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The Nelson Tribune May 30, 1903

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 */h  ���SO S  /  Saturday Afternoon, May 30, 1903  POLITICAL EXIGENCIES ACUTE AT VICTORIA -EBERTS AND WELLS ASKED TO RESIGN  THE GOVERNMENT DEFEATED-ANOTHER SCANDAL-LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR TAKES TIME FOR CONSIDERATION  , Wednesday was an exciting day iu Victoria. The galleries of the house of parliament wero, crowded. Upou the assembling of the house, premier Prior rose  and made a statement which he thought  of great importance to the province. After relating the circumstance under which  he was asked by Dunsmuir to join the  government and later to form a cabinet  himself.  The premier alluded next to the investigation and the interest ho took in the  matter. After following it he found it  was impossible for the government to continue with such a divergence of opinion.  In a government there must be a difference of opinion. But in this'case he saw  that thero was not the confidence which  should exist among some members of the  government. In view of this he reluctantly called for the resignations of two  of his ministers. When ministers saw  that it was in the public interests it was  not a question of their personal feeling,  but he must take the bull by the horns.  Hon. W. W. B. Mclnnes had also sent  in his resignation. It had not been accepted, and.he had asked the provincial  secretary to continue longer.  He had acquainted the lieutenant-governor -with the situation and had asked if  he would grant him dissolution. His  honor had granted him this, but asked  that he should endeavor to have supply  granted before this course was taken.  He thought that it was wise to have,  this granted.  Joseph Martin asked for a inoro definite  statement. He [wanted to know if the  house passed a vote of want of confidence  would he be granted an appeal to the  country.  Premier Prior said that he expected an  appeal to the country under any circumstances.  Mr. Martin asked if he had the promise  of the governor to that effect.  Premior Prior said that if- the house  wanted to defeat him thoy might do so.  He would go to the .lieutenant-governor  ���and ask o dissolution.      -       *        ~������* .  He appealed to the house to grant necessary supply and perhaps pass a few necessary bills, such as the Coal Mines  Amendment Act.  Mr. Mclnnes said that his resignation  as handed in was final. He had good reasons for doing so which he did not propose to place before the house now. . He  was prepared to assist in passing the necessary supply. '���'.*'.  An appeal to the country was needed.  Had he seen a chance of carrying on the  affairs of the country by the government  in a dignified manner he. would have remained with it. The events of the past  few days showed that this was not to be  accomplished, and he considered it his  duty to resign.  Mr. Eberts said he did not stand in a  very enviable position. He had been  asked by his leader to resign, which he  had done. He could not have' resigned before because his reputation was  at stake.  ==Ebertsobjected to=tbe^premier=having"  taken the course he did.  Wells said that he took tho position ho  was called on to. take in a philosophical  manner, although it came as a surprise,  which seemed to be sliared by the general  publio.  McBride refused to say whether he  would grant supply or not and drew at  tention-1'to the~charges against the premier re tenders for Ohimuoy creek bridge  supplies. 0 ���';"'���  The premier said that the statement  that he had opened the tenders previous  to his own firm's tender being filed was  false.  Victoria, 3:30 p,m., May 30.���[Special  to The Tribune. ] The political situation  is rather complicated. On Wednesday a  motion to adjourn, made by the.premier,  was defeated by 15 to 17. McBride, the  leader of the opposition, then made a motion to adjourn, believing he had control  of the house, and his motion was defeated  by 14 to 18. The premier for the. second  time moved the adjournment, and the;  motion was carried 15 to 16. Before adT  journment on Wednesday McBride read  from the Victoria Times a charge.that the  premier, while acting as chief corn-mis-,  sioner of lands and works in November,  1902, had taken advantage of his position  to secure for a limited liability company  in which he is the controlling owner, an  order for wire rope for the Chimney creek  bridge in Cariboo.  On Thursday the house met as usual,  and a motion made by the premier to go  into committee of supply (in other words  to consider the estimates for the year  1903-04) was defeated by 16 to 19. The  premier left the house to inform the governor of the action of the houso, and on  his arrival was informed that Smith  Curtis, the member from Rossland, had  written him that morning that he (Curtis)  would bring charges against the premier  ior malf easanco in office in respect of the  the Chimney creek bridge matter. The  premier could only say that he would return to the house and ask for the appointment of a committee of investigation.  While the premier was absent the member for Rossland had introduced resolutions reciting his charges against the premier and asking for the appointment of a  committee. The resolution passed the  house before the premier's return, but  three of the members named to act on the  committee refused to act. On the premier's return, and on being informed of  what had taken place, he asked that  members would serve on the committee,  as he wished the charges to be fully investigated. The committee was appointed  and that night heard the evidence.  On Friday the committee .reported the  facts and the house in order" to give tho  premier time to lay the facts and the evi-  denco before the governor, the house on  mation'.'of." the.'..premie*' t.pfl*j/)tiJ:iiQfi-"til!.-"  Monday at 2 o'clocN.  Many rumors were afloat last night as  to what the outcome would be. It is very  generally believed that opinion is being  manipulated by lawyer Duff, of the firm  of Bodwell & Duff so as to prevent an  election on party lines. McBride in the  house yesterday in one of his several  speeches said the opposition had the confidence of the country. The Duff deal is  that McBride will be called on to form a  government and that he will take in Tatlow of Vancouver and Green of Kaslo as  representatives of the Conservative party  and Oliver of Delta and Patterson of North  Victoria as representatives of the Liberal  party. That on being sworn in adjournment will be had so as to enable the new  ministers to secure. the approval of their  constituents. The most likely thing to  happen is that the governor will ask the  premier for his resignation on the ground  that he has lost the confidence of the  house and then ask him to recommend  someone else to form a government. That  someone else will not be McBride, Mc-  l_L_tis1or.anyone,m_;he,present-Opposition._  A. S. Farwell who has been here for six  weeks left for Nelson last night.  Curtis made against ex-premier Dunsmuir.  After relating that he had been appointed  a royal commissioner to enquire into the  charges, he says:��� .;"The first and main  charge is, in substance, that Mr. Dunsmuir, while premier, agreed, in order to  enhance the value of his railway .and  other personal interests oh Vancouucr  island, to give the Canadian Northern  Railway company an excessive provincial  subsidy iii money and land for the purpose  of assisting; them to extend their eastern  railway system through the province to  the waters of Bute inlet, and ultimately  to the city of Victoria."  Mr. Dunsinuir then gave evidence that  the land was practically worth nothing,  not even ten cents per acre. Mr. Justice  Walkem goes on to say: "This evidence,  not having been contradicted in any respect, the* land grant proposed to be given  as part of the subsidy to the company was  a valueless asset of the province. The im-  plementol part of the subsidy, namely the  cash bonus, was not impeached, consequently the allegation that' the subsidy as  a whole was excessive has not been proved.  This disposes of'the charges of corruption  made against Mr. Dunsmuir, and also the  charge made against his colleagues as  being alleged parties to that corruption.  "With respect to the next charge, that  the government improperly employed Mr.  Greenshields as its legal advisor in the  matter of the railway negotiations with  the company, notwithstanding the fact,  wtiich they were aware of, that he was at  the time acting in that capacity for the  company, I need only to say that the  weight of evidence is against it."  EAST KOOTENAY IRON NONES.  DUNSMUIR EXH0N0RATED,  m  Justice Walkem last Saturday brought  his report on tho charges of Smith  C. Hungerford Pollen has written an  exhaustive article upon the Bull river iron  mines. He says: It is a matter, not  merely of individual, but'of national importance whether pig iron or steel can be  profitably produced in British Columbia.  There must always be a beginning. The  value of a commodity must be governed  in the end by the cost of its production.  The position of Bull river is a. striking  one when the estimated'costs of production are compared with that ofjiteel_pro-_  fl'iced-ia tho United Sta&'s^.^ebuiltung-  of the Kootenay Central railway, which  seems now a certainty, will give special  advantages in the making of a great center  for the reduction and refining of metals.  Deposits of various kinds, such as manganese, that have hitherto been considered  of no commercial value whatever, seem  destined to become great assets to the  wealth of the country. The property in  question is known as the Bull River'Iron-.  Mines arid is-situated on Fenwick mountain, 18 miles from Fort Steele. The distance to existing railway points are, to  Jaffray and Wardner, oh the C.P.R., nine  and five miles respectively; Elko, on the  Great Northern railway, 20' miles. Good  wagon roads connect with these places at  present, but the route of the proposed  Kootenay Central railway passes immediately below the claims at the foot of Fen-  wick mountain and will 'be within convenient reach of a tramway. The elevation of the claims is 6,000 feet above sea  level and 2,500 above Bull river, which  encircles two sides of Fenwick mountain. '  -The^vertical-distance^measured^from-the^  summit to the lowest workings is 500 feet  and to the lowest outcrop it is 900 feet.  The analysis from samples taken from 11  claims gives au average of 69.99 per cent  metallic iron. The cost of extraction of  ore is placed at $1 per ton. The falls on  Bull river, two and one-half miles from  the claims, afford a magnificent opportun  ity for power. The river Jdrops 200 feet  within a distance of��one mile and has a  flow of 6,000 inches. The reduction of the  ore on the spot is taken up by the writer  and by comparing all the costs connected  with the iron smelting industry at Pittsburg with what they would be here, he  shows that the cost of making one ton of  pig, iron at the former place is $12.94,  while at Bull river it would cost only  ��11.85, or $1.09 less per ton. Another  table, comparing freight rates to the Pacific coast, shows ihat the Bull river product* would have an advantage of $5.90  s?per ton in this respect, which taken with  '���the gain of $1.09 at the smelter, would  make a total gain, of $6.99 per ton on pig  iron. ,-��� . ������--������'   . ..   ���    ���   ���   ,-.���_/������  MINERAL SAMPLES WANTED.  Angus K. Stuart was in Nelson this  week arranging for.a. mineral exhibit to  advertise the wealth of the West Koot-  enay'district at the St Louis World's Fair  which will open in May next year. Mr.  Stuart has had much experience in the  work of exhibition, and desires the assistance of all mining men and mine owners  so that a thoroughly representative exhibit can be sent.   ,  What is really wanted is, that in addition to' small specimens properly tabbed  from all the mining claims of the division  that can be got, a large exhibit from each  of the well developed mines be sent in  and that a, sufficient quantity of the char-  ��� acteristic ore of the various camps be got  together so as to give a general idea of the  wealth that is here.  The Dominion government will not pay  for the collection of the samples but will  pay for their freight to Ottawa and all  subsequent expenses. -  Small specimens or samples which do  not weigh more than four pounds may be  mailed free to Ottawa, others may be  packed up in boxes and sent by C. P. R.  freight. All package should be addressed  to* the "Secretary, Exhibition Branch,  Department of Agriculture, Ottawa."  Notification by mail of packages forwarded should accompany, each exhibit. All  letters on the subject go to Ottawa free of  postage and should be marked* " O. H.'  M.S."'  Mr. Stuart is anxious that full descriptions should accompany each -and every  exhibit sent to.Ottawa. He asks that at  ���Tlesist'-shouia'^'e^gireiiV. Name" of ~claim*;s  owners, locality, approximate assay,values  and any further general or statistical information that can be given. Exhibits  should be forwarded to Ottawa at once,  but the department will accept them till  October 31st next.  pTLPfG NOTES.  In the immediate neighborhood of  Greenwood some good strikes are reported  of telluride ore.  The Mother Lode is keeping ahead of  the requirements of the two furnaices at  the Greenwood smelter-  ; Angus McGillivray7 has gone to work  the Neepawa, Ten Mile. He will work*  the property all summer.  It is expected that the ten stamp mill on  the Eva, near Camborne, will be in oper-  tion within the next few days.  On the Edith L. Fraction, near the Ath-  elstan mine, in the Wellington camp, an  uprooted tree exposedlthe croppings of a  ledge 100 feet wide. The values are said  to bo $100 in gold and silver.  