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The Western Call 1914-03-20

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 u  Subscribe for  The Western Call  today  Published in the Interests of Greater Vancouver and the Western People  VOLUME V.  VANCOUVER, British Columbia, MARCH 2p, 1914  5 Cents Per Copy  No. 45  Gold 1M& in South Vancouver Broken at Last  Critical Situatioif at Ottawa Over Railroad Affairs���������Sir Richard McBride Hurrying to the Capital  Bank of Vancouver thoroughly Jfe^ Capital  PEACE NOW POSSIBLE  IN SOUTH VANCOUVER  As we go to press news has come from the  Municipal Hall on Fraser street that renders  needless much of our copy for this week's issue.''  All day (Wednesday) the Council had been debating' the question as to whether the paving  contract was to be gone on with as it stands or  fought out in the courts. A deputation of 19 men  from the Main Street Business Association waited  upon the Council in the morning, and sought to  impress them with the imperative necessity of  immediate action as regards the paving of Main  street. Ex-Reeve Kerr pleaded eloquently for  an unprejudiced examination of the terms of the  paving contract and the public setting forth of  any of the terms or conditions therein that were  in any way objectionable. He was followed by  Mr. R. Street, Mr. Prouse, Mr. Robson and several others. The council was closely divided,  Messrs. Gold, Twiddy and Thomas being strongly  against going on with the contract, Messrs. Rutt-  ledge, Winram and Stevens apparently as  strongly in favor of ii Mr. Rowlings held' the  balance, and was non-committal.  At noon the Council retired into committee  for final decision, and in the afternoon after  much careful consideration, "en camera," passed  the.resolution to begin paving section 1���������under  the paving contract at once. . ^ - f  It transpired during the morning session that  the Dominion Creosote Company had never refused to take the bonds as provided for in the  contract in payment for work done. They were  and are now willing to do so and always have  been. The only objection came entirely-from  the fiscal agents for reasons that are quite apparent. '"'.���������  The Western Call commends the decision as  the only fair solution possible, and trusts that the  bitterness evoked by the strong contest may  speedily disappear and a large body of men in  our municipality get to work at once.  BANS Of V.Atf0OUVE&  The Bank of Vancouver has entered upon a  new era. It is no easy matter for a new bank  to establish itself anywhere in Canada today.  The present banks are so strong���������so thoroughly  established the length and breadth of the land���������so  aggressive and jealous of their business that a  newcomer finds a cold welcome if.no actual opposition. .  Then again the Bank of Vancouver came into  existence on the last year of a very strong business" wave; ^"^ -~="-���������^---"���������-���������-���������-^-:--������������������  There has been considerable talk of ultimate  amalgamation with one or other of the large  banks, but all Vancouver will be glad that our  City and Province is to have a local bank.  The shareholders' meeting, held yesterday,  received with a warm welcome the news that  strong financial backing, up to as much as $500,-  000, had been arranged for���������and agreed gladly to  a re-arrangemerit of capital stock that will place  the bank on the soundest financial basis.  PATRICK THE UVANGBT4ST  Patrick, the Evangelist,has had another birthday. Patrick the Good was a Scotchman, born at  Kirkpatrick, near Glasgow, Scotland. He never  was a Roman, but a strong capable missioner of  the ancient Culdee church, which withstood Rome  in Briton for more than 1000 years. Patrick did  not convert the Irish from Paganism���������that work  had been done many centuries before his day, as  archaeological evidences abundantly prove. Patrick led a great revival of spiritual religion in Ireland, such as we all need so badly in Vancouver  and elsewhere in British Columbia. Patrick was  a thorough going Protestant preacher a little  ahead of time. You can get some of his sermons  in Latin or English by sending to the British and  Foreign Tract Society, London. There are many  traditions, myths and fables about Patrick, but  you can get the unadulterated truth as it fell  from his lips by sending for his sermons. Ireland  owes Patrick a debt of gratitude, and piercing  through all untruth, the people of Ireland still  venerate his name. ,  Katalla,. Alaska, March 18.���������The people here  are looking forward to the busiest season since the  shut down of the Guggenheim R. R. work, and  believe that Controller Bay is to become the  scene of great government activities at an early  date.  ������H������H4������:������*4HK"H'**������'H'������'H^H * ���������!������������������}��������� 'I ���������M"MI<''M'*������M>'M'4'4"I' -M'  Vale Mr. Gold  Thursday night, after one of the stormiest scenes  on record in the Hall, South Vancouver Council finally voted Mr. Gold and his "stop all work"policy into  the dump heap, thus confirming the work and vote  in committee.  ������ ^:^ypr^  SIR RICHARD McBRIDE  |..H'<"H''H'*'M'*MM'H'W|*4^  Our Correspondent at Ottawa  Ottawa, March 18.���������The C. N. R. situation is commanding univeisal attention here at  present, and there is much speculation as to what form the assistance will take, for it is generally accepted that something must be done. The present condition is the, direct outcome of the  reckless policy of the Laurier administration and imposes a grave responsibility on the present  government. It is clear that should the C. N. R. be allowed to default it ^ould result in a commercial (crash, involving thousands of small business firms from Halifax to Vancouver, and many  large concerns, including a leading bank and incidentally ruin the credit of the country, so it is  admitted that such a catastrophy must be averted. How this is to be done is a puzzle. There  is unanimity of opinion that Mackenzie, and Ma^^, deserve no consideration, and 'wljateyer assistance is given must be amply secured. The government are making an exhaustive investigation into affairs, and will shortly announce its policy which will secure Canada's credit at a  minimum of cost.  Sir Richard's Trip East  Our first citizen is on his way to Ottawa.  Many objects are attributed as the motive of  the visit., "Better terms," "Hindoo immigration," "Canadian Commissionership"���������all of  which doubtless have their part in calling our  busy Premier to the National Capital, but the  above grave dispatch to the "Call" from our  own correspondent at Ottawa is undoubtedly the  chief reason. Those who are on the inside know  how near we were, last year, to a world-wide  panic. Chief among the factors were the  Canadian and Brazilian Railroad complications.  That it was avoided--and that only by a  handbreadth��������� was due to the careful dividing up  of the burden amongst those who could bear it.  The policy of the Liberal press in worrying  the Borden government at this time over the aid  that must be given to the Canadian roads under  construction is akin to "Nero fiddling whilst  Rome was burning."  We trust that Sir Richard's presence at Ottawa in these critical days will bring strength to  the council of the wise. Speaking of the. commissionership, the whole West would rejoice to see  Sir Richard McBride appointed, and we believe  his appointment would mean much for the whole  of Canada. In many ways, however, Sir Richard  can ill be spared by British Columbia.  CONGRATULATIONS FOR  OUR MEMBER AT OTTAWA  We congratulate H. H. Stevens, M.P., for Vancouver, on the stand he intends taking with a view  to settlement of future disputes between labor and  capital. Mr. Stevens instances the case of the  labor troubles at Nanaimo and expresses the  opinion that neither the Provincial nor Dominion Governments exhausted their powers to bring  about a settlement. He said that Avhile some who  were'guilty had been punished there were others  who were just as guilty who had got off. He is  on the right traek when he suggests making both  employers and employed responsible parties to  agreements. Employers are now responsible and  labor organizations should be in the same position. International organizations should be required to keep funds raised in Canada in the  country, and these funds should be liable to damages for breach of agreement, as are the funds of  employers,���������Mining, Engineering and Electrical  Record.  Keep your face always toward the sunshine,  and the shadows will fall behind you.  Not until you make men self-reliant, intelligent and fond of straggler���������fonder of struggle  ls   than of help���������not till  then have you relieved  poverty.  DESPERATE CRISIS AT  HAND IN OLD IRELAND  The Home rule for Ireland movement is rapidly assuming the nature of a national crisis. All  thought of conciliation is dropped for the moment, and in the words of Winston Churchill,  the government will oppose "force with force."  Already the Royal Irish Constabulary are being  concentrated upon Belfast, and the government  is credited with preparing a coup by which the  Ulstermen will be undone.  On the other hand, there is great activity at  the headquarters of "The Provisional Government," and every evidence of an ugly struggle is  on hand. A struggle that will awaken passions  that many have thought forever put to rest���������  that may shake and even rend the Empire.  The man or party that imagines that Ulster  will not fight���������has either left history unread or  is a modern-mad man���������and the same is true of  British Protestantism the world over. Protestantism has been drugged���������by a dose of false liberalism���������administered by modern quack doctors  ���������but the bone and sinew are still there and the  first Ulster blood shed will awaken the sleeping  giant.  The attempt to use military force on Irish  ! Protestantism will mean an ill-ending to what  \ has been otherwise one of the greatest govern-  'ments Britain has ever known.  LATEST NEWS FROM  ALBP OIL FIELDS  Evidences are accumulating that Northwest  Canada is about to open up perhaps the largest .  oil fields yet developed.   Whilst the work done so  far has hot yet resulted in finding oil within the  .  bounds of present transportation, yet the striking  of oil in Commercial quantities near Fort McKay  ���������where the formation outcrops has resulted in a  suppressed excitement over the whole situation  that is practically world-wide, and that in itself ,  accounts  partly  for  the  somewhat  premature,  boom in Southern Alberta.      '-;.-,-  We sub-join a report on the situation in Alberta from one who has just visited the field.  A few months ago   great   excitement   was  caused in the City of Calgary by the discovery of  a small deposit of oil in the Dingman well, which,  however, Was hot in commercial quantities.   This  strike was made at 1562 feet, and the well is being deepened  (according to the latest advices  having reached a depth of over 2200 feet) in the  hopes and belief that they are over a large body  of oil.   However, in the present state of developments of this field it is entirely a matter of depth,  and until this is proven up the situation is a speculative one.   In connection with this situation,  as it is at Calgary, the excitement which the strike  referred to has caused can be readily understood  and appreciated, when it is. realized what the  proving'u|> of a.big oil field would mean to Calgary in particular, and to Western Canada in  general.   However, the position is that in the excitement which has arisen there is altogether a  tendency to ignore" what   developments   have  taken place in other parts of the field, and as-  they have a very important bearing on the position it may prove interesting to attempt to recapitulate very briefly the present position of the  developments elsewhere, as in connection with  this situation and the efforts that are being made  to prove it up there is probably the biggest thing  in Canada at the present time as a successful  outcome would undoubtedly   revolutionize   the  whole of this Western country.   In the excitement generated by the Calgary strike comparatively little has been heard of the developments  which have been done in the northern part of the  Province, t Hough probably a better showing has  been obtained, ana even more justification for a  real development than was called for or warranted by the Calgary strike.   For instance, up  at Pelican R ipids, a well there has proven up the  existence ot an oil impregnated formation   extending for hundreds of feet, pointing to the existence in th \ immediate vicinity of a deposit of  oil to cause  hat impregnation.   The same condition was pro ���������en lip on the property of the American-Canadian Oil Company at Morinville, just  north of Edtt mton, where the well hai reached ������  depth of 335. feet with a showing that most impressively points to the fact "that they are above  oil" and that it is a matter of going to a greater  depth to reac'i the source from which that impregnation coiies.   At the present time there are  persistent run ws that the further development  of the Americt- n-Canadian position is to be taken  seriously in hi ud, and the present outlook certainly justifies the expectation that success will  be the outcome -1  (Continued on Pag* 8)  SETTLEMENT AT BAND  ���������^������������������5**2&4lV,*#V4^V">^V**4^**J*,*,j' *^+^tj..^+^+^.^+^+&.^.J*+������* ^*9^Kfl^*^Q^^^9S^^r^f^P^P^^^^^^O^^ ���������  New    Westminster,    March    17.���������  Steps to  close  up  the special  assize  were taken  this afternoon.    Pleas of  guilty    were    being    accepted    from     ,y  ������ a large number of miners, who will  T be   allowed   out   until   next   Monday  X when they will appear for    sentence.  T One man today declined to plead at  Y all and his case will be tried in the  4. usual manner. +'  ���������5������ .        ���������>  % %  % . : %  The above despatch indicates an approaching  end to the Island mining difficulties. The Olive  branch is waving and it is to be hoped that every  one concerned will help on the good work of  settlement. Soon our miners will all be back to  work, the bunkers full and British Columbia's  best pajdng business in full blast once again.  Speed the day. We need every bit of help to  drive away the last vestige of hard times.  Being forced to go to work and forced to do  your best will breed in you temperance and self-  control, dilligenee and strength of will, cheerfulness and content, and a hundred virtues which  the idle never know. P^SCrP^^^  '���������-.^���������^^���������'���������^''.'���������IK^  ������������������:v''^i\:'-^v;  THE WESTERN CALL!  Friday March 20, 1914  Law- Druggist  Wants to See You  SPRING  TONICS  Why should you take a  Spring Tonic? Because, during the winter you have been  living on a different diet to  that which you live on in the  summer. You have not been  getting the fresh green vegetables which keep the system in a healthy condition;  and, although you may not  know it, the system is  clogged and the blood full  of impurities. You simply  need to house-clean your sys  tem as you house-clean your  home.  We have in stock about all  the spring medicines on the  market.   But we would re  commend you to take one of  the following:  Nyal's Blood Purifier   $1.00  "    Spring Tonic      1.00  National Blood Purifier 1.00  Sulphur and Molasses     35c  law the  L������������ Building,       Broadway and M������ln  Phone Fairmorit 790  PHONE FAIRMONT 1852  (At it here since 1900)  HON. T. W. CROTHERS HITS BACK HARD  E. M. MacDonald of Pictou, N.S., Badly Shown Up  HON. T. W. CROTHERS  Minister of Labor  (A .Trust Company)  Works night and day.  Sundays and holidays.  Never gets tired.  Never falls sick.  Never requires repairs.  Never strikes.  Easy to take.  Is it Working for You?  fWfCIHYTSIAS^.TO-  AGREEMENTS  BOUGHT aw,  COLLECTED.  Short*  Loa.  Maul  *���������  Specially insured against burglary  and hold-ups.  NOTAKY PUBLIC  Dow, Fraser & Co.  LIMITED  317-321  Cambie Street  2313 Main Street  Between 7th and 8th Aves.  McKay Station, Burnaby  "The chickens are coming home to  roost," -said Sir Wilfrid Laurier the  other day in the House of Commons.  He was right.  E. M. Macdonald, Liberal M.P. for  Pictou, N.S., a corporation lawyer,  the representative of the iron and  steel interests of Nova Scotia, is the  latest chick. He is roosting now,  and he will likely roost for a long  time to come. Hon. T. W. Crothers  has put him on his perch and his feet  are stuck there with good strong glue  of his own manufacture.  E. M. Macdonald is now presented  to the public at large, and to the  miners of Nova Scotia, of whom he  poses as a friend, as the enemy who  directed the attack upon .their union.  There is no question about it. The  indictment is his own, in his own  handwriting and over his own signature. -' \  '",;'  THE WHOLE STORY.  In 1909 there was a strike of coal  miners in. progress in  Nova Scotia,  j.   G.   Gillies,    M.L.A.,    wired    the  Labour Department from Glace Bay,  N.S., as follows:  ,   "Five thousand employees Dominion Coal Company on strike  here.    Situation    looks    serious.  Important that you get here immediately and try to    effect    a  settlement."  What did E. M. Macdonald do?  On the very same day, July 7, 1909,  he wrote to Mackenzie King, who was  then Deputy Minister of Labour, advising him not to send a representative of the department to Glace Bay.  The letter reads:  "Let me, congratulate you up-  on the fact that you / were not  troubled with an election, and  that you have got into the saddle  without very much trouble.  "I have just been talking on  the phone with our mutual friend  Alex. Johnston, and our joint  opinion in regard to the situation  in Sydney is that at tbe present  stage it is not wise or prudent  ;^for=_you_to^.come_ down,r or_jtake���������^  part in the situation.  "There was a rumour in Sydney  that you were to be asked to  come down, and I am writing as  a result of my interview with  Johnston, to say that I think for-  the present that you should not  come down. We will advise you  a little later in the matter, and if  it can be possible for you to produce any result you can depend  upon our judgment in the  matter.  "I am writings you in case any  request has been made."  TELEGRAPH ALSO.  Macdonald felt he could not wait  for the letter to reach the Minister  of Labour. He was afraid that Mackenzie King might act in the meantime, so he sent the telegram also.  On July 13, 1909, the Minister of  Labour replied, stating that he did  not intend to take any action towards  settling the strike. The reason will  be shown later. Mackenzie King's  reply was:  "I have received your letter of  the 7th instant, confirming your  wire to the effect that it was  Alexander Johnston's wish and  yours that I should not take any  part in regard to the situation at  present.  "Though it was not my intention to intervene in any way, I  am glad you wired me promptly."  Of course, it was in the interest of  the men of the country that something should be done, but Mackenzie  King took this advice from E. M.  