Islands and turned
out on the south side of Masset Inlet, where shortly after their arrival a fawn was born. The
herd originally consisted of four fawns; now there are seven animals (one buck, four hinds, and
two fawns).
Mr. Dunning, of Auckland, New Zealand, who kindly presented these animals in the first
instance, wrote during the year saying that he would be glad to furnish another shipment of
his English red deer, and as the introduction of new blood is now very important, it would be
well for the Department to immediately avail itself of his generous offer. In view of the success
which the introduction of these deer in New Zealand has met with, there should be little or no
difficulty now in establishing them in this Province, seeing that the first consignment has proved
that they can be successfully acclimatized.
Non-residents.
In spite of a reduction in the bag limit, the number of big-game hunters in the Cassiar
District exceeded that of last year. Bag limits were obtained, with the exception of mountain-
goat, in almost every case by hunting-parties, which included two ladies.
It is also interesting to note that, under the new schedule of fees for big game killed,
receipts averaged $203.63 per hunter in the Telegraph Creek District this year, but while the
gross receipts exceeded those of last year by $380, the average of fees collected throughout the
Province from each hunter amounted,to only $68.03. During the previous year the licence fee
under the " Game Act" was $100 for each licence.
Indians.
Without exception, the most difficult problem confronting the Game Conservation Board in
their effort to preserve the game in the Province is to find ways and means for checking the
wanton destruction of game by the Indians. Where formerly tribes had a mutual understanding
as to the territory over which they should hunt, these arrangements seem to have largely lapsed,
and the restraint on killing game unnecessarily, formerly self-imposed, has given away to a
policy of killing all they can while it lasts. The Deputy Inspector at Fort George, on reporting
on the Indians in his District, says, with a good deal of truth: " It must always be borne in
mind that Indians were this country's original inhabitants, and that their descendants, not
unnaturally, nourish the belief that all game is theirs and every white man's trap-line an
encroachment on vested rights."
Complaints are frequent of Indians cutting beaver-dams and breaking up beaver-houses.
Fur Trade.
The prices to which furs have increased during the past few years have drawn more attention to the valuable asset which this Province possesses in its fur-bearing animals. The sale of
trappers' licences this year has increased by 400 and fur-dealers from all over the American
Continent have their agents in the most convenient districts for obtaining the choicest pelts. 9 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
S 19
The Chief Constable at Fort St. George, one of the main exporting centres, states that fur
to the value of approximately $300,000 was exported during the winter of 1917-18, and commenting on this remarks: " These buyers are making more from the fur than the licensed
trappers, and should be made to pay for such a profitable occupation, besides giving the Department a much better idea of the fur shipped from the Province. A fur-buyer at the present time
runs around the country buying fur from every one or any one, whether licensed or not."
It would appear that if the fur-trader, both resident and non-resident, were required to
have a licence and report as to the fur purchased and exported, a more definite idea of our
annual fur trade could be arrived at. In addition, administrative assistance would be given to
this Department by having some control on outside buyers, and thereby assisting to prevent
the traffic in unprinie pelts caught out of season.
From the returns furnished by trappers for the season 1917-18, it would appear that there
had been a general falling-off from the previous year in the number of fur-bearing animals
taken, as will be seen from the following comparative list:—
Returns  from  947    Returns from  869
Trappers, 1916V17.    Trappers, 1917-18.
Beaver  7,140 5,916
Marten      5,517 5,031
Otter     236 190
Mink      2,958 2,485
Racoon      627 654
Fox     702 483
Musk-rat     15,991 13,398
Lynx   4,380 2,456
Wild-cat   88 195
Weasel    11,444 13,175
Wolverine     250 195
Fisher     641 518
Fur-farming.
Fox-farmers evidently have not met with much success during the past year. The following
firms have reported they are discontinuing this business: W. McCullough, Pouce Coupe; W. E.
Lennox, Telegraph Creek; Pacific Silver & Black Fox Co., Revelstoke; E. Haenell, Atlin; O. A.
Haywood, Fort Fraser.
Owing to the remoteness of the districts in which certain farmers are located, reports have
not yet been received from all of those engaged in the business.
The following is a list of fox-farms at present being operated in this Province with the
number of foxes in captivity :—
Name.
Address.
O
.d Foxes.
Pups bred in Cai
TIVITY.
Total.
Additional Foxes lost
or disposed of.
Silver.
Cross.
Red.
Silver.
Cross,
Red.
Died.
Killed.
Sold.
Atlin Fur Farming Co	
Atlin	
15
S
2
3
5
2
4
5
6
3
8
i
3
3
2
2
6
1
5
i
3
3
'5
i
'3
3
1
31
9
8
8
6
3
3
12
11
6
7
3*
St
'i
1   ie
15
'2
2
Atlin	
Atlin	
Atlin	
Bickle	
Bickle	
N. Laverdiere	
A. Blayner 	
Bella Coola	
Sointula	
i
Hcmfrav & Axten	
W. McCullough	
* Litters.
Pups.  9 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
S 21
INDEX.
Page.