A. M. Symons claims to have on Ping-  ston creek one of the largest zinc properties in the Kootenay. He says the ledge  is 25 to 80 feet wide, it is eight miles from  Arrow lake, and at a depth of 200 feet a  body of clean zinc ore three feet 'wide is  found. The ore averages botwcen 30 and  40 per cent zinc with some galoua going  2 to 5 ounces silver, $1 to $5 gold hud 13  per cent lead. ���  E. Rammelmeyer is in from the Fern  mine and reports that he is keeping the  ten stamp =mfll working with only four  miners getting out ore and that the re-'  suits so far are entirely satisfactory.  Under J. L. Parker's management the  North Star is looking splendid. As soon  as the government gives the necessary encouragement to the lead industry this  property will be a steady shipper.        '   ,  Coal lands have been located on Fording river, north of block 4588. This is  unreserved crown land. The Trail* smelter have a license from the. government  to prospect for coal in that neighborhood  and have located a block of 42 claims, y  Work on the Cromwell will be begun  as soon as the snow is away sufficiently  to allow, a tunnel to be commenced about  250 feet above the present lower crosscut.  This tunnel will strike the vein in about  150 feet giving a depth of between 500 and  60*0 feet on the ledge.  Work on the Georgie group, situate on  the north fork of the Illicilliwaet river,  about 19 miles from Albert Canyon, lias  proceeded steadily all winter. Over 100  feet of tunnelling has been done. Dave  Woolsey and partners own the group and  have great confidence in the future of the  property.  Colonel Toppping, the father of Trail,  was in Spokane to see president Roosevelt  and incidentally to try and interest him  in one of the biggest things on earth.  The president was, however, too busy to  talk about'mining deals. The genial old  colonel is "now located in Greenhorne  camp, about 25 miles from Sumpter, Oregon, and has a bond on the Forty-Nine  Jimmy. The vein is only five inches wide  at present but goes $1000 a ton in gold onthe average. Surface water interferes  with mining just now, but as soon as" it  is away the colonel has arranged for  steady development work. All reports  heard about the property indicate that ^ it  will be a steady shipper from this time  forward.  . At the annual meeting of the Payne  company the manager of the property,  reported on the recent strike in the low  level tunnel: "The vein is wider and  shows a higher grade of ore in the floor  <Jhan.in,,thej*oof.ofr the,,,drifts.��� Its. avor-  ageNvidthis %% feet, showing- in several  places swellings of tho vein. About 8,700  tons of ore*are in sight." The new magnetic separator plant put in by the company will be running by June. It will  have a capacity of 40 tons of zinc ore per  24 hours. It comprises a roasting furnace, magnetic separators, screens, elevators, zinc rolls, etc. The finished product, which will run approximately 60  per cent zinc, and 16 to 20 ounces silver,  will contain only a small percentage of  iron and less than two per cent lead. On  this the manager remarked: "With the  prospect of being able to produce 6000  tons or more of zinc from the. present ore  reserves hi the mine during the next 18  months, I am able to predict a bright future for zinc and it will be^ readily, seen  that the* revenues from this by-product  from now on will be an important factor  to contend with."  and $4500 for the other, there may be  some truth in the rumor.  The probability is that Hill or the C. P.  R. will buy; the charter from McLeans,  who are not looked upon as strong enough  to build the line themselves.  TheC. P. R. might consider it a good  buy on account of the change that will  likely take place in the personnel of the  British Columbia legislature after the  election, which may make it difficult for  them to get subsidies from the province.  The Dominion government is expected  to grant additional aid to the extent of  $6400 per'mile to the builders of the line.  GENERAL NEWS.  COAST-KOOTENAY LINE.  It is reported from Princeton that Mc-  Xean3ros.,=who-were=granted=a=-chartefc=  last session for the building of thc Coast-  Kootenay, are about to begin work on  their line within a mouth or two.  Unless construction is started by September 1st of this year the charter will be  cancelled, and as it carries a goodly sub-  subsidy of $4000 a mile for one portion,  On Monday last the southern portion of  Nebraska was swept by a tornado. Fifteen persons were killed and the financial  loss is saidio be upwards of $60,000.  A petroleum company has been formed  in'London with a' capital "of $10,000,000  which has holdings in the United States  and China and Avho3e purposo it is to enter the field against the Standard Oil  Company.  Paul Blouet (Max O'Rell) died in Paris  on Sunday last. Max O'Rell was a famous French traveller, writer and lecturer. He had been seriously ill for some  months and died from the results following an operation for appendicitis.  Tho Western Federation of Miners commenced its eleventh annual convention'on  Monday at Denver, Col. Every state west  of the Mississippi and north to British  Columbia is represented. A movement to  make the eight-hour day universal in all  the mining camps under the jurisdiction  of the federation is expected to be one of  results of the convention.  The next session of the provincial normal school will commence on Monday,  July 6th, at the Roberts' school, Vancouver. All teachers who are holders of certificates issued under the regulations  prior to July, 1901, are eligible to attend  at this session. Forms of application and  auy other necessary information can be  obtained from thc principal of the pro-'  vincial normal school, Vancouver, B. C.  Reports from the North West received  in Nelson, say that both freight and-passenger traffic is terribly congested. One  man brought in Wo train loads of cattle  from Kansas to Lethbridge, it.took as  loug.to getjthem^frpm*. Medicine-Hat'to'  Lethbridge as'froia"'-Kansas'to" Medicine  Hat and when they arrived, he informed  the station agent that he could take tho  few that .were alive to pay the freight.  Au eve witness said the cars were full of  dead cattle.  Bulletin No. 10, dealing with laud and  agriculture in British Columbia, issued by  the Bureau of Provincial Information, lias  been received. It deals with the, physical  characteristics, geology, rivers and lakes,  political divisions, climate, agriculture oud-  general 'conditions of the province; with  much other useful information, compiled  by R. E. Gosnell, secretary Bureau of Provincial Information, and published under  the direction of the provincial secretary.  It has a number of photogravures, and is  probably, much the best printed bulletin  yet issued from the office of the king's  printer at Victoria.  The city of Toronto is making an interesting departure in horse shows and is  holding a novel form of equine exhibition  in the open ah* on tho afternoon of July  3rd, iu connection with the Old Homo  gathering which=the=boai'd;ofjtrade=of-theT'  city has arranged. Instead of extending  a show over one week* in Madison square  it will all be done in one hour of a sunny  summer afternoon. The beautiful Queen's  park and University oval f ui-nish roadway around adjoining circles of over two  miles and on these will be ranged upwards of 500 horses and carriages.   An  army of judges-will make the-awards  simultaneously and thc judging -will not  occupy above an hour. Then the whole  exhibition will move around the oval and  :pass in review before his excellency the*  ���governorTgeneral of Canada, lord Minto. *  It is expected that over 200,000 people will  witness this unique horse show. It is designed to show to tho thousands of home  coming Canadians how important a centre  of the horse breeding industry Toronto  has become.  Twenty six actions against the Canadian. Pacific railway have been entered in  the county court of Nelson by Taylor &  O'Shea, for the wages of the men now on  strike for the men now on strike for the  month of, February. The Canadian Pacific are understood to have issued the  cheques, but the men cannot get them delivered. The cheques for the few days  worked in March have been paid. The  cases come up for trial on June 30. The  men on strike no doubt need the money  and withholding these cheques seems a  small piece of business for such a large  corporation to stoop to.  YMIR CELEBRATION.  The celebration on Victoria day at Ymir  was a great success. Quite a large number of the citizens of Nelson went and all  thoroughly enjoyed themselves, except for  the uncomfortable time they had between  Mountain station and Ymir, the cars being so crowded that even ladies had to  stand. This might have been easily  remedied if an extra car-had been put on _  and left at -Ymir for the return journey. ���*  On the arrival of the train a heavy salute was fired and the Nelson band headed  the procession which at once marched off.  A  float crowded with pretty children, ���'.  having "Canada's Hope," in large letters   ,  was the feature of the procession.   The   ��� '  Yrnir Miners'  Union followed two and ��� ���  two, to the number of about 220.  After the procession the sports took  took place. Kirby Douglas of Nelson won  the 100 yards dash, the remainder of the  items being won by local men. There  were some-very good contests. The drill- .,  ing contest was keenly watched by en- _��  thusiastic critics. Dan McDonald 'and'V-? J3&  Charles Farrell put down the best -hole,,  making 41 inches in hard granite/ Beth-^  ,nne and Brown'only managed 35>_ inches  having bad luck with their steel.** i     * -  A grand ball was a fitting close to the  day's entertainment, and quite a number  of the Nelson visitors remained over for  it.  The quoit match was won by J. H.  Wallace, E. G. Smythe being second.  LACROSSE AT KASLO.    *  **__  **3<.'  7 A fair number of citizens of Nelson  went to Kaslo on Victoria Day. The Nelson lacrosse team won from Rossland by  a score of 13 to 7. The line up was as  follows :,-������-.'  Nelson  P. Grcyerbiehl.  A. Jeffs   C. Jeffs.........  A. Taylor   C. Williamson.  L. Steele.......  A. A. Perrier...  I). McNlchol::'.  J. Fox    .W. Hill...:...:  H.J. Perrier...  R.Knox   goul  .   point  cover  1st defence  2nd defence  . 3rd defence .  centre  3rd home   .  2nd home  Itosslund  E. Koblnson  K. Summers  H Williams  E. Conrov  ...   .   G. Paul  J. Donahue  .P. Wilkinson  .   . .. J. Lee  J. McLaughlin  1st home   .    . .   A. Keating  outside E. Powers  Inside. . ..C Summers  A baseball match was played in the af-  terncxnfbetween tlie Rossland_intermedi^  ates and the Nelson Butterflies, in which  the latter team was victorious by a score  of 13 to 2.  The match was.a good one considering  the amount of practice the Rossland boys  liad been able to get.  Tlie Salvation Army band enlivened  the proceedings.  Visit of President Roosevelt to Spokane, His Magnificent Reception and Splendid Speech  w  m  Tuesday, tho 26th of May was a great  day for the city of Spokane. Thousands  of visitors from tho adjacont towns camo  to welcome the first visit of president  Roosovelt. They came from eastern  Washington, Idaho, Montana and a goodly number from British Columbia and it  is computed that 75,000 people were present.  With the exception of two slight  showers, which fell just about the time of  tho president's arrival, the weather was  all that could be desired.  The city was splendidly decorated. One  flag in pai'ticulor called for notice, it being about 40x80 feet and waved most majestically between two banks on Riverside.  The main streets were all roped off and  soldiers, militia and police kept the large  crowd in good order.  About 2:30 a special train with president Roosevelt arrived on the O. R. & N.  railroad. The reception committee were  introduced by governor McBride, mayor  Boyd and senator Turner, after which the  party took their seats in the carriages and  the drive around the city began.  Mounted police lead the way, followed  by an escort of rough riders, then the carriage with the president, mayor Boyd,  governor McBride, secretary Loeb, and a  special constable.  Great disappointment Avas caused to the  Spokane Athletic Club. They had prepared the ground and were all ready ex  pecting tho president to turn the sod for  their now building, when greatly to thoir  surprise tho cavalcade passed them without stoppiug. This and the great disappointment to the school children, were  the most prominent features of the blundering which took place in the ' arrangements.  About 6000 school children had been got  together in the Coeur d'Alene park where  they expected the president would address them. When, however the carriages came in sight it was very soon seen  that there was no intention on the part of  the president to stop/ This was a very  cruel blunder on someone's part, as the  listening to a few words from the "president would have been a prominent event  in the lives,of Spokane's future men and  women. From what could be learned  afterwards it seems that no arrangement  had been made by the committes for the'  president to speak to the children.  The president's thoughtful nature asserted itself a little later when, on being  told that E. Sanders, who had served in  Cuba and the Philippines, was very ill,  and the house being pointed out to him,  he at once ordered the carriage be stopped  and getting out went and shook hands  with the young man, and wished him a  speedy recovery.  The ceremony where president Roosevelt broke ground for the new Masonic  temple, while exceedingly brief was intently interesting to the big crowd of  Masons which assembled to witness it.  Prior to tho ceremony tlie Masons   liad  marched from the present temple to the  scene - of tho new ono. Ninety-one  Knights Templars, brilliantly uniformed,  led the procession, and they wore followed by 346 blue lodge Masons. Thus  there were 437 Masons in line.  When tho president reached the site, ho  was escorted, together with governor McBride, secretary Loeb and mayor Boyd,  from his carriage to the scene of the ceremony, a distance of only a few feet, by a  guard composed of captain John Gray, E.  F. Waggoner, H. L. Burns and F. E.  Michaels.  A. M. Thomas, George E. Clark and H.  