Macdonald and Alexander Johnston,  and did not send anybody to the scene  of the strike. Though there were five  thousand men on strike, and though  the Minister of Labour of the Laurier  Government received word from a  political friend that the matter was  looking very serious, he accepted the  telegram from Macdonald and Johns  ton, who stated that they thought it  better he should not go to the scene  of the strike���������  As a reward for what he did at  this time in the interests of the coal  owners, Johnston was made Deputy  Minister of Marine and Fisheries.  SHOULD BE JAILED!  But Macdonald went further. He  expressed the opinion that the striking miners of Nova Scotia should be  imprisoned. He insisted upon the  Government prosecuting these men  for having gone on strike. Take his  own words, written to the Minister  of Labour on August 14, 1909:  "The strike situation in Nova  Scotia has been summarized in  this way, that in Inverness, the  strike practically does not exist.  There are some men who are not  working, but these men are not  necessary to the adequate operation of the mines. In the Dominion Coal Company's works,  from which I have just returned,  the company are rapidly increasing their output, and the men .are  only being kept out on strike, at  least a great portion of them, by  tbe usual stories which the resources of the United Mine  Workers people supply to them,  of the fact that the company are  : going to settle and various reasons are given for this from week  to week.  "I do not doubt at all that the  company will be successful there,  and there may be a break very  shortly.... I think that the men will  eventually realize that the company will not, on any terms,  settle their compromise.  "The Springhill situation is one  I am not advised about, and is  really very serious. The situation at Inverness and the action  of the United Mine Workers is  a direct and absolute defiance of  the provisions of the Conciliation  Act, and I think it would be a  great mistake if the department  itself���������-riot the company or any  outside party or person���������did not  proceed against the United Mine  Workers people who came out bri  strike in disregard of that Act.:'  "I notice by the press that inquiries are being made by thfe;  department with reference to the  circumstances, and I am quite  ��������� sure that you will find the facts  to be that the strike is one which  is in contravention to the Act.  And can assure you of my fullest  support in so doing if you should;  arrange to have proceedings initiated. "It seems to me that the  effect of the department proceeding against this infraction of  Jheir. own law would be a very  good move in Nova Scotia."     '  . INSISTED ON ACTION. ,  This is the man who has been  showing so much concern for 'the  striking miners out in Nahaimo, so  far away; but when they got near  to where he lives he insisted upon  th������2_Government ^Pjrose^uting^them  and sending them to prison for  striking. He did' not quit with one  letter. He insisted, time and time  again, on the Government sending  to prison these men, who had gone  to prison in Nova Scotia, and still  he gets up in the House and manifests great v'concern for the miners  on Vancouver Island. He writes  again to Mackenzie King:  "At the present time public  opinion is strongly against the  ) strikers and against every one  who is connected with them, and  there is no question about their  desire to have,the matter speedily dealt with by a strong hand.  "In the event of your having  any proceedings I would suggest  that the matter be put in the  hands of some recognized lawyer  of ability, such as Mr. Roscoe,  of Kentville, who has been acting  for the Militia Department and  making some investigations in  that matter. I should be very glad  to hear from ydu in regard to  this matter."  KING WOULD NOT ACT.  So the militia" down there, looking  after the interests of the public, yet  the Minister of Labour would not  go to Glace Bay because his supporters, Messrs. Macdonald and Johnston, did not want him there just then  for political purposes.  But Mackenzie  King    would    not  prosecute.     He   declared    that    the  Government was    not    affected    by  the strike of    five    thousand people  in Nova Scotia at all!   And he would  not  send a  representative  from  the  department to try to settle the strike!  So  he  wrote  to  Macdonald  as  follows: ���������        .  "Where   a   province,   a   municipality, a company, individual or  set of individuals,  any    one    of  which may be adversely affected  is not prepared to lay information  against any individual or set of  individuals who are acting in a  manner prejudicial to their interests, when the law as it stands  affords them this measure of redress, it is difficult to see just  why the Federal Government,  which is the least remotely affected of all, should be expected to  take the initiative in entering a  prosecution.  "When the means of redress  are so ready at hand the most  obvious inference to be drawn  where no information is laid, is  either that interests are not being  seriously affected, in which case  it would be a mistake for the  Government to attempt prosecution; or that in the circumstances  known to the parties the law has  not been violated, in which case,  of course, a prosecution would be  of no avail."  KNOCKS THE MINERS.  Still Mr. Macdonald was not satisfied with that, and he  sent another  letter to Mackenzie King:  "I have your favour of the 17th  and note its contents. I am very  much obliged to you for the  frank way in which you have  written me in regard to the  matter. I do not agree with you  altogether, that the main motive  of the men who struck at Inverness was not openly to defy the  Act.   .    A  ���������������������������:.;'  "The idea has been generally  circulated by the Opposition  people that the Act was of no  force, or value, and whether they  desire to openly defy the Act, or  riot, they were, certainly very regardless of it.  "The United Mine Workers is  still maintaining an attitude of  hostility to the company, and the  men who compose the organizations are still out. Mn Moss,  one of the district officers, is  still in Inverness conducting the  strike.  "It does seem to me that on  the whole, it would be in the  best interests of the order and of  the public if the Government  should take steps, so that the  mining men should understand  that the United Mine Workers'  men should understand that this  Act is a serious proposition and  is not one that is to be openly  disregarded. I do not think you  need at all fear as to any injuries  resulting in the subsequent working out of the Act, and I am  quite satisfied this would be the  proper course to take from a  matter of standpoint."  MB. LEMJEUX PU3S LOYALIST  "JINGOES"  Sneering Allusion to Loyal Canadians  By a Liberal Ex-Minister.  Hon. Rodolphe Lemieux, who was  Postmaster-General in the Laurier  Cabinet, has placed the Liberal party  in the-anti-British class,-and opposed  to all ideas of Imperialism.  Speaking in the House the .other  day/ on Hindu immigration, ��������� he made  the following extraordinary statement, with a sneer on his lips:  "It is well known that in Canada  the only loyal people, or, to speak  according to the new Imperialistic  dictionary, the only loyalists are the  jingoes."  Very pleasant reading for the  Britishers in Canada. Because they  love the old land they are jingoes.  But Mr. Lemieux goes further.  "The only true Imperialists," he said,  "and therefore the only loyalists, are  the friends of ithe present Government."  And then Mr. Lemieux went on to  make a vicious attack upon Sir Richard McBride, Premier of* British  Columbia. For why? Because he is  an Imperialist. "Parades his Imperialism," declares Mr. Lemieux.  Mr. Lemieux is one of the accredited leaders of the Liberal party. He  sits on the second seat to Sir Wilfrid  Laurier's right in the House of Commons. He is regarded by some  people, especially by himself, as the  legitimate successor to Sir Wilfrid.  This Liberal leader, therefore,  should know what he is talking about  when he places the Conservatives in  the pro-British class and the Liberals  in the anti-British class.  It is just as well that the country  should know what is the political  situation in Canada regarding the  Empire.  HE WOULD HAVE ALL OF  THEM ADMITTED  E. W. Nesbitt, Liberal member for  North Oxford, stated in the House  a few days ago that he would admit  all the wives of the Hindus who were  polygamists and had settled in  Canada.  I City Press, Ltd.  203=207  way  COMMERCIAL  PRINTING  Your Printing Orders will  receive prompt and careful attention.  PHONE Fairmont 114o  and ask for our prices.  ADVERTISE IN THE WESTERN CALL  Office of THE WESTERN CALL  203-207 KINQSWAY, Cor. 8th Ave.  BUFFALO GROCERY  Commercial Drive am) Htb Avenue  "TWe Home of Quality"  Guaranteed Fresti  BestQuality  Groceries  j. P. Sinclair. Prop.   flMp.faiffllOIlt 1033  Real Estate  Insurance and loans  Phone Seymour 2552 441 Homer Street  Vancouver, B.C.  EXCHANGE  OR CASH   ~  I Jiave four lots at White  Rock, B. C.   What have you ?  APPLY TO Ota, WESTERN CALL  g������H������H4'*������4-4^4'*'H^'������*4"M"  f -v  Pritltino* Terminal City Press, Ltd.  I    1 1111111������    2414 Westminster Rd. Phone FairnioBt 1141 Friday, March 20,1914  THE WESTERN CALL  3  LAND ACT NOTICES  DAJTD ACT.  VAHOOUV8B LAUD DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Banff* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry Frank  Lazier, of Vancouver, occupation Salesman, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:������������������  ,. Commencing at a post planted 4 miles  distant in a Westerly direction from the  Northwest corner of Lot. 425; thence  80 chains North; thence 80 chains West;  thence 80 chains South; thence SO chains  East, to. the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 16th, 1914.  HARRY  PRANK LAZIER,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VAKCOVVEB  DABD   DXSTBXCT:  District of Coast Bangs X.  TAKE NOTICE    that Bert Minor, of  Vancouver, occupation Engineer, intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands :������������������  Commencing at a post about two  miles distant, and in a Westarly direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425, commencing at a post in the  Southeast corner; thence 80 chains  North; thence 80 chains West; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains East  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated  January   16th.  1914.  BERT MINOR.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  X.ABD ACT.  VABOOOTBB  X.AKD  DXSTBXCT   ,  District of Coast Banff* X.     '  TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Charles  Falconer, of Vancouver, occupation  Clerk, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southwest comer of  Lot 421; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner; thence West 80  chains; thence South 50 chains; thence  following the beach 80 chains in a  South-easterly direction; thence 80  chains North to the point of. comrnehce-  - ment; containing 500 acres, more or  less, for agricultural. --  Dated  January   15th,  1914.  ARTHUR   CHARLES   FALCONER,  H. G. Adams, Agent. \  X.AXCD ACT.  VABCOOTBB   SABTD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bans;* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Herbert Black,  of Vancouver, occupation Telegrapher,  intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  West end of Robison Island high water  mark; thence traversing the beach in a  South and Easterly course to the East  entrance to Blunden Harbor; thence  traversing the beach in a North and  Westerly direction to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more  or less, for agriculture.  Dated January 13thT1914.  HERBERT BLACK,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VADTCOUVBB  DASTD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Banff* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Kate E. Hen-  shaw, of Vancouver, occupation Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing, at a post planted at the  Southeast corner, about one mile   distant and in a Westerly direction from  ii    the Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a post; planted in the South-  I\,   east corner;  thence    80    chains  West;  thence   80     chainB    North;   thence   80  chains East; thence 80 chains South to  the point of commencements containing  > 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 15th. 1914.  KATE   B.   HENSHAW,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  X.AWD ACT.   ,  80 chains South; thence 80 chains  East, to - the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres,: more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 15th, 1914.  CHARLES H. BAILEY.,  H. G._Adams, Agent.  L&HS ACT. ���������'  VABCOUVKB  UVD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Banff* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry George  Adams, of Alert Bay, British Columbia,  occupation Cruiser, - intends to apply for  permission.; to purchase the following  described lands:���������  Commencing at,.a. post planted at the  Southwest corner of. Lot -421; commencing, at a post in the Northwest corner;  thence 40 chains East; thence 40 chains  South; thence, 40 chains East to beach,  following the beach in a Southerly direction to the Southeast corner of the  Indian Reserve; thence traversing the  survey of the Indian Reserve Northwest--, and South to- the beach; thence  West along the beach to a point one  mile directly South, from the Southwest corner of Lot 421; thence North  80 chains to the point of commencement, - containing 640 ���������< acres, more or  less, for agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 1914.  HARRY GEORGE ADAMS,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAKD ACT.  ,   VAXfCOUVBB DABD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Leonard G.  Eveson, of Vancouver, occupation Salesman, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 421; commencing at a- post in the Northeast corner; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains North;  thence 80 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 1914.  LEONARD  G.   EVESON,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAHD ACT.        -  ���������AxrcotnrsB xwlhd dxstbxct���������  XHstrlot of Coast Banff* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward  Mellor, of Vancouver, occupation Capitalist, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following , described  lands:��������� -.,  Commencing at a' post planted about  three miles distant and in a Northwest  direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 421; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner; ' thence 80 chains  South; thence 20 chains West to beach;  thence 60 chains Northwest along the  beach; thence 50 chains North; thence  SO chains East to the point of commencement, containing 560 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 13th, 1914.  JOSEPH EDWARD MELLOR,  H. G. Adams. Agent.  rection to the point of commencement,  containing 500 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 29th, 1914.  BERTHA B. LAZIER,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  ":   XAHX* ACT.;.  vabcootsb xastd dxstbxct  XHstrlot of Coast Banff* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Jane Dodds. of  Vancouver; occupation, spinster; intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post' planted about  one mile distant and. in an Easterly  direction from the South'west corner of  Lot 422; commencing at a post in the  Northwest corner; thence 80 chains  East; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West to beach; thence following the beach in a Northerly direction  80 chains to the point of commencement,  containing 600 acres more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 23rd. 1914. ,  JANE DODDS,      '."������������������  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABTD ACT.  ���������AxrcotnrsB la������ dxstbxct  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Rose Hamilton,  of Vancouver; occupation, widow; intends to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  10 chains in a Westerly direction from  the Southwest corner of Lot 422; commencing at a post in the Northwest  corner; thence 80 chains East to beach  of Cohoe bay; thence following the  beach in a South and West direction to  the East entrance of Blunden Harbour;  thence in a North and Easterly direction to the point of commencement,  containing 480 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 23 rd. 1914.  ROSE HAMILTON,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  yavcoctsb dahd dxstbxct  Distriot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that FredC. Mock, of  Vancouver; occupation, broker; intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about 60  chains distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southeast corner of T.  L. 4479; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner; thence 60 chains  West; thence 40 chains South' to beach;  thence following the beach in a Northeast direction to the point of commencement, containing 200 acres, more or less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 29th, 1914.  FRED C. MOCK,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  LASS ACT.  X.AHD ACT.  vAwcoTmm dawd dwtjwct  District of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry Joseph  Woodward, of Vancouver,- occupation  Book-keeper, ��������� intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425; commencing at a post planted  in the Northwest corner; thence 80  chains South; thence 80 chains .East;  thence 80 chains North; thence 80  chains West, to the point of com-  mencement, containing 640 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated   January   15th,   1914.  HARRY   JOSEPH   WOODWARD,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  _ vADxiotrvBB dabd dx^^^  Dittrtot of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE that George A/ Sim-  monds, of Vancouver, occupation Merchant, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post one mile distant and In a Westerly direction from  the Northwest corner of Lot 425; commencing at a post in the- Southwest  corner; thence North 80 chains; thence  East 80 chains; thence South 80 chains;  thence West 80. chains to the point of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 15th, 1914.  GEORGE   A.   SIMMONDS.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  LAUD ACT.  VABTCOOTDB  DABD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Banff* X.  TAKE NOTICE that George Douglas  Beveridge, of Vancouver, occupation  Broker, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northeast corner and at the Southwest  corner of Lot 421; thence 80 chains  West; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East; thence 80 chains South;  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January  13th,   1914.  GEORGE   DOUGLAS   BEVERIDGE,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VAXCOVVBB XiABTD DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Banff* X.  