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The Western Call Mar 27, 1914

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Array VOLUME V.  - Subscribe for  The Western Call  Today  Published in the Interests of Greater Vancouver and the Western People  VANCOUVER. British Columbia, MARCH 27. 1914  5 Cents Per Copy  No. 46  Earl Grey Says Ulster lias Good Cause to Fight  Premier Asquith and King in Conference���������Serious Times in Old Land���������Empire on the Brink of Civil War  Field Marshal Sir John Fr$i&W  S. VANCOUVER HONOR ROLL  Councillor Rutledge,  Councillor Winram,  Councillor Stevens,  Councillor Rowlings.  Those are the men that stand for the rehabilitation of a" Municipality without a conscience.  The men who are determined that a contract  once made by the Municipality shall stand.  It looked for a season as if the whole electorate had made ups their minds to forget the  good old-fashioned, honest way of standing by a  contract once made���������but through the stand taken  -by these four men the Municipality will now be  relieved of the shameful necessity of being forced  by the courts to make good bur contracts as well  as paying sweetly for the costs thereof.  There are still some ratepayers foolish enough  to believe that "repudiation" can ever be made to  pay and to swallow the enormous doses of false  accusations , slanders and wholesale denunciations, without one vestige of proof, that constituted the mainstay of our late campaign.  There are still some workingmen ready to sell  their votes for the vain promises of jobs that  were never meant to materialize. But their ranks  are rapidly thinning now, and saner thoughts are  possessing the minds of the electorate as regards  the Bluff and Bluster that has been called by  succeeding events and the senile mutterings that  have been imposed upon us as the %isdom of a  ripe old age.  We would say, especially to the workingmen  of South Vancouver, that Gold is the most elusive of all metals, and that Gold.mining prospects, with the richest showings von:^^-surface  make often the poorest showing' when developments proceed. They say, however, that every  roan gets the Gold fever at least once in a life  time���������so after all South Vancouver must not be  too much blamed for having been "Gold-bricked"  so effectually.  The old time fable of the ''Tortoise and the  Hare" still holds good.  The race is not always to the swift nor the  battle to those who appear most strong, and the  Western Call believes that with all the surface  brilliancy of Eddie his Gas-bag has been pricked  and his "curses, like chickens, come home to  roost."  The statement is being circulated on the authority of Mr. Gold (vide daily press) that the  Canadian Bank of Commerce will not make the  loan for Main street paving until it has been referred to headquarters, thus necessitating a  further delay of 12 days���������also that unless every  one- of 4he-members of- the Council-append their  signatures to any agreement with bank same will  not be valid.  This shows still more clearly the animus that  sways Mr. Gold���������opposition to the paving of  Main street or any other public works for that  matter that will increase his assessments, but we  will not readily believe that the Bank of Commerce will be a party to any aid to repudiation of  contracts such as Mr. Gold and his co-adjutors  are doing their best to foist on South Vancouver.  Upon enquiry of Reeve Dickie, however, we  find������that these statements are on a par with all  the campaign statements of Mr. Gold.  Reeve Dickie on Thursday morning emphatically denied all knowledge of any such statement on part of the bank, and moreover stated  that the note to the bank had already been signed  by all members of the Finance Committee.  The time has come to call a halt on this method  of misleading public sentiment. The Western Call  once more, affirms that the recent campaign of  defamation conducted by Mr. Gold and backed by  Messrs/Lewis, Houston and Gateman, is nothing  less than a public scandal, and is on the eve of being completely shown up.  \\\  CONSTABLE JAMES WARD  ���������-��������� . ���������.-���������.������������������      ...    .0 ., .  Our readers will be pleased to learn that Police Constable James Ward, who fell under the  ban of the purgers at the Municipal Hall for the  part he played in a recent prosecution, was appointed Constable at Point Grey last week. This  appointment Mr. Ward has relinquished to take  up the position of Chief Constable at Cumberland, to which he was appointed at the end of  last! week, We congratulate Mr. Ward on his  speedy promotion, and the vindication of his  -abilities to perform his duties as shown by the  prompt manner of his appointments.  A Literary and" Musical Recital under the  auspices of Mt. Pleasant Methodist Epworth  League by Mrs. Alma Keeler, Elocutionist,  bron7e, silver and gold medalist, will be given in  the Mt. Pleasant Methodist church Ontario and  10th streets on Tuesday, March 31, at 5 p. m.  ������������������M^������H^^^^^^������H^4^^^^^^5VK^������:"  ^>^^M������^H^H}..|..i..t..t..t..t..t..t..H..l..l..i..t..l..I.4.  ���������/iNOfinrifica-  Birds of a featherf/ockToqeThor  T/rey ThafuseTAtSitcni shot/ Urish fy/Ae Swerg,  G-LD, TW--DY AND ONE MORE-FIND HIM.  Special From Our Correspondent at Ottawa  Ottawa, Ont., March 25,1914.  Tbe feature at Ottawa this week is tbe debate on tbe report on tbe National Transcontinental scandal. George Graham buried the charges of graft deep in tbe verbiage of a five  . hours' speech, during which be skated around a* proven charges and vented bis spleen on the  investigator, Wr. Lynch (Staunton. Mr. Liddlebro replied on tbe government side with a speech of  about three quarters of an hour, and fastened t>n the Laurier government the whole responsibility of the scandalous waste of the country's money.  Sir Wilfrid bad stated time and time again that the whole cost to tbe Dominion would  not exceed thirteen millions, whereas the real cost will be between two and three hundred millions.  Sweet William Pugsiey is back in bis place in the Bouse, and heralded his return by precipitating a row; an appeal from the ruling of the chair regarding a bi-iiuguai question. &  vote was taken, and all the Wberals and three Nationalists voted in favor of tb������ appeal from  the speaker. The Conservatives stood loyally by the speaker. Pugsley spells trouble at Ottawa,  and an outbreak may occur at any moment equal to the historic rebellion on the navy question  of last session.  The following letters from the Postoffice Department of Canada and United States have come  to us for publication :  To the Menace, British Edition, at Aurora, Ont.,  Canada:  Ottawa, March 2,1914.  ^rSir^r beg toacknowledge receipt of yourlet-  ters of the 27th and 28th of February last, making application for statutory privileges for newspapers entitled "The Menace" (British Edition)  published at Aurora, Ont. In reply I am to say  that as "The Menace," published at Aurora, Mo.,  has been placed on the list of newspapers, the  transmission of which by post in Canada is prohibited, the department is not in position to favorably consider your application. I am, sir,  Your obedient servant,  A. M. THROOP, Sec.  No. 256711.  If any further correspondence on this subject  the above number should be quoted.  Division of Foreign Mails.  POSTOFFICE DEPARTMENT  Second Assistant Postmaster General, Washington.  March 9, 1914.  Postmaster, Aurora, Mo.:  Your attention is invited to the following extract from a letter of the postal administration  of Canada, dated February 23, viz.:  "I have to inform you that the 'Menace,' a  weekly paper published at Aurora, Missouri, has  been placed on the list of publications which are  prohibited from circulation by mail in Canada,  on account of   its offensive contents."  Please cause the publisher of the paper in  question to be properly informed respecting the  matter, and such action taken at your office as  will prevent the acceptance of copies of said paper for mailing to Canada.  (Signed) JOSEPH STEWART.  The methods of the Menace in attacking political and ecclesiastical Romanism are not ours, but  we confess to some astonishment that such an incident should have passed unnoticed by our vigilant daily press.  We refrain from further comment until this  matter has been taken up at Ottawa, where it  will undoubtedly speedily be dealt with.  !(  ROBERT LEARD BORPEN.  premier of Canada.  Kentish people are proud of the present Premier of Canada, Mr. Borden, who is of Kentish  stockythe_preseiit head of^the^..familyL,beirig_an^  aged miller at Headcorn, Kent. The lineage of  Mr. Borden in direct male line is traced from  one "Henry Borden, of Borden," who flourished in the reign of Richard II., 1380 A.D. William Borden, great grandson of the above Henry,  held lands in Borden and Headcorn temp. Henry  VIII. Fifth in descent from this William was  Richard Borden, who emigrated to New England in 1638, and died at Portsmouth, Rhode  Island, in 1671. At the time of the last visit  of Canada's premier to England the interesting  fact was mentioned that the first "white" to be  born on Rhode Island was a Borden. Richard's  great grandson, Samuel Borden, surveyed and  valued Acadian lands for the British Government, and acquired an extensive estate in Nova  Scotia. Robert Leard Borden, the Premier, is his  great grandson.  THE GREATER  VANCOUVER  POT HOOK  In the City of Paris there is a restaurant situate in the South Vancouver District of it, called  "The Pothook." Every customer is met at the  door with a demand for five cents. On payment  of this small sum the patron is furnished with a  plate and spoon and starts down the line towards  the great cooking range. Here the chef, clad in  white, dips a ladle full of soup into the man's  plate and hands him a long culinary tripod. This  the customer plunges into the great Pot-au-feu  seething on the range, and whatever he stabs and  lands on his plate���������be it a pound of beef or a  potatoe or turnip���������is his prize.   Nuff said.  God Save the King  Latest from London indicates the possibility of a  I strong conspiracy to overthrow the Crown and establish a Republic.   The King's name is being purposely  ' dragged into the arena of strife.  STOP PRpSS. London, March 26���������Field Marshall Sir John French, Chief of the Imperial General Staff  of the British Army, resiemed his commission to-day: Lieut-General Sir John Spencer Ewart, Adjutant-  General, also resienpd.    Premier Asquith in conference with the Kin^-  Cuidad De Juares. Mexico. March 26;��������� Stronsr rumors that Villa���������bandit, rehel jreneral and murderer of  Benson has been defeated.  Sir Edward Carson has received the following despatch from Capt. Tom Wallace, South-African veteran, and son of the late esteemed leader  of the Orange Order in Canada, Hon. N. Clarke  Wallace: "Thousands of Loyal Canadians are  with you in your magnificent fight to preserve  the best traditions of Irish citizenship by resisting the coercion of Ulster. We are ready if  necessary to help you with men and money to  the last ditch."   Tom Wallace.  Also a cable from J. S. Horsfall, a wealthy  Australian sheep farmer, offering $100,000 to  help Ulstermen if they are driven to fight: Also  that if an Australian contingent was found necessary he would contribute $10,000 toward the  cost of it. ,-  The situation in the Motherland remains  hazy still. This, however, is certain, some one  tried to intimidate Ulster by ordering strong military and naval movements and the bluff was  called by both arms of the service declining to be  used in coercing Ulster.  Little is to-be gained by mincing words, and  it seems abundantly evident that the real Protestant element of the Empire have made up their  mind to fight if need be rather than submit to  coercion by the Ancient Enemy.  Premier Agaujth and his Government exist  only by virtue'of a solid phalanx of Romanist  members of Parliament���������Nationalists���������men whose  leaders have declared that their ultimate object  is complete separation; from the Empire.   Before  a liberal government could be formed with any  hope of success���������an agreement had to be arrived  at; with theset men. ; It is alleged -that-.������ written  and signed agreement exists calling for the enforcement of a Home Rule measure, agreeable to  them, by all the power of government.   Securing  this Redmond has delivered tbe Nationalist vote,  and Premier Asquith and his colleagues have inaugurated much needed legislation of a most  revolutionary character, that has been welcomed  in every corner of the earth.  But now the Liberal Government have to pay  the price. It has been put off as long as possible,  but the note must be met.  Politics, they say, make strange bed-fellows.  To see Asquith and bis more than 400 non-conformist henchmen���������led by the nose by Papists of  the Redmond and Devlin type is a sorry picture.  Non-conformist doctrine has of late been sadly  undermined by two factors���������Socialism and practical infidelity of modern criticism of the Word  of God. Thus it is that political non-conformism  in Britain is found allied to its former greatest  foe political Romanism.  " "Wta  point where political differences are irreconcilable the point of civil war has been reached-  Premier Asquith has received due warning that  this point has been reached in the Empire, and  that the enforcement of the legislation he stands  pledged to his Romanist political bed-fellows for  means the disruption of the Empire.  EARL GREY SAYS ULSTER  HAS CAUSE TO FIGHT  Auckland, New Zealand, March 23.���������Speaking on the Ulster crisis here today, Earl Grey  said: " E oppose the bill because it founds a nationalism based on anti-federal principles."  "The idea of settling the Irish question on the  basis of civil war is absolutely intolerable. Ulster has just cause to fight for the maintenance  of her liberty;'if Ireland is entitled to Home Rule  surely the northeast corner of Ulster is entitled to  equal consideration, having as it does a population equal to a quarter of the whole of Ireland."  "I cannot understand," he continued, "how  any Liberal can withhold his sympathy from the  people of Ulster in their resolution to defend  their liberties with their lives. It looks as if the  ship of state is going full steam ahead like the  Titanic onto an iceberg. I cannot believe that  the people of England will allow the bill to receive royal assent without a demonstration that  will make a general election necessary before it  becomes law."  ARMS MAY BE IMPORTED  Belfast Court Decides That Prohibition of Importation of Arms Into Ireland Is Illegal  Belfast, March 25.���������The Assize Court decided  tonight that the Government prohibition of the  importation of arms into Ireland was invalid, because the Act of Union provided that all subjects  should have the same privilege in respect to trade.  The decision was rendered in an action for dam-  sees hy a merchant from whom six cases of arms  had been seized.    ' ���������;/-;v-  THE WESTERN CALL.  Friday March 27, 1914  Wants to See You  Hard  Times  Prices  25c Carter's Pills  15c  50c Gin Pills 35c  50c Dodds Pills... 35c  50c Pink Pills  35c  50c Herpicide ...40c  $1.00      " 80c  50c Hind's Cream 40c  $1.00 Eno's Salt 65c  50c Zambuk .....35c  35c Cuticura Soap 25c  75c      "      Ointment 50c  35c Baby's Own Soap.25c  50c Nestle's Food....... 40c  35c Castoria..........25c  50c Scott's Emulsion...40c  $1.00      " " .75c  $1.00 B B B...        ... .75c  $1.00 Ayer's Sarsaparilla 75c  $1.00 Hood's       "75c  10c, 25c & 50c Cascarets,  10c,20c&...........    40c  25c Chase's Pills...:.:.... .20c  25c Electric Oil 20c  $1.00 Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 75c  25c Minard's Liniment. 20c  Law the Druggist  Lm Building*       Broadway and Main  Pnon Fairmont 790  PHONE FAIRMONT 1852  (At it here since 1900)  (A Trust Company)  4 Trlitory  Worth Tfiinjcing Over  Tony Menza of New York chiseled a  hole in his wooden leg and put $434 in  it for safe keeping. At night fee laid  hiB leg on a chair beside his bed. One  morning when he awoke it was gone.  After considerable search he found it  in the cellar where the thief hadt hrown  it after taking out the $434.  Readers who are now keeping their  money in Insecure places should take  warning and remember we pay 4% on  deposits, subject to your cheque withdrawal, and pay the interest  12 Times a Year  We PROTECT your none) for you and  PAY VOU for doiiif so.  AGRIEEMBWS  BOUGHT w  C0OECTEP  Short  C    \     ON  JJ'lOEfoJTi  :momtiMLy  tME.Cn/F  'Dow.Fr&uer  31/-   b2\  Crvrr.i  fcty  DEPOSIT  Specially insured against burglary  and hold-ups.  NOTARY PUBLIC  Dow, Fraser & Co.  LIMITED  317-321 Cambie Street  2313 Main Street  Between 7th and 8th Aves.  McKay Station, Burnaby  INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS  Dry Farming  The International Dry Farming Congress has  become the greatest organization in the world,  whose thought is turned toward better agriculture. The Congress has become a clearinghouse  for information, and the annuaL sessions a forum  for discussion notable in the history of the general forward agricultural movement now taking  possession of the world.  The 1914 sessions will be held in Wichita,  Kansas, U. S. A., October 7-17. The preparedness of Wichita, a city of 64,000 people, is unquestioned. The organization foresees an excellent relationship with the city of Wichita and  the state of Kansas during the year. The city  has ample railroad facilities; its location is excellent; agricultural conditions surrounding it  make the work of the Congress entirely consistent, and the facilities for housing both the Congress and Exposition are so excellent as to be  very gratifying, indeed. The Congress will be  held in the Forum, a municipally owned building,  which seats 6,000 people, and is a great modern,  auditorium, one of the largest in the West. With  it, are the Exposition grounds, much of whose  housing facilities are already in permanent existence. The nearness and the excellence of the  location cannot be overlooked.  Marquis Wheat Offer  Wichita, Kansas, March 13,1914.  My Dear Sir:���������  I want to call your attention to some prize  wheat seed. I am sure you will be interested in  it and will want some.  At Tulsa, last October, Paul Gerlach, of Allan, Saskatchewan, Canada, took tbe first prize  for the best bushel of hard wheat, securing a  Burnley threshing machine, worth $1,250.  