B. Winchester, representing the tliree  Masonic lodges in Spokane, were on hand  with a bright new pick and spade. Judge  H. L. Kennan, who was with the Knights  Templars, made a brief speech on the significance of the occasion and presented  the tools to the president.  The president's speech was very brief.  He said; "It is a very great pleasure to  me to be present among my brothers and  my countrymen on this occasion. It is a  pleasure to throw the first spade of dirt  for your new Masonic temple."  Then seizing the pick the president  struck the ground twice vigorously. Then  a quick turn with tho spade aud the work  was over.  F. P. Weymouth thanked the president  on behalf of the Masons.  At the comer of Lincoln and Main a  grand stand had been erected. This was  well filled by the invited guests and the  reception committee and from it could bo  seen the sea of faces, said to number 25,-  000 to 30,000. President Roosevelt arrived on the grand stand about fiive.  o'clock and was met by a lady and gentleman who were evidently old friends of  his, with whom he talked for a time.  The gentleman, who wns said to be an old  ranching partner of tho president, showed  his delight by patting the president on the  back.  Senator Turner then called up mayor  Dean of Rossland, mayor Archer of Kaslo,  aud mayor Burritt of Grand Forks and  introduced them to tho prosident, who  shook hands with them and said ho was  glad to see theni, and that ho had been in  the Kootenay country years ago.  After some little delay caused by the  Grand Army men, who wero being  marched into position at the foot of the  stand, Senator Turner in a brief but effective speech introduced the president.  He finished by saying:  "Mr. president, in the name of these  thousands, I give you a cordial and hearty  welcome to our midst. They love their  country, respect its laws, honor those who  have been selected to rule over it aud in  its hour of stress will be found in the vanguard of those who brave suffering and  danger and death for its protection and  preservation. Again in their name I bid  you a cordial welcome to our midst. Fellow citizens, I now have the distinguished  honor of presenting to you Theodore  Roosevelt, president of the United States.''  (Loud and continued applause.)  President Roosevelt said in part:  "Senator Turner and you, my fellow  Americans: It is a matter of the greatest  pleasure to me that I am able today to  come here and greet you, greet you in  this wonderful city of this wonderful  state. (Applause.) Before I came I knew  you had done a great deal, but I did not  know qiute how much, and though I  thought I came to Washington a pretty  good American, I go away a better one.  "Ours is a government of liberty by,  through and under the law. No man i.s  above it. And the crime of cunning, the  crime of greed, the 0111110 of violeuco, are  all equal crimes nnd against them all  aliko the law must set its fnco. (Great  applause)  "This is not and it never shall be a government either of a plutocracy or of n  mob, neither one. (Great applause.) It  is, aud it has been, and it will be, a government of the people, including alike the  people of great wealth, of moderate  wealth, the people who employ others,  the people who are employed, the wage  worker, the lawyer, the mechanic, the  banker or the f arnier; including them allv  protecting each and every one if he acts  decently and squarely, and discriminating against each of them, no matter from  what class he comes, if he does not act  fairly and squarclj", if lie does not obey  the law.   (Applause.)  "And while all people arc foolish if  they go outside the law, wicked as well  as foolish, yet the most foolish man of  this republic is the man of wealth who  complains because the law is administered with impartial justice against or  for hhn. (Great applause.) And his folly  is greater than the folly of any other man  who protests against the law, because he  lives aud moves and has his being because  the law does indeed protect him and his  property; and we have the right to ask  cveiy decent Americau citizen to rally to  the support of the law if it is being broken  against the interests of the rich man, nnd  we have the same right to ��� nsk that rich  man to cheerfully and gladly acquiesce in  the enforcement of the law against his  seeming interest if it is tbe law. (Applause.)  "And now, my friends, in closing, for  I shall not keep you long, let me dwell  upon ono more lesson taught by tho men  of the civil war, the lesson of brotherhood,  thc lesson of accepting each man on his  worth as a man.   Remember that there  aro two sides' to an estrangement. It i.s 11  base thing, a base aud wicked thing, for  nny man in a spirit of arrogance to look  down upon another because lie is less well  off, less successful; aud also, my brothers,  it is just a.s base, just as wicked in a way,  to look with rancor aud envy and hatred  upon another man because he i.s better off  than you are. The two crimes are manifestations of tho same feeling, and one is  as base and .as un-American a.s the other,  and each aliko is destructive of thc principles that lie at the base of our American  republic.  "Now, I want to make clear one point:  if you only have enough selfrespect you  would not envy or hate another man because he is better off in the world's goods.  You would not do it because you aro too  proud of yourselves as American citizens,  because you have too much confidence in  yourselves, because you will not admit the  inferiority that accompanies envy. If you  envy and hate another man, you admit  that you arc inferior, to him, and it is not  only a baseness of attitude toward him,  but it i.s nn admission of unworthiness in  yourselves.  "What wo want to know about our fellow citizen is, if lie is a man who docs his  duty by his neighbor and the state, if he  is a good father, a good husband aud a  good man to work beside, to deal with, a  good man in the performance of his civic  duty, then he is a good citizen and entitled to the respect and regard. of all  honest men.  "And if he is not, if he docs not come  up to tho standard as regards all those  matters, then, be lie poor or be he rich, be  ho worth his millions or be ho a ninn who  does not know nt one day whore the next-  bread will come from, in either case he is  a bad citizen, and not a good one, and I  ask that we see to it- in this', our country,  that the lino of division in the deepe*  matters of our citizenship be drawn never  between   section   and section, never between  creed  and  creed;   never, thrico  never, between class and class, but that  the lino bo drawn on the line of conduct  cutting through sections, cutting tlirough  creeds, cutting through classes, tho line  that divides the honest from thc dishonest, tho line that divides good citizenship  from bad citizenship,  the line that declares a man a good citizen if he only acts  in accordance with the immutable law of  righteousness, which has been the same  from the beginning of history to the present moment, and which will be tho same  from now to the end of recorded time.  ''I thank you for listening to me."  At  the  conclusion of his speech tlie-  president was driven to the Northern Pa-'  cific depot, leaving at 6 :lo for Helena.  The president was presented with a  silver plate, engraved "Honorary Member  Spokane Amateur Association," and as  souvenirs from Spokane, a minature dinner pail of silver filled with rich specimens of ore from Washington mines and  some cups of royal onyx from the Stevens  county quarries of the United States  Marble company. After shaking hands  with those of the conjniittce nearest him,  the president waved his hat and oried  "Good-bye, boys," and the train pulled  slowly out amid the cheers of the crowd,.  A magnificent display pf fireworks fittingly concluded the festivities of the day,  and most of the visitors wended their way  to the depots and wearily went to their  homes after a day long to be remembered.  About 11:30 a sad accident occmred at  the Northern Pacific depot, Julia Porack,  the 20 year old daughter of Rudolph Porack, of Sprague, while waiting to take  tho train for home, was run over and  killed. The Nelson Tribune  I  I  un  Bank of Montreal  KsinMisheil 1817.    Incorporated by A.-t of Parliament.  CAPITAL (all paid up) $12,000,000.00  REST     8,400,000.00  UNDIVIDED PROFITS  35,698.62  Head   Office,  Montreal  RT. HON. LORD STRATHCONA AND MOUNT ROYAL, G.C.M.G., President.  HON. 0. A. DRUMMOND, Vice-President. K. S. CLUSTON, General Manager.  NELSON BRANCH Con,er Baker ttnd  Kootenay Streets  A.  HI.  BUCHANAN.  Manager.  IMPERIAL BANK OF CANADA  Head   Office:  Toronto,    Ont.  CAPITAL (Authorized)   $4,000,000  CAPITAL (Paid Up)  2,9M,784  BEST..  2,520,076  Branches in  tho Northwest Territories, Provinces of liritlsh Columbia, Manitoba,  Ontario and Quebec.  T. R. MERRITT, President. D. R.  WILKIE, Vice-President and General Manager  ��. HAY, Assistant General Manager. W. MOFFAT, Chiei' Inspector  NELSON   BRANCH  A general banking business transacted. Savings Bank Department���Deposits received and interest  allowed. Drafts sold, available ln all parts of Canada, United States and Europe. Special  attention given to collections. J.  1VI.; LAY,  Manager.  The Canadian Bank of Commerce  With which is amalgamated  The. Bank of British Columbia  PAID  UP CAPITAL.   RESERVE FUND   AGGREGATE  RESOURCES OVER.  .? 8,000,000  . 2,500,000  . 72,000,000  Head Office:   Toronto, Ontario  HON. GEO. A. COX, President      B. E. WALKER, General Manager  NELSOfV  BRANCH  Savings   Bank   Department  Deposits received and Interest allowed  BRUGES  HEATHCOTE,  Manager  The Nelson Tribune  Founded-in 1892.  ", THE TRIBUNE COMPANY, LIMITED,  *'���'' PROPRIKTOKi.  with; the set purpose of benefitting his fel-  lowmen, with the result that his hearers  go away better men, better citizens and  incidentally better Republicans.  Office: McDonald Block, Baker Street.  The ��� Nblson-.Tribunb is served' by carrier to  subscribers In Nelson or sent: by mall to any  address in Canada or the United States! for $1.00  a year; price to Great Britain, postage paid,  11.50; No subscription taken for less than a  year.  JOHN HOUSTON; Editor.  SATURDAY, MAT 30,  1903  : The Vancouver World insinuates that  the Canadian Pacific 'contributed $60,000  towards the anti-Martin campaign fund  in the 1900 provincial election, and that it  was disbursed through E. P. Davis, K.C.,  of Vancouver, and E. V. Bodwell, K. C,  Victoria. None of the money was used  in the interests of the candidates of the  Provincial Party in that contest; it went  to defray the expenses of the " Turnerites " and the " Straight Conservatives "  and the "Independent Liberals." Politicians in Nelson who worked for the  " Straight Conservative " and the " Independent Liberal" candidates could, if  ��� they would, explain how much of that  fund was used to bring about the defeat  of John Houston, the candidate of the  Provincial Party. ; They .could) if they  would, also explain how the defeat of  Houston was to be brought about. The  World, however, is wrong aB to the  amount contributed by the Canadian Pa-  cific.   While that raU-wayiandJits officials.  contributed part of the 160,000, most of it  was contributed by the Crow's Nest Pass  Coal Company and men like Senator Cox  of  Toronto.   If these corporations contributed 160,000 to bring about Martin's  defeat in 1900, it is not at all unlikely  that  other  corporatipns   contributed to  Martin's campaign fund, which is placed  at $40,000.   If corporations put up $100,-  000 for election expenses in 1900, what  did the corporations expect to get in return for their money?   Was it legislation  to directly benefit them; or was it orders-  in-council to give them the Dutchman's  one per cent on their- investment ?   Today  the party managers are casting about for  campaign funds.   None of them have the  courage to appeal to the people themselves  for the necessary funds to carry on the  election.   If the people are honest, party  managers would not need to go to corporations  for campaign funds.   At the  last Dominion election in the city of Vancouver, the manager of one of the parties  stated that there were more grafters in  Vancouver than in all the rest of Canada.  Were the people of British Columbia to  declare they would not support a political  party who liad a campaign fund, political  purity might follow, and investigations  like  those  seen  at  Victoria  would no  longer be heard of.   But the people want  campaign funds, and when they get them  the corporations who furnish the funds  want something in return, and that something always comes out of the pockets of  the people.   What fools the people nre!  Mighty crowds greeted presidont Roosevelt at Spokane on Tuesday and lie everywhere won golden opinions from the assembled multitude. Although not to be  considered an orator, he is a forcible and  convincing speaker, and his intense earnestness is evident in every word he utters.  He impresses his audience with the idea  that he is talking from his heart, and  SUNDAY OBSERVANCE.  Sabbath' observance is older than the  Hebrew nation. Doubtless it arose out of  the well marked phases of the moon, and  the Hebrew name, which means division  or cessation, or rest, sufficiently points to  that derivation. The moon was the most  obvious marker of the' divisions* of time,  and in all ages it has been observed as  such. ' Our word month points to the  moon as the source of our first division of  the year.  Two.reasons are given in the Bible for  the observance of the Sabbath by the Jews.  The first is that " in six days the Lord  made heaven and earth, the sea, and all  that in them is, and rested the seventh  day: wherefore the Lord blessed tho Sabbath day and hallowed it." But the only  command connected with this hallowing  was that the Hebrew people should rest  on that day.  