TAKE NOTICE that Miss Clara Sim-  monds. of Vancouver, occupation  Housekeeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted one  mile distant, and in a Southerly direc-  |i tion from the Southwest corner of Lot  ' 421; commencing at a post planted in  the Northeast corner; thence 80 chains  West to beach; thence following i'the  beach in a South-easterly direction to  [l the West entrance of Blunden Harbor;  thence in a North-easterly direction and  North to the point of commencement;  containing 320 acres, more or less, for  agricultural. ."���������,���������'      ,  Dated January 13th, 1914.  MISS CLARA SIMMONDS,  H.  G. Adams, Agent.  X.AVD ACT.  VABCOUVDB DABD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Banff* X.  TAKE NOTICE that William Ryan, of  Vancouver, occupation Laborer, intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands: . -  . Commencing at a post planted about  three miles distant, and in a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425; commencing at a post planted  Jn the Northeast corner; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains South;"  thence following the; beach in .an Easterly direction 80 chains; thence North  80 chains to the point of commencement,  containing 400 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 14th, 1914.  WILLIAM RYAN,  H.G. Adams, Agent.  DABP ACT.       '.'A. ���������  ���������.ftWCOVYBB DABD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Banff* X.   -  TAKE NOTICE    that    Barbara Jean  .Gibson, of Vancouver, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted about  two miles distant, and in a Northwest  direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 421; commencing at a post in the  Southeast    corner;    thence    80    chains  North;  thence  80  chains  West;; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains East,  to the point of commencement, contain  ing 640 acres, more or less, for agricul  tural.  Dated January 13th. 1914.  BARBARA JEAN GIBSON,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  '. '     DAWD 4ACTT"  VAWCODVDB DABD DXSTBXCT  Distriot ot Coast Bang* l.  TAKE NOTICE that Ada M. Beveridge, of Vancouver; occupation, married  woman; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  4 miles distant and in a North-westerly  direction from the Northwest corner  of Lot 425, commencing at a post in  the Southwest corner, thence 80 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains West,  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural. ..���������_''  Dated - January-21strl914T-""--"-"1"   ADA M. BEVERIDGE,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  .       DAWD ACT..  vawcodvbw' dawd dxstbxct  XHstrlot of coast Bang* I.  TAKE NOTICE that George Hamlyn,  of Vancouver; occupation, worklngman;  Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  3 miles distant in a Northwest direction  from the Northwest corner of Lot 425;  thence 40 chains West; thence 80 chains  South; thence 40 chains East; thence  80 chains North, to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more or less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  GEORGE  HAMLYN.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAWD ACT.  VAWCOUVBW DAWD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bug* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Edgar Lees, of  Vancouver;  occupation,  logger;   intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of T. L. 1122���������thence  80 chains West; thence 60 chains South;  thence 80 chains East; thence 60 chains  North to the point of commencement,  containing 400 acres, more or less,, for  agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  EDGAR LEES,  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VAVCOTJVEB DABD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Norval E. Mall-  ahan, of Vancouver; occupation, adver  tiser; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 426; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence 80 chains East; thence 80 chains  North, to the point of commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less, for  agricultural.  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  NORVAL   E.   MALLAHAN,  H. G. Adams, Agent,  LAVS ACT.  VAXCOT/VEB   X.AHD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* X.  TAKE NOTICE tha t Charles H.  Bailey, of Vancouver, occupation Broker,  intends to apply for psrmission to  purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  one mile distant and in a Westerly  direction from the Northwest corner of  Lot 425; commencing at a post in the  Southeast corner; thence 80 chains  North;   thence  80  chains  West;  thence  VAVCOTJVEB X.AHD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlct of Coast Banff* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Bertha B. Lazier,  of Vancouver; occupation, married woman; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  60 chains distant and in an Easterly  direction * from the Southeast corner of  T. L. 4479; commencing at a post in the  Southeast corner; thence 60 chains  West; thence 80 chains North; thence  80 chains East; thence 30 chains South  to the beach; thence following the  beach 50 chains in a South-westerly di-  7AVCOWEB DABD   DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Daniel Miller, of  Vancouver, occupation, Undertaker; intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile and one-half distant and in a  Southerly direction from the Southeast  corner of Lot 542; commencing at a  post in the Southwest corner; thence 70  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 40 chains South to beach; thence  following the beach 80 chains in a  Westerly direction to the point of commencement, containing 420 acres, mora  or less, for agricultural:  Dated January 26th, 1914.  DANIEL   MILLER,  H. G. Adams, Agent,  DABD ACT.  East; thence 80 chains South; thenca 40  chains West to the beach; thence following the beach 40 chains in a Westerly  direction; thence North 80 chains to  the point of commencement, containing  500, .acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 27th, 1914.  JOHN MacDONALD.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAWD ACT.  VABCOUVZB LiUTS DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Harrold A.  Rourke, of Vancouver;.; occupation,  Freight Clerk; intends to apply for permission to purchase the. following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 41022; commencing at a post in  the Northwest corner; thence 80 chains  East; thence 80 chains South; thence 80  chains West; thence 80. chains North  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, ��������� for  agricultural-  Dated January 26th, 1914.  HARROLD A.  ROURKEi  H. G. Adams, Agent.  XAWD ACT.  TAirootnrxB lass dxstbxct  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE  NOTICE  that  Thomas Christie, of Vancouver; occupation, Lumberman; Intends to Apply for permission to  fiurchase     the     following     described  ahds:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in a Southerly  direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 4479; commencing at a post in the  Southwest corner; thence 40 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 40  chains South to beach; thence following the beach in a Westerly direction  80 chains to point of commencement,  containing 320 acres, more or less, for  agricultural. ,  Dated January 29th, 1914.  THOMAS CHRISTIE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VAWCOUVXB DABD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Sidney Clifford  White, of Vancouver; occupation. Telegrapher; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de-  crlbed lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northwest corner of Lot 426; commencing at a post in the Southeast corner; thence 80 chains North; thence 80  chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence 80 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  SIDNEY CLIFFORD WHITE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  VAWOOOTBW DAWD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Annie Brown, of  Vancouver;    occupation,    Widow;    intends to apply for permission to purr  chase the following described lands:������������������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of Lot .542; commencing at a post in the Northeast corner;  thence 80 chains South; thence 80 chains  West;, thence. 80 chains North; .thence  80   chains  East to  the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 24th, 1914.  ANNIE feROWN.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  :.DAWD ACT. '���������  y*Eq2FT*5 5*** wwniwr  _    Distriot of coast Bang* I.  TAKE NOTICE that John Sline; of  Vancouver; occupation, Longshoreman;  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.-.���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in a Southwest direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L- 41022; commencing at a post in  the Southwest corner; thence 40 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence  80 chains South to the beach; thence  following the beach in a Northwest direction 80 chains or to point of com-  mencem nt, containing 450 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  JOHN SLINE,        .  ���������"���������.__.     H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAWD ACT.  VAWCODVDB DAsTD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bang*,._i. ____,  TAKE NOTICE that Hans Harold  Arthur Anderson, of Vancouver; occupation, Logger; intends to apply for  permission to purchase the- following  described lands :���������  Commencing at a post planted about  60 chains distant and in a Southerly, direction from the Southwest corner of  Lot 424; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner; thence 80 chains  South to the beach; thence along the  beach 80 chains West; thence along  the beach North 60 chains to a point directly West from the starting point;  tence 75 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 480 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 23rd, 1914.  HANS     HAROLD   ARTHUR    ANDERSON.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAXfD ACT.  VABCOOTBB  DABD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Samuel de Winter, of Vancouver; occupation, Telegrapher; intends to apply for permission  to- purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northwest corner of Lot 426; thence 40  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 40 chains South; thence 80  Chains West to the point of commencement, contining 320 acres, more or less,  for agricultural.  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  SAMUEL DE WINTER.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  -, DAWD ACT..: ���������  chains  or  to  the point  of commencement, containing 260    acres, more    or  less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st. 1914.  FRANK E. TAYLOR.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DABD ACT.  I  VAWCOTIVBB DABD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE  NOTICE    that  John  William  Bradshaw,   of   Vancouver;   occupation, i  Mechanic; intends to apply for permis- '  sion   to   purchase   the    following    described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  4   miles distant  in a Northwest direc-,  tion from the Northwest corner of Lot  425; thence 40 chains West; thence 80  chains  North:   thence  40   chains   East; |  thence 80 chains South to the point of  commencement, containing    320    acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  JOHN WILLIAM BRADSHAW.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  3  DAXfD ACT."  ���������AJTCOWXm  DAATD  DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* I.  TAKE  NOTICE  that Leo Mayne,  of  Vancouver;     occupation,     Telegrapher;  intends to apply for permission to pur-:  chase  the following described lands:��������� I  Commencing at a post planted about >  2 miles distant in a Southerly direction  from the Southwest corner of Lot 428; >  commencing at  post  planted    in    the  Southeast    corner; ' thence    80   chains  West;  thence  80 chains North;  thence  80 chains East; thence 80 chains South  to the point of commencement, contain- <  ing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 24th, 1914. i  LEO MAYNE. I  H. G. Adams. Agent,  ra  D  DAXTD ACT.  TAXfCOVTBB DASTD XtXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Martha Adelaide Kay, of Vancouver; occupation,  Spinster; intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:������������������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant in a Westerly direction  from the Southeast corner of Lot 131  commencing at a post in the Northwest  corner; thence 80 chains East; thence  60 chains South; thence 80 chains West;  thence 60 chains North to the point of  commencement,. containing 500 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 23rd, 1914.  MARTHA ADELAIDE KAY.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAXfD ACT.  vAvcotnrxB daud dxstbxct  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Lawrence  Hartje, of Vancouver; occupation, Engineer; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1. mile and a quarter distant, and in a  South-easterly direction from the Southwest corner of T. L. 4486; commencing  at a post in the Southeast corner;  thence 80 chains North; thence 80  chains West; thence 30 chains South  to the beach; thence following the beach  in a South-easterly direction 80 chains,  or: to the point of commencement, containing 620 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 27th, 1914.  LAWRENCE HARTJE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  SESHSE52SHSES2S25ES2SESaS2S2f  I  Who  mutilated thepktnn?  Who  shattered the tajuotr  Who  stole Robert Cameron?  If you want to letd  a teal clever mystery  itoiy. don't bum the  new serial we hate  arranged to print���������  Hie  Sable  Lorcha  A tale of theihiewd  cunning of die Orientals.   It's good hoax.  the my beginning, to  CettjMbstw  With the Mrtt  Installment,  I  G  0  G  G  G  G  0  G  VAarcoTxvsB dabd dxstbxct  District of Coast Bang* I.  TAKE NOTICE that Jasper Nation,  of Vancouver; occupation, Hotelkeeper;  intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of Lot 542; commencing at a post In the Northwest corner;  thence 80 chains East; thence 80 chains  South; thence 80 chains West; thence 80  chains North to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more  or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 25th, 1914.  JASPER NATION.  H. G: Adams, Agent.  DAXfD ACT.  ���������AXfCotnrsB dahd dxstbxct  XHstrlot of Coast Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that John Harold Al-  bertson, of Vancouver; occupation,  Logger; Intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 and a half miles distant and in a  Southerly direction from the Southwest  corner of Lot 424; commencing at a  post in the Southwest corner; thence 60  chains North; thence 80 chains East;  thence 70 chains South to beach: thence  following the beach 80 chains West to  the point of commencement, containing  520 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  JOHN   HAROLD   ALBERTSON.  H. G. Adams,  Agent.  X.A3TD ACT.  VAXfCOUVBB DAXTD  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Sinclair A. Aich-  lnleck, of Vancouver; occupation, Miner;  intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  4 miles distant in a Westerly direction  from the Northwest corner of Lot 425;  commencing at a post in the Southeast  corner; thence 80 chains North; thence  ,80 chains West; thence 80 chains South;  thence 80 chains East to the point of  commencement, containing 640 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 81st, 1914.  SINCLAIR A. AICHINLECK.  H. G. Adams, Agent  DABD ACT.  DAXfD ACT-  VAXfCOVVDB DJUTD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Holton Evens  Sands, of Vancouver; occupation, Broker; intends to apply for:permision to  purchase : the following - described  lands:��������� ���������������������������  : 'Commencing at a post j>lanted about  1 mile distant and in an Easterly direction from the Southeast corner of Lot  542; commencing at a post in the Northwest corner; -thence 35 chains East;  thence 80 chains south; thence 35  chains West; thence 80 chains North  to the polt of commencement, containing 300 acres, more or less, for agricultural. ������������������  Dated January 25th 1914.  HOLTON EVENS SANDS.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  The first instalment  of  The Sable Lorcha  appeared in our  issue of Jan. 9.  W$ can supply back numbers  Distriot of Coast Bang* i.  TAKE NOTICE that James Veno, of  Vancouver; occupation. Cook; intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:���������  ,- Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southwest corner of T.  L. 4487; commencing at a post in the  Northwest corner; thence 80 chains  East; thence 60 chains South to beach;  thence following the beach in a Northwesterly direction 80 chains or to point  of commencement, containing : 200  acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 28th, 1914.  JAMES VENO.  H. G. Adams. Agent.  DAXfD ACT.  DAXfD. ACT.  VAXrOOTrVDB DAVD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bangs I.  TAKE NOTICE that Harry Washington Steele, of Vancouver; occupation,  Carpenter; Intends to apply, for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������   ���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in a Southeast direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 4487; commencing at a post in the  Southwest corner; thence 60 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 80  chains South; thence 60 'chains in a  Northwest direction, or to the point of  commencement, containing 600 acres,  more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 28th, 1914.  HARRY   WASHINGTON   STEELE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAXfD ACT.  VAXfCOVTBB DAXfD DXSTBfCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that William Seymour, of Vancouver; occupation. Logger; intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in a Southerly direction from the Southwest corner of  T. L. 4483; commencing at a post in the  Southwest corner; thence 70 chains  North; thence 80 chains East; thence 80  chains South to beach; thence following the beach in a Westerly direction  80 chains to the point of cum mencement, containing 560 acres, more or less,  for agricultural. ;  Dated January 29th, 1914.  WILLIAM SEYMOUR.  .   i     H. G. Adams, Agent.  VAWCODVDB. DAWD DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bangs 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Florence Malla-  han, of Vancouver; occupation, Dressmaker; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  - Commencing at a post planted about  2- and a half miles distant and in a  South-easterly direction from the Southeast corner of. Lot 542; commencing at  a post in the Southwest corner; thence  40 chains North; thence 70 chains East;  thence 40 chains South; thence 70  chains West to, the point of commencement, containing 300 acres, more or  less, for agricultural.  