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The Western Call 1914-04-10

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 L  JL^ CI 4/^^VUa-  i .,���������  .e.  .O-V.  (    ���������(* ���������  ^C/V s>  Read Dr.  McKim's  Address  Subscribe for  The Western Call  Today  Published in the Interests of Greater Vancouver and the Western People  VOLUME V.  VANCOUVER, British Columbia, APRIL 10.1914  5 Cents Per Copy,  No, 48  Sir Robert Perks, Liberal M. P., Out for Ulster  Strong Protestant Movement Developing in U. S. in Fflce of Constant Political Aggression of Romanism  DfrPeter-W:^ Crosses the Bar  *������  SOUTH VANCOUVER  When a shot is fired into a dark corner and  a growl comes back it is certain some one has  been hit, but when it is a skunk other sense than  that of hearing is evoked, and when there.is a  family of them the smell is rank. The "Call"  apologizes to South Vancouver for having raised  such a muss, but drastic action is needed under  certain conditions.  ��������� At the risk of being tedious we must return  * to the charge. The halting of the grant to the  North Arm Harbor Board is matched in folly only  by the excuse given for delaying same.1 To call  upon the Harbor Commissioners for definite plans  before a line has been run or a sounding taken;  before a competent engineer, with all the data  possible before him, has reported to the Commissioners, is putting the cart before the horse with  a vengeance. With apologies to our friends the  Commisioners who cares for their plans. A competent engineer's plans are what is wanted. And  this is what the Dominion Government asks for;  that the Municipalities concerned should evidence  their faith in, the possibilities of the North Arm  -Harbor scheme by supplying the necessary funds  to make the necessary engineering researches to  furnish plans upon submission of which a large  grant is promised.    :  Point Grey and Richmond have both made  their appropriation, but led by the superior business" ability and wisdom of Mr. Go|d, $outh Vancouver delays consideration of the grant until  plans have been submitted. The delay may prove  fatal. New Westminster is-moving heaven and  earth for the South Arm, and it is just possible  that dazzled by the glitter of the meteoric cam-  1 pBigner,' South Vancouver will ��������� loose an ^opportunity now at hand that may not quickly return.  The paving of Main street is now assured,  and the men are gathering daily in the hopes of  long awaited work. But two precious months  have been wasted, and for every day's delay the  workers and business men of Main .street are piling up the blame on the Gold-Thomas-Twiddy  combine. Some day the storm cloud will burst  over their heads.  MOTOR HIGHWAY TO BE BOOKED.  The Board of Works of South Vancouver has  decided to rock Fraser street from the River road  to the bridge over the Fraser river. The purpose  is to have it ready for motor traffic from Wod-  ward's landing to Vancouver.  Main Street Paving  The Dominion Creosoting company wrote, stating that as far as possible South Vancouver ratepayers would be employed on Main street paving.  3RIDQE RIVER  i,    HEAVY VALUES REPORTED  AT BROKEN HJLL MINE  North Bay, Ont, April 8  The Western Call, Vancouver, B.C.  The Grain Commission heard delegations from  Burrard Inlet and Fraser River on question of location of Government elevator. Mayor Baxter made  strong Cijse for Burrard Inlet and is confident of  success. The Budget speech of Finance Minister has  aroused great enthusiasm among Government supporters and has greatly strengthened Government in  Western and Eastern Canada. The Liberal Free  Trade cry is meeting with bitter opposition in their  own ranks.  H. H. Stevens  The Broken Hill mine, situated in the mountains on north side of Bridge river, reports rapid  progress on this winter's development.  . John Hunt, superintendent, states that' the  average assays run in the neighborhood of $64,  principally gold., Bridge river has shown much  higher values than this, but it has always been,  hitherto, found in small veins of free milling  quartz.  The Broken Hill is practically a quarry of  almost 90 feet in width. According to the reports  of engineers visiting this property last fall $5 ore  of this nature would pay. The outlook therefore  is very bright for Bridge River District, as the  company has announced the intention of immediately installing a large reduction plant  THE BOSS BOOSTER  Dr. Vrooman, speaking to the Royal ^Colonial  Institute, London, said that adequate dock facilities' at Vancouver and the'Panama Canal would,  mean a gain of $20,000,000 on one crop to the  Alberta farmers.  Dr. Vrooman estimates a saving to the (Alberta farmers of 7 cents a bushel in summer and  15 cents in winter. '  EXPRESSION OF SYMPATHY  With   Ulster Prom   Noted   British  Liberal M. P.  Death of Well Known Pastor  Founder of Kitsilano Presbyterian Church and  Well Known Throughout B 0. Passes Away  Suddenly.  Rev. Dr. Peter Wright, one of the best known  Presbyterian clergymen in British Columbia, died  suddenly in his home at Kitsilano Monday. He  had been ill for thr.ee weeks, but seemed to be on  'the way to recovery. In the forenoon he Was:moy-  ing cheerfully about his residence as usual when  about noon he took ill and passed away in a few  minutes. Heart failure is believed to have beeii  the cause of his death.  , Dr. Wright was a native of Westruther, Berwickshire, where _ h e ^wasWbomVt wb^years ^after-  Queen Victoria came to the throne. He arrived  in Canada at the age of twenty and studied in  Knox college, Toronto, where, in 1886, he became  a bachelor of divinity. He was principal of Norwood, Ont., High school for three years and of  St. Mary's High school for one year-  In 1870 he was ordained and thereafter held  charges in Ingersoll, Quebec, Montreal, Stratford,  Portage la Prairie, Nelson and Vancouver. He  married in 1864 Miss Agnes McGregor, of Baltimore, Ont.  In Vancoucver lie had the distinction of being  the founder of the Kitsilano Presbyterian church  at Third avenue and Vine street. He was interested in all matters connected with temperance  and advocated it from the platform frequently  while in Toronto. In all his charges he met with  great acceptance. When he was leaving Stratford, Ont., the press said of him: '' His pre-eminence in the pulpitis ^undisputed; his sermons are  marked"b1y^ a spirituality  of more than ordinary impressiveness.''  Besides his wife he leaves three sons and one  daughter, Messrs. John arid Albert Wright, living  at home, Mr. Peter Wright of 2043 Third avenue  west, and Mrs. Mary Burch of Toronto.  The Fight Against Roman Aggression in U.S.  HOWS THIS FOR THE LAND OF THE  FREE AND THE HOME OF THE BRAVE?  REVIVAL OF THE A. P. A.  A Roman Catholic reader made complaint to  the Siegel-Cooper Company, of New York city,  owners of one of the largest department stores  in that city and publishers of the Book World,  concerning some statements which? had appeared  in that publication. 'In their reply to this complaint the Siegel-Cooper Company expressed their  regret that such utterances had been printed in  their magazine, and stated that in consequence  thereof the resignation of the editor, Rev. Madi:  son C. Peters, one of the well known clergymen  of New York city, had been accepted by them.  This case is fully reported in the Truth (Roman  Catholic), one of the subheads being "Rev. Madison O. Peters at His Old Game." There is evidently an organized plan to prevent the publication, as far as possible, of any matter which, is  displeasing to Roman Catholics, or, in other  words, any discussion of Roman Catholicism from  the Protestant standpoint.  IN THE UNITED STATED  Copy of Circular Issued  A call to arms is being sounded for every  American patriot to save the country from the  blighting hand of the Roman Catholic church.  Can you-, discern the signs of the times? It is  putting its puppets into office all over the country.  John Purroy Mitchell, Romanist and member  of the Corrigan Council, 'Knigh^lof Columbus,  has been elected mayor of New Y'ui4c.  ��������� William Sulzer was deposed as governor because he was a Protestant, so as to allow Glynn, a  Roman Catholic and a Knight of Columbus, to  become New Yoi'k's first Roman Catholic governor. Malone,. another Knight of Columbus, has  been appointed collector of the port of New York,  at the behest of the " system."   . ..   ���������  All patriotic citizens who believe that the Roman Catholic political maehine is the deadliest  menace-to American liberties and civilization, are  invited to join this association.  Cut in Rates That Caused Seven Point Drop in C. P. R.  The Western freight rates decision's chief  feature is that the Manitoba, standard tariff,  which is the lowest in the West, will apply  throughout British Columbia lake district.  Pacific coast" rates are somewhat higher, but  are substantially reduced from the present rates.  Special distributing tariffs, placing Western  eities on the same bjtsis'as Wininpeg, are ordered,  the reduction from the standard tariff being 15  per cent, of the prairie standard scale.  The through rates from Eastern to Western  Canada are based on these charged from Fort  William and Port Arthur.  Local grain and flour rates are substantially  reduced.  Coal rates from Alberta mines are cut, also  the rate from Souris mines.  The local passenger rates in British Columbia  are not touched.  No reduction is ordered on livestock rates, on  cement rates, or on sugar rates from Vancouver.  The judgment involving the new tariffs will  come into effect on September 1 next.  SIR ROBERT PERKS ON HOME RULE  That Premier Asquith and the Liberal government will be defeated in the general election which  he expects will take place, this summer is the  opinion of Sir Robert Perks, well known politician and world famous engineer, aa expressed in  an interview with the Daily Mail last night.  "I believe the significance of the election will  be that the people of Great Britain are not in  favor of forcing Ulster to accept Home Role  against her will. But I believe, general affairs  will play a large part in determining the outcome  of the election. People are dissatisfied with the  government. There has been general unrest for  some time under the administration; labor troubles have been prominent; the Insurance Act has  been a signal failure; suffragette disturbances  have been bothersome,; there is the Home Rule,  question with its present difficulties, and there is  the advance by leaps and bounds in taxation."  "My opinion is Home Rule will be passed under the Parliamentary Act and in spite of the,  opposition of the House of Lords and that then'  the government will go to the people. All this  talk about the army versus the nation is fudge  and nonsense. * The election, to my mind, wUl  merely show the people of Great Britain are not in  favor of forcing Ulster to accept - Home Role  against her will. I do not see, therefore, what  benefit is to be gained by an election, since it will  ^nqt solve the Ulster question.  ,  Would Leave Ulster Out  " I am in favor of putting Home Rule into effect, but allowing Ulster to remain out. I think  the fears of her people concerning tbe probable  , unfair treatment frcihn her Catholic ^neighbors  are justified. The proper solution, I believe, is to  let her watch the operations of the Irish parliament for some time and then, if she sees from the  way it is operating that she has nothing to fear  in the way of religious or any other kind of unfairness, she can vote to join the Irish parliament.  In making these statements, Sir Robert emphasized the fact that for the last twenty years,  he has been a staunch Liberal and has sat in  parliament. He is a free trader, he said, favors  the disestablishment of the English church as a  State church, but in the coming election will vote  against the Liberals.  Government Should Be Warned  "I think it is very serious for soldiers like Sir  John French to tell the government they will not  carry out their policy, but 1 believe it is wise that ���������  the government should be warned. The army cannot be relied- on to shoot down the citizens of  Ulster. Yes, I think this trouble will be righted  with little difficulty, but the incident will have  shown just where the officers stand on the Home  Rule question."  SIR CHARLES DOUGLAS  NOW CHIEF OF STAFF  London, April 2.���������Mr. Asquith has appointed  General Sir Charles Douglas, inspector-general of  tbe home forces since 1912, to succeed Field Marshal Sir John French as chief of staff.  Sir Charles Douglas has had-a most distinguished career in the British army. He joined the  92nd Highlanders in 1869. In the Afghan war  he'-served as adjutant of his regiment, and took  part in the famous inarch from Cabul to Kandahar,. In the Boer war of 1880-81, he served with  the Gordon Highlanders and was present at the  disastrous fight of Majuba Hill. He took part  in the Suakim expedition and later served at A1-"  <4ershot for some years, going to South Africa in  1899 as a member of the headquarters staff. For  his services there he was made a major-general.  Hot Welcome tor Bank  Robbers at New Hazelton  New Hazelton is to be congratulated. Five  out of a covey of six bank robbers is good shooting. And there is no better way of stopping the  dastardly hold up business. The Rocher-de-  Boule mountain, up which the sixth bandit escaped, is a hard climb, and doubtless he will soon  be caught, and the whole gang accounted for.  Something New in Russia  -   !.    ���������;   It certainly is something new in the world  when the great hall of, the Duma in St. Petersburg is thrown open to an evangelistic service,  every Lord's day, as is now the case.  , '-</jI ���������Pi  K&i  jmimmmsammm  MKfxi!fiZ\/iJf^fXf  xt\ aa* zHixcitfiSi 6%tt$xn>&ksteXt.iii  ������- ^<!^i/!teM&^to&l^\,n#ts������^  ���������J^^kfU<WjW*������)kJUi5J������)4>i,jw'ij.  Wtttw^^efwtF-wtti^^  ���������?N  THE WESTERN CALL.  Friday April 10, 1914  Wants to See You  Lee Building,        Broadway and Main  Phone Fairmont 790  Soda Fountain  is now open  Cnoccrfafs des  Aristocrates  Nuts, Hard Centres, Cream  Centres; Fruits in  Liqueur, Jelly Centres  and Bonne Eouche (the most  delicate of all creamy centres.)  All enveloped ia a thick coat-  injj of rich pure chocolate.  Neiteon dipping does not mean  a thin coating of chocolate, but a  lavish, heavy coating of pure undiluted chocolate.        .   V   <  One Dollar and Twenty-five,  Cents the Pound  THE%ay#WVWl  THAT ARE DIFFERENT  PHONE FAIRMONT!852  (At it here since J900)  (A Trust Company)  Addre-ss by Dr. McKim  Rector of Protestant Episcopal Church, Wa^ington, t). G.  "Why We Are Protestants"  Is not only one hundred cents wasted,  but one hundred cents end the  Oonmgund Informal unon ft  for Wei Just reflect what tbis  means to you arid yours.  We, as a people, are prodigal and our  extravagance will have to be paid for  eventually. We are NOT saving up  for the rainy day���������for the time of need.  You are simply buying future income  when you use part of your regular income now to build up a fund whose  earnings will reward you later.  Thrift in the home should be cultivated and besides is a splendid heritage  for either a Boy or a Girl.  Start a Deposit Account  and Stick to it.  We pay 4% on Deposits anil credit  the interest \% times a year.  Closed at 1.00 O'clock on Saturdays  pMMJflirWANA&l������  AGKEErNfENT  BOUGHT aw  'CDUECTED  'Short  Loans,  feed  <? ,V  DEf-OSsT:  517     Y?A C&m!  deposit  nwrciru ���������  CHEQUE  Specially insured against burglary  and hold-ups.  NOTARY PUBLIC  Dow, Fraser J Co.  LIMITED  317-321 Cambie Street  2313 Main Street  Between 7th and 8th Aves.  McKay Station, Burnaby  Mr. Chairman, Brethren, and Fellow Citizens:  ! hail the presence of so many ministers4 of different Protestant churches and so many leading  members of different Protestant churches in this  vast audience as an evidence that the pressure  of the conflict with Borne is drawing us closer together (Applause.) We are finding out, I venture to say, that the things in which we agree are  more important by far than the things in which  we differ.   (Applause.)  A Word of Explanation  Now, sir, no apology is necessary at any time  for setting forth the reasons why we occupy "the  position we do; but, as you have already intimated, Mr. Chairman, the time is opportune for this  exposition of the Protestant, faith, because of the  Mission to "non-Catholics," as they offensively  call us, recently held in St. Patrick's church, for  the express purpose of proselyting our Protestant people. Why, my friends and brethren, so  eager were the Paulist Fathers to let us know  all about it that some of them, or one of them, or  some representative of theirs, came into the vestibule of my church and tacked the notice of the  lectures on my bulletin! Well; I took notice!  (Applause.)  In the Mission, the doctrines of Protestantism  have been assailed, as usual, and every argument  known to those skillful controversialists has been  employed to seduce Protestants from their allegiance. In these notices and in the public press,  Protestants have, as I have said, been dominated  "non-Catholics." Now we resent that nomenclature. We Protestants are "catholics" in the  true sense of the word. In our creed we say, "I  believe in the I|oly Catholic church," and we do.  On the other hand, we refuse to yield to the  church of Rome the'name "Catholic." It is the  greatest arrogance for that church to appropriate  that great and venerable term. I know ofAno  church upon earth that has so little claim to-he-  called Catholic as the church of Rome.  Under the circumstances now described, it has  been felt by the ministers at whose invitation I  am here, that the time is opportune for a definition and a defense of the Protestant faith.  Now, I am not here to attack the Roman  churchy but to defend Protestantism from the attacks which have been leveled against it. But in  repelling these attacks, it will become necessary  to expose some of the contradictions and absurdities and inconsistencies that are involved in the  doctrines of that church. I, however, am not responsible for that; but those who by assailing  our faith, and doing everything in their power to  draw our" people from their allegiance, have made  it necessary for us to expose what we believe to be  th������> unreasonableness of the faith of the Roman  church. '-V-..  