BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Western Call Feb 21, 1913

Item Metadata

Download

Media
xwestcall-1.0188551.pdf
Metadata
JSON: xwestcall-1.0188551.json
JSON-LD: xwestcall-1.0188551-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): xwestcall-1.0188551-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: xwestcall-1.0188551-rdf.json
Turtle: xwestcall-1.0188551-turtle.txt
N-Triples: xwestcall-1.0188551-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: xwestcall-1.0188551-source.json
Full Text
xwestcall-1.0188551-fulltext.txt
Citation
xwestcall-1.0188551.ris

Full Text

 ^S^S^a^i^s*^^ i:  v&m.  r<''>v'-;-C*:.-'.'\*y***J:L.r':' 1 A  l^a-Vvo  AtiyyAy  IV. ..v  bbiw-T  :W7v7',^''-;'7:.7't'"7'VSi'-i'fl ���������''^ii.x 7-7-7  Publish ei in the Interests of Vancouver and the Western People  VOLUME TV  :.V7  NOTEHROMOHM  ~        By Arthur B. Ford.  Parliament had its first sensation of the Bession  on Friday, when Col. Hugh Hector McLean, Liberal member for Sunbury-Queen's,and one of the  opposition lieutenants from New Brunswick bolted  his party on the naval question and came out  strongly for the Borden naval proposals. He also  pleaded that the question be taken out of politics,  that tiie vote for three Dreadnoughts be passed,  and that a parliamentary committee to be known  as the Canadian Defence Committee should be  appointed to visit England and outline a permanent policy. No speech on the Conservative  side during the course of the debate was as strong  a presentation of the arguments in favor of the  Borden proposals as Col. McLean's. Following  his speech and an announcement earlier in the  day that the government intended to fight the  bill through to a finish, came the hews that the  Liberals for the time being at least had agreed to  drop their obstruction to the bill and would agree  to a vote next Thursday. While the Liberals may  yet hold up the bill on second or third reading or  in the committee stage, the present outlook is that  the Liberal opposition has collapsed. Col. McLean,  the leader of the bolt is an ardent Imperialist, was  commander of the last Canadian contingent and  has a son in the imperial army.  Col. McLean's declaration in regard to having  the question taken out of politics is well worth  repeating.  "I am strongly in favor of the settlement of this  great question," said Col. McLean. "Let us no  longer make a football of our Canadian naval service or of the question of imperial assistance. In  England all matters connected or affecting the  navy and army are settled by the two great parties  in a fair, amicable spirit. Let us forgive and  forget the past and start square. Let both parties  unite in creating an effective Canadian naval service and unite now in building three of the best  fighting ships that can be built and loan them to  the British admiralty.  4<Carry out the Government's resolution," he  declared, "and adopt the recommendation of the  board of admiralty by building 'the largest and  strongest ships of war that science can build or  money supply.' Let us agree to make the number  three. Let a special Parliamentary committee be  appointed to be known as the Canadian Defence  committee. Let them take up and consider the  details of a permanent Canadian naval service and  our contribution to imperial defence.  "This Committee would require the advice and  assistance of the best admiralty experts. They  should bave power to sit during the Parliamentary  recess and should visit England bo as to obtain at  first hand the best and most reliable information.  A report could be submitted st the next session  of Parliament and, both parties being united as  to the scheme, it could then be submitted to the  people by plebiscite. I want the party leaders  to show themselves in the true white light of public opinion as imperial statement. Let them rise  above the mists of party politics."  On the question of the emergency and the German menace Col. McLean made a particularly  strong case.  '' The argument is made,'' he said,'' that there is  no emergency existing, that Britain is perfectly  able to hold her own against Germany and that she  can build ships fast enough to keep clear of the  danger line. The word 'emergency' is not the one  to use. The question is, what is our dutyf Should  we lie back and let England do all the work of  building up a steel breakwater to protect us from  Germany? In my opinion we should be represented on the firing line with Canadian ships and we  should adopt the advice given by the admiralty  in their memorandum and build three Canadian  war vessels. There is no use of our singing the  swan song snd saying there is no danger. Germany is a warlike nation. Germany will be prepared to take advantage and the Kaiser is acting  on the principle laid down by Frederick the  Great, "Hide as far as possible your plans and  ambitions; secrecy is an indispensable virtue.'  And history shows us that she strikes with secrecy."  When, continued Col. McLean, honorable gentlemen spoke of the peaceful intentions of Germany and said that she was only building vessels  to protect her commerce they seemingly forgot  that thrice in the last four years had Germany  threatened war. In 1905 there was the Casablanca  incident in Morocco when Britain's support enabled France to withstand German threats. Another instance was her support of Austria in the  seizure of the Turkish province ofl Bosnia and  Hertzegovn5a. Twice in 1911 Germany and England were on the verge of war. A British flagship turned her searchlights on German cruisers  close off the coast of Britain. In August of that  year English battleships had out their torpedo  net and had torpedo boats patrolling the fleet. In  September all leave in the navy was stopped. And  now there was the Balkan war with all its poten-  (ConUnuad aa Paga H  ONION MADE  BACHELOR  CIGARS  Ask the man who smokes them.  ���������nf ���������***���������* ***** ���������������������������.��������������������������������� ��������� *'**���������������. *r m ****)*  VANCOUVER E������ra^ *8&  aaaaawaaaaamaaaaaaaaaa~**pL*99  myymmAm^m^������^m  ���������yyy yyyyy AyyyyAxA^yy^^^^  sssssssssssssssssmm 'yHyM  AyAAy^Aym^yJ^i^mAMs^mm  *���������******'*)*>*>���������>*'*>*>*****'*>*>*>****���������**���������****)  >   forward movement she is makihg, we must take  Hon. Gbo. B. Fostcb  Minister of Trade and Commerce  A. B. Basram  President of Board of Trade  m*m  . Geo. E. foster  By Alex  The banquet at the Hotel Vancouver last Saturday night was a brilliant event Hon. Geo.  E. Foster, Minister, of Trade and Commerce, in whose honor it was given by The Vancouver Board  of Trade talked for fifty minutes on several topics to the delight of the one hundred guests, who  were honored with seats at the banquet, and the ladies of the galleries.  Mr. A. R. Erskihe, president of the Board of Trade, occupied the chair. Seated at his right  were Hon; G. E. Foster, C. B. Tisdall, W. H. MStk.a, the Japanese Consnl, M. Yadu, and C. Sweeney; At his left sat Mayor Baxter, Mr. Ralph with, Mr. G. H. Cowan. Mr. H. A. Stone, Mr. Ew-  ing Buchan, Mr. Jonathan Rdgers and Aid. Hep^Mrn.  Among the other gentlemen present were Messrs. W. J. Baird, C. G. Johnson, H. Thompson,  E. S. Morgan, H. Bell-Irving, A. E. Hepburn, Dr. Carl Weias, C. S. Douglas, E. P. Miller, C. B.  Brydone-Jack, C. S. McArthur, G. F Gibson, W. % Arnold, John Nelson, W. H. P. Clubb, V. S.  Meek, A. Shaw, W. A. Macdonald, G. M. Endaeott, A. M. Harper, James Findlay, C. J>. Band, Mayor Gray of New Westminster; Mayor Hanes of North Vancouver, A. H. Alexander, Capt S. CK McKenzie, A. Wallace, H. B. Brenton, E. Odium, rssn Le Yemazaki, J. C. Jones, J. R. Seymour, E-  W. McLean, R. S. Pyke, P. M. Beasley, F..L. Morgan, J. A. Howell, A. B. Clabon, A. H. Wall*-  bridge, Martin Griffin. Dr. Riggs, J. R. Jeaol*H:.^teaJo������, W-.McNeill, & S. Davis, Cat*. JfconL  T. F. Peterson, R. p. Maitland, G. A. Odium, C. W. Veysey, G. A. Campbell, F. Newton, C?% Bus-  combe, W. M. McLacbland, B. A. Con way-Miles G. 8. Telfer, John Hendry, G. E. Trorey, W.  Henderson, W. H* Greenwood, H. HI Watson and others. '  The chairman read letters of regret from-Sir Charles Tupper and Sir Charles Hibbert Tup-  per.  The toast, "Our Guest," was spoken to by Mr Ralph Smith, M.P., with taste and excellent ability in the adaptation of his remarks to the event. He paid a high tribute to Mr. Foster's ability  and his superior fitness for the portfolio of trade and commerce. He pointed out the necessity of  ministers visiting the West and becoming conversant with the remarkable progress going on. In  closing, he made a brief reference to Mr. Foster's mission to Australia, and hoped it would be  crowned with success.  Mayor Baxter,, who substituted Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper, spoke with ease, true eloquence  and a mental poise that can never be acquired but is a natural endowment.  In the course of bis brief but pithy remarks he said:  "Mr. Foster was a Canadian of whom all Canadians might be proud. He was going to negotiate a treaty with our brothers under the Southern Cross, and no city in Canada was more interested in the successful result of the mission than Vancouver. '���������  The event of the evening was the address of Hon. G. E. Foster. From the opening sentence  to the final word interest never abated. It was replete in the things that prove his greatness  and his adaptation to his office and present mission of trust.  Reverting to Vancouver and the province, he said* when he first entered politics he knew  there was a place called British Columbia, but at tbat time British Columbia was as much at the  bach door of the world as it was possible for any country to be. Today British Columbia was at  the very front door of the world. It was a front door and it would always emain a very large  front door. *  The speaker alluded tp the awakening East, with its five hundred millions of people waking  up to modern conditions and modern enterprises. What would be the position in twenty years f  When he came here twenty years ago, the giant British Columbia was lying prone. Today the  young giant of British Columbia wss beginning to stir its limbs, quivering with vitality. What  would happen when this giant was fully awake and all his great opportunities were put into ac*  tion? Today, in the East, they all took off their hats to British Columbia, today one of the  greatest provinces of the Dominion.  Alluding to Home Production he questioned the business sagacity of importing many articles  from our neighbors such as butter, pork, ham, beef, poultry, eggs, etc. Where, he asked, could  they get better feed than the Western Prairies? There was truth in the problem of over importation and under production. Its remedy would bring both capital and labor. He gave great  emphasis to the following remarks, that should be pondered in this city and province:  The one main thing to be striven after -iras production. Distributors were valuable in their  way, but they never made a blade of grass grow. Real estate men he also referred to who also  did nothing in the way of actual production. Docks and wharves were splendid, but it was necessary to have something to fill them with.  . In British Columbia they should get every agricultural settler they could and place them on  what agricultural lands they had. The results oi mining and of lumbering, left assets so much  the less. They must keep in mind that they were drawing out of a great bank and that some day  they would have to pay back what they had taken out.  Mr. A, R. Erskine, president of the Board of Trade, added much to the success and enjoyment of the occasion in which he demonstrated his fitness for the r*ositi<--n  After a vote of thanks proposed by Mr. G. H. Cowan, and the singing of the National Anthem,  the banquet broke up.  As a guest and eye witness we record our observations and our appreciation of the kind invitation from the Board of Trade.   Yes, The Western Call enjoyed the event.  A GREAT STATESMAN���������AN IMPERIALIST  (Prof. E. Odium, M.A., B.Sc.)  At the Canadian Club he was the man, the  Canadian and a Christian of a peerless type. Here  he won the highest possible euloginms, and gave  all who heard him a splendid treat, and a solid  subject for long years of study and application  to the affairs of daily life.  At the Dominion Hall, where he addressed  the Conservatives, their friends and a sprinkling  of good Liberals, he showed himself to be a keen  politician, a clever diplomat, and an able statesman. His thought, language and plan of analysis, synthesis and reinforced argument, as applied  to the history of the past in Canadian political  The three addresses given by the Hon. George  E. Foster, Minister of Trade and Commerce, while  he was a visitor at Vancouver, on his way to  Australia, proved him to be a statesman of the  highest rank, an imperialist of the most pronounced type, and a magnificent man among men.  At the banquet he was a man of observation,  and a heart to heart talker. No one would suspect him to be a politician while he spoke to the  large group of interested business and professional banqueters. He left politics for "a more  convenient season" as one of old. And all were  delighted with him.  . ������,.. .libs  7-7' ���������;.. ,.y (By Professor E. Odium. atk.% Bi|9e^7|gp|g5������||  ���������;': ji is; :*Mit.'#ti\:^  'making gigantic strides along the lines of mt^  'national trade ahd'eon^  the land, water, forest, mine aM skilled Ul-^^  are making headway, among ;thelH^  ing and trading nations.   While we\are^pleSa|(IJ^?7liiS  at the most .wonderful and -steadily /meiressliil^jfW^  x yygiyy$'M.  $m$  a look-m at her annual balance, and see if she  has done as well as shexxu^.yy-:y':-yyAAxyy:y  Let us look at the foUowing figiires of a  nations of the Empire.   I shall give the trade, ���������  eluding imports snd exports -for eleven 'n������d������^i,^:^v������^^  of last ���������year, -1912. ;:The 'December ��������� totals1: sJrs:iioi^:^Si  to hand.  I quote in pounds gUi^ag4>[.l:'--''^^A^  y.yxx.!frMyy%m  Il^fill  Imports.     7E������^rtifc  mwm  ���������r���������.. ....���������.^^^.yy^mm.  Great Britain ......:...........506,983,000 402,617,000 Wtf$mm  British South Africa....... 83,370,000 ;sz^tfftA:ymmM  British India ... "'       "    "  Egypt .............j..  86,886,000   135^90,0(������    ,������ ,^  .21^,000- y2w^'mgii  ���������yy'-i&y  Canada ................���������........107,943,000    53,350,000    ,.>���������--*������*  From the above we must admit that while A* ^  j-tuiu cue aoove we must aamit tnat ���������majL%'-99ai\A'S^^������^M  volume of business done by Canada is very credit- ���������MgWrnSl  able,- still, when we see that her:Tiimptox'tai': iMNi -'::;:.���������^t^S-*^^  double her exports we are forced to conclude the >^W$  balanced: on; the wrong side. And it Is a vW^pwillfti  serious belanoe. It means that for every dollar rsy.W$im������  worth of goods she sends out, she takes in'-two 7 :s;'7^7^77  dollars' worth of goods from other countries. Thlb'"*^  is,, in the end. a business that must prove disastrous. . .;,,^.,,^i^.tt^  ,   If we look at India we ^that^she^exwiiiK^  nearly 50,000,000 pounds sterling worth of'fAW^^fflf  more: than She imports. '7 Therefore she must il0#W-B^lii  gaining-ih^pernisnent'wesllh'^  And .some people' tell us' that Britain ia exploitifla ^1  India to the harm of India and solely���������.^mi!^^^Mf  good of Britain. v        ^^  If we 'look at Egypt we ;find7a similar :**uM^&^$MM  gain, for her -exports w:;g!ieater^  w������rttV7 And Britain is Said to - ii^������^:a������*MffiliiSlld  Egypt, too.  Btwh\ exploitation '  ---^*-^  to both Egypt and India.  And even South Africa, too, is going  the trade balance to her advantage.  Tbis^  other country said to be under the curse  Briton..  It does seem that the  4e a el������%r hleeKWff.  And aoTit "  ago to Abraham and his seed.  Now ,whst about Canada t Canada who delights  to be her own mistress f She, the young North  American giantess, is a growing, proud and poshing lady. But the trade balances are afainst h*.  And from my knowledge of the great nations*  whose trade figures J have not given above, I venture to affirm that Canada has the worse showing, so far as balances go, of the entire list. How  comes this about f How are we going to mend the  matter?  In another letter I shall try to indicate one or  more of the chief causes. In the meantime I suggest thst those who read this comment will do  well to consider snd try to discover a workable  solution.  k- it vs-;?-! ~yA->'#AM  life; the momentous present, snd the rapidly ex-  ������ ending future, captivated and held spellbound  is immense audience.  When he finished his address of an hour and  three quarters, bis audience concluded thst in  tbe hands and heads of such men as the Hon.  George E. Foster Canada is safe, and Canada will  do her duty before God and nations in relation  to the whole Empire, and therefore to mankind.  His three talks were a sort of a national and imperial REVIVAL. He is a true missioner. He  has gone on his wsy to the land of the "Southern  Cross," and we wish him Godspeed.  BAPCO PURE PAINT  Is manufactured in a factory where  every ingredient is carefully tested by  an expert chemist Every can of Bap-  co Pure Paint is guaranteed to give  satisfaction.   Ce������e ia as! cet a color card.  "STAROID"  <Be������1st������rcd Trsde-Mark)  ASPHALT ROOFING  Nails and cement packed in each roll.  Our Stoves are guaranteed  W. R. OWEN  2337 Main Street Phone: Fairmont 447 ^v  THE WESTERN CALL.  Friday, February 21,1913  ��������� tr  1   }i  yH  m  w  J!  i i,  Sub-Agency for the J  Columbia   Graphophone  Prices from $7.50 to $350.       Latest records in  great variety.  Of course you know without using"; time or  space   to   explain,. that   we   lead  where others follow  In Stationery, Toys, Books, Magazines,  Papers, Confectionery, etc.  1130 Commercial Drive  J.W. EDMONDS, Prop.  Higfcclass Groceries  PROVISIONS, FRUIT, STATIONERY  CONFECTIONERY,  TOBACCOS     '  .  Cakes, Pastry, Bread  Special attention to phone orders  --'���������*��������� ' ��������� ���������  Winnipeg Grocery and Bakery  O. E. Jones, Prop.  Corner Harris and Campbell Ave.  Phone Highland 102 Branch Post Off ice  .Z-  M Watches Clocks  Jewelry and Optical Goods  A.   WISMER  Jeweler *% Opt Men  Repairinga Specialty 1433 Commercial Drive  This scientific paving composition combines  in the greatest Qegree the qualities of  i^w-s^jftoiun^ss, hbsw-PNCY or  Bitulithic Paving on Marine Prive  COUJHBIA BITUUTHIC, HP.  WW toyiw 7129,7130 717 Dominion Trott BUfl.  Why send your son to occupation not congenial to him ?  Have you observed his God given talent for his  Life's course? Buy him a  TECHNICAL  .    BOOK  We supply issues to help men spiritually and temporaly.  CHRISTIAN LITERATURE DEPOT LTD.  1175 Oranvllle Street  BUPPALO GROCERY  Commercial Drive and 14th Ave.  "The Home of Quality"  Business comes our way because we keep what  the people need and charge moderately.  Groceries,  Provisions, Fruits  Only the best brands kept in stock.  Our goods are all guaranteed and money refunded if  not satisfactory.  J.P.Sinclair, Prop.   KOMl FairiDOElt 1033  ���������f��������� t' ���������!��������� ���������!��������� ���������!' '!��������� ������������������������ !��������� ���������!��������� -t-t' ������������������������ ���������!��������� ������������������������ 'I-t. .������**>������g ���������!��������� .> ������������������������ ���������!��������� !������������������������������ S '1 't '1' 'I- 'ft '!���������'I '!���������'������'1' # ���������������!"��������� t- '!��������� ��������� '!��������� ���������> ���������!��������������� # ��������� ���������������  THE SECRET  OF PAUL FARLEY  BY JOHN MARCH  ::  .**********M'******************4**4'********4<********4f+  T'l aay. Mrs: Radler?' tie said to the  buxom landlady tbey encountered ln  the- sanded passage.# "juat bring a  brandy and soda, and a bowl ot warm  water; thia gentleman has met with  an accident."  "Why. it's Mr. Farley!" she cried in  surprise. "Oh, my. Well I won't be  a minute, air."  Paul   aat down on' the horsehair  couch feeling sick and g|ddy.   Squire'  Fleming turned up the light and set  the lamp on the edge ot the table near  the sofa.  "By Jove! That's an ugly cut," he  aald, removing the hand pressed over  the wounded eye. "That scoundrel's  knuckle must be made of flint to lay  a cheek open ln that manner. No,  don't touch it, bathe it gently with the  warm water."  "Thank you," he continued, relieving the landlady of a basin and towel.  "Now, Mra. Radley, if ycu could oblige  me with an old soft handkerchief, Instead of this huckaback towel, a small  piece of lint, and some plaster, I  shouldn't need to give you further  trouble."  "Nb trouble at all, sir," she said,  briskly. "I have some lint left of the  piece you gave my husband when he  cut hia wrist a week or two since, and  plaster, too."  ��������� "Capital!   We are in luck's way."  "You are Sir Thomas Hargrave's  secretary, I take it," the Squire resumed, uncorking the soda water.  "My sister Is dining at the Hall this  evening."  "I had the pleasure of sitting next  to her at dinner," Paul answered, rousing himself with an effort.  "Oh, Mrs. Radler," the Squire exclaimed apologetically, as the good  creature again appeared. "I am  afraid I shall run you off your legs,  but I really must have a pair of sharp  scissors."  "I've brought a pair, sir," she said  with a breathless laugh, "I knew you'd  want them for the plaster."  "You're a treasure, Mra. Radler! 1  suppose a leash of partridges won't  come amiss?"  Mrs. Radler vanished smiling and  curtseying.  "Dry that gently, Mr. iFarley," ie  aald, placing the brandy and soda at  the young man's elbow, and catching  his wrist ln a firm clasp as he spoke.  Paul looked up at tbe sunburnt face  bending over him. He noted tbe  square Jaw, and the bronze moustache and the keen, steady eyes now  smiling kindly Into bis. He saw, too.  tbat the broad forehead was,,blue*  veined and almost white, where tba  bat had protected snd sheltered it  from the summer's sun. The man'*  whole personality expressed powerful  energy of mind, a welding together ot  severity and tenderness, and an open  honest fearlessness, bred and fostered,  perchance by the simplicity of bis pastoral life.  "Why, you are as tremulous as tbe  leaves of a tree," be said, with some  concern, "drink that stuff and let ma  filaster the wound, and you'll begin to  eel yourself again."  "I ought to be extremely grateful to  you, Mr. Fleming," the patient said,  with quivering lipt. taking another  glance at tbe face, which began to  have a strange fascination for him.  "Why, tor not leaving you to Denham to pound to a Jelly?"  "Yea, and for the trouble you are  taking now."  "Virtue brings Its own reward, Mr.  Farley, and one handsome brown eye  has amply rewarded me, I assure you.  I am congratulating myself upon not  being a 'weak woman,' otherwise that  wanton orb might entangle itself in  the mechanism of my heart and cause,  a deal of mischief. Keep still.. Don't  move for an instant, and I shall have  fixed you up very presentably. There!  Now lie down while I go and see what  has become of my trap."  Aa tht door cloaed upon the Squire's  stalwart form Paul lifted tbe lamp and  walked unsteadily to the old-fashioned  mirror. The left cheek Immediately  below tbe eye waa neatly strapped  wltb fine strips of pale yenow plaster.  The eyelid waa swollen and discolored,  and an unbecoming pufflness thickened ona side of tbe nose. He set tha  lamp back on the table,, and finished  his brandy, and felt in his waistcoat  pocket for bis eye-glasses. Coming  along, tbe humid atmosphere had  blurred the glass, and he remembered  taking them off and slipping them ln  along with his. watch, a fortunate  circumstance when seen ln the light of  after events. He waa endeavoring to  replace them, trying to find a spot  where they would sit with the least  discomfort, and to fix the rlma accordingly, when the Squire returned.  "How do you feel now, Mr. Farley?"  he asked, drawing on hla doeskin  gloves.  "I feel quite equal to the walk  back," he said, Stroking his inflamed  noBe.  "Nonsense, I am going to drive  you." /  "Don't wear theme glasses for a day  or so," he said, as they went out together and climbed into the dogcart,  "they might worry and set up an irritation. Better let the swelling subside with first intentions. Now, my  girl," he added, shaking the reins,  "take us to Weyberne Hall like a  lady."  ��������� north-west wind had awept the  sky clear. A great golden moon hung  above the plantation trees, and little  gusts of wind sighed and murmured  among the firs as the dogcart bowled  through the -town and out along the  moist brown road.  "How long have you been at Wey  berne Hall?" the Squire asked, as the  mare sobered down into an easy regular motion.  "Five weeks. I wonder Ihaye not  met you or Miss Fleming before.'  "We've been away for a couple ol  months.   It waa like this.   My sister  haa been at school near Brussels. She  came home this July, and I met her at  Harwich, with the idea of giving her a  taste of gaiety before she settled down  to prosy housekeeping duties. However, we lound London rather dull.  All the fashionable folk seemed.to  have flown, so I said to my sister one  night at table d'hote, 'Agnes, to-morrow we'll dine ln Paris.' Well, from  Paris we went to the Riviera, Monte.  