It was peculiarly a Hebrew institution-  so far as these commands go. '' And the  Lord spake unto Moses, saying, speak  thou also unto the children of Israel, saying, Verily my Sabbaths ye shall keep;  for it is a sign between me and you  throughout your generation; that you  may know that I am the Lord that doth  sanctify you. Ye shall keep the Sabbath;  therefore; for it is holy unto you: every  one that defileth it shall surely be put^ to^  "d^tbTTfoFwhcMSver doettTany woriclhere-  in, that soul shall be cut off from among  his people. Six days may work be done:  but in the seventh is the Sabbath of rest,  holy to tho Lord; whosoever shall do any  work in the Sabbath day, he shall surely  be pat to death. Wherefore tho children  of Israel shall keep the Sabbath, to serve  the Sabbath throughout their generations,  for a. perpetual covenant. It is a sign between mc and the children of Israel for  ever: for in six days the Lord made  heaven and earth, and on the seventh day  he rested and was refreshed." In Deuteronomy the reason for the Sabbath observance is given thus: "And remember,  that thou wast a servant in the land of  Egypt, and that the Lord thy God brought  thee out thence through a mighty hand  and by a stretched out arm: therefore the  Lord thy God commanded thee to keep  the Sabbath day."  It was only a command to rest. Thero  was no command to worship on that day,  and there was no inhibition of recreation  and innocent pleasure. ' The plain meaning of all Sabbath laws in the Old Testament is that on the seventh day of the  week (our Saturday) both man and beast  should have rest from labor. "In it thou  shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son,  nor thy daughter, thy man servant, nor  thy maid servant, nor thy cattle, nor the  stranger that is -within thy gates." It  was purely a benevolent law in the interests of workers both man and beast.  Afterwards, when the Pharisees became  dominant in the Jewish theocracy, they  added many things to the Mosaic law.  These were the men who took tithe of  anise and mint and cummin, and neglected the weightier matters of tho law���  judgment, mercy and faith; the hypocrites who devoured widows' homes, and  for a pretence made long prayers; the  men who bound heavy burdens and grievous to be borne upon men's shoulders.  But the Great Teacher condemned the  Pharisaical Sabbath as pointedly as he  condemned the Pharisaical hypocrisy.  He aud his disciples walked in the fields  on tlie Sabbath day, and plucked the ears  of com; and when he was charged with  violation of the law, he replied that  the. fcJabbath was mado for man, and not  man for the Sabbath day. He directed  the man whom he had healed to take up  his bed and walk.thongh it was the Sabbat-May. Paul insisted that those who  had become free from the law should no  longer be entangled therein. He said:  "one man esteemeth one day above another ; another man esteemeth every day  alike. Let every man be fully persuaded  in his own mind." To the Galatians he  said: " Ye observe days and months and  times and years. I am afraid of you, lest  " I have bestowed upon you labor in vain."  There is not one word in the New Testament commanding or even commending, the observance of the Sabbath; still  less is there the slightest intimation that  another holy day had been substituted for  the Jewish Sabbath.  The early Christians of Jewish birth  continued to observe the Jewish Sabbath,  and they also met on the first day of the  week. The heathen Christains also, to  some extent, showed respect to the Jewish Sabbath; but, as Sunday was a  heathen festival, their opportunities  jumped with their inclinations, and they  more and more fell into the habit of keeping Sunday and neglecting the Sabbath.  In 821 the emperor Constantine issued an  edict that all courts of justice, inhabitants of towns and workshops should rest  on the ''venerable day of the sun," but  those who were engaged in agricultural  labor might work on that day. From<  that time to this the law in all Christian  countries has commanded some observance of the first day of the week as a day  of rest. But in nineteen-twentieths of the  Christian world there is no Pharisaical or  Puritanical observance of the day. Such  a thing was never heard of till the Puritans became dominant in England, and  undertook to make a fetich of the day of  rest. There are people in Canada today  who want to do the same thing. If they  could have their way they would rob the  workingman of his day of rest and make  it a burden heavier to be. borne than the  hardest days labor. Existing conditions  have driven a large percentage of the  working classes from the churches, where  those who can afford to wear fine clothes  have the gospel preached unto them. The  Sabbatarians would deny them the privilege of making Sunday a day of recrera-  tion, thus reversing the Divine command.  The day of rest was intended to be a  sweet and blessed relief to the toiling millions, Properly observed it falls with  holy benificence into the lives of the poor,  and makes their conditions less sorrowful.  Six days of toil, poor child of Cain,  ��� Thy strength the slave of want may be;  Thy seventh thy limbs escape the chain;  A God hath made thee free.  The narrow Pharisaical spirit which  would take away the boon will certainly  not be allowed to prevail. For this is a  land of freedom, and the people will not  suffer themselves to be robbed of one of  their most precious possessions.��� Hamilton (Ontario) Spectator.  JUST  ARRIVED  pIG HORN  BRAKE!  anion  fltede  *****  ��verallst  Shirts,**  we manufacture:  Shirts,  Overalls,  Denim Pants,  Tweed Pants,  Cottonade Pants,  Jumpers,  Blouses,  Cooks' Aprons and  Caps,  Carpenters'Aprons^  Walters' Aprons,  . Painters' and Plasterers'Overalls,  Mackinaw Coats,  Engineers' Jackets, Mackinaw Pants,  Walters' Jackets,     Tarpaulins,  Barbers' Jackets,     Dunnage Bags,  Gingham Jackets,    Horse Blankets,  Mission Flannel     Tents,  Underwear,       .   Etc., Etc., Etc.  TURNER, BEETON & CO.  LIMITED,  WHOLESALE MERCHANTS  Warehouses, Wharf Street  Factory, 1 Bastion Street   .  -VICTORIA,  B.C.  Silver King Hotel  BAKER STREET, KELSON  UNDER   OLD- MANAGEMENT  RATES $i:00 PElt DAY  The.Dining Room is unsurpassed nnd thc  Bedrooms arc thc best in Nelson. The Bar is  stocked with good "Wines, Liquors and Cigars.  New Spring Goods  OF THE LATEST FASHIONS  Scotch   Tweeds,   Landslide,   Strathcona  and Belwarp Serges.   A fine line  of Pantiugs of the latest styles  Prices to suit the times.  Call and see them.  John Smaflwood  Ward Street  MERCHANT TAILOR  UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT  Hotel Phair  Bartlett  House  Josephine St.,  Nelson, B. C.  AVhite Help Only Employed  The Best  Dollar-a-Day House  in Nelson  The Bar is the Finest  GEO. W. BARTLETT,  .Proprietor  B.  TOMKINS  MANAGER  The Leading Hotel of the Kootenays  Good Sample Rooms  Special  Rates  to Commercial  Men  Corner Stanley and Victoria Streets, Nelson, B.C.  Queen9s Hotel  Bnker Street, Nelson. B. C.  Lighted by Electricity and  Heated by Hot Air  Large ond Comfortable Bedrooms and First-  class Dining Room. Sample Rooms for Commercial Men.  RATES |2 PER DAY  MRS. E. C. CLARKE, Proprietress  T*emont House  European and American Plan   m  Meals 25 cts.   Rooms from 25 cts. to $1.  Only White Help Employed.  MALONE  Bnker St., Nelson  & TREGILLUS  Proprietors  madden House  Kootenay Wire Works Co*  Manufacturers of Mottrcsscs, Springs,  Pillows, Bed Lounges, Couches, Upholstering, Turning, Bandsawing, Grill  Work and other novelties. Our No. 4  Spring is the best on the market. Ask  for it a'nd take no other.  FRONT STREET NELSON, B.C.  Notice is hereby given that I, J. H. Matheson,  intend within the time prescribed bylaw to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works  of the province of British Columbia, for alicense  to prospect for coal and petroleum upon thc  lands hereinafter described and. commencing at  a post at the northwest corner marked J. II.  Mathcson's n. w. corner post, thence 80 chains  cast; thence 80 chains south; thence 80 chains  wpst; thence 80 chains north to the post of commencement. These lands are situated on the  Flathead river and international boundary,  about 45 miles in a southeasterly direction from  Elko, B.C., on or near the Flathead river.  Dated May 23rd, 1903. JrH. MATHESON.  Notice is hereby given that I, Fred H. Smith,  intend within the time prescribed bylaw tp apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works  of the province of British Columbia,for alicense  to prospect for coal and petroleum upon tho  lands.hereinafter^describedand^commencing-at  a post at thc northeast corner marked" Fred II.  Smith's n. e. corner post, thence 80 chains west;  thence 80 chains south; thence 80 chains cast;  thence 80 chains north to the post of commencement. These lands are situated on thc Flathead  river and international boundary line; about -15  miles in a southeasterly direction from Elko,  B. C, on or near the Flathead river.  Dated May 23rd,' 1903. FRED II. SMITH.  Notice is hereby given that I, C. Wilson, intend within the time prescribed by law to apply  to the chief commissioner of lands and works of  the province of British Columbia, for u license to  prospect for coal and petroleum upon the lands  hereinafter described and commencing nt a post  at the northwest corner marked C, Wilson's n.w.  corner post, thenco 80 chains south; thence 80  chains cast; thence 80 chains north; thence 80  chains west to tho post of commencement. These  lands arc situated on the Flathead river, tliree  miles from the International boundary, about-12  miles In a southeasterly direction from Elko,  B. C, on or near tho Flathead river.  Dated-May 23rd, 1903. C.WILSON.  Notice is hereby given that I, A. O. Nelson, intend within the timo prescribed by law to apply  to the chief commissioner of lands anil works of  the province of British Columbia, for a license to  prospect for coal and petroleum upon the lands  hereinafter described and commencing at a post  at the southwest corner marked A. G. Nelson's  s. w. corner post, thence 80 chains north; thence  80 chains east; thonce 80 chains south; thcnceSO  chains west to the post, of commencement.  These lands are situated on the Flathead river,  four miles from the international boundary,  about 41 miles in a southeasterly direction from  Elko, B. C, on or near the Flathead river.  Dated May 23rd, 1903. A. G. NELSON.  Notice is hereby given that I, J. E. Annable,  intend within the time prescribed by law to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works  of the province of British Columbia, for u license  to prospept for coal and petroleum upon the  lands hereinafter described and commencing at  a post at the southeast corner'marked J. E. An-  nable's s. c. corner post, thence 80 chains north;  thence 80 chains west; thence .80 chains south;  thence 80 chains east to the post of commencement. These lands are situated on the Flathead  river, one mile from the international boundary, ���  about 44 miles in a southeasterly direction from  THOMAS MADDEN  l'ROFKIETOIl  Centrally Located  Electric Lighto  HEADQUARTERS FOR TOURISTS AND  OLD TIMERS  Buker and Ward Streets  Nelson, B. C.  Elko, B. C., on or near the Flathead river.  Dated May 23rd, 1903. J. E. ANNA  \BLE.  Notice is hereby given that I, T. Sproat, intend  within the time prescribed by law to apply to the  chief commissioner of lands and works of thc  province of British Columbia for a license to  prospect for coal and petroleum upon thc lands  hereinafter described and commencing nt  a post at the northeast corner marked  T. Sproat's N.E. corner post, thence 80 chains  south; thence 80 chains west; thenec 80 chains  north; thence 80 chuins east, to the post of commencement. These lands are situated on the  Flathead river, three miles from international  boundary, about 42 miles in a southeasterly direction from Elko, B.C., on or near the Flatliead  river. . T. SI'ROAT.  Dated May 23rd, 1903.  Hatty-H. Ward  FIRE,  LIFE,  ACCIDENT  INSURANCE  MINES  AND  REAL ESTATE  BAKER STREET  NELSON,  B.C.  Notice Is hereby given that I, Dave L. Dover,  intent! within the time proscribed by law to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works  of the province of British Columbia for a license  to prospect for coal and petroleum upon the lands  hereinafter described und commencing at a post  at the southeast corner marked Dave L. Dover's  S.E. corner post, thence 80 chains north; thence  80 chains west; thencoSOchains south; thence 80  chains east, to the post of commencement. These  lands are situated on the Flutheud river, four  miles from International boundary, about 41  miles in a southeasterly direction from Elko, B.  C, on or near the Flathead river.  Dated May 23rd, 190.1.        ' PAVE L. DOVER.  Notice is hereby given that 1. A. T. Walley, intend within the time prescribed bylaw to apply  to the chief commissioner of lands and works of  the province of British Columbia for a license to  prospect for coal and petroleum upon the lands  .hereinafter described and commencing at a post  at the southwest corner marked A. T. Walley's  S.W. corner post, thence 80 chains north; thence  80 chuins cast; thence 80 chains south; thence 80  chains west, to the post of commencement.  These lands are situated on the Flathead river,  one mile from international boundary, about 44  miles in a southeasterly direction from Elko, B.  C, on or near the Flathead river.  Dated May 23rd, 1JKK1.              A. T. WALLEY.   . a   Notice is horeby given that 1, W. A. McPhee,  Intend within the time prescribed by law to "apply to the chief commissioner ol lands and  works of the province of British Columbia, for a  license to prospect for coiil and petroleum upon  thc lands hereinafter described aud commencing at a post at the southwest eorner marked W.  A. McPhee's s. w. corner post; thenco 80 chains  east; theuce80 chains north; theuce 80 chains  west; thence 80 chains south, to the post of commencement. These lands are situated on the  Starvation: creek, one mile from international  boundary, about 50 miles in ft southeasterly direction from Elko, B. C, seven miles east of the  Flathead river.  