Protestantism Not a Series of Negations.'  Now, first of all, and before entering particularly upon exhibition of the grounds upon which  we protest against the doctrine and practice of  the Church of Rome, I desire to make two brief  preliminary remarks.   The first is that Protest-  ism is not, as commonly represented,a mere series  of negations,���������denying error rather than affirming truth ,- repudiating false doctrine rather than  proclaiming the true.  No; we write the word Protestant on our escutcheon in its full etymological  ^significance.   A Protestant is one that hears witness for any person or thing; and a Protestant  church is one that bears witness for Christ and  his gospel in the world.   It is a name pot to be  ashamed of, in either its origin or its history.  When our Jjord Jesus Christ stood before Pilate,  he-said-to. himselfjrMTo-this-end-was-I born, and-  for this cause came I into the world5, that I should  bear witness unto the truth."   Humbly treading  in the footsteps of her divine Tjord, the Protestant church goes forth into the world having, this  as her aim, that she may "bear witness unto the  truth." '���������-���������-������������������  Lot was a Protestant when he stood alone for  God in the midst of wicked Sodom. The Jewish  nation was Protestant, standing among the nations of the earth, a witness for the unity of God,  the supremacy of conscience, and the sancity of  the moral law. And, supreme instance! let it  never be forgotten that Christ and his apostles  were Protestants in their day. They were  Protestants for the truth of God, against  ���������the traditions and corruptions of the  Jewish hierarchy, the established church  of that day. And they not only bore witness for the revelation made in the incarnation  of the Son of God, but they bore witness against  the false doctrines of the scribes and Pharisees,  the chief priests and elders of the church. In  like manner and in fulfillment of the injunction  of the great Head of the church, our Protestant  churches bear witness among men today, not only  positively, for "the faith which was once delivered unto the saints,'' but negativelyy-against  the manifold corruptions of that faith for which  the Church of Rome is responsible. And, therefore, they bear on their escutcheon the glorious  word Protestant,���������the witness bearers.  -   Protestants Are Not Heretics Nor Separatists  The other introductory remark I have to make  is that though we are Protestants, we are not  heretics nor separatists.   (Applause.)  In 1868 the late Pope Pius IX. addressed letters  "to Protestants and other non-Catholics," inviting  them to return to the bosom of the Holy Mother  Church, as the only means of insuring their salvation.  Now, we deny that we have ever separated  from the Catholic Church. One of the articles of  our faith is,' "I believe in the Holy Catholic  Church," and in this we claim and enjoy full  membership, hy the same Spirit which joins in one  communion and fellowship "the blessed company  of all faithful people." In fact, the Pope and his  adherents are the innovators and heretics who  have departed from "the faith once delivered,"  who have corrupted the Christian creed; and not  the Protestants, who have rejected Romete novelties and returned to the creed and the practice of  the primitive ages of Christianity. Yes, it is the  Church of Rome, and not the Protestant churches,  which, by her errors and usurpations has separated herself from the Catholic Church of Christ.  When she departed from the primitive faith, she  became heretical; and when she made the acl  knowledgment of her erroneous and strange doctrines a condition of membership within her communion, she then forced upon men the alternative  of separating from her or of abandoning the  faith which they were bound to "contend for."  Luther and Melanchthon, Calvin and Beza, Cran-  mer and Ridley and Latimer,���������all that noble  band of reformers in the sixteenth century, chose  the former alternative. They decided to obey God  rather thaii' men. Were they therefore heretics?  Was it heresy to obey Christ and Christ's unchangeable truth rather than abandon these for  the sake of union with a Church which had apostatized from the faith and required all her members to acquiesce in her apostasy?���������iNay, was  ��������� not she the heretic who, abandoning the Holy  Scriptures as her guide, taught for doctrines the  commandments of men ? Let it be remembered,  also, that as far as the Church of England was  concerned,   the   reformation   was   a   rebellion  ��������� against a foreign yoke, and the restoration of the  original ecclesiastical authority. The British  church, had existed for centuries in entire independence, of Rome, It had produced martyrs to  the faith in the reign of Diocletian. It had sent  bishops to the Councils of Aries (A.D. 314), Sar-  : dica (AD. 347), and Ariminum (AD. 359). It  had held numerous t synods of its own. As to its  orthodoxy, St. Jerome and St. Chrysostom had  both borne testimony to!it. But it was not until  the seventh century that the Church of Rome  gained a footing on the island. Her pretensions  to exercise authority over the British church were  resisted.   The bishops of the native church re-  / fusedL to yield their customs or to receive Augustine as \their archbishop. They resisted for more  than a century the attempt of Rome to bring  them into/ subjection. In short, /the Church of  England of that day became Romanised only  after an ineffectual protest and a prolonged resistance on the part/of the native episcopate.  > S  Now, my friends, I come to the substantive  part of my address this afternoon. Why are we  Protestants? I reply, First of all, we are Protestants because we build our faith and hope on the  impregnable rock of Holy Scripture, and hot on  the shiftin||MaBds of ecclesiastical tradition. The  Bible, and the Bible alone, is the basis of the religion of Protestants; hut tradition, interpreting  the Bible, and often superseding it and contradicting it, is the basis of the religion of Romanists.  (Now when I use the term Romanist, I beg you  to observe that I am using a term which has for  authority no less a person than John H- New-  ��������� man himself, for he published a book called "Lectures on Romanism and Popular Protestantism."  Therefore, if instead of calling that church the  Catholic church, I speak of it as Romanism, I am  simply adopting the language of John H- Newman.) We follow the teachings of Jesus Christ  and his apostles in building our faith only on the  revelation of truth contained in the Bible.  '' Search the Scriptures." Christ said. The  Scripture cannot be broken. j  The Church of Rome, on the contrary, builds  her doctrines upon a double basis,���������the Bible and  tradition; but by making tradition the authoritative-interpreter of-thePib^^  upon the teaching of the Bible, but upon the  teaching of tradition.  Now, that is a serious charge. I wish to prove  it. The creed of Pope Pius IV., which was published in A.D. 1564, and has ever since been the  universal symbol of doctrine in the Roman  Church, declares as follows:  1. "I most firmly admit and embrace the  apostolical and ecclesiastical traditions, and all  other observances and constitutions of the said  church. ^  2. I admit also Holy Scripture, according to  that sense which Holy Mother Church, to whom it  appertains to judge of the true meaning and interpretation of the Sacred Scriptures, hath holden  and still holds."  Now compare with this the language of the  Council of Trent: "The Holy Ecumenical and  General Council of Trent . . . receives and  venerates with equal affection of piety and reverence all the books of the Old and the New Testament, ... . as also the said traditions, as  well those pertaining to faith as to morals, . .  preserved in the Catholic Church by a continuous  succession." '    ;   .-  A Fundamental Error  Here, then, is the first, as it is the fundamental, error against which we; protest,���������the making  tradition, i. e., the alleged oral teaching of the  apostles, handed down from their times, of equal  authority with.the written word of God; and the  declaration that the Sacred Scriptures are to be  admitted only in the sense in which the Roman  Church explains them. The sixth article of the  Church of England declares, on the contrary, that  "Holy Scripture containeth all things necessary  to salvation; so that whatsoever is not read there-.  in, nor may be proved thereby, is not to be required of any man that it should be believed as  an article of faith." When this is denied, the  very foundations of the faith are sapped. Our  feet no longer stand on the rock of God's written  Word, but upon the uncertain and shifting sands  of tradition. No wonder that the Church of  Rome has been "carried about by every wind of  doctrine," since.,she has cast anchor upon such  treacherous ground. For, mark you, as if it were  not a sufficient impiety to declare the traditions  (Ctntinuatf on Pat* 7)  terminal City Press, Ltd.  203=207 Kingsway  COMMERCIAL  Your Jointing Orders will  receive prompt and careful attention.  PHONE Fairmont ii4o  * '���������-.-..       ..'.��������� 1  and ask for our prices.  ADVERTISE IN THE WESTERN CALL  Office of THE WESTERN CALL  203-207 KINGSWAY, Cor. 8th Ave.  Commercial Drive and 14th Avenue  ^TDeHomeofQualllv'v  Giwranteeil Fresh  Best Quality  Groceries  J. P. Sinclair, Prop.   P(lO(|B FairiDODt 1033  HOUSEtiOID GOODS ^OFFICE FURNITUKt  tii <-ll������AJ'LST "ROOIt        .   tK   ,n.     tMlRt   ti���������.*KIU  CAMPBELL  MOVING - PACKING-STORAGE-SHIPPING  PHONE SEYMOUR 7360.  OFFICE 857 BEATTY ST.  * !*^*������t*4i<i' *\**h *X* *{MI' 't'4* *t>>}>*S'fS>'S' ���������fr������tMlMf"{M8''},<SM$M8,' 'S**!**}1*^' *\* *|* *\* *|* *l"l* 'ft 4* *%" *t9*V *tMl' 't* *1* 4*4' *\*'b 4*^*  SNAP!  50x100, *corner 29th Ave. and  St. Catharines Street, modern  7-room house.  YOIJR OWN  PRICE FOR CASH  APPLY WESTERN CALL  frfr.i'4..fr.fr.>'3>4^~fr,fr^fr,4H,,fr,fr'M"^*fr,3^^  Terminal City Press, Ltd.  2414 Westminster Rd.  Phone Fdrnoit 1140 Friday, April 10,1914  THE WESIffifcN CALL.  3  ^-#  '���������fife-  "''lip  LAND ACT NOTICES  &AJTD ACT.  VASCOVTBB  SAND  SI8TBXCT  Distriot of Coast Baas;* I.  TAKE NOTICE that HarryN Frank  Lazier, of Vancouver, occupation Salesman, intends tq apply for-permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted 4 miles  distant in a Westerly direction from the  Northwest corner of Lot 425; thence  80 chains North; thence 80 chains West;  thence 80 chains South; thence SO chains  East, to the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, fo*  agHcutural.        "V  Dated January '16th, 1914.  CHABRY  PRANK LAZIER,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  I.AJTD ACT.  ';:  TAHCOUVXBR  ������AHO   DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Sang* X.  TAKE NOTICE    that Bert Minor, of  Vancouver, occupation Engineer, intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:-���������  Commencing at a post about two  miles distant, and in a Westerly direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425, commencing'at a post in the  Southeast corner; thence 80 chains  North; thence 80 chains West; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains East  to the point of commencement, containing 840 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated  January   16th,  1914.  BERT MINOR,  H, G. Adams, Agent.  XjJJTB ACT.  !--(���������>  ���������ASrcOWBB  &AHB  DXTFBXCT  District of coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Charles  Falconer, of Vancouver occupation  Clerk, intends to appljt. for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������-  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 421; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner; thence West 80.  chains; thence South 50 chains; thence  following the beach 80 chains in a  South-easterly direction; thence 80  chainB North to the point of commencement ; containing 500 acres, more or  less, for agricultural.  Dated   January   15th,   1914.  ARTHUR   CHARLES   FALCONER,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  CASTS ACT.  VAVGOUVBB  X.ASTD  DXSTBXCT  Distriot of coast Bangs I.  TAKE NOTICE that Herbert Black,  of Vancouver, occupation Telegrapher,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the. following described lands:���������  Commencing at ,a post planted at the  West end of Robison Island high water  mark; thence traversing the beach in a  South and Easterly course to the East  entrance to Blunden Harbor; thence  traversing the beach in a North/and  Westerly direction to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more  or less, for agriculture.    x'".'.���������  Dated January 13th, 1914.  > HERBERT BLACK,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  . ,':' ���������.-'    "'"'    , ,.'-������������������'.��������� .-  .    ���������, <  \  ������������������v ;:ii4AWD4l\CT. V':;'-V      \ ��������� ,->..  VABTCOVVSB UVB  DXSTBXCT"  District of Coast .Baaga X.  TAKE NOTICE that Kate E. Hen-  Bhaw, of Vancouver, .occupation Stenographer, intends, to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:��������� . '?���������":���������. C ,:--': -   :;.. ���������>  :- .  Commencing'''at a post planted a;t the  Southeast corner,: about one mile distant and in a Westerly direction from  the Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a post-planted, in the Southeast* corner; thence 80 "chains West;  thence 80 chains North; thence 80  chains East; thence 80 chains South to  the point of commencement, containing  640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 15th, 1914.  KATE   E.   HENSHAW,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  ������������������"������������������'��������� X.AXTO ACT. '  80 chains South; thance 80 chains  East, to the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 15th,��������� 1914.  CHARLES H. BAILEY,  H.  G. Adams, Agent.  LANS ACT.  ���������AHCOUVSB  XiAJTD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry George  Adams, of Alert Bay, British Columbia,  occupation Cruiser, intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a post in the Northwest corner;  thence 40 chains East; thence 40-chains  South; thence 40 chains East to beach,  following the beach in a Southerly direction to the Southeast corner of the  Indian Reserve; thence traversing the  survey of the. Indian Reserve Northwest and South to the beach; thence  West along the beach to a point one  mile directly South from the Southwest corner of Lot 421; thence North  80 chains to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or  less,.for agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 1914.  HARRY GEORGE ADAMS,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  XiAXTD ACT.  VAITCOVTBB X.ABD  DXSTBXCT  District of coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE that Leonard G.  Eveson, of Vancouver, occupation Salesman, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a post in the Northeast corner; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains North;  thence "80 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 1914.  LEONARD  G.   EVESON,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  XULVD ACT.    V  ���������AWCCuTXIB XiABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Baaga X.  TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward  Mellor, of Vancouver, occupation - Capitalist, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:��������� /  Commencing at a post planted about  three miles distant and in a Northwest  direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 421; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner; thence 80 chains  South; thence 20 chains West to beach;  thence 60 chains Northwest along the  beach; thence 50 chains North; thence  80 chains East to the point of commencement, containing 560 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 1914.  JOSEPH EDWARD MELLOR,  H.G. Adams. Agent.  .X.AXTD ACT.  rection to the point of commencement,  containing 500 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 29th, 1914.  BERTHA B. LAZIER,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  XfABD ACT.  VAX*COUTBB XiABD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bang* l.  TAKES NOTICE that Jane Dodds. of  Vancouver; occupation, spinster; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and' in an Easterly  direction from the' Southwest corner of  Lot 422; commencing at a post in the  Northwest corner; thence 80 chains  East; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West to beach; thence following the beach -in a Northerly direction  80 chains to the poiat'of commencement,  containing 600 acres more or less, for  agricultural. ���������  Dated January 23rd, 1914.  JANE DODDS.  H. G. Adams, Agent  ;   XWLBD ACT.  ���������AHOOUYBB XiJJTXt  DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Rose Hamilton,  of Vancouver; occupation, widow; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  10 chains ln a Westerly direction from  the Southwest corner of Lot 4S2; commencing at a post in the Northwest  corner; thence 80 chains East to beach  of Cohoe bay; thence following the  beach in a South and West direction to  the East entrance of Blunden Harbour;  thence ln a North and Easterly direction to the point of commencement,  containing 480 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 23rd. 1914.  ROSE HAMILTON,  H, G. Adams, Agent.  XkABD ACT.  ���������AVCOUTBB  XiAJTD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Baaga l.  