Dated January 26th, 1914.  FLORENCE MALLAHAN.  ~^ ^^^^^^^H^G;-A^ams,~Agent:  DAWD ACT.  VABCOCVDB DAXfD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Barr-  able, of Vancouver; occupation, Broker;  intends to apply for 'permision to purchase  the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northwest corner of Lot 540; thence 80  chains North; thence 80 chainB East;  thence 80 chals South; thence 80 chainB  West to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 22nd, 1914.  ARTHUR BARRABLE.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  DAWD ACT.  VAXfCOWSB DAWD DXSTBXCT  Distriot of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Henry Teaeger.  of Vancouver; occupation, Brewer; intends to apply for permission to pur-  g|hase the following described lands:���������  W Commencing at a post planted about  1 mile distant and in a Westerly direction from the Northwest corner of Lot  425; commencing at a post in the  Northeast corner: thence 80 chains  South; thence 80 chains West; thence  80 chains North; thence 80 chains East  to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 15th, .1914.  HENRY  TEAEGER.  H. G. Adams, Agent.  X.AHD ACT.  VAXfCOTTVBB DAVD   DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Baaga 1.  TAKE NOTICE that John MacDonald, of Vancouver; occupation, Railway  Clerk; intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted about  40 chains distant and in a Westerly direction from the Southeast corner of T.  L. 4486; commencing at a post in the  Northwest   corner;   thence     80     chains  VAXfCOXTVEB X.AVD DXSTBXCT  XHstrlct of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Peter Freeman,  of Vancouver; occupation, Book-keeper;  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at. the  Southeast corner of T. L. 1122; thence  80 chains South; thence 80 chains East;  thence 80 chains North to the beach;  thence following the shore line in a  North-westerly direction 80 chains or  to the point of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less, for agricultural.  Dated January 21st, 1914.  PETER FREEMAN.  H.  G. Adams, Agent.  XkaJTD  ACT.  VAHCOT/VBB  SAKS  DXSTBXCT  District of Coast Bang* 1.  TAKE NOTICE that Frank E. Taylor, of Vancouver; occupation, Broker;  intends to apply for permission to purchase   the following  described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northeast corner of T. L. 1144; thence  80 chains "West; thence 80. chains North  to the beach; thence following the  beach   in a  South-easterly  direction  80  LAHO ACT.  Vancouver X.asd District.���������District of  Coast Bangs 3.  TAKE NOTICE that Antonio Belan-  ger, of Brettany Creek, occupation  Miner, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  northwest corner of Lot 922; thence  west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;  thence east 40 chains; thence south 40  chains, for grazing.  ANTONIO   BELANGER,  Dated December 17th. 1913.  1-23-14   to   3-20-14.  X.AVD ACT.  Vancouver   Xiand   District���������District   of  Coast Bangs 3.  TAKE NOTICE that Frank Rial Angers, of Brittany Creek, occupation  Rancher, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:���������  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner of Lot 923; thence  west 20 chains; thence north 20 chains:  thence east 20 chains; thence south 20  ' chains, and containing 40 acres more  or less, to be used as a pasture.  FRANK   RIAL   ANGERS.  Dated 17th of December, 1913.  ��������� 1-23-14 to 3-20-14.  ',.-  Phrenology  And Palmistry  (Formerly of Montreal)  0l������O9 Prmotloel Advlee  On Business Adaptation, Health  and  Marriage.  805 Granville Street  Over H������rrison's Drug* Store   ���������  Hours: 10a. ni. to9p. ro  Do you know Canada? A novel  and unique mine of information is  found in the popular booklet, "5000  Facts About Canada," just issued for  1914, and compiled by Frank Yeigh,  the well known statistical authority on  things Canadian. This new edition  shows a marked advance over previous issues in an increase of new data,  a handsome cover, a revised map,  and improved paper. The publication .contains all the essential facts  of Canada's progress in a year, under  such chapter heads as Agriculture,  Area, Banking, Census, Mining, Manufacturing, Trade, etc., while striking  tables of comparisons present a  measuring rod of our national development. Its wide circulation is easily  understood when its value is realized,  for it presents the Dominion in a nutshell a ready reference encyclopedia  of facts and figures. It may be had  by sending- 25 cents to The Canadian Facts Publishing Co., 588  Huron St., Toronto, or from news  dealers.  The All-Alaska sweepstakes, 412  miles, from Nome to Candle and return, will take place in April. The  contestants in the long Taces must  finish with the same dogs and equipment as at the start. If a dog is disabled he must be carried on the  sledge. Winners in either of the deg  Derbys are honored for the remainder of their lives. Ilf������jfs������^^  THE WESTERN CALL  Friday, March 20,1914  M WESTERN CALL  PUBLISHED EVERYFRIDAY  BY THE  TERMINAL CITY PRESS, LTD.  HEAD OFFICE:  203 Kingsway, Vancouver  Telephone Fairmont 1140  Suhocrlptlon:  One Dollar a Year In Advance  41.BO Outride Canada  If you do not get "CALL" regularly  it is probably because your subscription  is long overdue. Renew at once. If paid  up, phone or write complaint today.  PAX BRITANNICA  THE TRANSFORMATION OF-THE SOUDAN  .^f Fifteen years ago���������-September 4th, 1898���������the  ^Anglo-Egyptian troops, under Lord Kitchener,  ��������� Vthen Sirdar of the Egyptian army, entered Khartoum and, running up the Union Jaek and Star  fmd Crescent over the ruined palace, proclaimed  to the world that the reconquest of the territory  that had been abandoned twelve years previously  had been achieved, and that the Pax Britannica  was about to be extended to its utmost confines.  The story of the wonderful transformation of  this vast trritory, which, since the addition of the  Lado Enclave, exceeds one million square miles  in area, from a land of desolation and despair to  one of hope and promise, has been ofttimes told,  and there is little need to dwell on the point.  The fact that the British government has seen  fit to guarantee for thirty years the interest on  the loan of 3,000,000 poinds sterling to be raised  for the development ;Sche Soudan shows that it  endorses/ijnueyery way the opinion of the great  future lying before that country.  The capture of Khartoum opened a new era  for the "iaimd of the Black," for it liberated  them from5 the fire and swotM of the Mahdi and  his brutal hordes, and gave it an opportunity to  recover from the devastation, ranr and oppres:  sion under which it had suffered for over twelve  years.  Similarly, the passage of the Soudan Loan  Bill opens another era for the country. Jt synchronises with the emancipation of the Soudan  from the financial support which it has had to  obtain annually from Egypt-rthis is the first  year that it has received no subsidy^���������and it provides it with the wherewithal for the development of the resources which experiment has  shown time upon time that it possesses, and which  will cause it become one of the most valuable���������  as it is one of the most promising���������territories over  which the Union Jack floats.  Little did Gordon Pasha dream that the  country which he stigmatized as useless would  within thirty years'be launching out as a great  cotton growing and grain producing area, one  whose fertility and excellent situation will in  ^tjme convert it into Lancashire's main source of  supply ^anU uitcTone"ot Ithl^^reW^anariesrbfthe ^  Empire.  The loan which is being raised, is in addition  to the construction of railways, intended to start  the work of irrigating the Segira, an enormous  tract of land just south of Khartoum, and lying  between the Blue and White Niles, which, if  furnished with sufficient water, could produce  five million acres of good American, and possibly  good Egyptian, cotton, with which a first-class  grade of wheat could alternate.  Indeed, the possibilities of the Soudan are  boundless; its area is so enormous and the conformation of the land so varied that well nigh  every commodity grows and can be grown within  its borders with success. Everything has been  kept back owing to the lack of communication.  The government is straining every nerve to  repair this defect, and the tremendous impetus  that is given to local production and the export  trade whenever a new stretch of railway or a  new road is opened to traffic constitutes an earnest of the great expansion that will ensue when  once every district is in direct contact with the  main markets and the Bed Sea.  EMPIRE POPULATION.  The increase of the peoples who owe allegiance  to the British Crown is shewn, by Government  statistics, to be as follows:  1881 . .303,694,000  .1891 .......;..... 345,355,000  1901 385,398,000  1911 416,318,000  PROSPEROUS INDIA  India's income from the sale of opium averaged in years past 4,500,000 pounds sterling. Last  ye ar it was only 30,600 pounds sterling. It was  the loss of this income that long held British India in shameful partnership with the opium traffic. Forced out of a shameful position by China's  heroic example British India consented to cut off  the opium trade.  The surplus on the financial year of 1912-13  was eight millions sterling, in spite of the enormous loss on opium monopoly. This surplus is  being mainly applied to education and sanitation.        ll  CHRISTIAN POPULATION OF INDIA  I A..S*Ai$*������ftisfrst*������ts������&s>ft>AA^ I  In 1881 the Christians in India numbered 1,-  862,634; in 1891, 2,284,380; in 1901, 2,923,241;  and in 1911���������the last census, 3^876,199. It is interesting to note that in the native states (governed by native rulers) the increase has relatively been much greater than in British India  proper. In the 'former, with some 71,000,000  people, the increase is 365,000, and in the latter,  with 240,000,000 people, only 588,000. Christianity has greatly exceeded the other religions in  relative increase during the last 10 years. The  figures are as follows:  Christians, 32 per cent. !     ���������  Buddhists, 12 per cent. .-  Mohammedans, 6 per cent.  Hindus, 5 per cent.  Ottawa News  %  %  HE WOULD HAVE ALL OF  THEM ADMITTED  INDIAN EDUCATION  The government policy on education in India  has been greatly broadened and strengthened.  Surveying, technical, industrial, agricultural,  veterinary, forestry, medical, legal and commercial education, schools of art, museums, chiefs of  colleges, etc., are covered by it. Special strength  is laid on the formation of character through direct religious and moral instruction and indirect  agencies, such as the monitorial system, social  life, traditions, discipline, betterment of environment, hygiene, physical culture and organised  recreation. A great effort is being made to improve the education of girls.  WHERE BRITAIN'S SAVINGS GO  The Daily Graphic says:���������  Altogether something like 983 million dollars  was raised by the investing classes in the United  Kingdom last year for foreign and Colonial governments, railways, mines, iron, coal, steel, rubber, oil, manufacturing, stores and trading concerns all over the world. Our capital seems to  be going abroad entirely. Out of the immense  total raised last year not 10 per cent, seems to  have been invested in this country. Nobody lends  us money, but we lend everybody else money.  130 millions went to Colonial governments, 26  millions to foreign governments, nearly 75 millions to Colonial municipalities, nearly 35 millions  to foreign municipalities, nearly 75 millions to  Indian and Colonial railways, over 53 millions to  American railways, nearly 87 millions to foreign  railways, over 50 millions to foreign .and Colonial mining and exploration companies, nearly 55  millions to manufacturing companies* over .33'  millions to rubber and oil ventures, while the,  only thing home industries have captured out of  all this overflow of capital, exclusive of the $5,-  000,000 for British railways, has been some proportion of the 30 millions found for iron, coal,  and steel enterprises and the ten and a half miK  lions for manufacturing and trading enterprises..  ���������E.:.W. Nesbitt, Liberal member for'  North Oxford, stated in the House  a few days ago that he would admit  all the wives of the Hindus who were  polygamists and had settled in  Canada.  In order that there may be no mistake about Mr. Nesbitt's words, the  following is taken from "Hansard"  of March 2:  "Mr. Stevens: "A question  has been raised about the admission of Hindu wives. We have  been berated, those of us who  are opposed to any relaxation of  the regulations, for cruelty because we have not seen fit to give  way on this point. It is not a  question of admitting the wives of  Hindus, but whether you are going to open the door to let them  all come in. Consider for a  moment the wife question: I ask,  which wife are you going to admit? The answer is that the  Hindus are not all polygamists;  but quite a number are. Supposing a man has five wives and  goes to the Government and  says: I want you to admit my  wife. . Which wife are you going  to admit?"  Mr. Nesbitt:    "All of them."  ;TH* Battle Axe   *':^"���������������������������:; 'f  London, March 17.���������Great Britain will have1  ten of the new big gun battleships in the water  by the time any other nation in the world has  two, declared Winston Spencer Churchill, first  lord of the admiralty, in tbe JJouse of Commons  today. "All of these ships," he added, "will  carry fifteen-ineh guns���������the best weapons ever  possessed by the British navy and capable of  hurling a projectile weighing a ton for a distance  of twelve miles. ,'"'" ;_  Four of these ships, which are presumably t&^'  burn oil, are provided in the budget for next year.''  Three of them are of the Soverign type and one of  the Queen Elizabeth type. -./���������'''  The Queen Elizabeth, launched last October.:  was the first ship to mount fifteen-inch guns, of  which she is to have ten.   tier cost is estimated  at about $12,000,000.     She   uses oil   fuel ex^  The Royal Sovereign, the first ship of an even  more powerful type; has not yet been launched,  and no details as to her size or equipment have  been made public.  ,-. The latest type of American Dreadnought is  provided with twelve 14-inch guns.  LONDON TIMES ONE PENNY.  Naval Question  ENGRAVING-  ETCHINGS AND HALFTONES  ARE NOW BEING MADE IN  WESTERN CANADA BY THE  MOST SATISFACTORY PRO-  CESS KNOWN TO THE WORLD  THE "ACID BLAST" PROCESS  MAKES YOUR ILLUSTRATIONS  ���������- LITERALLY TALK ������������������  MANUFACTURED IN WESTERN CANADA  Byth[CluandDibdIiEnc(oI'  "sV*������������  FLOOR   WORLD   BLOC.  WAMCOUVir* I*      o    -  ANYONE  CAN  THEIR CLOTHES  WITH  Try Our Printing  Quality Second  to None  DYOLA  ��������� The Dye that colors ANY KIND1  1      of Cloth Perfectly, with the  8AMEOYC I  i No Chute* ol MlMalra*.  Clean tad SlmpU.  FAslcyourDrotalatorDMtar. Send for Booklet  ThaJohtuon-IQcluinlMin Co. Limited, Montraal  FOR SALE CARDS HERE  The Times dropped in price from 3 pence to  1 penny this week.  By universal admission in Fleet street the  Times today reaches high water mark for all-  round quality. It has set a pace that will keep  the British press humming.  London, March 17.���������The publisher of the London Times saUlyesterday:  "We had orders for 750,000 copies of our first;  penny issue today, but we printed and sold less  than 300,000 because the printing has to be carefully performed. Our orders for today are still  larger and we have sold over ten pages of small  advertisements. The normal size of this paper  will be as today, 24 pages, but it will run up as  high as thirty."  The paper is exactly the same in quality and  print as the two penny edition, and how it is to  be made a paying proposition is a problem that  is puzzling Fleet street. According to its last  balance sheet, the Times made a profit of $100,000  last year, about two per cent, on its capital.  The Daily Telegraph ignores its new penny rival, of which it prints1 a page advertisement.  The Morning Post has adopted a new make-up,  somewhat resembling that of the Times, and it is  said the Post declines to accept an advertisement  from the Times.  The real competition will be between the Times  and the Morning Post.  IMMIGRATION FROM THE UNITED STATES  In the past 7 years over two-thirds of a million  people have come to Canada from the United  States, bringing with them money and property to  the extent of over $775,000,000.  The navy question has pretty much  dropped out of sight lately, but now  and then a Liberal speaker attacks  Mr. Borden for seeking to make a  contribution of $35,000,000 to the British Admiralty, and,tells us how much  cheaper it would have been had we  adopted Sir Wilfrid's policy and built  two fleets in Canada, one for the Atlantic and the other for the Pacific.  It is tolerably evident that these  gentlemen have never looked into the  cost of constructing war ships. Mr.  Borden's $35,000,000 would have  looked wholly insignificant by comparison with the expenditure entailed  by the erection of ship.building plants  and the building of Vessels in the Dominion. The other day the Committee on Naval affairs at Washington  examined Admiral Strauss, chief of  the Bureau of Ordinance of the United  pSiates riavy; on the subject of starting  government works for the manufacture of armour plate. Admiral  Strauss is a very able man and his  testimony is highly interesting.  He said it would take about three  years to build an armour plate factory and get it into operation. The  cost of the armour and armament for  a first-class battleship exceeds $7,-  000,000. An armour plant capable of  manufacturing 20,000 tons of armour  'per annum would cost over $U,000,-  000; if the capacity was 10,000 tons the  cost would'be over $8,000,000, while  if it was a small plant with a capacity  of only 5,000 tons a year the cost  would run over $6,000,000. The industry has to be carried on by experts of skill and experience who are  highly paid; on the other hand the  cost-in-the-=United-Sttates-would-be  lower than in some other countries if  the works were built in Pennsylvania  or Alabama, where coal and iron lie  side by side and competent artisans  could be obtained from the private  factories such as the Carnegie or  Bethlehem companies.  The cost of manufacturing a big  gun for a man-of-war is about $60,  000. The cost of firing it with a full  charge is nearly $500 per shot. The  cost of building- sub-marine destroyers  and armoured cruisers, gun boats,  transports, supply ships, hospital  ships and armed tenders, is, of  course, much less than that of fitting  out a battleship, yet the armament  alone of one of these vessels ranges  from $100,000 to over $400,000, saying nothing of the cost of building  the hull.  