Carlo, and Beveral other places, and  have only Juat arrived home."  "Mlas Fleming is going to keep  house for you?"  "Yes. It's been pretty lonesome for  me waiting for Agnes to grow up.  Now, however, I hope to have some  life and merriment about the old  Manor."  "I presume Miss Fleming Is several  years your Junior?",  "Fifteen. Agnes is my half-sister.  Have you been there, Mr. Farley?"  he asked, pointing with bis whip to an  oblong grey stone .house neBtllng  among a clump of trees.  "It's the Larches?"  "Yes, the ornate home of the Widow  Wycherly."  "She has a beautiful face, has she  not, Sir?"  "Very; it's a beautiful mask to a  hideous soul."  "You don't like her."  "I don't know of anything ln her to  like.   I admire her gowns, though."  "What is wrong with her boy? Tom  Hargrave told me he had fits, aad was  sent away for medical treatment."  "Poor little Guy! Some of the  more Imaginative folk about tha village say he Is under lock and key at  The Larches. That the little fellow  Is an Inmate of a private lunatic asylum is the more feasible and generally accredited version of bis disappearance." ���������  "Wbat caused the brain trouble?"  "Friguc, whether excited intentionally or not I must leave."  "How?    By whom?"  "His mctner."  "Oh, Mr. Fleming! Do you think a  lovely, childlBh, shrinking little woman like Mrs. Wycherly could be  capable of such superhuman vile-  ness?"  "What I know and have seen of tbe  woman I dislike immensely; therefore,  pernapa, I judge her harshly. However, I'll give you my experience, and  you can form your own opinion.  "My old housekeeper's nelce, Rose  Pilgrim, was tbe child's nursemaid.  She used to bring the boy to my place  two or three.times a week to. have  tea wltb ber aunt. I gradually slid  tbe habit of ringing the bell for tbe  child to be brought to me in the parlor. He was a quaint, charming little  chap, with bis mother's great hazel  eyes and apple-blossom complexion*  After a while I discovered that Rose  came alone and my little friend's  visits bad entirely ceased. One evening I went into the kitchen and questioned her. She said the child was  constantly being punished for the  most trivial offences, and was always,  more or less, crying and' miserable.  I promised the first evening I bad I  would call at The Larches and endeavor to persuade Mrs. Wycherly to let  him spend a day with me now and  again. HarveBt was in full swing, and  I forgot Guy's troubles, but one night  I bad occasion to ride Into East Weyberne, and as I was pasting The  Larches I thought of the child. I  turned in at the white gate, rode up  to the bouse, gave my horse to a  stable lad who was hanging about, and  rang the bell. Rose pilgrim answered  It, and when she saw me she came  out and pulled the door to behind her.  "'Mr. Fleming,' she said, laying an  impressive hand on my arm, 'that woman either Intends to murder or craze  tbe child. He is locked in a closet  under the stairs and is shrieking himself mad.'  " 'Have you tbe key, or do yon know-  where tt is?' I aaked.  "She shook her head.  " 'What kind of a door Is lt? Easy  to open?'  Shfe nodded. ���������-  " 'Come along and ahow me tht way,  then,' I aald.  "'But the mistress! She'll hear  yoo.' "      ���������      '  "'No matter at all; she can't prevent me, and tbe rest does not signify.'  "'Sir,' she whispered, looking cautiously around; 'it's better the poor  child should lose hla reason than any  barm come to you���������and Mlas Agnes  coming home!'  . "'What could happen! What is It,  Rose,' I demanded, as I saw the girl's  face whiten.  " 'She carries firearms,' ahe whispered, 'and lt thwarted she would not  scruple to use them.'  " 'Come, Rose, lead the way,' I said,  twisting the leather thong round my  whip handle.  "We went softly up the stairs together. Rose stopped at a door under  the second flight of stairs and bent  to listen at the keyhole.  "'He's very quiet now,' she said, a  great fear dawning ln her eyes.  "I threw my whip on tbt floor and  made a terrific lunge at the door.  The slight framework gave way with  a crash. The interior was dark, and  before I could fully realize that the  place was empty I received an awful  blow en the side, of my head and face,  accompanied by a scream of terror  from Rose. For a few minutes 1  leaned against the wall partially stunned, and then turned to find Mrs.  Wycherly facing me, my whip In hei  hand.  " 'Mr. Fleming,' she exclaimed, dropping the whip and holding out her  little jewelled hands, 'pray forgive  me; I had no idea I was assailing a  friend and neighbor. I heard stealthy  steps and low voiceB, and although  half dead with fright I followed, determined to make an effort, howevei  fuii*9i. tp JLrotectmj- fcousehold^goods.'  "���������But the 0oyrvi saw, oewnaerefl,  my head" darting and shooting with  pain 'I thought he was in this close!  and crying'to be let out'  "'My boy!   Why Guy Is asleep is  Ua brass crib. I hope you have not  been drinking, Mr. Fleming?' and the  look of rage and malevolence she  turned on Rose decided me to take  the girl back to her aunt that night  "T humbly apologize,' I said, recovering my hat and whip, 'I came to do  you a service, Mrs. Wycherly, but I  am afraid I have only annoyed and  frightened you.'  "'Never mind,' ahe aald, smiling a  sweet, naive smile, 1 belabored. you,  ao we are quits, and can afford to bury  the hatchet between ua.'"    '  "How did Rose come to make such  an egregious mistake?" Paul1 asked.  "There was no mistake, Mr. Farley;  the child was there up to the time she  heard and recognised my mare. She  also heard the ball and watched Rose  come out to me and close the door.  She drew conclusions and acted swiftly. She had wit enough also to perceive that I was not taken in by the  ruse, and loves me accordingly."  "Do you think there waa ever a  period during ber widowhood when  she contemplated becoming Mrs.  Fleming?' *  A spontaneous hearty laugh   rang  through the dusky stillness, awaken- [  Ins the game in the adjoining wood.  (To be Continued)  Mrs. Hibrow���������Don't you find the  Stone Age interesting?  Mrs. Lobrow���������Yea, indeed! Willie's  just that age now; but it's awfully  hard on the windows!���������Brooklyn Life.  thing trom  5C  to  999c  A most  varied stock of  every-day  x      wants  999C Stores  1150 Commercial Drive  The Queen Tea Rooms  618 Oranvllle Street  Luncheon and Afternoon  Teas a Specialty  r  All Silk Ties and  Stylish New Gloves  For Careful Dressers  First the ties.      They are the best silk wove ties you  could buy at anywhere near this price.    They're fashionable and come in clear colors and in two color effects.;  Shades include silver gray, Copenhagen; cardinal, irown,  myrtle, etc.  The entire line at 75 cents.*  *���������������  *���������.''���������'  Gloves are 2* button kids of best make with absolutely  unbreakable stitchings and fully guaranteed.     Come in  fashionable shades of gray, tan, brown, beaver, white  and black.  $1.00 the pair.  An Umbrella Bargain  Ladies' gloria silk umbrellas, engraved wood and  'metal handles, very stylish, very serviceable. They run  from $lto $2 and are selling fast st that.  -   -  All these lines, with many more new arrivals, will be  on display in our windows.  "%  Ohio Blouse Oo*  v  723 Georgia St.  Opp. Hotel Vancouver  J  Bicycles  Try the fWaQC'WtfWe  A medium priced wheel of excellent  quality, made by one of the best  English  factorial and  fully guaranteed.  1. s. |. un Raagt-WMtwinb Bicycles mi Ii  stack.  TISPAU8 UMITCO  919*990 Hatting* 9ti*oat, Hmat Yanoomvor, 9* O*  SOWING HIS WILD OATS  REAPING A HARVEST OF SORROW  Row many young men  can look back oo their  early life and regret their  misdeeds. "Sowing their  wild oats'' in various waya.  Excesses, violation of nature's laws, "wine, women  and song"���������-all have their  victims. Ylou have re*  formed but what about the  ���������eed you have sown���������what  about the harvest? Don't  trust to luck. If you are  at present within the  clutches of any secret habit  which is flapping your life  by degrees; if you are suffering from the results of  Eist indiscretions; if your  ood has been tainted from  any private disease and yon  dare not marry; il you are married and live in dread of symptoms breaking  out and exposing your post; if yon are suffering as the result of a misspent  life-DRS. K. *% K. ARE YOUR REFUGE, hey your case before  them confidentially and they will tell you honestly if you are curable.  YOU CAN PAY WHEN CURED  Wa Tnat and Cure VARICOSE VEINS,. NERVOUS DEBILITY,  BLOOD and URINARY COMPLAINTS, KIDNEY and BLADDER Db*  ���������sea aad all Pii���������tee Peculiar to Men.  CONSULTATION FREE. Books Fra* <* Diaooaoa ef Mea. tf noble to call. writs  te������Qo-MUoaBlukfbr BOMB  TREATMENT.  DrsKENNEDY&KENNEDY  Cor. Michigan Ave. and Griswold St, Detroit, Mich.  'NOTICE   All letters from Canada must be addressed to our  aaaeaaaaa Canadian Correspondence Department in Windsor,  Ont. If you desire to. see us -personally call at our Medical Institute in  Detroit as -we see and treat no patiaaU in pur Windsor offices which are  used for correspondence and Laboratory for Canadian business only.  Address all letters as follows:  DRS. KENNEDY & KENNEDY, Windsor, Oat  Write for onr private address. \y  Friday, February 21.1M3  TOB WESTERN CALL  <>yr.ry^Wi  V* V **P������J!  Agreement Betw'n  C. N. R. and City;  Now Before  BTXAW HO.  A Bylaw to ratify a certain Agreement between the City of Vancouver,  and the Canadian Northern Pacific Railway Company and the Canadian Northern Railway Company, dated the 5th day  of February, 1913.  WHEREAS THE City of Vancouver  proposes to enter Into an agreement  with the Canadian Northern Pacific  Railway Company and the Canadian  Northern Pacific Railway Company and  the Canadian Northern Railway Company bearing date of the 5th day of  February, 1913, which agreement and  the plan therein referred to are set out  In the schedule to thin Bylaw;       '  ANO WHEREAS it is provided by the  said agreement and by the provisions  ���������of the Vancouver Incorporation Act 1900  and amending Acts that such agreement  and the conveyances and other Instruments to be made thereunder shall take  effect after a Bylaw approving of the  same has been submitted to, voted upon  and received the assent of the Electors  of the City of/ Vancouver in conformity  with and in manner provided by the requirements of the said Acta in respect  to Bylaws for contracting debts;  THE MAYOR AND COUNCIL of the  City of Vancouver in open meeting assembled enact as follows :  1. The said proposed agreement between the City of Vancouver and the  Canadian Northern Pacific Railway Company and the Canadian Northern Railway Company Bet out in the schedule  hereto is hereby confirmed and declared  to be valid and binding upon the City  of Vancouver.  2. It shall and may be lawful for  the Mayor and Clerk, of the City of  Vancouver and they are hereby directed  for and on behalf of the City of Vancouver to execute and affix the corporate  seal of the City of Vancouver to the  said agreement'and all such grants,  deeds, quit-claims, conveyances, leases  or other instruments or documents as  shall be necessary or requisite for the  purpose of fulfilling and carrying into  effect the said agreement.  3. This Bylaw shall, before the final  passing hereof, be submitted to, voted  upon and receive the assent of the Electors of the City of Vancouver under, in  conformity with, and in manner provided by the provisions bf the Vancouver  Incorporation Act 1900 and amendments  in respect of Bylaws for contracting  debts. s  4. This Bylaw, if passed, shall come  into force and tafee effect from the date  of the final passing hereof.  Received; the assent of the Electors  this J.~day of.:.....���������......A.D., 1913.  DONE     A*JT>    PASSED     IN     OPEN  COUNCIL, this .....day of   A.D.,  1913.  Mayor.  City Clerk.  'Schedule to the Bylaw hereto annexed.  ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT made  tliis fifth day of February in the year  of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred  and thirteen: .._������������������.,_,.  BETWEEN  THE CITY OF VANCOUVER (hereinafter called "the City.") OF THE FIRST  PART AND THE CANADIAN NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY  (hereinafter called "the Railway Company.") OF THE SECOND PART, AND  THE CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY OF THE THIRD PART  " WHEREAS the City has obtained  grants from the Crown in right of the  Dominion of jBanada and of the Province  of British Columbia to the bed of, False  Creek lying east of Westminster Avenue (now Main Street) In the City..0'  Vancouver, ln the Province of British  Columbia;  AND WHEREAS the City has, pursuant to certain agreements which are designated an "Agreement A" and "Agreement B" in the schedule of the False  Creek Confirmatory Act,  (being Chapter  65 of the Statutes of British Columbia  for the year 1911), transferred toi the  Vancouver, Victoria and Eastern Railway and Navigation Company the por-  -- tions of the bed of False Creek lying east  of Westminster Avenue (now Main  Street) set out in said agreement;  AND WHEREAS the title of the City  Under said grant from the Crown in  right of the Province of British Columbia to the remainder of the bed of False  Creek east of Westminster Avenue (now  Main Street) is subject to certain restrictions contained fir said grant, upon  the City's right to alienate the same.  AND WHEREAS the Railway Company la desirous of establishing in the  City of Vancouver the permanent western headquarters and permanent terminals (both passenger and freight) of  the transcontinental line of the Canadian Northern Railway System (including the line of the Railway Company) and  of the trans-Pacific steamship line to be  established, as in this" agreement provided, and in connection therewith has  agreed with the City to expend large  Bums of money as hereinafter set out;  AND WHEREAS the City is desirous  that the said remainder of the bed or  False Creek should be filled In ana  reclaimed from the sea and used  for the purposes hereinafter set out on  the terms and conditions hereinafter defined, and is also desirous of acquiring  the property and rights authorized to  be purchased and taken by the False  Creek  Reclamation  Act   (being Chapter  66 of the Acts of tbe Legislature of  the Province of British Columbia for  the year 1911) and for the purposes of  carrying out the matters aforesaid the  parties hereto have agreed in the manner hereinafter set out;  AND WHEREAS by the said False  Creek Reclamation Act the City was authorized to purchase or take certain  property, riparian, littoral and other  rights and interests as therein set out,  the same to be held for certain purposes  therein stated, and subject to the restrictions therein contained, which restrictions the parties hereto are desirous of  having removed, so to enable the City  to deal with the property, riparian, littoral and other rights and interests  aforesaid   in   the   manner    hereinafter  NOW THEREFORE THIS AGREEMENT WITNESSETH that in consideration of the premises and the sum of  one dollar ($1.00) of lawful money of  Canada by each of the parties hereto  paid to the other (the receipt whereof is  hereby mutually acknowledged) and *bf  the mutual covenants and agreements  hereinafter contained, the parties hereto have agreed as follows: .-  Xeaialattoii. 1-   The parties hereto shall,  t" without delay, apply to the  Legislature of the Province. of British  Columbia for an Act ratifying and confirming this agreement, and authorizing  and empowering the parties hereto to  carry the same Into effect.  Consent 2. The parties hereto shall  Governor- Join in forthwith applying,  General at the expense of the Rail-  in Council way Company, for the approval by the Governor-  General in Council of Canada, in so far  as necessary, of the works in the bed or  False Creek as hereinafter defined, hereby proposed to be done. If for any reason it should be impossible to obtain  such necessary approval, and the Railway Company be thereby prevented from  filling In the bed of False Creek as  agreed, this agreement shall become  null and void, except that the Railway  Companv shall continue liable to repay  to the City any cost and expense which  the City may .then have incurred, and  which, under the terms hereof, are payable bv the Railway Company to the  City.  Expropriation   3.   Tbe City  shall- upon  the passing   of  the  Act  referred to in Article  1,  and upon  thei  N  U  e  a.  3  a  \.  - : - -    i<, WJK&  .,,.-.,--v- -..-*��������� yxy-.���������-.-���������,}���������,y&{x*\y?rl'A;&j&&&$jm  yAmxyAmttMmmm  myym^ymmmm^M  ���������������������������'. ������������������ -.-  V-i-y   '��������� y- ������������������ryyf^pxfifxs&m^SM  ml  vil'--yXtX;.XirW,.X.������St!������&  ���������!������������������ -; .y-y sjsfea-ii  yyyy$x:mm  '  AyyAimmm  x-jyyJAm>~  ':JAA:&4&&������"  y '������������������y^AAyy^^M^m  ���������   ��������� .-��������� ������������������....    yfy&Wfyyqwggmm  ���������'V-:7^7=:#ff;$iP^^  .- y ��������� ��������� '���������������������������y-'vyyy^f^Mm  .: 7.7- yy'y:yyyy&&^mm  ta  Wl <��������������������������� - -  it In.   Aw, *>"*������ ���������*">'**'  **eOwit .������n..ii **.!*������������ to  ���������yy. 'yy'A'^^yM^m  ������������������>'" ��������� 7 -..���������"��������� yy\yyyy^^&^m  ���������'.Xy .' ��������� ���������.'���������;;777$!"&7^^5ji������|jjp  ���������77 -.ry. xi>''yyyyypyyBiy������$0m  aa- x '������������������;��������������������������� yy yyy^ArAyyy^sM  yyyy. '������������������������������������������������������ yx-yyy^yy?yy!0yMM  y ��������� ���������'������������������ yy^ykAAPxy%^%!!i  Axx:Ayy,:y^$0^$y0^M  "���������'���������' :yyytyiy^AAAA^$M  approval referred to in Article 2 being  obtained, purchase and take, at the expense of the Railway Company, pursuant to the said False Creek Reclamation  Act, and any other powers it in that behalf thereto enabling Lots Forty-six (46)  to Fifty-one (51) inclusive, In Block  Twenty-five (25) according to Subdivision of District Lot One Hundred and  Ninety-six (196) In Group One (1); New  Westminster District and Lots One (1)  to Thirteen (13) inclusive, In Block  Three (3), according to Subdivision of  District Lot Two Hundred "A" (200A)  New Westminster District all ln the City  of Vancouver, and the riparian, littoral  and other rights and interests referred  to in the said.False Creek Reclamation  Act. All offers for the sale to the City  of any portion of the said lands, rights  and interests 'shall be submitted by the  City to the Railway Company. If tho  Railway Company shall consider any  Such price excessive, or if the owner  shall fail to make an offer of sale to  the City, then the price to be paid for  such portion of said lands, rights and Interests shall be determined by arbitration to be conducted pursuant to said  False Creek Reclamation Act. The Railway Company shall pay and provide to  the City, when, and as required, the full  cost and expense of all such lands, rights  and interests, including the cost of obtaining the same as aforesaid. All ot  such lands, rights and interests when  purchased or taken shall remain and be  the property of the City except such portion thereof (if any) as may be included  in or extend into the Railway Property  ao hereinafter defined, which portion  thereof (if any) shall become the property of the Railway Company, such portion of said Lots 11, 12 and 13 in said  Block Three (3) as may be required  for the purpose of continuing the Roadway marked "T>" on plan hereto annexed  (being the area or portion described in  sub-paragraph (D) of Article 4) westerly  at the same width to Main Street to be  held by the City for use as a public  street.  OoaTt-raaet.  4.    The   City   shall,   upon  the passing of the Act re  ferred to in Article 1, and upon the approval referred to in Article 2 being obtained, whether or not the lands, rights  and Interests referred to In Article 3  have then been obtained, purchased or  taken, execute and deliver to the Railway Company a conveyance Of alt Its  right, title and Interest in SOO to tne  following lands and lands covsrtd by  water, that is to say, that portion of the  bed and foreshore of False Creek lving  east of Westminster Avenue (now Main  Street)  in the City of Vancouver, more  fiarticularly known and described as fol-  ows:���������  Commencing at the south-east corner  of Lot Forty-five (46), Block Twenty-  five (25), District Lot One hundred and  ninety-six (196), Group One (1), New  Westminster District, which corner is  one hundred and twelve and seven-  tenths (112.7-10) lineal feet easterly  from the east boundary of Main Street,  formerly Westminster Avenue, measured along the dividing line between Lots  Forty-five (45) and Forty-six (46) In  the said block; thence seventy-five" (76)  degrees thirty-one (31) minutes and  thirteen (13) seconds east of due south  three thousand eight hundred and  seventy-four and fortv-nlne one-hundredths (3874.49-100) lineal feet to a  point, the said point being four hundred  and seventy-six and seventy-three one-  hundredths (470.73-100) lineal feet measured westerly along said course from the  Intersection of the westerly boundary of  Glen Drive, formerly Boundary Avenue,  with mean high water mark of False  Creek; thence along the arc of ten (10)  degree curve, seven hundred and forty-  four and seventy-nine one-hundredths  (744.79-100) lineal feet to a point on a  line parallel to and equl-distant forty  (40) lineal feet from the westerly boundary of Glen Drive, formerly Boundary  Avenue, as extended sixty-six (66) lineal  feet in width from the north shore of  False Creek to Glen Drive on the south  shore, the direction of the radius of said  arc from the initial point being fourteen  '14) degrees twenty-eight (28) minutes  and forty-seven (47) seconds west of due  south, the length of said radius being  five hundred and seventy-three and sixty-nine one-hundredths (673.69-100) lineal feet; thence on the said line, parallel  to and equl-distant forty (40) lineal feet  from the westerly boundary of Glen  Drive, one (1) degree eight (8) minutes  and ten (10) seconds east of due south  five hundred and nine and forty-two one-  hundredth (509.42-100) lineal feet; thence  along the arc of a ten (10) degree curve  one thousand and fifty-seven and five-  tenths (1057.5-10) lineal feet, the direction of the radius of said arc from the  Initial point being eighty-eight (88) degrees fifty-one (51) minutes and fifty  (50) seconds west of due south, and the  length of said radius being five hundred  and seventy-three and sixty-nine one-hundredths (573.69-100) lineal feet; thence  seventy-five (75) degrees thirty-one (31)  minutes and thirteen (13) seconds west  of due north three thousand three hundred and thirtv-four and ninety-one one-  hundredths (3334.91-10OJ lineal feet to a  point on the line between Lots' twentv-  ������wo ("221 and twenty-three 723V *=Unc*-  Three (3>. District Lot Two hundred A  (200A). Group One (l). New Westminster District, produced north-westerly,  which point is two hundred and twenty-  one and five-tenths (221.5-10) lineal feet  north-easterly from the northern bopnd-  and one (1) second west of due north  four hundred.and ninety-five and thirty-six one-hundredths (495.36-100) lineal feet to a point, said point being seventy-five (75) lineal feet distant from  the east boundary of Main Street, formerly Westminster Avenue,' measured  along the dividing line between Lots  Thirteen (13) and Fourteen (14) Block  Three (3), District Lot Two hundred A  (200A). Group One (1), New Westminster District; thence eighty-eight (88)  degrees twenty-three (23) minutes and  twenty-five (26) seconds west of due  north seventy-five (75) lineal feet to intersection with the east boundary of the  said Main Street; thence along the said  east boundary of Main Street one (1>  degree thirty-six (36) minutes and thirty-five (35) seconds east of due north  one hundred and ninety-seven and sixty-  one one-hundredths (197.61-100) llne^i  feet; thence also along the said east  boundary of Main Street nineteen (19)  degrees fifty-four CS4) minutes and thirty-five (35) seconds east of due north  three hundred and ninety-two and forty-  seven one-hundredths (392.47-100) lineal feet; thence also along the said east  boundary of Main. Street one (1) degree  forty-one (41) minutes and ten (10) seconds east of due north nine hundred and  eighty-five and eighty-eight one-hundredths (985.88-100) lineal feet to the  southrwest corner of the aforesaid Lot  Forty-five, C45), Block Twenty-five (25),  District Lot One hundred and- ninety-  six (196), Group One (1). New Westminster District; thence along the aforesaid dividing line between Lots Forty-five  (45) and Forty-six (46) in said Block  Eighty-eight (88) degrees eighteen (18)  minutes and fifty (50) seconds east of  due south one hundred and twelve and  seven-tenths (112.7-10) lineal feet to the  point of commencement, the whole con-,  taining an area of one hundred and  sixty-four and nine-tenths (164.9-10)  acres more or less, excepting therefrom  Lots Forty-six (46) to Fifty-one (51)  inclusive. Block Twenty-five (26), District Lot One hundred and ninety-six  (196), Group One (1), in said district,  and Lots One (1) to Thirteen .