This wheat is Marquis, which has broken all  records in the Northwest for quantity and quality  of yields under dry land conditions. The sample  tested 71pounds per bushel.  This wheat is now our property, and we have  devised the scheme of dividing it into small lots  and auctioning it to the highest bidder, the proceeds to go to the support of the Congress.  This auction will be April 1. Until that time,  I shall receive bids for one full pint each. There  will be 64 lots and not more than two pints will  be sold to any one farmer. No price has been  set. A certificate will accompany the wheat.  Money sent by those who are not successful bidders will be returned.  Don't you want some of this wheat, which, in  three years' time should produce enough to plant  a good sized field?  Very sincerely yours,  R. H. FAXON,  Secretary Treasurer.  The International Diw-Farming Congress.  SBTTWi&S FROM 80UT9.  0. P. H. Expects a Greater Influx of Immigrants  tma Year.  Calgary, Alta.���������Mr. J. S. Dennis, vice-president  of the Canadian Pacific, and head of the railroad's land department, in an optimistic address  before tbe Calgary Ad Club, said the land department sold over $4,500,000 worth of good land to  actual settlers last year,r and stated that the reports of the company's agents, of which there are  some 3000 in the United States alone, indicated  a much larger influx of immigrants this year  than last.  *m$m to i������ismi<ii������r  Bow Bassano Welcomed Immigrants From Ool-  Bassano, Alta.���������The Bassano Board of Trade  officially welcomed with a banquet, the eighty  Colorado settlers who arrived in the irrigation  town. The expedition was probably one of the  most unique treks of the homeseeker in the annals of immigration;"^ The^se������tle1������"letf Denver  about a week-ago on a special train, from cattle  car to pullman sleeper, which brought the farmers, their families, livestock and effects to their  destination; The dining car was supplied with  milk and eggs by the hens and milch cows on the  train. The settlers have purchased twenty-seven  ready made farms on the Canadian Pacific's irrigated tract near Bassano.  Alaska News  Valdez, Alaska, *'. Charles Eby, for  several years cashier of S. Blum & Co.'s bank in  Cordova, was arrested yesterday charged with  embezzling $7500 of the funds of the bank. The  arrest caused a sensation, as the accused had  occupied a prominent position in the social and  business life of Cordova since his arrival there  five years ago. The warrant upon which be was  arrested was sworn out by tbe American Surety  Company, which bonded the accused in $10,000.  He was given a preliminary hearing yesterday afternoon before Commissioner Adams and was  bound over to the grand jury with hail fixed at  $5000.  The bank will not lose a dollar, as the surety  company has already wired for a statement and  will make an immediate payment of the shortage.  Experts are working on the books to uncover all  peculations and will have a statement in a few  days.  Seattle, -Aboard the Admiral line  steamer Admiral Sampson, which left Seattle for  the North last night, is the biggest party of gold  and copper mining men to take passage on a  vessel at this port this year.  In the party are operators, prospectors and  mining crews bound for the gold diggings of the  Chisana, Thunder Creek, near Mount McKinley,  the Iditarod and copper mines near Chitina.  Also aboard the Admiral Sampson are Walter  Johnson, Henry C. Hensley, and Charles Bader  en route to Fort Gibbon, where they will take  charge of a United States government steamer  which is operated on the Yukon river during the  summer months.  RAILROAD NEWS  CAPE TO CAIRO RAILWAY.  Only 700 Miles Remain to Be Laid of Line to Be  Nearly Seven Thousand Miles Long.  London.���������All but 683 miles of the rails of the  Cape-to-Cairo Eailway in Africa have now been  laid, and in two years, if present progress is continued, this wonderful dream of the late Cecil  Rhodes will have "come true," and passengers  will be able to proceed uninterruptedly from  Alexandria, on the Mediterranean, to Capetown,  at the southern extremity of the "Dark Continent.". _ -'yy-:0.---.  Great Britain proudly calls it her "All-Red  Route." It will be the longest railway route on  the globe.  The All-Red Route proper begins at Cairo.  From there to Capetown by the route is 6,944  miles. Counting the existing railway from Cairo  to Alexandria, 130 miles, as a part of the route,  the total distance is 7,074. miles. The Continent  of Africa is only about 4,900 miles long, but the  Cape-to-Cairo Railway does a good deal of winding about.  Of the total route (6,944 miles), 4,979 miles will  be by rail and 1,965 miles by water.  The 683-mile link that is yet to be built will be  all-rail at the Equator.  DOUBLE TRACK FROM  VANCOUVER TO REVELSTOKE.  Canadian Pacific Will Spend Seven Millions in  ,        This Province During Coming Year.  Mohtreal.TT-A local paper says: In double  tracking 1332 miles of road between Port Arthur and Sudbury, the C. P. R. will spend this  year $6,000,000; between Calgary and Brandon  there are 178 miles, and this piece of work will  cost $5,000,000; between Revelstoke and Vancouver it will,cost $7,000,000, the distance to be constructed this year being 139 miles. On the Lake  Superior division, where double tracking is to  be carried out, the work will cost $45,113 per  mile, while on the prairie section the cost will he  about $22,000 per mile.  Of course, the mountain section will be heavier,  costing, to be accurate, some $50,000 per rrile.  These are high figures, but the work will be of  the highest character.  K. V. R. CONSTRUCTION.  Work Began on Link With V. V. & E. Line at  Princeton on New Route.  Construction work is now proceeding on the  portion of the Kettle Valley Railway, which will (  link up the Canadian line with the V., V. & E. at  Princeton. Authorization for a change ������n the  route as originally planned was given at the recent session of the Provincial Legislature, the  change being previously approved of also by the  Dominion Government.  Pending the decision of the, government a si art  had been miide on a ten-mile section which would  form part of either the original or the proposed  new route, and now grading gangs are at work  over the remaining 23 miles of the 33-mile section  between Osprey Lake and Princeton.  The provisions of the Kettle Valley Railway  Bill, which was recently passed by, the province,  relieved the company from constructing its line  to Otter Summit from Osprey Lake, the K. Y.  having made arrangements for using the V., V.  & E. via Princeton to the former point. A similar agreement exists between the two railways  with respect to the use of the section between  Coquahalla Summit and Hope, which is being  built by4he K. V. and oyer which the V.,vV.& E.  will be accorded running rights.  The forces at work on the latter portion of  the Hope Mountain route have recently been increased, and the work is said to be well advanced.  About 1600 men are employed on the grading  operations on the joint section.  Romanism  Governor Fois  AND CARWN.AL O'GQNNELL.  (A Question of Precedence.)  Even among citizens Who pride themselves on  not being prejudiced against Roman Catholicism  it will scarcely be thought that Governor Foss, of  Massachusetts, was straining at a mere gnat when  he refused to take their place at the function in  Boston, where a society of Catholic laymen was  entertaining President Taft. The laymen wanted  to put Cardinal O'Connell in second place of  honor over a^mere governor. But Foss stubbornly held to it that in the United States there cannot be any ecclesiastical princes of foreign appointment outranking an Ameircan civil officer  elected by the people. The pretension of the  cardinal is one which, if not resisted thus at the  outset, would surely grow.v A Boston Catholic,  writing in The New York Sun, argues that "a  prince of the church is above all earthly dignitaries." By this it would appear that from Cardinal O'Connell's own viewpoint,it was a concession of personal humility alone that he did not  insist on preceding even the President of the  United States. r  ROMANISTS IN U. S.  There are 15,015,569 Romanists in the United  States proper, according to the 1912 edition of  "Kennedy's Official Catholic Directory," which  is authority also for the following statistics:  A year ago the Catholic population of the country was 14,618,761, while ten years ago it was  10,976,757, showing an increase of 4,038,812 for  the decade. Twenty years ago Catholics numbered 8,615,185, showing that within twenty  years the Catholic population has nearly doubled.  There are 17,49.1 Catholic priests in the United  States and 13,939 Catholic churches, of which  9,256 have resident priests, the other 4,683 being  mission churches. The directory also shows that  there are fourteen archbishops, two titular archbishops, ninety-seven bishops, two archabbots,  and fifteen abbots in the Union.  203=207 Kingsway  Your Printing Orders will  receive prompt and care-  ������������������*..'  ful attention.  PHONE Fairmont 1140  and ask for our prices.  ADVERTISE IN THE WESTERN CALL  Office of THE WESTERN CALL  203-207 KINGSWAY, Cor. 8th Ave.  BUITALO GROCERY  Commercial Drive and 14th Avenue  "Tbe Home of Qualify"  Guaranteed Fresb  Jm  Groceries  4, P. s.���������cWn prop   PJlflOIJ |j||ri|lO||t |fl33  Real Estate  Insurance and Loans  Phone Seymour 2552 441 Homer Street  Vancouver, B.C.  l������frl$l.t.l}ll|llfrlfrl*.l*l.|������^Mf4.*4.}.4fr>I������lfrfo������|<.fr������3w}^������$^  SNAP!  5ClxlOO, corner 29th Ave. arid  St. Catharines Street, modern  7-room house.  YOUR OWN PRICE FOR CASH  APPLY WESTERN CALL  ::  ^���������*'M"H-<K^***������-H"fr^^  Terminal City Press, Ltd,  2494 Westmiaster Rd.  Pbone Fftirnoit 114* Friday, March 27, 1914  THE WESTERN CALL  LAND ACT NOTICES  DABS ACT.  '   VANCOUVER  DABD   DISTRIOT  District of Coast Banff* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry Frank  Lazier, of Vancouver, occupation Salesman, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing' at a post planted 4 miles  distant in a Westerly direction from the  Northwest' corner1 of Lot 425; thence  80 chains North; thence 80 chains West;  thence 80 chains South; thence SO chains  East, to , the v point . of commencement,  containing: 640 acres, more or less, for  agricutural.  Dated January 16th, 1914.  HARRY FRANK LAZIER,  ���������'.���������'.   H. G. Adams, Agent  DABD ACT.;.'"'  VABCOVVSB DABS DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE . that Bert Minor, of  Vancouver, occupation Engineer, intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:���������  ' Commencing' at   a   post   about     two  miles  distant,   and   in a  Westerly  direction  from the Northwest  corner of  Lot 426, commencing at a post in the  Southeast   corner;     thence     80   chains  North;   thence  80  chains  West:  thence  80 chains South; .thence 80 chains East  to  the  point  of . commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January  16th,  1914.  BERT MINOR,  H. 6. Adams. Agent.  DABD act.  VABCOUVBB DABS BXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Sang* X.  k    TAKE NOTICE that Arthur   Charles  Falconer,     of     Vancouver,     occupation  Clerk, intends to apply for permission  to   purchase    the    following  described  .lands:���������  V   Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in a Westerly direction from  the ��������� Southwest corner    of  Lot 421; commencing at a post in the  Northeast    corner;     thence    West     80  chains; thence South 50 chains;  thence  following  the  beach     80    chains  in   a  [\ South-easterly      direction;     thence    80  K chains North: to the point of commence-  fi ment;   containing  500  acres,  more    or  ft less, for agricultural.  |(     Dated  January  15th,  1914.  ARTHUR   CHARLES   FALCONER,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  L&VO ACT.  ���������ABCOUVSB  LaVD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE  NOTICE  that Herbert  Black,  . of   Vancouver,   occupation   Telegrapher,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  West end of Robison Island high water  fi mark; thence traversing the beach in a  South and Easterly course to the East  entrance   to    Blunden    Harbor;  thence  traversing  the   beach   in   a   North  arid  .Westerly   direction   to   point   of     com-  f   mencement, containing 320 acres, more  or less, for agriculture. ; ".,  Dated January 13th, 1914.  HERBERT BLACK,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  ��������� i::': iAHb.ACW.v,';..''������������������������������������...���������'  vabcotsvbb dabs dxstbxct  District of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE   NOTICE   that   Kate   E.   Hen-  shaw,   of  Vancouver,  Occupation  Stenographer, intends to apply  for permission to purchase the following described  . lands:������������������' "*..,,;.'���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner, about one mile distant and in a Westerly direction from  the Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a post planted in the South-  1 east corner; thence 80 chains West;  thence 80 chains North; thence 80  chains East; thence 80 chains South to  the point of commencement, containing  640 acres, more or less, for agricultural;  Dated January 15th, 1914.  :      KATE   E.   HENSHAW,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  ��������� ��������������������������� xJuin-AGt.:-: ..  VABC0UVBB dabd dxstbxct  Dlitrtot of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE  NOTICE that  Harry    Joseph  Woodward,   of   Vancouver,    occupation  Book-keeper, intends to apply for per-  (\mission to purchase the following described lands:'���������  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in a Westerly  , .direction from the Northwest corner of  I'Lot 425; commencing at a post planted  in the Northwest corner; thence 80  chains South; thence 80 chains East;  thence 80 chains North; thence 80  chains West, to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated   January  15th,   1914.  .'. HARRY   JOSEPH   WOODWARD,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  '    '^DABD-ACT-V :  80 chains South; thence 80 chains  East, to the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 15th, 1914.  CHARLES H. BAILEY,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  vabcouvbb iahd dxstbxct  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry GeOrge  Adams, of Alert Bay, British Columbia,  occupation Cruiser, intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described lands:���������  Commencing At a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a post in the Northwest corner;  thence 40 chains East; thence 40 chains  South; thence 40 chains East to beach,  following the beach in a Southerly direction to the Southeast corner of the  Indian Reserve; thence traversing the  survey of the Indian Reserve Northwest and South to the beach; thence  West along the beach, to a point one  mile directly South from the Southwest corner of Lot 421; thence North  80. chains to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or  less, for-agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 1914.  HARRY GEORGE ADAMS,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  ';  DABS ACT.   '���������'.���������-:  ���������aboootsb dabd dxstbxct  District of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE that Leonard G.  Eveson, of Vancouver, occupation Salesman, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a post in the Northeast corner; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains North;  thence 80 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 1914.   .  LEONARD  G.  EVESON,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  X*AXfD ACT.  VABCOT/VBB  DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward  Mel lor, of Vancouver, occupation Capitalist, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  three miles distant and in a Northwest  direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 421; commencing at a post in the  Northeast- : corner; -: thence 80 chains  South; thence 30 chains West to beach;  thence 60 chains Northwest along the.  beach; thence 50 chains North; thence  80 chains East to the point of commencement, containing 560 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 19V4.  ��������� JOSEPH EDWARD MELLOR,  H. G. Adams. Agent.  DABD ACT.  rection to the point of commencement,  containing 600 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 29th, 1914.  BERTHA B. LAZIER,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAXfD ACT.  VAVCOimat dabs dxstbxct  District of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKB NOTICE that Jane Dodds, of  Vancouver; occupation, spinster; intends to apply for permission to purchase the  following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in an Easterly  direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 422; commencing at a post in the  Northwest corner; thence 80 chainB  East;, thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West to beach; thence following the beach in a Northerly direction  80 chains to the point of commencement,  containing 600 acres more or 'less, for  agricultural. ~: y  Dated January 23rd. 1914.  JANE DODDS,  H. G. Adams, Agent         DABS ACT.   . ���������       ''.  VABCOT/TZB DABD  DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Rose Hamilton,  of Vancouver; occupation, widow; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:-���������  Commencing at a post planted about  10 chains in a Westerly direction from  the Southwest corner of Lot 422; commencing at a post in the Northwest  corner; thence 80 chains East to beach  of Cohoe bay; thence following the  beach ln a South and West direction to  the East entrance of Blunden Harbour;  thence in a North and Easterly direction to the point of commencement,  containing 480 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 23rd, 1914.  ROSE HAMILTON,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAXfD ACT.  ���������AWCOIIVSR DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE that William Ryan, of  Vancouver, occupation Laborer, intends  to apply for permission to'purchase the  following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted about  three miles distant, and in a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425; commencing at a post planted  in the Northeast corner; thence SO  chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence following the beach in an Easterly direction 80 chains; thence North  80 chains to the point of commencement,  containing 400 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 14th, 1914.  --"������������������. WILLIAM RYAN.   V"  H.G. Adams, Agent.,  V..v;\.;...:,; V.,l,ABDJ.ACrTv -V..V ���������������������������.''?'. ���������  VABCOT/VBB. DAWD DXSTBXCT  .s^^--^-j-^p|s^rt������t^oF-COMt"-4Sa������(rt=-fc--^^"-'^  TAKE NOTICE that George A. Sim-  monds,  of Vancouver,  occupation  Merchant, intends to apply for permission  to   purchase   the     following-described  |. lands:���������  Commencing at a post one mile distant and in a Westerly direction from  tho Northwest corner of Lot 425; commencing at a post in the Southwest  corner; thence North 80 chains; thence  East 80 chains; thence South 80 chains;  thence West 80 chains to the point of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 15th, 1914.  GEORGE   A.   SIMMONDS,  ���������������������������-������������������ H.G. "Adams, Agent.  DAXfD ACT.  VABCOVVSB DABD DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE that George Douglas  Beveridge, of Vancouver, occupation  Broker, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northeast corner and at the Southwest  corner of Lot 421; thence 80 chains  West; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East; thence 80 chains South;  to the point; of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural. .  Dated  January  13th,   1914.  GEORGE   DOUGLAS   BEVERIDGE,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  VATOOVTOB DAWD DXSTBXCT  v TAKE NOTICE that Barbara Jean  Gibson, 6f Vancouver, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for; permission to  purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted about  two miles distant, and in a Northwest  direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 421; commencing at a post in the  Southeast' corner; thence 80 chains  North; thence 80 chains West; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains East,  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural. .'���������"-.  Dated January  ISth,  1914.  BARBARA JEAN GIBSON.  o H. G. Adams, Agent.  ..'r y^xamn:*0w<-i-i''  VAWOOT/VBB DAWD DXSTBXCT  District of coast Bang* L  TAKE NOTICE that AdtTM. Beveridge, of Vancouver; occupation, married  woman; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  4 miles distant and in a North-westerly  direction from the Northwest comer  of Lot 425, commencing at a post in  the Southwest corner, thence 80 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains West,  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated -January- 21st. -1914;  ^���������-������������������--���������  ADA M. BEVERIDGE,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  X>AWP ACT.;;   ' ';  VAB^OUVBB DABD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of coast Jiangs 1.  TAKE "NOTICE that-George Hamlyn,  of Vancouver; occupation, workingman;  Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands;���������  Commencing at a post planted about  3 miles distant In a Northwest direction  from the Northwest corner of Lot 426;  thence 40 chains West; thence 80 chains  South; thence 40 chains East; thence  80 chains North, to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more or less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  GEORGE  HAMLYN,  H. G. Adams, Agent. 0  DABD ACT.  ���������AXfCOtrvSB DABD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that FrecVC. Mock, of  Vancouver; occupation, broker; intends to apply for ' permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about 60  chains, distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southeast corner of T.  L. 4479; commencing at a post In the  Northeast", corner;' thence 60 chains  West; thence 40 chaintKSouth to beach;  thence following the beach in a Northeast direction to the point of commencement, containing 200 acres, more or less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 29th, 1914.  FRED C. MOCK,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAXfD ACT.  VABCOUYBB DABD  DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Daniel Miller, of  Vancouver, occupation, Undertaker; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile and one-half distant and in a  Southerly direction from the Southeast  corner of Lot 542; commencing at a  post in the Southwest corner; thence 70  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 40 chains South to beach; thence  following the beach 80 chains in a  Westerly direction to the point of commencement, containing '420 acres, mora  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  DANIEL  MILLER,  . H, G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.        ;���������...���������  DABD ACT.  ���������ABCOTTVEB  DABD DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE that Miss Clara Sim-  monds,      of      Vancouver,      occupation  Housekeeper, intends to apply for per-  1 mission   to  purchase  the  following  described lands:���������  Commencing  at  a  post  planted     one  I mile distant,  and  in a Southerly direc-  Iftion from the Southwest corner of Lot  421;   commencing  at  a post  planted  in  the Northeast corner; thence  80 chains  I West  to   beach;   thence  following    the  ! beach   in  a   South-easterly  direction   to  the West entrance of Blunden  Harbor;  thence in a North-easterly direction and  North   to  the  point  of   commencement;  containing 320  acres,  more  or Less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 13th,  1914.  MISS  CLARA  SIMMONDS,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VABCOOTEB  DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs 2.  TAKE NOTICE tha t Charles H.  Bailey, of Vancouver, occupation Broker,  intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following described  lands:���������-'  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425; commencing at a post in the  Southeast corner; thence 80 chains  North;  thence  80  chains West;  thence  VABCOOTSB DABD DXSTBXCT  ���������:..��������� District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Annie Brown, of  Vancouver;     occupation,    Widow;     intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  -Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of Lot 542; commencing at a post in the Northeast corner;  thence. 80 chains South; thence 80 chains  West; thence 80 chains North; thence  80   chains  East  to  the  point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 24th, 1914. <.'  ANNIE feROWN.  . ^ H. G. Adams, Agent.  East; thence 80 chains South; thence 40  chains West to the beach; thence following the beach 40 chains in a Westerly  direction; thence North 80 chains to  the point of commencement, containing  500 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 27th, 1914.  JOHN MacDONALD.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VABCOUVXCS  DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE     NOTICE     that    Harrold    A.  Rourke,     of     Vancouver;     occupation.  Freight Clerk; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following de-  Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 41022; commencing at a post in  the Northwest corner; thence 80 chains  East; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains North  to tbe point of commencement, containing 640 acres; more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  HARROLD A.  ROURKE.  H. G. Adams, Agent  . <-��������� ��������� ��������� I,   ��������� .    ...I���������  .  .DABS ACT. '  VABCOUTBB DABS DXSTXUCT  Distriot of coast Baaga 1.  TAKB NOTICE that  Thomas Christie, of Vancouver; occupation. Lumberman; intends to apply for permission to  following     described  the  f������urchase  ands:������������������  Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in a Southerly  direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L; 4479; commencing at a post ln the  Southwest corner; thence 40 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 40  chains South to beach; thence following the beach in a Westerly direction  80 chains to point of commencement,  containing 320 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 29th, 1914.  THOMAS CHRISTIE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.   :������������������  '   ;  DABD ACT.  ���������ABCOVTEB  DABS  DXSTBXCT  . Distriot of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that  Sidney Clifford  White, of Vancouver; occupation,' Telegrapher;   intends  to apply  for permis-  '"       following  the  de-  slo'n to  purchase  crlbed lands:���������:  Commencing at a post planted at the  NorthweBt corner of Lot 426; commencing at a post in the Southeast corner; thence 80 chainB North; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence 80 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing. 640 . acrea  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  SIDNEY CLIFFORD WHITE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  YAVCOUTEB DABD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Samuel de Winter,: of Vancouver; occupation, Telegrapher; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the -following described  lands:��������� ������������������.;������������������'.,'"���������  . Commencing at a post planted at the  Northwest corner of Lot 426; thence 40  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 40 chains South; thence 80  Chains West to the point of commencement, contining 320 acres, more or less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  SAMUEL DE WINTER.  .'������������������!',  H. G. Adams, Agent  chains or to the point of commence*  ment, containing 260 acres, more or  less, for agricultural. .  -  Dated January 21st, 1914.    *  FRANK E. TAYLOR.  H. Q, Adams, Agent.  DABS ACT.  VABCOT/VBB DABS DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bangs l.  TAKE NOTICE that John William  Bradshaw, of Vancouver; occupation,  Mechanic; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  4 miles distant in a Northwest direction from the Northwest corner of- Lot  426; thence 40 chains West; thence 80  chains North; thence 40 chains East;  thence 80 chains South to the point of  commencement, containing ��������� 320 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.:,���������,���������'  Dated January 21st, 1914.  JOHN WILLIAM BRADSHAW.  -��������������������������������������������� H. G. Adams, Agent  DABD ACT.  vabcovtbb davd dxstbxct  XHstrlot of Coast Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Leo Mayne. ������of  Vancouver; occupation, Telegrapher;  Intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  2 miles distant in a Southerly direction  from the Southwest corner of Lot 428:  commencing at post planted ln the  Southeast corner; thence 80 chains  WeBt; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East; thence 80 chains South  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 24th, 1914.  .  LEO MAYNE.  ~ H. G. Adams. Agent  DABS ACT.  VABCOUVBB DABS SX8TBX0T  Distriot of Coast Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Martha Adelaide Kay, of Vancouver; occupation,  Spinster; Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described'  lands:���������  ���������"  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant in a Westerly direction  from the Southeast corner of Lot 13;  commencing at a post In the Northwest  corner; thence 80 chains East; thence  60 chains South; thence 80 chains West;  thence 60 chains North to the point of  commencement, containing 600 acres,  more or less, for agricultural. ���������  Dated" January 23rd, 1914.  MARTHA ADELAIDE KAY.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABS ACT.  DABS ACT;  VABCOVTSB DABD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Edgar Leea, of  Vancouver;  occupation,   logger;   intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described   lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of T. L. 1122���������thence  80 chains West; thence 60 chains South;  thence 80 chains East; thence 60 chains  North to the point of commencement,  containing 400 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  EDGAR LEES,  H. G. Adams, Agent  DABS ACT.  ���������ABCOVTEB DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Sang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Norval E. Mall-  ahan, of Vancouver; occupation, advertiser; Intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 426; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence 80 chains East; thence 80 chains  North, to the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 22nd,  1914.  NORVAL   E.   MALLAHAN,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  ���������ABCOtnrZB DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Bertha B. Lazier,  of Vancouver; occupation, married woman; intends to apply for permission.  to purchase the following described  lands:���������   '   *  Commencing at a post planted about  60   chains  distant   and   in   an   Easterly  ^'   DABD ACT. ;.'...  VAVCOITYDB DAJTD DXSTBXCT  t District of Coaat Bang* i.  TAKE NOTICE that John Sline, of  Vancouver; occupation, Longshoreman;  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described landB:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in a Southwest direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 41022; commencing at a post in  the Southwest corner; thence 40 chains  North; thence 80 chainB East; thence  80 chains South to the beach; thence  following the beach in a Northwest direction 80 chains or to point, of common cem nt, containing 450 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  ���������j JOHN SLINE,  Hi G. Adams, Agent.  ���������.    DAWS ACT.  Distriot of Coa������tB*ng* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Hans Harold  Arthur Anderson, of Vancouver; occupation, Logger; intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  60 chains distant and in a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 424; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner; thence 80 chains  South to the beach; thence along the  beach 80 chains West; thence along  the beach North 60 chains to a point directly West from the starting point;  tence 75 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 480 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 23rd, 1914.  HANS     HAROLD    ARTHUR    ANDERSON.  s      H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  ���������AVCOTSVBB DABD DXSTBXCT  Distriet of Coast Bang* I.  TAKE NOTICE that Sinclair A. Aich-  inleck, of Vancouver; occupation, Miner;  intends to apply for permision, to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  4 milea distant in a Westerly direction  from/the NorthweBt corner of Lot 425;  commencing at a post in the Southeast  corner; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence 80 chains East to the point of  commencement containing 640 acres,  more or lesB, for agricultural.  Datefl January 21st,-1914. -  SINCLAIR A. AICHINLECK.  -      H. G. Adams, Agent  ���������AJTOOVVEB DABD  DXSTXUOT  Distriet of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Lawrence  Hartje, of Vancouver; occupation. Engineer; intends to apply for permission  to  purchase   the    following    described  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile and a quarter distant, and in a  South-easterly direction from the Southwest corner of T. L 4486; commencing  at a post in the Southeast corner;  thence 80 chains North; thence 80  chainB West; thence 30 chains South  to the beach; thence following the beach  in a South-easterly direction 80 chains,  or to the point of commencement, containing 620 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 27th, 1914.  LAWRENCE HARTJE.  H. G. Adams, Agent  ��������� /  Who  mutilated die pktun)>  Who  diatteied die iniircr?  Who  Hole Robert fernera*?  If you want to resJ  a real clever njamy  maty don't mitt tha  new serial we have  arranged to print-"-  Sable  Lorcha  A tale of die afarewd  cunning of the Orientals. It's good from  die toy beginnings ao  Get tbe tone  WhhtbeMrat  Installmenti  DABD ACT.  YABCOVTBB DABD DXSTBXCT  Distriet of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE   NOTICE   that   Jasper  Nation,  of Vancouver;  occupation, Hotelkeeper;  intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following described   lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of Lot 542; commencing at a post in the Northwest corner;  thence 80 chains East; thence 80 chains  South; thence 80 chains West; thence 80  chains   North    to  the   point   of   commencement, containing 640 acres,  more  or less,'for agricultural.  Dated January 25th, 1914.  JASPER NATION.  H.  G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  DAWS ACT.  TAWCOVTSB DAWS DXSTBXCT  Distriet of coast Bang* 1.  I TAKE NOTICE that Holton Evens  Sands, of Vancouver; occupation. Broker; intends to apply for permision to  purchase the following described  lands:��������� ������������������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southeast corner of Lot  542; commencing at a poBt ln the Northwest   corner;   thence   35   chains   East;  thence  80. chains    South;    thence    35  chains  West;  thence  80 chains North ���������  to the polt of commencement, contain-1  ing 300 acres, more or less, for agricultural. ;  Dated January 26th 1814.  HOLTON EVENS SANDS.  .   H. G. Adams. Agent.  The first instalment  of  The Sable Lorcha  appeared in our  issue of Jan, 9.  We can supply back numbers  TAKE NOTICE that Jamea Veno, of  Vancouver; occupation, Cook; Intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southwest corner of T.  L. 4487; commencing at a post in the  Northwest corner; thence 80 chains  East; thence 60 chains South to beach;  thence following the beach in a Northwesterly direction 80 chains or to point  of commencement, containing 200  acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 28th. 1914.  JAMES VENO.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VABC  B BXBTBXCT  DABD ACT.  VABCOUVBB DABS SISTBXCT  Bitrtriot of Coatt .Bong* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry Washington Steele, of Vancouver; occupation.  