Dated May 18th, 1903. W. A. Mcl'HEE.  Notice is hereby given that I, R. W. Drew, intend within the timo prescribed by law, to apply  to thc chief commissioner of lands und works of  the province of British Columbia, for alicense to  prospect for coal and petroleum upon the land  hereinafter described and commencing at a post  at the northwest corner marked R. W. Drew's  n. w. corner post,'thence 80 chainssouth; thence  80 chuins east; thence 80 chains north; thence 80  chains west, to thcpostof commencement. These  lands are situated on the Starvation creek, three  miles from the international boundary, about 64  miles ina southeasterly direction from Elko, B.  "   0 miles east of the 1 latliead river.  Dated May 18th, 1903.  R. W..DREW.  Notice is hereby given that I, Fred Starkey, intend within the time prescribed by law to apply  to the chief commissioner of lands and works of  the province ofBritish Columbia for a license to  prospect for coal and petroleum upon the lands  hereinafter described, and commencing at apost  at the southeast corner marked Fred Starkey's s.  e. corner post, thenee 80 chains north; thence 80  chains east; thence 80 chains south; thence 80  chains west, tothe postof commencement. These  lands are situated on thc Starvation creek, about  three miles from the international boundary,  about 54 miles in a southeasterly direction from  Elko, B. C, on or near the Flathead river.  Dated May 18th, 1903. FRED STARKEY.  Notico is hereby given that I, J. W. Holin.es, intend within the time prescribed by law to iapply  to the chief commissioner of lands and works of,  the province of Britis Columbia for a lleenso to  prospect for coal nnd petroleum upon the lands  hereinafter described und commencing at a post  at the northwest corner marked J. w. Holmes'  n. w. corner post, thence 80 chains east; thence  80 chains south; thence 80 chains west; thence  80 chains north, to the post of .commencement.  These lands are situated on the Starvation creek  and international boundary, about 56 miles in a  southeasterly direction from Elko, B.'C, six  miles east of the Flathead river.  Dated May 18th, 1903. J.W.HOLMES..  . Notico is hereby given that I, Jessie G. Kirkpatriek, intend within tho time prescribed by  law to apply to the chief commissioner of lands  and works of the province of British Columbia  for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum  upon the lands nereinafter described and commencing at- the northeast corner at a post  marked Jessie G. Kirkpatrick's n. e. corner post,  thence 80 chains west; thence 80 chains south;  thence 80 chains east; thence 80 chains north, to  the post of commencement. These lands are  situated on the Kisheneiia creek three miles  from the international boundary, about 46 miles  in a southeasterly direction from Elko, B. C, on  or near the Flathead river.  Dated May 13th, 1903.  JESSIE G. KIRKPATRICK.    .  Notice is hereby given that I, Lizzio Gilker, intend within the time prescribed by law to apply  to the chief commissioner of lands and works of  -thoproviuce of-British"Columbia7for-a.-licerise*t6~  prospect for coal and;petroleum upon the lands  hereinafter described and commencing at a post  at the northwest corner marked Lizzie Gilker's  n. w. corner post, thence 80 chains east; thence  80 chainssouth; thence 80 chains west; thence  80 chains north to tho post of commencement.  These lands arc situated on the Kishenena  creek, three miles from the International boundary, about 50 miles ln u southeasterly direction  from Elko, B. C, on or near the Flathead river.  Dated May 13th, 1903. LIZZIE GILKER.  Notice is hereby given that I, J. K. Douglas, intend within thc time prescribed by law to apply  to the chief commissioner of landsjuid works of  the provinco of British Columbia for a license to  prospect for coal nnd petroleum upon thc lands  hereinafter described and commencing ata post  nt the southeast corner marked J. K. Douglas'  S. E. corner post, thence 80 chains west; thence  80 chains north; thence 80 chains cast; thence 80  chains south, to the post of commencement.  These lands are situated on thc Starvation creek,  one mile from International boundary, about 55  miles in a southeasterly direction from Elko, B.  C, six miles east of the Flathead river.  Dated May 18th, 1903. J. K. DOUGLAS.  Notice is hereby giveii that I, W. E. McCandlish, intend within the time prescribed by law to  apply to tho chief commissioner of lands and  works of the province of British Columbia for a  license to prospect for coal and petroleum upon  the lands hereinafter described and commencing  at a post at the southwest corner marked IV; E.  McCandllsh's S.W. corner post, thenco 80 chains  north; thenco 80 chains east; thence 80 chains  soutli; thence 80 chains west, to the postof commencement. These lands are situated on tho  Starvation creek, three miles from international  boundary, about 54 miles in a southeasterly direction from Elko, B.C., six miles east of the  Flathead river. W. E. McCANDLlSH.  Dated May 18th, 1903.  Notico is hereby given that I, D. McArthur, intend within the time prescribed by law to apply  to the chief commissioner of lands and works of  the province of British Columbia for a license to  prospect for coal and petroleum upon the lands  hereinafter described and commencing at a post  at the northeast corner marked D. MeArthur's  N.E. eorner post, thence 80 chains south; thence  80 chains west; thence 80 chains north; thence 80  chains east, to thc post of commencement. These  lands are situated on the Starvation creek, three  miles from international boundary, about 54  miles in a southeasterly direction from Elko, B.  C, six miles cast of the Flathead river.  Dated May I8th, 1903. D. MCARTHUR.  Notice is hereby given that T, John J. Malone,  intend within the time prescribed by law to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works  of the province of British Columbia for a license  to prospect for coal and petroleum upon the lands  hereinafter described and commencing at a post  at thc northeast corner marked John J. Malono's  N.E. corner post,.lhcnee 80 chains west; thence  8Q.chu.ins soutli; thence 80 chains east; thence 80  north, to the post of commencement. These  lands are situated on the Starvation creek and  international boundary, about 55 miles ln a  southeasterly direction from Elko, B.C., six miles  east of the Flathead river.  Dated May 18th, 1903.        JOHN J. MALONE.  Notice is hereby given that I, William O. Rose,  intend within the time prescribed by law to apply to the chief commissioner of lands and works  of thc province of British Columbia for a license  to prospect for coal and petroleum upon the lands  hereinafter described nnd commencing at u post  nt the southwest corner marked Wm. O. Rose's  S.W. corner post, tlience 80 ehains east; thence80  chains north; thence 80 chains west; thence 80  chains south, to the post of commencement.  These lands are. situated on the Kishenena creek,  three miles from international boundary, about  47 miles in a southeasterly direction from Elko,  B.C., on or near the Flutheud river.  Dated May 13th, 1903.       WILLIAM O. ROSE.  Notice is hereby given that I, J. A. Irving, intend within the time prescribed by law to apply  to the chief commissioner of lands and works of  the province of British Columbia, for a license to  prospect for coal and petroleum upon the lands  hereinafter described and commencing at a post  at thc southeast corner marked J, A. Irvlng's  s. e. corner post, thence 80 chains west; thence  80chuins north; thence 80 chuins cast; thence  80 chains south, to the post of commencement.  These lands are situated on thc Kishenena creek,  three miles from international boundary, about  ���17 miles in a southeasterly direction from Elko,  B. C, on or near the Flathead river.  Dated May 13th, 1903.3 J. A. IRVING.  city of rvEL-sorv.  Notice is hereby given that thc first sittings of  the Court of Revision, for the purpose of shearing  all complaints against the assessment for the  year 1903, as made by the assessor of the City of  Nelson, will be held at the city offices, Nelson, B.  C, on Thursduv, the llth day of June, 1903, at  two o'clock p.m. D. C. MCMORRIS,  Nelson, B.C., May 8,1903.    City Clerk.  Notice of Application to Transfer Liquor License.  Notice Is hereby given that I, A. K. Vaughan,  intend to apply at the next sittings of the Board  of LiccnsCjCommissioners for the City of Nelson  for a transfer of thcliquorlicen.se now held in  my name for the premises situate on lot 10 in  block 1 of the City of Nelson, known as the Nelson Hotel, to Churles A. Barclay.  Dated this Cth day of Mav, 1903.  Witness: A. K. VAUGHAN.  A. M. JOHNSON.  NELSON MINERS' UNION, No. 96, W. F. M.���  Meets every Saturday evening at 7:30  o'clock, in Miners' Union Hall, northwest  corner Baker and Stanley streets. Wage scale  for Nelson district: Machine miners, 13.50; .  hamniersmen, $3.25; mine laborers, ?3. J. VV.  Sinclair, president; Frank Phillips, secretary.  Visiting brethern cordially Invited.  FOR SALE.  AT a genuine bargain, a 27-ft. gasoline launch,  with simplest and most reliable engine on  the market, excellent speed; also a number of  row boats and canoes. For particulars write  or come and see boats at  H. L. LINDSAY'S BOAT LIVERY,  ���  . Kaslo, B.C.  Corporation of the City of Nelson.  NOlTCE.  NOTICE is hereby given that under the provisions of By-law No. 80, "Pound and Dog  Tax By-law," it is unlawful for. any person to  suffer any horse, mule, bull or cow, sheep,  goaf, pig or other cattle, or poultry to run at  large within the limits of the City of Nelson.  Every owner of a dog in the City of Nelson is  required to pay annually a tax of two dollars  for each dog owned by him.  No person shall suffer or permit his dog to  run at large in the City of Nelson for which  such person has not paid the tax required of  him and unless such dog shall have around  his neck a collar or strap to whicn shall bo attached a metallic plate to be supplied by the  city on payment of the said tax.  Warning is hereby given that any person  guilty of an infraction or violation of any of  the provisions of the above named by-law is,  in addition to the fees and charges set forth  therein, liable upon summary conviction to a  penalty of One Hundred Dollars and the costs  of prosecution, and in default of payment to  imprisonment for a term not exceeding two  months.   By order. ���!  '.--��� "*: ���-- -D. C. MoMORRIS,   City Clerk.  Nelson, B.C., April 8th, 1903.  NOTICE.  Respecting Timber Licences.  NOTICE it hereby given, pursuant to the provision of Section 50 of the1 'Land Act," that in  future no special licences to cut timber on Crown  lands will be granted or renewed until after the  applicants have had the limit* surveyed by a duly  qualified Provincial Land Surveyor to the satisfaction of the Lands and Works Department.  W. C. WELLS.  Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works.  Lands and Works Department,  Victoria, B.C., a6th March, J903.  NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days after date  I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for permission to purchase the  following described lands in South East Kootenay:  Commencing at a post marked "W. F. Teetzel's  southeast corner," planted at D. LaBau's northwest  corner post, thence north 80 chains, thence east 80  =chainSrthence south Sochainsrthence west 8o~chairis ~  to the place of beginning, containing 640 acres more  or less.  Dated the 7th day of March, 1901.  WF. TEETZEL.  NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days after date  I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works tor permission to purchase the  following described lands in South East Kootenay:  Commencing at a post marked "J. A. Skene's northeast corner, planted on the east bank of the Flathead River, about twenty miles north of the International Boundary line, thence south 80 chains,  thence west 80 chains, thence north 80 chains, thence  cast 80 chains to the place of beginning, containing  640 acres more or less.  Dated the 7th day of March, ioo-i.       J. A. SKENE.  NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days after date  I .intend to apply to tho Chief Commissioner of  Lands nnd Works for permission to purchase tha  following described lnnds in South East Kootenay:  Commencing at a post marked "D. La Bnu s  northeast corner," planted on the east bank of  Flatliead River, almost 1* miles north of the  International boundary line, thence south 80 chains,  thence east 80 chains, thence north 80 chains, tlience  west 80 chains to thc place of beginning, containing  640 acres more or less.  Dated the 7th day of March, 1003.  D. LaBAW.  NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days after date  I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for permission to purchase the  following described lands in South East Kootenay:  Commencing at a post marked "J, O. Patenaude's  southwest corner," planted at F. C. Elliott's southeast corner post, thence north 80 chains, thence  east 80 chains, thence south 80 chains, thence west  80 chains to the place of beginning, containing 640  acres ino.re or less.  Dated the 7th day of March, 1907.  J. O. PATENAUDE.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notice is hereby giveii that thirty days after  date I intend to apply to the honorable the chief  commissioner of lands nnd works for a special  license to cut and curry away timber from the  following described tract of land: Commencing  ut a post marked "A.R.F. S.E. Cor." and planted  near Puss creek, about four miles from Robson,  thenco north 100 chains, thence west 40 chains,  thence south 100 chains, thenee east 40 chains to  point of commencement.       A. It. FINCJLAND.  Dated at Robson, May 2nd, 1903.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notice is hereby giveii that thirty days after  date I intend to apply to the honorable the  chief commissioner ot lauds und works for  11 special license to cut and curry away timber  form the following described lands situate  in West Kootenay district, British Columbia.  