TAKE NOTICE that FreoTc. Mock, of  Vancouver;     occupation,     broker;     intends to apply  for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about 60  chains  distant  and  in an  Easterly direction from the Southeast corner of T.1  L. 4479; commencing at a post in the  Northeast  corner;    thence    60    chains  WeBt; thence 40 chains South to beach;  thence following the beach in a Northeast direction to the point of commence*  ment, containing 200 acres, more or leBS,  for agricultural. .-   '  Dated January 29th, 1914.  FRED C. MOCK,  i H. G. Adams, Agent.  &AZTD ACT.  VAKCOVYXI* XfAUB PXSTBXCT  Distriot of coast Bangs j.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry Joseph  Woodward, of Vancouver, occupation  Book-keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:��������� ������������������ .���������. - .  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 42S; commencing at/a,post planted  ln the Northwest corner; thence 80  chains South; thence 80 chains East;  thenee 80 chains North; thence. 80  chains West* to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated   January   15th,   1914.  HARRY   JOSEPH   WOODWARD,  ' ��������� . -���������   - H. G. Adams, Agent.  ' XiABB act. _:''_._:._.:':  VAITCOtrVBB X.AWD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE that George A. Sim-  monds, of - Vancouver, occupation Merchant, intends to apply: for. .permission  'to purchase the following described  lands:���������  ��������� Commencing at a post one mile distant and in a Westerly direction from  the Northwest corner of Lot 425; commencing at a post -in the Southwest  corner; thence North 80 chains; thence  East 80 chains; thence South 80 chains;  thence West 80 chains to the point of  commencement;-- containing 640 acres,  mora or less, for agricultural.-���������  Dated January 15th, 1914.  GEORGE   Ar SIMMONDS,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  X.ABD ACT.  VAWCOUVSat  XiABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE that George Douglas  Beveridge, of ^ Vancouver, occupation  Broker, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at'the  Nortlieast corner and afthe Southwest  corner of Lot 421; thence 80 chains  West; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East; thence 80 chains South;  to the point of commencement, containing. 640 acres, more or less, for ag-  ricultTiral.  Dated  January  13 th,   1914.  GEORGE   DOUGLAS  BEVERIDGE,  H. G. Adams, Agent.'  VABCOtrVZB  X.AKD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE that William Ryan, of  Vancouver, occupation Laborer, intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted about  three miles distant, and in a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot-425s commencing at a post planted  in the. Northeast corner; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence following the beach in an Easterly direction 80 chains; thence North  80 chains to the point of commencement,  containing 400 acres,, more or less,' for  agricultural. ���������,���������'..-.. '���������'���������'.  -Dated January 14th, 1914. "v.  WILLIAM RYAN,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  -;.'��������� ;;X^P;Ai0T.'V.:V  VAHCOtrVBB 'XAVDOXSTMCT  District of Coast Baaga X..  TAKE NOTICE that Barbara. Jean  Gibson, of Vancouver, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post, 'planted about  two miles distant, and in a Northwest  direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 421; commencing at a post in. the  Southeast''���������-, corner; thence 80 chains  North; thence 80 chains West; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains East,  to the point of commencement,' containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Datod January  13th,  1914.  BARBARA. JEAN, GIBSON,  f     H. G^ Adams, Agent.  V XmUTD ACT.        V  VAHCOXTVEB XiAXTD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Daniel Miller, of  Vancouver, occupation, Undertaker; intends to apply for permission to pur*  chase the  following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile and one-half 'distant and, in a  Southerly direction from the Southeast  corner of Lot 542; commencing at a'  post in the Southwest corner; thence 70  chains. North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 40 chains South to beach; thence  following the beach 80 chains in a  Westerly direction to the point of commencement, containing 420 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  DANIEL  MILLER, '  H. G. Adams, Agent.  .V-V-;:      DAJTD ACT.  T/AWCOVVSB X.ABP PXSTBXCT  District of Coast **������*��������� *���������  TAKE NOTICE thatNAda M; Beveridge, of Vancouver; occupation, married  woman; intends to apply for permission to purchase .the following described' lands:���������   '      * "  Commencing at a post planted about  4 miles distant and in a North-westerly  direction from the Northwest corner  of Lot 425, commencing at a post-in  the Southwest corner, thence 80 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence  80 chains South; thence 8Q^chains West,  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st. 1914.  ADA M. BEVERIDGE.  .   H. G. Adams, Agent.  -    PAWXt ACT.  VABCOPYBB X.ABP PXSTBXCT  District of Coast Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that George Hamlyn,  of Vancouver; occupation, workingman;  Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  3 miles distant in a Northwest direction  from the Northwest corner of Lot 425;  thence 40 chains'West; thence 80 chains  South;   thence   40   chains   East; -thence  80 chains North, to point of commencement, containing 320 acres', more or less,  for agricultural. ' -        - '  Dated January 21st, 1914;  GEORGE  HAMLYN,  H.G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  PA1TD ACT.  ���������AWCOUVBB  XjABD   DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Miss Clara Sim-  monds, -. of Vancouver, occupation  Housekeeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:��������� *  Commencing at a post planted one  mile distant, and in a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of Lot  421; commencing at a post planted in  the Northeast corner;" thence 80 chains  West to beach; thence following the  beach in a South-easterly direction to  the West entrance of Blunden Harbor;  thence in a North-easterly direction and  North to the point of commencement;  containing 320 acres, more or less, for  agricultural. , ������������������ ���������  Dated January 13th,  1914.  MISS  CLARA SIMMONDS,  H, G. Adams, Agent.  XiAHP ACT.  VAHCOUVXB LASS DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE tha t Charles H.  Bailey, of Vancouver, occupation Broker,  intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following , described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant arid in a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425; commencing at a post in the  Soutlnaast corner; . thence 80 _- chains  North;  thence  80   chains  West;  thence  VABCOPVSB X.ABP  PXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bangs l.  TAKE NOTICE that Edgar Lees, of  Vancouver;   qccupation,   logger;  intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of T. L. 1122���������thence  80 chains West; thence 60 chains South;  thence 80 chains East; thence 60 chains  North to the point of commencement,  containing 400 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  EDGAR LEES,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  X.AHD ACT.  VAHCOUVEB ZJMTD PXSTBXCT  -^ XHstrlot of Coaat Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Annie Brown, of  Vancouver; occupation, Widow; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner, of Lot 542; commencing at a "post in the Northeast corner;  thence 80. chains South; thence 80 chains.  West; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, mors  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 24th, 1914.  ANNIE *>ROWN.  ��������������������������� --��������� H. G. Adams, Agent.  East; thence 80 chains South; thence 40  chains West to the beach; thence following the beach 40 chains in a Westerly  direction; thence North 80 chains to  the point of commencement, containing  500 acreB, more or less, for agricultural. _  Dated January 27th, 1914.  JOHN MacDONALD.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  -_ i   ���������  BAVP ACT.  TABC01TTBB XASTP DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Harrold A.  Rourke, of Vancouver; occupation.  Freight Clerk; Intends to apply for par-  mission to purchase tha following described lands:���������  Commencing at a. post planted about  40 chains distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southwest corner of  T. It. 41022; commencing at a post in  the Northwest corner; thance SO chains  East; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains North  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less,, for  agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  HARROLD A.  ROURKE.  - H. G. Adams, Agent  XABB ACT.  YABOOUTBB XWaBD DXSTXUCT .  XHstrlot of Coaat Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that  Thomas Christie, of Vancouver; occupation, Lumberman; intends to apply for permission to  fturchase     the     following     described  ands:���������  -Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in a Southerly  direction from tha Southwest corner of  Tilt. 4479; commencing at a post ln the  8outhwest corner; thence 40 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 40  chains South to beach; thence following the'beach ln a Westerly direction  80 chains to point of commencement,  containing 320 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 29th, 1914.  THOMAS CHRISTIE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  &AJTB ACT.  TAsTCOOTXB BAWD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Baage 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Sidney Clifford  White, of Vancouver; occupation. Telegrapher; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de-  cribed lands:'���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northwest corner of Lot 426; commencing at a post in the Southeast corner; thence 80 chains North; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence 80 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.'-  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  SIDNEY CLIFFORD WHITE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  ,r   ���������   , ���������: ���������^ !   X,ABD ACT.  VAITOOtrTBB PAVD  BXSTBXCT  District of Coast Baage l.  TAKE NOTICE that Samuel de Winter, of Vancouver; occupation, Telegrapher; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northwest corner of Lot 426; thence 40  chains,North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 40 chains South; thence 80  Chains WeBt to the point of commencement, contining 320 acres, more or less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  I'-'-      SAMUEL DE WINTER.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  chains  or  to  the point  of commencement, containing 260    acres, more    or  less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.    ,  FRANK E. TAYLOR.  ��������� H. G. Adams, Agent  XkAVD ACT.  ���������AVOOUTBB KAVD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that John William  Bradsbaw, of Vancouver; < occupation.  Mechanic; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  4 miles distant in a Northwest direction from the Northwest corner of Lot  426; thence 40 chains West; thence 80  chains North; thence 40 chains East;  thence 80 chains South to the point of  commencement,. containing 320 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914. . .  JOHN WILLIAM BRAD8HAW.  H. G. Adams, Agent  ItAVD ACT.  YABCOUTBB XtABD DMTBXOT  Distriet of Coaat Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Leo Mayne,  Of  Vancouver;     occupation,    Telegrapher;  Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  2 miles distant in a Southerly direction  from the Southwest corner of Lot 426;  commencing at. post  planted    in    the  Southeast    corner;    thence    80    chains  West; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East; thence 80 chains South  to the point of commencement, contain-1  ing 640 acrea, more or less, for agrl-1  cultural. I  Dated January 24th. 1914.  LEO MAYNE. I  H. G. Adams, Agent  BAVD ACT.  TAXCOVTBB XtABD PXSTBXCT  v   XHstrlot of Coaat Baaga 1.  TAKE    NOTICE    that Martha Ada  laide   Kay.   of  Vancouver;   occupation,'  Spinster;  intends to apply for permis- >  sion to purchase the following described  lands:���������. -"'       -.-j  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant in a Westerly direction  from the Southeast corner of Lot 13;  commencing at a post in the-Northwest  corner; thence 80 chains Bast; thence  60 chains South; thence 80 chains West; >  thence 60 chains North to the point of  commencement, containing 500 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 23rd, 1914.  MARTHA ADELAIDE KAY.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  X.ABP ACT.  XiABP ACT.  ���������AVCOtrVSB XtABP DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Baage 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Lawrence  Hartje, of Vancouver; occupation, Engineer; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile and a quarter distant, and in a  South-easterly direction from the Southwest corner of T. L. 4486; commencing  at a post in the Southeast corner;  thence 80 chains North; thence 80  chains West; thence 30 chains South  to the beach; thence following the beach  in a South-easterly direction 80 chains,  or to the point of commencement, containing 620 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 27th, 1914.  LAWRENCE HARTJE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  PAXTP ACT.  VABCOXTYBB SAffP PXSTBXCT  .-   XHstrlot of Coast Baage l.  TAKE NOTICE that John Sline, of  Vancouver; occupation, Longshoreman:  intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in a Southwest direction from the Southwest'corner of  T. L. 41022; commencing at a post in  the Southwest corner; thence 40 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence  80 chains South to the beach; thence  following the beach in-* a Northwest direction 80 chains or to point of com-  mencem nt, containing 450'acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  JOHN SLINE,  H. G. Adams, Agent  .-'.'     X.ANP ACT.  ^���������Aircotrvpliir'jwwp^slwiiiT^"  District of coast Bangs I..  TAKE NOTICE that Hans Harold  Arthur Anderson, of Vancouver; occupation. Logger; intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following  described  lands:-���������    ������������������   . ^������   . ���������  Commencing at a post planted about  60 chains distant and in a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 424; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner; thence 80 chains  South to the beach; thence along the  beach 80 chains West; thence along,  the beach North 60 chains to a point directly West from the starting point;  tence 75 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 480 acres,'  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 23rd, 1914.  HANS_ HAROLD    ARTHUR    ANDER-  SOX  H. G. Adams, Agent.  X.ABP ACT.  VAKCOTSVDB fcABP  PXSTBXCT  Plstrlot of Coast Baagt 1.  TAKE   NOTICE   that  Jasper  Nation,  of Vancouver;  occupation, Hotelkeeper;  intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following, described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of Lot 542; commencing at a post in the Northwest corner;  thence 80 chains East; thence 80 chains  South; thence 80 chains West; thence 80  chains   North   to   the   point   of   commencement,  containing 640 acres,  more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 25th, 1914.  JASPER NATION.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAXTD ACT.  ���������AVCOTfVBB USD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlct of Coast Bangs 1.  VTAKE NOTICE that Nerval E. Mall-  ahan���������\>of Vancouver; occupation, advertiser; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 426; thence 80  chains West; thence ��������� 80 chains- South;  thence 80 chains East; thence 80 chains  North, to the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 22nd,  1914.  NORVAL   E.   MALLAHAN,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  USD ACT.  VAJTOOOTSB USD   DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Bertha B. Lazier,  of Vancouver; occupation, married ��������� woman; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  ���������60 chains distant and in an Easterly  direction from the Southeast corner of  T. L. 4479; commencing at a post in the  Southeast corner; thence 60 chains  West; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East; thence 30 chains South  to the beach;- thence following the  beach 50 chains in a South-westerly di-  TAXCOtrVEB  LAVS  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that John Harold Al-  bertson, of Vancouver; occupation,  Logger; intends to apply for permission  to purchase . the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 and a half miles distant and in a  Southerly direction from the Southwest  corner of Lot 424; commencing at a  post in the Southwest corner; thence 60  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 70 chains South to beach; thence  following the beach 80 chains West to  the point of commencement, containing  520 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26tb, 1914.  JOHN   HAROLD   ALBERTSON.  H.  G. Adams, Agent.  X4AVD ACT.  ���������ABCOWPB PABP PXSTBXCT  XHstrlet of Coast Baagt I.  TAKE NOTICE that Sinclair A. Alch-  inleck, of Vancouver; occupation. Miner;  intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  4 miles distant in a Westerly direction  4hrom the Northwest corner of. Lot 425;  commencing at a post in the Southeast  corner; thence. 80 chains North; thence  80 chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence 80 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914. ~  SINCLAIR A. AICHINLECK.  H; G. Adams, Agent  PABB ACT.  