Carpenter; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in a Southeast direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 4487; commencing at a post in the  Southwest corner; thence SO chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 80  chains South; thence 60 chains ln a  Northwest direction, or to the point of  commencement, containing 600 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 28th, 1914.  HARRY   WASHINGTON   STEELE.  H. G. Adams. Agent.  ���������ABCOVVXB DABD1 DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that John Harold Al-  bertsbn, of Vancouver; occupation.  Logger; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:������������������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 and a half miles distant and in . a  Southerly direction from the Southwest  corner of Lot 424; commencing at a  post in the Southwest corner; thence 60  chains North; thence 80 chains. East;  thence 70 chains South to beJach; "thence  following the beach 80 chains-West to  the point of commencement, containing  529 acres, more or^-less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  JOHN   HAROLD  ALBERTSON.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VABCOUVBB DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE   NOTICE   that   John   MacDon-  ald, of Vancouver; occupation, Railway  Clerk;  Intends  to apply for  permission  direction from the Southeast corner  of j to  purchase    the    following    described  T. L. 4479; commencing at a post in the'lands:���������  Southeast corner; thence 60 chains j Commencing at a post planted about  West; thence 80 chains North; thence ��������� 40 chains distant and in a Westerly di-  80 chains  East; thence 30 chains South   rection from the Southeast corner of T.  DABS ACT.  ���������AWCOTJVDS~DABD DXSTBfCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that William Seymour, of. Vancouver; occupation, Logger; intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post plantitd about  1 mile distant and in a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 4483; commencing at a post in the  Southwest corner; thence 7b chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 80  chains South to beach; thence following the beach In a Westerly .direction  80 chains to the point of commencement, containing 560 acres, more or less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 29th, 1914.  WILLIAM SEYMOUR.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  TAKE NOTICE that Florence Malta-  han, of Vancouver; occupation, Dressmaker; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  2 and a half miles distant and In a  South-easterly direction from the Southeast corner of Lot 642; commencing at  a post in the Southwest corner; thence  40 chains North; thence 70 chains East;  thence 40 chains South; thence 70  chains West to the point of commencement, containing 300 acres, more or  less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th. 1914.  FLORENCE MALLAHAN.  .^-^^^-^-.^^-^---Hi-G. -Adams,-^ Agentr  DABD ACT.  VAWCOtrvBB DABS DXSTBXCT  Blttrlot of Coaat Bang* I.  TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Bankable, of Vancouver; occupation, Broker;  intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described  lands:-���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northwest corner of Lot &40; thence 80  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 80 chais South; thence 80 chains  West to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  ARTHUR BARRABLE.    "  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABS ACT.  DABS ACT.  ���������ABCOVTBB DABD  DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE  that Henry Taaeger.  of  Vancouver;  occupation,  Brewer;  intends  to apply for permission   to  purchase  the following described   lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and In a Westerly direction from the Northwest corner of Lot  425;   commencing at  a    post    in     the  Northeast    corner;    thence    80    chains  South;   thence   80  chains  West;   thence  80 chains North; thence 80 chains East  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 15th, 1P14.  HENRY TEAEGER.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  VAVCOUVSB DABD   DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE-NOTICE that Peter Freeman,  of Vancouver; occupation. Book-keeper;  intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following  described   lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of T. L. 1122; thence'  SO chains South; thence 80 chains East;  thence 80 chains North to the beach;  thence following the shore line in a  North-w������sterly direction 80 chains or  to the point of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  PETER FREEMAN.  H. G. Adams,  Agent  DABS ACT.  ���������ABCOWXB DABD   DXSTBXCT  Distriet of Coast Bang* 1.  TAK& NOTICE that Frank E. Taylor, of Vancouver; occupation, Broker;  intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following described   lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  DABD   ACT.  Vancouver   Dand   District.���������District  Coast Bang* 3.  TAKE  NOTICE   that  Antonio  Belan-  ger,     of    Brettany    Creek,    occupation  Miner,  intends  to apply  for permission  to   purchase   the    following    described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  northwest corner of Lot 922; thence  west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;  thence east 40 chains; thence south 40  chains, for grazing.  ANTONIO   BELANGER,  Dated December 17th. 1913.  1-23-14   to   8-20-14.  DABS ACT.  Vancouver   Dand   District���������Distriet  Coast Bang* a.  TAKE NOTICE that Frank Rial Ang  ers,     of    Brittany     Creek,     occupation  Rancher,   intends   to   apply  for  permission to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted.at the  southwest 'corner of Lot 923; thence  west 20 chains; thence north 20 chains;  thence east 20 chains; thence south 20  chains,   and   containing   40   acres   more  Phrenology  And Palmistry  MRSr^fQVH4h���������  (Formerly of Montreal)  dim practice! Advice  On BurineM Adaptation, Uvaltb soil  IftrriHTe.  805 Oranvllle Street  Over Hsrriaon's Drug Stor*  How: 10s. tn. to 9 p. m  8. Mary th* Virgin, South Hill.  (Cor. Prince Albert St. and 52nd Ave.)  8:00 a.m.���������Holy Eucharist.  11:00 a.m.���������Matins and. Berrnon.  (Late celebration on 1st and 3rd  Sundays).  3:00 p.m.���������Children's Service (Third  Sunday).  4:00 p.m., Holy Baptism (except  Third Sunday).  7:30 p.m.���������Evensong and Sermon.  Vicar, Rev, Owen Bulkeley, A.K.C.  Sunday School and Bible Classes  every Sunday (except third), afternoon, at 3 o'clock, in St. Mary's Pariah Hall, also Men's Bible Reading,  every Thursday evening at 8 o'clock.  Northeast corner of T. L.  1144;  thence   or less, to be used'as.a pasture.  80 chains "West; thence 80 chains North | FRANK  RIAL   ANGERS,  to   the   beach;   thence     following     Uie  L.   4486;  commencing at a post  in  the   to   the   beach;   thence     following     the   Dated l"th of December. 191$.  beach 50 chains in a South-westerly di- Northwest   corner;   thence     80     chainsbeach  in a  South-easterly  direction   80       I - 1-23-14 to 3-20-14. ^^i^^^^^piPSHivlSiifii  :&        |SU,i,vr^w.,^WvW,  IMU<     N I"- I M.' \  VI,i  Friday, March 27, 1914  PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY  BY THE  TERMINAL CITY PRESS, LTD.  HEAD OFFICE:  203 Kingsway, Vancouver  Telephone Fairmont 1140  Subscription:  One Collar a Year In Advance  41.BC Outaldo Canada  If you do not get "CALL" regularly  it is probably because your subscription  is long overdue. Renew at once. If paid  up, phone or write complaint today.  PAX BRITANNICA  The English Cathedral at Zanzibar is  built on the site of one of the greatest  slave markets in the world, the altar  standing directly oyer the spot where  the flogging post formerly stood.  4^^^^^44^^M^^I^4m{m^^m{|^4^m{|^4^^44{^4^,^*^^I^4^*4^I^I^4^4^^mJ*^4^4{������  NIGERIA.  The romance of the Empire is, perhaps, not  realized to the full by many. The remarkable  $15,000,000 railway begun in ^Nigeria, and. to  run 500 miles through a strange and dangerous  country incredibly rich in coal and palm oil, will  therefore help to a realization of British enter-  prize in a land destined to become something like  an Eldorado of Africa.  The construction of the new trunk railway will  form one of the most important features of Sir  Frederick Lugard's administration of. Federated  Nigeria. The chance discovery of Port Harcourt,  the coast terminus of the line, by Lieutenant  Hughes, R.N.R., the commander of the Government yacht Ivy, was made under dramatic circumstances, and the.fact that the new railway  will cut through the very heart of the mysterious and almost unknown centres of the strongest  forms of jujuand fetish worship should provide  incidents which, as construction advances, will  prove not less exciting than those which attended  the building of the Uganda railway.  jji view of tbe importance of the undertaking it  is intended to push it on as rapidly as possible,  8,n<J the construction party follows immediately  behind the survey, while the line will he opened  to traffic section by section as the rails advance.  The whole line, which will be 550 miles in  length of the standard African gauge, is estimated to cost $15,000,000, and to occupy  four or five years in construction. Owing to the  immense wealth of the district to be tapped, and  the fact that the existing Nigerian railway is payr  -ing-a-handsome-dividendr-its-respurces-being al-^  ready severely taxed by the volume of traffic, the  necessity for speed in providing this alternative  route from the interior of Nigeria to the sea is  regarded as highly important.  For years past attention has been directed to  the necessity for opening up a part of Africa  which is not only the most thickly populated  region on the continent, but also includes the  richest palm oil belt in the world, and after the  discovery of a coal field at Udi extending for  over a thousand square miles, and yielding coal  showing 75 per cent, of the value of the best  Welsh coal, the question of a railway became  more pressing. The great difficulty has always  been that the shallow mangrove swamps have  made the construction of railways and wharves  impossible.  Owing to the energy of the Nigerian Marine  Department, and the discovery of Lieutenant  Hughes, the situation is now entirely changed.  Recently the latter found a hitherto unchartered  creek, which to the surprise of all, showed a  depth of 50 feet of water alongside a precipitous  cliff 45 feet high���������a condition of things unknown  anywhere between Sierra Leone and the Congo.  On thic discovery being reported, the Governor,  in March last, commissioned the Director of Bail-  ways and the Director of Marine to investigate  the matter, and as a result it was established that  the newly-discovered creek, though not shown on  any map, is really the main channel of the Bonny  Eiver.  Though close to centres of river traffic, it had  never been visited, except possibly by a stray  launch; and the cannibal people who paddled out  in their canoes were greatly surprised at the presence of the Government yacht as it slowly  steamed up the waterway preceded by a motor  launch taking soundings. The results were in  the highest degree satisfactory, for on rounding  a bend in the creek a remarkable series of cliffs  extending for three-quarters of a mile, and averaging 45 feet above high water, was discovered  among the swamps. Opposite these cliffs soundings showed a depth of 70 feet of water. Armed  with machetes, the Director of Railways, the Director of Marine and the commander of the Ivy  landed, and by means of a rope ascended the  cliffs and cut through a section of almost impenetrable growth twelve feet in height.  Lieutenant Hughes then ascended a tree to  view the country. A few people were met, and  it. was discovered that no white man had been  there before. Further investigation showed that  the general conditions of the place were such as  had never been hoped for on the West African  coast, and the spot has been called Port Harcourt and selected as the terminus of the railway.  Here a town with wharves, residential and trading sites, railway shops, etc., will be constructed  to meet the requirements of what will be the coal-  distributing, centre for the whole of West Africa.  Not far distant is the home of the notorious Long  Juju of Arochuku!  From Port Harcourt the railway will go diiect  to the Udi coal fields, 140 miles distant, and it is  expected that the centre of this field, which the  Government intends to work itself, will be  reached in eighteen months. This section traverses the juju centres, and, apart from questions  of development, the presence of the railway  should have a valuable effect in putting nn end  to practices which, despite the vigilance of the  Government, still occasion much sacrifice of  human life. Beyond Udi the railway will run  northeast to the Benue River.  "The Mother of Waters" will here be crossed  by a steel bridge 800 yards in length and 80 feet  above the water, one of the largest bridges in  Africa. As by international arrangements the  river is opened to free navigation, a sufficient  height will have to be allowed for the largest,  river steamers to be able to pass. Frem the Benuc  the railway will skirt the edge of the P������auchi  plateau and connect at the Kaduna with the  existing system. Branches to the'tin fields will  be constructed as necessity arises.  ALIGHT-BEARER.  /No human Jaws or administration can be free  from mistakes, but, at least, the mistakes of British rulers are honest. Here we can appeal to the  verdict of the world; we are not commonly reputed amiable, but we have the reputation of  being just. We need not fear comparison of the  results with those achieved by the Roman empire  at its best. Foreign observers, at any rate, have  often held up the work of British rulers as an  example. We may not always have made the best  use of our opportunities, but we have not made  any such failure (to choose the mildest term) as  the Spanish conquests in the New World. The  worst our enemies can charge us with, rightly  or wrongly, in particular instances, is departure  from the English principles of law and liberty  that we ourselves have made known to them. One  thing is certain, that we have carried those principles round the world and brought their light  into many dark places.���������Sir Frederick Pollock.  THE KEEPER OF THE PEACE.  One merit of the British Empire is that it keeps  the peace over a great part of the world. This  benefit is not confined to citizens or inhabitants'  of the Empire, but extends to every one who;  trades or does business with any part of it. .What  sort of peace there would be from the Red Sea  to the Straits of Malacca without a British Empire need not be conjectured; the collapse of the  Mogul Empire gave over India to internecine war,  and the East India Company found itself the  necessary peacemaker. Not that it made peace  out of war with rosewater; no power of man ever  didi What sort of peace there would be in the  Atlantic and the Pacific if the self-governing  Dominions were isolated and adrift from the Empire is certainly matter of conjecture; we hope it  may long remain so. The conjecture is not worth  pursuing^ for we are not aware of any serious difference of opinion. Hence it follows that JJritislii  naval supremacy is an asset of the greatest value  not only in our own wealth, but in the world's.���������  Sir Frederick Pollock.  iiFCWAWSTiiN.  Habibullah Khan, Ameer of Afghanistan, has  estSbKsbelO ^^  built a telephone system along the road from  Kabul to Jalalabad, the great thoroughfare between Kabul and Peshawar over the Khyber  Pass; has made roads between the principal cities  of Afghanistan and tried to establish a motor  car service; is trying to develop iron and coal  fields near Kabul; has a printing office and newspaper, a postal system, a telegraph line under  way, and has factories making soap, firearms,  shoes and cloth.  AR-ABJA.  That part of Arabia which skirts the lower end  of the Red Sea, near Aden, is called Yemen. It  is probably as little known as a land could possibly be which is touched/by currents of world  travel. Surveys have recently been made by the  French, who have secured a railway concession  for the northern part of the Yemen. Back from  the settled portion near the coast is a mountain  range which the railroad will cross at an altitude  of 10.0QO feet in its run from Hodeida, the port,  to Sanaa, the terminal in the interior. Behind  this range of mountains in a high plain with  towns located at 4,200, 6,500, 7,600 and 8,500 feet  altitude. One of the line of craters along the interior mountain range rises to 10,000 feet, and  here a path had been constructed to the top,  where were found old structures showing that  people had come there for treatment with the  heated air or vapors. The district of Yemen has  a population of four and a half millions, of whom  a third are in this mountainous region. Some interior tribes practice vaccination on the arm with  virus from the human subject and claim that this  has been their custom from time immemorial.  The Isle of Timor  Two Australian firms, with one English and  one from Hongkong, are to develop the great oil  fields on the island of Timor, which is situated  some 2,100 miles from Hongkong and 400 miles  from Port Darwin, Australia. The island is 263  miles long by 60 miles wide, and the oil produces  kerosene of high grade as well as lubricating  fluids and a quality fit only for fuel.  rContlnwd en Pag* 9)  4^.^W^^44^M^4^������^, .T, .^. ,^..|. >fr .$.,$> .^4 .$> .8.4%. .$. *fr >t. .fr ,t > t������l 4$.  t    Ottawa News    i  A PLEASING CHANGE  IN POLITICAL METHODS  It is refreshing to witness the  statesmanlike conduct of the present  Government with respect to investigations. The other day in the House  charges were made relating to the  railway in New Brunswick, and to  which a Federal subsidy has been  paid. Though the charges were made  by a member of the Opposition, much  given to inaccuracies, the acting Minister of Railways, Hon. Dr. Reid,  listened attentively and courteously,  and finally declared the whole affair would be thoroughly investigated.  What a contrast that was to the  Liberal method.  The old way was when the Opposition (then the Conservative) made  any charges of malfesance in connection with any public work the  Government would immediately put  on the lid and sit tight, absolutely  refusing investigation unless a whitewash was assured. c  The change in methods must be  pleasing to the public of Canada, so  long accustomed to political autocracy.  ���������   ���������   ���������  New Citizens  "During the year ending December  31, 1912, 18,242 persons were granted  certificates of naturalization in Canada, and of these 300 sought re-admission to British nationality. These  new citizens represent forty-five different nationalities, and they come  from every continent. In Canada we  have now a total of 189,203 of these  naturalized immigrants, which is just  about one-seventh of the number of  voters who voted at the last Dominion election, and is more than four  times the majority by which the present government was placed in power.  These facts will help us to realize  just what the large naturalization may  mean. In the year's record the admission to citizenship are headed by  immigrants from the United States,  of whom 6,890 took the oath of allegiance; the Austrians came next with  2,030; then the Italians with 1,598,  closely follewed by the Russians with  1,586; then came 1,259 Finns, 845  Swedes, 653 Norwegians, 346 French,  344 Germans, 295 Galicians, 252  Turks, 217 Hungarians, and 205  Greeks, all the others falling below  200."     '������'  MOUNT PLEASANT HALL  Cor.. Main and Sixth Ave.  The public is cordially invited to  the following evangelistic meetings:  Sunday, 2 p. m., Sunday School;  Sunday, 2 p. m., Bible address; Sunday, 7:30 p. m., Gospel service. Thos.  Kindleysides, 4278 John St., South  Vancouver.  APOLOGIZING FOR CRITICISM  The famous Scottish professor, John  Stuart Blackie, was noted for his hot  temper and vehement candor, as well  as for his profound scholarship. The  Independent thus recalls a familiar incident in his life^^^^^^^^^-^-  At the opening of a college term,  the boys observed that he was un-  usualy irritable and harsh. The applicants for admission ranged themselves for examination in a line below  his desk.  "Show your papers," he ordered.  One lad held his paper up awkwardly in his left hand.  "Hold it up properly, sir, in your  right hand!" commanded the master.  The new pupil muttered something,  but kept his left hand raised.  "The right hand, ye loon!" thundered the professor.  The boy, growing very pale, lifted  his right arm. It was a burned  stump; the hand was gone.  The boys burst into indignant  hisses; but the professor had leaped  down from the platform, and' had  thrown his arm about the boy's  shoulder.  "Eh, laddie, forgive me!" he cried,  breaking into' broad Scotch, as he  always did when greatly excited. "I  didna. ken! But," turning to the  class with swimming eyes, "I thank  God he has given me gentlemen to  teach���������who can call me to account  when I go astray."  "After that day," wrote one of the  boys, years afterward,'' "every man  there was his firm friend and liegeman. He had won iis all by that one  frank speech."  BAPTIST  Mount Pleasant Baptist Church.  Cor. Tenth Ave. and Quebec St   ���������  Preaching  Services���������11   a.m.     and    7:3'  p.m.   Sunday School at 2:30 p.m  "Pastor, Rev. A. K.Baker, 6-14th Ave.,East  ANOX.XCAH  ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH  Cor.   Broadway   arid   Prince  Edward  8������  Services���������Morning Prayer at 11 a.m.  Sunday School and Bible class at 2:8)  p.m.  Holy Communion every Sunday at ������ a.:;.  Evening Prayer at 7:30 p.n������  and 1st and 3rd Sundays at 11 a.m  Rev. G. H. Wilson. Rector  Rectory, Cor.   8th   Ave.   and   Prince Ed  ward St   Tel     Fairmont   4������������-T.  For Sale and  For Rent  Cards  10c each 3 for 25c  088?  ENGRAVING���������  ETCHINGS AND HALFTONES  ARE NOW BEING MADE IN  WESTERN CANADA BY THE  MOST SATISFACTORY PRO.  CESS KNOWN to IHE WORLD  THE "ACID BLAST" PROCESS  MAKES YOUR ILLUSTRATIONS  ��������� LITERALLY TALK ������������������  MANUFACTURED IN WESTERN CANADA  By the Cle land Dibble [mc(������1'  HRD FLOOR   WORLD   RLDC  U.U4r~^.>vrR m   -  <"*    -  Try Our Printing  Quality Second   to None  THE DIFFERENCE  Between paper  that is "good  enough" and  that which is  really artistic,  may be a trifle  in cost but infinite in satisfaction. Do it right  the first time,  is our suggestion.  I Estimates  PHONE  FAIRMONT  998  HOUSE   DECORATORS  51 AIM L t Y  & tU.   2317 Main Street, Near. 7th Av.  i  SEED POTATOES  ; ������������������ PARLY ROSE," choice quality, $2.00 per 100 ->  , "QRace PARi-iNQ,,(lippqrtetlIrl8Meeil)$Mo ������������������   "  , You Can Rely on the Quality. "���������'  ,       we carry scLecTep uwn seep anp fertilizer      "  Our OlmmOOd OMek food contains all that is required to ������,\  ������   rear healthy chicks.  * r. t.vcrnoh :t,  255 jrwdwiy Em,    /  ? Mit n imo������t m  Hay, Grain anp Feep  ������  f  ELQOMFJILP'S CAFE  2617 MAIN STREET NEAR BBOAPWAY  \  KNOWN AS   THE BEST   ANP   OLDEST  ESTABLISHED CAFE IN HT. PLEASANT  BUSINESS MEN'S LUNCH 25c-XX:30 TO 2:00  V  PINNER 5:00 TO 8:00 P.M.  SHORT ORDERS AT ALL HOURS  J  j"l"|"|"t"l"t"H"t"I"I"}"{w^"{"i"|"|"{"{M{44{������4J������������{>4}t  >{4^<������J������^������^J<^l4^^>4^J>4^Jn^44{l4^������4{44^r4{44{<^4|^>  FRANK TRIMBLE REALTY CO.  Real Estate and Insurance Brokers J  CONVEYANCING  RENTS COLLECTED  LOANS NEGOTIATED  I  PHONE Fair. 185 2503 Westminster Rd. :;  | Vancouver, B. C.  4* *$������������$������������$' ������t"3',������S"ft ������l"fr ������M"M"I' ���������fr'$"{������*|������'ft������ft ���������fr4������4*������HMt' fr #'M^Mfr,fr4w$H^wfr4*4������'$>*fr<$^^  DOMINION WOOD YARD CO.  Cor. Front and Ontario Sts.      Phone Fairmont 1554  Paris.���������Madelaine,     the     "Siamese  twin,"  who  was   separated  Wednesday  from  her    sister,    Suzanne,   by  means of a delicate operation, died today  of convulsions:    Suzanne is re-1 2  covering rapidly  from the effects of  4  the operation,  and    physicians    say *  there is every prospect of her living.   .;..������^^;^^;^;^^;^^^^.^^^;^.^;^.x^~I~X^ ^>^^x>^~^->4^^~H~H~H~M"H--M'���������!��������� ������������������������ ������������������������  All Kinds of Mill Wood   I  Stored Un^er Cover i #";V$Ji:%Z%tyjrt  FridayMarch 27, 1914  THE WESTERN  CALL  PAX BRITANNICA  ' (Continued from page 5)  INDIA.  Making the Desert Blossom.  The Lower Bari Doab Canal is unusual in construction, for it actually crosses, upon a Level,  the important river Ravi. The new canal has  cost about one and a half million sterling, and  it is expected that it will irrigate oyer 871,000  aeries of crops. The Chenab Canal, which is another section of the Triple Propect, alone irrigates an area equivalent to two-fifths of- the  whole cultivable area of Egypt. The great Punjab canals have done more, for they have literally  peopled the desert wastes. The cultivators have  been established in districts which were formerly  quite useless. Their villages are thriving? their  land is growing in value, and for them the desert  sands have indeed proved golden. The Triple  Project cost close upon |7,000,000, but it  yields to the Government a return upon capital  outlay of 7 1-2 per cent. Yet it means affluence  to the peasantry also, and life in the canal colonies is so popular among the stalwart men of  Northern India that the development of; irrigation is seriously affecting recruiting for the native army.  The attraction of irrigation schemes for the uninitiated is that the results are so visible and concrete.    To enter an irrigated area in Northern  'India   is   an   unforgettable   experience.     The  stranger passes in a flash from monotonous, bar-  i ren sand hills into a land of smiling plenty.   On  'the one hand, the interminable desert; on the  i other, green waving crops, prosperous villages,  'and cool, refreshing gleams of water.   Small wonder that in the presence of such visions men haye  [sometimes been led to form exaggerated ideas of  'the possibilities of irrigation.   It seems so easy  [land so simple to collect and guide  the  waters  pouring downwards from the Himalayas, and  j'' bring the deserts in."   But it is not. so easy,  nand there is a definite limit, now fairly well ascertained, to the prospects of irrigation in India.  When all the programmes are completed, over  [85 per cent, of the surface flow of the rainfall  of India and of the water from the Himalayan  snows will still escape to the:;i'8ea.>;V;Rain.V!does  'not fall in greatest" volume where r'itkis most  needed. The 30 inches of annual rainfall Jh the  Cherrapunj Hills of Assam perforce runs to  waste, though it would make the arid emptiness  of Sind blossom as the rose.  Though the scope for irrigation in India ;is not  immeasurable,   enough  has  already  been  done  under British rule to make the Indian irrigation  system one of the wonders of the world.   "We  have expended 40,000,000 pounds On irrigation,  have brought millions of acres.under,cultivation,  and provided means of livelihood for millions of  (the peasantry.   Incomplete though they are, the  irrigation works constructed by the British in  ) India are, in some respects, the most beneficent  and the most practical monument- of our rule.  They have not exorcised famtne7~buTth"Srt"ave"  [done much towards that end.  Railways are destined to furnish the ultimate solution of the  i problem of famine.   Crops never fail simultaneously throughout the whole of India.   The difficulty has been to convey food to the stricken  'districts, and that difficulty the spread of railways is overcoming.  \y Immense Railroad Mileage.  India has as many means of locomotion as  'America���������and then some. First of all are the  railways, covering 33,000 miles.   They represent  ta tremendous amount of energy and skill.   Some  [to Darjeeling, or the line that brings you to  <,of them,' like the narrow gauge road that climbs  Kandy, that beautiful hill resort of Ceylon (for.-  the purpose of this article Ceylon may be linked  with India), are notable triumphs of railroad  engineering.     Englishmen   planned   them   and  Englishmen run them, at the top; but all the  'lesser employees, including many of the engine  ' drivers, station mastersand superintendents of  IflepalrlraentsV are Indians of EurasiansV   On the  whole, the trains are well run; they are apt to  be late; they linger at the stations as^ though  |* each was a terminal; but they avoid accidents  and they arrive finally.   Lines and even trains  vary in their equipment, much as they do in  America; the mail and the boat trains are usually  the fastest and the best.   And the best axe fine  ���������yestibuled, corridor cars, with electric lights  and fans, lavatories including bathtubs or shower  baths, dining cars; in short, every convenience  and comfort, except that it seems odd to the  "Westerner to be expected to furnish his own bedding and to spread his bed without a porter. This  is true of the first-class compartments, and it is  [substantially the same with the second, except  'for the lack of the bathtub and some, of the  upholstery.   Second-class fare is just half that of  .first-class.    One fails to see the difference in  'the accommodations, save that not so many In-  I dians travel first-class; you are apt to be thrown  [with them in the second.   And if the compart-  jfment is filled, and each occupant has his bedding,  [his water jar, and his various bundles, it does  (seem a little thick.  But it is nothing to third class! That carries  ithe great mass of Indian travelers. The fare is  'about one-half of the second-class rate; ridicu-  llousiy small it weems, till you see the accommodations, for the third-class passengers are packed  iin as we do not ship cattle in America. Plain  |*wooden cars, with hard wooden benches; into  them  crowd men, women and  children, fairly  L fighting to get in, as those already inside try to  [prevent more from entering. A third-class com-  Ipartment is reserved for Europeans and Eurasians. >  AN INDIAN POLITICIAN IS ANXIOUS.  brother'who is a Christian.   :  He says,: "At Ludihana the municipality prohibited a low caste Hindu from drinking water  from the municipal taps. It was voted with one  voice that so long as he remained a Hindu he  could not get water from the pipes, though if he  were to be converted to Christianity there would  be no objection. To be a Hindu alone was the  mark of disgrace for this, poor being. The question is whether we Hindus are ready to put aside  our pride of easte and embrace in brotherly fold  these poor brethren, in whose veins courses the  same blood as in our own, and thus build strength  for ourselves. Or are we going to let others take  these into their own fold? Both Mohammedans  and Christians are equally prepared to uplift  them by receiving them into their own faith.  During the last ten years more than 150,000 of  these depressed Hindus in the Punjab alone have  changed their faith.  . "The magnitude of the untouchable class exists  only among the Hindus. No such distinction obtains among Christians. Is Hinduism productive  of such teaching? Is the Untouchable a necessary consequence of Hinduism? A fourth of our  race lies under the fearful and disgraceful ban  of untouchableness. The condition of the Hindu  causes much anxiety. While the numerical  strength of the Christian is on the increase, the  Hindus are daily falling in numbers."  CHINA.  The American Red Cross has suggested a New  York engineering firm to carry out the plan of  preventing floods in the valley of the Hwai River,  China, an area of 17,000 square miles. The land  is very fertile, normally producing two crops a;  year, but the river carries nearly a million tons  of sediment daily, which raises the bed of the  river until the water bursts all banks or dams and  floods the country. In the last five years only  two crops have escaped the floods. The enterprise will require some $20,000,000 in money and  about sis years time for its completion. Although  the Chinese Gl-overnment has named the Red  Cross as its agent^ and our own government has  acquiesced in the entrance of American engineers  into the work, its financing must, of course, be  done by China. The Chinese Government, therefore, hopes to place an issue of twenty of twenty-  five million dollars' worth of bonds, the interest  and eventually the principal to be paid from  taxes levied on land in the flood district, and by  rentals and sales of the land reclaimed by the  engineering works.  Rudyard Kipling  to "Honest Jim,"  ip.  If you can keep your head when all about you  Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;  -If you can trust yourself "when all men doubt you,  , But make allowance for their doubting too;  If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,  Or being lied about don't deal in lies.  Or being hated don't give way to hating,  And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise;  If you can dream���������and not make dreams your  ���������... master; :,/���������'  It you can think���������and not make thoughts your  ��������� aim.  If you can meet with Triumph arid Disaster  And treat those two impbsters just the same,  If you can bear tovhear the truth you 've spoken  Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,  Or watchvthe things you gave your life to, broken,  And sloop and build 'em up with .worn-out  . tools:. - -.'������������������'.���������:��������� .'..*���������,  If you can make on heap of all your winnings  And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,  And lose, and start again at your beginnings  Andneyer breathe a ^  If you can force your heart arid nerve arid sinew  To serve your turn long after they are gone,  And so hold on when there is nothing in you  Except the will which say to them: "Hold on!"  If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,  Or walk with Kings���������nor lose the common  -���������touch,  .  If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,  If all men count with you, but none too much;  If you can fill the unforgiving minute  With sixty seconds' worth of distance run,  Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,  And���������which is more���������you'll be a Man, my son!  ������$���������^m^w^h^���������$������ >fr ������^4H^>������^������������^ 'I**$**I**<S* *8>*$* ^**i$**i}������^**������**S**SMi$*'5>  In the Indian Review there has just appeared  an article by Lala Lajpat Rai, the Indian politician who has figured largely in the recent political agitation. The subject of the article is, "The  Depressed Classes," meaning the "outcastes." In  this article, Lala Lajpat Rai, in agitation of spirit,  points out the disparagement between a low caste  man who is a Hindu and that low caste man's  Off to the Old Land  Mr. Joseph Mullett, the capable ex-superintendent of South Vancouver water system, is  leaving for a visist to the old folks in the Mother  Country after twenty-four years arduous service  in the Nanaimo and South Vancouver water systems. Those who know the difficulties overcome  and the splendid water service now on tap  throughout the entire municipality regret that  South Vancouver has lost Mr. Mullett, and wish  him joy in the re-union in the old land and a safe  and speedy return to a useful career in British  Columbia.  CHISANA  "Subtract hard work from life, and in a few  months it will have all gone to pieces. Labor,  next to the grace of God in the''heart, is the  greatest promoter of morality, the greatest power  for civilization," is a notable saying of General  Armstrong, the founder of Hampton Institute.  Predicts Summer Population of 10,-  000���������Benefits of Alaskan Railroad  "Of course 1' would not like to  speak authoritatively, having been  only 58 years in the mining game,  still, I venture the assertion that the  Shushana district, or the Chisana  district as it is called, both in Alaska  and in Canadian territory, is one of  the richest in the world and the introduction of transportation facilities  will,.! think, bear out what I assert."  This was the remark made this  morning by Mr. Thos. Charlton, of  Dawson. Mr. Charlton, who is a  guest at the Commercial Hotel, has  been for 17 years a resident of Dawson. He is a native of New York,  but Manhattan has known little of him  for the 58 years in which he has been  a miner. He has operated in all the  well known mining fields of the continent, and was one of the discoverers of Leadville, and was also one of  those who helped sink the Quinte  Boy shaft in which the only sand carbonates in America were found.  "The district in question," said Mr.  Charlton, "is one of the richest mineral camps that has ever been discovered. It offers a wonderful variety  to the seeker after precious metals.  