Mr. Hensley, a member of the committee, pointed out that within the  last ten years the United States had  spent on its navy nearly if not quite  1,000 million dollars in excess of the  amount expended by, Japan. Another, Mr. Witherspoon, showed that  within the last 12 years, the States  had spent a good deal more than Germany and Japan put together, and  that the navy, expenditure was now  ten times greater than it was 30 years  ago. Admiral Strauss said that in his  opinion the American navy was a  highly efficient one, but he confessed  that the armour plate companies had  for a long time back been acting in  collusion, and that their bids were  practically the same.  The reader will be good enough to  bear in mind that the figures here  given do not embrace the whole cost  of a ship of war, but merely that of  the armour and armament. We can  rform some idea, however, of where  we in Canada should land financially  if we undertook to build war ships  here.  THE DIFFERENCE  Between paper  that is "good  enough" and  that which is  really artistic,  may be a trifle,  in cost but infinite in satisfaction. Do it right  the first time,  is our suggestion.  Estimates  PHONE  FAIRMONT  998  HOUSE   DECORATORS  & 1 AINLfc Y  & CUt  2317 Main Street, Near. 7tti Ay.  ;; "������AR1-Y ROSE," choice quality, $2.00 per 100  ,, "dRACP darwnq" (importsIrlsH������9oa>S^^o ������������������   f  ,, You Can Relt on this Quality.  we carry sewcrep j.awn seep anp fertilizer  Our Olmmood QMek Food contains all that> required to  ,���������   rear healthy chicks.  r.T.VfffNOM  < ���������  flout f%\mn\ m        Hay, Gbajn and Feed 285 Urwdwiy l*%\  i  <r  BLQOMFIELD'S CAFE  25X7 MAIN STREET NiPrVR BROAPWAY  KNOWN AS   THE  BEST   AND  OLDEST  ESTABLISHED CAFE IN. MT. PLEASANT  *\  BUSINESS MEN'S LUNCH 25c-ll:30 TO 2:00  \*  PINNER 5:00 TO 8:00 P.M.  SHORT ORDERS AT ALL HOURS  J>  FRANK TRIMBLE REALTY CO.  I Real Estate and Insurance Brokers  CONVEYANCING  RENTS COLLECTED  LOANS NEGOTIATED  * =  PHONE Fair. 185 2503 Westminster Rd.  Vancouver, B. C.  *  *$s������������3m$m$m$s������3>������$m$m$m$������s$s<|< sfrsfril* ���������}*{*������$��������� ������$���������������$**$< >$���������������$���������������% s^������fr������$������������3������<3������������$������<.$i ������%������i$������i$m$������������$������ ������{���������*$������<$��������� i$t<t$������������|*������3������������$������.)3������������$������������3������ sfrs^fr^lfr Jj*  ������$l >$M$M$*>$I������$������������3m$������<I$������������$* sfrsfrsfr S^M^C^St^M^iS^S ������$���������������%������!%��������� S-*S������$M$t������$������      s^^M^������������^������^S^^M^S4l^M^>������|������������^*<  DOMINION WOOD YARD CO.  Cor. Front and Ontario Sts.      Phone Fairmont 1554  {    All Kinds of Mill Wood    I  I Stored Under Cover I  * *  *������������������"������������������. ������������������'.������������������* Friday, March 20, 1914  THE WESTEBN -CALL.  5  .&*������M$������4$MgM������M$M^*������������4gM$M^������**$M^ ���������  TEMPERANCE, REUGION AND MORALS  BRITISH GOVERNMENT AND  INSURANCE FIGURES AS TO  EFFECT OF DRINKING ON AGE  "The figures of the.British government and  English life insurance companies as to the effect  of drinking on longevity are stated as follows:  ���������������������������...; "If a man at the age of 20 is a total abstainer  and remains a total abstainer, His prospects of  life is 44 years, and he will live to the average  l^age of 64; but if he is a temperate regular drinker  his prospect of life will be 31 years, and he will  live to the average age of 51, after losing 13 years  out of his life. If he is a heavy drinker, his prospect of life is 15 years, and he will die at the average age of 35, after losing 29 years out of his life.  Conservative estimates place the number of confirmed drunkards in the United States at something over 1,000,000, of whom 300,000 die every  year; the heavy drinkers at over 4,000,000, and  {temperate regular drinkers at over 20,000,000.  A soldier wounded in battle and losing 10 years  pf his life as a consequence would be classed as  mortally wounded. The confirmed drunkards  iand heavy drinkers together, 5,000,000 in number,  must be looked upon as mortally wounded and the  emperate regular drinkers as seriously wounded,  aking a total of over 25,000,000 Americans  ounded by alcohol today, more than 10 times as  any as wounded in all the battles of the world  tince the dawn of history. The estimates for the  ,vhite race make over 125*000,000 white men to-  ay wounded by alcohol."  EDWARD EVERETT HALE'S OFFER  The late Edward Everett Hale, a lifelong observer of social conditions, is reported as saying:  "If anybody will take charge of all Boston's  poverty and crime which results from drunken-  less, the South Congregational church, of which  have the honor to be the minister, will alone  \eikecharge of all the rest of the poverty which  leeds relief in the city of Boston."  THE HIGH COST OF DRINKING  Wheat produced   in America   in   brie; year  rould pay our drink bill for only 80 days.  Coal produced in a year would pay less than  a$3 days.  Customs and internal v revenue'. for one year  rould pay the drink bill: for less than 85 days.  The gross expense of the postoffice depart-  lent pays the bar bill for less than thirty days.  Cost of the war department wpuld^keep the  Liquor gullets moist for less than 20 days.  I    The gold and sifver mined annually in the  united States would pay only 17 4ays' drink  \m..:> ���������.��������������������������������������������� ;-y^^->y^--:::--^.r^.yy/.������y  r^m&s������J^^MmMm cajial^owi4,pay.onlyj  JO daysi drink bill.    *  To pay a year's drink bill requires the following: All bur wheat, coal, gold and silver added  \o the cost of one year's customs and revenue,  rar and postoffice departments, with the cost of  the Panama canal. ���������       : ���������  >NE WAY TO REDUCE THE  COST OF WVJNG  TOMORROW  "Tomorrow," he promised his conscience,  "Tomorrow I mean to be good:  Tomorrow I'll think as I ought to; tomorrow  I'll do as I should;  Tomorrow I'll conquer the habit that holds me  from heaven away."  But ever his conscience repeated one word, and  one only, "today."  ���������|  Tomorrow, tomorrow, tomorrow, thus day after  day it went on;  Tomorrow, tomorrow, tomorrow, till youth like a  vision was gone.  Till age and his passion had written the message  of fate on his brow.  And forth from the shadows came Death with the  pitiless syllable, "Now."  ���������Justin McCarthy.  THE BIBLE FOR THE YOUNG  "Give the Bible to them unadulterated, pure  unaltered, unexplained, uncheapened and then  see it work its wholesome work through the whole  nature. It is very difficult, indeed, for a man or a  boy, who knows the Scripture, ever to get away  from it. It haunts him like an old song. It follows him like the memory of his mother. It reminds him like the word of an old and revered  teacher. It forms a part of the warp and woof  of his life."���������President Woodrow Wilson.  MARCONI'S RELIGION  Signpr Marconi is a devoted member of the  Walderisian church. In an interview he has made  the interesting statement that something in the  nature of overtures had been made by the Vatican to himself both in Rome and Canada, but  without effect.  THE BLIGHT OF ROMAN ERRORS  \\   Some years ago the following card was cut as  blotter, signed by a dozen grocery firms of Delaware, Ohio:  "Any one who drinks three glasses  whiskey a day for one year and pays 10 cents a  irink for it, can have in exchange at any of the  firms whose names appear on this caret three  barrels of flour, twenty bushels of potatoes, two  lundred pounds of granulated sugar, one barrel  )f crackers, one pound of pepepr, two pounds of <  tea, fifty pounds of butter, ten pounds of cheese,  twenty-five pounds   of   coffee, ten   pounds of  \andy, three .dozenLoranges,^ ten dozen bananas,  two dozen cans   of   corn, eighteen   boxes   of  -matches, half a bushel of beans, one hundred  [cakes of soap, and twelve packages of rolled  >ats, for the same money; and get $13.50 premium for making the change in bis expenditures."  Salvation Army Congress  London.���������The officials of the Salvation Army  |are now making arrangements for the great international congress which is to be held in London in June. The last gathering of the kind was  ield ten years ago, when a corrugated iron hall  ras erected for the purpose on the Strand island  Kite, and it is possible that a similar building will  Je put up this time. It was while in London that  King Edward first received the late General  |Jooth in audience and heard from him an ac-  )unt of the work of the army.  Two thousand delegates from abroad are expected at the June congress, and 3,000 from all  irts of the United Kingdom.   The meetings begin  rith'a reception in the Albert hall on Thursday,  fune il, and close with a farewell meeting in the  ime place on Friday, June 26.   During the in-  srvening fortnight meetings will be held daily  the special congress hall, which will accommodate 6,000 people, and the Salvation Army will  fecupy the Crystal Palace for one day���������June 23.  Lt the end of the London meetings many of the  lelegates from abroad will proceed to the prov-  pces, and gatherings will be held in Bristol, Bir-  lingham, Sheffield, Bradford,  Liverpool, Man-  lester, Edinburgh, Glasgow,    Sunderland    and  fottirigham (the birthplace of General Booth.)  Many of the foreign delegates will attend in  lative costume. Among the countries repre-  lented will be Sweden, Denmark, Lapland, Finland, France, Germany, Russia, Holland, (200  lelegates), Japan, China, New Zealand and  rava.  The cosmopolitan gathering will also include  Converted Maoris, Red Indians, Zulus and Kaffirs,  witch doctor and a devil dancer, all of whom  bill take some part in the meetings and in a profession from Victoria embankment to Hyde Park  pn Saturday, June 13.  It is expected that during the congress 32 different languages will be spoken at the Salvation  Lrmy's headquarters.  Booker T Washington sayss: "The black man  needs no sympathy or pity. I thank God that I  belong to a race that has its problem to solve, and  is solving it. A short time ago I paid a visit to  Italy, and there I observed a race that has been  free for hundreds of years, and thirty per cent,  of its people' cannot read or write. In Spain  sixty per cent and in Portugal seventy-six per  cent cannot read or write. When Mr. Lincoln  freed my race only three per cent were literate.  Now sixty-three per cent can read and write."  This is good for the negro, but Mr. Washington  forgets that Italy, Spain and Portugal are still  ���������bound by the very ��������� worst form of slavery this  :TVflrld^hJisx ej^eT;^  the errors of Rdmanism.    ','....."���������������������������.,'";,       -       ���������;  A MK.WON DOLLAJW  yOBUPUOATJON OF  PBLOIAN SOOULWTS  Ernest Solvay, Belgium's foremost capitalist,  has given one million dollars for educational  purposes to the Belgian Socialists.  Ernest Solvay is the inventor of the process now used all over the world in the manufacture of bi-carbonate of soda. It has been estimated that the saving annually caused by use  of the Solvay process throughout the world is  very close to fifteen million dollars. Quite a sum  for the product of one man's brain.  RAILWAY AND SHIPPING  0. P, R. PAYDAY  "'   The C. P. R. pays once ajnontb and pays by  clieque.""Orie Kundreo'"arid   twenty   thVmsand  cheques are issued totalling   over   $6,000,000.  Over 500,000 people are interested in this monthly  payday.  Grading Started on Last Lap of C.N.R.  Grading has been started on the last section of  the Canadian Northern Pacific Railway in British  Columbia. Mr. S. H. Sykes, assistant chief engineer for the C. N. R., who returned Monday  from a trip over the new route from the eastern  end of construction via Edmonton and Tete  Jaune Cache, stated this morning that the entire  line in British Columbia would most probably be  ready for the rails by next July.  Discussing the progress on the various sections of the new route, Mr. Sykes said that 60 per  cent, of the grading had been done on the twenty-  mile section west of Albreda Summit, and that  tracklaying would be started from the present  end of steel ten miles west of the Yellowhead  Pass early next month. Several bridges are now  under construction between the present completed  portions of the line. Track is laid to mile 122  north of Kamloops, and 60 miles of steel will  have to be installed to link up the two ends of  construction on the Kamloops-Yellowhead division.  OPERATOR'S LARGE LIST  With the largest passenger list ever carried  across the Atlantic at this season of the year, the  giant Hamburg-American liner Imperator will  arrive in New York Wednesday on her first voyage since undergoing extensive overhauling. She  has 2766 passengers. There are 450 first cabin,  330 second cabin, 817 third-class and 1169 steerage.  The Imperator left Hamburg March 14 for  New York, ran into a heavy gale and lost four of  her lifeboats, according to officials of the line.  The ship behaved well and few of the passengers  were aware of what had happened.  No serviee in i tself is small or great,  Though earth it fill;  But that is small which seeks its own,  And great which seeks God's will.  SOMETHING TO  THINK ABOUT  If there were international labor  unions in England and Germany, with  theiT headquarters in Germany, it is  tolerably safe to say that now and  then "strikes would be declared in  England with the intention- of serving- German rather than British interests. That would only be natural.  In like manner, while the international' anions which exist between Canada  and the States undoubtedly help the  cause of labor in' both countries,  there is always a danger that, as the  leading spirits are in every instance  Americans, some of them may occasionally be tempted to sacrifice us for  the   benefit  of  their  own  concerns.  It cannot, of course, be proved,  but there-are grounds for suspecting  that Mr. Frank Farrington, an organizer of the United Mine Workers of  America, with headquarters at Indianapolis, engineered the strike of coal  miners at Nanaimo for a sinister  purpose, namely, to interrupt the  shipment of coa! from Vancouver  Island to the United States in order  to benefit the mines on the American  side of the line. This much appears  from an article he wrote before he  brought on the Nanaimo troubles.  As was said by Mr. Shepherd, the  member for Nanaimo, who made a  singularly interesting and impartial  speech, "there was . evidently something underlying, some ulterior object, and that was that, the United  Mine Workers were using the. local  labor unions to control the coal trade  conditions on the Pacific Coast of  Canada.  At any rate from the moment that  Mr. Farrington appeared on the scene  agitation ensued, followed by a strike  of considerable dimensions, which led  to the destruction of property, the  calling out of the militia by the Provincial Government of British Columbia,' and then bloodshed. For all'  this the Liberals blame Mr. Crothers,  Minister of Labor, although the  evidence shows clearly enough that  he did his utmost to avert the conflict. One Liberal member, Mr. Macdonald of Pictou, who was very hard  on Mr. Crothers and championed the  United Mine Workers in all they did,  was caught in a trap of his own setting as neatly as ever man was.     7  . A few years ago the United Mine  Weckers suddenly appeared. ;at.; the  Nova Scotia Mines and started to  upset the local labor union known as  the Provincial Workmen's, Association. It������Va short- time the men they  had converted went on strike and the  situation v became quite serious;  amongst pther things, the' militia  were called out to. stop the outrages  which ensued. ..Like many other Nova  Scotians, Mr.' Macdonald wished the  control of the unions to remain with  the .Provincial Workers. Hence when  the United Miners from the States  had gone so far as to wreck property  and /establish a reign of terror, he  wrote to the Minister of ,Labour at  that time (Mr. Mackenzie King) urging him to start criminal prosecutions  against them. To this Mr. King replied that the enforcement of the  criminal law was in the hands of the  Provincial-authorities,���������consequently  the Dominion Government could not  act; but Mr. Macdonald wrote again  and re-wrote that the Federal Government itself should proceed against  the disturbers.  Today, the Conservatives being in  office, he defends the course of the  United Workers at Nanaimo and  professes to believe that because a  ntnnbcr'oi their adherents have been  put in jail for committing grave  offences, they have been shamefully  treated. So true is it that politicians  of a certain stripe are always ready  to box the compass when it is in  their interests to do so.  There is no more sincere friend of  organized labor than Mr. Crothers,  and labor men in general realize that  the attacks made upon him by Liberal  partisans seeking his overthrow and  that of the Ministry are not to be  accepted at their face value. One  assailant at any rate in the person  of Mr. Macdonald has been effectually  silenced out of his own mouth.  4iiI'.I..I.4t..l..ii.li.;l.l,i|..j,.{^^.^������������x-^-^X"i->  12^  Mount Pleasant Livery i:  TRAiNSFER  Furniture and Piano Moving:  Baggage, Express and Dray.   Hacks and Carriages  at all hours.  Phone Fairmont 04B  '.  Corner Broadway and Main A. P. McTavish, Prop.  I  ���������<������<mn<������������inimmmm i*h hti1111in11111nun  ^MgatgMgMgV^MgMigMgSajMp W^*������J������4>^*4>*������������t ������.^#  : VANCOUVER CUT-RATE FRUIT and CANDY CO. ii  :: J N. Ellis. Mgr.        2452 Main St. Cor. Broadway :  m 1111111 m ii ii 1\*a i n 111������  ��������� i  in Season I!  | Largest Stock of Confectionery Fruit & Tobacco on Hill j  i PHONE Fairmont 638  f       , Free delivery to any part of the city.  ������,������������������'������������ M'������I''1"H"1"M-4"M4 4Mh|..>*.,.-       >H--i"t'*l'I-i' l"M"l"l"t''M' I' 1 l"l I' I ������������t������  South Vancouver Undertakers  Hamilton  Bros.  We are foremost in our line for  Moderate Priced Funerals  6271 Frasar Strait Pnona fraser 19  CEDAR COTTAGE PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH  Rev. J. O. Madill, Pastor.  Services for Sunday, March 22���������  11 a. m.���������" Emmanuel���������God  With  Us."  7.30 p.m.���������"Giving One's Life for  Others,"  Sabbath School and Bible Classes  at 2.30 p.m.  Prayer meeting  at 8 p.m. on Wednesday-  Young People's meeting at 8 p.m. on  Monday night.  tfust received a lai^ of  &cwm  Polishing Mop an4 Q'CecJar  Make* Hard Work Eaayf  OGteWp  4������ ill wti fee A. <fo������fog ���������ml i-l���������nlnf  of tM tap# of bifb fniwMre, b������w������w������  ' ���������t>������nMt*r*of thaatraMiawMHMMi*  latjroycwV^to.tMfar corn** ttnefer  ��������� l^l>4������Mifath������ radiator ������o4 ottwr  ird-tofi������-������t-pMC4M.  TirwOOdwPoU^Mopfor  dart ft ow rifk. T<^������ it  wioiitwa  yowmoMr  Phone us your order.   We deliver  promptly.  W. R. Owen JMor rison  The Mt. Pleasant Hardware  Phone Fair. 447 2337 Main Street  X  I  *  ���������t  **-l.+*.H-t-H-H-fr l-H-.l..|..M-H-M'<"������ <H-<"i"H l-I'-H'-H ���������!��������� I'M"M ******++  Mrs.  J. S. Almond, Teacher of  VIOLIN  Is   prepared   to  accept   a   limited number of  attention given to beginners.  pupils.  Special  181  Eighteenth Avenue,  West  13^-14 THE  WKSTEKN   CALL
Friday. March 20,1914
Horace
hAZEOME
eot>rj*t&*rttf4.4i.G+r*ctvAQ-& eo.