(13) inclusive, Block Three (3), Dlstiict Lot  Two hundred A (200A), Group One (1),  In said district, the said lots containing  a total area of eighty-four one-hundredths (84-100) acres more or less, and  same is hereinafter referred to as "the  bed of False Creek), (but this definition  does not apply to Article 18); excepting  thereout the areas or portions following,  that is to say:  (A) (1) An area or portion adjoining  Main Street and lots first mentioned  in Article 3 and bounded on the north  by the southerly boundary of the portions on the north side of False Creek  heretofore transferred to the Vancouver,  Victoria & Eastern Railway & Nov Ration Company, as recited in thi*> agreement, and on the south by the area or  portion in sub-paragraph (B) of this  article described, and containing 3.38  acres more or less, and being more particularly described as follows:���������  Commencing at the south-went corner  of Lot Forty-five (45), Block Twenty-  five (26), District Lot One hundud and  ninety-six (196), Group One (I). New  Westminster District; thence along ihe  east boundary pf Main Street .-ne (1)  degree forty-one (41) minute* and ten  (10) seconds west of due south six hundred and fifteen and thirty-two one-hundredths (SI5.32-100) lineal feet to Intersection with the north boundary of a  roadway one hundred and twenty-five  (126) lineal feet In width; thence along  the said north boundary of sail roadway seventy-five (75) degrees f.,lily-one  (31) minutes and thirteen (11') seconds  east of due south two hundred and fifty-  six and thirty-six one-hundredths (256.-  36-100) lineal feet; thence parallel to  the aforesaid east boundary of Main  Street one (1) degree forty-one (41) minutes and ten (10) seconds east of due  north six hundred and forty and nlnetv-  ont* one-hundredths (841.-HM00) lineal  feet to intersection with the south  boundary of the northern portion of the  property of the Vancouver, Victoria &  Eastern Railway & Navigation Company;  thence along the said south boundaw  of the northern portion of the property  of the aforesaid Vancouver, Victoria &  Eastern Railway & Navigation Company  seventy-five (76) degrees thirty-one (31)  minutes and thirteen (13) seconds west  of due north one hundred and forty and  seventy-nine one-hundredths (140.79-100)  lineal feet to the south-east corner of  the aforesaid Lot Forty-five (46). District Lot One hundred and ninety-six  (196); thence along the said south boundary of Lot Forty-five (45) eighty-eight  (88) degrees eighteen (18) minutes and  fifty (50) seconds west of due north one  hundred and twelve and seven-tenths  (112.7-10) lineal feet to the point of commencement, the "whole containing an  area of three and sixty-four one-hundredths (3.64-100) acres more or less;  excepting therefrom Lots 46 to 51 inclusive. Block 25, D.L. 196, Group 1. New  Westminster District, containing twenty-  six one-hundredths (26-100) of an acre  more or less, being shown colored red  and marked "A" 1 on the plan hereto annexed. The same, except as In Article  36 mentioned, to be retained and used  by the City for park purposes.  (2) An area or portion adjoining  Main Street and the lots last mentioned  in Article 3 and bounded on the north  by the area or portion set out and described in sub-paragraph (B) o" tills  article, and on the south by the area or  arv'of   Front   Street;   thence   sixty-five   portion   set  out   and   described  in   S'ib  (65)   degrees   thirty-nine   (39)   minutes' paragraph   (D)  of this article and con  taining 7.64 acres more or less, and being more particularly described as follows: (,  Commencing- at a point situated on the  east boundary of Main Street, the said  point being one hundred and twelve and  seventy-two one-hundredths (112.72-100)  Hneal feet measured along tiie aald east  boundary of Main Street lh a northerly  direction from the north-west corner  post of Lot Fourteen (14), Block Three  (3), District Lot Two hundred A (200A),  Group One (1), New Westminster District in the City of Vancouver; thence  along the said east boundary of Main  Street -one (l) degree thirty-six (86)  minutes and thirty-five (36) seconds east  of due north eighty-four and eighty-nine  one-hundredths (84.89-100) lineal feet:  thence along the said east boundary of  Main Street nineteen (19) degrees fifty-  four (54) minutes and thirty-five (33)  seconds east of due north three hundred  and ninety-two and forty-seven one-  hundredths (392.47-100) lineal feet;  thence also along the said east boundary  of Main Street one (1) degree fortv-one  (41)-minutes and ten (10) seconds east  of due north two hundred and forty-two  and thirty-eight one-hundredths (242.38-  100) lineal feet to intersection with the  south boundary of a roadway one hundred and twenty-five (126) lineal feet in  width; thence along the said south  boundary of said roadway seventy-five  (75) degrees thirty-one (31) minutes and  thirteen (13) seconds east of due south  four hundred (400). lineal feet; thence  twenty-seven (27) minutes and thirty-  six (36) seconds west of due south eight  hundred and thirty-three and seventeen  one-hundredths (833.17-100) lineal feet  to intersection with the north boundary  of a roadway seventy-five (75) lineal  feet in width; thence along the said  north boundary of safd roadway sixty-  five (65) degrees thirty-nine (39) minutes, and one (1.) second west of due  north five hundred and seventy-four and  eighty-seven one-hundredths (574.87-100)  lineal feet to the point of commencement, the whole containing an area of  eight and six one-hundredths (8.6-100)  acres more or less; excepting therefrom  Lots 1 to 10 inclusive and the northwesterly portion of Lot 11, in Block 3,  D.L. 200A, Group 1, New Westminster  District, containing forty-two-hundredths  of an acre (42-100) more or less, being  shown colored red, and marked "A" 2 on  the plan hereto annexed.  (B) An area or portion to be used  as a city street one hundred and twenty-five (125) feet in width running east  and west from the easterly boundary of  the portion of the bed and foreshore of  False Creek hereby agreed to be conveyed to the Railway Company to the  easterly boundary of Main Street and  containing 12.79 acres more or less, being located and designated "Main Road- northern  way," and colored yellow and marked  B on the plan hereto annexed, and being  more particularly described as  follows:  Commencing at the north-west corner  of the area or portion of land described  In sub-paragraph "A" 2 of this article;  thence along the east boundary of Main  Street, formerly Westminster Avenue,  one (1) degree forty-one (41) minutes  and ten (10) seconds east of due north  one hundred and twenty-eight and eighteen one-hundredths (128.18-100) lineal  feet to the south-west corner of the  area or portion of land described ln subparagraph "A" 1 of this article; thence  along the south boundary of the said  "A" 1 produced easterly, seventy-five  (75) degrees thirty-one (31) minutes  and thirteen (13) seconds east of due  south four thousand three hundred and  fifty-six (4356) lineal feet, to intersection with a line parallel to and equidistant one hundred and twenty-five (125)  lineal feet from the south boundary of  First Avenue In the City of Vancouver  produced westerly; thence along the said  line eighty-nine (89) degrees fourteen  (14) minutes and thirty-eight (38) seconds east of due south ninety-eight and  forty-seven one-hundredths (98.47-100)  lineal feet to intersection with a line  parallel, to and equidistant forty (40)  lineal feet Afrom the west boundary of  Glen Drive; thence along the said line  one (1) degree eight (8) minutes and  ten (10) seconds east of due south one  hundred and twenty-five and seven one-  hundredths (125.7-100) lineal feet to intersection with the aforesaid south  boundary of First Avenue produced  westerly; thence along the aforesaid  south boundary of First Avenue produced Westerly eighty-nine (89) degrees  fourteen (14) minutes and thirty-eight  (38) seconds west of due north one hundred and seventeen and nine-tenths  f"i 17.9-10) lineal feet; thence seventy-five  (75) degrees thirty-one (31) minutes and  thirteen (13) seconds west of due north  four thousand three hundred and forty-  two and sixty-seven one-hundredths  (4342.67-100) lineal feet to the point, of  commencement, the whole containing'an  area of twelve and seventy-nine one-  hundredths (12.79-100) acres more or  less.  (C) An area or portion to be used as  an additional part of the street described in sub-paragraph (B) of this article,  adjoining the boundary of said street  extending from the easterly boundary of  the area or 'portion mentioned in subclause (2) of sub-paragraph (A) of this  article, easterly to the easterly boundary  of Scott Street produced northerly, and  containing 1.32 acres more or less, being  colored brown and marked with the letter C on the plan hereto annexed, and  befng more particularly described as follows:  Commencing at the north-east corner  of the area or portion ot land described'  in sub-paragraph "A" 2 of this article;  thence seventy-five (75) degrees thirty-  one (31) minutes and thirteen (13) seconds east of due south along the south  boundary of the area or portion of land  described in sub-paragraph "B" of this  article, two thousand three hundred and  three and sixty-five one hundredths (2,-  303.65-100)   lineal,    feet to Intersection  with the northerly production of the east  boundary of Scott Street; thence along  the  said northerly   production   of   the  east boundary of Scott Street thirty-five  (35)   minutes and one (1) second west  of due  south  twenty-five and seventy-  five   one-hundredths    (26.76-100)   lineal  feet;, thence   seventy-five   (76)   degrees  thirty-one (31) minutes and thirteen (13)  seconds west of due north two thousand  three hundred and three and fifty-nine  one-hundredths  (2303.59-100)  lineal feet  to intersection with the east boundary of  the aforesaid  "A"  2;   thence along  the  said  east boundary of aforesaid "A"  2  twenty-five and seventy-seveh  one-nun  dredths  (26.77-100)    lineal   feet   to   the  point of commencement, the whole containing an  area of one and thirty-two  one-hundredths (1.32-100) acres more or  less. /  7.7u^!S$i&Jifl  :/.:.. yy 7.y7������^wv@sa  7,77 "yyyig^xfs^  y:yyysiyyMW;M  :^%7|^7gf|f||  y'-x .yxyyyfy^m  ���������*.������������������������������������;  .- 77(?s4%M  yfcSIIIH  7777:i?^tgl������W$i;;Sl  thence seventy-five (75) degrees thirty-  one (31) minutes and thlrteea (13) seconds east of due south two thousand  three hundred and one and sixty-two  one-hundredths (2801.62*100) Ubsju fsst  to intersection with the east boundatr  of Scott Street produced northori**;  thence, along the said hortherly s������odue<  tlpn.of the east boundary orScottBtrost  thirty-five (36) minutes and one (1) sao*  ond east of due north seventy-oovon and    ,   ,   twenty-seven .one-hundredths aiM-tGOyyAAMmiA^  lineal-feet; .thenee- *WT������nt*^flw7(7S)7a*-������'fe*  *reesrthirty-one (81). mtaatea":an������;.tWr*:i77;77;:pi&?f|i  teen (13) seconds west of due .north:tw������.7'^/J;-������������������-���������*������������������:^^*  thousand two hundred and seventy-sUr,s  ?nd  forty-six  one-hundredths   (SztfMS-  100) lineal feet;  thence alxty-ftv* (SI)  degrees thirty-nine (39) minutes and oaf  (1) second west of due north six hundred  ??������, P,n?������Ja,nd.. 'ol-rtyyme one-hundredtbs  (601.61-100) lineal feet to the Intersection  with   the .east  boundary, of. Main  Street; thence along the east boundaryof  mmmm  i7ifi������a  ���������yyyy^m  AyAy-Wm*  Ayy.y$������ieWM  Main Street one (1) degree thirty-six (SS)  minutes   and    thirty-five   (36)    seconds  west of due south    one    hundred and  twelve and seventy-two one-hundredths  (112.72-100) lineal feet to the point of  commencement, the whole containing an  area of five (5) acres, more or less, ex-  . .      i cepting   therefrom   Lots   Twelve   (12)  An area or portion to be used as j and  Thirteen   (13)   and   the south-west  street seventy-five   (75)   feet. In������portion of Lot Eleven (11), Block Three  (D)  a  city  width, running east and west, adjoining  the northerly boundary of the said por  tions on the south of False Creek of the  bed and foreshore of False Creek transferred as hereinbefore recited to the  Vancouver, Victoria & Eastern7. Railway  & Navigation Company, and extending  from the easterly boundary of the lots  first mentioned In Article 3 to the easterly boundary of Scott Street produced  northerly, and containing 4.84 acres,  more or less, being designated "Roadway" and colored yellow and > marked  with the letter D on the plan hereto annexed, and being more particularly described as follows:  Commencing at the north-west corner  of Lot Fourteen (14), Block Three (3),  District Lot Two hundred A (200A),  Group One (1), New Westminster District; thence eighty-eight (88) degree*  twenty-three (23) minutes and twenty-  five (25) seconds east of due south along  the dividing line between Lots Thirteen  13) and Fourteen (14) in said block  seventy-five (76) lineal feet; thence sixty-five (66) degrees thirty-nine (39)  minutes and "one (1) second east of due  south four hundred and" ninety-five and  thirty-six one-hundredths (495.36-100)  lineal feet to a point on the dividing line  between Lots Twenty-two (22) and  Twenty-three (23) of the said block, produced north-easterly, the said point being two hundred and twenty-one and five-  tenths (331.6-10) lineal feet from the  boundary    of    Front    Street.  (3), District Lot Two hundred A (200A).  New Westminster District, containing  sixteen one-hundredths (16-100) acres.  more or less.  (E) An area or portion containing  twelve (12) acres adjoining the northerly boundary of the area or portion to  be used as a street described and set out  in sub-paragraph (B) of this article,  shown and designated Acreage, and col-*  ored red and marked "E" on the plan  hereto annexed, and being more particularly described as follows:  Commencing at the north-east corner  of the area or portion of land described  In sub-paragraph "B" of this article:  thence a line parallel to and equidistant  forty (40) lineal feet from the west  boundary of Glen Drive, one ft) degreo  eight (8) minutes and ten (10) second*  west of due north one hundred and  eighty-nine and thirty-three one-hundredths (189.33-100) lineal feet; thence  on the arc of a ten (10) degree curve  seven hundred and forty-four and seventy-nine one-hundredths (744.79-100)  lineal feet, the direction of the radius  of said arc from the Initial point being  eighty-eight (88) degrees fifty-one (61;  minutes and fifty (50) seconds west -of  due south and the length of said radius  being five hundred and seventy-three aat}  sixty-nine one-hundredths (673.69-100)  lineal feet; thence along the south boundary of the property of the Vancouver,  . (Cominusd on Pags I)  SWINDELL BROS. SPECIALS  A COUPON WITH EACH DOLLAR PURCHASE  a  u  a  Quaker Flour  Rolled Oats  Corn Flakes  Puffed Wheat  "    Puffed Rice  Each Coupon gives a guess as to weight  of large sack of Flour in Window. Best guesser  gets the sack FREE!  Decision will be given Saturday night, Feb.  i5th, 1913-  Swindell Bros.  1417 Commercial Drive      Next to UneetJa leit Market '������������������.yy;-\yy,y->\^..-yy-.-yy .*. ���������������������������.. ,*/,���������������������������-������������������'���������  ���������%���������:*���������'v-*'1-^^  TIIE WESTERN CALL  Friday, February 21,1913  *������������������ M������*������ 111I'M ***4 *** M������ *****  i ��������� ��������� i  i;     7 .i  :   The Successful Firms   :;  ;   Advertise.        WHY?   \\  < ���������������������������11 HI! 1111 lllllllfl *****'��������� '���������  *4*************4<*4<***4'****. ******************* I* *****  '���������'Me Delivery  ������������������   fbonet FalrmoBt 621  Ufa Credit  Mark t  ��������� ���������  WiflvsTNthibsic*  111 si all siptssn st  dillisry  lis i*ak*  kssplai.  We Lead in Quality. Our Prices most Moderate  9mtmr9my Speolala  Paa La  Fresh Local Veal Roasts 29c to 30c  Pea Ls.  Local Lamb, Legs 22c   Loins 25c  ���������������      8houlders   -   -  16c  Choice corn fed Pig Pork Legs 20c  " " Loins 26c  Fresh Spare Ribs     -    2 Iba. 26c  Fresh Dressed Chix   - 26c to 80c  Swift's Bacon  -       -   -   25c  Premium Ham, whole or half 26c  Sirloin Roast .... 22c  Choice Pot Roast - - 18c-15c  Choice Cuts of Round Steak20*22c  New Zealand Butter -31bs.31.00  Good Lard - - - 2 lbs. for 26c  Ranch Eggs, doz. 86c, 3 doz. $1.00  SEAL SHIPT OYSTERS  Freah Salmon  i Salt Herrings  1 Halibut .  I lbs. 86c  - eaehSe  S lbs. far 35c  FinanHaddi*  XJppcn       - '  ���������     ������  Frtah Smoked Sahnon  perlb.l*U-2e  6e par pair  2 iba. for 86c  2913 liln Street* or. Broadway  ********4 4 l"l 1"! 1 l-*-t"t"M"t'<-i"t..S.i.  The Place that Treats You Right  This U aa Indepeaoent Market  ****^.**.\LLll*****>\~V******u\>*i  **************************0**************************  PETERS & GO.  Pioneer Shoemakers  We do the Best Work for the Lowest Possible Prices.  Get Your Shoes Repaired Here  v      2530 Main Street  With improved quarters we improve and increase our work accordingly.   !  ***** I'l *******************  ***4>**e.e.*.e������i+**++** 111.������1.1t.1t.!  <���������< 1*1 11 ���������!������������������!��������� till I"l1-lMMilM������lM|-i">������ ��������������������� ��������������� ������������������ ���������<��������� ���������l"������ ��������� ���������!��������� ���������!��������� ���������!������������������������������!��������� !��������� ���������!������������������!��������� -t- ���������!��������� -B- ���������<��������� -l- *> ��������������� ,  I  Forgood vaiues in  REAL BSrATE AND INVESTMENTS  yy'-C: Callon '"  RIMBLE  & NORRIS  Cor. Broadway and Westminster Road  *****)*************************)**)******************)***,*)  2446 MAIN ST.  PHONE Fairmont 2250  4 Good Stock of No* 1  Fruit and  Produce.  jobn & mww  PftOPflJETOB  Take Care of Your Teeth.  GOOD TEETH-  Enhance appearance;  Conduce to health;  Aid in uae of language; and  Contribute to comfort.  PR. fl.WQQP, 312-313 Ue BWg.  IS PREPARED TO MAKE PERFECT TEETH.  Wet t������t CMsstst V4ete  laTswa  Out tba Beet Value for  noway  ���������t PLIANT C0NFecr/or'  *-aG^5^ W. H. Armstrong, Prop. ^0fit^  v^ 2440 MAIN STREET ^  We have just received another consignment of  WILLIAMS' FAMOUS ENGLISH TOFFEE  Alwaya an up-to-date stock of the best Candles, Chocolates & Fruits.  Cakes and Pastries fresh daily.   All the latest Magazines to be had here.  PH09*% Fairmont 179B  Mount Pleasant  Phone: Fairmont 1140  grWTHelp to. make these pages as interesting  a* possible   by' writing  or telephoning all local news each week before  Wednesday noon.  Clapp'8 new shoe store, corner Main  and Seventh Avenue, has opened for  business. It Is a very attractive  stand.  A meeting of the Grand Lodge of  Black Knights of British Columbia  was held on Tuesday forenoon and  afternoon in the Orange Hall The  meeting of the Provincial Grand  Lodge of Orangemen was held on  Wednesday and Thursday of this week.  Much enthusiasm was manifested.  Important legislation waa enacted.  The Senior Leaders of the Y.M.G.A.  were tbe guests of a number of young  ladles of the Y.W.C.A. at a valentine  party, in the gymnasium of tbe latter,  Friday, Feb. 14. A program of folk  dances followed by dainty, refreshments made the evening a pleasant  one. A solo by Miss Klrby and' a  violin solo by Mr. H. Austen added  greatly to the evening's entertainment  THE'DON.  Time may come and time may go  but the Don flows on for ever,.increasing in volume as it flows and ministering to multitudes who frequent this  interesting feature of Mt. PleaBant's  business concerns.  The Don is not a river but a store,  centrally located at 2648 Main Street,  and favorably known for its line of  choice confectionery and luscious  fruits. The things that please are  here and sold by men who have the  art of pleasing, men who would rather  fail to sell, than fall to please. The  Don is not a large store but it is a  good place to get the worth of yoUr  money and a store that holds a permanent place among business houses.  WILL DEVELOP LOCAL MARKETS.  KAMLOOPS, B. C���������That the development bf a nearby market for a  large part of the agricultural products  of j the Kamloops district is entirely  feasible is the opinion advanced by  local produce merchants familiar with  the situation. It appears, for instance,  that from two to five thousand tonB  of grain are available in the district  for local use at Interior points, and  that this amo.unt should be easily disposed of. It is pointed out tbat fruit  growers purchase all their oats and  chicken feed, not a hundredth part of  it being grown by themselves. Steps  will now be taken to gather and tabulate exact information as to variety  and price ot the local product, and a  ready market for all surplus is said to  be ready. Kamloops growers are  widely interested in this movement.  CHURCHES  Mount Pleasant Baptiat Church.  Cor. Tenth Ave. and Quebec St.  Preaching Services���������11 a.m.    and    7:10  p.m.   Sunday School at 2:10 p.m.  Pastor, Rev. A. F. Baker, 6-14th Ave., Eaat   .  CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH  Cor. 10th Ave. and Laurel Ht.  Services���������Preachlns at 11 a.m. and 7:10  p.m.   Sunday School at 2:80 p.m.  Rev . P. Clifton Parker. M.A., Pastor.  llth Ave. W.  Methodist Choir Concert.  The annual choir concert of the Mt.  Pleasant Methodist Church will be  held on Tuesday evening, Feb. 25th.  This will be a rare treat for all lovers  of music. ..Some of the finest soloists  in the city will participate. By request  Mme. Yulisse will sing some of her  famous "Bird Songs,'' in which she  takee notes so high as to seem Incredible that a human voice could reach  them.  White Tickets on B. C. ���������. ft.  The evening period during which  white tickets may be used on the lines  of the B. C. Electric Railway has been  altered to the usual time prevailing  during the longer days of the year.  During the winter season the company  has been accepting white tickets tor  transportation from 4:30 to 7 p. to., but  tbe "summer rule," which is now in  force, directs the conductors tos seeept  white tickets only after 6 p. m. There  ls no change in the morning hours, during which white tickets are accepted.  Crushed hy Motor Truck .  Jack Feltcher, driver for the Ke.ly-  Dougias Company, was severely  crushed before a motor' truck and  wagon, both belonging to tbe company,  Tuesday at 11 a. m. It being feared  that his injuries were serious, he was  rushed to St.. Paul's Hospital in ope of  the company's motor trucks. Medical  examination showed that he was not  seriously hurt. The injured mah, who  Is "married and lives at 868 Broadway  East, was anxious that his wife, be not  told of the accident, and the police  waited for some time before Informing  her.  Men's Dinner Party. <  Mount Pleasant Methodist Church  school room was the scene of an inter  eating men's ; dinner party Tuesday  evening. The attendance taxed the accommodation of tbe room, and the  feast spread by the ladies was highly  I satisfying. After a period spent in  getting acquainted there was an in  , teresting review of the history of the  church by Mr. Sparling and others,  followed by a harmonious' and profit  able conference on financial and other  questions. The pastor, Mr. Hall, performed the duties of toastihaster.  Toasts were proposed by himself, Mr.  Carter, Alderman Maban and others.  The only visiting speaker was Rev. E.  W. Stapleford.  Mount Pleasant Livery  A. F. McTAVISH, Prop.  Phone Fairmont 845 Corner Broadway and Main  Carriages at all hours day or night  Hacks, Victorias, Broughams, Surreys and Sjngle  Buggies, Express and Dray Wagons for hire  furniture and Piano Moving  jl 11111 11 I H 111 II 1 I < 1 Ml 1 * ******+*4r**4    "  THE BUFFALO.  There Ib much In a name.. A good  name is the best recommendation.  The proprietor of the Buffalo Grocery,  corner Commercial- Street and Fourteenth Avenue, has an enviable reputation as a merchant and citizen. The  name Buffalo does not imply that Mr.  Sinclair came from Buffalo, N. Y., nor  that he deals in Buffalo; neither does  it signify that he is Buffalo-like. This  name was adopted from the Buffalo  Park whicb is immediately across  Fourteenth Avenue from this modern  grocery store. Park and store alike  are growing attractions in this section  of the city. "Quality" Ib the motto  of the Buffalo. Sometimes mottoes  are a mere pretense, anvempty chest,  but here It is well sustained by facts.  "Goods of Quality" are bought and  sold by the Buffalo Grocery regularly,  without parade or ' bugle blast.  Buffalo!  COCHRANE *% ELLIOTT.  The Junction Grocery, or the House  of Success and Expansion is one of  the attractions in Mt. Pleasant. It is  located at the junction of Westminster Road, Fifteenth Avenue and  Scott Street, and Is owned and'managed by Cochrane and Elliott.  The building Is a large, new block  of modem convenience and is literally  the centre ot business In this section  of Vancouver. True, there are other  stores near by, but, for "goods of  quality* at prices tbat please patrons  and service that satisfies, Cochrane  & Elliott is unapproachable. They  are leaders in their line, which accounts for the rapid growth of their  business and their large double store  being constantly refilled with new  shipments of goods.  