There! are placer gold, gold quartz,  copper, lead, silver and tin. I have  knocked chunks off a mountain of  quartz, crushed it or smashed it with  a hammer and panned out 35 cents  to the pan. This was on Snag creek,  where I have taken up a claim. This  is in the Canadian section of the district. ;, Six men working with three  sluice, boxes took put $75^000 last  season. .They worked a claim 100 feet  long and 20 feet wide and went down  from 18 inches to two feet. On the  Snag river fine placer stuff has been  taken out."  Mr. Charlton produced a small bottle of samples and showed an as-  sayer's certificate that it ran $19 to  the ounce.'  "At present," said Mr. Charlton,  "I would not advise' any one to go  into the country unless he has the  money to take in supplies. It costs  $1 a pound to get supplies into the  district at present,, and supplies al-  readyoiri- are naturally high in price.  "I was called east recently by old  time friends- who are interested in  the putting through of the United  States government railway in Alaska," he continued, "and I gave evidence before a congressional committee at Washington;. Since then\ I  have learned that the bill has been  passed and the engineers will start  out next month. The road is to tap  the cbast at Cordova and Angeles  Mission.  ���������  ,i ''' ,  ���������    - . t .  - .���������'���������,������������������ ���������  "This road will afford transportation ajd. to both sides of the boundary line. People that I know are already arranging for the establishment  of a smelter somewhere near the  railway line. They will get their  buildings up from timber on the  ground, and will rush in machinery  as soon as transportation is afforded.  As^-I understand' itr the" railroad "is to;  be rushed to completion. Even without transportation facilities I believe  that there will be 10,000 people in  that section this summer."  Mr. Charlton, who is 77 years of  age, looks and acts like a man of  50. He has several claims in the Yukon which he has been working during the: past 17 years, and states that  he has no reason to complain of the  results. He looks, however, for larger  returns from his Snag river claims,  which are in the Yukon territory close  to the Alaskan boundary.  .  ��������� I  I Mount Pleasant Livery  I TRANSFER  Furniture and Piano Moving  Baggage, Express and Dray.    Hacks and Carriages  at all hoars.  Phone Fairmont B4B  Corner Broadway and Main A. P. McTavish, Prop.  ; I  ��������� ������||"l'������'l"l"l'������"l'������-l"l'������'l"l"l'l'l������l"l������.H������4i������4 ������'l|n1 ** ,\ .|..|..|ii|..M.iM������I"1 >���������*���������������������������"���������-'������'<������������������������  *t**(r*t**iv*8**l*"i,*i**9**w**J# ������������������* *���������  VANCOUVER CUT-RATE FRUIT and CANDY CO. ii  : J N.Ellis. Mgr.        2452 Main St. Cor. Broadway ::  "You have a fine signature, Mr. So-and-So,"  said a salesman to a buyer who had written his  name with many flourishes.  "Yes," answered the buyer, proudly, "I  should have. One of my forefathers signed the  Declaration of Independence."  "So?" said the salesman. "Veil, you ain'd got  nottings on me. One of my forefathers signed  the Ten Commandments."  A Linguist and the Bible  Sir William Jones, familiar with "the  languages of twenty-eight nations,  wrote: . "I have carefully and regularly perused the Scriptures, and am  of the opinion that the Bible, independent of its origin as divine, contains' more important history and  finer strains of eloquence than can  be collected from all other books in  whatsoever language they may be  written."  To the Bible men will return, and  why?r Because they cannot do without it.���������Matthew Arnold.  CEDAR COTTAGE PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH  Rev. J. O. Madill, Pastor.  Services for Sunday, March 29���������  11 a. m.���������"Two Ends Meeting "  7.30p.m.-"What about the King"?  Sabbath School and Bible Classes  at 2.30,pm.  Prayer meeting at 8 p.m. on Wednesday.  Young People's meeting at 8 p.m. on  Monday night.  ��������� ������'l l"l 1 I I I H.41M"I"I IMf I >������������������  All Fruits I!  i���������  in Season jj  Largest Stock of Confectionery Fruit i Tobacco on Hill; ;  PHONE Fairmont 638  Free delivery to any part of the city.  ��������� I        ��������� ������������������������������������*  Just received a large shipment of  O'CEDAR  Polishing Mop and O'Ceoar  Furniture Polish  Maket Hard Work Ea������vl  fXUSTINC, cleaning ������nd polishing Iwdwood floor* U J������r4, foeV-piwilr*  11 ing wore. A������ Mmart never ending tMk end ���������eldom wHifactory too  T"; old W������y. pq|8l������������������r,' quick mdwtitfectM? the new war-iMmf the QCedar  PojUm Mof>.. WiA������ty������m<MU������#������pend aftnrminutefdomf whet rt now, U*c������ jrouataxwf  ball* dax   Jonmm^p^AaO^fdkrf'obm Mopovarthe floor and evesyperticja of  nhfj iffrf f# fa^ft ttp ewliielcl*  BiTen ��������� JumkL duwb|#. ietfine iMrljafi  ��������� of  ���������������4  tu aim buJ fur tin chutiin* mil rlamlrn  ���������of tbe top* c* hl|* fiuaihira, batwaen  '1>������|>aiwtar*cfwaa<4m4mdwtoinade  t rem can fcttotlta farcomer ,������n<U������  Vbceamwerwiiaior end oUm*  ���������fM-et-pucas.  $aVbi8n CeiiwlMl tr met? MM4  Try m OCadV fojifh Map for  two cWt at our ri*k. Tef rt  a������eiywayrcf two ������n,m if  yon ara wot Jwijhtac) witoa  friUiNOinPttri  M^UZmtaQw1flK*.lUrdi#G*to9Ucm  Phone us your order.   We deliver  promptly. ___  W.ROwentJVlorrison  The IVU. Pleasant Hardware  Phone Fair. 447 2337 Main Street  .t.,|.������������.|i.|.iH..|..;.,|.,t..|..i..{..t..t44"l..t"t"H"!"H������'������-8"M'������������-������������-H'  NATIONAL CULTURE AND REFINEMENT  Can we measure the value of example In bettering the social, moral  ajid mental condition of home, civic or national life?  A living example is a powerful factor in leading up to culture and  refinement as a national asset. What more so than that of an artistically made home nestling among beautiful flowering plants; roses,  flowering and evergreen shrubbery; shade trees, all encompassed with  hedges of holly, laurel or privet.  Cultivate a habit to spend your time to make such a home, and  visit our Greenhouses and l^urseries; see our stock, and get expert advice from ; our capable and courteous employees, which will greatly aid  you in your effort. Our stock was never better, larger or of greater  variety. In our stock of over $100,000 we have everything that culture  and refinement demands to make a home a credit to the owners and  pleasing and interesting to the community.  Catalogues mailed free on application.  Royal Nurseries, Limited  Office���������710 Dominion Bldg., S07 Xastlags Bt. W.  Pbone Seymour 5556.  BTOBE���������3410 Granville St.    Phono ������������yview 1926. "f  Greenhouses   and   Nurseries   at  Royal   on  B.   C.   Electric Railway,    X  4J������     Eburne Line, about two miles south of the City limits. ���������?.  Fhont*���������Eborae 43. y  ���������H--W~^^H~M^~^���������������^K���������^~^-M-M-W��������� ������M"H ���������!������������������:���������*���������!'���������!��������� 1 1 t ���������! I 1M : I 1 t 1 1 M"l'% THK   WK8TUKN   ������  M >  Friday. March 27,1914  "Yes." I said, "Miss Grayson is here.  Who is it, pleas*?"   I thought I recog  nised Miss Clement's voice, and I was  not wrong. But, after all, it was I  she 'wanted. She had called up my  rooms and my office, and, unable to  get me at either place, had taken the  chance that Evelyn might aid her to  my discovery.  "You have learned something?" I  asked, disguising aaswell as I could my  burning Interest. If possible, I would  keep from Evelyn the least suggestion  of how vitally Important I regarded  the news I hoped for.  "I hardly know how to explain it to  you," came Miss Clement's reply. "I  was on the verge of what I am sure  was a most pregnant revelation. I  was to be given names and dates and  circumstances. I had been promised  these by one in whom I put the greatest reliance. And now I am asked to  wait another twenty-four hours. Something has happened, my confidant tells  me; something puzzling and utterly  unexpected, and those who know most  of the matter are now most at sea."  Evelyn must have seen me smile.  It was quite evident to me that Miss  Clement was in touch with some one  well informed, but It was not that  Which provoked the smile. I smiled  because I felt that Cameron in some  way had outwitted his captors and  {gained his freedom. This was the un-  jexpected happening which had thrown  Ithe villainous slant-eyed _ camp into  [confusion, and I rejoiced at my friend's  Intrepidity.  "And so, " I said to Miss Clement,  "you wish me to wait another day?"  '1 think it would be worth while,"  she answered.  "And I do, too," I told her. "I don't  '���������oppose you've seen an afternoon paper, have you?" I went on. "Well, they  contain some news of Interest   They  as I went Ly aim, 1 asked, under my  breath:  "What is it, Louis?"  "Ah!"    he    whispered.    "Monsieur:  Cameron is talking in    the    strange  tongue which neither Monster Bryan  nor I myself can understand."  CHAPTER XIX.  The Pang of Disillusion.  The sick room was ..dark. So dark  tbat for a little, until our eyes accustomed themselves to it, we could bit rely distinguish objects. But our ears  required no attuning. Even in the passageway, separated by a heavy mahogany door, we had hint of what was going on within; and as, we entered, a  hoarse tirade smote us in the gloom,  'like an assault from ambush.  To us both the tone and words were  alike unfamiliar. In inflection and  modulation the voice was strange. And  ithe uttered sounds were a coarse, horrid jargon. Once I thought) I detected  an, English oath, but I was not sure.  ��������� Evelyn clutched my hand tftfd I  icould feel against me the tremble of  her slim young body. Gladly I -would  have spared her this ordeal, but I had  been no less unprepared than she. And  now, as gradually shapes defined themselves less dimly in the gloom, the horror grew; and, held by it, speechless,  Inert, I stood where I had paused���������  the quivering girl very close .beside  me���������staring, listening, wondering.  It was a large room, lofty of ceiling,  with high windows, across which  heavy curtains were drawn; and the  only light was that which stole between these hangings or filtered  through three dark, richly-colored,  glass medallions set in a side wall.  Cameron's bed, a; massive, ornately  about, restlessly, muttering strange  oaths, mingled with suppliant murmurs. And to me this was the most  sadly trying part of the incident. I  would gladly have retreated, but Evelyn begged me to wait.  "Just until he is quiet," she pleaded;  "just until he falls asleep."  At length he lay quite still and we.  thought from his regular breathing he  had succumbed to the narcotic, and so  were about to go, when he started up  with a little feeble cry, low-voiced, but  clearly distinct.  "No, no, for God's sake, not thatM  didn't kill them. I swear I didn't IdU  them. It was an accident. She stove  on a rock. I���������I���������didn't, I say! I didn't  ���������;I���������������  His voice trailed into sflenco. He  dropped back, heavily, upon the pillows.   He slept  It is one thing to have your faith  in a friend shaken. That is serious  enough in all conscience. But your  faith may tremble, and sway and rock,  and still there is always the possibility of its being resteadled and made,  firm again by explanation���������by extent**  ation even. It is quite another thing  to have your faith toppled headlong,,  by the snatching away of ttie last vestige of support, the last sliver of underpinning. That is more than serious..  It is calamitous; it is catastrophic; it  is tragic.  Back in the library again, I Set to  pacing the floor. I think Evelyn resumed her seat In the big leathern  chair. I am sure. For a time I was  not conscious that she was in the  room. That it was inconsiderate ofj  me, I admit. It was, perhaps, unpardonable. And yet it was not wilful.,  Frankly, I had forgotten her, absolute-;  ly, in the stress of the emotional tempest raised by that revelation in the:  darkened bedchamber.  Back and forth, I strode from book*!  case to bookcase, over the soft neutral-tinted Persian rugs; and all the  while there echoed those repeated denials of Cameron's that he had ever  been in China. "Never nearer than  Yokohama," he had said.. "Once I ate  chop suey in a Chicago Chinese restaurant." "I have always been interested  in China and the Chinese, but I know  only what I have read." And the'  words of his quondam friend came  back to me now, too, with redoubled  emphasis: . "He refused to admit what  I knew to be the truth."  Nevertheless I had chosen to believe:  that Cameron, should he ever return.,  to us, would be able to clarify this!  turbid  stream  of circumstance,  and    _ _      carved four-poster, was   hung   with  say that Mr. Cameron came home^last iWn8ed ������nd embroidered velvet, and in \ prove the fallibility of appearances  !nlght, and for once, at least, they tell  What la very nearly the truth."  . If sincerity ever carried over a wire  It carried then in Miss Clement's con-  Jgratulations, and there was something  almost divine in her forbearance to  ask for particulars. She congratulated  Bvelyn, too, and p-^mlaed to come to  :aee her, eoon; and then once more she  assured me that she would yet learn  everything we could possibly care to,  know.  "The Chinese," she added, "are a deliberate race, Mr. Clyde. They refuse  to be hurried. But eventually we shall  have our answers."  With Evelyn beside ine the hours no  longer dragged. We talked unceasingly ; reviewing everything from the receipt of the first letter; conjecturing  on each of the score of little problems  making up the one "great mystery, but  arriving at nothing definite; adding, if  changing conditions at all, to our own  confusion-   vy\  And It In   passing, at   intervals,  whene opportunity offered, I spoke tender words and pleaded for a definite,  or at least a closer, more intimate understanding between us, who shall say  that X was to blame?   She was never  toore lovely, never   more   appealing  than she was that morning; and I  rhewod" lor an admission "of ijarTientl-=  taeot above and beyond the mere ait*  teriy regard to which hitherto she had  persisted In limiting her expressed affection for me. j  More than once I had read in her  eyes���������without  unseemly   conceit,   I.  trust I may be permitted this asser-.  tion--what I now asked In lip avowal.  But there seemed to be with her a notion tbat the occasion was ill-suited to .  my plea.      ���������������������������������������������'���������--';���������.���������                         ���������_��������������������������������������������� I  -Philip," she said, "dear Philip, I  care for you very much; almost as  much aa I care for Uncle Robert You  have been very good to me, and very  good to blm, and If I could tell you  that I love you in the way you ask,  I���������" And there she hesitated a shade  iof a second. "Even if I could tell you,"  jshe corrected, "I wouldn't tell you  inow. It Is not stubbornness, Philip.  It is Just a woman's way. Ask me  .again, when TJncle Robert Is well, and  all this horrible nightmare haa passed.:  IPromise me that you will ask me  again!"  "Never fear," I returned, "Til ask  you."  "And promise me, too," she added,  "that until all the skies are clear once  the dusk of the chamber it took on the j . Tne illusion to which I had clung,.  somber likeness of a catafalque, add- j however, was now in shreds, earning to the eerie seeming a touch of the   ercn, returning, with body enfeebled  funereal. Incongruously- from the  shadowy midst of it came that ranted  rigmarole of strange words, now high  pitched, now bass, now guttural.  What had at first seemed a moving  gray patch had developed by degrees  into the white, night-robed, sitting fig- j  ure of 'tbe invalid, swaying excitedly,  with arms extended in ceaseless gestures. For a long moment this uncanny object had held my gaze, but  presently near the bed's foot, l descried Bryan's white uniform and. tbe  sight brought a measure of relief.   In  and brain confused, had spoken in his  unguarded delirium. The mask was.  dropped, the screen thrown down, and'  barefaced and stark he stood revealed,  a woeful figure in tbe impartial glare  of truth.  At the moment I could see no extent  nation. He was a liar end be was a  coward; and all the sympathy, all the  friendship I ever felt for Mia died utterly, as I thought bow, probably,  ���������very untoward incident of the past  month, with its chain of vexatious  consequences, might have been avoid*  response to a beckoning head-tilt, the ed bad be been brave to the point of  nurse Joined us. .       j confession.;  "I thought you had better come," be i, It was now plain enough for the  whispered, quite calmly. "I thought least astute to see that at some time  possibly you might understand what he had committed an act which had  he Is saying." aroused certain of the Chinese to���������������  "But idon't," i whispered back. "U^tallation.   It was this which I had  it's a real: language I never heard it   *"~"* *  more, you will not mention the sub*  Lfect"  -,-���������" I was on the verge of promising;  not because it would be an easy promise to" keep, for I knew it would be  very difficult; but because I could  .deny her nothing. I was on the verge,  I say, when the library door opened,  and Louis, pale and excited, and so in  haste that he had not paused to knock,  was exclaiming:  "Monsieur Cameron! Pardon! Mais,  enfin, etesvous prete?"  A score of fears springing instantly  to birth within us, Evelyn and I were  on our feet before the speech, rapidly delivered as it was, was finished.  Were we ready! We evidenced our  readiness in no such voiceless thing  as words.  Louis stood aside for us to pass, and  What do you imagine it is?"  "I have an^idea it's. Chinese," he ari-  swered. "It sounds like tbe stuff you  hear at a Chinese theater, arid I  caught two or three words of pidgin-  English, just before you���������-" He broke  off suddenly; and pliicked at my sleeve.  "There!" he murmured. "Did you  hear~that?;-Maskee.iJThat^  enough. It means- 'never raincU'; A little while ago he was evidently trying  to hurry some one. It was chop-chop  about every other' sentence."--  Evelyn's eyes shone luminous in the  gloom.   "   ^  "Can't you give him something to  quiet him?" she begged. "It'B awful to  let him go on like tbis. It's cruel. He  seems to be in such distress."  "I can, of course," Bryan "returned.  "But l thought Mr. Clyde was anxious  to have, everything he said reported,  and���������'' "��������� "���������' -V .'���������-."'���������  "Oh, do give him something," she  insisted.  Bryan left us to obey. I saw him'  stop at a table near tbe bed, and in  the half light I caught the glint of a  hypodermic Byrlnge. But, as If scenting his purpose, Cameron's voice lulled  abruptly. For a second or two he waB  quiet, and then, before any one of us,  I think, suspected his purpose, be  turned, suddenly, swiftly, and slipped  from beneath the bed clothes to the  floor where he stood erect, with arms  upraised and tensed, shouting in shrill,  strident key what seemed to be orders,  directed not at one but at a horde.  j The great bed separated him from  i both Bryan and myself, but we skirted  | it in haste, and came upon him before be had taken more than a single  step. As we confronted bim, his arms  lowered and his clenched fists shot  forward threateningly. But a far  more startling happening at this juncture was bis abandonment of his jargon, and his adoption of intelligible  English.  I    "Below!" he yelled, fiercely.    "Below, you yellow dogs!    Below, I say!  i Every cur's son of you!   Below!"  Despite this truculence he was not  difficult to master. Together Bryan  and I grappled htm; in another moment we had him fiat on his bed once  more, and the nurse was pressing  home the piston of that little shining  Instrument of glass and silver which I  had so recently seen him take up from  the medicine table.  For a moment   the   patient rolled  feared from the first   It   waa - tbi������  Which he had chosen to hide.  As I paced to and fro, his etaven  words rang once more in my ears::  "No, no, for God's sake, not that! I  didn't kill-them I I swear I dldnt fclt  them! It was an accident!" .And I  knew that he was lying. The very]  tone of bis disclaimer convinced mei  of^his/guilt. ,=He had Wlled,eii������dh^  cowered before the avengers.  Plsgust, abhorrence, anger, all were  mine in turn.  At length I paused before a window,!  and remained there, with my hack toj  the room, looking down on the wltb-i  ered garden behind the house, yet see-j  Ing nothing but the red of my own pas-!  frtop..;"...'   .'���������������������������������������������'...'.^-: ':������������������!'  A touch upon my shoulder aroused!  me to a realization of my surround-i  ings, and informed me that I was not:  alone. Startled as one awakened abruptly from a dream, I turned; and  turning, there came a revulsion: Every;  surcharging emotion that had held  ami bound me gave way instantly to a violent self-reproach, excited  by the pathos of Evelyn's sad," questioning eyes and sadder, quivering  mouth.  My Impulse was to take her In my  arms, and pacifying, to plead pardon  for what must have seemed to her an  inexcusable churlishness. But the conditions which so recently she had set.  upon me forbidding the coveted embrace, I compromised on a hand-clasp.  "My dear child," I began, earnestly,  "I'm sorry. But then you must know  how what we just saw and heard distressed me. I think I have been mad  since we left that room. I hardly  know what I have been doing.1 To see  him so unstrung, demented, raving.  To hear him���������"  But she would not allow me to finish.  "Philip!" she cried, passionately.  "Oh, Philip! Can't you see? Don't  you understand? It is a mistake, an.  awful nightmare of a mistake. That  creature over there is not my uncle.  I am convinced that he is not my.  Uncle Robert."  CHAPTER XX.  An Enigma and Its Solution.  To my amazement I found that Evelyn meant more than I fancied. My  interpretation of her words was that  Cameron was not in his right mind���������  that be was net her Uncle Robert, aa  she had known him.    But In a very  brief moment she disabused me.   "It is not he, at all," she declared,  With emphasis. "TheT������ is a resemblance, yes. But the man you found  in the street is not Robert Cameron;  I am sure of that."  The idea that I had brought there,  not my friend,.but my friend's double,  seemed to me too preposterous for a  moment's entertainment. I fear I suspected, just then, that Evelyn's reason  had been warped a trifle by the racking scene of which we had been witnesses.  "I would to God, my dear child," I  said, sympathetically, "that you were  right But there can be no question  .as to the Identity of the sick man.  'Every one who has seen him recognized him at once���������Checkabeedy, Louis, Stephen, Dr. Massey. No, no, Evelyn,  you must not be misled by his ravings." And at this point there occurred to me a tentative explanation-  one in which I did not in the least believe, but which, at all events, was  worth trying; one which, indeed, I  prayed would serve.  "Cameron, you must remember, haa  been with his Chinese captors for four  weeks.. In tbat time he must bave  picked up something of their language.  It is only natural that he should. So,  you see, to hear him use a few words  of pidgin-English in his insane gibberish is not so remarkable, after all. And  as for that spirited denial just before  he dropped off to sleep, it is very evident that they accused him of something With which he had no connection, though quite cognizant of the  facts.1'  But the.girl would have none of it  Tolerantly she listened, and tolerantly  she smiled when I had finished.   -  "No, no, Philip," she Insisted, "I see  it all quite clearly. Whatever crime  Waa committed, the creature lying  there committed it. But he is not my  uncle. Others mistook the resemblance  for identity, just as you did, only the  situation was reversed. Those who  abducted Uncle Robert thought they  were abducting that villain we are  now housing."  It was an ingenious notion, but of  course it was not possible. However,  I saw that it would be idle to continue  to dispute with her.  "What would you suggest, then?.  Shall we send our invalid to a hospital?" I asked, in pretended serious-;  ness.  But very sagely she shook her head.  "Oh, no," she returned. "We must  keep him. He is very valuable to us.  Perhaps we can do as contending  armies do���������arrange an exchange' of  prisoners."  In spite of my wretchedness, I suppressed a smile. It was all very amusing; and yet the fear that she was suffering aberration due to hysteria, tempered pitifully the humor of It.  When, later in the afternoon, Dr.  Massey called, I told blm everything,  including this hallucination of Evelyn's. . ������������������; .:... .  "You did perfectly right," he said, In  tone of cordial approval. "The malady  with which Cameron Is afflicted has a  tendency to distort certain lineaments.  Especially at times of excitement bis  face changes, so that Miss Grayson is  justified In fancying that this is not  the Robert Cameron she knew. ;1  have noticed the dissimilarity myself,  but it is due, of course, entirely to distorted expression. In a couple of days,  at most, he will be fully restored, and  then he himself will be the best one to  rectify her error. Meanwhile, if I were  you, I would not dispute her- She has  gone through a great deal, and gone  through it bravely; indeed with a courage that is quite phenomenal, and she  is entitled to any little consolatory beliefs that she chooses to entertain."  And then, as If such, advice were not  wholly superfluous, be added: "Be  -kind=to-her,-Clyde !-be-good Vtp -her.~  She Is a wonderful young woman."  Whereat I grasped his hand, and  promised blm, lifting him a notch in  my estimation because of his perspicacity. And all the while a lump kept  rising in my throat and threatening;  my tear ducts.  On the following day I heard noth-'  Ing from Miss Clement, which, somewhat surprised me, though she had!  told me that her prospective inform-i  ants were likely to take their own j  time. Early, on the second morning,]  however, I had a note from her, the  enigmatic character of which Impelled  me to speculation. i  "Dear Mr. Clyde," she wrote, "I hope j  you can make It convenient to visit me',  this evening, at the Mission. I wantj  to talk with Ling Fo, an exceptionally I  well-educated young Chinaman, who;  tells me that his people are much mystified over a recent event; arid, If;  wbat he says be true���������and I never;  knew him to lie���������a new9������mp!exlon isi  placed upon this whole matter. Come,  about nine-thirty, after our service is ]  over." _   '������,'  Aa Dr. Massey's orders forbidding!  any one save Mr. Bryan to enter Cam-!  eron's room, issued immediately afteri  our hideous experience, had not yet,  been rescinded, our knowledge of his  condition was, perforce, gleaned entirely through physician and nurse. Both  how assured me that he -was progressing satisfactorily, and that there had  been no return of the dementia.  Evelyn still persisted in her notion.  that; the patient was not her uncle, but  ,hls double, and following the doctor's  directions I refrained from, trying to  convince her of the truth ^ even going'  bo far as to pretend, that I believed  mb she did, and planning to begin negotiations through Miss .Clement and  her Chinese confidants for an exchange of captives as soon as our hostage was able to.be moved.  "I am to see Miss Clement tonight,"  I told her, late that afternoon, "also an  Oriental acquaintance of hers, who appears to be informed on the subject  which interests us.   It is possible that  he will prove the very person who can  arrange it all,"  "Let me' go with you," she, urged,  laying a beseeching hand, on my arm.  "Do let me go with you, Philip. I am  so anxious. It will Beem years if I  have to wait here for you to bring me  the news; and there are sure to bo  some things you will forget to ask  about, if I'm not there to prompt.you."  In spite of the unflattery ot her  speech I smiled, indulgent. r,Her great  blue eyes, pathetically pleading as her  words, were able advocates. It was  haTd to deny her under any circumstances, and now, as I thought it over,  I saw no reason why in this instance  she should not have her desire.  "Yes," I agreed, "you shall go. But  remember, you must be very careful,  for the present at least, not to let slip  the slightest Inkling that we suspect  pur Cameron is not the real Cameron.  We are Beeking information, you know,  Evelyn, not squandering it."  Pell street wore its night gaudery  when the Cameron electric brougham  with Evelyn and myself as occupants  glided to a halt before the door of the  Mission over which Miss Clement ably  and successfully presided. The pale^  vari-tinted light of lanterns from the]  balcony of a restaurant across thel  way, mingling with the flickering yeli  low beam of the city's gas lamps,)  threw into sharp relief the curious!  pendent black signs with their red,  cloth borders and gilded Chinese lettering, hanging before shop doors. It!  revealed, too, oddly contrasting figures  of loungers and pedestrians, residents,  and visitors. And it bared, back of all:  that was bizarre, the commonplace  brick fronts of the typically American  buildings, with their marring gridiron-  lag of fire-escapea. To Evelyn, rarely  observant, the combination was Interesting, but disappointing.  THE DEAD SEA.  I looked upon a Sea,  And lo! 'twas dead,  Although by Hcrmon's snows  And Jordan fed,  How came a fate so dire?  The tale's soon told:  All that it got it kept,  And fast did hold.  All tributary .streams  Found here their grave,  Because this sea received  But never gave.  0 Sea that's dead! teach me,  To know and feel  That selfish grasp and greed  My doom will seal.  And Lord, help me my best,  Myself, to give,  That I may other's bless,  And like Thee, live.  *Z"       -    ���������       ��������� -  |W .  Next. Week.)  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A  trifling accident may disorganize their whole  svstem ��������� more serious, disturbance, with  attendant heavy losses involved, are not  preventable. Stave Lake Power is undeniably cheaper and more reliable than private plant operation. See us for particulars  and rates.  Western Canada Power  ���������'.-���������'. LIMITED  Phone: Seymour 4770      603-610 Carter-Cotton Bldg.  P, Q. BOX 1418, VANCOUVER, B. C.  ^j^-^M^>;.^v^v^^������M^.^.;^>vij������tji.f^  ^.,^^..^^..>.;.^>^^.^^^l.^fr^*4A*wl y ;������������������!������������������;���������.>i Friday, March 27, 1914  THE WESTERN CALL.  >}������'{M?������������JM$M}**f*������tMltlfrA������fr������T������*fr  "SdFETY FIRST"  Has been the watchword of The  Mutual from the day it was Organized in 1869 up to the present  time.  Only those forms of investment  consistent with the absolute security of policyholders have been  adopted.  The result is an institution that  is among the most stable in the  Canadian Financial World.  Business in force over 187,000.000  Assets over 22.000,000 *  Surplus over    8,800,000  The Mutual Life of Canada  It would be a business mistake  for YOU to place your application  with any company without consulting our Agents and familiar-.  izihg yourself with the model  policies issued by  CANADA'S ONLY MUTUAL  Investigation cost* nothW and htm  rtgr������ta  Write, phone or call for rateB, etc.  Wm. J. Twibs, District Mgr.  317419 lagirs lllg.  Viiamir. B. C.  t..|..t.������������^������.t"i'������-t-i-t"i"i-i-<i"H-t-'i'������-i-������������.i  oses  erbaceous Plants  for Spring Planting  also  GLADIOLUS  111 in first class condition.  Prices moderate.  Mer's Nursery  Corner 15th & Main St.  PHONE Fairmont 817  South Vancouver Undertakers  Hamilton  Bros,  We are foremost in our line for  MODBBATB PBICBO FtWBBALS  n\mwt\m\       ,   Plait Frisir ft  ������j������ .$~^^^.������j������^~$.4$*j������^.^>^4^������.j������^������^������^~^j.^4^.j.^i..;������������^;~;~j^  T  y  %  t  TEMPERANCE  ���������������4J������4Jl4Jl4J^.<J44J.<j������4J4^������^W^4J.4������^>4J4^w{.������^4^^������.^������4^>g������^M{M{^^l^.4  WORDS WHICH BURN. TO KILL A LIVING- KAN.  "Tonight it (liquor traffic) enters a humble  home to strike the roses from a woman's cheek,  and tomorrow it challenges this republic in the  halls of Congress. ,  "Today it strikes a crust from the lips of a  starving child, and tomorrow it levies tribute  from the government itself.  "There is no cottage humble enough to escape  it, ho palace strong enough to shut it out.  "It defies the law when it cannot.coerce suffrage. It is flexible to cajole, but merciless in  victory. It is the mortal enemy of peace and order, the despoiler of men and terror of women,  the cloud that shadows the faces of children, the  demon that has dug more graves and sent more  souls unshriveled to judgment than have wasted  life since God sent plagues to Egypt, and all the  wars since Joshua stood before Jericho.  "It comes to ruin, and it shall profit mainly by  the ruin of your sons and mine.  "It comes to mislead human souls and fo crush  human hearts under its crumbling wheels. It  comes to bring gray haired mothers down in  shame and sorrow to their graves.  "It comes to change the wife's love into despair and her pride into shame.  "It comes to still the laughter on the lips of  little children.  "It comes to stifle all the music of the home  and fill it with silence.and desolation. }  "It comes to ruin your body and mind, to  wreck your home, and it knows it must purchase  its prosperity by the swiftness and certainty with  which it wrecks this world.' '���������-Henry W. Grady.  More Wages for Sober Men  An increase of ten per cent, in wages for every  employee who will agree not to use strong drink  has been offered by a big quartz company in  Pennsylvania. It is said that nearly every employee immediately signed the pledge. The managers of this concern declare that they expect to  be more than repaid for the additional wages by  the improved service they will secure from sober  workmen. Perhaps this example may lead other  working men voluntarily to make a total abstinence pledge on the basis of which they can ask  for larger wages. A strike of that sort for increased pay would enjoy larger moral support  than many other attempts on the part of organized labor.  STIMULATING, NOT NOURISHING.  Some one asked John B. Gough whether alcohol was a food or a medicine. Bis reply was,  "It is very much like sitting down on a hornet's  nest���������stimulating, but not nourishing."  The late Dr. Guthrie of Scotland expressed  his opinion of whiskey in these words: "Whiskey is good in its place. There is nothing in this  world like whiskey for preserving a man when  he is dead, btit it is one of the worst things in the  world for preserving a man when he is living.  If you want to keep a dead man, put him in  whiskey; if you want to kill a living man, put  jivhiskey in him."  Among the Ancients  Plutarch says that Lycurgus prevented drunkenness among tbe Lacedaemonians by commanding tha| all their vines be cut down and none  others allowed to grow in the commonwealth.  WAS IT DRINK ABE?  GRAFTER CONVERTED.  Abe Reuf, the famous convicted grafter of San  Francisco, in his recent confession and repentance, reveals what is sometimes required to bring  men to a realization of their sinfulness.  Ho says:  "With others I co-operated in selling out the  city of San Francisco, and so I am in a prison  cell. It has taken these stone walls, this area six  by ten, where the only light or air is that which  comes from a narrow wicket to bring me to the  full realization of this betrayal. I started life  buoyantly. When I left the university I had the  usual high ideals of that period. How and why  my life flew so wide of its goal I am determined  to trace and to write in detail in the hope that it  may prove of public benefit and may make  amends for what society has lost by my work."  Efeiy Woman  L la Interested txA ������hoald know  , about tbe wondarful  "*���������*������ issur  AUcjroor drogylit  it If a* cannot ���������nptrir  the XABVEL, ������MG������pt W> _  otkar. but and atamv fbr Ol   .  tnted book-Mdad. It ctaa rail  pwMcilara and direelloaa wntiabto  to tadtoa.WDrDflOBsnrPXiTOOMWlndMr.OBt  Oaoeral Acanta tot  A DETECTIVE'S ADVICE  Baton aatphwiar ��������� W-  *ato Dateetir*, if yoa dan't  know roar nan, aak roar  tonladviaor.  JOHNSTON, tha Sacrat  Sarvtea liaMbjiajci Sanaa, flotta f$*4  310 Peader St., W.  . VaacMvar. B. c  ���������!.'#���������  Try Our Printing:  Quality Second  to None  .H^<^^:^^^^l^^l^^^'^^^^^'^^^^^'^^^I^^^^^^^^t^^t^^^^'I^^^^^M'<^'I���������^^';.lt..^^^ll^l^^lt 1  t t !H H t'lH 1 H f  ..   