WfiiE th��e coirrmvnrpisca vegan, to readjust themselves, I wis standing at
th* curb, my arm -wound supporttngly
about Cameron's waist and bla arm
pressing heavy on my shoulder. Drawing in to tis was an empty nanBom
jcab, provided by Providence, and,
{hailed, I suppose, by me, though I
'���wear I have no recollection of it.
The cabman helped me to lift him
in, and at this the pity of Us plight
���mot* me, tempering the joy of having
found him, and quickening within me
;a spirit of angry retaliation against,
his enemies. For the man now at my
,iside was far different from that man
who had sat with me on the after deck
of the Sibylla, only four weeks ago. He
,waa, indeed, it seemed to me little:
more than the husk of tbe Cameron I1
jhad known. In facial conformation the,
change was not so'marked, though his
expression was pathetically at vari-i
ance with anything I had ever before
seen him wear. The lines of his face|
{were drawn, as with pain, and his eyes:
were dull to vacancy. He lolled,
jaleazily, in a crumpled heap in his cor-!
(ner, like a spineless manikin; andi
though I plied him eagerly with a floodi
jet questions, he might hare been a deaf1
junto for all the answers he accorded:
pie. Once I thought he shook his
in negation, but I   was   later.
���reed to conclude that this was invok
tary, being caused by the roll ot the;
as one of its wheels encountered &
ipresfeon in the roadway.
Tot in spite of his sorriness of pre*-:
and demeanor���in spite too ot the,
anting mystery of   his   return,
hich was scarcely less baffling than;
mystery of his departure���It was;
st least a relief to know that he was
stive and out of the power of those;
mat were bent upon his harm. Good,
tturslng, coupled with skilful medical;
attention, had just worked wondersj
lor me, and I was confident that itj
srould do the same for him; and then
E) should have facts and not theories!
aid us in our quest for the culprits,
d, eventually, in the admlnlstrattbn.
of justice to tbe guilty.
I had given the cabman tbe Humbert
haf the Cameron house and admonished
jbim to make all possible speed; so,:
tirlth the long lash of the whip snap*
ptag sharply at brief intervals and the
jaded horse, thus urged, bounding at a
-clumsy, lumbering gallop, we rolled
noisily northward- Having given over
the effort to obtain from my fellow
passenger even a gestured answer to
my most pertinent inquiries, I turned
my wind to what lay before us. The
Cameron establishment would doubtless be fast locked in slumber as well
gs otherwise, but I made small question of ��y ability to rouse some of the:
servants. My hope, however, was not
to awaken Evelyn. It could mean only
a night's rest lost for her, for she
could gain nothing by seeing her uncle
��t this hour, considering his condition.
J was still busy planning when a
mighty band on the lines brought our
horse to his haunches, and ourselves
pearly out through the suddenly part*
|ed apron; and the Cameron resident*
loomed massive and dark on. our right
1-iiU J-stepped^to tha-sldewalk the-
driver descended, too, but I motioned
him back.  ''������������ ' v
"Never mind, thank you," V atld.!
nil get some one from Inside to help!
carry him"  And in a moment  my
. ��� �� ' . mu probably
prove the most exciting topic of tbe
servants' hall for weeks to come, he
gave not the smallest sign tbat he was
taking part in other than the usual.
Checkabeedy, the butler, however,
though no less perfect a servitor, was
more privileged; and Louis, volatile
as the most characteristic ot his countrymen, collapsed utterly, without effort, apparently, at any restraint whatever. The former's interest was evidenced in a commlseratlngly lugubrious visage and a few blunt questions,
but the Frenchman wept and sobbed
In wordless sympathy. And I bad it
not ln my heart to blame either, for a
more pitiful picture than the one presented by tbe restored Cameron as he
sat there in his own spacious hall,
gazing with lack-luster eyes at the
dead and dying embers on the hearth
before him, I hope never to see.
The butler, ruddy and rotund, and
looking for all the world like a well-
fed monk, for he wore a bathrobe ot
somber hue and his crown was barer
than any shaven tonsure, stared for a
moment ln sad silence. Then, turning
to me, he asked:
"But what haa happened to Mr. Cameron, sir?"
"I wish I could tell you Checkabeedy," was my unguarded reply. "I
wish he could tell us himself."
"But he is so wasted, sir! And his
clothes. I never saw Mr. Cameron in
such clothes."
It was quite true. They were of
what is called, I believe, a pepper-and-
salt mixture, coarse of texture and Ill-
cut, yet not much worn. ��� ���
"He does not recognise us," Checkabeedy went on, "and still he is con-
.scious. May I ask you, sir, where you
brought him from?"
I chose to ignore the question, in
sudden realization of the necessity of
caution.
"And he has been missing a month,
they say, sir.  Is that true, Mr. Clyde?"
"Missing!" I repeated. "Who says
he has been missing?"
"The servants all say so, Bir."
"Then the servants must get rid of
the idea, at once," I said, sharply. "Mr.
Cameron has merely been out of town
for a while. He went away for his
health, and now he has returned, bene*
fited. So you understand, Checkabeedy? He has returned, benefited.
And now, you and Louis will get him
to his room, while I telephone for Dr.
Massey."
Checkabeedy bowed, assenting, and
Louis, still whimpering, wiped hia
eyes.' '
Jt was nearly four o'clock when the
physician left his patient and joined
me In the library downstairs. His face
was very grave.
"I have examined Mr. Cameron thoroughly." be said, "and I can assure
you that be is not seriously Injured."
The paras�� opened up a new line of
thought to me. f
"Seriously injured?" I repeated. "I
don't understand. Poctor. Do you
mean that���"  ;
"I mean," he interrupted, "that the
blow on the back of the head caused
ho fracture.'' -
^ i*Tben he^as, struck !?^U^- ,���-^
"Undoubtedly. Probably with ��
sandbag. Hence his present dazed con*
dltion. Had the blow been delivered
with more force, it might have .resulted in complete loss of memory.   You
thumb was on the push-button and1 .have heard, of course, of instances
faintly there came back to me through , where men have forgotten even their
heavy double doorsthe far-off echo of j own names?"
the bell, jarring against the silence of!
the great house.
J nodded.
"Mr. Cameron will regain his mem-
The promptness with which chains,, ory. It's merely a temporary matter. I
fall and bolts were drawn surprisedV have telephoned for a man nurse for
Cameron's, after a talk with the nurse,
and I promised to return in an hour.
The interval was devoted to a cold
bath, a shav��3, and a change pf clothing at my rooms; and at Bix I was
back again, talking once more with
Checkabeedy who was personally serving me' with coffee in the breakfast
room.
"Between you and me," I began,
"there is small need of concealment tn
this matter of.Mr. Cameron's disappearance and return, his coming as remarkable and mysterious as his going.
I think I am experienced enough to understand that such an affair as this
cannot be kept entirely secret���especially not from Mr. Cameron's servants���and it is better, Checkabeedy,
that you should understand it thoroughly. I can fancy the distorted
story that has been circulated below
stairs. That more rumors, wide of the
truth, have not leaked out and gained
press publicity, speaks very well for
you and your staff, and I congratulate
you on your loyalty and good judgment. All I ask now is that you will
continue to be guarded in what you
say. A single unadvised word might
interfere very materially with our efforts to trace the guilty oneB and bring
them to punishment."
And then I told him as much as I
deemed wise of the facts of the ab-
.duction, of my chance finding of his
master the previous night, and of my
anxiety concerning his present condition.
"And above all things, Checkabeedy," I added in conclusion, "don't look
solemn and distressed when Miss Evelyn is present. Before her, no matter
how we really feel, we must, appear
confident."
A little later the morning papers
were brought in, and I scanned one
after another in search of some new
twist or turn of the story of the previous afternoon. The more conservative
journals were Inclined to make light
of the scare. "Mr. Cameron," said
one, "ceased to be active in the affairs
of the Crystal Consolidated over two
years ago. If he be ill, which is by no
means certain, the fact can have but
little real significance so far as the
company of which he is the largest
shareholder is concerned. It may be
stated on the best authority that Mr.
Cameron's shares have never been
used speculatively, and-that even in
the event of his death they could not
by any possibility come on the market,
for the reason that he has provided a
trust fund, by will, for the benefit of
his niece, and that they are a part of
thatfund."
The sensational press, of course,
still insisted that the Glass King was
in a New England sanitarium, though
they had failed to locate the Institution. Despite my alarm I smiled at
the thought of how their afternoon
editions would have to eat the leak, as
the Welsh say.
: The papers finished, I grew restless.
I desired constant news from the sick
room, and lacking it, I roamed about
the house, in nervous unease, my brain
busy with conjecture, forming one
theory after another, and dismissing
each as readily. The situation was a
tantalism. The answer to all the questions which bad absorbed me for
weeks lay dormant in the brain of the
man sleeping beyond t^at closed door.
Theories, therefore, were now, more
futile tban,��ver. The one accomplishment to be asked was tbe arousing of
an intellect, the stirring of a memory.
Dr. Massey had promised that when
Cameron awakened mental clarity
would be restored, tbat he would be
able to answer questions with Intelligence.   ."'-'..;
Jt le bard to explain why I doubted
this. I think it must have been something I saw in those dull, vacuous
eyes, when I first looked into them under the pale light of the white-globed
electric street lamps. If I had been
forced- to- identify-Cameron by those
eyes alone. I should have said that
this -man was net be. Tbey were so
different, lacking all the expression of
the Cameron eyes I knew.. And yet I
made no question as to his identity. I
knew him, despite this; knew that'
strong chin and jaw, which spelled determination in two syllables; knew his
broad, generous nose, and his.high intellectual forehead. These points of
recognition were so convincing, that I
i could afford to ignore the eyes l had
awaken Mr. Checkabeedy and Louis.
And make haste. No, 3 can't come in;
111 wait outside." He turned away in
obedience to my directions, but I
checked him. "And, Stephen," I
charged, "no word to any one else, as
you value your position; especially no
word to Miss Grayson."
I marvelled at the man's preserved
unemotion. His "Very good, sir," was
uttered with all the stolidity which
marks a response to the commonplace;
and yet I knew that he was fully conscious of the eventfulness of this late
and unlooked-for home-coming. And
the footman who joined me a few minutes later was not less well-trained.
Together, he and I lifted Cameron
from the hansom and carried him up
the broad flight of granite stepB, between the massive guarding lions, and
placed him in a great chair in the
hall, before the wide, sculptured^ fireplace." Ana: though uii"'wd
He was about to bid me good-night
when I checked him.
"Doctor," I said. "I am glad to find
you go optimistic. Before you go I
want you to write me a bulletin of Mr.
Cameron's condition and sign it. I
want no mention in it of the injury,,
since' It is not serious. If possible, I
would suggest that you use the word
���indisposition' and be sure to employ
the 'temporary* you called into play a:
moment ago."
Dr. Massey gladly acceded. Seated*
at Cameron's writing table he scribbled a bulletin of even more encouraging and confident tenor than I had Indicated. And I used it to turn the tide!
pf speculation in Crystal Consolidated.!