Who  mat&ted the pktnra}  Who  nattered tho mnorr  Who  itole Robert Cameras}  If you want to ma  a veal clever nxftbmf  stay don't bbbb tfcit  new serial we lint  arranged to print-"  Hie  Sable  Lorcha  A tale of the shrewd  canning of the Oriental*. It's good from  the ray beginning, so  Get the ktna  Whk the Pint  Installment  PABP ACT..  ���������ABCOtrVBB XUtBP PWTBXCT  XHstrlot oT Coaat Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that HoTton Evens  Sands, of Vancouver; occupation, Broker; intends to apply for permision to  purchase the following described  lands:���������. ��������� :,:>;.���������������������������  " Commencing at a post _planted about  1 mile distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southeast corner of Lot  542; commencing at a post in the Northwest corner; thence 36 chains East;  thence 80 chains South; thence 35  chains West; thence 80 chains North  to the poit of commencement, containing 300 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 25th   1914.  HOLTON EVENS SANDS.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  The first instalment  of  The Sable Lorcha  appeared in our  issue of Jan. 9.  We can supply back numbers  Pistriot of Coast Baaga J.  TAKE NOTICE that .Tames Veno, of  Vancouver; occupation. Cook; intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in,a Westerly direction from the Southwest corner of T.  L. 4487^ commencing at a post in the  Northwest corner; thence 80 chains  East; thence 60 chains South to beach;  thence following the beach in a Northwesterly direction 80 chains or to point  of commencement, containing 200  acres, more or less, for agricultural. '  Dated January 28th, 1914. %  JAMES VENO.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  XdtBP ACT.  PABP ACT.  VABCOVYSB PAKP PXSTBXCT  Plstrlot of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry Washington Steele, of Vancouver; occupation,  Carpenter; intends to apply for permission to purchase, the following described lands:��������� .  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in a Southeast direction from the Southwest icorner of  T. L. 4.487; commencing at a post in the  Southwest corner; thence 60 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 80  chains ' South; thence 60 chains in a  Northwest direction, or to the point of  commencement, containing 600 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 28th, 1914.  HARRY   WASHINGTON   STEELE.  H/G. Adams, Agent.  X.AVP ACT.  YAVCOUVSB X.ABP  PXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* J.  TAKE NOTICE that William Seymour, of Vancouver; occupation, Logger; intends to apply .for permission to  purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post plantijd about  1 mile distant and in a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 4483; commencing at a post in the  Southwest corner; thence 70 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 80  chains South to beach: thence following the beach in a Westerly direction  80 chains to the point of commencement; containing 560 acres, more or less,  for agricultural. >  Dated January 29th, 1914.  WILLIAM SEYMOUR.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  PAVP ACT.  VAHCOUVEB DABD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlct of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Peter Freeman,  of Vancouver; occupation. Book-keeper;  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of T. L. 1122i thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chainh East;  thence 80 chains North to the beach;  thence following the shore line in a  North-westerly direction 80 chains or  to the point of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less, for agricultural. '������������������-''������������������  Dated January 21st, 1914.  PETER FREEMAN.  H. G. Adams,  Agent.  VAHCOTJTXB  X.ABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that John MacDon-  ald, of Vancouver; occupation, Railway  Clerk; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:��������� ������  Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southeast corner of T.  L. 4486; commencing at a post in the  Northwest   corner;   thence     80     chains  XdUVD ACT.  VASTCOTJVZB  X.ABD  DX8TBXCT  District of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Frank E. Taylor, of Vancouver; occupation, Broker;  intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following  described   lands:-���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northeast corner of T. L. 1144; thence  80 chains West; thence 80 chains North  to the beach; thence following the  beach  in  a  South-easterly  direction  80  VABCOVTPB X.ABP PXSTBXCT  Plstrlot of Coast Bang* I.  I TAKE: NOTICE that Florence Malla-  hah, of Vancouver; occupation. Dressmaker; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  : Commencing at a post planted about  2 and a half miles distant and in a  South-easterly direction from the Southeast corner of Lot 542; commencing* at  a post in the Southwest corner; thence  40 chains North; thence 70 chains East;  thence ,40 chains South; thence v 70  chains West to the point of commencement, containing "300 acres, more or  less, for agricultural.  Dated.January-28th,= 1914.   --^=^=^  FLORENCE MALLAHAN.  H.  G. Adams, Agent.  %A*P ACT.  VAHCOVVPB PAVP PXSTBXCT  Plstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Barr-  able, of Vancouver; occupation, Broker;  intends to apply for permision to purchase the' following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted'at the  Northwest corner of Lot 540; thence 80  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 80 chais South; thence 80 chains  West to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less,--for agricultural. ..  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  ARTHUR BARRABLE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  X.ABS ACT.  VABCOVVSB X.AVB PXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Henry Teaeger,  of Vancouver; occupation, Brewer; intends to apply for'"permission to purr  chase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in a westerly direction from the Northwest corner' of-Lot  425; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner; thence 89 chains  South; thence 80 chains Went; thence  80 chains North; thence 80 chains East  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 15th, 1914.  HENRY TEAEGER.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAND  ACT.  Vancouver   Xiand   District.���������District   of  Coast Bangs 2.  TAKE NOTICE that Antonio Belan-  ger, of ���������' Brettany Creek, occupation  Miner, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  northwest corner of Lot 922; thence  west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;  thence east 40 chains; thence south 40  chains, for grazing-.  ANTONIO   BELANGER,  Dated December 17th.  1913.  1-23-14   to   3-20-14.  LAHD ACT.  Vancouver   Dand   District.���������District   of  Coast Bangs 2.  TAKE NOTICE that Frank Rial Angers, of Brittany Creek, occupation  Rancher, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Lot 923; thence  west 20- chains; thence north 20 chains;  thence east 20 chains; thence south 20  chains, and containing 40 acres more  or less, to be used as a pasture.  FRANK   RIAL   ANGERS.  Dated 17th of December, 1913.  1-23-14 to 3-20-14.  "tAlh i  ETCHINGS AND HALFTONES  ARE NOW BEING MAPE IN  WESTERN CANADA BY THE  , MOST SATISFACTORY PRO.^  CESS KNOWN TO THE WORLP  WE'ACW BLAST" PJtOCgsS  MAKES YOUR ILLUSTRATIONS   LITERALLY TALK   manufactured in western canaO*  CmAMcDiohit 1m<.6i  ��������� i a < -M    a o m i i>   . i. o  a. .it A'   O k*    r m   fi I -  8. Mary tha Virgin, South Hill.  (Cor. Prince Albert St. and 52nd Ave.)  8:00 a.m.���������Holy Eucharist  11:00 a.m.���������Matins and sermon.  (Late celebration on 1st and 3rd  Sundays).  3:00 p.m.���������Children's Service (Third  Sunday).  4:00 p.m., Holy "��������� Baptism (except  Third Sunday).  7:30 p.m.���������Evensong and Sermon.  Vicar, Rev. Owen  Bulkeley, A.K.C.  Sunday School and Bible Glasses  every Sunday (except third), afternoon, at 3 o'clock, in St. Mary's Parish Hall, also Men's Bible Reading,  every Thursday evening at 8 o'clock.  ANYONE  CAN  ' THEIR CLOTHES  WITH  DYOLA  iThe Dye that colors ANY KIND!  I      of Cloth Perfectly, with the  8AMEDYE. 1  %   No Chum of Mlatakm.   Cleta mnd Simple.  I Aok jour Dnniil or Dealer. Send far Booklet.  The J<>lisaon.Rkhmr(1������aaC>>. Limited,Moalretl  Do not go about repeating the  statement that nothing affects the  temper like disease of the stomach ; it would be better to say. that  nothing troubles the functions of  the stomach like moody tempers.  ���������Paul Dubois. ' i ; ���������>    j 1     < a   "v._  "       ������������������ -t     ,  ,'���������    i *v  v,~?  -wrr���������*r  ��������� v, -.  i'HK  WESTERN" CALL  Friday, April 10,1914  IE WESTERN CALL  PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY  BY THE  TERMINAL CITY PRESS, LTD.  HEAD OFFICE :  203 Kingsway, Vancouver  Telephone Fairmont 1140  Sunacrlntlon:  One Dollar a Tear In Advance  $t.BO Outride Canada  If you do not get "CALL" regularly  it is probably because your subscription  is long overdue. Renew at once. If paid  up, phone or write complaint today.  A WORLD IN ARMS  Winston Churchill closed his speech in presenting the Naval Estimates to the House of Commons with a world survey of naval affairs.     ,  All through it he had instituted comparisons  with Germany, and he placed her case in the'forefront of this survey :  The defeat of Germany at sea means nothing  but the loss of the ships and the men. Behind  the German Dreadnought line stands four and a  half millions of soldiers- Nothing that we could  do after a naval victory could affect the safety or  freedom of a single German hamlet. Behind the  British line of battle lies the long low coast line  of the east of England, our trade routes, our food  routes, our small army, and our vast peaceful population with'immense possessions. The burden of  responsibility laid upon the British navy is heavy,  and its weight increases year by year.  All the world was building ships of the greatest power and training officers and men. Even  small states. "It is sport to them; it is life and  death to us," be cried. "We have won for ourselves an exceptional share of the wealth and the  traffic of the world. We have got all we want in  territory���������(cheers)���������but, our claim to live in undisputed enjoyment of our vast and splendid  possessions, largely acquired by war and largely  maintained by force, is one that often seems less  reasonable to others than it does to us."  World in Anns.  He spoke of tbe value of our regular intervention in European affairs, and brought his speech  to an end with this peroration:  The world is arming as it has never armed  before. Every suggestion for the arrest or limitation of armaments has been unsuccessful. From  time to time awkward things happen and situations occur which make it necessary that the naval  force at our immediate disposal, now in this  quarter, now in thaly stauld be rapidly counted  up. On such occasions the responsibilities which  rest on the Admiralty come home with brutal reality to those who are responsible, and unless our  naval strength were solidly ample and unswervingly maintained the government would not feel  tbat they were doing itheir duty to the country.  PUSBW0 ON WCWt* OF  JCHYBEJt PASS FOJtTS  Peshawur, India.���������With secrecy and speed unusual in public work, English army engineers are  rushing to completion the forts and roads of  Khyber Pass, to make it a Gibralear against invasion from the north. As domestic unrest grows  in India, the fear of the Bussian bear and the unruly states between Russia and the Indian empire increases, and England is clearly determined  not to be attacked in the rear in the event of a  native rebellion.  Two years ago the road across the famous pass  was hardly more than a trail for pack animals,  but today Khyber is traversed by two roads suitable for the fastest and heaviest millitary traction. The defensive works have been constructed  with such secrecy that none of the details are  known to the public- It is believed that the natural batlements formed by the cliffs above the  roads are honeycombed with hidden embrasures  behind which great mountain guns lie hidden.  Competent engineers believe that unless the defending force is cut off from^the south, the pass  can be defended by a small garrison even against  a host such as the ancient invaders of India  brought down from the north.  IMPERIAL WIRELESS CHAIN  Wireless experiments' betwen Durban and  Johannesburg have hitherto failed, but a special  operator left Durban recently, for a ten days'  test, the object of which is to determine the site  of the South African station in the Imperial wireless chain. The station is to have the capacity to  signal direct to Malta. It will be planned on a  large scale, with thirty-two aerials a mile long  and three sources of electrical supply, including  a self-containing installation.  "There is no difficulty in obtaining oil; the  difficulty is in obtaining it at a good price," and  he raised his voice in emphasis. "We must look  to sources independent of existing combinations,  and also to developments of the home production of oil from.shale, and later, as we hope, from  coal."  I      THE WORLD AT WORK  *  iH"H..H'M������'M'������4'4"M"H'<HMH"H^  MAKING THE DESERT BLOOM  Authority and finances have been provided by  the Turkish government for an irrigation project  that will again bring into cultivation the great  fertile plain of Mesopotamia, lying between the  Tigris and Euphrates, the burial place of the most  ancient civilization of the world, and the birthplace of history. The irrigation project is being  carried out by the eminent English engineer, Sir  William Willcocks, who built the great Assouan  dam on the Nile. He will use in part the old  canals constructed by the Babylonians, the plans  of which are in existence. The water will come  from the Euphrates, in sufficient quantity to irrigate three million out of the twelve million  acres in the plain. This irrigated land will produce one million tons of wheat and a hundred  thousand tons of cotton. There are also two and  one-half million acres of swamp land to be  drained. Transportation for the products will be  secured by a railroad running from Bagdad,  through Damascus, to the Mediterranean,  SURPLUS ON INTERCOLONIAL  DR. PARKIN SPEAKS ON  CANADIAN OIL FIELDS  London.���������Dr. Parkin, fellow of the Institute  of Chemistry and the Chemical Society, read a  paper before the Royal Society of Arts on Canadian and other Imperial oil resources. He said  attention had recently been focussed on Alberta.  It was noted that twelve wells were now drilling  within the city limits of Medicine Hat.  , Conditions similar to those of many of the  world's greatest oil fields existed in the eastern  foothills of the Rockies. If only a small portion  Of existing projects proved successful Alberta  would become the scene of the richest oil fields  in the world, a most valuable asset to Canada and  the British Empire. It was important therefore  that the Canadian government encourage the  opening up of new oil fields. This would-, encourage the confidence of British capitalists, he  said. ���������;.'��������������������������� '.' ���������  STEWART INSTEAD OF NASOGA GULF MAY  BE TERMINUS OF THE D. A. THOMAS LINE  According to reports in railway construction  circles, the route of the Nasoga-Groundhog line,  promoted for the purpose of tapping the anthracite coal fields of Groundhog mountain, and  headed by Mr. D. A. Thomas, the Welsh coal magnate, has been changed, and the line will hot terminate on tidewater at Nasoga gulf On Portland  canal, but at the head of the canal at Stewart.  At the time of the mining boom in the Portland  canal district more than three years ago, Sir  Donald Mann, as a private enterprise, built a  fourteen mile railway from Stewart, the mining  camp at the head of the canal up Bear river valley. This line is built on standard gauge, and, at  that time, it was said to be the intention of thev  well known builder to extend into Peace river  district. But the line was closed down when the  mining boom subsided, and during the past year  or so a zealous citizen of the camp has used it  and one of the small handcars and pair of dogs  in transporting supplies along the valley. A large  wharf and station headquarters were built in connection with the project.  It now is said that Mr. Thomas and his associates are negotiating for it, as it gives a good  grade to the Groundhog district, though there isi  ^a tunnel of about 2,000 feet necessary to maintain a good grade through Bear river pass,   The;  distance would be about 150 miles to the coaj  fields, against close to 150 by the original survey  with Nasoga gulf as the tidewater terminus.   At  Stewart at the head of the canal there is a perfect harbor and the distance from Nasoga is not  considered too great to make the proposed change'  in route an item of consideration from a standpoint of water transportation. "  GREAT GOLD SCHIST DYKE DISCOVERED  Formation Said to Be Twenty Miles Wide���������Pis-  .-.;. coverer Stakes. ~.:\.-a..  The Pas, Man.���������F W. Robinson, D. LvS., an  expert geologist, has examined the territory at  the goldfields and finds that there is a schist;;  dyke, which contains gold quartz about twenty1  miles wide north and south. On the north, the'-  quartz runs into granite and on the south is &������  limestone formation. The line of contact between the limestone and the gold quartz is at the  north end of Beaver lake approximately. The  length of the schist is not known and may be several hundred miles.  Robinson covered an area of fifty square miles  and staked 22 claims.   He says it is possible to  find gold in large quantities anywhere in the  schist; and believes that better discoveries will be'  made than the original ones.  WOMAN ENGINEER.  Regina, April 3.���������Mrs. Victor Garnist, who was  for twenty years a licensed engineer in Minnesota, applied today to take out a license here, desiring to run her husband's traction engine. Because the Saskatchewan law defines persons qualified to become engineers as males over 18, she was  refused. She says there are many women in the  province who would become engineers if they  could secure licenses.  