They have now on a Forty Days'  Sale with many specials to make room  for a large consignment ot Groceries  due before Easter.  Their catalogue of prices is being  circulated and will present many attractions in staple articles needed ln  every home for regular housekeeping.  Examine it and visit the store or  phone tbem for prices. Cochrane &  Elliott will answer your questions  with pleasure.  WEYBURN'S PROQRE88 6HOWN IN  REPORT.  WEYBURN, Sask.���������In his own annual report to the Weyburn board of  trade. Secretary Chas. A. Cook expresses the belief that the publicity  work accomplished during the past  year will show substantial results in  the near future. "The manufacturing  East has its eyes on Weyburn," says  Mr. Cook, "and with anything like a  definite assurance of the advent of  the C. N. R. they will lose no time  in entering this field."  Among the Important Improvements  scheduled for Weyburn for 1913 is a  new hotel to cost over $100,000 to be  erected near the C. P. R. depot. Five  hotels, however, could not cope with  the trade at the present time, It is  estimated. The entrance of the C.N.R.  Into Weyburn during the coming  Spring is expected to mark the com*  mencement of a new era of progress  for the city and district.  osm>  MT. PLEASANT CHURCH  Cor. 10th Ave. and Ontario.  Services���������Preaching at 11 am. and at  l-.ii p.m.   Sunday School   and  Bible  Class at 2:30 p.m.  Rev. W. Lashley Hall, B.A.B.D.. Pastor  Parsonage, 125 llth Ave. W. Tele. Fairmont 1449.  Alert Ad-alt Bible Class of Mewv  tain View Methodist Church meets at  2.30 every Sunday. Visitors ww bt>  made welcome. S. Johnston, presf*  dent  AVOZ-XOAV.  ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH  Cor. Broadway and Prince Edward 81  Services���������Morning Prayer at 11 a.m.   .  .'��������� Sunday school and Bible class at %:t*  ���������' p.m.  Evening Prayer at 7:80 p.m.  - Holy Communion every Sunday at 8 am.  . - and lat and 8rd Sundays at 11 am.  Rev. O. H. Wilson, Rector  Rectory, Cor.  8th  ward St Tel-  Ave. and Prince Bd-  . Fairmont 404-L.  MOOSE JAW 8EEK8 MORE ELEVATORS.  MOOSE JAW, Saak.--In view of current reports as .to the systematic  establishment of grain elevators of  large capacity at various points in the  West, grain men are of tbe opinion  that it ls to be tbe Government policy to assist in every way possible the  milling of grain in prairie towns and  cities. It Is argued, however, tbat  before any community secures one of  the proposed elevators, it should be  required to produce assurances of a  milling capacity equal to at least 2500  barrels every 24 hours.  CEDAR COTTAGE PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH  Rev. J. O. Madill, Pastor.  Services���������11 a.m., 7:30 p.m.  2.80 p.m.-r Sunday School and Bible  Class.  11.00a.m.��������� "A  Root out of Dry  Ground."  7.30 p.m.���������f'f'Keeping Guard Over Your  Heart. '  Writing tablets, a big ten cents  worth for one dime, at the Terminal  City Press, corner Eighth and Westminster Road.  Business is Good  I  niX$t .9 MATTHEWS  7MscbU������i<rts  Aatvp-tobilet, Motor Wist*, Bicycles, etc.  ,      .'    iiliiiiii'*a-aTa-aTaaTaTaaapai .   n.  Try a "CAW'ad.  i������������������*|fiMI������*>'������lH'������ill"l"l"l|l I'l'ti-r ****9*)*+***\**)**l>99*)*>*4****)* >  Rev. Dr. Sipprell Is Invited at Pastor.  Mount Pleasant Methodist Church  bas invited Rev. Dr. W. J. Sipprell to  take the pastorate in succession to  Rev. Lashley Hall, whose resignation,  tendered last autumn, takes effect at  the end of the conference year.  A cable received yesterday from  Dr. Sipprell, whose is now at Cam-  brige University, accepted the pastorate subject to the approval of the conference.  Dr. Sipprell resigned the principal-  ship of Columbian College two years  ago, and since then has been pursuing  a course of study in Oxford and Cambridge Universities, with a season or  travel on the Continent.  During the fourteen years that Dr,  Sipprell presided over Columbian Col  lege he became well known in this  province. He was president-' of the  B. C. Conference in 1904, and has been  a member of several General Confer-  ances. He is a native of Ontario, a  graduate in Arts of Toronto University, and in Divinity of Victoria College, and before coming to this province held several pastorates in the  Niagara and Hamilton Conferences.  Mothers' Reception.  The mothers of the Grandview  Methodist Sunday School Primary Department children were given a reception by the superintendent, Mrs.  Thomas Odium, and the teachers ot  the department on Tuesday evening  of this week at 8 o'clock.  A large number of the mothers  were present and were waited upon  and entertained by the officers and  teachers who rendered a very pleasing program, consisting of reading, recitations and music, both vocal and instrumental. .  Refreshments were served and a  guessing contest with prizes added to  the pleasure.  It was home-like and good enough to  be repeated.  FHONJ3  FAIRMONT  510  PKOnagTOIUI:  -^cGOWEN  C&SALTERj  THC OQN  REST PARLOR  994* mete at. attetere fremiti****.  CHOCOLATES  FRUITS  STATIONERY  ^*****4'4***********4****4*   * * * * 4 * 4 * * 4 * * * *'������ *4 * * * * *****  BRANDON FORGING AHEAD.  BRANDON, Man.���������Plans looking to  the formation of an association to include all local boards of trade in the  Brandon district are taking favorable  shape and are expected to result in a  definite organization very shortly.  Plans for the Dominion Fair to be  held in Brandon in July are now well  in hand, the position of this city in the  circuit of agricultural fairs held in this  part of the West now being fully recognized among outside exhibitors. Included in the plans as outlines will  be a large manufacturers' display  building and a cattle barn. Work on  both buildings is to start at an early  date.  Lawyer (to judge)���������I admit that my  client called the plaintiff an ox, but,  seeing the price of meat, I consider  that rather as a compliment than an  insult.���������Sacred Heart Review.  Semi - Ready Sale  Save Your Dollars  " BARGAIN " is a word that has been much  abused. Usually it means merely a reduced  price for some undesirable piece of goods.  But at the Semi-Reedy Remevel  Sele it is different.   We are selling suits  for which you would willingly pay the full  price and be satisfied, under the usual conditions.  We're moving to larger quarters up street,  and must reduce our stock before we move  i  \ .  in.   So better not wait.   Come to the old  address,  SI9 Granville St.  Thomas & McBain  Sole Agents:  Semi-Ready Tailoring* Vancouver '���������-������fm-<  i&y������*%  y>y'\*A^M  FrSay. February 21. 1913  THE WESTERN CALL.-  m  Heart ������f Vancouver  HMI1HHIIIMHIIHHIII  ; I If You Help Your District j  j; You also Help Yourself :  ' >M 11II ������4 111| H 11111 J I MSI |  ������****f.T.|  Issued every Frtaajr at 2408 Weatmla  ���������ter Road, one-half block north of Broadway.   Phona Fairmont 1140.  Editor, H. Q. Stevens; Manager. Oeo.  a. Odium.  ���������nbaottpttoiti  11.00 per year, 60 ceata  'per   six montha;   SB cents   per   threa  months.  Chansea of ads. must be 1a by Tuesday evenlnf each week to Insure lnser-  tf<m to followins Issue.  Notices of births, deaths aad mar-  rlaces Inserted free of charga.  This is the reduction we are making  ' for our ���������'-���������  First Annual Sale of  Call in and let us convince you that  we are making the above reduction on  all Wallpaper in our store to make  room for 12,000 rolls high-class Spring  stock.  JOAQUIN MILLER HA8 PA88ED  AWAY.  ���������\  LEE & WOOD  7       Importers of WsJlpaper  i23BrM4way, W    rbooe FUr. 1520  A full stock of Cfoeria  ForSote  Plants   healthy,   fllowers   unusually large and colors  extraordinary.  KPeiPR'S NURSPRV  Cor 15 th Ave. -& Main St  PHONE: Fairmont 817  Dr. do Van's Femaft Pills  "Poet of the Siarraa" Dies in Hia Home  in California���������Some of the Strange  Adventurous Life of Writer.  San Francisco, Peb. 18.���������"Joaquin"  Miller, the Poet of the Sierras, died  yesterday in his one-room cabin which  he built with his own hands ln the  Piedmont Hills many years ago. His  daughter, Juanita Miller, and his wife  were with him. The end came at 3  o'clock in the afternoon with warm  sunshine oodtng the room where lay  the author of. "Songs of the Sun-  land."  Death came slowly upon the venerable poet. He became unconscious on  Thursday, after a lingering illness,  which began when he was stricken  with parlysls two years ago. His  wife and daughter were summoned at  tbat time from the eaat and have been  with him since. The weakness of old  age had crept upon him, and although  he worked at times, he rarely ventured far from the "Heights," as he  called his mountain retreat.  For many years "The Heights" has  been the Mecca of lovers of Jaoquin  Miller's poetry. He received his guests  graciously and loved to talk in a vein  of quaint humor of the old edventur-  ous days which he -Demoralized in- his  verse. His faculties were ; undimmed  until almost the end, and he worked  at intervals upon a poem which he  said was to be the most momentous  work of bis life. He guarded the  poem with the utmost secrecy and not  even his wife and daughter knew its  subject.  A Man of the Wilds.      **  CincinantuB Heine Miller, better  known by his pen name, "Joaquin"  Miller, was one of the most picturesque characters in the literary world  of poems in paper covers, called  Specimens" and next a volume with  (he title "Joaquin et al," which contained a defence of Joaquin Murletta,  the famous Spanish-American outlaw,  wbo had been the terror of California  for ten years. From this Miller took  hie pen name "Joaquin," under which  he published all his subsequent works.  In 1870 Miller went to London,  where he published the following year,  his "Songs of the Sierras" and "Pacific Poems." During bis sojourn in  London, Miller was taken up by society and became a much sought after  guest in drawing rooms. The romantic  nimbus surrounding his personality,  his eccentric way of dressing and of  bearing himself interested society and  he was fairly overwhelmed with in-  whelmed with invitations., His poems  were read by everybody and there was  no man more popular than he In London at that time. He used to entertain his bOBts with accounts of his life  in the wlldernes, his fights with Indians and outlaws, his experiences in  the gold fields and in the camps of the  Indians.  Madero Forced Out of Office  Mexico City, Peb. 18.���������Francisco I.  Madero, arrested in the national palace  this afternoon by General Blanquet,  one of his own commanders, was  forced to sign hia resignation from the  presidency.  General Vlctorianb Huerta, commander of the federal troops, which have  been lighting Diaz, has been proclaimed provisional president.  Gustavo Madero, and all the cabinet  ministers, with the exception of Ernesto Madero, are under arrest The  vice-president of the Republic, Jose  Pino Suarez, still is at liberty, but ln  hiding.  The American ambassador and the'  other foreign diplomats held a conference at the American embassy tonight  to discuss the re-establishment of order and the further, protection of foreign residents.  The Zocalo, the great plaza In front  of the palace,/ was jammed tonight  !with a delirious crowd with banners  incribed "peace" and "liberty," shout*  Ier found himself a celebrity in hia (ing for Diaz, Huerta, Banlquet and  own country.  He waa well known and i Mondragon.  had no difficulty in finding papers or j The women members of the Madero  magazines, eager to print and liber- J family, who were in Chapultepec eaa-  ally pay for his prose and poetry. He j tie, were whisked away in automobiles  became a regular contributor to the, by friends who had learned of the coup  daily and periodical press and in  1873 published another volume under  the title of "Songs of the Sun Lands''  and a prose volume, entitled, "Life  Among the Modocs; Unwritten History." In later years he published  more than twenty books, poeme, novels, essays and plays. Of the -latter  "The Dahites" and "49" became quite  popular. For two years be travelled  in Alaska and wrote letters to newspapers about, the conditions in the Tu*  of the United States.   He waa born Ikon ogld region.   For a number of  3-Room Suites For Kent  Folly  modern,   gas   ranges,  beam ceilings, laundry tuba.  1629 10th Avenue, East  PHONE Fairmont 16S4L.  MT. PLEASANT LODOB NO. It  lfeets  every  Tuesday  at  t pM  I.O.O.F.  hall,    Weatmtoster   A  Pleasant   Soot-rntaa- brethrea  Invited to attend.  &E  j. c. oar?ia.M.a. isn:  J. Ha-ata. V.C.. MS BUb Stmt  Tfcoa. SawaU. Bee. See.. 4S1 Seveath AvaaT  7 r-4?������i  \ ' * j  m<  AiellabUFif^bree-atoto/;neverfaUs. Tbtwe  ���������Uto sre axeaadlttglv powariul in rafuliUnf the  Sinmtlve portion of %femaie lyatem. JtffaM  aUchaapiSlUHooa.pr,4eTea's era told at  r|������**-<  Sold at  CatnpMlV  prugni Store  Cor. Hastings and Granville Sts.  Vancouver, B.C.  Garments of all description  cleaned.  PLUMES CLEANED,  DYED  AND CURLED.  IK. mice, sth *lata, Pksss Fair. 504  Wtrks, S29 ath Aw., E., Phoss Fair. 174  from Scotch-American parents In the  Wabash district of Indiana, on November 10, 1842. He was scarcely ten  years of age when his father emigrated to Oregon, then a wild and sparsely  settled country. He received but lit*  tie education and lived a wild and  adventurous lite. Three years later,  Miller, then a boy of ia, left home to  try his fortunes in California.  Very Uttle of reliabe nature ts  known of young Miller's life during  the seven yeara he roamed aimlessly  through the "wilds of Northern California and Southern Oregon. Gold diggers, lumber men and trappers, In*  dians and outlaws were his companions. The erratic nature of the young  poet, was unintelligible to the rough  adventurers witb whom he came In  contact and they considered him crack  brained.  After his return to Oregon he took  up tbe study of law and later became  editor of the Dempcratic Register, a  weekly newspaper in Eugene, Ore.,  which was suppressed by tbe authorities afterwards because of tbe seditious character of Its editorials.  It was while he was editor of the  Democratic Register that be became  acquainted with Minnie Myrtle, a frequent contributor of poetry; to the  paper. A brief courtship was followed  by their marriage and two children  were the result of that union.  Lionized In London.  In 1863 Miller opened a law office in Canon City, Oregon. While  living in that young and struggling  town he distinguished himself by lead-  ingan expedition against the hostile  Indians, who had attacked the settlement. In 1866 Miller was made  county judge of Grant County, which  post he occupied until 1870. His literary activity began about 1864 or 1865.  He began to write poems, dealing  mostly with the adventurous life of the  west.   He published first a collection  years he lived the life of a recluse on  his farm near Oakland, Cal., but the  last years of his life he spent on his  estate 'The Heights" near Dlmond,  California.  RAILWAY      NORTHCA8T      FROM  SELLA COOLA.  Capitsl of Paciflc-Hudten Bay Line to  Pe Increased to $25,000,000. .....  Ot^wa, Feb. 18.���������The railway committee of the House of Commons today reported the bill which changes  tbe route of tbe Pacific ft HudBon Bay  Railway Company. Mr. Clive Prlngle,  counsel for the company, said that as  a result of the surveys made, it bad  been decided to start from Bella Coola  Inlet instead of Dean Inlet. The route,  be said, had all been surveyed.  Mr. H. H. Stevens, speaking In support of tbe bill, said that there is a  fine harbor at Bella Coola, and the  valley of that name is a fine agricultural country. It was explained tbat  tbe construction will commence at  both Fort George and the Pacific at  an early date. A branch line to Fort  MacLeod is proposed.  The proposed main line is from tbe  pacific to the Hudson Bay, and in  view ot its length, some 2,580 miles,  the capital of the company is increased from five to twenty-five million  dollars.  GROWTH  OF   RESIDENTIAL  NIPEG.  WIN-  WINNIPEG, Man.���������A survey of  Winnipeg's present rapid suburban  growth especially in the high-class  residential sections indicates a steady  forward movement that is increasing  rapidly in volume and persistency season by season.  at the national palace.  Military Governor.  Telegrams have been sent to the  governors of the states notifying them  ofthe proclamation cf Huerta as provisional president, and also the military commanuers assuring them that  a general election will be held.  General Huetra made a speech from  the balancy of the palace to the assembled crowds. He declared that he j  had no personal ambition and announced himself as military governor,  and General Blanquet aa military commander of the federal district  It is fully believed that/ a definite  agreement will b ereached between the  rebel forces and General Huerta. The  negotiations will be conducted through  tbe American embassy.  Huerta received a commission from  the diplomatic corps. He said he bad  assumed the provisional presidency  snd: would deliver it to whomever Congress designated.  General Felipe Angeles, who refused  to support tbe new government was  placed under arrest  One of the first acts of General  Huerta as: provisional president was  to notify Ambassador Wilson of the  change of government. He informed  tbe ambassador tbat he had in bis  power ln the National Palace the president of the republic and his ministers.  Has No Ambition.  General Huerta asked that this be  interpreted as a patriotic manifesto of  a man who bas no ambition other than  to serve his country and who wishes  to re-establish peace in the country to  insure the safety of the interests of its  sons and of the foreigners.  He requested Ambassador Wilson to  notify President Taft and the diplomatic representatives of all that had  occurred and to give notification to  the rebels.  Another early official act of General  Huerta was to send a note to the deputies calling them to meet in special  session for the purpose of giving legality to the new order of things.  Anticipating danger from mobs, the  provisional president supplemented his  speech at the palace with a proclamation in which he outlined the developments and appealed to the patriotism  of Mexicans to maintain order.  M-M M HIM * M Klllll ****���������  TORONTO;  FURNITURE   STORE  3334 Main St.  Our stock of Furniture  is Large, Modern and  adapted to the tastes of  -  Buyers.  -Dressers, Buffets, Tables i  Chairs, Couches,   ���������������+  *  *  t  ���������  Mat- .  tresses, Bedsteads, etc. i  A complete line of  Linoleums. Carpet Squares, etc.  Drop in and inspect our goods.  This is where you get a square  deal.  M. H. COWAN  NOTES FROM OTTAWA  (Continued from Page I)  tialities for disturbance. Germany could not Club of Peterborough on Asiatic immigration into  easily be assailed by sea, having a small coast line Canada and Judging by the complimentary corn-  protected by enormous batteries while the British     ments of the press, Liberal and Conservative, he  -:���������������>*���������*M"l *t"M"M"H'������*'*'l-H'tl1 I  Empire was world wide.  "It does seem to me," he added, "that the  moral effect would be greater if Canada could  build and loan to England three of the best fighting ships that science can devise and money build.  This would be better than two small fleet units on  the Pacific and Atlantic. If you are going to help  England, let us give her what she asks. If British  power is broken Canada is left defenceless and  where would Germany find a colony like Canada  or what would keep the Japanese from landing on  the Pacific Coast.  "Germany is now on the last lap of the race.  Her debt is heavy and might not the'appearance of  Canada as a factor decide the Germans to stop  the struggle for supremacy at sea 1 "We have been  singing 'God Save the King' and 'God Save the  Queen' for a great number of years. Let us show  the mother country that our loyalty is not merely  hot air."  Through the reports of H. H. Stevens, Vancouver's energetic member, the postal department  has issued orders for postal free mail delivery in  portions of Point Grey, including D. L. 472 and  Shaughnessy Heights.  Mr. Stevens addressed this week the Canadian  made a most favorable impression. The Peterborough Review describes the address as "one of  the most interesting and instructive addresses ever  given before the club, and adds, "coming as  he did from the Coast where the situation is the  most critical the speaker used facts gained by  personal observation and to all indications his  hearers were convinced that the west faces a  situation that is not desirable." One extract from  bis speech seems to have particularly impressed  the Review, which emphasises it by playing it up  in ten point type. It was the following on the  Hindus.  "We exclude the Britishers if they do not meet  the requirements of the law. We have no room  for men who are drones and who will deteriorate  the race.    COMING TO THIS COUNTRY IS A  PRIVILEGE There are some who say  the Hindu women should be allowed to come. We  say which wife, and if not which wife, we ask do  you want to introduce into Canada the system of  child-wife? . . . They say the Sikhs are willing to marry our p eople. What one of you would  want to see his daughter or sister married to a  Hindu? Not one, and yet marriage is absolutely  the basis of assimilation."  "THE SCHOOL OP CEaWONTIES^  . ;"��������� i -:- ;���������;  -       -"''   /  : .    '. ;':;   ' '. :": 'A:   y^yy^r  We invite the public to call at onr new premigeg iiitbe  Harris Block. We would like you to inspect our equipment; to see * hat splendid light and ventilation we have;  toseeour students at work.  If you are interested in Biisineofl Education, a visit to  us will convince you that this is the school for you to attend.  The best is what you require.  PHONE: Fa^    2076      VAN^  AM0 _  yy>-A������gm  y xAAA^yjt&t  7>'7:s?;$l$&P  yyyyt^m  *. ,..     :" ���������I'XrgZg'jiy  ���������. x:-yy*0$L  7i -yyyemi  'Ayy^MM  A'yAii^B  '���������������������������yy<%sm:t  yyyA%0mm  yAA:y^:������$$m  mymlwm  Wm  Si!^  mm  w$y&wk  ��������� ���������������������������.}>*;.���������:& ;:W.eWS?*K  mm  AiMm  :.y:\yymm$  "���������: '. '?,-:   .'Ay-A?te������fy*a  yyyyy������mm  A Home  Poor Workmen, poor Paint or a poor selection  of Wallpaper would spoil the best of taste.        /  Mount Pleasant iPeople Don't  yyy ��������� ;have to go down town  to secure  good  services in  wall  papering: and  painting.   Xy  OUR NEW SPRINO STOCK OF  Is worth coming from any part of the city to see.  '������������������feVS.  yyA0;0&$m  ! \V- -j*' L^r-1^1-.**  , mAym.  7i7?i!W<SiSl  yyyw&'M  iyy$ymM  STANLY & CO. m?mZ  FalrmoNl   tff  Use Stave lalm Ml  Those Industries m 3etter  In ultimate results which use our electric  power service. The factories or office buildings which operate private power plants are  under a big expense for maintenance. A  trifling accident may disorganize their whole  system ���������more serious disturbance, with  attendant heavy losses involved, are not  preventable. Stave Lake Power is unde-  niably'cheaper and more reliable .than pri-  vate'plant operation. See us for particulars  and rates.  Western Canada Power Company,  * LIMITED . \l  timet Seynrar 4770     6O3-6IO Carter-Cotton Bldg. ::  P. O. BOX 1418, VANCOUVER, B. C.  &Vl:seyy. ->_  ���������AiSM  MMitnmnint nitiiiM ������iiiiiiiiiiiimhiiiimm  PHONE Fairmont 1177  PHONE Fainaoat ������4-R  MAIN TRANSFER  Express and Baggage  Furniture and Piano Moving  Always in Mount Pleasant  Stand: 2421 SCOTIA ST.  PHONE Fairmont 1177  Landscape Gardening  MOW i's the time (not in Spring when the rash is en) to plan  ���������vour new home surroundings.  Having had ten years practical experience laying out grounds  in Vancouver, I may be able to give yoo some advice.  I grow and specialize in up-to-date Dahlias; also furnish Roses  and everything in nursery stock at reasonable prices. For charges and  further information, address  WILLIAM SMITH  Tat. Fairmont 494 L B90 7th Ave., ������aat ft*  THE WESTERN CALL.  /  Friday, February 21, 1913  9  $  Agreement Betw'n  C.N.R. and City;  Now Before  Voters  (Continued from Page 3)  Victoria & Eastern Railway' & Navigation Company seventy-five (75) degrees  ���������thirty-urn* (31) minutes and thirteen (li!)  -second* west of due north three hundred  -and seventy*.hree and torty-one one-hun-  <lrt*<lta*j (--73.41-100) lineal feet; thence  fourteen (14) degrees twenty-eight (28)  .minutes and forty-seven (47) seconds  ���������west of due south six hundred and twenty-five (6^5) lineal feet to intersection  with the north boundary of aforesaid  **B"; thence along the said north bound-  mrr ot the aforesaid "B" seventy-live  (7������) degrees thirty-one (31) minutes and  thirteen (IS) seconds east of due south  ���������sight hundred and eighty-one and thirty-  ������ae one-hundredths (881.31-100) lineal  feet; thence eighty-nine (89) degrees  fourteen (14) minutes -and thirty-eight  <*M) seconds east of due south ninety*  ���������sight and forty-seven one-hundredths  4M.47-100) lineal feet to the point of  ���������mt-etaneiicement, the whole containing an  area of twelve (12) acres, more or less,  rvlng thereout to the Railway  ny a right-of-way not exceeding   lundred (100) feet in width adjoining the northerly and easterly boundary  ***** the said area or portion last herein-,  "before particularly described and shown  asau-ked proposed Railway "Rigfyt-of-  Wsy** on the plan, hereto annexed, or in  ���������as-en other place as may be agreed upon  Hereafter between the parties hereto;  provided, however, that the said reservation of the said right-of-way is and shall  be conditional upon the Railway Com-  pony conveying to the city free and clear  ef liens, charges and encumbrances a  sufficient additional area or portion of  the railway property adjoining the area  or portion in this sub-paragraph (E)  'particularly described immediately on  the west thereof, to make, when added  to said last mentioned area or portion  the full amount of twelve (12) acres  .exclusive of said right-of-way.  The bed of False Creek above descrlb-  -ed, excepting the portions thereof described in sub-paragraphs (A). (B). (C).  <!)) and (E) is herein referred to as the  -"Hallway Property," and the portions of  the bed of False Creek described in such  sub-paragraphs (A). (B), (C), (D) and  <E> are herein referred to as "City  ���������Property;"  Xttla. 6. The right, title and interest  in the bed of False Creek to be  ���������conveyed In accordance with the provisions of Article 4 shall be conveyed to  the Railway Company, its successors and  assigns, to be held and used for all time  only for railway terminal purposes and  other purposes expressed In this agreement, and in all and every of the Arti-  cIes>of this Agreement, save and except  Articles 8, 15 and 16, the words "Rail-  ' way Company" shall extend to and include the successors and assigns of the  Canadian Northern Pacific ftallway Company, and the covenants and agreements  ���������eontained-ln each of the Articles of this  Agreement, except as aforesaid, shall be  "binding upon such successors and assigns, and shall be covenants running  -with the land, and a charge thereon, and  the said conveyance from the City shall  ���������contain the' above provisions, and a  ���������elapse that no portion' of the Railway  property shall be transferred, leased or  ���������conveyed by the Railway Company, it������  successors or assigns, nor shall any  tright, title or interest therein, legal or  .equitable, be created except upon the ap  ���������pi-oval of the Lieutenant-Governor-in  Council. Nothing in the said clause re-  tauiring the-approval of the Lieu tenant-  Governor-in-Council, however, ��������� shall be  construed to limit or restrict the right  of the Railway Company, Its successors  or assigns, subject always to all the Articles of this Agreement, except as aforesaid, fo secure upon the Railway Prop-  ���������erty without such approval, any bonds,  ^debentures or other indebtedness of the  "Railway Company or its successors, by  ���������mortgage or trust deed containing power  of p������?le, foreclosure or right of possession, but without thereby extending the  right to use the Railway Property for  purposes other than those expressed in  (his Agreement, or interfering with the  use then or threeafter of the Railway  Property by other railway companies as  expressed in- this Agreement or the covenants running with- the land and charged  thereon as aforesaid.  Sofa} on    6.    The     Railway    Company  Batlwsy     may,    either    by    itself    or  mtopeetj.   througu some subsidiary company, erect  and maintain   a  (hotel jjupon the Railway Property, using  .���������such portion of the property as may be.  Treasonably   sufficient   and   suitable'  for  :sueh purposes, the portion of the prop-  . erty to be used for such purposes to be  ,-determined by the Lieutenant-Governor-  - fn-Counctl. Buch hotel shall not form  ���������part of the Union Passenger Station referred to in Article 11. The erection of  :*ny   hotel   upon   the   Railway   Property  - 4a not, however, in any sense to be compliance with the covenant to erect a hotel  ���������In the City of Vancouver as specified in  Article   16.  ;X*eeoe for 7. The Railway Company  '.Sjaavfactor* shall   from   time   to   time  Xug, Stc. lease for manufacturing,  industrial     Or     warehouse  -sites, any portion bf the Railway Prop-  ��������� erty not at the moment required for  railway  terminal  purposes  of  itself or  ��������� other railway companies as provided in  ' this Agreement, such leases to 4>e subject to the Railway Company obtaining  ^a reasonable annual rental for the leas-  ���������<i*ri property, which without the consent  ���������of the Railway Company shall not be  -tens than seven per cent (7 p.c.) of the  .''assessed value thereof, and such leases  . shall be on as favorable terms as those  now used by the Canadian Pacific Rail*  ' way   Company   In   connection   with   its  Vancouver property on the aouth shore  ��������� of  False  Creek  west  of  Bridge  Street.  -Such - leases shall contain suitable provisions  permitting   the   Railway   Com-  ��������� pany or the Lleutenant-Governor-ln-  : Council to cancel same upon reasonable  - notice, and proper compensation to the  "Lessee, should the leased property be  t required for railway terminal purposes  ���������either by the Railway Company or other  ���������railway companies as provided in this  Agreement Such leases shall become  effective only upon the approval of the  Weutenant-Governor-ln-Council. and in  the event of the Railway Company recusing to give or make any such lease  the Lleutenant-Governor-ln-Councll shall  have power to direct the making and  execution of any such lease by the Railway Company, subject to the payment  of a reasonable annual rental as aforesaid. In the event of Its being deemed  necessary to extend the terminal facilities on the Railway Property to enable  the Railway Company to accommodate  .any other railway company desiring to  /make use thereof under the terms of  ;this Agreement such railway company  -desiring to make use thereof, or the  ������������������".ity of Vancouver, may apply to the  'Cieutenant-Governor-in-Council to direct  Ahe cancellation of any such lease or  ���������teases, and the Lieutenant-Governor-ln-  ���������Council may, subject to the rights of all  vaTtles Interested to be heard, direct the  cancellation of any such lease or leases  conditional on the payment to the lessee  . or the Railway Company on betialf of  ������he lessee bv the railway company desiring to make use of such railway fa-  -r^Biies of the amount to which such  lessee shall be entitled as compensation  ���������for such cancellation under the terms  . -of the lease.  tTca for 8. The Railway Company  'TmrtolxaaX, and the Canadian Northern  <0. BT.B. Railway   Company   covenant  -System. that the Railway Property-  shall at all times be occupied and used as the principal permanent Western terminus and terminals;  V-oth for passenger and freight, of the  Canadian Northern Railway system, including the Railway Company, their and  Sis successors and assigns.    This  cove  nant shall not be taken to lessen, prejudice or affect the right of the Railway  Company to mortgage or charge the  Railway Property in accordance with  and to the extent of the provisions hereinbefore contained.  Filling  in.  9. The Railway Company shall  fill in the City Property (including so much of the -lands  referred to in Article 3 as the City shall  designate) the grades to be furnished by  the City Engineer, which shall be approximately the grades shown on the  plan annexed hereto, and shall all ln the  Railway Property as provided in Article  10, such tilling in of the City Property  (inclusive as aforesaid) to be done concurrently with the filling In of the Railway Property, s othat the bed of False  Creek shall be filled in uniformly and  continuously -forking eother east and  west , west and east, or north and south  or south and north. \  Tim* for 10. The Railway Company  -rilling In. will commence the filling in  and reclamation of the bad  of False Creek within ninety (90) days  after the passing of the Act referred to  in Article 1, or the approval referred to  ln Article 2 being obtained, whichever  shall  be last, and will  thereafter dill-  f-ently proceed with such work of filling  n and reclamation until sufficient filling  in has been done to enable the Railway  Company to establish upon the Railway  Property the terminals and works hereby agreed to be constructed. The Railway Company shall, in any event fill in  and reclaim three-fifths, of the bed of  False Creek (Including so much of the  lands referred to in Article 3 as the City  snail designate) within three years after such time for commencement and the  whole thereof, within five years after,  such time for commencement; The Rail  way Property shall be so filled in as to  give reasonable access thereto from the  City Property.  OoBSteno-     li.    So soon as the work of  tion of filling in has sufficiently ad-  Terminals, vanced to permit the same  to be done, the Railway  Company shall lay out make and construct, and thereafter permanently maintain upon the Railway Property, freight  and passenger terminals, Including the  necessary and convenient buildings,  tracks and facilities, adequate to prop  erly care, for the business of a transcontinental railway and of all other railway companies which may be permitted  to use the same under the terms of tnis  Agreement. The passenger station and  buildings shall be modern in all respects  and designed to accommodate not only  the business of the Canadian Northern  Transcontinental Railway system, but  also that of all other railway companies  which may be permitted to use the terminals as aforesaid. The passenger station shall be a Union Passenger Station,  and shall be a building in keeping with  the dignity of the City of Vancouver,  and shall cost, with its attendant passenger platforms, passenger, train sheds,  baggage, express and office accommodation which may be provided as part  thereof, not less than One Million Dollars ($1,000,000.00). Such freight and  passenger terminals, Including the cost  of the lands, rights and interests to be  acquired by the City at the expense of  the Company under paragraph 3 of this  Agreement the. cost of filling in the  City and Railway Properties, the cost  of the passenger station, freight slieds,  tracks and terminal facilities agreed to  be erected upon the Railway Property,  but not including the cost of any hotel  in this Agreement referred to, shall be  not less than Four Million Dollars ($4,--  000*000.00.)  Tunnels. 12. The approach of ��������� the  Railway Company's . railway  through the high ground lying to the  south and east of the Railway Property  shall be by means of a tunnel, which  shall be of sufficient size to accommor  date a double track railway. 0r\ by means  of two tunnels, each Of which shall be  of sufficient size to accommodate a single track railway. In driving or constructing such tunnel or tunnels the  Railway Company shall do so in such  manner as to interfere as little as possible with any sewers, sewer pipes,,  water mains, water pipes, mains, pipes  and other works of the City, and shall:  absolutely protect and care for, and save  from damage or injury any and all sewers, sewer pipes, water mains, water  pipes, mains, pipes or other works., of  the City whichi may be encountered In  driving or constructing such tunnel or  tunnels and if any of the same are (in  the judgment of the City Engineer) interfered with in any manner, the Railway Company shall pay all damages occasioned thereby and replace, relay and  make good such works to the satisfaction of and In such place and In auclv  manner as the City Engineer shall direct.  Buiasnce   13.   The    Railway   Company  Prom. agrees  that  it will  electrify  Smoke,       the  tunnel   or   tunnels   here-  Sto. inbefore referred to. and will  permanently maintain them  so electrified, and that nO engines of  the Railway Company or the Canadian  Northern Railway system or any subsidiary lines will at any time, be operated on the Railway Company's portion  of the bed of False Creek in this Agreement designated as the Railway Property, by steam produced from coal, oil  or ' other substance emitting fumes,  gasses or smoke to such an extent as  to create a nuisance.  fan- 14.   The Railway Company will  Station, establish and permanently  maintafn a suitable passenger  station at or near the south or east portal of the tunner or tunnels aforesaid,  and in the event of the north or west  portal being at a greater distance than  three-quarters of a mile from the Union  Passenger Station hereinbefore referred  to, the Railway Company will establish  and permanently maintain an additional  railway station at or near sueh last  named portal, and will use for stations  for suburban or other local passenger  traffic of the Railway Company.  Western 16.    (a>   The      Railway  Bes4a.asrter* Company and the Cans-  and 8.8. Sine, dian Northern Railway  Company shall make, or  cause to be made, and thereafter permanently maintain the western headquarters of the Railway Company and  of the Canadian Northern Railway system, both for passengers and freight,  and their principal" western terminus at  the City of Vancouver and not elsewhere, and the Railway Company shall,  within five years from the date of de-  Uvery-of conveyance aforesaid, procure  and thereafter permanently maintain  deep water wharfage and facilities therefor within the City of Vancouver, adequate to the needs of a transcontinental  railway and a trans-Pacific steamship  line, and the Canadian Northern Railway  Company covenants and agrees:  (1). That smta Canadian Northern  Railway Company shall, on or before  January 1st 1915. obtain authority by  statute of the "Dominion of Canada authorising it ts operate a trans-Pacific  xteamshlp line both for passengers and  freight  (2). That said Canadian Northern  Railwav Company shall, within eight  (8) years from the date of delivery of  conveyance as aforesaid, establish or  cause to be established, and thereafter  permanently maintain or cause to be  maintained a trans-Pacific steamship  line both for passengers and freight  having Its freight and passenger terminals and Its home office at all times  as effectively in the City of Vancouver  as the Canadian Pacific Railway Company or any company which may operate  or control the trans-Pacific steamship  steamers operated ln connection with the  ar'flc Railway from time to  time makes the City of Vancouver the  passenger and freight terminals and  home port of such trans-Pacific steamers for freight and passenger traffic; and  (3) That supplies for said steamship  lines shall at all times be purchased for  and supplied to its vessels In the City  of Vancouver in so far as they may be  obtained on as favorable conditions there  as elsewhere, and that such steamship  line shaH at all times make the City of  Vancouver its head office on the Pacific  Coast and the place in Canada for the  signing on the crews of its steamers and  the point at which in so far as possible  such crews shall be discharged and paid  off- _ ..  ,  (b>    The "City of Vancouver    In this  article shall mean and refer to the present limits of the City of Vancouver.  Hotel    16.    The  Railway   Company   and  in the  Canadian  Northern   Railway  City Company covenant and agree  that the Railway Company or  the Canadian Northern Railway Company shall within five (5)- years after  the delivery of the said conveyance,  erect, construct and complete, . and  thereafter permanently maintain,   with  in the City of Vancouver, and elsewhere .than on the Railway Property,  a first-class modern hotel containing  not less than two hundred and fifty  (250) rooms, such hotel to be permanently operated as part Of the hotel  system of the Canadian Northern Railway. .  Spar 17. The Railway Company  Tiaok shall, if at any time required  by the City, so to do, lay otit  and construct and thereafter,- .except  as hereinafter provided, permanently  maintain a good and sufficient spur  track crossing Main Street and connecting the City Market with the Railway lines in the Railway Property with  switch for same, and shall switch cars  to along and from said spur track at  such times as may be indicated or designated by the City from time-to time,  and shall remove the said switch  and spur track at any time when requested by the City so to do. Ih the  event of such removal the: Hallway  Company shall leave Main Street and  the paving thereon in "such condition  as shall be satisfactory to the City  Engineer.  Wstaiwlng 18. If and when the City  Wall shall obtain  the approval ol  the Governor-General In  Council of Canada for the construction  of a retaining wall and the filling hereinafter in this article mentioned, the  Railway Company shall:  (a) Construct a retaining wall commencing at the Intersection of t he  westerly boundary of Main Street and  the property now known as "Armstrong  & Morrison's property and wharf," and  'running thence westerly along the  southerly boundary of said Armstrong  & Morrison's property and wharf three  hundred (300) feet and from thence  southerly to/the northwest corner of  the present City Market Wharf, and  from thence southerly along the  westerly boundary of the said City  Market Wharf to the southwest corner  of the City Market Wharf. and  from thence southeastly along the  southerly boundary of said City  Market Wharf to such point above the  high water mark of False Creek on  or west of Main Street as the City  shall designate, such retaining wall being shown and designated "Sea Wall"  and marked with the letetr F on the  plan hereto annexed: provided, that if  the City shall so desire the Railway  Company shall construct the said re-,  tdinlng wall ln such other position (including other angles, directions and  distances) within the boundaries of the  said retaining wall hereinbefore described as shall be designated by the  City. ������������������'   ���������  (b) Fill in to such grade as shall  be designated by the City the portion  of the bed and foreshore of False  Creek bounded by the said retaining  wall and the space between the easterly boundary of Main Street" and said  retaining wall including the space under Main Street Bridge and Main  Street, such retaining, wall to be of  sufficient size, depth and strength so  that neither the filling in to be done  under this agreement nor any dredging in False Creek which may at any  time be authorized or undertaken by  the Dominion of Canada shall endangar  the same. Provided, that in the event  of the City not designating the position of such retaining wall within, two  (2) years from the delivery of convey;  ance as aforesaid, or in the event of  the City not obtaining the approval of  the, said Governor-General ln Council  as aforesaid within the said period of  two (2) years, or in any event if the  City shall at any time within the  said period of two (2) years so request, the Railway Company ��������� instead  of constructing said retainine wall and  works in connection therewith in manner aforesaid���������shall,. subject^to the approval of the Governor-General in  Council being first obtained by the City,  erect and construct a retaining wall or  the character before mentioned at and  along the western boundary of Main  Street from the south side to the north  side of False Creek, and shall also remove Main Street Brfdge, and fill in,  grade and pave Main Street across  False Creek from the point where the  general grade of such street rises to  approach such bridge., on one side to  the corresponding frOfnt ort rthe  other      side      thereof;,     such      filling  in, grading and. P*-V������nf, 1*������^ia_lSf  done in such manneras shall be designated by the City Engineer, provided  that in carrying out the work ��������� afo-je*.  snid the Railway Company shall .provide for the traffic passing over Mam  Street Bridge so as tb- interfere therewith as little as reasonably possible.  The City shall Indemnify, protect and  save harmless the Railway Company  from and against all claims by any  person on account of any lands or  right*. In lands taken or Injuriously affected by reason of the works referred  to in this article.  B**edflnff   19.   The: Railway   Company  ^ Bhall     work     in     harmony  with the Dominion Government or any:  department thereof in any dredging of  filling material from the basin of  False Creek west of Main Street to be  done by the Railway Company.  Oxadiag, 20.    The    Railway    Company  Iltc,' of shall when and so. soon as the  treats same shall, have been fully  > filled, in,, and not In any event  later than five (5) years from the  delivery of said conveyance, make,  grade and pave as city streets  in manner. satisfactory to the  City Engineer, the areas set out in subparagraphs (B) and (C) of article 4.  and will thereafter, maintain, repair and  repave the said streets,, when and as  required by the City., and will pay one-  half of the cost of making, grading  and paving the street comprised in  area set out in sub-paragraph (D) of  Article 4, including extension thereof  through Lots 11, 12 and 13, ln Block  3 referred to in Articla 3, and will thereafter pay one-half the cost of maintaining, repairing and nanavlng the said  last named street by, the City. In cose  the British Columbia. Electric Railway  Company, under, tha terms of its agreement with the City,, be responsible for  the paving or repaying of any portion  of any such streets,, then the paving or  repaying of such last named streets  shall be done by the Railway Company  in conjunction with the British Columbia Electric Railway Company, ao that  the latter compaay may pay, or provide. Its fair and proper proportion of  the cost, of the. work. Is tbe event of  the Railway Company and the British  Columbia Electrkt Railway Company being unable to agree as to the doing of  any of the said, works, then the City  shall itealf do tiie meek, the Railway  Company paying such portion of the  cost thereof as is not payable by the  British Columbia Electric Railway Company as aforesaid. The Railway Company further agrees that In respect of  any streets.. lanes er passages other  than those btarelnfeafore in this Article  referred to mad* or conatructed by the  Railway Company and permitted to be  used by the public in or upon the Railway Property tho Railway Company  shut at all times keep such streets,,  lanes and passages paved and in good!  repair. Ia cose at the Ume when under  the provisions ������f this Article any streets  are to he paved it Is impracticable ln  the opinion of the City Council to do  the work in consequence of the ground  being liable to settle or otherwise, then  the Railway Company shall by planking or otherwise make temporary roadways suitable for use -by the public,  and thereafter when practicable to pave  such streets the Railway Company  shall pave same or pay' one-half of  the cost of paving as provided in this  Article. >  Coxnpletten 21. The Railway Company  shall proceed with all the  works hereunder including  the works referred to ln  Article 18, so that the  Union Passenger Station,  terminals, tunnels and works shall be  fully established, constructed and completed within Ave (5) years from the  date of delivery of conveyance as aforesaid. The Union Passenger Station  shall be constructed and established  facing on the driveway referred to in  Article 36 and at some point between  the northern boundary of the Railway  Property and the northern boundary of  the "Main Roadway" marked (B) on  the plan referred to in Article (4).  The freight sheds shall be located immediately adjoining the roadway shown  on said plan and marked (C). Said  passenger station and freight sheds  shall thereafter be permanently maintained in such place, or in such other  place as shall be agreed upon by the  City Council. Nothing herein contained,  however,   shall   prevent     the   Railway  Company, or its successors, from establishing or causing to be-established additional passenger, freight and shipping  accommodation and facilities on the  , Railway  Property.  Joint 22.   The   Railway   Company  Use by. shall so design and con-  Other struct the/ Union Passenger  fctttlways Station, terminals, buildings,  tracks and facilities, In so  far as same are to be located upon the  Railway Property, as to reasonably  provide for the use thereof not only by  the Railway Company and the Canadian Northern Railway System, but by.  such other railway companies (including the Pacific Great Eastern Railway  Company) as may require to make use  thereof. Any other such railway company shall be entitled to the joint use  of the aald passenger terminals, and  stations, including the tunnels to the  extent of the reasonable capacity thereof, in so far as such use shall not interfere with the reasonable and necessary use and enjoyment thereof by the  Railway Company or the Canadian  Northern Railway System, or any  other company which may be then  making use of sueh facilities, upon  payment of just and reasonable compensation for such use. The right of  other railway companies as aforesaid  shall Include the right of railway companies entering such terminals otherwise than through such tunnel or tunnels to obtain access to such terminals  and station, and. If necessary for that  purpose, to connect with or cross the  tracks of the Railway Company at'a  point between the portal of said tunnel or tunnels nearest to the Railway  Property, and such property, or at such  other point as may be most convenient,  having regard to the interests of the  Railway Company and of. such other  railway companies entering such terminals as aforesaid and of other railway companies using or that may use  such terminals, such point in case of  dispute to be determined by the Lieu-  tenant-Govenror hi Council. The extent of the reasonable capacity of such  passenger terminals and station and of  the use which would interfere with the  reasonable necessary use and enjoyment thereof as aforesaid shall, In case  of any dispute, be determined by the  Lieutenant-Governor in Council.      ,  Tarda, ate.,  AdSqnat*  for ths  BaUways  X-oeattoa  et  Terminals  23.   The    Railway    Com-  ?any shall provide and  urnlsh upon the Railway property sufficient  and adequate yards,  tracks and freight sheds to at all times  reasonably accommodate snd provide  for the handling of tbe freight cars  and freight of any other railway companies referred to In the first . sentence of Article 22, 1* so far aa by  doing Its own -reasonable and necessary  use and enjoyment of the "Railway  PrOpertv snail not Be substantially  Impaired or interfered with, and such  3uestlon, ln the event of dispute, to be  etermlned   by    the    Lieutenant-Governor In Council.  Control 24. Subject always to the  of Yards authority of the Lieutenant-  ana Sheds Governor In council under  this agreement,, the said  freight yards and freight sheds shall  be under the sole control of the Railway Company, and the freight cars  and freight of any other railway com-  fiany as aforesaid shall be handled sole-  y by the Railway Company, except  that such other' railway company shall  be entitled to access to and to place Its  freight' cars upon the transfer track  or tracks referred to in Article' 25.     i  aTsndHng 25. The Railway Company  "rreight shall, handle both in and out  Can and through any freight yard  -Freight or yards that it may estab-  of Other lish on the Railway Prop-  Bsilways erty the freight ears of  ' other  companies  referred   to  in the first sentence of Article 22, for  such period and upon such terms and  subject to such stipulations and upon  payment of such just and reasonable  compensation as may from time to time  be mutually agreed upon,.and the Railway Company shall provide reasonable  and convenient access to such yard or  yards, so that such other companies  may enter same for the purpose of placing cars-on a suitable transfer track or  tracks which the Railway Company  shall provide therein. ' - The Railway  Company shall also handle .both in and  out through the skid' tunnel or tunnels  the freight and passenger cars and  trains of any such other company  (which is not desirous of handling  such cars and trains itself by electrical-devices), and in the case of freight  cars and trains shall haul same to  and from such transfer track or tracks,  and in the case of passenger oars ana  trains shall haul same to and from  the Union Passenger Station, for such  period and upon such terms and subject to such stipulations, and upon  payment of such just and reasonable,  compensation as may from time to  time be mutually, agreed upon. The  Railway Company shall handle both ln  and out through its freight' sheds on  the Railway Property the freight of  such other companies for such period  and upon such terms and subject to  such stipulations and upon payment of  such reasonable compensation as may  from time to time be mutually sgreed  upon, and shall allow access,. by means  of any driveways lt may estabtish, to  said freight sheds for the receipt and  delivery of the freight of Sueh other  companies, provided that the Railway  Company shall not in so doing, substantially impair or interfere with its  own reasonable and necessary Use and  enjoyment of the Railway Property,  and sueh question, in the event of dispute, to be determined by the Lieutenant-Governor In Council;  Sows-* 26.   In  the event of the  Usatsaaat*' Railway Company refus-  0orsmor Ing   to   allow   any   other  in. CoaaoU - railway company to use  the said Union Passenger  Station, terminals, buildings, tracks  facilities or tunnels, or refusing to allow any other railway company .-to obtain access ta said passenger terminals and station, or to connect with -or  cross the tracks of the Railway Com-  ?any, as atoreaaid or neglecting or reusing to handle or haul the freight  or passenger cars or trains of any  such other railway company as aforesaid, or. neglecting or. refusing to  handle the treight cars or freight of  any other railway company as aforesaid, or in any other manner neglecting  or refusing to comply In any particular with the provisions of Articles 22  to 26 Inclusive or In tbe event'of any  such other railway company complaining of tha service given by the Railway Company in connection with such  Union Passenger Station, or in handling or hauling such freight or passenger cars and trains, or handling  freight or in the event of the Railway Company���������and any such other  company as aforesaid���������falling to agree  on the period or upon the terms and  conditions or upon, the sum to be paid  as a. Just and reasonable compensation  for any of the matters aforesaid, such  other company shall have the right to  apply to the Lieutenant-Governor ln  Council, who shall have power to-order  compliance with said Articles 22 to 25  inclusive,, and to direct, the manner  thereof, and shall determine the reasonableness or otherwise of such neglect  or refusal or service, and confirm such  refusal, or direct the Railway Company to permit the joint use of such  Union Passenger Station, terminals,,  buildings, tracks, facilities and tunnels  to the extent herein provWed, the nature  and extent of such use to be determined by the order of the Lieutenant-  Governor in Council, or direct that such  other company have access to said  passenger terminals and station and be  at liberty to connect with or cross' the  tracks of the Railway Company for  that purpose, or direct the Railway  Company to handle or haul the freight  and passenger cars and trains' (or any  of same) or handle the freight of such  other company as aforesaid, or Improve  the service, as the case may be, tn  such manner and for such period and  upon such terms, and subject to such  stipulations, and upon payment of such  sums as the Lieutenant-Governor in  Council may determine, but nothing in  this agreement contained shall be  deemed to authorise any order or direction compelling the Railway Company  to increase the capacity of its* tunnels  or to construct any additional or other  tunnel than as in this agreement expressly provided.  sToa-Xntor-       27.   The    Railway    Com-  fexencs pany  shall  not so   long  With Other      as   reasonable   and   just  Bailways compensation   as   herein'  before referred to ls  duly paid, at any time do or permit to  be done any matter or thing to impede  or Interfere with the use by the Pacific  Great Eastern  Railway Company,  or other railway company entitled to  make use ot same, of. the passenger  station, terminals, buildings, tracks,  yards, tunnels, driveways, sheds and  facilities referred to in Articles 22 to  24 inclusive.  Taxes 28. Ths Railway Company  agrees that, except as in this  Article stated, the tax exemption contained in Chapter 3 of the Statutes of  British Columbia for tho year 1910.  and schedule thereto, shall not apply  to. the Railway Company's portion of  the: bed of False Creek, in this agreement designated as . the' "Railway  Property." The said Railway Property  shall continue exempt from all taxes  during three years from the delivery  of conveyance as aforesaid; during  the two years following, such three-  year period, the Railway Property  shall b* assessed in like manner as  other lands and improvements are assessed, but the Railway Company shall  be liable to pay only three-fifths of  ���������he taxes based upon, the land value  under the assessment and the Assessor ln fixing such land value shall  include therein' the value of any and  all filling done under this sgreement,  but no other Improvements. After the  expiration ef such two-year period and  until the year 1924, when the exemption referred to in the said Statute ex-  Sires, the Railway Property as herein-  efore defined shall be assessed and  land value fixed in manner aforesaid,  and the Railway Company shall pay  the taxes based on sueh land value.  Taxes for the purpose of this Article  shall be taken to mean and include all  taxes and rates either for ordinary  yearly or usual taxes and rates or for  school taxes and rates or Otherwise  howsoever, but there shall be no exemption as to local Improvements.  Carolina 29. The Railway Company  or Scott consents and agrees to the  Street City extending   either   Caro-  Brtdgo lina or Scott Street as the  City may at any time elect  by an overhead bridge of such material  and design as the City shall determine  across the bed of False Creek, and  agrees to permit the city to place and  at all times maintain the footings and  supports of such bridge upon the? Railway Property, and to provide the/ land  necessary therefor. The Railway  Company shall also provide from out  of the Railway Property such land adjoining Main Roadway being extension  of First/ Avenue and adjoining, ������������������ the  street on the south boundary of the  Railway Property as the City shall  designate as nece&sary for the erection  thereon of steps and ramps -leading  from the said streets to the said overhead bridge ln addition to the width of  such streets. The Railway Company  shall pay one-half the cost of such  bridge, Including such, last mentioned  steps and ramps, in so far as the same  shall be upon or over the Railway  Property. The Railway .Company shall  give to the City three months' notice  before commencing to. construct its  tracks upon the Railway Property of  the date when such construction of  tracks will: be commenced and during  said period of three months the City  Engineer shall designate the location  and dimensions of such footings, supports, steps and ramps. The bridge  shall be designed and constructed having regard to the uses to be made of  the Railway Property, and so as to  interfere therewith as little as reasonably possible.  Additional 30. The Railway Com-  Brldgas . pany consents and agrees  at. * S. to    the City at any time  hereafter extending, .by  means of overhead bridges, two additional streets running north and south,  one to the east and one, to the west  Of the hereinbefore mentioned overhead  bridge, from Carolina or Scott Street  across the bed of False Creek, and  agrees to permit the City to place and  thereaftetr at all times maintain on  the Railway Property footings and supports, and to provide the land necessary therefor. Such bridges shall be  designed and constructed having regard to the use to be made of the  Railway Property, and so as to interfere therewith as little as reasonably  possible. So far as practicable the  footings and supports of these bridges  shall be in line with the footing and  supports of the Carolina or Scott Street  bridge. If practicable the City will  designate the locations of such footings  before the Railway Company shall  establish its tracks, and should tha City  fail so to do it shall pay the cost of  moving any of the tracks of the Railway Company which may be interfered  with by the construction of such footings and supports. The City shall have  the right by its officers, servants,  agents, workmen or employees to enter  In and upon the Railway Property for  the purpose of constructing, maintaining and repairing the overhead bridges  running North and South authorized by  this agreement, and the Railway Company agrees to grant and does grant  to the City such easements as shall  be necessary upon the Railway Property ror the purposes in this article  mentioned.  Satsnsloa 31. Whenever the City shall.  ���������first determine  to  extend    First  ���������aveaae Avenue so as to connect.said  First Avenue at Clark Drive  with bridge or overhead crossing across  the property of the Vancouver, Victoria  and Eastern Railway and Navigation  Company, the Railway Company shalL  pay to the City one-half of the cost, of  Fifty-nine (69) or such portions of said  Lots and such portion of Block Sixty-  eight (68) as shall be necessary for such  purpose, all in District Lot. 264. A in.  Group 1. New Westminster District up  to a width for such atreet of one hundred and twenty-five (126) feet, including the purchase price or values paid  for or fixed for same. and. all costs,  charges and expenses in connection with  purcnasing, acquiring or expropriating  same. In case the price for which the  City can purchase any- portion of said  land is deemed too high by the Railway Company, then the price of same  shall be determined by arbitration under Section 133 of the Vancouver ~ Incorporation Act and amendments. The  said cost of purchasing or expropriating, of l which the Railway Company  shall pay one-half, shall mean the total  cost of same whether to the City alone,  or to the City and any other person  providing any part of such cost  Brtdgss 32. The Railway Company  B. ��������� W. shall connect the bridge or  overhead crossing referred to  in Article 31 with the area or portion  of land described in Article 4 B (Main  Roadway) by suitable ramps to be constructed of such size, materisl snd design snd in such manner as the City  Council shall direct. When from time  to time pursuant to order of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, or to resolution of the City Council, said bridge  or overhead crossing is requ'red to be  extended westerly to or towards Main  Street, for the purpose of avoiding the  crossing of railway tracks in the bed of  False Creek, same shall be so extended  and constructed ay the Railway Company at such width as the City Council  shall determine,, and with suitable  ramps connecting with said Main Roadway; if such extension ts to avoid the  crossing of tracks at a point one thousand feet or more west of Glen Drive,  formerly Boundary Avenue, . marked  "Glen Drive" on the plan hereto annexed, then sad in such case the said  bridge or overhead crossing shall be  so extended and continued by the Roil-,  way Company to the easterly boundary  of the overhead bridge referred to ln  Article 29 (Carolina or Scott Street  bridge) and if such extension is to avoid  the crossing of tracks west of said  bridge referred to In Article 29, then  such bridge or overhead crossing shall  be extended to such point west of said  bridge referred to in Article 29, as the  City Council shall determine; and from  the westerly end of any such extension the Railway Company shall construct suitable ramps to said Main Roadway, and all extensions of said bridge  or overhead crossing referred to In  Article 31, and all ramps therefrom  referred to in this Article, shall be  constructed of such size, .material and  design and in such manner as may be  directed by order of the Lieutenant-  Governor in Council, or resolution of  the City Council, and such extensions  and ramps shall at all times be maintained and kept in repair by the Railway Company. Such extensions shall  be so constructed that there shall be  no level railway crossing thereof.  Sewers. 33. The Railway Company  consents fo the City extending  any of Its sewers, drains, and culverts  from time to time through' the Railway  Property at such places as shall be con  venient to the City, and in conformity  with any general .plan < or system of  drainage or sewerage that may from  time to time, be designed by or on behalf of the City. And the Railway Company grants to the City the right at  any time and from time to time to  enter upon the Railway Property, and  to repair, renew or re-build any such  sewers, drains and culverts, , and the  Railway Company agrees to grant, and,'  does grant, to the City such easements  as shall be necessary upon the Railway  Property for the purpose in this Article  mentioned, and the Railway Company  agrees to pay the cost from time to time  of such extensions in so far as such,  extensions may, be in the bed of False  Creek. . -..  Water 34. The Railway Company  Courses, agrees that In the event of the  City diverting or otherwise  taking care of any natural water course,  new running into False Creek or preventing any flow from such water  course from running therein, to,pay to  the City the amount lt would have cost  the Railway Company to itself take  care of such. water course, or the flow  therefrom, the amount in case of dispute to be settled by arbitration.  Sroteotion 36, The Railway Company  of Street shall at all times hereafter  Tra-Bta. furnish and provide all  necessary and adequate protection for vehicular ��������� and pedestrian  traffic at all.streets, roads or highway  crossings on the Railway Property, and  on the lines within/the City of Vancouver of the Railway Company entering  through the tunnel or tunnels.v and if  any order shall at any time be made  by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council  in respect of protection at any such  crossing the Railway Company will  agree and consent that all cost and expense of' such protection shall, by such  order, be directed to be paid by the  Railway Company, provided that If any  such street road or highway is carried  over or under any track of the Railway  Company as protection for, any such :  traffic (whether under order as aforesaid or. otherwise), then such street  road or highway shall be so carried  over or under at the full width thereof. This article shall be without prejudice to the liability of any person  (other than the City) to contribute or  pay any, portion of said cost or expense  other than any such portion of cost or  expense which may be repayable at  any time by the City to such person.  Bri-rswa-f. 36. The Railway Company  shall reserve and permit  the use as a public drive-way of a strip  or area fifty feet (60) in width oft  the Railway Property adjoining the  easterly portion of the area or portion  of the bed of False Creek set out ln  sub-clause (1) of sub-paragraph (A) -of  Article 4, and running north and south  from the area of portion set out in  sub-paragraph B of Article 4 to the  southerly boundary of the portion of  the property on the north side of False  Creek heretofore conveyed to the Vancouver, Victoria and Eastern Railway  and Navigation Company (or for such  portion of said distance as the City  shall deem necessary), and the City  shall provide the land to continue such  drive-way from, at or near the south  end thereof to Main Street, and from,  at or/ near the north end thereof to  Main Street or to some other street  or highway connecting with Main Street,  and may make such continuations ln  either rounded or curving directions, or  in such other directions or manner as  the City shall deem advisable, and may,  if the City deem it advisable, make  such driveway either fifty feet (60) in  width throughout or any greater width  throughout than fifty feet (50) and for  such purpose may use such part of the  area or portion of lands set out In subclause (1) of sub-paragraph (A) of  Article 4 as shall be requisite or necessary. The Railway Company shall reclaim and fill in in manner satisfactory  and to a grade required by the City  Engineer the whole of the said driveway at and within the times hereinbefore specified for the Railway Company to reclaim and fill in the City  Property, and the Railway Company  shall pay to the City all the cost and  expense of paving. said driveway, and  shall thereafter pay to tho City all the  cost and expense of re-paving and maintaining in good repair the said driveway at any time in the future. .������������������.-,  |.abor.      37.   The     Railway     Company  shall not carry on any of the  construction works referred to in this  Bereement on or in connection with the  Railway Property or the City Property '  on the Sabbath Day: and shall not employ upon the construction of any of the  works referred to in this agreement  either directly or indirectly any Aslatio  or persons of the Asiatic race, and in the  event of the Railway Company so employing any Asiatic or person of the  Asiatic race, it shall forfeit and pay to  the City one dollar (fl.00) for each and  every day or portion of a day that each  such Asiatic or person of the Asiatic  race may or shall be employed by it.  Wage*.     38.    The    Railway 7. Company  shall pay or cause to be paid  to any and all workmen, artisans, mechanics and laborers employed in connection with' the construction of any  of the works .referred to in this Agreement upon the Railway Property or the  City Property the current wages paid by  the City at the time to competent workmen engaged upon similar work, the  same- working hours to prevail and no  labor to be paid at a less rate than the  minimum wages paid at the time by the  City, "and iii the Jevent of the Railway  Company falling to pay to any workman, artisan, mechanic or laborer wages  in accordance with the provisions of this  Article, the Railway Company shall pay  to the City one dollar (f 1.00) per man  for each and every day or portion of a  day that any such workman, artisan,  mechanic or laborer Is employed or paid  at wages less than are provided in this  Article, such one dollar ($1.00) to be  paid for each person employed for each  day or portion of a day that he ls em*  ployed at wages less than aforesaid.  The amounts specified in this Article  and in Article 37 are agreed upon as  liquidated damages and not as a penalty,  and the liability to pay such amounts  shall not prejudice or interfere with the  rieht of the Supreme Court of British  Columbia, or a Judge thereof, to grant  mandamus or injunction to enforce  obedience to such Articles, and the Railway Company agrees that obedlenca  thereto may be so enforced at the suit  of the City.  Maotsrs. 39. The Railway Company  agrees that all Its employees  engaged in and upon the construction of  any of the works hereby agreed to be  done, shall be residents of the Province  of British Columbia, in so far as it is  possible for the Railway Company to ob*  tain such employees who are residents  of British Columbia, at the rate of  wages agreed to be paid in Article 38,  and that in and during* any such em*  filoyment the Railway Company shall  ropose no restriction whatsoever on any  such employee as to where he shall live  while employed by the Railway Company, but any such employee shall be at  liberty to live wherever he pleases when  so employed. The Railway Company  further agrees that ln any and all contracts or subcontracts let or entered  into by the Railway Company providing  for or relating to, or affecting works  hereby agreed to be done by the Railway  Company or any part thereof, the Railway Company shall provide and insert  or cause to be provided and inserted a  clause embodying and effectually providing for the carrying out of the provisions of this Article and Articles 37,  38, 40 and 45, but such. provision and  insertion shall not tn any way release  the Railway Company from any liability  under this Article or Articles 37, 38, 40  and 45.  State-rials. 40. The Railway Company  further agrees that all materials and supplies purchased and obtained by it for the construction and  carrying out of any of the works in  this agreement referred to shall, provided terms and prices are as favorable as  can be obtained elsewhere, be purchased  and obtained within the Province of  British Columbia  Bights 41. Nothing hereinbefore con-  t������f City, tained shall prejudice or take  away the right of the City to  apply to the Lieutenant-Governor in  Council or other authority (Dominion,  Provincial or local) official or person  having jurisdiction in that behalf for an  Order compelling or directing the Railway Company to fulfil, carry out and  perform any of the terms and provisions'  of, or any of the works agreed to be  done, performed or carried out by the  Railway Company In this Agreement or  any matter or thing relating thereto.  Bond. 42. The Railway Company shall  rurnish  a  bend   or  bonds   with  (Continued  on  next page)  i-E-SaSiimjt'w-^-'^iSS^^Qa^S^S^^^iS^-   ,$-."-.-���������:j-?.:  Mivi>SMHs-sss|iH  fe^fr-^^'HFsJfe-g.-vfe.^A'S'  ��������� irFiG^XSZlS ; V-V<  Friday. February 21,1913  THE WESTERN CALL.  ������*  Phrenology  MRS. YOUNG  Qlvoa Praotloal Advloa  On Bosiness Adaptation, Health  and  Happiness  806 Granville  Street, Corner Robson  Hours: 10 a m. to 9 p. m  Every Woman  , Is interested and ahoald know  i about the wonderful  - sUk TOtV yTfttKIn  It If ha e-umotaap*4y".  the MAHVEL. aeoepf no  other, bat send stamp (br-ffloa* .  ���������rated book-aaalod. .It gtvaa foil  serttenlara and dlrectiousirtTaluable  to:UalM-WnOMORSUPPI/V CO.,Wlndao-*. Ont  Oenceal Asento for Canada.  A DETECTIVE'S ADVICE  Before emplorins* a Private'Detective, if you don't  'know your man, ask: your  legal adviser.  JOHNSTON, the Secret  Service .Intelligence Bureau, Suite io3������4  319 Pender St., W.  Vcacouvar. B. C>  The human being la made up  ot two parts, the Mental and  the Physical, or in other words,  "Mind and Matter."    7  Perfect Health is co-ordination or harmony between Mental and Physical, a condition in  which tha brain baa free and  uninterrupted communication ���������  with every part of the body.  