A. E. Barron  J. A. Harron  G. M. Wilmammk  4.  HARRON BROS.  FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS  VANCOUVER NORTH VANCOUVER  ;:   Office & Chapel���������1084 Granville St.      Office & Chapel���������122 Sixth St W.   I.  Phone Seymour 8486 ->  Phone 184  l^,^;n^n^Mll���������:���������,IMHl^l^^^1il1HlM^ln^iil^MlMtl^il,^.ll^|^l^.^l|.^M^il.l.ll,^1l,l.lllllil^l,^,^^  ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������t������������������������������������t������������������������t������������t������������������������#������������������<������������������������>������������������������i������>������#>|  HUXLEY ON THE BIBLE.  Consider that for three centuries the Bible has  been woven into the life of all that is best and  noblest in English history, that it has become the  natural epic of Britain, and is, familiar to noble  and simple, from John o' Groat's House to Land's  End; that it is written in the noblest and purest  English, and abounds in exquisite beauties of  mere literary form; and finally, that it forbids a  man who never left his native village to be ignorant of the existence of other countries and other  civilizations, and of a great past stretching back  to the farthest limit of the oldest nations in the  world. By the study of what other book could  children be so much humanized, and made to feel  that each figure in that vast historical procession  fills, like themselves, but a momentary space between two eternities, and earns the blessings or  the curses of all time, according to its effort to  do good and hate evil, even as they also are earning their payment for their work!���������Professor  Huxley.  Phone Seymour 943  Davies & Sanders  General Contractors  55-66 DAVIS CHAMBERS    ::    615 HASTINGS ST. W. ~  ���������t..t..|,.t..n,.i.,|..t..!..t-.!..t"l"H"l..|.lt.l.-t"t"l"t"t"l"M"t-lMH"l"M H'H' 1 Hit l-HfrH t >*  Trader's Trust Company, Ltd.jj  328-333 Rogers Bldg.  Vancouver, B. C. ;;  GENERAL AGENTS:  Pacific States Fire Insurance Company  Franklin Fire Insurance Company  A GENERAL TRUST BUSINESS TRANSACTED ������  ,t,���������t.,tMt���������^,���������t,���������^���������,tl���������^������������������^���������^.t���������l|���������.^..^.���������^l^������������������t..!���������lt.���������tM^1..^������������������^���������I..I^.^������������������^���������^������������������tM^���������<.���������t^^^'^^l������������������������^lI^^���������l^.^Ml���������l^ll^i���������lt������������������^���������������^������������������  Subscribe to The Western Gall  One Dollar a year in advance  L+.fl+i|li������f4i'Hi������������������'|Mt"H"M'������^^^ '���������������������������^������������������^���������������������������'I||l'tt<4*������*4'������i1|<|t| <���������������������������������< ���������^������������������������������������������������������t'������|l'4'������#l|l''ll't'������������<i't'������������|1|������1;  *  t  13500  Horse  Power  Turbine  I35IHI  Horse  Power  Turbine  The Spirit of the Time Demands  RELIABLE,   SAFE,   ECONOMTCAL   FOWER  Stave Lake Power is Dependable and Economical  By harnessing the Great Stave River we have made it possible to generate 100,000 horse power of electrical energy at our Stave Falls Plant,  the Biggest Electrical Feat in Western Canada.  100,000 HORSE POWER  Or half asmuchagain as the combined connected load in steam and electricity in Vancouver today, a fact of great significance to local industries  Offices: 603-610 Carter-Cotton Bldg.  Phone: Seymour 4770  R. F. HAYWARD, General Manager  WESTERN CANADA POWER CO., Ltd.  JOHN   MONTGOMERY, CVmfcract Agent  P.O. Drawer 1415  Vancouver, B.C.  t ,,..... T 8  lvH K   W KSTBKN   VALL !  friday^vMarch Zfol914  ON THE VERGE OF CIVIL WAR  London.���������Earl Grey, interviewed in New Zea- '  land upon the question of Home Rule for Ireland,  was asked; according to a Daily Telegraph cable,  if the report about officers of the army resigning  their commands is true.  Earl Grey replied he believed Sir Edward  Carson's pockets were stuffed with letters offering resignations, but he told them their duty  was to obey the Crown. The Ulster men have a  just cause and were prepared to make any legitimate sacrifice, but one sacrifice they were not  prepared to make, namely, to enco^age sedition  in His Majesty's army.  Sir Edward Carson, added Earl Grey, had  not made a single mistake. His influence had  kept the Ulstermen peaceful, although threatened with withdrawal of their liberties. His action would probably lead to a settlement by general consent.  Earl Grey repeated that now was the opportunity for a settlement on federal lines and unless  Premier Asquith waa too far indebted to John  Redmond, there was hope the councils of moderation and statesmanship wpuld prevail on the eve  of a settlement which would bring contentment  and prosperity to Ireland and increased strength  to the Empire.  Earl Grey has cabled to Sir Edward Carson  that it is certain Australia will subscribe $25,000  to the Ulster fund.  ��������� .:',:������������������������������������"'".;.'���������.���������'������������������' ���������'���������'������������������.-.   ��������� "'���������'���������;.'������������������ '"-'..���������*.  t   ���������  "  ������������������'  ��������� ���������  * ���������' ���������-.' ���������"���������'.������������������..'������������������������������������������������������������������������    ��������� ->,  IT WAS DESERVED  E. M. Macdonald, M. P. for Pictou, N. S., was  horribly peeved at the showing up the Minister  of Labor gave him the other day. Few in the  House will deny that the Liberal member fully  .deserved.all he got. Though in Parliament many  years, Mr. Macdonald has never earned the name  of a fair fighter. His exposure by Hon. T. W.  Crowthers carries a lesson.  Hit as hard as you like, Macdonald, but keep  above the belt in future.  THE NATIONAL DEBT  NEW GROUPING OF GREAT POWERS  St. Petersburg, March 17.���������The Novoe Vremya  publishes an extraordinary report to the effect  that negotiations are proceeding for the regrouping of the powers, whereby Germany will join  Russia, France and Great Britain.  The Liberal press is telling the country that  the Borden administration is increasing the national debt.  The fact of the mater is, that the present Minister of Finance is being compelled to borrow  money to save the unsound ventures of the Laurier administration. He is compelled to borrow  money because of the legacies left him by virtue  of the aeroplane finance of his predecessors. Yet,  in spite of the obstacles, which the bungling incapacity of the late government left in his path,  and in the face of a monetary depression that is  world-wide, the Hon. Mr. White is not increasing  the nation's debt.  The national debt of Canada will be smaller  on March 31, 1914, than it was on October 11;  1911, when the Borden administration tok office.  TWENTY-TWO MINERS  .ARE TO BE RELEASED  Ottawa,   March   25.-���������The   Governor-General  signed the papers today for the release of twenty-  two mine strikers of Nanaimo, B. C, who were  sentenced several months ago. The release of the  men will occur as soon as the papers reach New  "Westminster. , The fines of the strikers of $100  each will be remitted.  MR. D, FERGUSON'S GENEROSITY  Laurier and Manitoba  It may be said of Laurier, as it was said of  of the Bourbons, that he learns nothing and forgets nothing. Among the things that he does not  forget is his hatred of Manitoba. As long as he  was in power he stunted the growth of Manitoba.  Now he is trying to deny them the senatorial representation to which they are entitled in Manitoba.  Big Gold Strike in Atlin  The people of Atlin are coming into their  own. A prospector just in from there reports a  big gold strike on O 'Donnell river, 14 miles south  of Atlin City.  The proven ground is about 30 miles long and  the pay streak has been found on the benches.  $5 to $68 per pan���������$108 out of a wheel barrow  load, and $700 out of 4 mining cars, are amongst  results reported. The whole creek has been  staked by Atlin people, and the work is being  done under hydraulic leases.  An Old Church.���������Built before the Norman  Conquest, of rough hewn oak trees split into  halves, the ancient parish church of Greensted,  near Ongar (Essex),- reached its 900th year of  active service on Sunday, December 15th.  Whilst passing along the street lately a; gentleman called to me and as I went into his home]  he informed me that he had some things for the}  Vancouver Museum.  They are as follows:���������  1. A forged Ten Tael Note on the Bank oi  Hong Kong, Shanghai.   It took the government]  -four years to run the counterfeiters to earth.  2. A Twenty Dollar Confederate Bill.  3. An old Methodist Hymn Book, in all pror|  bability the first edition printed in the States.  4. An old Gold Watch of a, very interesting  construction.  5. The First and Second Volumes of the Don-!  aid Truth published in B. C, East Kootenay.  6. New    York    Herald, Saturday, April 15,1  1865, giving a full account of the Assassihatior  of President Lincoln.  7. A Souvenir Copy of the British Colonist J  date, Saturday, December 11, 1858, published at]  Victoria, Vancouver Island.  9. Copies of Grip and Punch. .   . .  .10. A hunter's Shooting Seat. D ������j  Mr. Ferguson came to Vancouver in 1889. He  was born in Lambton county, Ont. He is an old!  timer and a Canadian, and a loyal Britisher. Thl  museum authorities have sent him a letter of apl  preciation. Who will be the next to add to ouf  worthy museum? There is room for more, alj  ways more room on the inside. A museum is likd  an omnibus. Omnis all, and bus a buggy���������a bug{  for all.   So says one etymologist.  Prof. E. Odium, M.A., B.Sc.  NO SABBATH BREAKING THERE.  One Sunday morning a minister's wife saw M  son chasing the hens with a stick.   She went  the door to investigate, and heard him say:  "I'll teach you to lay eggs in a minister's fai  ily on Sunday morning."  *'M''l''M'<MH'it'i|''l''M'ifrM  JOS. H. BOWMAN  ARCHITECT  910-11 Yorkshire Building  Seymour Street Vancouver, B. C.  FOR VANCOUVE!  Kamloopo-Vanoouver Meat Co., Ltd.  Oor. Mole end Powell St: 1949 Main Street  Phone Seymour 6561 Phone Fair. 1814  For Choice Meats  of large variety ancl reasonable prices, this house  iiannot be excelled.   It stands to the very front  M"l"l"l"l"l"l"li'l"l'il"l'i>t'l'������'l"I"M"l'4"l"l"l  t, s. Baxter  ���������^i-f^W,-**;-*  Peter Wwgwt  FURNITURE  complete House  Furnishers  Agents for Ostermoor and  Rest mure daUreMes  Davenport Bed  Have you tr ed our Easy Payment?  Come In and talk It over with us.  BAXTFlT&WRiarlT  (Successor?, to Hutching* Furniture Co.)  ;   Phone Seymour 77X 4X6 Main Street  South Shore Lumber Co.  LIMITED  Lumber Manufacti*rers ���������  I Front St., Foot of Ontario St.  J   PHONE Fairmont 154        VANCOUVER, r>. C  ��������� -v.������$M<V*4*������tw������������������.  I������������'.|n1  Terminal City Press, Ltd.  2404 Westminster Rd. P.ieoe Farmnt 1149  GEN  s ite  ' ���������I������������M*'!~!4"i*������!~!~M4'-M**M~M~!*^������^^*5,^lV������^ *r  CONTRACTS LET ONP.O.E. LINE.  Awards Cover Hundred Miles on the Kelly Lake-  Fort George Section.  Announcement is made by the Pacific Great  Eastern Railway Company that three contracts  have been let on the Kelly Lake-Fort George section to be built by the company this year. The  contracts cover the proposed line for 100 miles  south of Fort George and^ have been allotted as  follows: Messrs. H. E. Carleton & Co., the;-first  25 miles; Messrs. A. E. Griffin & Co., the next 25  miles, and Messrs. Burns, Jordan & Co., the remaining ; 50 miles.: ���������'���������:'-"���������'<; ';������������������  The three firms which have been awarded eon-  tracts will be in a position t6 commence the work  immediately. Surveyors are now in the field locating the hew portion of line north ofrFort  George;-''.. ; \,i-r..  The Kelly Lake-Fort George section, a distance  of 280 miles, south of Fort George, will be rushed  ahead this summer, and is expected to be completed next year.  Grading gangs are now working north of Clinton towards Kelly Lake, and north of Squamish'-  along the Cheakaraus River bridge building and  track-laying is now proceeding.  Movement Under Way to Teach Uninitiated Bow  y::y.to.jem:m% a Profft.  Edmonton, Alta.���������-British capitalists, represented by Albiu Hunt and?jHal Carleton of London, have just acquired 14#00 acres of land adjoining the town of Kinsella, 75 miles east of Edmonton, where a model rural community and  dempnstration^farm^s^o-be^established?-���������The  plan is to teach settlers from Great Britain how  , to grow live stock, grain, grasses and produce at  a profit. The tract will be operated upon a cooperative basis, the projectors supplying the  land, houses, machinery and seeds and facilities  for marketing. - '  Calgary, March 25.���������George Ball was arrested here today on suspicion of Deing one of  the three men who held up the G. N. train near  Bellingham on, February 20th, and killing three  men who resisted. He will be taken to Bellingham for trial.  NEW WESTMINSTER  MADE IN B. C.  The Western Call desires once again to call  attention to the fact that home industries must  be patronized locally if we are ever to build up  our city. It is a policy akin to madness to pass  over our own manufacturers because some large  foreign manufacturer has influence, socially or  otherwise, or because our middlemen here are  deprived of thei rprofks.  We understand that the contract for equipment of ��������� one of our big hew public buildings is  in the balance at present, and we enter our protest against any further discrimination against  our local industries. Home first���������the world afterwards;, v:  The Navy in Shakespeare's Time.���������Sir Sidney  Lee, lecturing on "The Pawn of Empire in  Shakespeare's Time, "at the Royal Institute of  Great Britain recently, said the nation owned at  Queen Elizabeth's death no more than 29 ships  of 100 tons and upwards. The naval expenditure,  which greatly varied from year to year, averaged  about 15,000 pounds to, the date of the Armada.  A GOOO MANY TINKERS.  "John;'' said the minister of a Scotch parish,  "I fear you are growing remiss in your religious  duties, j have hot seen you, in the kirk these  three Sundays.'' ���������' No," answered John. " It's  no that I'm growing remiss, I'm just tinkerin'  awa? wi'my sioul masel'.  Pending arrangements for the ..ea  tablishment  of terminal  facilities  its  own  at .Vancouver the Chicago!  Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  railway evif  dently intends to gain access to th(  city over the' lines of the British  turhbia Electric railway, it is said.   ,  Negotiations have recently beer  closed by Mr. Floyd Williams, figtit  of-way agent for the Chicago, Mil]  waukee & St. Paul line, for the pur  chase of land at Sumas for the cor  struction of a belt line which wil  link up the company's line with thj  British Columbia Eelectric railwa  at the international boundary..  Surveyors  are  said  to ��������� have  bet  busy for some time locating a rout  on the Canadian side of the interna  tional boundary near Sumas for thl  Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, indi  eating that the company has plans it  entering  Vancouver  over    its , owl  lines.    The question of terminal facl  ilities in this city is also being taket  up, and the company, which recentl^  applied at Ottawa for a charter to oj  erate a line  on the south shore ol  False creek, and to establish railwaJ  facilities and docks for ocean steaml  ships on the Kitsilano reserve, is alsjf  believed to be acting more or less if  conjunction  with   the  Chicago,  Mil]  waukee &, St. Paul.  ���������i ��������� i������-.  COUNCIL PASSES THE ESTIMATES.  Much Tribulation Involved in /Keeping Expenditures Within Bounds of Income.  After much tribulation, due to an attempt to  make one dollar go as far as two, the City Council in special session finally passed the estimates  yesterday afternoon. Many meetings in committee of the whole have been held before this  fruition of the labors of the fathers.  Expenditures will total $695,662.09, Seing held  down to the total of estimated receipts plus a  balance of $37,272.10 for contingencies.   -  JEWS WITH SCOTCH NAMES  A great number oi Jews bear the name of  Gordon, nor is it an adopted name. Perhaps the  most famous person in this respect is Gordon-���������  the notorious money lender���������Isaac to wit, who is  a Polish Jew. The origin of this cognomen has  been a matter of controversy, but the accepted  view is that it was derived from Grodno, a district in Russia.  A JEWISH CENSUS  Carlton Hall  (COU-INGWOOD EAST)  On behalf of  LIVIKOSTONE CENTENNIAL CHURCH  Admission  Children  25 cents  15 cents  Charles the First brought togethej  the finest gallery of pictures that ivel  was collected in England, and Cronvj  well,  hard  pressed  for  money,   soli  them.     But   this   is   not .enough   tc  prove that Charles was even the more  cultivated man/not to say the greaterl  man, of the two.   It may be, it is at|  least     conceivable     that   Cromwell,  parted  with  these  irreparable  treasures, not because he valued them less,|  but because he valued other treasures  more,   even   the   rights   of   freeborr  Englishmen.      And    in    any    mere  measuring of endowment this suscep-j  tibility   is   quite  as  precious   as  the  other.  OLD AND NEW FRIENDS  Make new friends, but keep the old]  Those are silver, these are gold.       A  New-made    friends,   like new-mad(  wine,  Age will mellow and refine.  Friendships that have stod the test,  Time and change, are surely best.  !  SPECIAL MEETING  COUNTY LODGE  Brow may wrinkle, hair turn gray,  Friendships that have stood the test]  For 'mid old friends, kind and true,  We once more our youth renew.  But, alas! old friends must die;  "New friends must their place supplj  Then    cherish    friendship    in    youij  breast;  New is good, but old is best.  Make new friends, but keep the old;'  Those are silver, these are gold.  ; I���������Henry van Dykel  SLAVES  According to the Jewish.Chronicle the number  of Jews in the world is now 13,052,846, made up  as follows: Europe, 9,950,175; Asia, 484,359;  Africa, 404,836; America, 2,194,061; Australia,  19,415.  They are slaves who fear to speak  For the fallen.and the weak.  They are slaves who dare not be  In the right with two or three.  ���������Conwell.

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