MILLION TRAVELLERS TO EXPOSITION  It is predicted and apparently with much  soundness that there will be over a million people  go from the East to San Francisco next year.  There appears to be little doubt but that the Exposition will be ready on time. In fact it has  been officially stated that the Exposition grounds  and buildings are eighty per cent, completed now.  BIG SUNSPOT DISCOVERED  Washington, April 2.���������A sunspot group about  50,000 miles long, consisting of a large circular  spot and faculae, with small spots in them, has  been discovered by the naval observatory here.  It was photographed at noon yesterday.  Past Year Has Been Very Successful  The success of the Borden Government in handling the Intercolonial  railway is shown by the fact that for  the first time in its history the government owner road has been run  with the same energetic and business  like manner as a private owned railway. During the two and a half years  of Conservative administration the  road has been put on a new and  sounder basis, and despite increased  cost of material and operation, along  with greatly increased wages for the  men, has shown surpluses almost for  the first time in its history. The surpluses have been turned over to the  renewal of equipment account. Incidentally, during the past year nearly  a million dollars was spent in new  equipment and rolling stock.  Surplus of $300,000  The receipts, as announced by Hon.  Dr. Reid, acting Minister of Railways,  in the House this week, will total for  the year $12,632,973, and the estimated  expenditure will be about $12,328,000,  leaving a net surplus for the current  fiscal year of about $300,000.  "During the present year," said Dr.  Reid, "we have been able so far to  transfer to equipment renewal ac  count $300,000, also to rail renewal  account $150,000, and to fire renewal  account $60,000, or a total of $510,-  000."  Growth in Traffic  The growth in traffic since the Borden government has started, to run  the Intercolonial railway as a business  proposition is remarkable. Last year  alone there was an increase in the  number of passengers carried of 229,-  563, and of freight tons removed of  210,971.  Halifax Terminals  In addition to improving the road  itself, the government has undertaken  big terminal works at Halifax. It  has been a recognized, fact for many  years that the terminal facilities, not  only at Halifax, but at St. John, were  insufficient. In fact, if the trade is  developed to any considerable extent  from the extension of the Transcontinental railway to the Lower 4 Provinces, and the growth of our country,  it would be impossible to handle the  traffic at Halifax and St. John without very great improvement./   ,  V,':)���������:'���������.       When Completed  Accordingly terminal    plans  were  * prepared to cost some $5,200,000, and  are now well under way.*,  "When these terminals 'are complete," added the Minister, "we believe that we will have a harbor equal  to any other port in the world, with a  capacity sufficient to handle the traffic which is expected to come through  :- that port." '  9. C. IJUDIIS TO BE  54 40-ACRE TRACTS ARE READY  FOR SETTLERS IN SAYWARD  DISTRICT ,  W  Are W he Thrown Open for  Vancouver on May 18  On Monday morning, May 18, fifty-  four forty-acre tracts in ithe Salmon  Riyer valley are to be thrown open  for pre-emption 'by the Provincial  government.  The rule is to be, first come, first  served, and it is likely that the office of Mr. J. Mahoney, the government agent, in ,the court house in  this city will witness some interesting  spectacles in the rush for the tracts.  The fifty-four lots are all logged off  lands in townships three and six, in  the Sayward. district of Vancouver  island, and were formerly held as  timber berths by the Hastings Sawmill Company, and the B. C. Mills  Timber and Trading Company.  The lands will be declared open for  entry by pre-emption at 9 o'clock in  the morning of May 18, and all applications have to be made at the office  of the government agent at Vancouver. The. lands have already been  surveyed into blocks ranging from  36 to 42 acres, to suit the topography  of the country.,; The lots in township  six are situated on both banks of  Salmon river near the junction of  White river, while those in township  three are on the east bank of Salmon  river, near to Johnson strait.  With the exception of two patches  where gravel occurs in |the sandy  loam, the land is said to be equal to  the richest in Vancouver island, being either a sandy loam or a rich red  marl. In the lots in township three  the clearing to be done., is heavier  than on the other lots, owing to more  small timber having been left by the  loggers, and a good deal of windfall.  The surveyors report that there is  a good deal of game in the valley.  Tnere are already a number of settlers in the valley who are doing well.  A  local  agricultural   association  has  been formed, and the valley has been  opened up by the construction ot a  wagon road and a bridge across the  river. The river has a width of 250  feet, and is navigable for gasoline  launches for a considerable distance.  Other lands in the interior, in the  vicinity of Cranbrook and Fernie are  to be throw nopen for pre-emption on  May 1, and must be reorded at the  Cranbrook or Fernie office of the  government.  The throwing open of these lands  for pre-emption is part of the land  settlement policy brought forward by  Hon. W. R. Ross, Minister of Lands,  at the last siting of the Legislature.  Mount Pleasant Baptist Church.  Cor. Tenth Ave. and Quebec St.  Preaching Services���������n a.m.    and    7:Sv  'p.m.   Sunday School at 2:30 p.m.  Pastor, Rev. A. F.Baker. 614th Ava.. Ban  AXCHUCAJT.  ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH  Cor.   Broadway and Prince Edward St  Services���������Morning Prayer at 11 a.m.  Sunday School and Bible class at 2:20  p.m.  Holy Communion every Sunday at 8 a.m.  Evening Prayer at 7:30 p.m.  and list and 3rd Sundays at 11 am  Rev. G. H. Wilson, Rector  Rectory, Cor.   8th  Ave.   and   Prince Edward St. Tel . Fairmont 406-1.  For Sale and  For  FOR SALE CARDS HERE 10c each 3 for 25c  THE DIFFERENCE  Between paper  that is "good  enough "���������' and  that which is  really artistic,  may be a trifle  in cost but infinite in satisfaction. Do it right  the first time,  is our suggestion.  Estimates  PHONE  FAIRMONT  998  HOUSE   DECORATORS  CT A 1UI   PI/     &    nt\        HOUSE    DECORATORS  b I AINLt Y CC tu.  2317 lain Street,Near.7tbAv.  SEED POTATOES  ;; "EARLY ROSe," choice quality, $2.00 per 100 <  ,;��������� "QRACe parmnq " (irojiiirteil irl������l������ 5bN) W.so ���������>   '  ,, You can Rely on the Quality.  we carry seu2crep i-awn seep and fertilizer  >\ Oar Olamond QblQk food contains all that is required to   '  ��������� t   rear healthy chicks.       < "'w  >.  PI������m Filnawt m        Hay, Grain anp Feed 255 BroKwij Fait  ��������������������� ������if i f i���������������*������i������i ������������������������ *>*+������������������������*������������������+���������������������������*+   n ���������.���������������������. ������if.������i fmf mf i������i % i f HM  yssssssmsBsssssassssssss^sssssssssssBss^^ssssBSBa  f  2517 MAIN. STREET : NEAR BROADWAY  \  KNOWN AS THE BBST AND OLDEST  ESTABLISHED CAFS IN MT. PLEASANT  BUSINESS MEN'S LUNCH 25c-U:30 TO 2:00  \  DINNER 5:00 TO 8:00 P.M.  SHORT ORDERS AT ALL HOURS  J  ,}*'}"t"l"I"t"������"I"I"t"i"?"t"I"������"I"t"l"l"t"l"I"l"i'^i'   ������)V������tV4{>^W^4Jt4{44|4^������4J4^4J4<j|4^4J������4J44|4<j������������{MJ������4^}4������}l4Jt������{������4J������  FRANK TRIMBLE REALTY CO.  Heal Estate and Insurance Brokers  CONVEYANCING  RENTS COLLECTED  LOANS NEGOTIATED  .T  PHONE Fair. 185 2303 Westminster Rd.  % Vancouver, B. C.  ��������� '���������������������������- -*��������� i  <^WgM{������4J>^'������J4<jl������{44g>4{l4}l4|4l{������l{4l{lljl4t44}������l{l4J4<^l������������}4MJ������^44Jl^4{4<J44J������l}4<g������4{������ I  4J������4J������4{l4J4<{n{ll{n|l|jn{������l^l{������l{MJ>������{44J������4^4l{������l}4<}n{n^������j>l^4l4l|j������      ^^^������^>.^������jw^4^.^.4J������������^>|..^.|������.^l.]l l[4l}l l^������$w{������4^������4|.  DOMINION WOOD YARD CO.I  Cor. Front and Ontario Sts.      Phone Fairmont 1554 \\  All Kinds of Mill Wood  Stored Under Cover  4^.4^H^W^^-H^M-J������M^*4-5~H������fr V1'  Friday April 10, 1914  THE WESTERN CALL.  6  VANCOUVER NOT SO BAD  Pearson's Magazine, in describing the labor  conditions in the United States, draws a picture  that is in such marked contrast to the Canadian  situation that our people cannot but appreciate  the difference. Our temporary ajid slight slackening of trade is prosperity compared to the conditions south of the Line. On the United States  conditions this great magazine draws this gloomy  picture: "The principal charity organizations  of New York city reports 350,000 men out of work  there; in Chicago the unemployed number more  than 120,000; in Milwaukee, 30,000; in Los Angeles, 30,000; in San Francisco, 40,000. From  many parts of the country come* the complaint  that the ordinary resources of public charity are  unable to cope with the most distressing industrial conditions that has confronted us in many  years. Meantime the cost of living continues to  rise upon the poor, the boundaries of poverty to  spread and its misery to deepen-" There is no  other country that has come through the period  of depression with as little hardship as Canada.  HEN LAID OFF BY MANY THOUSANDS  New York Central Dismisses 25,000 in Four  Months, Pennsylvania 16,000  New York.���������A. T. Hardin, vice-president of  the New York Central railway and head of its  operating department, announced tonight that  the New York central had been forced to dismiss  25,000 workmen since December 1,1913.  This statement followed an announcement of  the Pennsylvania railway on Thursday that 15,000  men had been dismissed on that Line. Mr. Hardin said that the conditions, so far; as he had  learned, were thecsame on other Eastern railways.  REMARKABLE OPERATION  j- Baltimore.���������What is believed to be the first  operation of its kind in this country was performed yesterday at a local hospital, when the  cornea of a pig's eye was takei off and grafted  on to the sightless eye of a three-months old boy.  It is said that previous operations in which rabbits' eyes had been used, were unsuccessful, but  that experiments with pigs' eyes had led scientists to believe that they were more adaptable.  Two cases were said to be on record where the  grafting of human corneas gave sight to totally  blind eyes.  In yesterday's operation the pig was chloroformed, the eyeball taken out, and the cornea cut  from it. An extraordinary fine needle and fine  silk were used in putting the cornea in place until  it has grown to the child's eyeball. The eye will  remain bandaged for about a week.  4^^*4^^^*|4^^^l^^44^4W^^44^l^l4^Mg^4^^44^4^<^4^4^44^Mg44J44^4^44J44^^4^tJ4K^4^*  ���������I���������.^.S���������.^.t..^.^���������i���������.^.^..t..H^^^������^^a^^I^^^<^^H'���������H^^^^^'^^^t'^^^^^^^^l^'H'  CLAIM FOR VIOLATION  OF TREATY OF GHENT  British Government'Pressing Demand by Kingston Lady for 26,000.  JVashington, March 30.���������Violation of the  treaty of Ghent which restored peace between  Great Britain and the United States after the war  of 1812, was alleged as the basis for a claim for  $25,000 pressed yesterday by the American pecuniary claims commission now in session here.  Miss Elizabeth Cadenhead, a British subject  from Kingston, Ont., was killed in the streets of  Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., by a bullet fired by a Fort  Brady sentry at an escaping military prisoner.  The suit, taken, up today, was brought by the  British government in behalf of Miss Cadenhead's heirs.  ALASKA TOWN IS NOW  FILED ON AS FARM LAND  . Seattle.���������The site of Dyea, Alaska, which in  the days of the Klondike rush contained 20,000 inhabitants, has been filed on as farming land by  three homesteaders. .One is an Indian woman,  another a young man who is founding a fox  ranch. : r*  VA  50,000,000 PEOPLE IN CANADA  Hon. Waiter Scott, Premier of Saskatchewan,  speaking at Sidney, Australia, said: "Until we  have about 40,000,000 or 50,000,000 people in  Canada the country will not be developed properly, nor will Canadians reap the utmost benefit  from their labors., The immigration statistics  show, I think, that close upon 500,000 people are  coming into the country annually, and most of  these have gone oh the land, and are farming it  profitably. We want more. I admit, of course,  that we have thousands who are inclined to drift  into the citiec instead of remaining at work in the  country. Our comparatively small population in  so large a territory is like an infant trying to run  a 10,000-acre farm, because he can't make proper  use of it."  The Turkish government has given a French  bank a concession to build an electric railroad between Jerusalem and Bethlehem and for lighting the former city with electricity.  RANCHING  REGULATIONS  Hon. Dr. Roche Revises Old Methods���������Great Western Industry to  Be Encouraged  Athabasca Petroleum Co., Limited  Public Notice is hereby given that  | under the First Part of chapter" 79 of  the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906,  known as "The Companies Act," letters patent have been issued under the  Seal of the Secretary of State of Canada, bearing date the 16th day of  March, 1914* incorporating Raymond  Neilus Bond, financial broker, ,Thos.  Todrick and Charles Leonard "Fillmore, barristers-at-law, Henry James  Bethell, notary public, and Walter  Francis Chaffey, student-at-law, all of  the City of Vancouver, in the Province of British Columbia, for the fol-  |, lowing purposes, viz:���������(a) To acquire, manage, develop, work and sell  mines, including coal mines, coal  lands, oil lands, natural   gas    lands,  \\ mineral claims and mining properties  and petroleum claims, and to win,  get, treat, refine and market minerals,  coal or oil therefrom; to carry on the  business of a mining, smelting, milling and refining company in all or  any of its branches and to; carry on  /the business of producers, refiners;  storersrsuppliers"and"distributors-of  petroleum and petroleum products in  all its branches; (b) To obtain by  purchase, lease, hire, discovery, location or otherwise, and hold mines,  mineral claims, mineral leases, coal  lands, oil lands, natural gas lands,  prospects, mining lands, (petroleum  claims and mining and petroleum  rights of every description and to  work, develop, operate and turn the  same to account, and to sell or otherwise dispose of the same or ariy of  them, or any interest therein; (c)  To dig for, raise, crush, wash, smelt)  assay, analyze, reduce, amalgamate  and otherwise treat gold, silver, coal,  copper, lead ores or deposits, oil,  petroleum and other minerals and  [metallic substances and compoundsof  all kinds, whether belonging to the  company or not, and to render the  'same merchantable, and to buy, sell  j and deal in the same or any of them;  (d) To   acquire  by   purchase,   lease',  hire, exchange or otherwise such real  and personal property of all kinds,  timber lands or leases, timber claims,  licenses to cut timber, surface rights  and Tights of way, water rights and  privileges, mills, factories, oil refineries, oil and petroleum wells, furnaces for smelting and treating ores  and refining, metals, buildings, machinery, plant, patents, licenses, concessions or other real or personal  property as may be necessary for or  conducive, to the proper carrying out  of any_of the objects of the company,  and manage, develop/sell, exchange,  lease or otherwise ; deal with the  whole or any part therpf; (e) To  construct, maintain, alter, make, work,  and operate on the property of the  company, or on property controlled  by, the company, any canals, trails;  roads, ways, tramways, bridges and  reservoirs, dams, flumes, pipe lines,  storage tanks, oil tanks, race and  other ways, water courses, acque-  ducts, wells, wharves, piers, furnaces,  saw-mills, crushing works, smelting  works^"cbh<: entr Sting" works? hydraulic  works, coke ovens, electrical works,  and appliances, warehouses, buildings,  machinery, plant, stores and other  works and conveniences which may  seem conducive to any of the objects  of the company; and, with the consent of the shareholders in general  meeting, to contribute to, subsidize  or otherwise aid or take part in any  such operation, though constructed  and maintained by any other company or persons outside of the property of the company, and to buy, sell,  manufacture and deal in all kinds of  goods, stores, implements, provisions, chattels and effects required by  the company or its workmen and servants'; (f) To build, acquire, own,  charter, navigate and use steam and  other vessels for the purposes of the  company; (g) To take, acquire and  hold as the consideration for ores,  metals or minerals sold or otherwise  disposed of, or for goods supplied or  ::  T. S. Baxter  < >  i < >  Peter Wright  FURNITURE  Complete House  Furnishers  ttimmwmnima  *  Agents for Ostermoor and  Restmore ilattresses  Davenport Bed  Have yon tried our Easy Payment?  Cone in and talk it over with us.  