Disease is incoordination or  discord, the communication between the brain and the diseased part being hindered.  Therefore, to bring a sick person back to health, coordination must be restored, there  must be free communication between the brain and the diseased part, the hindrance must  be removed. .'   .,-  Drugs and prescriptions do  ^ not-restore co-ordination. Tbey  are supposed to act on' the diseased part which is physical.  Operations cut oat the diseased  physical part, and do not restore co-ordination.  Christian   Scientists,   Mental  *" HealerB and others work on the  mental part by giving suggestion, etc.   This does not restore  co-ordination.  Now See -tile' Difference  A Chiropractor, by Spinal Adjustment, removes the pressure  which is hindering communication between the brain and the  seat of trouble. Nature -then  sets to work and soon restores  co-ordination, Harmony, Health.  Some day YOU will try Chir-  opractlc     Spinal     Adjustment.  Why not now? It will make you  , feel years younger, make a new   >  man or woman of you. i  For further information and  explanatory literature, call on  Ernest Shaw, P.C  Chiropractor.  250 22nd Avenue East  (Close to Main St)  Office Hours:  1-30 to 6.  Free.  Consultation  sureties and in form satisfactory to th*  City in the penal sum of one million Ave  hundred thousand dollars ^$1,600,000.00)  each conditioned for the due performance ln accordance with the provisions  of this Agreement of the several things  which are agreed to be performed by the  Railway Company and, or the Canadian  Northern Railway Company by the following Articles of this Agreement, that  Is to say: Articles 2, 3, 9, 10, 11 (except  as to maintenance after construction) 12,  16 (except as to maintenance after construction and completion), 18, 20 (except  as to maintaining, repairing and re-  paving streets or paying half the cost  of such, and except as to the last paragraph of said Article), 21 (except as to  maintenance after construction and completion), 29 (lf the extension of such  street is mode within five years from  the delivery of conveyance as aforesaid),  31 (if the purchasing or expropriating  referred to in said Article Is done within  Ave years from the delivery of  conveyance as aforesaid), 82 (if the  order or determination to extend such  bridge or overhead crossing is made  within Ave years from the delivery of  conveyance as aforesaid), 87, -38, 89  and 40. Unless said bond or bonds  are furnished within ninety days from  the passing of Act referred to in Article  1 or from the obtaining of approval referred to ln Article 2, whichever shall  be last, this Agreement shall become  null and.void except as mentioned tn  Article 2. The said conveyance shall  not be delivered until said bond or bonds  have been furnished.  Completion 43. In the event of the  at Ballway Railway Company and, or  Company's the Canadian Northern  B-menaa. Railway Company,  failing  to perform, in accordance  with the provisions of this Agreement,  any of the several things agreed  to be performed' by the Articles  referred to in the last preceding  Article, the City shall be at liberty  to perform the same at the expense of  the Railway Company, and this provision shall be inserted in the bond or  bonds referred to In Article 42, and the  said bond Or bonds shall among other  things be conditioned for the payment  of the expense of performing such work  if same has been performed, or the  amount which It would cost to perform  same if same has not then been performed, such amount when recovered to  be expended by the City in -performing  such work.  By-X*w. 44. This Agreement shall not  take eKect until a by-law  approving of the same has been voted  upon and received the assent of the  electors of the City of Vancouver, under  and In manner provided by the provisions Of the Vancouver Incorporation Act  and amendments, for the submission to  and voting upon and assent of the electors Of and in respect of By-Laws for  contracting debts, and until this Agreement has been ratified and confirmed by  an Act of the Legislature of the Province  of British Columbia. All parties shall  Join in endeavoring to obtain the necessary ratifying legislation.  Indemnity. 46. The Railway Company  shall Indemnify, protect  and save" harmless the City from'and  against any liability for damages, compensation or . costs arising', from or  occasioned by any work or works done,  performed'or carried on Or agreed to be  done, performed or carried on by the  Railway Company in and by thiB Agreement, or any work or works incidental  to or in connection with the same, or by  any work or works of. whatsover kind  or nature shall hereafter be done, performed or carried on by the Railway  Company or by any use which shall at  any time hereafter be made by the Railway Company With respect to any Of the  lands or property referred to in this  Agreement, or by any act, thing, or deed  by the City hereby agreed to be done, Or  which may be done,-performed or carried  out by either the City or the Railway  Company in pursuance of and in fulfilment of this Agreement or in respect to  the lands and p-*o*perty referred to herein, and If any claim for any such damages, compensation or cOsts Is made or  action for same brought against the City  the Cit" will notify the Railway Company of such claim or action, and the  Railway Company will, be at liberty in  the name of the City, but at its own  cost and expense, to defend such claim  or action.  46. Should the Act ratifying and confirming this  Agreement and authorizing  repair  and  good  order    and   condition.  'Where, under .the terms of tbis Agree  ment, any works are to be maintained or  kept in repair by the Railway Company  on the City Property, the same shall be  and empowering the part-  !|fl  Ktsisiatto-a.  ies hereto to carry the same~lnto elfecti  referred to in Article 1 hereof, not be  passed within eighteen months from the  date of this Agreement, then this Agreement and every clause," condition and  thing therein contained shall be null and  void, and the parties hereto shall be  and be deemed to be in the same position  as If this Agreement had never been  made, except that the Railway Company  shall continue liable to re-pay to the  City any cost and expense which the  City may have incurred which under the  terms hereof are payable by the Railway  Company. '������������������'���������';  Interpretation. 47. All Acts, deeds,  ��������� .. '* matters and things  which by this Agreement are to be done,  performed, fulfilled or carried out by the  Railway Company shall be so done, performed, fulfilled and carried out at the  sole cost and expense of the Railway  Company. Where any order to be  performed or obeyed by the Railway  Company ls made by the Lieutenant-  Governor in Council, pursuant to the provisions of this Agreement, auch order  shall be binding upon the Railway Company, and Bhall be promptly compiled  with by the Railway Company. Where,  by the terms of this Agreement, any  works are to be maintained or kept In  repair by the Rallwayy Company, the  ���������mnw  shall   be maintained  and kept  in  Electric Restorer for Men  PhosDhonol **"J5** #WT ?**!? to *he !)W,*r  rnwi-wwwf *~ *t������ proper tension; restores  vim and vitality. Premature decay and all sexual  weakness averted at once. Plwepbswo! will  matte yon a new man. Price tg a B0Xv0tt"JP I0'  {6. Mailed to any address. The Booboll Dm*  {>���������������������������. Cfetftarlsss, Oat.  Sold at  Campbell's   Prug   Store  Cor. Hastings and Granville Sts.  Vancouver, B.C.  <8f  SPECIAL VALUES  GIRLS' TAM3 in red, brown, myrtle, cream and  navy.   Reg. to $1.25, to clear.,.  25c  GIRLS' JAPANNED WATERPROOF HATS, black  and tan shades.    Regular to $2.00, toclear.......  25c  GIRLS' HEWSON SWEATER COATS-Pine knit, pure  wool, splendid for wearing under a rain cape. Colors  red, brown and navy. Regular to $2.50. al f-IA  To clear      :....... 1 .QU  GIRLS' LONG COATS in tweed and brown serge; only  2 dozen of them. Sizes 26 to 24 Regular 4 *mm  upto$9.00.   Toclear        1 . f O  BOYS' SUITS-Fine quality tweeds and worsteds, full  bloom pants; about 200 in all.     *a t x  To clear at a reduction of  *&*$~3~ pCr Cent.  Clubb & Stewart  309-315 Hastings St.W. Phone: Sey. 702  maintained and kept in repair In good  order and condition, to the satisfaction  of the City. Whenever in this Agreement  lt Is provided that any option shall or  may pe exercised or request made or  notice given, or proceeding, act, thing or  deed done or performed by the City, the  same shall, unless required by this  Agreement to be done by by-law, be exercised, made, given, done or performed  by the City Council by resolution. Where  in this Agreement reference is made to  any order, decision, determination or approval to be made or given by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, such reference shall be construed to give full  power and authority to make or give  such order, decision, determination or  approval, and to refer to the Lieutenant-  Governor in Council of the Province of  British Columbia, and the power to make  or give any such order, decision, determination or approval may be exercised from time to time as may be  deemed necessary, and it is agreed that  in addition to the parties directly interested, the City shall have the right of  being represented and heard before such  Lieutenant-Governor in Council, "before  the making or glvlng-of any such order,  decision, determination or approval. If  the Railway Company shall at any time  fail to pave or re-pave any street, lane  or highway of the City in accordance  with the provisions of this Agreement,  or to do or perform any other works  which it ia liable to do and perform  under this Agreement, and which the  City under it* Act of Incorporation and  Amending Acts hai or may be given authority to do and perform as a local  improvement, the City may from time to  time do ouch paving, or .re-paving, and  do and. perform such other works as  aforesaid upon the local improvement  plan under Its Acts of Incorporation and  Amending Acts, and ln the event of the  City so doing the Railway Company"  agrees not to oppose any such action by  the City either by petition against same  or. before any Court of Revision, or-in  any other manner whatsoever. It is  nvreed between the parties hereto that  time.shall be deemed to be the essence  of this Agreement. In this Agreement  unless a contrary intention appears,  words in the singular shall include the  plural, and words in the plural shall include the singular, and the word  "person" shall include company or other  corporation: and the wOrd "company"  shall include person, and the'expression  "City Engineer" shall mean the City  Engineer of the City. Where this Agreement provides that the Railway Company shall permit other railway companies to u<e any'of the railway terminals and facilities herein referred to, the  Railway Company shall, upon the terms,  times and conditions upon which such  said Railway terminals and facilities are  to be used, being determined, enter Into  an agreement with such other railway  company or companies, setting out the  terms, times and conditions aforesaid  and agreeing to the use of such railway  terminals and facilities to the extent and  for the time, and upon the terms so determined upon as aforesaid. Where ln  or by this Agreement the Railway Company or the Canadian Northern Railway  Company, undertakes to complete any  particular work or works or acquire. or  convey any property or properties, Or do  any act or thing within any specified  time, the Agreement shall be read to  mean the time so specified, or such enlargement or extension thereof as may  from time to time be granted by resolution of the Council of the City of Vancouver. Should the Railway Company or  the Canadian Northern Railway Company, be delayed in the prosecution oi  completion of any of the workB agreed  to be constructed under this Agreement  by reason of the Act of Ood. King's  enemies, strikes not occasioned by any  act or default of the Railway Company  or, ; the Canadian Northern Railway  Company, vis., major, or other unavoidable causes, then the time herein fixed for the doing or completion of any such works shall be  extended for a period equivalent to the  time lost by reason of any or all of the  causes aforesaid. The period of such extension shall, if the City and Railway  Company or the Canadian- Northern Railway Company are unable to agree upon  the same, be determined by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, and the Lieutenant - Governor in Council shall have  the sole power to determine as to  whether any strike is occasioned by act  or default of the Railway Company or  the Canadian Northern Railway Company, and as to whether causes delaying the prosecution or completion of any  of the works are unavoidable.  IN WITNESS WHEREOF the said  parties hereto have on the day and year  flr������t above written, hereunto set their  respective corporate seals under the  hands of the respective officers ln that  behalf duly authorized.  SIGNED, SEALED AND EXECUTED  ln the presence of'  '"f'lA  eaam  ******* ******************* ********* *** 1 **t miimu m f Ifrtoched  her'and   that she ateat'a*  Provincial, Dominion and Foreign  ��������� ** *>** ii'MiiiiMiiimti *** mm *********.t !���������������������������������*���������������*.....*������������������.*  PROVINCIAL  Annexation Delegation.  Mayor Baxter appointed the following aldermen to go to Victoria on  Monday to Interview the executive of  the government on Tuesday, relative  to the~South Vancouver Annexation  Bill: Alderman McBeath, Hepburn,  MeSpadden, McMaBter and Trimble.  ���������    *    a  Annexation  Bill   la Endorsed by  Council.  SOUTH VANCOUVER, Feb. 14.���������  The Annexation Bill passed by the  Vancouver City Council yesterday received the unanimous endorsation of  tbe South Vancouver Council at a special meeting! held this afternoon.   .  ' 7- * .-���������*)   '���������������.;��������� 7  -'     '" ,'-...���������        ���������-'���������'.��������� '-''*���������,. **  ���������y    "Car Service Improvetnenta.  SOUTH VANCOUVER, 7F1eb.I4.~-  The B: C. E. R. yesterday assured the  municipal council that through cars on  Main street from Twenty-fifth avenue  to Fraser street, would be run just as  soon as the. "Y" line could be laid.  Cars will then be enabled to run  through from, the city to the Fraser  terminus, thus avoiding the present Interchange of cars at Twenty-fifth and  Main, which causes great inconvenience.  '.���������'���������'"'���������" ... .e   * '*...  ��������� 7  Effects of Tax Sale Case.  SOUTH VANCOUVER; Feb. 14���������A  refund of taxes from the year 1898 \o  the present time was asked by Messrs.  Smith Brothers in a letter to the council, read this afternoon. The firm  wrote that following upon the decision  in the Anderson tax sale case, tbey  had found that they had paid $1,400 In  taxes to the municipality on land in  D. L. 701, which they had never owned.  The request was referred to the solicitor for legal advice.  top of a slate pencil, and worth only  one-twelfth of a penny.  ese  . U. 8. Going Into Coal Trade.  BREMERTON, Feb. 14.���������The United  States is going into th������ coal business  in Alaska' ln* earnest.   Navy yard employees are today working on four coal  i Afe'i$$  ^ v*->_  i Art  self-defense.  ������ ��������� * -   - " * ' t.;  Wgnr of Peat* In Ma*l*-x *V*  President Madero has. fol}owed?VB������  example oT President Dia*.   Viatam  that he was aiaklng no pimmW 111  suppressing tha rebellion, ana thst *m       .   .,,..,-.,-.  could not rely upon the federal maaiml ���������   v <*&$������  he has tendered hla resignation, sate    "    Sflfafi  holding offlca a year and tare*  The nominal administration la  the second time placed In the haa** ���������*  Senor de la Barra, who seema to  y <j i-pw  A--f**4S  1 tTv **&  h.W(lo fnm ���������M hw ,.   mMMmw.mmit ,��������� accepted provisional authority  barges for use by the government in #.    ____*.__ tt-JMrf|��������������� ^ .  transporting fuel rrom the mines to|2L!!!!,ll^..f6?!^0fi*  tidewater.  V*1-^ ,f*."  DOMINION  As  to the execution by  the City of  Vancouver.  As to the execution by the Canadian  Northern Pacific Railway Company.  As to the execution by the Canadian  Northern Railway Company.  VOTXCs*,  TAKE NOTICE that the above ls a  true copy of a proposed By-Law which  has been taken Into consideration and  which will be finally passed by the Council in the event of the assent of the electors being obtained thereto, after one  month/from the first publication in The  Western Call, a newspaper published in  Vancouver, the date of which first publication is the 14th day of February,  1913; and that the votes of the electors  of the said Corporation will be taken  thereon on the 15th day of March, 1913,  between the hours ot nine o'clock in the  forenoon and seven o'clock in the afternoon, at the following polling places:  1 Ward 1���������At Pender Hall, corner of  Pender and Howe Streets.  Ward 2���������At the Dominion Hall, 339  Pender Street West.  Ward 3���������At the Orange Hall, corner  of Hastings Street and Gore Avenue.  Ward 4���������At the City Hall, on Main  Street.  Ward 5���������At the Oddfellows' Hall. Lot  2, Block 38, District Lot 200a, Main  Street, Mount Pleasant.  Ward 6���������At the Fairview Hall, corner  of Granville Street and Seventh Avenue.  Ward 7���������At the Exhibition Building,  Hastings Park.  Ward 8���������At Ash's Hall, corner of  Twentieth and Fraser Avenues.  WM. McQUEEN,  City Clerk.  Vancouver, B. C, Feb. llth, 1913.  M"l'������'l'������������*|"l'������������<"|"|"K-l"H������l"l"������<-H"t  LABOUR COMMISSION  SITTINGS of the Provincial  Labour Commission will be  held as follows :���������  .Nanaimo���������Monday, February  17th, at 8 p. m., Court-house.  Cumberland���������WedneEday. February 19th, at 8 p.m.  Alberni���������Monday, February  24th, at 8 p.m.  Ladysmith���������Tuesday, February  25th. at 3 30 p.m.  Steveston���������Monday, March 3rd,  at 2.30 p.m.  Chilliwack ��������� Tuesday, March  4th, at 2.30 p.m.  New Westminster���������Thursday,  March 6th, at 11 a.m., Citv Hall.  Vancouver���������Friday, March 7th,  at 10 a.m., Court-house.  The Commission is empowered  to inquire into all matters affecting the conditions of labour in  British Columbia. All persons  interested are invited to attend  and give evidence.  H. G. PARSON,  1 Chnirtna.n.  F. R. McNamara,  Secretary.    7-2-13-7-3-13  .���������t..l.������*H..|..|..l..H..l..I..I..l..l.H"l"I'-rn..|*ii-������  Marttfn Bringing Wife's Body Home.  NEW YORK, Feb. 14,���������Joseph Martin, M.P., left London Sunday on the  Frederich Wilhelm, bringing to Canada the body of his wife, who died in  London yeBterday. .  m   *>   m  To 8olve Grain Storage Problem.  SASKATOON, Sask., Feb. 13.���������Hospital elevators for the treatment of  damp grains and other internal storage  elevators will be urged upon the Dominion government as tbe right solution to tbe problem of grain storage  and marketing.  ��������� . * ��������������������������� '  Woman Kills Regular Bear.  WHITE, SALMON, Wn> Feb. 14.���������  Mrs. A. L. Hay is haled as a nimrod  here today, after killing a bear on her  ranch with two shots. Attracted by  the barking or her'dogs ahe spied the  bear up a tree and opened fire with a  pistol. After killing it she ran away  hysterical, crying: "I killed him," but  gained control over ber nerves later.  ��������� ���������   ���������  Royal City Will Have Fine Depot.  NEW WESTMINSTER, Feb. 14 ���������  The Canadian Northern Railway's terminal at New Westminster will entail  an expenditure of $3,000,000, according n0w here,  to Mr. W. O. Swan, divisional superintendent. Of tbis amount $2,000,000  bas already been spent for right-of-  way. For terminals at this city, Port  Mann, Vancouver and Lulu Island the  cost is estimated at $25,000,000.  ��������� e   ���������  Wheat for the Orient.  Hitherto only small shipments of  wheat have gone across the Pacific,  but the announcement has been made  that the Fukui Mam will come bere  next month to carry 5,000 tons of  wheat to Japan, and that she will be  the first of a number of Japanese  steamers which will come to Vancouver every month for wheat during the  coming season. This new departure is  stated to be the result of the failure f  of the Australian grain crop. The  Fukui Mam loaded herring here for the  Orient in 1907-8.  ��������� *   ���������  New Fishing Regulation*.  OTTAWA, Fefc 14.���������An order-in-  councll has been passed making a few  slight changes In the special fishery  regulations for British Columbia,  which went into effect on March 12,  1910. The new regulations provide  that the use of nets, other than gill  nets, drift nets, drag nets and seines  shall not be permitted in the capture  of herring or pilchard. A herring or a  pilchard purse seine shall not exceed  100 fathoms in length and the mesh  shall be one inch, extension measure.  The fee on a herring or pilchard purse  seine shall be $75.  8ylvla Dotes on Jail.  LONDON, Feb. 14.���������Given her choice  of paying a $35 fine or going to Jail  for eight weeks today, Miss Sylvia,  Pankhurst, the suffragette leader, selected the jail, sentence; after being  convicted of smashing a window in the  Thames police court.  , .-���������"' '��������� ���������'���������.. '���������'  Lords Reject Disestablishment.  LONDON, Feb. 14.���������The House of  Lords rejected tonight the"Welsh Disestablishment Bill 252 to 61. Thus its  fate is identical with that?of*.the Home  Rule. Bill; it must be passed by two  succeeding sessions of the House of  Commons before it can become law.  .-.. '"7" .' ��������� ' '���������; V .':  Court to Decide When Orange Is Ripe  TAliLAHASSEE, Fla.. Feb. 14.���������  "When is an orange ripe?'' This is  one of the next questions to be put  before the Supreme Court of the  United States in an appeal from the  1 recent decision of the Florida Supreme Court upholding as constitutional the Florida green fruit law.  The Florida statute prescribes the age  of an orange and its condition of maturity before it can be shipped out ot  the state.  ���������   ���������   e  Masked Motor Bandits Taken at  Log Angeles.  LOS ANGELES, Feb. 14.���������With the  capture of three masked men in an  automobile today the police believe  they have the street car bandits who  have held .up fifteen street can on the  West Adams line during the laat tew  weeks.  George Johnson, Bert Hamilton and  Frank Smith were arrested early today, following a running revolver battle with a squad ot policemen. Ham*  ilton Is said to haye confessed and the  police are looking for a fourth man  and a woman, alleged to be an accomplice of the gang. The battle was  bloodless.  ..'' ������ ��������� ".������������������  Dr. Friedmann Leave* for America.  KANSAS CITY, Mo., Feb. 8.���������Chas^  E. Finlay, the New York millionaire,  who offered $1,000,000 for a positive  cure for tuberculosis, so as to cure his  son-in-law, today received a cablegram  stating that Dr. F. F. Friedmann. the  German scientist, who claims to have  discovered a tuberculosis cure, left  Berlin last midnight to board the Kron  Prinzessin Cecile to sail for the  United States.  The reported reason for secrecy  about his departure was that he had  been forbidden to leave Germany by  the government, Finlay bsfb.  Finlay also said Dr. Friedmann  probably would make bis permanent  home in the United States.   Finlay is  Madero. But( at the time of writiafe  there is yet no Information that MHk  Diss, who has proclaimed himaalf provisional president, will accept de to  Barra, even as a temporary dictator  and reconciler. It appears that Via:  Intermediary:.^: fjrsa^-niiism^Bi^^^  all, and that he prt������-������Kl in 1������1 Ids owsi ^  **jy.  :z,iAM  ��������� $$$%  yii������yyi-'i\?������M  unselfflshnesa by refusing to  any permanent office.7 ::V  wmmm  ym9*A:iyAW$M������.  yyyyyyys^'  xyyyyyML^ .���������  :yyyyy$$l������0m$  ;/*rasfi8  ';,; 7 VICT0RIA7 f>AHITARll[j^;e|  ���������������������������:.. /. ./ -:-'Vi " -���������--*��������� V'>\Ai;::\y[\..i\~'s:*tf-$-lfa  Newly Opened, a Much 'N*mm^miil^A:S^^^  ���������-.tuUon^do^-tjetim^y  This new private SaiUtair.^^Ifl^MliiPft  ed at. 1931 William .Stree^Oroel-ijaiw^" -'*****������������  was opened to the public Wednaadar  evening of hut ae*ikyiiilw>:*-W  tion..was held at.' which one ^Imnd^^fii^S  and fifty persons were In attendant, ""  Including many leading professl<ps*  and business men of the (^.'-9ta0^y,,^T^^  ot' these were pnnnlnent^phyit^^  and surgeons.   All ���������awoyenXam^am^  over the Bobm^^ : appearing  elegant equipment'' bf ���������. the ������������������:liiaiiM9L\W?0.^i^^^  ���������^ ���������-.':.- 7   i . ��������� v yz--''y y'y$'-''t~sfr^rf5  It seems that nothing more "cwyVa������r-77;v^^^|gC  ftary and' Inviting for those-otU^oi77-|sft|i^^  health could be desired. ���������     .:-:yyi^y0yW$������^M  .   Mrs; Tolle, the 'congenial:mea^mai^Ay^^^^  like. head' of the establlsbmenk7iKn>:7^^  sonally conducted the. writer on:-mBi;t^y0A^������^M  spection tour- of the 'place from ���������*^'^'-y^^^^L  bottom.   Only one opinion is possible    "'"'"'"'"*'"'"*  ���������ideal in location, equipment and bt������������  perintendency. The view, from the Balconies   is   channlng.   