But neither the spoken nor the writ-1
ten words of the physician held for1
b>e any considerable measure of solace. My friend's condition was desperate. I knew It and my heart ached
for-him; but it ached more for Evelyn,
bis ward, who loved him, and who
piust be given the gladness of good
news only to be crucified the next moment on the cross of anxiety.
arm.  And yet, I suppose, it waa mtra-: j him���one who understands such cases. I never-seen before and   the   wasted
ly an evidence of the perfect   man-i He will be here In twenty minutes. At
���foment of an establishment wherein!' present Mr. Cameron is sleeping.   I
every contingency Is provided against.: am in hopes that when he awakens hia
A footman, as Irreproachably Uverledl mind will be comparatively clear/'
groomed aa though tha time were
day instead of after two o'clock in
io morning, greeted, mo with becom-
imperturballlity. I recognised him;
laa one of the men from Cragholt, and
UgHed him by name.
"Stepbaa," I said, with an effort to
disguise the excitement with which,
my every pulse was throbbing, "your1
master is outside in a cab. He is very
| weak ��ad will need assistsnee. Get
miotber man to aid  me,  and   then
frame   and   the   shrunken, unsteady
legs.
At brief intervals I consulted the
clocks. It was marvellous how the
time dragged. And that nurse! Would
he never have an errand outside the
suite? I had told him I should spend
the morning ln the house, and that I
wished to be informed of the slightest
change in his patient. I must conclude.
"Yes, yes," I hurried him. "And
what then? Did he inquire for any
one?"
"No. For all of a minute he lay
looking about the room without another word. Then, in a puzzled way, he
repeated: 'My own house!' and asked,
"Where is this house?' And I told him.
He did not seem to recognize the room
at all."
"Is he still awake?"
"Oh, no. Dr. Massey left directions
that he was to be given some nourishment���a raw egg and milk���and then
another powder to make him uleep. He,
turned oh his side after that, and in
less than three minutes was in a deep',
slumber once more."
I was annoyed that I had not been;
called. I let myself hope that sight of
jme might possibly have stirred bis!
memory even though the familiar ob-j
jects of his bedchamber failed. I said'
as much to the short, broad-shouldered:
nurse, whose twinkling eyes were in-
violent contrast with' his thin-lipped,;
igrave, determined mouth.
"Dr. Massey's orders were that for-
.twelve hours no one should be admit-j
ted to the room," was his unanswer-t
table rejoinder.
"Which means not until after five:
lo'clock," this evening?"
"Exactly, sir. But I shall report to,
you everything he says, as nearly as
'possible ln his own words."
"Very well," I said. "I shall spend
the day here." My tone conveyed dismissal and I fear it still smacked of!
annoyance. Mr. Bryan, however, gave
no sign of resentment. His eyes were
still kindly merry, his mouth still Inspired reliance. He turned towards
the door, saying:
"He'll probably sleep four hours at
least, Mr. Clyde. If you wish to go
out, there's no reason why you
shouldn't."
I meant to reply. My lips were already framing a sentence, when a
tableau checked me.
Evelyn Grayson was standing in the
doorway. She wore a clinging house
gown of pale blue, cut low at the
throat, and bordered with a deep collar of Irish lace. The rose flush of
youth and health tinted the cream of
her complexion and a shaft of:sunlight
from a near window made a glittering
golden nimbus of her hair. With wide,
startled eyes she was gazing at Bryan,
or, to be more exact, at the snowy
linen duck in which he was clad, and
which must have held for her a pep
plexing significance.
The nurse had halted, deferentially
standing aside at sight of the girl
whose young beauty seemed to dazzle
him.   ..
For a moment the stillness and silence were absolute. Then Evelyn
turning her gaze upon me advanced
iqulckly, with a little questioning cry:
"Philip!"
"You're surprised to find me here,"
I interpreted, with hands outstretched.
"And to���" she began, laying her
'Angers against my palms.
"To find a nurse here, as well," f
finished for her. "Let me Introduce
Mr. Bry���" But when I would have
presented him be had already gone.
"But who is ill?" she questioned in
nervous haste.   "What-���"
It were well, I thought, to have the
revelation over and done with as
speedily as possible.
"Your uncle. I brought him borne
at two o'clock this morning."
I do not know what I expected, but
I erasure I was not prepared for what
ensued. Her fingers, suddenly releasing themselves from my fond but
feeble support, clutched wildly at tbe
lapels of my coat for support, as she
burst into a passion of sobs. In vain
I made efforts to comfort and quiet
her. She became hysterical. She
laughed and cried by turns, while I,
making bold to regard her as a sorrowing child rather than the woman she
was, held her close and murmured all
the soothing, encouraging words and
phrases I could conjure.
"I���I���am so glad," she whispered
at last, her big liquid blue eyes swimming, her fair face wet with the par-
rent of her emotion. "I���I������ am so
nappy." V
Presently I placed fcer fn a great,
[cayemouB leathern chair, and lent her
jmy handkerchief���assisted her, In-
fdeed���to remove the evidences of her
(tumultuous joy. After which I sat
"down opposite her and answered a
hundred questions, still marvelling at
the contrariety ot the feminine temperament which defies disaster ���dry-
eyed and over good tidings la like Nl-
<obe all tearB.
: Evelyn's emotions alone considered.,
ilt waa, therefore, just as well that
(Cameron had not returned robust and
jof sane mind. Her rejoicing undiluted
Imight have resulted in nervous breakdown.   As it was, the mere fact that
therefore, that Cameron was still sleep- [be waa weak and a trine distraught���"
CHAPTER XVIII.
Three Promises.
Need I say that I did not sleep that
bight r  It was five o'clock when I left
Ing, that Bryan was still watching.
From the fact that Evelyn had not
.yet appeared I drew a measure of consolation. If I could have tidings of
.even the slightest improvement In
Camerqn before meeting her, it would
aid me ln the assumption pf confidence
'upon which I had determined.
At ten minutes past eight I was
searching the encyclopaedias In the
library for information on the subject
of brain concussion. Already I had
followed the trail through three volumes from "Brain" to "Nervous System" and from "Nervous System" to
"Concussion," when an opening door
caused me to turn eagerly. Mr. Bryan,
the nurBe, in a white uniform such as'
hospital doctors wear, stood on the
threshold.    The next moment I had
[which was the mildly equivocal way in
[which I softened the truth for her���
lhad for her fortitude the revivifying
jpotsney of a tonic. It so balanced her
Joy with anxiety that she grew strong
jtn surprisingly short space.
! *1 do not see why a nurse is at all
necessary," she objected, at once. "I
shall nurse him, myself. Louis and I
can do everything that is required."
; "But Dr. Massey���" I began. Where-
[upon she interrupted me:
': "Dr. Massey probably thinks I am
ja foolish, frivolous child. I shall nurse
jUncle Robert even if I have to dismiss
[Dr. Massey and get another phy-
islclan."
; There was nothing to be gained by
(opposing her at this time, so I held my
jnon-commlttal peace, doubting, never-
tional weakness.   "Come, let us go to
him, together."
She was on her feet before I could
restrain her,
"Not now, Evelyn," I said, quietly,
and, at the risk of seeming rudeness,
sat Btill.
"But, why?" And there was a hint:
of suspicion in the look she gave me.
"He is asleep," I told her. And
when, she had relaxed into the great
chair again, I added, temporizing, "Mr.
Bryan will let us know when he
wakens."
Her disappointment was undisguised, and in secret I sympathized
with her. She was experiencing something of that which had come to me
when Bryan had refused me converse
with his patient. But it were better
to divert than to commiserate, and bo I
said:
"This is the day I am to hear from
Miss Clement."
"Is it?" she asked, differently, the
disappointment still rankling. "I didn't
iknow."
"She has promised me important information before three o'clock.   If she
keeps her word, this whole perplexing '
mystery may very shortly be cleared
op." I
"Isn't that what you would call
supererogatory?" she asked, smiling.
"I should think Uncle Robert could tell
all that is needed, now, himself."
I was At a loss for a moment how to
answer her; and in that moment the
telephone broke in, and did away with
the necessity of response.
The instrument was on the writing
table at my elbow, and with a "Shall
I?" to Evelyn, I took the receiver from
the hook and bent to the transmitter.
(Continue.:    Next Week.)
Abitibi,  by Bernard    Muddiman;   AJ
Walrus Hunt within the Arctic Circle; A Caribou Hunt in the Yukon';}
The Little  Lake  of the Big Trout;
Angling notes by H. Mortimer Bat-]
ten; and other    stories   and articles,!
along with the regular departments
devoted to the interests'of the trap'
line, trap-shooting,    etc., etc., which j
are as usual    well    maintained, are I
combined to make a magazine   that]
should be    read    by    all    Canadian]
sportsmen and  by those Americans!
who come to   Canada  annually   fori
their hunting and fishing.   This mag-l
azine, which is the only publication,]
devoted  wholly  to  the  interests  of]
Canadian   outdoor  life,  is  published
by W. J. Taylor,  Ltd., Wobdstock,J
Ont.
SOME TAXES
There are as usual many things to
interest the sportsman in the latest
issue of Rod and Gun in Canada, the
March issue, which has recently
come to hand;    The    Ojibways    at
It  is estimated that  the  State  of
New York will contribute $30,000,C
to the federal government under thd
new income tax law.   John'TX Rockel
feller will contribute $6,000,000; An/]
drew    Carnegie,    $900,000;    Williar
Rockefeller,    $800,000;    George
Baker,   $300,000;   William   A.   Clarl
$240,000; J. P.  Morgan  estae,
000; Mrs. EVH. Harriman, $210,C
Mrs.  Russell  Sage, $200,000;  W.
Vanderbilt,  $150,000;" Vincent .
$225,000;    Jay   Gould   estate,
000;    Mrs.   Hetty    Green,   $190,C
W.   H.   Moore,  $150,000;   Arthur
James,   $150,000;   Robert   Goelet
tate,    $180,000;    Thomas    F.    Ryai
$150,000.    Some   New  York  expert]
say that the contribution of that staj
to the income tax fund will be neare
$50,000,000 'than $30,000,000.
Pauperism in  Great    Britain    hi
reached  the  lowest  figure,  both
actual numbers and in proportion
population, known for many years.
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risen from my crouching position he* [tbeless, the practicability of her prop-
fore the bookcase and had met him
midway across the room with anxious
inquiry.
"Mr. Cameron awoke a quarter of an
hour ago," he told me. "His power of!
speech has returned. He asked me
where he was and what had happened.
I told him he was in his own house,
and that he bad met with an accident"
Sosition. But to her next proposal I
must needs Interpose the obstructive
troth.
"Come," she commanded, brushing
'back from her temples with both
hands the encroaching golden halo,
with the gesture of one who prepares
for conquest, wiping away, as it were,
fika last clinghuc yestlses of her emo-
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.,:-^.^.,}.,;,.;..t,.i.^..;.^..^.;,.i.^..;..;.,|,;.,;,4. Friday, March 20, 1914  THE  WESTERN CALL.  THE BORDEN GOVERNMENT AT WORK  lfr.{Mfr^4������3������^4^M$l^4^4^44J4^4Jl^M$44J4^l4Jwfr^4������}Mft4J4^������^4^.3^  [ET DEByEDOCED  Is Less Now Than  Two Years Ago  t  MINISTER OF FINANCE HAS  DONE GOOD WORK  The  HON. W. T. WHITE  Minister of Finance  Reckless Borrowing  of the  Liberals Re-  Called.  When Hon. "W. T. White makes his budget  speech shortly he will be able to announce that  at the end of the fiscal year, March 31st, the net  debt of the Dominion is less than two years ago,  when the Conservatives came into power. The  Finance Minister has been able to accomplish this  despite heavy borrowings the past year, due to  big public undertakings and. legacies handed  down from the Liberal regime.  The Liberals and Liberal press have been talking much of the expenditure and extravagance,  but a party which squandered $40,000,000 in the  costly National Transcontinental, which administered the public works in the slip-shod manner  the Trent Valley Canal was run, should be the  last to criticize the present administration. The  record Mr. White will be able to show of not a  cent of increase in debt is in striking contrast to  the record of Hon. W. S. Fielding. During the  last four years of the Liberal regime the increase  in the national debt of the country was no less  than $76,000,000. In the one year alone of 1909  the net debt of Canada was increased by no less  than $46,000,000.  Reckless Borrowing.  Speaking recently on the subject, Mr. White  showed the reckless borrowing of the Liberals  during the lSst four years previous to 1911.   The  records of the two governments is a striking  commentary on the two administrations. Mr.  White said:  "In literature sent out from here under the  authority of the Liberal organization, it_has been  stated that, whereas we are ��������� increasing the national debt, our friends opposite were engaged in  the reduction of the national debt. What are the  facts? For'the four years preceding 1911 the  increase in the national debt of Canada under  the Liberal administration was no less a sum  than $76,000,000. In 1909 alone the net debt of  Canada was increased by $46,000,000. Nor is that  all. That was in a year in which there were  many maturities, and I myself could scarcely believe the' figures when I looked up the record.  What were the borrowings in the year 1908 and  the early part of the year 1909? My predecessor  the Hon. Mr. Fielding, from the. 11th day of December, 1907,���������and I desire you to note the year,  because that���������to the 23rd day of January, 1909,  was the year of the money stringency, a period of  thirteen months, borrowed the staggering���������I had  almost said the appalling total of over $100,000,-  000. Of that money 5,000,000 pounds was borrowed in June, 1908, 5,000,000 pounds in October,  1908, and 6,000,000 pounds in January, 1909���������  16,000,000 pounds within a period of seven  months."  Efeiy Woman  . U Interested andshonld know  , about the wonderful  Ask yonr droortrt Ibr  tt If he cannot amply  the MARVKlL acceptae  otber, bat tend stamp for VSoh  trated book-seeled. It kItm foil  MrtienJanand directions liiY������lu*t>ls  W Udles.WTNDSOBSUPPI,VCO.,Wln<lMr.Ont  OwommI Asenta for Canada.  A DETECTIVE'S ADVICE  Befon employiar a FH-  vato Detective, if too don't  know yonr nan. ajk roar  local adviser.  JOHNSTON, tha Secret  Service iatekSteace e������.  MM. Sojim ieS*4  319 Mender St, W.  Vaacewvor. B. t.  Try Our Printing  X   A. E. Habron j. A. Habron g. M. Williamson  HARRONBROS.  FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS  ::  VANCOUVER  Office & Chapel���������1034 Granville St.  Phone Seymour 8-486  NORTH VANCOUVER  Office & Chapel���������122 Sixth St. W.   +  Phone 134  *.:~;~;.^X";~X~X<<������^^  The wealth production of British Columbia  from natural resources for 1913 is estimated as  follows: Mining, $31,000,000; timber, $30,000,-  000; fisheries, $14,455,488.  Phone Seymour 943  ii Davies& Sanders  General Contractors  55-66 DAVIS CHAMBERS     ::     615 HASTINGS ST. V.  K'������H^X~H^3������K^*'K'������H'*^ ***H~:-^K<������M'������H*,H4'<H''H^  S������H'*KMM������'  -&rW&-  fTTTTTT^  Western Canada Powet ODrnpany^s Systetn  NO. t POWER STATION. 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Phone: Seymour 47/0  R. F. HAYWARD, General Manager  WESTERN CANADA POWER CO., Ltd.  P.O.Drawer I4IS  Vancouver, B.C.  JOHN   MONTGOMERY, Contract Agent  !  ������.i a 11- H"i .mill ii 1111 '������������������������������������������������������������������  .../���������;^{.^,.i..i,H..;..,..;-I ;,.| ,;,,������,;, i |,.������.    -������<..,-.>-;-.>*    M^>i^y~trJh+*<"*'\������*>\'***\ I 1' t-l <"1 I ������ 1 I ���������! t"H'l"M������H'll>������ THE WESTERN GALL  Friday, March 20, 1914  V������{4^l^4.34<fr^4t{t^4^l^44{4^������4Jl^l^MJ.4JM^.l}l.fr.jl.frfo  ITEM  %  !*4^i4W'?,,i,^MS,4,4,4^MSMJMJM4W^,4,^*4,H,,S,4^  NEEDLES IN HER HEAD  How Little Colored Girl at Edmonton Was Done  to Death  Edmonton, March 17.