BAXTER & WRIGHT    ������  (Successors to Hutchings Furniture Co.) |  I   Phone Seymour 771 416 Main Street J  for -work done byv.contract or otherwise, shares, debentures, bonds or  other securities of or in any other  company the objects of which are  similar to those of this company, and  to sell or otherwise dispose of the  same; (h)... To enter into any ar-,  rangement for sharing profits; union  of interest or co-operation with any  other person or company carrying on  or:about to carry on any business or  transaction which this.; company is  authorized to carry on, and to take or  otherwise acquire and hold shares  in or amalgamate with any, other  company having object altogether or  in part similar to those of this company; (i) To purchase or otherwise  acquire and undertake all or any of  the- assets, business, property, privileges, contracts, rights, obligations  and liabilities of any person or company carrying on any part of the  business whichA this company is authorized to carry on, or possessed of  property suitable -for the purposes  thereof;_(j) To> distribute any^of the,  property of the company among the  members in specie;V(k)   To sell, im-  {������rove, manage, develop, exchange;  ease, dispose of, turn to account or  otherwise deal with the undertaking  or the whole or any part of the property and rights of the company, with  power to accept as the consideration  any shares, stocks or obligations of  any company; provided, however, that  in case of a sale for shares in a company other than a non-personal liability company such shares shall be  fully paid up; (1) To enter into contracts for the allotment of shares of  the company as the whole or part of  the purchase price of any property,  real or personal, goods or chattels  purchased by the company or for any  valuable consideration, including services rendered to the company, as the  company may from time to time determine; (m) To pay a commission  upon shares offered to the public for  subscription either in cash or shares  to any person or corporation tn consideration of his or its subscribing or  agreeing to subscribe, whether absolutely or conditionally, for any shares  in the company or procuring or  agreeing to procure subscriptions,  whether absolute or conditional, for  any shares in the company, provided  such payment is authorized by a resolution of the company in general  meeting and does not exceed the  amount so authorized; (n) To cause  this company to be registered or licensed to do business and to carry out  its objects in any country or place;  (o) To do all the above things and  such other things as are incidental or  conducive to the attainment of the  foregoing objects. The operations  of the company to be caried on  throughout the Dominion of Canada  and elsewhere by the name of  "Athabasca Petroleum Company,  Limited," with a capital stock of five  hundred thousand dollars, divided  into 500,000 shares of one dollar each,  and the chief place of business of  the said company to be at the City of  Vancouver, in the Province of British Columbia.  Dated at the office of the Secretary of State of Canada, this 21st day  of March, 1914.  THOMAS MULVEY,  Under Secretary of State.  For years the great ranching industry of the West has been greatly  handicapped by obsolete regulations.  This great industry was being wiped  out, and the West is suffering in consequence of the decreased production  of horses, cattle and sheep. When  the .government came into power a  commision was appointed to investigate the industry. Insecurity of tenure of leases was one of the greatest  drawbacks to the development of the  stock industry. After carefully revising the recommendations of the  commission, and consulting with the  best authorities on this subject, Hon.  Dr. Roche, Minister of Interior, drafted new regulations.  Half Section the  Maximum  In future the maximum areas  granted (under lease to any one person  will be a half section. No particular  part of the provinces is set aside for  ranching, but the regulations apply  to the whole of the three. Applications for grazing leases on any land  will only be granted after inspection  to determine whether the land in  question is grazing or agricultural  landi} Where the farmers adjoining  grazing^ land express their desire that  this lie retained a������ a commons for all  to use for their stock, no lease will be  granted. Lessees must fence the area  they obtain tinder lease. Leases  will be granted for ten years, but existing leases will not be disturbed until their expiration.    '  . In the Foothill -Country  'West of the Calgary-Edmonton  and Calgary-McLeod railways, what  is known as the foothill country, is  now nearly all under lease and in very  large blocks. Here the lessees of  these great areas have signified their  intention of giving up a part of their  grazing lands as soon as the farmers  acquire stock. These areas will likely  be held as commons; will be for the  use of all the farmers engaged in  stock raising.  Lessees will be required to have  one head of horse or cattle or five  sheep for every thirty acres. Where  the inspectors believe that the land  will not carry that amount of stock  they will fix the number they consider should be grazed on each area.  Thirtyrthree per cent, of the required stock must be placed the first  year .on each leased area granted.  At' leiast twenty-five per cent, of the  stock'must always be breeding stock.  An Impetus to Ranching  It is believed that these new regulations will give an impetus .to the  ranching industry by giving a permanency of tenure to the j leases.  They will also greatly stimulate  farming by securing ample grazing  land! to the farmers for their stock.  It is expected that under these new  provisions the West will again take  its place as one of the great stock-  raising countries of the world. The  development of this industry will add  to the prosperity and permanency of  the "Western settler. The farmer who  wishes grazing privileges is protected, the agriculturist'has still access  to all arable land, and the rancher is  giveh"-a -permanency -of-tenure that  will encourage him to develop his industry.  ���������|l������.|ii|,ii.,I,.t..>.|..l.,I,.l.,|.tl.?..|,.}.,;,.M.,I,.M..|.,;,.i.<.<l<.<,,I���������>l|���������|���������|���������|���������|l t,.t.,t..l.,|. Ii.r M J..J. l |���������l.������  Mount Pleasant Livery  TRANSFER ,  Furniture and Piano' Moving  Baggage, Express and Dray.   Hacks and Oan-fajrea  at all hoars.  Phone Fairmont B4B  t  Corner Broadway and Main A. F. McTavish, Prop. ;  ��������� i ton m t nnii in !'��������������������������������������� i iuiiium mhihi in in*'  ���������������������������*<'l"l'l"i'������������4"i"i"t"i-;->>;~:-:  i ii inn i n in i mi nin������������  VANCOUVER CUT-RATE FRUIT and CANDY CO. I  J N. Ellis. Mgr. 2452 Main St. tor. BTMiffiy  All Fruits;!  in Season]  Largest Stock of Confectionery Fruit & Tobacco on Hill:  PHONE Fairmont 638  Free delivery to any part of the city.  ��������� ���������Mil..|.|.|.|..|..|.������.H.4.������������������I M 'l'������������i|i������������  ..|n|.i|,i|4 M>4h|i.M������**��������� ili.l..|i.|..|..ti*.l4 444|.������*.  Just received a large shipment of  O'CEDAR  n  Polishing Mop and Q'Ceclar  ^l^rmture Polish  SELLING GOOP COWS CHEAP  The.following is a sample of what  is discovered by a simple weighing  of milk and testing, of samples. A 4-  year-old cow gave in one month 920  pounds, of milk containing 35 pounds  of fat. In the same herd a 5-year-old  cow gave only 330 ponds of milk  and 19 ponds of fat. Thus the first  cow gave more than the other two  combined.  This further fact is interesting:  This particular cow was sold by a  man absolutely ignorant of her value  or dairy capacity. The present  owner, through, keeping individual  records, knows her better and would  not sell her for less than thirty dollars than he paid for her.  Another fact is worth careful attention, the total of the herd yield  for a day or a month will never reveal these good individuals. What  the owner needs to know for certain  is obtained only from a record of each  cow he keeps. You can save labor  and good feed by bestowing them  on cows. that you know are worth  keeping; you will then be in a position to keep your best cows, and will  not lose money by selling good cows  cheap.  CEDAR COTTAGE PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH  Rev. J. O. Madill, Pastor..  Sabbath School and Bible Classes  at 2.30 p.m.  Prayer meeting at 8 p.m. on Wednesday.  Young People's meeting at 8 p.m. on  Monday night.  Maket Hard Work Etnyf  .,    .clearingand!������!������<&������������* JwwdwwxlHoonbhurt, be^fefeek.  msworfc. Analtnott never ending tasfcaaa seldom wtisrectocy the  L ki.   r*T<���������&*** ���������  wa*T ^saesf eef ejaajprvavs* vesje aaavtap e^a'sai  Qmtftf  of fee type of j^JywSw������rb*mmm  (bat.raj can s������l to the far ctmwr, vmam  &.M,bmm^fmn*atorw4otim  Jw4H0-s*-et<pUcet.  liMtetiej CewwNel er thevr tafeaM  Tiy ea OCacler Poll* Mop for  w wiwftw  |w������t meney  ppSpSS w ea^iesesviess) ijeeesCTBjajepa^i^pej^^Faieee  Phone us your order.   We deliver  promptly.  W,R, Owen i Morrison  Tbe Alt. Pleasant Hardware  Phone Fair. 447 2337 Main Street  ������'H-������+4"M'**-M"M'-H4H'*������H^  4-  NATIONAL CULTURE AND REFINEMENT  Can we measure the value of example in bettering the social, moral  and mental condition of home, civic or national life?  A living example is a powerful factor in leading up to culture and  refinement as a national asset. What more so than that of an artistically made home nestling among beautiful flowering plants; roses,  flowering and evergreen shrubbery; shade trees, all encompassed with  hedges of holly, laurel or privet.  Cultivate a habit to spend your time to make such a home, and  visit our Greenhouses and Nurseries; see our stock:, and get expert advice from our capable and courteous employees, which will greatly aid  you in your effort. Our stock was never better, larger or of greater  variety. In our stock of over $100,000 we have everything that culture  and refinement demands to make a home a credit to the owners and  pleasing and interesting to the community.  Catalogues mailed free on application. D  Royal Nurseries, Limited  Office���������710  Dominion BIOS'., 207 Xmatlnga St. "W.  Ptaoae Seymotut 5556.  STOKE���������3410 Oranvllle  St.    Pbone Veyvleer 1936.  Greenhouses  and  Nurseries   at Royal  on B.   C.  Electric Bail way,  Eburne Line, about two miles south of the City limits.  Flume���������Eborn* 43.  .X~X'^~H~H^^~X^������^~:~H^H~4VH^������i"t-l ���������!��������� 11 !��������� M"M"M"H 11 41 ���������! M"M"������������<- 6  THE WESTERN CALL,  Friday, April 10,1914  03+r/t/*#K *9f*\ A. C Af>ett/*Gr ������** CO.  ; fkee Consul Chon bowed gravely,  and I, In my turn, gestured my visitors  to itsume their seats. So far i hadj  not apoken. but mentally 4 had been  baair. Frankly, I distrusted Tup Slug,  and I questioned how much ot hia ex*!  planation, -whatever It might be, 1  tould afford to accept Fortunately,!  however. I now bad aome basis for  Judgment. I felt tbat, so far as it]  went, tho letter from Miss Clement.,  could be relied upon absolutely. If.  tho merchant's story coincided, then It  would perhaps be safe to assume the,  correctness of added details. If it did;  not coincide, I was ln possession of I  tamable material for cross-examination.  "I am an advocate of the polloy of  reciprocity, Mr. Tup." I said at length.  "If, In return for your service, I can;  sender & service to you, you have only;  to command me."  I chose a chair between them and  the door, and sitting down assumed an  attitude of attention.  "What I tell you," began tho mer-j  chant, his body erect, his shoulders;  squared, his chin lifted, "Mr. Chen will!  verify." And once more Mr. Chen endorsed his friend's assertion by a,  grave forward sweep of his head.  "When you came to me, Mr. Clyde,  with the story of your friend Mr. Cameron's annoyance and subseobent abduction, I was Inclined to the view  that you were, yourself, in some way;  deceived. What I have learned since,  corroborates that impression. As you!  say here in America, your friend, Mr.  Cameron, did not play fair with you,"  Under ordinary circumstances I;  might possibly have permitted this assertion to go unchallenged. I am not  as a rule truculent; more often than  not I And it advisable to Ignore preliminary inaccuracies of narration, the.  quicker to reach the vitals of the narrative. But on this night I was con-  trarily disposed. Tho inscrutable countenance and the superior, almost pat  ronlsing manner of the speaker chafed  and irritated mo to the verge of-endurance; and so, without hesitation, I  Interrupted him with a contradiction.  "If all that you have learned is no  more reliable than this corroboration,"  I declared, warmly, "ws might as well  end the Interview hero and now. Of  Mr. Cameron's fairness at all times  and under all circumstances there can  bo no question. He is my friend, tried  and trusted, and incapable, of deceit.  On that I would stake everything I  hold most dear; and .wo may as well  have It clearly understood at tbe outset."  A white man would either have Insisted or apologized. But the yellow  man haa a way of bis own.  Yup Sing  treatment. Passage money required;  $45. I Win lend the money on good;  security, but I cannot take your wife  and child in pay. Come to Canton,,  iahd I will care for you until the ship;  I sails. The ship is good.' The circular  'was signed by Ah Shoo, the agent. In  response to it, exactly ninety-seven of  my countrymen, having left good security for the required passage money,  were led stealthily aboard a small,  coasting vessel one night, and tbe vessel slipped quietly down the Chu-Klang  to the open sea, with McNish himself  at. the helm, and a Eurasian named  John Woo, in the galley."  ' The Vice Consul was now consulting a slip of paper bearing, as I could  see, certain Chinese characters.  "If I am in error," said Yup Sing,  addressing his companion, "I pray you  to correct me." Whereat Mr. Chen  Mok smiled reassuringly.  "You are in all particulars accurate," he announced; and the Mott  street merchant, thus encouraged, proceeded.  "The .vessel, you understand, Mr.  Clyde, was what 1b known In those waters as a lorcha. It was not so large  as a junk and it dlgsred ln other respects as'well.   It���������"  "I think I have seen a, rude, but  more or less effective representation  of' it," I Interrupted: -,  "I know to what you refer," was the  ���������speaker's rejoinder. "But that was  more or leBs conventional. As-1 told  ;you, every child draws boats like that.  .However, the lorcha was to be used  .merely to convey the passengers to  iMcNish's steamship, which had si-  iready cleared from Hong Kong, and  [which waited off the coast well out of.  ;slght of prying cruisers. Such, at  'least, was the explanation. Whether  JMcNlsh ever had a steamship is a  {matter for conjecture. Whether a  (United States cruiser of the Pacific  jSquadron, having received a hint as  ito his purpose, bore down upon him,  as has been said, Is likewise open to  question. But of the truth of the incidents which followed there can be no  'dispute.'*/ ���������--; >'���������-.'���������"���������������������������.  He hesitated long enough for the  Vice Consul to echo: "No dispute,  whatever, Mr. Clyde," and continued:  "On the second morning'after leaving Canton, an hour after dawn, when  be at least pretended to see-the cruiser  In full chase, he ordered bis passengers below, declaring that their safety depended upon their keeping out of  sight. No sooner, however, were they  below decks than be battened down  the hatches, and imprisoned the cook  In his galley. A white fog prevailed  and the sea was very calm, both of  which were conditions favorable to  remained, silent until I had finished.... McNJsh'e   purpose .Lowering    the  **}J%!2*2*-������L*!* Jifif!I*JO*!** !���������*������������������������'���������. two boats he cut one' adrift,  eB^:ent���������riflg-theVothe'r,Vw|iich'^h.e;:h'a4  manifested neither by word nor sign.  Without change of facial expression or  alteration of tone, be placidly proceeded, choosing bis phrases with Infinite  care and rounding his periods with a  faculty that for an Asiatic was little  short of marvelous. Had ho been  any_one else __ln_the .world I should,  have admired him. As It was, Ws cleverness only added to mr aversion.  "There Is a story," be went on, "t,  true story familiar to all Chinamen;  to some Chinamen especially It is a  very bitter, a very pathetic story, because it haB to do with the passing of  their   kinsmen���������their fathers,   their  previously stocked with stores, "he  made bis way in it along the lorcha's  Side to her pro^ir."  At this Juncture^ Yup Sing slowly  rose to hls\feet.  "And now," he said,"I want you to  picture -what-followed.- Standing-up,  axe in hand, Ponald McNish began his  diabolic work. With strong arm be  swung, and close to the water'line  the blade bit deep into tbe timbers of  the lorcba's bow. He swung again;  and again the blade bit deep. Once  more, and still once more the axe rose  w   ..,. j, ^ . ������.   ���������.-������������������-       and fell.   Frantically, with   fiendish  times Is glorious, as we all know. To  die for one's country, or for one's honor, Is to be privileged. To die of pestilence or famine Is deplorable. But  to die by treachery is to leave a poor  legacy to those who follow���������a legacy  of unrest until vengeance has been  wrought."  He paused for just a moment and I  moved Impatiently.   But  to disconcert him by my.  not rewarded.  "It is possible, Mr. Clyde," ho continued, "that you are familiar with  the history of the trade In coolies between your country and mine?"  I nodded. "Yes," I answered, "passably familiar. I know that at one time  it was black with outrages. I know  that ln 1882 a Chinese exclusion act  was passed, and tbat In 1801 the Oesry  law followed."  "But you did not know, perhaps,  that ln spite/ of your laws, the smug-  fife* of Chinamen���������ot Chinese labor-  jers���������-Into this country, has been  most continuously practiced?"  "It Is quite possible, I dare say. I  do not know the facts, however."  "The facts in a general way are not  material," Yup Sing assured me. "But  I shall Inform you of a single specific  ���������case.' Sixteen years ago there appeared in Canton a white man, supposedly a Scotchman, calling himself  Donald McNish, and representing, according to his own statement, certain  large American Interests. Through a  native agent it became known that  :McNlsh was in search of coolies. Very  soon, circulars appeared throughout;  the district, worded somewhat after  ���������this fashion: 'To the countrymen of  (Ah Shoo. Laborers are wanted in the  lland of California. Great works to be  idone there, good houses, plenty food.  