Commencing at a post planted on thc Eust  bunk of Fyfe creek about one mile north of the  north end of Cariboo lako being J. H. Christie's  northwest corner; thence south 80 chains,  thence cast 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;  tlience west 80 chains to the place of beginning  and containing 040 acres.  J. II. CHRISTIE, Locator.  Dated 2nd May, 1903.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notice is hereby Riven that thirty days afterdate I Intend to apply to the honorable tlie chief  commissioner of lands and works for a special  license to cut and carry away timber from the  following described land situate in AVest Koote-  nuy district, British Columbia: Commencing ut  11 post planted on the east bank of Fyfe creek  about one mile north of the north end of Cariboo  lake, adjacent to the northwest corner of J. 11.  Christie's claim; being William Kirby's northeastcorner; thence south 80 chuins; tlience west  80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thenec east 80  chains, to the pluccof beginning, and containing  040 acres. WILLIAM KIRBY. Locator.  J. II. CHRISTIE, Agent.  Dated 2nd May, 1903.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that thirty days after  date I intend to apply to the honorablo chief  commissioner of lands and works for a special  license to cut and carry away timber from the  following described land, situate in West Kootenay district, British Columbia. Commencing  at a post planted on the east bank of Fyfe creek  about two miles north of the north end of Cariboo  lake adjacent to the northwest corner of John  Fyfe's claim being Ross Thompson's southeast  corner; thenco north 80 chains; thence cast 80  chuins; thence south 80 chuins; thence west 80  chains to the place of beginning and containing  040 acres.  ���ROSS THOMPSON, Locator.  J. II. CHRISTIE, Agent.  Dated 2nd May, 1903.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notico is hereby given that thirty days after  date I intend to apply to the honorable tlio chief  commissioner of lands and works for a special  license to cut and carry away timber from tho  following described land situate in West Kootenay district, British Columbia: Commencing ut  a post planted on the east bank of Fyfe creek  about ono mile north of the north end of Cariboo  lake, adjacent to the northwest corner of J. H.  Christie's claim,, being John Fyfe's southwest  corner; thence north 80 chains; thence east 80  chains; thence south 80 chains; thence west 80  chains, to the place of beginuing, and containing  040 acres. J OlIN FYFE. Locator.  J. II.: CHRISTIE, Agent.  Dated 2nd May, 1903.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that thirty days after  date 1 intend to apply to the honorable the chief  commissioner of lands and works for a special  license to cut and carry away timber from the  following described land, situate in West Kootenay district, British Columbia: Commencing tit  a post planted on the east bank of Fyfe creek  about one mile north of the north end of Cariboo  lake, adjacent to the northwest corner of J. H.  Christie's claim, being J. Fred Ritchie's southeast:  corner; thence north 80 chains; thence west 80  chains; thenco south 80 chains; thence east 80  chains, to the place of beginning, and containing  M0 acres. J. FRED RITCHIE, Locator.  J. H. CHRISTIE, Agent.  Dated 2nd May, 1903.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that thirty days after  date I-intend to apply to.the honorable chief  "commissioner of lands and works for a special  license to cut and carry away timber from the  following described land, situate in West Kootenay district, British Columbia. Commencing  atapost planted on the north end of Cariboo  lake being J. S. C. Fraser's northeast corner;  thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;  thence west 80 chains; to the cast bank of Cariboo lake; thence north 80 chains; following the  east bank of Cariboo lake to the place of beginning and containing 640 acres more or less.  J. 8. C. FRASER, Locator.  J. H. CHRISTIE, Agent.  Dated 2nd May, 1903.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that thirty days after  date I intend to apply to the honorable the chief  commissioner of lands and works for a special  license to out and carry away timber from the  following described land, situate in West Kootenay district, British Columbia: Commencing at  a post planted on the shore of lower Cariboo lake  being J. S. C. Fraser's southeast corner post;  thence 80 chains west; thence 80 chains north;  thence 80 chains east, to shore of lake; thence  south along shore of lake to place of beginning,  and containing 640 acres more or less.  J. S. C. FRASER, Locator.  J. H. CHRISTIE, Agent.  . Dated 2nd May, 1903.  TIMBER NOTICE.  JJqticeJs hereby^given thatJthlrtyjlays^aftct^  ��� date I Intend to apply to tho honorablo chief  commissioner of lands and works fora special  license to cut and carry away timber from tho  following described land, situate In West Kootenay district, British Columbia.   Commencing  nt a post planted on Rocky Bluff east side of  lower Cariboo lako being E. E* L. Dewdney's  southwest corner post; thence 80 chains east;  thenco 80 chains south; thence 80 chains west;  thence 80 chains north to place of beginning.  E-. E. L. DEWDNEY, Locutor.  J. II. CHRISTIE, Agent.  Also commencing at a post planted on the cast  bank of Watchand river about half a milo from  lake being E. E. L. Dewdncy's northwest corner  post; thence 40 chains east; tlience 160 chains  south; thence 40 chains west; theuce 160 chuins  north to place of beginning.  E. 15. L. DEWDNEY, Locator.  J. H. CHRISTIE, Agent.  Dated 2nd May, 1903.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date  I intend to apply to the chief commissioner of  lands and works for permission to purchase the  following lands in Southeast Kootenay, described  as follows: Commencing at apost marked "F.  C. Elliott's southeast corner," planted on .the  north bank of the Flathead river, about 80 miles  from the International boundary line, tlience  north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence  south 80 chains; tlience east 80 chains to the  place of beginning, containing 640 acres more or  less.  Dated thc 7th day of March, 1903.  F. C. ELLIOTT.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days after date  I intend to apply to the chief commissioner of  lands and works for permission to purchase the  following described lands in Southeast Kootenay: Commencing at a post marked "H. Sturgeon's northwest corner/' planted on the cast  bank of the Flathead river, almost 21 miles from  thc international boundary line, thence south  80 chains, thenee east 80 chains, thence north 80  chains, thence west 80 chains to the place of  beginning, containing 6-10 acres more or less.  Dated the 7th day of March, 1903.  H. STURGEON.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notico Is hereby given that thirty days after  date I Intend to apply to the honorable the chief  commissioner of lands and works for a special  lleenso to cut and carry away timber from the  following described land, situate in West Kootenay district, British Columbia: Commencing at  a post planted on the east side of Fyfe creek  being J. II. Christie's southeast corner post:  thence 80 chains west; thenco 80 chains north;  thence 80 chains east; thence 80 chains south to  place ol beginning.  J. H. CHRISTIE, Locator.  Dated 2nd May, 1903.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that thirty days after  date I intend to apply to the honorablo chief  commissioner of lands and works for a special  license to cut and carry away timber from tho  following described land, situate and being in  West Kootenay district, British Columbia. Commencing at a post planted on the east side of  upper Cariboo lake being J. Fyfe's northwest  corner post; thence 80 chains east; thence 80  chainssouth; thence 80 chains west to shore of  lake thence north along shore of lake to place of  beginning.  J. FYFE, Locator.  J. H. CHRISTIE, Agent.  Dated 2nd May, 1903.  TIMBER NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given that thirty days after  date I Intend to apply to the honorable chief  commissioner of lands and works for a special  license to cut and carry away timber from the  following described land, situate in West Kootenay district, British Columbia. Commencing  at a post planted on the east side of Barnes creek  being W. II. G. Phipps southwest corner; thence  80 chains north; thence east 80 chains; thence 80  chainssouth; thence80 chains west to place of  beginning.  W. H. G. PHIPPS, Locator.  J. H. CHRISTIE, Agent.  Also commencing at a post planted on thc  bench east side of Barnes creek being W. II. G.  Phipps southwest corner; theuce80 chains north;  thence80 chains east; thence 80 chains south;  thence 80 chains west to place of beginning.  W. H. G. PHIPPS, Locator.  J. II. CHRISTIE, Agent.  Dated 2nd May, 1903. The Nelson Tribune  RESPECTIVE ATTRACTIVE VALUE OF EUROPEAN  AND AMERICAN SCENERY TO THE TOURIST  We bear much in these days of in-  ��� creased European travel, stimulated largely by the number of tourist agcucies of  the " Cook " order which havo mado it  possible for tho person of moderate means  to obtain a very fair idea of things in  three or four foreign countries within tho  usual monthly holiday limit aud at a figure that is becoming well nigli irresistible.  It- is the fashion to do Europe and the  thousands who go there every year aro  adding to tho already very largo number  who are able from experience to talk  freely on continental topics.  Fashion has decreed that all who can  possibly afford it should go to Europe,  even if only to say they have been there,  somewhat after tho clever skit which appeared in Punch some time back wherein  si lady at the dinner table of' an hotel in  Geneva asks her neighbor where she was  going. 0! said the lady "I am going to  Geneva." " But you are in Geneva retorted the other." "0! well then I am  going to Rome." -  Much stress is laid on the scenery to be  witnessed in the older lands. One returning traveller will rave about thc beauty of  tho Rhine, while as a matter of fact the  St. Lawrence or the Hudson are both  naturally finer. Another will go into  rhapsodies over the Fiojrds' of Norway,  whicli are surpassed in beauty by the inlets on the west coast of this province.  Still a third, will grow sentimental over  Alpine scenery that can be matched any  day right at oiu* doors in the Sellrirks or  Rockies. ''. Hills look green from afar''  is one reason why we on this side are  more eager to {.'do" Etu*ope before we  have oven commenced to " do " our own  land. There must be something, however, beyond this, some greater attractive  power which draws annually a vast army  of pilgrims to the various pleasure shrines  of western Europe, an army increasing in  numbers year by year with the facilities  for travel and unquestionably doing splendid international work by way of cementing the relations between, the two great  English speaking nations of the earth."  There is a story told of how an American who went to London to visit and  among his social credentials w*as one to  an old lady of tlie ancient school. ' He  called in dite course, found her sitting in  an arm chair with a cat ptiiTing on the  hearth of a cosy fire. She received hini  with that cordial warmth tempered with  the silent dignity which befits people of  breeding. Ho came away charmed with  her attractive personality and returned to  America. Ten years passed away when  he had occasion to go to England again.  Ho called as a matter of course on tho old  lady and found her in tho same house,  sitting in tho same arm chair, with a  tabby on the hearth of a cozy firo precisely as before.  The story vividly illustrates the calm  even^tenor of life in the older lands, where  tho environment will remain tho same  for long, long years and'is a wonderful  contrast to the mad whirl which we on  this continent live and movo and have  our being. A restlessness stalks tho laud,  people come and go hardly knowing  whence thoy came and whither going.  Tho veneration for age is passing away  and only the thc brand new, up-to-date  has any groat value iu our eyes; the  glories associated with tlio past tiro losing  their hold on us. The struggle there has  been to save from obliteration the few interesting relics of antiquity on this continent and more particularly the remains of  the old missions iu California, simple  souvenirs of tho happiest days that fan*  land has ever seen, testify to the degenerate condition. ��  In the lands that have a past, the close  observer knows it is not so much the  scenery as the environment that capti-  va'tes and stores oiu* minds with lasting  vistas. The Swiss mountains are no more  ' sublime in then* rugged grandeur than  are the Rockies or Cascades. The Swiss  Oberland as seen from Lucerne is no finer  than the magnificent sweep of the Rockies  as seen from Calgary, nor the lakes of  Scotland more picturesque than those of  this province. Only this, the Helvetian  Alps, the valley of Lucerne aiid the lochs  of Scotland are the homes of peoples that  have lived thero for generations, chosen  the most picturesque spots, adopted costumes of dress as if to lend a charm to the  scenes around. Grand as is the scenery  here, it fails to captivate for the reason  that it does not appeal to the heart of the  traveller as much as scenes where' the  heart of humanity has throbbed for years  and where the joys and sorrows of human  life have had their sway.  They who have stood on the mountain  side in the Tyrol and heard the shepherd's,  call from across the ravines; thoy who  have gazed on the glorious Rhine1 and  heard the dulcet' song, of the " Lorely���".'