���������The death occurred a  few days ago of a four-year-old girl named Lowe,  who lived with her step-parents at 449 Gallagher  street. Yesterday Dr. Campbell was called in,  and as.he was not altogether satisfied with the  cause of death, he called in Coroner Porin, who  made a post mortem examination and found that  there were five needles thrust into the brain  through the skull. The child carried heavy life  insurance. The stepfather, William Lowe, and  his wife, have been taken into custody by the  police pending an investigation which is now  proceeding.   All the parties are negroes.  'YOUR DRESS IS TORN.  King Albert of Belgium Does Not Like Slit Skirts  Brussels, March 14.���������At the court ball last  night the observing eye of King Albert saw a  woman entering the theater with a slit skirt. The  king whispered something to the court mrshal  who immediately offered the woman his arm  and led her out of the room. At the door of the  ballroom, the marshal, bowing to the woman,  said:  "His Majesty noticed that you had torn your  dress up one side and requested me to escort you  to your carriage so that you might return home  and have the damage repaired."  Uniyersity ot British Columbia  The University of British Columbia is, at last,  beginning to take shape. Dr. Westbrook has returned after an absence of three months, during  which time he has visited most of the universities  of the United States and Great Britain. The doe-  tor has been on the outlook for likely professional timber for the B. C. University, his idea being that many men eminently qualified for work  in the East would not fit in out here.  We trust that the Doctor has had in mind  something more than mere learning or disciplinary efficiency, and that we will not be afflicted  with a bunch of modern Pagans, so fearfully omnipresent in American Universities and alas in  Canadian also���������who will subtly undermine what  is left to us of the-faith that has made and keeps  the British Empire together.  An ignorant pagan is bad enough and we have  exclusion laws against them. But a learned  Pagan is worse than 10,000 Hindus and will do us  more damage in the long run.  Montreal, March 17.���������Joseph Beauchamp, the  alleged leader of the trio of murderous bandits,  while praying in St. Vincent de Paul church at  the corner of Fullum and St. Catharine streets at  8 o'clock this morning was caught by Constable  Wilfrid Choquette, aided by Lieut. Trudeau and  Sergeant Cousineau. He was heavily armed,  carrying a thirty-eight and a thirty-two caliber  revolver, but was grabbed by Choquette from behind in such a sudden and strong manner that  he was unable to make any resistance.  Beauchamp says that he has not seen his  companions, Alphonse Foucault and Bourret since  the memorable night of the gun fight last Thursday. Since then he has been hiding in cellars  and shacks, had been in communication with none  of his friends and has been almost starved at  times, subsisting mainfy on nuts. He denied  having shot Constable Bourdon.  As Others see us  Last night I went to church by way of a  change. It happiened to be the Mount Pleasant  Methodist church and I was fair dumfounded.  First, it was a week night, and there must have  been six hundred people there. Then they were  singing Gospel hymns, and singing them; too, as  if they meant it. But the worst of it was���������the  fellow that was preaching read and spoke of the  Bible as if he believed it. Fancy that in this  twentieth century! They say he used to be a  theological professor���������but I should fancy that  his caste would disown him if they could hear  him now. Why, he actually had the audacity ,to  say that a man was a "fool" not to believe the  Bible. Of course he excused himself by saying  that he was quoting seripture. All the same it  was a great liberty to take considering how many  very clever ministers tell us they don't believe the  Bible.  But there was worse to follow. The preacher  ���������Sipperell they said his name was���������took for his  text:  "For God so loved the world that He gave  His only begotten Son that whoesoever believeth  in Him need not perish, but have everlasting life."  A good enough textj of course, if you do not  press it too far. But Sipperell went on to say  that just as love meant love���������so believe meant believe and everlasting life meant everlasting life  and perish meant perish. And then a most unheard of thing happened. The preacher said he  believed in hell���������an everlasting hell. Fancy  a Methodist preacher, in this day of grace, 1914,  saying anythink like that! Shades of Jackson  and Workman, what is Methodism coming to in  these last days?  And the strange thing was the people seemed  to like it. Not one of them objected���������only I  could not help wondering what Pastor Russell  would say to our friend Sipperell. Anyway, it  was just like an old fashioned Methody meeting  "l"i"l"I"t"t"l'it"}"i"t"j'i<tnl"|i't'>j������ilnt"t';t"l"t"{>*8> ���������1^^^������^���������^^^���������^*^^4^MW^,,J,^*^^~J~W*^~5M������������������  JOS. H.  ARCHITECT  910*11 Yorkshire building  Seymour Street Vancouver, B. C.  L������{M3M{l4$I^M{4^Mgl4$l4$>^4.$M{4^M$M$4^4H$.{l.3M$44$l.^^  Kamloopo-Vanoouvor Meat Co., Ltd.  Qor. Mmln end rowed Ste. 1949 Mole Street  Phone Seymour 6561 Phone Fair. 1814  For Choice Mwts  of large variety and reasonable prices, tbis bouse  cannot be excelled.   It stands to tbe very front  f*****,\u\,*,\������y,\.**,\u\nl,<l,\u\uln\*,\,)* f���������>���������������!(������������������<��������� i"l"M-t-I-l"l"l"������"l"t'l"t"I-l't"l"I"������"l''>  :; T. S. Baxter  peter Wright  ANNUAL MEETING OF THE  BANK OF VANCOUVER  ^!0jsjn|ete^|Joj|se  Furnishers  Agents for Ostermoor and  Restmore Hattresses  Davenport Bed  Have you tried our Easy Payment? Come In and talk It over wltb us.  BAXTER &WR1QHT  (Successors to Hutchirigs Furniture Co.)  ���������;  Phone Seymour 771 4X6 Main Street ;  ���������Vwt-  . lmm^+m''j^l+*'^+fr+'~~***ip~\*+')-  i. r*..^..*. .A,.*.*  Report of the Directors  The Directors beg to present to the Shareholders the following  statement of the result of business for the year ending 29th November, 1913, together with,, a statement of the assets and liabilities of  -the Bank: ���������,;���������<��������� ���������..������������������-.. .   ���������;,  Fourth Annual Statement  28th Nov������mb������r, 1913  'PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT  1912���������'': :-":'  Nov. 30���������By Balance brought forward.  $26,699.51  1913��������� ���������..    ���������:;...-,;,,      ��������� , vv... .Vvvv r  NoV.   29��������� By   profits   for   the   twelve'���������-���������'��������� ;.V Vw;";  months to date ........ .......$12,423.16  Less, charges paid during year,  but ! incurred    in   previous   .  '���������year   ....... ;:;....,:^.......;...........  '6,430.00  ::  *  ::  To transfer to provide   for   Bad  and  Doubtful Overdue Debts ..........;���������....$32,692.67  5,993.16  $40,000.00  $32.692.67 $32,692.67  RESERVE FUND  1912���������  Nov. 30���������By Balance . - .............  1913���������- -  Nov. 29���������To transfer   to   provide for   Bad  and  Doubtful Overdue Debts ���������������������������.-������������������.������������������������������������...���������������������������$40,000.00  $40,000.00 $40,000.00  BALANCE SHEET  LIABILITIES  Notes of  the   Bank  in circulation ..;.-;..$ 373,150.00  Deposits   not   bearing interest ...V-...    681,761.81  Deposits bearing interest, including interest  accrued   to  date of statement..    824,963.38  $1,879,875.19  Capital   Stock   paid  in   ...........................    873,838.90  .'  ':*-,      'ASSETS'  Current   Coin    held  by the Bank ........$    36,036.29  Dominion     Notes  held  ..���������.....:������������������.......���������    150,883.75  ::  ~"������-i������f���������^^H-^~^n-^~j~4>->������4-{������*������~t������'>-i~>'t~J~l*������i-*    fl"1'���������>'���������{������������������! |m|ii|"| H"H"l"|"t"|'|"| |"l'4'l'* +  South Shore Lumber Co.  LIMITED  ���������Lumber Manufacturers  1 Front St. v Foot of Ontario St.  ::   PHONE Fairmont 154        VANCOUVER, B. C  \\  !!'-.��������� , . . " ���������  4. ���������        ��������� . -  .t^frfr.M"! ,|, |, I 1.1.4..I..I..������.l.il .|.������ l..|..l..|..l..|i i. .| .|..t..l..l..|..!..l..}..|..;..I..M"I"M"H"t..|..l..t..i.*  PHlltinG* Terminal City Press, Ltd.  I    I Illtlll^    2404 Westminster Rd. Phone Fairmont 1140  R. P. McLENNAN,  President.  $2,753,714.09  ���������.' $  186,920.04  Deposit    with    the  Minister   for   the  purposes    of    the  Circulation  Fund.  37,155.11  No t e s    of    other  Banks  :.:.................  34,270.00  Cheques    on    other  Banks   ....���������....;........;  157,419.14  Balances     due     by  other Banks in Can  ada   .;.....;;...i.^........���������  29,734.16  Balances     due     by  Banks   and   bank  ing correspondents  elsewhere  than  in  Canada   ���������.....:.:...V...V  26,455.37  Railway    and   other  bonds,   debentures  and stocks (depre  ciation  to  be pro  ������ vided  for)   106,068.77  Call and Short (not  exceeding 30 days)  Loans   in   Canada  on   bonds,   deben  ��������� .  tures  and stocks..  225,000.00  ���������'.'::'-:'-    $  803,022.59"  Loans      to     Cities',  V  Towns, Municipal  ities   and   School  - ���������  Districts  ...;   43,115.00  Other  current  loans  and   Discounts   in  --  Canada    (less   re  bate of interest) .. 1,704,673.48  Overdue Debts, esti  "  mated  loss   to  be  :  provided for ........  87,414.90  Real    Estate    and  4  other - than    Bank  .-��������� Premises  ...  1,628.08  Bank    Premises,    at  not     more     than  cost ......  57,724.18  Other Assets, not in  1 ��������� -i          ���������          !  cluded in the fore  going  ���������.:.���������..���������.������������������..���������..  57,135.86  of the old time ignorant days���������before model  enlightenment had set in, when    people    were  foolish enough to believe the Bible was true,  wonder if any of the other preachers are going tc  be so foolish?   I must go and see.   Maybe ye!^  hear from me again.  THECHIEL.  IT IS SAID IN SOUTH VANCOUVER  That Councillor Gold does not relish the re  peated doses of the "Gold Cure" which he is;  being compelled to take from Messrs. Bowsei  Reid & Wallbridge.  That Edward prefers the role of doctor to thai  of patient.  That he will have to take his medicine jus]  the same.  That the reorganization of the municipal  staff has had the effect of finding "soft jobs']  for relatives of the new regime.  That people are beginning to wonder whethej  the wholsesale "head chopping" was meant t|  have that effect.  That efficient employees dismissed h&\  merely made way for relatives.  That $387.90 was paid for well testing whic(]  was absolutely futile.  That the information required could have bee  ascertained free gratis, for nothing, by que  tioning municipal employees present when tl  original tests were made.  That to spend $387.90 on testing the origh  depth of a 12-inch hole, into which sand ai  gravel had been allowed to run freely for sever  months, was waste of money and absolute follyi  That it savored of payment for election sei  ices. -v.  That at a recent meeting, when Councill]  Gold insinuated that a $500 sand screen was  to be found, and that it had never been deliver^  men present knew that the sand screen had be|  delivered,  used and afterwards removed  frc  the well.  That one man said to those about him:  removed the sand  screen myself and we  h?  to take the roof off to get it out of the well."  That when asked why he did not say so,  reply to Councillor Gold's insinuations, the m������  replied:    "What is the use?    The people suj  porting Gold would tell me I was a liar, a  cry, 'put him out!   It is not the truth they wa:  but scandal.' "  That the council under the Gold regime" hi  wasted more money on unnecessary and fruitlel  law costs than would have kept a gang of men ei|  ployed for a month.  That it is curious how working men, depen<j  ant almost entirely, upon the municipality for ei  ployment, have supported and are still suppoj  ing a regime determined to stop all public woi  as far as possible;  That when they begin to realize that it is t]  "absentee landlord," the non-resident in Soul  Vancouver, who benefits most by a cessation ]  public improvements, a change will come o^  the scene.  That the'' Gold regime.'' means the stoppage j  all work not absolutely necessary until the  tural overflow   from Vancouver   increases tl  price of "Gold lots."       -  That in the meantime Edward does not desil  any increase in taxes.  That the present situation in South Vance  ver is like the co-operation of millionaires a���������  workmen to deprive the workmen of their mea]  of earning a living, to    save the millionaire  pocket. a  That the funny thing is the workmen regal  the millionaires as their best friends at present/  wanl  $2,753,714.09  C. G. PENNOCK,  General Manager.  The Shareholders will be asked to approve of a Bylaw to create  a Contingent Fund to provide for estimated losses on certain of the  Assets included in the foregoing Statement. t  During the year the Paid-up Capital of the Bank has been increased from $046,600.50 to $873,838.90,  You will not that the amount standing to the credit of Reserve  Fund and Profit and Loss Account last year has been set aside to  take care of ascertained losses.  The Broadway West Branch, which was being operated at a serious loss, was closed on April 30th last.  The Head Office and all Branches of the Bank have been inspected during the year, and a full report of each office brought in  review before the Directors.  R. P. McLENNAN, President  Vancouver, B. C, 17th March, 1914.  t  t  t  Albert* Oil FieKJs  (Qontinec) from Piure 1)  Few people seem to   realize   the   fact, ai-  others have ceaied to remember that the highe]  gradeof ashph .ltum 4mse oil on-this eontinei  has been found ������a four wells near Fort McKay  the Athabaska river.   Well No. I was sunk il  1911, and 114 f < et of oil was obtained.   In 19]  Well No. 2 pro ed up 143 feet of oil which, c.  analysis, showed 67 per eent. of burning oil, 7.)  per cent, gasolin., and 67.1 per cent, kerosine, af  amazing result from an oil of an ashphaltui  base.   In Well Nv3 in 1913 234 feet of oil wi  obtained, which is an    enormous    body of bi.  Well No. 4 was unfinished in 1913, having reache]  the oil sand for a ctepth of 10 feet���������the oil in thf  sand being so liquid that as soon as the sand wt  pierced the oil rose 80 feet above the level of th  sand.   There is no d^ubt that this discovery hjj  an exceedingly important bearing on the provii  up of the position elsewhere.    Every geologl  who has studied the position as it is at Calgai  admits that it is in either the Dakota or Kootena  formation where the oil will be found���������thejattl  being the finest and most ideal formation fouil  anywhere.   The oil sand found at Fort McKf  was submitted to a well known geologist in Ci  gary recently, and he pronounced the formatio]  after examination, to be Kootenay, and econol  ically it is an event of the highest importance til  discovery of this formation up at the outcropphl  (the formation which undoubtedly underlies tj  whole country) and in connection with the il  lowing of that formation back it is impossible I  estimate what it will mean in connection wi|  the future development and proving up of the  fields of Northern ALberta.  Oil boring is a slow and difficult businej  and certainly requires pLuck, perseverance, f  tience, and above all money to reach a final o\  come, and so far there is no doubt but tha't'tl  virtues referred to have   been    exhibited   in  marked degree.   It is satisfactory to observe thl  there are indications from several sources point  ing to the fact that the position is being closelT  studied, with the certainty that development w|  be very marked in the immediate future.   Thei.  cannot be two opinions as to what will ensue ij  the event of a successful outcome to the presei  efforts to locate the oil, which, though the deve  opments have so far been very slow and tedioi,  yet have proven conclusively that in the nortU  em part of the Provinee of Alberta there is prof  ably the largest petroleum field in the world.

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