I You will get $20 a month and good  there opened a gaping hole through  which, upon those ninety-seven  trapped souls, rushed the bitter waters  of death."  It was a, very dramatic recital.  Unaccompanied though it was by a single gesture, tha speaker's voice lent itself most effectively to the tragedy.  T7'������.^ht.Ana th0UBn 1 disliked and distrusted  ������h������������ ? ���������.! Wm������I 'as certainly more or less im-  acuon ������ was .pre8Md by the scene be painted.  "McNish escaped, I presume?" I  asked the question more to relieve the  tensity of the silence which ensued,  than because of any doubt on tbis  point.  "McNish escaped," be echoed.  "And no one else?"  "The Eurasian'cook escaped, too.  He broke out of his galley. Hastily he  patched together a raft and reached  land a week later, more dead than  alive."  "And all the rest���������those ninety-seven deluded, tricked countrymen of  lyours���������perished ?"  "To a man."  "Then the graphic description you  have juBt given me, came���������how? From  Whom? Certainly not from the cook,  Whcwas locked in the galley?"  'Tartly from the cook, yes," he answered, unmoved. "And partly from  one to whom McNish, himself, described his own crime."  The Vice Consul here added a word.  "Moreover," he said, and his accent  tsvas in marked contrast with the merchant's perfect English, "we have corroborative evidence. It happened that  the lorcha 'sank in what you call  shoal water. Six months later, she  was declared a menace to shipping.  [Under ordinary conditions she would  have been dynamited where she was.  But because of the tragedy, she was  al-  ralsed, and examined; and the hole in ,  .h?r bow proved the truth of what we  had heard."  In spite of the seriously Impressive  manner of my informants I was fair  from credulous. Such a crime might  have been perpetrated, but I questioned-that the perpetrator, for his  skin's sake, if for no "other reason,  would ever have admitted the deed,  much less haye truthfully detailed the  manner of its commission.  But, even admitting that there was  neither Invention nor misrepresentation in the narrative, I was now more  than ever convinced that Robert Cameron had no part in It, and that in  placing even the slightest blame upon  him an egregious error had been com-  Imltted. *  "What you tell me," I said, at length,  '"la very interesting, but I do not see  iJust how it applies to my tortured and  *now missing friend."  ' The Vice Consul In an unguarded  'moment forgot himself.  ��������� "You no can see?" he queried, lapsing for the nonce Into the vernacular.  "I certainly can not."  Mr. Yup Sing Indulged ln the shadow  of an ley smile.  "Your friend, Mr. Clyde," he said,  with a brief impressive pause between  each word, "and Donald McNish are  one and tbe same man."  Up to this point I had maintained  my poise. I had listened with feigned  respect and denied myself the satisfaction of interruptions. But at this preposterous claim, I could contain myself no longer. Before the slowly  apoken sentence'"was complete I had  sprung up, restless with Impatient Indignation, my blood throbbing ln my  temples, my hands Itching to throttle  an honest man's traducers.      ,..  "That," I cried, hoarse with exasperation, "is a damnable lie!"  If I expected retaliation I was disappointed. .��������� Yup Sing's seamed yellow  face continued an Immobile mask for  whatever emotion he may have felt,  and Chen Mok placidly consulted his  memoranda.  "Robert Cameron," I went .on, my  paBsion whetted by their indifference,  "has been a gentleman of leisure and  fortune always. Of all men in the  world he is the last to be accused of  such a crime as this. A seafaring mas!  A smuggler of coolies! It is too preposterous even for discussion. And  I want to tell you now^ Mr. Yup, and  you, too, Mr. Chen, that I shall leave  no stone unturned to bring to justice  those who are guilty of having made  this unthinkable mistake. Hitherto I  have been unable to get a clew. But  what you have said tonight does away  with that difficulty.   Both of you shall  answer, now, to the authorities."  As I spoke I edged toward an electric push-button, at the side of the  chimney-piece, and at the last word, I  pressed it.    -r'  ;} That Checkabeedy, foHowinjRnr instructions, had remained within close  call was demonstrated by his prompt  appearance. -   V  "Telephone the police station," I  commanded, "to send two officers here  at ohce." ���������  CHAPTER XXHl.  A Tattoo Mark. -,\  Though i spoke In my ordinary tone,  tbe visiting Celestials gave no sign  that they heard me. I had expected  protestation. I should not have been  surprised had I been forced to restrain  them���������to make them prisoners,' in fact,  until the arrival of the police. But  neither of them either moved or spoke,]  until the silence, in my nervoubly excited condition, becoming unbearable  tome, I demanded: '  "By what right, Mr. Yup, do i you  make the assertion tbat my friend and  your enemy are 000?''      ���������        :     <  /With a supercilious arrogance of  manner that maddened me to the limit  of self-control, be made.j-eply.  "I was coming to that, Mr. Clyde,;  when you bo unfortunately lost your  temper. In stating the purpose of our  visit I think I informed you that It wasV  two-fold. In the first place, we came;  to give what, you bad asked for���������lnfojy  matlon. In the second place, we camel  to request something from you���������as-l  slstance. The motive of the threaten-!  tag letters which Mr. Cameron re-;  celved, I think I have made clear. For'  sixteen years my people, the kinsfolk]  of the victims of tbe Sable Lorcha,:  have searched the world for tbe fiend]  who brought upon them a sorrow be*!  yond any that you of the Occident can.  understand. To, us of the Celestial  .Empire tbe tombs of our fathers are  Very dear., McNish robbed these men  hot only of life but of decent burial."  "That Is all very well," I exclaimed,,  fmpatlently, "but can't you see that a  terrible mistake has 'been made? Why  under heaven you should fancy that in  Mr. Cameron, a gentleman to his finger-tips, you have found this outlaw  McNish is incomprehensible."  Once more Yup Sing smiled his icy  imile and the Vice Consul made as if  to speak, but thinking better of it, apparently, maintained his stolid silence.  "You were coming to that," I urged.  "The man to whom McNish boasted  of his deed was the man who Identified,  him. They had been partners in the  Par East in the trade of smuggling  coolies. The one, I have no doubt,;  was no better than the other; yet we!  believe that our informant was neither  directly nor Indirectly concerned in  the particular piece of brutality of  which I have told you. Eventually, he"  and McNish quarrelled and parted. For!  some years he lost all trace of him;I  and then by accident, one day he came!  upon-him, here in America, living in a  palace on Long Island Sound and masquerading under a new name."  "A resemblance!" I cried, ln a passion of Indignation. "A mere resemblance! And on that you and your  people conspire to torment and abduct a, purely innocent man. Was ever  Address by Dr. McKim=-"VVhy We Are Protestants"  (Continued from Page 2)  of men to be of equal authority with the written  Word of God, she really exalts tradition above  the Word, by making that the rule of interpreta-  tioni  The False Decretals  Let me give you an example to show how far  the traditions to which the Church of Rome appeals are to be depended on. In the ninth century a tremendous forgery arose, under the name  of the Isidorian decretals, consisting of nearly one  hundred letters, written in the names of earlier  bishops of Rome, together with certain spurious  writings of other church dignitaries, and acts of  hitherto unknown councils. These documents  were eagerly seized upon by Nicholas I., who was  Pope at that time, and by him and his successors  were made the instrument of; completely revolutionizing the constitution of the church, and developing the papal power, from a mere primacy, into  an absolute ecclesiastical despotism. For centuries these false decretals were accepted as genuine;  but for over three hundred years their true character has been known, and they have been on all  hands admitted to be a forgery, and a very clumsy  forgery at that Even the most extreme partisans of Rome now admit this,���������indeed, the popes  themselves have admitted it, yet the radical  changes "Which they were the instruments of in-  troducing^remain.  Now,' one cannot help asking, What dependence is to be placed on the traditions which the  Church of Rome professes to have preserved since  the time of the apostles, if she thus accepted for  so many centuries this gross forgery, and made it  the support and foundation of doctrines and  -usages she has insisted on as vital to the true constitution of the church? And this is only one of  numerous examples in which the infallible Church  of Rome has accepted, and magnified the authority  of documents which have subsequently been  proved and admitted to be forgeries. But if she  is thus incapable of distinguishing the true from  the false in the writings and documents of her  own!-bishops and synods, how are we to trust her  when she presents us with alleged traditional  handed down from the age of the apostles ? And  how can we do otherwise than protest against her j  impiety when we see the plainest declarations of j  the Sacred Scriptures made void by her pretended]  traditions ? In our Saviour V time the Pharisees 1  appealed to tradition, but our Lord made his!ap-/f  peal ever to the Scriptures. He changed themj  with transgressing the commandments of God by I  their traditions. His words to them are most ap-/]  plicable today to the Church of Rome: "ThusJ  have ye made the commandment of God of none j  effect by your tradition." Matt. 15:6. J'In vain]  they do worship me, teaching for doctrines thei  commandments of men." Verse 9. He said to]  the Jews, "Search^the Scriptures." He never!  said, Search your traditions.  There are the words, and there is the author-j  ity, of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ against]  the method which the Church of Rome adopts ir  asking us to accept her traditions as the basis oi  doctrine.  Roman Catholic Interpretation of Scripture  But again, the Roman Catholic hierarchy  teaches that the Bjble is to' be accepted only ac|  cording to the sense which the church puts upoi  it. Now, perhaps you would like to haye a sampl 1  or two of the interpretations of this infallibll  church. Well, here is one of many that might bjf  given. What do you suppose is the chief passag  relied upon to establish the;; dogma of papal ii  fallibility? Here it is in our fjord's words to Sj]  Peter: "Satan hath desired to have you, that hj  may sift you as wheat; but I have prayed' f0  thee, that thy faith fail not; and when thou ai  converted, strengthen thy brethren" Luke 2������  31-32. This, we are told by Romanist interpretei  since Pope Agatho, A.D. 680, contains the grai  of special privilege to the bishops of Rome as su<;  cessors^of St. Peter. And this, although not onJ  of the eighteen Fathers who comment upon tha  passage gives any hint of such an interpretation]  (To be continued.)  ���������nob an outrage heard of! Every One  jot you shall pay dear for this error."  I might have been the fire wood  sputtering on the hearth for all the effect my vehemence had ; upon tbat  precious'pair of Mongolians.!  "We understand," the spokesman resumed, "that your friend managed in  Some way to escape from his captors,  and is now in this house."  '���������Yes/''" I resumed, hotly. "He's here,  more dead than alive unfortunately;  but be is coming around slowly and  will be quite able to testify when the  time comes." '  "Mr. Chen Mok," he proceeded,  jcalmly, "has communicated with the  (state Department at Washington, and  She United States authorities are now  >nly waiting: burTwo'rd to put your  ;ood, gentlemanly friend under arrest,  jMr. Clyde, tor the crime be committed on. the high seas, sixteen-- yeaw  iago."  For a moment I stared at them In  Silent amazement.  "You're both mad," I exploded at  ���������length, "both crazy. Do you think for  one moment I believe such rot as  that? Even if what you say were possible���������and n isn't���������you would have to  [Identify the accused by something bet-  Iter than the mere word of a man who  ihadn't seen blm for years. Of what  :use would such an Identification be  against the testimony of Mr. Cameron's life-long friends?" N  "Since you doubt our ability to  Wontlfy," was Mr. Tup's prompt re-  Joinder, "I may add tbat there are two  marks of Identification, which must, I  think, convince even yourself."  ��������� {laughed grimly. So that was their  fame!_ For nearly a month Cameron  Ibad t>een their prisoner. In that time  they had examined, Inspected, Inventoried biro. Hia scars, moles, birth-  marks bad been Hated, and were now  to be used to identify .Mm wltli a renegade murderer of Chinese coolies.  I told my slant-eyed visitors that  their trick was transparent. Put they  only looked at me with an expression  which seemed half pity and half contempt, -v,  "Did you ever observe a tattoo mark  on your friend's left forearm?" asked  Mr. Chen Mok. \  "Never," I answered.  "He has one there."  "I am willing "to^wager something  valuable he hasn't a tattoo mark anywhere on his person," I retorted*, "and  PlI prove it in live minutes."  "Wo shall be glad to haw tao  proof," said Yup Sing.  Once more I pressed tho button at  the side of the chimney-piece, and  once again Checkabeedy appeared tn  the doorway.  "You telephoned?" I asked.  "Yes, sir."  "Very good, now send Mr. Bryan to  sn* here, at once." Then turning to  jCameron's accusers, I explained: "Mr.  Bryan, for whom I have just sent, Is  nursing my friend. Ho would naturally know if what you say is true."  To my surprise they made no demur.  Yup. Sing, however, asked that he  might be permitted to put to the nurse  the necessary questions, and as I was  perfectly confident that no lncriminat-  ilng answers could be given, no matter  what the form of catechism, I willingly acceded.  Had I not played tennis and golf  "with Cameron scores of times on hot  summer days when, with shirt sleeves  irolled above his elbows, his forearms  were bared to view? Could there by  any possibility have been a tattoo  mark there, and I not have seen it?  Mr. Bryan came quickly, a little puz-  sled, seemingly, at being called to  Such an audience. Purposely I kept  'Silence, merely waving an introductory  hand toward the two Chinamen.  Yup Sing tactfully explained the situation.  -������:- Next W������ek.)  t "'" :    .  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'  The 1914 sessions will be held in Wichita,  Kansas, U. S. A., October 7-17. The preparedness of Wichita,, a city of 64,000 people, is unquestioned. The organization foresees an excellent relationship with the city offWichita and  the state of Kansas 'during the year. The city  has ample railroad facilities; its location is excellent ; agricultural conditions surrounding it  make the work of the Congress entirely consistent, and the facilities for housing both the Congress and Exposition are so excellent as to he  very gratifying, indeed. The Congress will be  held in the Forum, a municipally owned building,  which seats 6,000 people, and is a great modern  auditorium, one of the largest in the West. With  it, are the Exposition grounds, much, of whose  housing facilities are already in permanent existence. The nearness and the excellence of the  location cannot be overlooked.  WHAT AILS  AULD SCOTLAND  SCOTLAND'S NEW BIRTHRATE  Marquis Wheat Offer  Wichita, Kansas, March 13,1914.  My Dear Sir:��������� '';>���������_,  I want to call your attention to some prize  wheat seed. I am sure you will be interested in  it and will want some. -  At Tulsa, last October, Paul Gerlach, of Al-  latl, Saskatchewan, Canada, took the first prize  for the best bushel of hard wheat, securing a  Rumley threshing machine, worth $1,250.   .  This wheat is Marquis, which has broken all  records in the Northwest for quantity and quality  of yields under0 dry land conditions. The sample  tested 71 pounds per bushel.  This wheat is now our property, and we have  devised the scheme of dividing^ it into small lots  and auctioning it to the highest bidder, the proceeds to go to the support of the Congress.    .  This auction will be April 1. Until that time,  I shall receive bids for one full pint each. There  will be 64 lots and not more than two pints will  be sold to any one farmer. No price has been  set. A certificate will accompany the wheat.  Money sent by those who are not successful bidders will be returned.  Don't you want some of this wheat, which, in  three years' time should produce enough to plant  a good sized field? "���������'���������'  Very sihcerely'yours,  s B.H. FAXON,  Secretary Treasurer.  The International Dry-Farming Congress.  Serious people are shaking their  heads over the announcement that  Scotland's birthrate for 1913, which  was 25.5 per thousand, is the lowest  yet recorded and no less than 28.4  per cent, less than 1876, the maximum  year, the natural increase of the year,  that is the excess of "births over  deaths was 47,476 which is 2,903 less  than in the previous year, 4,487 less  than the average naturaj increase of  the preceding five years and 6,199  less than the mean of the last ten  years. Such a position cannot be regarded with equanimity. We will be  told that the love of pleasure and  ease accounts for the smaller families.  No doubt the increased cost of living  isjilso a factor. Good trade has resulted in a record,marriage rate for  the year, and it is gratifying to notice  that the death rate from tuberculosis  is 12 less than in 1910 and 42 less than  the mean of the years 1901-10, while  that for phthisis is 7 less than in 1910  and 31 less than the mean rate of the  tenK years. Healthier conditions and  a wider knowledge of the methods  by which the disease can be fought  are no doubt responsible for this very  considerable improvement.  