���  wafted on the breeze to guitar accompaniment and sung as they sing in the Fatherland; those who have walked amid the  vine clad hill.s of France and heard'the  huntsman's horn from afar off at the setting of the sun; those who have listened  to the village chimes in England, wafting  harmonies around and inviting thought  towards higher themes, all who have  experienced either of these know of the  value of environment and why some,  places become hallo*,ved by the hand of  time, and why pleasant memories cling to  one particular scene through life.  , -Art would be greater on this continent  if there were more color around. The  brush searches in vain for > that beautiful  softness of pastoral scenery which seems;  as it were to harmonize with the mental  condition .of a people. satisfied with its  lot and upon whom the deadly, blight of-  twentieth century restlessness has not, as  yet, descended. The great painters Corot  and Millet must; have seen exceptional  beauty in the forest of F.ontaiuebleau, for  ho woodland has attracted art as this incomparable forest, has done, and none has  been so immortalized. We shall be long  before we, oii this continent, are able' to  show spots having the attractive power of  those in older lands. This must'be diie  largely to tlie-inability of the people here  to get away from their business. Thc  English people, whatever may be said,  cannot learn very much from us in a business way*. John Bull,-in .spite of all the  American tooting7 is still doing business  at the old stand and will remain there for  long years,   The Germans know as much  about mercantile affairs as any on this  continent aiid the business aptitude of the  French  is  marvelous.   All  these threo  nations work hard, quite as hard as people  on this side, who are prone to impress one  that if one wants to see work one should  come   to  America.   Yet  with all their  work these Europeans know how to play;  they know how to give this color to the  landscape and give more time to the study  of the arts and sciences.   People on this  sido seem never quite able to get away  from then- business.   One feels they aro  packing it around, with them, be they at  the theatre, out fishing or in a lodge room.  The Britisher locks his offlce door at the  close of business of the day and he will  put aside business till the next morning.  The German will go off to his beer garden  and discuss politics to the sound of music  that is part of himself, for he can "no more  live'without music than we can without  ah*.   The Frenchman goes off to dinner at  some summer auberge at which he will  sit for hours with his family and friends.  They turn all this iiito a happy environment and thus succeed, far better than we,  in answering the question whether life is  worth living.  There are deeper causes that go to. make  up environment and shed some faint light  on the power some places have of giving  a calm-to the mind. Many have realized  this without knowing why. The old  cathedrals and churches bring to the man  of the street a feeling of calm which he  does not attempt to deny. It is said  that the repeated aspirations and purer  thoughts 'that characterize the average  mind of the worshipers has a sort of clarifying effect on the unseen atmosphere and  tunes it to a higher key. The subject  comes under the study of thought and its  tremendous ��� power, but it has some bearing on the question of the attractiveness  of certain places laying claim to age.  Much can be done to make our environment better than it is. Charles Dickens  used to say that his characters lived with  him in the unseen, that they danced  around him while he wrote, so he lived in  the environment of his own making���the  reflection of his own mind. Quite possibly the tourist sees all the various meccas  in Europe tempered largely with his own  personal view of things; and the one re-,  corded by Mark Twain, who blew out a  sacred light which liad been burning for  years in an old cathedral, had probably  little veneration in his make-up.  In'years to come, out of thepreseiit  mixture of races on this continent, will  arise nations; "as In Europe today, having  each its own history and traditions,--and  with them will come the color winch: we  sea in Europe;, today.������;��� Meanwhile, the .  charm of -European; travel will captivate,  for they are the'outcome of centuries of  residence of the. various nations, and there  is nothing more fascinating than to study  how things arc done by other peoples,  from whom we can learn much. There  is a time for work and a time for play,  and when the latter arrives it is worth  knowing how to do it wisely and well.  -F.sWrPETiTr:���  TALES FOR TRAVELERS,  The following description of Slocan City  and Mew Denver are from the illustrated  pamphlet issued by the Tourist Associa-  ^ **��*** ft*��****^  4*  4Z  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  $  49  49  49  J��.  "49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  We have purchased the entire Dover stock  at a greatly reduced price from the> mort-  gagees and will offer for the balance of this  month at and below wholesale cost. ..-. . . .  Here is a chance for the people of Nelson to get  Diamonds  Watches  Art Goods  Sterling  Silverware  Carvers  Fancy China  Jewelry  Clocks  Fancy Bronze  Lamps  Plated  Silverware  Cut Glass  Umbrellas  ______ lOmm      ______ LO*  t  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  All at prices never before offered in the Kootenay.  _E____H__HHBa_HBa_______S  Special prices on all SEWING MACHINES and Supplies  ia order to close out this line of our goods at once.  Out-of-town orders will receive our very best attention.  Nelson, Rossland, Trail      E WCft    BfOS*      Jewelers and Engravers  .��  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to-  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  it  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to.  to  to  to  tion of Kootenay:. ���    .  "Not alone for the prospector and miner  is this the heart of the Kootenays.   The*  sportsman, the mountain climber and the  lover of nature can find within a few  miles of Slocan City the opportunity of  indulging his taste with gratifying results and little discomfort.   It is a bright  little town, with several good hotels, situated on Slocan Lake, at the head of Slocan  river, and is about two hours' journey  from Nelson, by the O.P.R. line.   It may  also be reached from Nakusp, on the Arrow lakes, via Rosebery, from the latter  place by steamer, 20 miles, over one of the  loveliest of mountain lakes.   The Slocan  river runs through a valley averaging two  miles wide, for about 80 miles before joining the Kootenay.   It is a typical trout  stream, and with tlie lake and numerous  mountain streams, gives all the sport the  fisherman can require.   The valley is well  stocked with willow grouse, and the first  range of. hills is the home of the blue  grouse.   Here, too, deer, both black and  white tail, range thickly.   In the lower  mountains are numbers of black bear, and  in the higher the grizzly.   Mountain goat  are still common within a few miles of  the town.   The peaks and glaciers of the  Slocan and Valhalla mountains are easily  accessible by roads and trails, and in six  or seven hours, through magnificent mountain scenery, one can reach the Kokanee  glacier, 9,000 feet high.   Many peaks have'  not yet been climbed, and are worth conquering.   Slocan lake offers the best of  hoating, bathing and fishing and the summer weather is delightful.   All necessary  outfitting can be done in Slocan City, and  good guides, packers and horses can be  obtained.   Slocan has its Tourist Associa:  tion, whose secretary will give au information to those desiring it."  '5 And what shall we say with regard to  New Denver, that beauty spot on the  most beautiful lake in North America;  Slocan lake, 28 miles long, two to three  miles wide, and from 900 to 2000 feet  deep; Switzerland has its Lucerne, to  which thousands flock, but its scenery is  mild, so travellers say, compared with  that surrounding NeW Denver. Here majestic mountains liftytheir snow capped  peaks thousands of feet heavenward, rising in some instances abruptly from^the  water's edge and in others being lapped  by rolling hills, hi the heavy timber oh  which can be found wild game of every  description. Prom here can be viewed  the finest sunsets that cau be conceived of  and the lake and mountain scenery form  one grand panorama. - In a few hours one  can betaken to mountain streams alive  with speckled beauties, and steam and  naphtha launches will convey you to the  most charming camping grounds that can  be imagined; Pack horses will convey  your camp outfit to the mountain fastness  where7 deer^'caribouy black and grizzly  bear are found, and a half-day's climb  will take you to the summit of Glacier  mountain, where you can examine the  great glacial field of ice and enjoy on the  lake the most exciting of troll fishing.  There is no need for fear of not being  comfortable. The hotels are all that can  be desired in the way of personal ease,  and though you may not find all you  would- in J!fow York orXondon, you'maiy  be sure of a good welcome and attention  being given to your personal .wants. All  necessaries in the way of outfitting and  travelling can be obtained here. New-  Denver should be the home of many poets  and artists, but it is not sufficiently well,  known. More inspiration can be drawn'  in one day from the grand works of nature that surround this Lucerne of America than can be had in twenty years in  the walled-in streets of large cities."  cAtthut Gee  cMerchant Tailor  Tremont Block  Buker Street  CHOICE SPRING  and  -SUMMER-GOODS-  Latest Cut  Latest Styles  Drink  THORPE'S  LITHIA  WATER  Every small bottle contains five grains  of Lithia Carbonate  NOTICE.  Notice Is hereby given thnt sixty (GO) days after  date I Intend to apply to the honorable the chief  commissioner of lands and works for the right to  purchase the following described lands, for agricultural purposes, situate in West Kootenay district, B.C. Commencing at a post planted on the  north bank of the Little Slocan river at Its mouth,  known as David Booth's southeast corner post,  thence west 80 chains, thence north 20 chains,  thence oast 80 chains, tlience south 20 ehains, to  place of beginning. DAVID BOOTH,  Nelson, B.C., April 21th, 1903. Locator.  INOTICe-  Notice is hereby given that sixty (GO) days after  date I intend to apply to the honorable thc chief  commissioner of lands and works for the right to  purchase the following described lands for agricultural purposes, situate in West Kootenay district, B.C. Commencing at a post planted on the  west bank of the Slocan river, 20 chains more or  less north of the Little Slocan river at or near its  mouth, known as T. M. Ward's southeast corner  post, thenee west 80 chains, thence north 20  chains, thence east 80 chains, thence south 20  ehains to place of beginning.  Nelson, B.C., T/M. WARD, Locator.  April 24th, 1903. DAVID BOOTH, Agent.  Corporation of the City of Nelson.  ELECTRIC LIGHT RATES.  Electric rates for the month of May arc now  due and payable at the city oflice. If paid on or  before the 15th of .lunc a rebate of 10 per cent  will be allowed.   By order.  II. C. McMORIUS,  Nelson, Jfay 30, V.m. f'ity Clerk.  ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  j    ANNOUNCEMENT  Borden's Condensed  X  ���  ���.  ���  ���  ���  ���  Originators of Condensed. Milk���-Established 1857.  , PROPRIETORS OF THE CELEBRATED  PEERLESS BRAND EAGLE BRAND  ^-Ji*��iI_ht^Mh-r-i.*'  J__a__��n5rr��M.H��_Jgg  Evaporated Cream  Condensed Milk  Having established a BRANCH FcACTORY in Canada, are now prepared to  supply customers throughout the. trade with their brands. Jlyff  SOLD BY ALL GROCERS AND BY  A. Macdonald & Co.  Nelson --Wholesale  The "BORDEN BRANDS" represent the highest possible standard.  Leaders for o"ber 40 years.  Retail by T. S. McPherson, Morrisouffc Caldwell, J. A. Irving, T. J. Scanlan.  P  ROSSER'S  Second Hand Store  find  China Hall  New and Second Hand Goods of every description bought and sold. Call in and look over  the stock before sending cast for anything.  Goods Rented  Plr>��t-Gluss  Warehouse  Pot- Storage  WESTERN  CANADIAN EMPI.OV.MK.VT  AGENCY  Baker Street, West,  Next to C.I'.K. Ticket Oflice  Phone 2G1A P.O. Box 58S*  Dealers in  Coffee, Teas, Spices, Halting,  Flavoring Extracts.  tP and  OUR GOODS &re pure an(* sdttttd from Me I*** ,n th* various'  ���    " ��� ��� = lines.   In order to get the best, please buy from us  direct, and Ive guarantee satisfaction.   cAddress,  Kootenay Coffee Co.  Nelson, 'B.C.  Telephone 17'  r. O. Box 182  REISTERER & C2  BREWERS  OF'  LAG$R BEER AND PORTER  Put up in Packages to Suit the Trade  Brewery and Office: Latimer Street, Nelson, B.C.  If yogi want good  Bee*  Call in and get a drink of  Ucistercr'rt best at the  BARTLETT HOUSE  P. Burn<�� &Co  . Wholesale  and  Retail  Meat  Merchants  Head Office and Cold Storage Plant at Nelson.  BRANCH MARKETS at Kaslo, Ymir, Sandon, Silverton, Kovelstokc, New Ptnrer, C_se_4��, Trait,  Grand Forks, Greenwood, Midway, Phoenix, Rossland, Slocan City/ Moyie, Cranbrook,  1'ernie and Macleod.  NELSON BRANCH MARKET,  BURNS BLOCK,  BAKER 8TREKT  Orders by mail toJinyJBranch wllljrecelve prompt and careful attention.  West Kootenay Butcher Company  Fresh and Salted Meats.   Fish and Poultry in Season.  ORDERS BY MAIL rcccive|prompt  and careful attention.  E. C. TRAVES. Manattr.  K.W.C. Block, Nelion  GELIGNITE   The strongest and best Explosive on the Market  Hamilton Powder Company  Manufacturers of  High Grade Exploshru, Sporting-, Hlnhsc and Blutfof Tvwitt  Manufactured  By the   GEO.  O. TUNSTALL, JR.  District Mgr., Nelson, B.C. The Nelson Tribune  The ]��� E Ashdown Hardware Co*, Ltd,  s  Importers   and   Dealers  in  Shelf  and   Heavy  HARDWARE  i  Tinware and  Graniteware. ._������  Stoves and  Ranges.  BAKER ST.  Fire Brick, Fire Clay, Portland Cement,  T-Rails, Ore Cars, Sheet Steel, Crescent,  Canton and Jessop's Drill Steel. : : : : :  INBUSOIN  le.'  if-  TT Tf Use an inferior grade of flour  \/y \T\\\      when you can get the best at  vf      l^y      fa same pT{ce} jusf unloaded  a/jcar of Five Roses   -    -    $i.50 Per Sack  J. A. IRVING & CO.  