The   majeatle  mountains, the expanse of water  the wlde-spreadii^ city, afford a pano*  rama of which one <kHdd never tira.:  we do not;Wdn4ar;tha^'.alw������^  tlents are *}nai\y:'ue*1rtw  of rest and v*iVM:tmfa;.*nn^:  ed. Vancouver haa long needed ~  such a quiet, home-like lastitutlbn  this. -We' s/e'-'cobftjia^ii:'w^^ i: ^JlSi^S  adequate tor-the^demand./W^wlin^ii^  commodate ;at,;prasent7^rty-tWi  tie nts.   IU roomy ':-t&yv*>4a^^  equipment for surginal^'Jws*s4������^W>i$?:  very Important feature of the splendid  facilities in evidence on every haiML^  We are glad to welcome this new addition to the already long list of tfo*  public and  private  institutions  that  the people of Vancouver have reason  to be proud of.  ��������� ;������������������' y ���������-iiW&mvisi  -yyyy^vMim  vyti������m  sviry<y$  ''yiAim  ..^r.'iv-.-'v;**  yy  y-3\  FOREIGN  World's Smallest Coin.  The smallest coin in the world baving a genuine circulation is probably  the Maltese "grain," a tiny fragment  of bronze about, as big round as the s  Wife Kidnapped and Imprisoned.  SAN DIEGO. Cal., Feb. 14.���������Kidnapped, she alleges, in Los Angeles by a  man whose name she gave as Fred.  Blunt, Mrs. Edith Little, wife of a Los  Angeles man, was discovered by her  husband and the local police here today in a house where, she says, she  has' been held since February 3.  Blunt shot himself through the head  and was taken to a hospital, where it  is reported he will die.  The woman declares she was held  a prisoner in the house at 1160 National avenue, this city, and didn't  know where she was. Her husband  located her through the note mailed  to him by a delivery boy, to whom  she had entrusted it.  The Los Angeles police had been  searching for Mrs. Little and had sent  out a bulletin containing a picture of  her and ber baby.  ���������   ���������   ���������  Sucragettes Use Liquid Explosives.  BIRMINGHAM, England, Feb. 14.���������  Militant suffragettes dropped a bottle  containing an explosive into tbe letterbox of the Inland Revenue Office  here today. An explosion and a fire  resulted. The box contained $25,000 in  paper money. Most of this was rescued. Among a number of suffragettes  In the police court today charged with  smashing shop windows last night was  Miss Zeelie Emerson, an American woman. She was sentenced to jail for  six weeks in default of paying a fine.  Miss Emerson led the raiders in company with Sylvia Pankhurst, who was  sentenced to two months' imprisonment. A police inspector declared that  Miss Emerson played football with his  cap, kicked him in the shins and  punched his face. In reply the young  woman declared that the    policeman  .   JUJJUSt  ������&*e9^m^9m*W*"  rawcoirrwi **ma p*ar*now  TAlEMc?5&rWer������^  of Vancouver, B. C, occupation Farmer.  Intends to apply for permission to lease*  the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted *������  chains Inland from the East shore of  Homfray Channel, about 20 chains Nortl*  East of the mouth of Marble Cree*,  Uoy������- point West coast of the mainland of British Columbia and adjolnlna  John pedersen s appliaation for lease on  the East; thence East 20 chains; thenca  South 20 chains; thence West 20 etiaina*  to the South East corner ot John pedersen's location; thence North along tho  Bast line of Pedersen's application X*  chains to point of commencement.  rv .     -.^  -HERMAN W. VANCB.  Date. 9th December,  itl2.  r*woovram **������*) atwrmmm  plttric* of Ooast, aMaf* I  TAKE notice that O. F. Monckton, of  Duncans, B. C. occupation mining engineer, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following descrlbed  landa:���������  Commencing at a post planted at tha  northwest corner of Quinn pre-emption.  Lot 379. on Phillips Arm, tnence south  40 chains, thence west 20 chain!-, thence*  north 40 chatns, thence east 20 chain*,  to point of commencement, being 80  acres more or less.  GEOFFREY F. MONCKTON.  Per Alfred J. Smith. Agent.  Date, December 9th, 1912.  uma act  TAiiootmm *Ajn> mnramtr  Ptstrlet of Coast, Baage ������  TAKB notice that M. J. Monckton, of  Duncans, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission*  to lease the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the*  northeast corner of Woolner7s preemption on the west side of Phillips  Arm, thence went 40 chains, thence north  20 chains, tbence east 40 chains, thenee  south 20 chains, to point,'of commencement, comprising SO acres more or less.  M. J. MONCKTON*.  Per A. Smith, Agent-  Date, December 9th, 1912.  17.M8-14-S-13'  HoiM-at and Artistic  Dentiatr*-  Themoat scientific and  up-to-date method*  DR. W. J. CURRY  DENTIST  301 Dominion Trust Bldg.  Open from 9 to 5 and 7 to 8.  RING UP SEYMOUR 2354 FOR  APPOINTMENT.  For Rent  3 furnished Housekeeping Rooms  $20 per month.  2S3S  Apply  Mein  Street y.-'W-~ -yr- ~~>~x'y38$i$\ yy��������� yy ~~ r^y.~~ ��������� t ���������-~&Txr~r tcsskt ~ -^f~  B  THE WESTERN GALL/  Friday, February 12,1918  1  r if  li  uiii  i! Hi  ii  k  III  i!  j  li  j  ***\\*******4 ******** lit Kit i ��������� i i m in n I** ii 1111111 *���������;  Business Directory ||  ���������������"r*M"t-'t"I"������"������"l"8 1 1 **********���������*>* I*********************-*  by them, and the prices they sell at.  For quality, go to tbls firm.  Oo to Clubb & Stewart for high-class  .gent's furnishings.  * ���������   ���������  Trimble & Norris have good buys.  Corner Broadway   and   Westminster  Boad.  ������   ���������   ���������  "Landscape gardening by Wm. Smith.  Phone, Fair. 464L, 550 Seventh Avenue E. .  * *   ���������,  Bulbs, In sixty varieties/at Heeler's  nurseries, corner Fifteenth and Main  ���������street.  * *   *  Peters & Co. do the best shoe re-  -palring; this shop is up-to-date.   2530  Main street.  * e    ���������  Swan Bros, are reliable cleaners.  We know from personal experience  (heir work Is good.,  * ���������"���������."    7   ���������������������������.���������   '  ��������� : -   . I  Por knives that will cut and hold  their edge go to TisdaU's, Limited,  618*620 Hastings St. W.  A full line of the best magazines,  fruit and candies, at the Mt. Pleasant  Confectionery, 2440 Main Street.  Bachelor Cigars are   union   made.  Tou might as well try one and have a  good smoke, when you' do smoke.       .  ...���������"������������������������������������'������������������  Lee * Wood , 623 Broadway W., sell  wall  paper that Is up-to-date.    Try  some.   Let them fix up your rooms.  ���������  .* . ���������'...  Dr. W. J. Curry, Dentist,   301 Do*  tnlnlon Trust   Building,   phone Sey.  2354, does honest and reliable work.  '   ���������: '������������������ ,.���������,'��������� ���������'.'.'���������������������������'.  The Okanagan Valley Fruit Market,  2446 Mala Street, has a fine stock of  apples;  good eaters and good cookers.  ���������"'.,���������.'::���������'>;'"7V.7..-  At 1150 Commercial Drive the 999c  Store sells everything from 6 to 999c.  Ita goods are good and worth Inspec*  ��������� ���������������������������'.���������' '���������������������������;.'.  The Don tells high-class, chocolates,  fruits and stationery, at 8648 Main  ntreet. second store from Eleventh  ���������venue.  *���������'**..-'...'  Bltulitblo paving makes ttteal roads.  Get some of their literature, at 717  Dominion Trust Bldg., or phone Sey*  s������our71M.  ���������"������������������. ���������'���������'��������� .'���������������������������  For express, beggage and storage go  to Main Transfer Co. stand. 8481  Jfartia Street, Mt. Pleasant. Phone  Fair. 1177.  For. rigs and carriages at all boors  at the day or nlgbt, go to the M  Pleasant Livery, corner Broadway and  Main.  Phone Fairmont 845.  ��������� ������������������' V ���������  In the spring the housewife's fancy  turns to cleaning and to paint. W. R.  Owen, 8887 Main street, haa a complete stock for painting and cleaning.  .- ��������� ��������� *  T*he Chic Blouse Co., 723 Georgia  Street, opposite Vancouver Hotel,  phone Seymour 8888, bas an up-to-date  ���������tock of new spring waists. Call in  ���������nd investigate.  ��������� ���������   ���������  Swindell Bros., 1417 Commercial  Prive, on page 2'of this issue have a  very Interesting list of goods carried  For dainty, clean and appetizing  luncheon just try the Queen Tea  Rooms, 618 Granville Street.  * ���������   ���������  The Honig Stores are still in the  game, and are offering bargains that  ARE bargains.   Investigation will be  worth while.  ��������� *   ������  The B. C. Telephone service makes  miles grow short. See their rates and  you will find that for quick communication 'the priceB are reasonable.  For the best grades of stationery,  books, magazines, toys and confectionery go to the Grandview Stationery,  1130 Commercial Drive, sub-agency for  the Columbia Graphophone.  ������������������.'���������'���������������������������..  *   ���������'���������'��������� .  At the corner of Commercial Drive  and Fourteenth Avenue Is the Buffalo  Grocery, 'The Home of Quality." The  groceries, fruits and provisions kept by  this firm are all guaranteed.  ��������� 7 m'-.xe ���������;:������������������.���������  Good teeth enhance appearance,  conduce to health, aid in use of language, and contribute to comfort is  the undisputable argument of Dr.  Wood, dentist, 312-313 Lee Bldg.  77:" '��������� V. e.',y .  For confidential investigations you  want a man of integrity; experience  and ability. That man is Johnston;  secrecy guaranteed. Vide press. The  Secret'Service Bureau, 319 Pender.  '���������";.'*''������������������'."���������'���������"  A reliable, high-class furniture store  is the Toronto Furniture Store, run by  Mr. M. H. Cowan, at 3334 Main Street  Dressers, buffets, tables, chairs,  couches, mattresses, bedsteads, etc.  ���������'���������yx\.\y ,y. ^yoyoy y ������������������������������������;'.-,.y..] 7  Many a train has been missed, and  many a dollar lost by a man carrying  an unreliable timepiece. Take your  watch or clock to "JL Wismer, 1483  Commercial Drive, and he will make  It reliable.  ���������������������������������������������'���������"���������''. o'y.-������ ��������� :���������:'���������  Mr. Foster in City  Bound for Australia as special trade  commissioner for Canada with a view  to bringing about better trade relations  between the countries of the South  Seas and the Dominion, the Hon.  George E. Foster, minister of trade  and commerce, arrived in Vancouver  last Friday afternoon from Ottawa.  He was given a flattering reception  on his arrival, being met at the Canadian Pacific terminal by at least one  hundred of Vancouver's leading cltisens, headed by Mayor T. S. Baxter  and many aldermanic representatives.  Early Start on Big Bridge.  Advices from Ottawa and Victoria  indicate that the many difficulties  which have retarded the Second Narrows Bridge project up to the present  time, will all be cleared up at an early  date, and that the Burrard Inlet Tunnel & Bridge Company will be enabed  to start actual construction work on  the structure within the next few  months. l  ... , Falls Five 8tories.  "Some people, you know, are remarkably hard-headed," remarked the  house doctor at the General Hospital  to a reporter last week. He was explaining that one Jim Yuen, a Chinaman, who at 5:40 p.m. last Friday  plunged out of the fifth storey of the  high building in Chinatown, at the cor  ner of Pender street and Shanghai  alley, and struck with considerable  force on the cement sidewalk, chanced  to be suffering only from a scalp  wound and a alight concussion of the  brain.  The Honig Stores, Ltd,  Beginning March 1st THE HONIQ STORES, LTD., will carry a complete line of CROCKERY AND HARDWARE.  Mr. Burke, who is conducting the Sale of Stationery and Fancy Goods, expects to clear  out these*lines by this date.  Our Hardware Department is already noted as the Real BargaixfHardware Store of Vancouver.  "Why can we do it!   Because we sell for CASH.  While Mr. Burke is closing out the other Departments we are putting on sale a big line of  Hardware at "Below Cost" Prices, such as:  Our Chain Steel Range, which is so well known and made by one of the oldest Canadian  Manufacturers and built with large fines for soft coal.  14-inch with High Closet and; Oven Thermometer; regular, $48.00, now  $36.50  16-inch with High Closet and Oven Thermometer; regular, $48.00. now .$37.60  18-inch with Polished Top High Closet and Oven Thermometer; regular, $50.00,  now  .....A........   .-..  .\    $39.60  Carpenters' Aprons, with 7 pockets, legs* or, straps, in brown or white duck; regular,  <P--L-t I t/j HU vV    ��������� ���������-*.���������������������������������������������������������>���������������������������������������������������������������^���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������.������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������^ V W  ������i   AAA   -L       OlaU-t?   X^ Oil Oil a   aM    li������f**ilff * i i '������������������'��������� ���������������������-���������*������������������--. ' --- .^--^..���������...���������.���������������..���������������..������������������-.- .......j ....._-.. ^^A.^9*Yp  Smoky City Wall Paper Cleaner;, per tinu^......��������� ............: .260  Veribrite Furniture Veneer, regular 25<t$ now���������............���������..;..... -..16c  Veribrite Furniture Veneer, large size; regular, 50c; now .r..,.���������........  . .360  Ax-LUlUXUUXIa   vUPH   jCttv-AA   ���������-������������������������-���������������������������'������������������>���������>-������������������>������������������������������������������������������.>������������������������������������,������������������'���������-��������������� aa^  Aluminum Salt and Pepper. Shakers;.2!for............ .........A......... :. 26c  Aluminum Toothpick Holders, eachL-......������......i..;.���������. ....:.............. 16c  ,    t\ I "HMlll*l*lp"     lO l/AO-AaUvaVCfa     vttvl*     ���������"������������������ ���������)������������������������������������������������������������������������ '.���������'���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������*>������������������*���������>*���������������������������.���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������>������������������'.���������*_������������������  /\1 minima la    * -L *������H*'���������' J9ttJlAKSa   I"cl,\jla' .*������������������������������������ h^...,h.. ���������....������������������.������������������ ��������� ��������� ������������������..,��������� -IUV  Phone  Sey.  3472  3473  U*M aitif ttfl HASTING STPFFT PAS'  Phone;  Sey.  3472  3473  Stanley ft Co., 1317 Main St., are  selling high-class wall paper; they  will supply the paper and put It on  your walls, by single room or by con  tract do the whole house. Their prices  are very reasonable.  '..:**;.->.���������������������������.'������������������  Did yon ever stop to think that the  business that remains in batiness is  the firm that gives satisfaction? The  Winnipeg Grocery, corner Harvis and  Campbell avenue, has been giving  satisfaction for all its career.  :.   '*  <���������. e-.e :*"  Tablets  \ To have a successful career, either  as a stenographer or book-keeper, a  course at the Success Business Col*  lege, corner Main and Tenth Avenue,  will go far towards giving you the  realisation of your ambition.  .:   e':.:*   e  .  Another store worth recommending  Is 9. nf. i������ynn's Grocery, comer Keefer  Street and Campbell Avenue. Mr.  lomn sees that all customers are  served promptly and invites anybody  and everybody to test his store.  ,   ���������   -Ve - \  The Sanitary Market, 3513 Matt  street, near Broadway, sells meats,  fl������n and poultry of a little better quality and for a Httle less money than Its  I competitors. For example, see Sanitary ad. on page 4 of this Issue.  ���������   ���������   ���������  Fruits, vegetables, flour, feed, tea,  coffee, cocoa, sugar, at the South Hill  Grocery, run by F. J. Rolston, the Reliable Grocer, corner Forty-fifth and (himself  Fraser Avenues. Also River Road and  Fraser Avenue. Phone Fraser M.  ���������    ���������    a  Wants the Lid Clamped Tight  Speaking in the Efficiency Club  rooms in the Y. W. C. A. laat week,  Alderman Ramsay, after making an  attack on the moral state of Vancouver, urged the churches and citizens  to unite and support those who -wished  to turn the city into one of clean morals. He then turned to the progress  the city had made commercially, giving figures regarding the increase lh  population and various Industries. Cob  eluding, he stated that the city was  well to the fore with regard to commercial progress and if this was to  be maintained strict attention should  be paid towards moral progress as  .well. ".:  'y.yft&.'jmfayej**^^ Wftr '���������  Lady Tupper,i^regent ef the Monici  pal Chapter of 7 the Paughters of the  Empire, lias announced that the organisation has under consideration the  raising of funds for the erection of a  memorial In Vancouver to the memory  of Captain Scott and those in the party  who perished with him. They plan to  ask the co-operation of the public. The  memorial will be placed In some suitable place in the city, but it has not  been decided yet Just wbat form tt  will take. Vancouver's citizens wore  white yesterday, the symbol of mourning for the Scott party. White flowers  'and white ribbons were In evidence  everywhere. Pupils in all the schools  wore white of somel sort, an������l white  flowers were in great demand through  out the city.  ord, but previous to his trial at the  spring assises it will be prepared.  Many Frozen Oranges Are Being  Condemned.  Beware of frozen oranges here from  California, is a warning Issued by  Mr. Thomas Cunningham, provincial  fruit inspector, to all prospective purchasers of that fruit.  Already two car loads and a number of smaller shipments have been  condemned and sent back by Inspector Cunningham and his staff within  the last two days.  For when the oranges are once  frozen and then thawed out again the  fruit very quickly deteriorates and' It*  not only worthless for food hut dan-  erous after decomposition sets In.  What makes frozen oranges hard to  detect is the fact that until the entire  heart of the fruit ^rbts the outer skin  Shows Uttle trace of the fact that It  has been frozen. There. Is even* a  chance tbat some of the frozen fruit  has escaped detection by tl������e li������spee*  tors, hut they believe they have opfc  demned most of It at least, as by this  time they have become familiar witt*1  the slight indications of the injury Ur  the oranges: "���������.'���������;��������� :^ -:.  Latest accounts from the sdutu to'  d������cate tbat nearly seventy-five perrpent  of the orange crop of California4 was?  affected by the recent unprecedented  frost experienced there last paontlt.  Some of the fruit was only sllfilttt^ui-11  fected by the frost, so lightly thati tm  all appearances it looks perfectly  sound, even when cut open���������hutiilsoani  be detected by a slight Mtter taate.  The recent frost caused at severe  loss to the orange growers of 7Culi  fornla, all citrus fruits sutferinarto a  certain extent.  Cvr. 8th &  Westm'r  Rd.  Ernestgbaw, D.C., Doctor of Chiropractic, 250 Twenty-second Avenue E*  close to ' Main Street. Office hours,  1:30 to 6. Often a slight derangement  of the spine is the cause of prolonged  disease and suffering. Chiropractic  corrects the spine.  ���������   *   ���������  G. E. McBride ft Co., corner Main  Street and Sixteenth Avenue (phone  Fairmont 899), also at corner Forty-  ninth and Fraser Avenues (phone Fairmont 1167L), are offering 20 per cent,  off heaters. Are you wanting a heater  or stove or range? Now ls your time  to buy.  Allege Forgery on Local Bank.  New York, Feb. 14.���������The glittering  swath that William Van Taffrey, a  young bank tellers of Nova Scotia, has  cut;through New York, Boston and  London, ended here last night in the  police station. Van Taffrey, who Is  20 years old, Is charged with cashing  a forged draft tor $5,400 on the Royal  Bank of Canada at Vancouver.  It is alleged that he forged the  name of the cashier to a draft payable at the New York branch of tbe  bank, then came here and represented  as the payee, and got the  money. After a glided career In Bos*  ton and London he returned to New  York, where he was arrested by a  detective who gained his confidence  by posing as a millionaire's son.  According to the police, Van Taffrey  admits his guilt;  LATEST NEWS*  ������v������H������������������������t t >���������������! 1^^ MIUIIH  I ARf YOU INTERESTED IN B.C.METHODISM? I  THEN THE  Western Methodist Recorder!  (Published Monthly)  Is almost indespeiuible to you.  No other medium will give you such general and  such satisfactory information about Methodist  activity in this great growing province. Whether  a Methodist or not you are interested in Methodist  movement   Send your subscription to  r ���������������������������������!���������? Mi9to������1st*lit^Not f-IF.Co,,U(l   ��������� ���������   VfcttTrl* l������C* !  $hOQ ���������  One Yeer  444*44*4**4**4*444**4****9* ************************)>  raamaaammsemamaasBssasesamamaamaamamakmaaaa*^^  Oddfellows' J1al|t Hain St.. Suture  February 22ticl*at *p*m*  9%. the request of leading cltisens of Ward Y (1ft. Pleasant), a M������������s  Meeting ef above Ward will he bold in the Oddfellows'Ball, Main Street, on  Saturday Waning, 22nd insL, at Eight O'clock. The speakers of the evening  willbeWs Worship Mayor Baxter, and Mr. ^. S. Taylor, K*0.  Hr.ltalpb Smith will take the chair.  Mrs. Pankhurst admits; mat tbe  Militant Suffragettes blew* up the  country residence of Mr. Uoydi George  with dynamite.  /  A great fire in Tokyo has destroyed]  a thousand buildings..  i: If You Are Sick;;  I I  I ! CALL ON i'  ERNEST SHAW, D. C.  (Doctor of Chiropractic)  250 22nd Avenue East  Chiropractic  succeeds   where  medicine fails.  Hours 1:30 to 6 Consultation free  Late President Madero, of Mttslito-  must spend his remaining days In esll������  from bis country.  Bitter cold weather suspends hoe-  tillties In the Gatttfntt Peninsula aad  at Tchatalja. Turks expected to, sue  for peace soon..    '  a*************************  BIGGAR, Sask.---lmproved warehouse and cold storage facilities are  assured for Biggar for the coming  season by the decision of Peterson and  Fels, the well-known Winnipeg contractors, to make this point their  Western distributing centre, with a  large plant in the G. T. P. yards. Produce and supplies will be handled in  carload lots, the buying being done  locally as far as possible, and a decided improvement in marketing conditions for Biggar farmers is anticipated.  Probing Hold-up. Man's History.  Not only will the series of hold-ups  and highway robberies, which have occurred during the earlier part of the  winter and for which George Wilson,  who was so sensationally captured a  few weeks ago, is alleged to be responsible, be explained, but    several  crimes of this nature which occurred  in Callofrnia and in which state this  alleged criminal is wanted, will probably come to light. This is the latest  development of this case, according to  pictures and records received recently  by the local police.  Wilson has served several sentences  of varying length in San Quentin and  Folsom prisons is the declaration of  the local detectives. He is said to be  known under the aliases of Cordon,  Smithers, Peterson and others, and ia  also said to be familiar with the conditions ln Walla Walla, Salt Lake and  several other eastern jails, according  to  these   records.    It  is  difficult  at  Dominion Gottetament inspectors de*  clare that butter is being watered by  wholesale firm* Itt Vsaeouffer. Thia  process Increases the weight and thna  cheats the cosanimer.  Yaw Can Talk Over  Our long Distance  tines Three Minutes  PR08PERITY    THE    ROLE    WITH  B. C. FRUIT GROWERS.  ELKO, B. C���������Reports of the phenomenal successes of farmers and fruit  grower? in the Elko and East Kootenay districts continue to command  the attention of real estate men and  investors, especially in view of the  record influx of newcomers booked for  arrival during the coming season.  Recent railway development in thiB  section of the province has now practically assured the position of Elko  as the entrance to the Columbia Kootenay valley and the chief transportation centre. It Is estimated in Government reports that the valley contains not less than one million acres  of arable land, in addition to immense  timber and mineral resources- With  the coming  of  improved  transporta  tion facilities the development of the  present for the police to ascertain the j district is expected to go forward very  * exact length of Wilson's criminal rec-1 rapidly.  FROM VANCOUVER  To Steveston for 15 cents.  To Port Moody for 20 cents.  To Coquitlam and Ladner for 25 cents.  To  Cloverdale. Hammond and Milner for  30 cents.  To Abbotsford and Mission for 40 cents.  To Chilliwack and Bellingham for 50 cents.  To Agassiz and  Harrison Hot Springs for  55 cents.  British Columbia Telephone  Company, Limited  Above rates are subject to change without  notice.  Writing Tablets at the " Call Office."  iiiii  ^^^^gmaammmaamdmmmmmm

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.xwestcall.1-0188551/manifest

Comment

Related Items