Administration,     Department     amalgamated
with Provincial Police      5
Amendments, 1914 " Game Act " amended....    6
Automobiles used for hunting illegally    10
Accidents to hunters   15
Bag limit, reduction of  7
Bannon, A., reporting freak black bear killed.. 16
Beaver Lake created bird sanctuary  6
Beaver-dams, destruction of, by Indians  18
Bear   (grizzly), fees for killing, by non-resi-.
dents  7
(Black and brown), fees for killing, by nonresidents   7
Close season recommended  16
Bounties, recommendations by Game Conservation Board    5
Paid to December 31st, 1918  8
Order in Council of July 1st, 1918  13
Caribou, general report     15
Reduction of bag limit     7
Fee for killing, by non-residents     7
Chief   Game   Inspector,   amendment   creating
position       6
(Acting), reporting on enforcement of law.. 11
(Acting), locating lost hunters   15
Chief    Game    Guardian,    Alberta,    offering
prairie-chicken     17
Chief Constable, Golden, reporting on enforcement of law    11
Clinton, reporting on enforcement of law. ..  11
Convictions, pit-lamping   10
At Telegraph Creek     10
In Columbia and Fort George Districts....  10
Cougar, increase in bounties recommended....    5
'Reported increase in Fort George District. .   13
Coyotes, bounties payable   13
Bounties paid to December 31st, 1918   14
Crows, recommendation for bounty on    14
Chairman, Game Conservation Board, reporting on game conditions in assuming office    6
Reporting on enforcement of the law 10
Reporting  on wild-fowl       17
Reporting on prairie-chicken     17
■Reporting on pheasants    17
Deer, bag limit      7
Fee for killing, by non-residents     7
Open season on same date throughout Province    14
General report    16
Deputy Game Wardens, gratuities to officers
retired        6
Merging some with Provincial Police     6
Deputy  Inspectors,   Vancouver,   reporting  on
enforcement of law    11
Kamloops, reporting on enforcement of law 11
Fernie, reporting on enforcement of law... 11
Fort  George, reporting  on  enforcement  of
law ;  11
Ducks, general report   17
Doves, protected        7
Page.
Dunning, offer of more red deer   18
Elk Lake created bird sanctuary  6
Expenditure, statement to December 31st, 1918 8
Comparative statement  8
Elk River Game Reserve, reports re wapiti.. 15
Violations of the Act   15
Eastern District, boundary of  15
Farmers, re damage to crops   5
Amending free licence  7
Firearms licence, introduction of, iu 1913.... 5
Fur-farming, firms reporting closing up business   19
Statement of farms in operation  19
Fur trade, general report    18
Game Department, commencement of  5
Game Conservation Board, creation of  7
Duties  7
Goat, bag limit    7
Fee for killing, by non-residents  . .  7
Geese, general report   16
Grouse, general report    17
Hewitt, Dr. G. C, re predatory animals in
(British Columbia   13
Horst Farm, lease expired and pheasants
transferred        6
Indians, reported by Chairman as damaging
game in East  Kootenay  and on  Fraser
River     16
(Chilcotins)  killing deer    16
General report     18
Licences, statement of licences issued to nonresidents      9
Statement of licences issued to residents...    9
" Migratory Birds Convention Act," establishment of zones     5
Difficulty of setting open season  16
Moose, reduction of hag limit  7
Fee for killing, by non-residents  7
^Reported infected by pneumonia    15
General report   15
Mule-deer, fee for killing, by non-residents. ... 7
Malahat District, two hunters lost  15
Non-residents, amending big-game licence ....    7
Amending angler's licence       7
Licence   fees   under   subsec.    (e),   sec.   24,
obtained    18
Northern District, boundary of 15
Noxious animals, bounties payable   13
Open seasons, meeting open to public   14
Recommendations   forwarded  to   Executive
Council   14
Seasons fixed for 1918-19     14
Opening dates on " Saturday "   15 S 22
British Columbia.
1919
Page.
Owls  (big-horned and snowy), bounties payable in certain districts    13
Partridges   (European), general report     18
Pheasants,  farm  started at Wilkinson  Road
Lock-up       6
Open season for hen pheasants   17
Open season for cocks in South Okanagan..  18
Pigeons protected        7
Quail, general report   ...-   17
Revenue in early years of Department  5
Comparative statement  7
Table of non-resident licence fees  9
Table of resident licence fees  9
Red deer, release of herd   18
General report   18
Robins protected    7
Superintendent   of  Provincial   Police  created
Provincial Game Warden     5
Page.
Sheep, reduction in bag limit  7
Fee for killing, by non-residents  7
Protected south of G.T.P. Railway  15
General report   16
Special constables, employment of, during open
season  10
Telegraph Creek, stricter enforcement of game
laws     10
Visited by Acting Chief Game Inspector. ..  10
Thrushes protected       7
Trappers, returns of fur trapped   19
Wapiti, bag limit  7
Fee for killing, by non-residents  7
'Claims paid for damage to crops  15
At Elk River Game Reserve   15
'Request for open season refused    15
General report    15
Willow-grouse,  close season in Western District    15
General report    17
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty,
1919.

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