Groceries and Provisions  Houston Block, Nelson.  Wc earrv a very large  I        Stock of  '$     The Latest Patterns.  Come and make your choice  .-.-Before Home Cleaning  Linoleums  i'j>  SBB    OUR   GO-CARTS  All prices.   We can suit you.  D.   McARTHUR   &   CO.  Furniture   Dealers   and   Undertakers  & Co,  Wholesale Provisions  Produce and Fruits  ( R. A.. Rogers & Co., L,d., Winnipeg  f���*"  Representing   ; rV. K; Pairbank Co.,     -     Montreal  i- (Simcoe Canning Co.,     -  - Slmcpe  Office and Warehouse,  ������t (Josephine  Street ���  Nelson, B. C  CTVIOK"|h    ���  ���   Tackctt Cigar Co's  \  Monogram  ^1Tlv-r*VJ-1   ���  ���   Union Label Cigars 1  Marguerite  George E. Tacfcett's Cigarettes  \ Karnack  Only Union-Made Cigarette In Ciuuda    (    T��'&  B��  ;:w. j. McMillan & co.  WHOLESALE  GROCERS  Agents for B.C. Vancouver,  B.C.  ������ ��� ��� , ��� '  CeLsh   Advanced   on   Consignments  \ Jacob Green & Co,  Aoctioneets,  Appraisers, Valuators  General   Commission Agents  Corner of Baker and Josephino Street.  NELSON, B.C.  ^  ^  We have secured the  services of  R.W.RUSSELL  .EXPERT  OPTICIAN  And we have the latest appliances for  testing Eyes, and we  solicit your patronage.  ?^ Special Sale  Will continue until, the  31st of this month...  We are  offering  better bargains than  ever In  Watches      Clocks  Jewelry  Silver Novelties  Silver Plated Ware  J___T"We are giving special values in the  LATEST  LADIES' CHATELAINE  BAGS.  .  J.J.WALKER  NELSON, B. C.  . . THE . .  LEADING  JEWELER  WANTED.  rjAKDENKR, to work on shares two acres  ^ Hrst-class land; has been worked for live  years; two blocks from the tramway line, Fair-  view.   Address I'.O. Box 119, Nelson, lt.C.  WANTED.  A MFK INSURANCE CANVASSER FOR THE  ���<*��� Nelson District. Ciood inducement*. Apply OKU. t>. SCOTT, Vancouver. i��.(J.  MORLEY & CO.  -Wholesale und Ketuil  Booksellers and  Stationers  (Artists' Materials  Engineering and Mining  Books  Typewriters  SMimeographs  'Photographic Supplies  cMusical Instruments  Morley&Co* Nelson,B*C  LOCAL NEWS NOTES.  M. S. Davys has beeu in Victoria. He  is expected back with Mrs. Davys tonight.  Those children who remained, in Nelson  on Monday had tlie usual good time on  Baker street. C. A. Waterman as usual  being the master of ceremonies.  The tug Sandon will shortly be put out of  commission on Slocan lake. The C. P.R.  aro. now handling all their freight via the  Crow's Nest road. '-.*������  There was a baseball game on the recreation grounds this morning between the  Intermediates and Juniors. The former  were victorious the score being 10 to 12.  The game was hotly contested.  H. T. Irvine after a visit to thc Alberta  Coal Co.'s property iu the early part of  the week, went to Spokano on Thursday  and is expected back today with Mrs.  Irvine.  . Professor Heath is now looking after  the tonsorial -department in tho Hume  hotel. He intends to settle in Nelson and  it is expected will be a great acquisition  to the Presbyterian choir.  Among those visiting Spokane on Tuesday to see thc president from Nelson  were: Mrs. H. T. Irvine, Mrs. Sharp,  Mrs Povah, G. A. Hunter, James McDonald, Frank Gibbs and Jacob Green.  An alarm of fire was turned in about  11:45 this morning. It proved to be a cottage occupied by Mrs. Stevenson, near the  Kootenay Lake General hospital. There'  was about $10 damage done, the blaze being put out by the chemical engine.  The first cricket game of the season was  played on the recreation grounds this afternoon. There was a good turnout and  tlie playing showed there was lots of good  material for a first class eleven with practice.- F. Fletcher and A. M. Johnson were  the captains. Fletcher's team ran up a  score of 74, of which E. Mason made 26.  Johnson's team made '!.*>, [of which tho  captain scoreel 14. In the second innings  Boultbeo made about -to, playing good  cricket.  Complaints are made by residents on  the C. P. R. flats that tin* Chinese laun-  drymen are being allowed to drain into,  or towards Cottonwood creek. In most  instances the filthy water escapes from  the flumes, and lies mound in pools,  which when tho hot weal her comes may  be very unhealthy.  C. P. R. district passenger agent J. S.  Carter's many friends will bo glad to  know that for tho present at least he stays  at Nelson. A rumor liad been going the  rounds of tho papers that ho was to be  promoted to Vancouver to take the place  of E. J. Coyle. There seems to be no  truth, in the statement as far as can be  learned here.  The case of the city of Nelson vs. J. K.  Strachan, formerly citj*- clerk, came up  again this morning before police magistrate Crease. P. E. Wilson, city solicitor, appeared on behalf of the city and  W. A. Macdonald, K. C, for tho defence.  Mi-. Wilson said that under his instructions he had no evidenco to offer, and the  case was adjourned until Monday, bail  being renewed as before. It is understood that any difference in the accounts  havo been adjusted and the money refunded the city.  SUPREME COURT.  On Tuesday the first matter to come up  was Docksteader. vs. Clark. W. A. Macdonald, K.C-, for defendant, applied that  the case be postponed so that a witness,  now in Dawson, could be got. The application was granted on defendant paying all costs of the day and ail costs incidental to the adjoiirnment in any event.  S. S. Taylor, K.C., for plaintiff.  Kingsmill vs. Crow's Nest Pass Coal  Company came next. S. S. Taylor, K.C.,  for plaintiff, W. A. Macdonald, K.C., for  the company. Tho following were the  jurymen on this case: G. O. Hodge, foreman, W. Park, H. Amos, W. W. Bradley,  G. S. McLaughlin, R. M. Hood, H. Cane  and D. S. McLachlan. The principal witness was the plaintiff A. C. Kingsmill,  who sues for damages for injuries caused  to him on March 28th, 1902, while at work  in the employ of the company in room lo,  level No.- 7, of the No. 4 mine at Michel.  In his evidence, he stated that throughout  the mine at that time tho company was  pushing the getting out of coal, and  refusing to supply timbering with which  to make the roof of the working places-  safe, and that by reason of this, while,  he was working, coal from the roof  fell on him; breaking his thigh and  dislocating his ankle. The case was continued all Wednesday and the jury were  excused until two o'clock on Thursday.-  The court then charged' the jury, his lordship submitting six questions, if however  the first question was answered in the  negative the others could be abandoned.  The jury then retired, and in an hour's  time reported to the court that their answer to the first question was in the negative. Their verdict was accepted and  they were discharged from further attendance. Tho question submitted aud  the answer given was as follows: Did  the defendant company or its servants do  anything in regard to the timbering of  tho room which a person of ordinary care  aud skill would not have done under tho  circumstances, or omit to do anything  which a person of ordinary care and skill  would have done under tho circumstances?  The result of the jury's finding is a judgment iu favor of tho defendants the  Crow's Nest Coal company, who are acquitted of negligence in connection with  the accident in which the plaintiff sustained the injuries he complained of, and  on account of Avliich he sought damages  from the company:  The case of Briggs vs. Fleutot next occupied the attention of the court. In this  case H. Giegerich, of Kaslo, as assignee  of R. P. Briggs, seeks an order from the  court that he is owner of certain mineral  claims, and that the court order property  sold to satisfy a judgment of $1446 obtained by Briggs end assigned to Gieg-  ; rich. S. S. Taylor, K.C., for plaintiff and  W. A. Macdonald, K.C., and Rex Macdonald for defendant. The argument  was continued by W. A. Macdonald on  Friday, and S. S. Taylor summed up for  the plaintiff. The learned judge announced that further argument would be  heard later on. In the meantime the next  case called\jvas Balfour vs. Ingram, in  which suit is brought to set aside a chattel  mortgage made by Ingram in favor Of W.  H.. Covert of Grand Forks, and assigned  by him to the Eastern Townships Bank.  John Elliot and R. S. Lennie for plaintiff,  J. A. Macdonald, of Rossland, for tho  Eastern Townships Bank, and S. S. Taylor, K.C., for W. H. Covert. The case is  now proceeding.  ^***********A**i|********^**_%*_%****'��)?��  PROFITABLE BANKING BUSINESS.  The Bank of Montreal has issued the  following statement of the'results of the  business of the bank for the year ending  April 30th, 3903:  Balance of profit and loss account'10th  April, 190'* * 105,8315.09  Profits for the year ended 8l)th April,  1903, after deducting charges of management, and making full provision  for all bad and doubtful debts  1,813,483.00  Premiums on new stock     965,408.00  f-,944,807.75  Dividend 5 percent, paid 1st  December, 190. $000,000.00  Dividend 5 per cent, payable  ��� 1st June, 1903  020,000.00 1,220,000.00  Amount credited to rest account 1,000,000.00  Bal. profl t and loss carried forward... ? 724,807.75  FOR SALE.  Scotch Collie Pups, male and female, nine weeks  old. Eligible to registry. F. B. Mercer, It.*.D.  No. 3, Spokane, Wash., or Phone Suburban -963.  Children's  White and Colored Dresses.  Ladies' French  Wash  Kid Gloves.  4r\  ��-?  ��*?  ��K  ��-?  �����?  ��9  4H  4H  4H  �����?  49  49  -M  ���?  -��  4?  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  49  Special Cash Prices  FOR ONE WEEK=  3 lbs. Ram Lai's 60c. Tea---  3 lbs. Monsoon 60c. Tea   3 lbs. Blue Ribbon 60c. Tea.  4 cans Gallon Rhubarb .���  12 cans 3-lb. tins Rhubarb .  12 cans Smoked Salmon ���  $1.00  1.00  1.00  1.00  1.00  1.00  6 cans Strawberries    1.00  6 cans Raspberries  6 cans Peaches ----------  6 cans Pears- -   10 lbs. Jam or Jelly. -----  12 cans Assorted Spices-  1.00  1.00  1.00  1.00  1.00  J. A. Kirkpatriek & Co.  LIMITED  Aberdeen Block  P.O. Box 577  NELSON, B. C.  tZ������9����������$����?����9��9������999c4������99c4999%  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������  Dry Goods, Men's Furnishings, Milli-  nery, Carpets and House Furnishings.  }. A. Gilker's;  ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������  # Is now complete in every Department, consisting of a Magnificent Assortment,  w Brydges, Blakemore & Cameron, Ltd,  I OuLSpring���and  /iv  ft  ft  $  /is  /iv  Ladies' White and Colored Blouses  and Shirt Waists, each from : 75c. up  Ladies' Silk Waists  $3-50  Ladies' Linen and Lawn Skirts  1.50  .Ladies'. Rainy-Day and Dress Skirts      2.00  Ladies' Tailor-Made Suits   Ladies' Silk Monte Carlo Coats   Ladies' Silk Dress Skirts   18.00  Ladies'Silk Underskirts  5.00  Ladies' and Children's White Wear.  Ladies' White Underskirts  75c. up  Ladies' White Corset Covers  25c. up  Ladies' White Muslin Nightgowns 75c. up  Ladies' White Muslin Drawers... 25c. up  Children's White and Colored Dresses.  I  L  Men's White and Colored Shirts.  Men's Balbriggan Shirts and Drawers    50c.  Men's Natural Wool Summer Shirts  and Drawers   Men's White Night Shirts     75c.  Latest Styles in Collars and Cuffs,  Scarfs. Ties and Neckwear.  Made Stilts  AT  ���Gait-Coal  And  Wood of All  Kinds  Terms Spot Cusli '  W.  F��. TIERNEY  Telephone 265 Bnker Street  Spring Medicine  Our Compound Extract  of  Sarsaparilla  .Cleans out.tho System, tones up the Digestive  Organs, makes a Good Appetite, regulates the  Bowels, and Is wonderfully beneficial in all rundown conditions.  LARGE BOMTLES (reg.ular *1 size) each...78c  SIX BOTTLES for $4.00  Canada Drug and Book Co's Stores  Take Advantage  Of This Offer  Real Estate and  Qeneral Agients  _5JtL_T_n  of  Fresh Jam  MILLINERY.  Ladies' Straw Sailor Hats, each  25c.  Ladies'   Ready-to-Wear and Pattern Hats  in the latest styles,  and Novelties from  some of the leading designers.  JOSEPHINE ST.  NELSON, B. C.  Frank   Fletche*  PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR  Lands and Mineral Claims Surveyed  and Crown Granted  P.O. Box 563  Oflice: Kootenay St., Nelson  Dress Goods in all the Latest Materials and Shades.  Carpets, Linoleums, Oil Cloths, Rugs, Blinds, Curtains, Portieres, Etc.  AT PRICES AWAY DOWN.  jj\    Summer Lawns, Muslins, Dimities, Organdies, Batistes, Linens, Ginghams at all prices and qualities.  $ = _���; _____ ; .. ; __���  $ ���  Geo. M. Gunn  Maker of first-class hand-made Boots and  Shoes. Repairing neatly and promptly  done. Satisfaction guaranteed in all work  Ward St. next new postofllce bid Nelson  JOHN  HEPBURN  BUILDER AND  CONTRACTOR  Jobbing work done   Estimates given  for  50 Cents  See Our Window.  All Carpets aad  Oil Cloths Made  and Laid FREE  OF CHARGE.  FRED IRVINE & CO.  Sole Agents  for   Butterick  Patterns.  ^ ^���'��������r',*-w**--r--*-5'*-'C----s-'-S-"-C-^  SHOP   ��� RESIDENCE  Behind new postoffice       Cor. Front and Willow  NELSON  Sewing Machines/Pianos  FOB RENT and FOR SALE  Morrison & Caldwell  Springs Summer  Josephine Street  Old Curiosity Shop,      J<$KeI!E  PROVINCIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE.  His honor the lieutenant-governor ln council  haa been pleased to make the following appointment; John H. Fox, of the City of Nelson, Esq.,  to be collector of revenue tax in and for thc said  city, in the Nelson assessment district.  18th May, 1903. ^^  We are showing the most beautiful assortment  of Newest Millinery Styles evey exhibited in the  vicinity.  The Latest Styles in Trimmed and  Ready-to-Wear Hats  For Women, Misses and Children. We exhibit  Millinery that is correct in Style and appropriate  for Spring and Summer wear, at ���  The Lowest Prices ever Quoted  in this vicinity  Actually 50 per cent lower than you can buy elsewhere. Call and see us���you will bo cordially  welcome. You will undoubtedly see something  to please you at A VERY LOW ?RICE.  THE ENFIELD CO.  COSTUMERS AND MILLINERS  Baker Street, next door to the Hudson Bay Stores

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