MIXED BATHING '  FOR ST. ANDREWS  St. Andrews, hot without some hesitation, has decided to have mixed  bathing. Dean di Guild Grubb was  quite shocked, and declared that the  proposal would offend the susceptibilities of both ratepayers and visitors. Mixed bathing had been a-  dopted on the Continent, but he did  not regard that as any reason for introducing it in St. Andrews. Their  city was a university city, and he did  not think that mixed bathing would be  an honor. But the City,Council had  no fear, and this summer there will be  family bathing parties' at the Step  flock.  ST. SAVIOUR'S CHURCH.  z-   (Anglican.)  Corner of First Avenue East and  Semlin Drive, Grandview.  SUNDAY SERVICES ���������Morning  prayer and Holy Communion the first  and third Sundays of tbe month at 11  I a. m.; morning prayer every Sunday  at 11 a. m.; Holy Communion 2nd and  prayer    every Sunday at 7:30 p. m.  GENERAL NEWS ITEMS    t  OBUISEE MALASPINA CAPTURES  SEATTLE HALIBUT FISHBOAT  A radio telegram from the fisheries cruiser  Malaspina/Capt. Newcombe, at sea, gave the news  that the Malaspina had captured the Prince Olaf, <  an American fishing schooner with her fishing  gear down, inside the three-mile limit. The cruiser  wired that she was towing the captured fishboat  into Prince Rupert.   .  The Prince Olaf is probably one of the new  gas halibut fishing schooners operating from Seattle, carrying six dories and twelve fishermen.  Fishing vessels of this class cost to build about  $12,000, There is a Canadian Prince Olaf, a small  vessel used as a cannery tender on the Skeena  .river. '-���������������������������'  The Malaspina iff one of the new fishery cruisers lately built in Dublin for the protective service on this coast- The Galiano, her sister ship, arrived here some time after the Malaspina. She is  cruising outside Vancouver island.. Both vessels/  are capable of a speed of fourteen knots, and are  armed with a rapid-firing gun mounted on the  forward deck. Capt. Newcombe. the commander  of the Malaspina, formerly commanded the fishery  cruiser Kestrel, which was sold to a South Sea  island trading company, tnd is now in the island  \ service.  12 U. 8. RESEBVE BANKS  Under New Currency Law Republic Will Be Divided Into Twelve Banking Divisions  Washington, April 2.���������After three months of  consideration the reserve bank .organization committee tonight announced that it has divided the  continental United States into twelve banking  districts and selected twelve cities where Federal  reserve banks are to be located under the new  currency lawr The cities and districts follow:  District No. 1, Boston; 2, New York; 3, Philadelphia ; 4, Cleveland; 5, Richmond; 6, Atlanta;  Chicago; 8, St. Louis; 9, Minneapolis; 10. Kansas  City; 11, Dallas; 12, San Francisco.  BLACKFEET INDIANS ARE THE  WEALTHIEST PEOPLE IN  CANADA AND SECOND WEALTHIEST IN THE WORLD  The.most of these Indians are resident in  Southern Alberta. The total of the Blackfoot Indians, including an average yearly income, is $10,-  987,250, second only to the wealth of the Osage  Indians of Kansas. Fortunately the bulk of this  wealth is held in land, implements, fencing, building, live stock, etc., so that the Indian cannot  squander his immense wealth.  ,t}ll|||jH|llfrl|li;.i;il(M}ll|ll(ll}H|l>}������l|4.(������l|l������t4ty  Six Pays a w^ek fa  uno wm mm m  m  mm n mm  it  |v  Every morning during tfre week The  h.   Qhicago Daily Tribune ^  plete. Moving Picture Story based on  one of the Moving Picture Plays being  shown in Chicago and in the cities, towns and villages t  in the vast territory surrounding Chicago.  The Play selected for each morning's story is the one  , which The Tribune's Moving Picture Editor has selected  as the best of all those being shown that day. You can  read the Moving Picture Stories every nwning ������nd then  as these fascinating plays are exhibited in your locality  your enjoyment of them will be doubled and trebled  BECAUSE YOU HAVE READ THE STORY,  THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE  not only gives you a complete Moving Picture Story  EVERY DAY during the week, but it also gives you  on Sunday, in serial form, the greatest Moving Picture  Story ever written, " They Adventures of Kathlyn," by  Harold MacGrath, the thrilling romance from which has,  been produced the famous "KATHLYN" Moving Pictures which all Chicago is standing in line to see.  Read the Daily Moving Picture  in the Chicago Tribune  Read "Tfie Adventures of Kathlyn" in The Chicago Sunday Tribune  V''  L< >  [< ���������  r ���������  80,000 Acres Between McBride and  Fort George to Be Open for Preemption���������Bustling Town in Productive Valley.  Victoria, B. G, March 31.���������Eighty  thousand acres of land adjacent to  the Grand Trunk Pacific railway,  which is to be completed from ocean  to ocean on April 10, a large proportion bordering on ithe railroad, will  be opened to pre-emption in the valley of the South Fork of the Fraser  river in June, according to an announcement made���������yesterday by-the  Hon. William R. Ross, Minister of  Lands.  When the work of building the  Grand Trunk. Pacific railway was begun this valley, which contains a  large amount of agricultural land,  favorably situated,, was placed in reserve. In 1907 a reserve was created  under which a strip -of six miles covering the valley was reserved for the  pre-emptor. Now that the railroad  is completed the agricultural lands are  being opened to the settler.  The land to be opened to settlement is in two parts, the eastern half  stretching on either side of McBride.  the young city 90 _ miles from the  eastern border of the province, where  a divisional point has been created.  Car shops, large yards, etc;? arc being  built, and a city is in its infancy. The  western half stretches from Willow  Station on the G. T. P., not far east  from Fort George to join the other  part of the tract. ^  Bustling Young Town.  The lots in the eastern half will be  opened to entry by pre-emption at  McBride on June 1 at 9 a. m., a special office being opened there by the  Land Commissioner of _Jhe district  for one week in order to give those  who seek a homestead there an opportunity to file theitf records at the  nearest ''city to the land, and, after a  week records will be made at the office of the government agent for the  district at Fort George. The lots in  the western half Will be opened to  entry by pre-emption on June 15 at  9 a. m. at the office of the government agent at Fort George.  , McBride, where the lots in the  eastern half will be opened for a  week, beginning at 9 a. m. on June  1, was the first townsite laid out in  the district, and the first postoffice  in the district was created there.    It  is a bustling young town, and, as it  is in the heart of the agricultural  land, is expected to become a great  center. It is 145*miles from Fort  George, 90 miles from the eastern  border of the province and 345 miles  from Edmonton.  The town, named in honor of British Columbia's Premier, is both the  passenger and freight-divisional point  and a large amount of money has  been expended by the railway com-]  pany to make preparations for the future,- alHts-xonstruction=-being-of-a  large type. Thie yards cover eight  miles; and the station, yards, roundhouse, shops, etc., are the largest between Winnipeg and Prince Rupert.  The G. T. P. have a hospital, and  there are few permanent buildings,  the number of which is being increased. There are some rooming  houses and three or four well stocked  stores.  Farming and Lumbering.  The valley of the South Fork of  the Fraser in which the large area of  land, set aside, when the railroad was  begun, and held until transportation!  facilities were provided for the pre-  emptor, varies in width from one to  two miles in its upper part at Tete  Jaune Cache to five miles at McBride,  six at Goat river, and about ten miles  at the Canyon. It lies at a mean altitude of 2250 feet above sea level.  The main industry of a great part  of the valley, other than farming, will  be lumbering, and this should reach  considerable proportions. There is a  large amount of good timber, and the  lumber mills built to handle it, together with the towns along the railroad between Fort George and Mount  Robson park, which, before long will  prove a great tourist resort reached  from the west. through this valley,  should prove a ready market for farm  produce from this district. A large  mill with a maximum daily capacity  of 100,000 .feet has been built by the  Upper Fraser River Mills Company  at Mile 14, near Dome creek. Another big mill is projected for Mile  128, and a number of other sites are  being sought for mill purposes.  A pamphlet descriptive of the district, with special maps showing the  various lots which will be available  for pre-emption in this valley in June,  is now being prepared, and will shortly be issued by the Department of  Lands.  ������\> | M 'M"M"H "I ���������|"M'<'<''M''M"M"H''|'  ������S4ffTY rmsf  Has been the watchword of The  Mutual from the day it was organized in 1869 up to the present  time.  Only those forms of investment  ��������� .consistent with the absolute security of policyholders have been  adopted.  The result is an institution that  ; is among the most stable in the  , Canadian Financial World.  ' Business in force over $87,000,000  Assets over. : 22,000,000  Surplus over    3,4800,000  The Nu!������������l life Aitansda  It would be'a business mistake  for YOU to place your application  with any company without consulting our Agents and familiarizing yourself with the model  policies issued by  Investigation costs nothing and sarei  regreta  Write, phone or call for rates, etc.  Wm. J. Twiss, District Mgr.  317-319 to������ir������ m%.   TilMiw, p, C.  Herbaceous Plants  for Spring Planting  ALSO  GLADIOLUS  All in first class condition.  Prices moderate.  Heeler's Nursery  Corner 15th & Main St.  PHONE Fairmont 817  South Vancouver Undertakers  Hamilton  Bros.  We are foremost in our line for  Moderate Priced Funerals  S27I Frmr strut Pint Fnstr 19 ,        "    ,  *    <-    -, ������������������<?  ���������T-������������M      *>���������    "��������� -.I4f-  IT'  .-     '���������������'  ���������t������MW!MW������JJW������������IW  THR WESTERN CALL  Friday, April 10,1914  MISCELLANEOUS  PRINCE RUPERT LAND SOLD  English Capitalists Buy 764 Acres of Waterfront  Land in Northern Harbor for $217,500  Prince Rupert.���������The Grand Trunk Pacific Development Company has sold 764 acres of land  across the harbor, including foreshore rights, to  Mr. Morten Prewen and associates in England for  $217,500.  A very remarkable index of the temperance  trend of the present day business management is  on the face of every deed which the Santa Fe  railroad makes out for lots in the new town of  Riverbank, Cal., which it is establishing as a division point on its California lines. The terms  of conveyance make it impossible for liquor ever  to be sold on the townsite- The Santa Fe requires  its men to keep away from the saloons, and with  admirable consistency it proposes to make it easy  for the men who live in Riverbank at least to observe the rule.  N. t. R. COMMENT  One of G. P. Graham's chief grievances lies in  the fact that the Borden government gave to the  world the awfuf details of the carnival of waste  on the Transcontinental.    Natural enough.   The  Laurier government was very strong on covering  things up and keeping down lids. They never  did like to have the light turned on, and, in view  of what is now known, can you blame them?  The Staunton-Gutelius Commisison found that  the Transcona shops were far too big for the requirements of the Transcontinental. The vast-  ness of these shops was illustrated in the Graham  "defence." When the ex-Minister got into these  shops in the course of his Marathon oration it  was a couple pf hours before he was able, to find  his way out again.  Hon. George P. Graham made i profound impression when he argued that the G- T. P. would  not have to pay rental on seven years' accumulated interest on the Transcontinental, but that  the forty-one millions involved would have to be  put up by the taxpayers of Canada. This was  part of his "defence.''  VEL0fJfTTE8~~  ��������� high wind travelB from 80 to 45  miles an hour; a hurricane 80 to 100  miles an hour.  The velocity of the earth on its axis  exceeds 1,000 miles an hour; around  the sun it is 66,000 miles an hour; the  velocity ot Ihe moon Is 2 fill miles an  hour.  Sound travels through air at 1,000  feet a second; through water 840 feet  a second; along steel wire 17,180 feet  a second.  Electricity travels along wires above  {ground at 24,360 miles a second.  1    light, the swiftest of all* travels at  186,770 miles a second.  Pressmen's Ball and Whist Drive  Vancouver Printing Pressmen's Union No. 69 will  give a Whist Drive and Dance on the Evening of Friday April 17th, at 8 P.M. at the Labor Temple, for  the purpose of raising funds to send a representative  to the Hale Springs, Tehnesee, convention in June, to  represent Vancouver and British Columbia in general.  A pleasant evening is assured. Valuable prizes for  the whist drive are on exhibition atO. B. Allen's Jew-  elery store.. Refreshments. Everybody Welcothe.  Tickets, Gents 75c Ladies 25c.  ������  t  i  ������!���������  ./  1  i  Government of British Colombia Land Sale  There will be .offered at public auction in the cities of Vancouver,  Victoria and Prince George, British Columbia, the Government Holdings  in the Townsites of Prince George, Fort George anVl South Fort George,  comprising in all 2,350 lots.  Dates of sales���������  May 19, 20 and 21, Vancouver  May 26 and 27, Victoria  June 9,10 and 11, Prinze George  For full particulars, descriptive literature and maps, apply���������  Armstrong & Ellis  Selling Agents for Government of British Columbia  Head Office: 804=5 Birks Bldg., Vancouver, B. C."  WHAT IT SHOWED  "Gentlemen," said the quack doctor,  ,who waa trying to get together some  money.:for Christmas, "I have sold  these pills In your market-place for  the past ten years. Never during that  period have I had a single complaint  about t^c��������� " -*��������� does that prove  to you, gentlemenT* \ | j**?H  ; i   i������ .... proves that dead  men tell no tales," replied aa onlooker as ha moved away.  Alert Advlt Bible Class of Moua  tain View Methodist Church meets at  2.30 every Sunday.     Visitors will be  made welcome.     8. Johnston, presi  dent.  X  Empress Theatre  Easter Sunday Afternoon  3:00 p.m.  Splendid Program of  Music and Song  ���������������H������H^fr'H*HMfr#.H..M,.M..|..fr3.4"H,.}..fr  '* X  Pease Pacific Foundry Limited f  HEATING AND VENTIUTiNQ ENGINEERS  ii  MANUFACTURERS  99 Steam Heaters and Ventilators for Public Buildings  ������������������-���������-������������������ - iation Furj  Registers  99 Steam and Hot Water Boilers  Radiators, Pipe and Fittings  ii r* .^ 9������ Steam Heaters and Ventilators for Public Builc  riCnnfllTlV       Warm Air Furnaces ��������� Combination Furnaces  . Kvvuvuij        Steain ^Hot WaUsr Boilers. Regiatera  ;   1136 Homer St.      Vancouver, B. c.     Tel. Sey. 3230 ];  ���������������;���������:; 4r  4^4{������lJ4^t4J44J4<gtl|4^44J44J������l|4lfi4J������4J4<jl44J44J4^4������}44}44|������l|������<jl4Jl4J������4^lJ4<{.<jt<g,^^  JOS. tt. BOWMAN  ARCHITECT  | 910-11 Yorkshire Building  | Seymour Street Vancouver, B. C.  lJ..*.4.^*..*.lJa^.4{V4*4.*MjM*^4^44{44{4^44{M*.4.<<.^������4^44{4^  The Salvation Army Band  White Robed Junior Chorus  Solos by Ensign and Lieut. Mardall  Kamloopa-Vanoouvor Moat Co., Ltd.  Oor. Main and Powell Stm. 1649 Main Street  Phone Seymour 6561 Phone Pair. 1814  For Choice Meats  of large variety and reasonable prices, this house  cannot be excelled.   It stands to the very front.  4j44$44{l������^4S>������{a4^4{������$M^.g>^4������^^24^4������������|4$������.3.444$4*^       ^^������{M^M^^M|.^^mJm^^^M{.^m{������^.^44^4.}4  fytyfrfy%>ty$H$ll$l<%HJltylfrtfHi!^  Address oh  -'Triumphs of the  By Major Nettie Simco  ALL WELCOME  Preliminary Song Service led by  Songster Brigade at 2:30.  Shore Lumber Co.  5:  LIMITED $1  I Lumber Manufacturers  1 Front St., Foot of Ontario St.  :--.   ������������������'������������������ '���������    ' '   ��������� ������������������ '���������'������������������,.  > ...���������'������������������...���������  j: PHONE Fairmont 154       VANCOUVER, B. C.  !���������  :   "v-V. ���������     : ,   ' ��������� *      '  '���������.      7   ���������   : :  ?���������������������������:'���������., .     .    .        ; '     '  ������ft4ti������fr.ji't',Miit''t'4t"M''l'M  i|ii|ii|ii|ii|ii|ii|ii|ii|if \\%% |-|t1"M<"1 T III tfrTVH T ill"! M1 TII'TTTriTTTt't ttttl I"I l"I T 1 \ I H f"t M'^'M'^'fr'M:iH''H,*J,l'',lvl1*^ i.itiiTiiiiifi>iiTti.til^iritil4������l.T.ltlrf.li.rf.iti4f.ii.if..fiifi.fi.|i^.|.f..T..f..)..y..|..|.,y..t..T..t..T..t..| yj^ ; j TT ,T..|.^.  ..  13500  Horse  Power  Turbine  t  t  ������  X  4-  13500  Horse  Power  Turbine  a  I  *  ��������� " The Spirit of the Time Demands *  Stave Lake Power is Dependable and Economical  By harnessing the Great Stave River we have made it possible to generate 100,000 horse power of electrical energy at our Stave Palls Plant,  the Biggest Electrical Feat in Western Canada.  100,000 HORSE POWER  Or hal������as^mucheagain as the combined connected load in steam and electricity in Vancouver today, a fact of great significance to local industries  Offices: 603-610 Carter-Cotton Bldg.  Phone: Seymour 4770  R. F. HAYWABD, General Manager  WESTERN CANADA POWER (XL Ltd.  JOHN   MONTGOMERY, Contract Agent  P.O. Drawer 1415  Vancouver, B.C  ��������� OHlMMIMMllllllMtMW--W>H-M-M4; I 111IIIIIIIIMMIM I "I 11II1HI1 * I MllllllfH M ������ M i"i M M'A"tA"l^>ll"V'M-i !������������������!���������>������ M-l ���������{������������������������.;���������.;������������������!��������� ^^^H^-^>>-������-?>^~i-^i~>>V^?-������������t 4"! 1 * *���������'������ **Vh>ll H-!������������������������ I-H !��������� 1������������

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