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The Nelson Tribune Dec 19, 1901

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 ESTABLISHED  1892  THURSDAY  MORNING,  DECEMBER  Id   1901  DAILY EDITION  3  SETS PEOPLE OF SLOCAN  WILD WITH JOY.  ONE  OF  THE   MOST  IMPORTANT  STRIKES EVER MADE IN  THE DRY ORE BELT.  SLOCAN CITY, December, 18.���[Spcc-  - iiil to The Tribune.]���Slocan is jubilant  tliis afternoon because of a strike mado  in the Ottawa, a mino situate on  Springer creek, about four miles distant  from town. Tlie Ottawa is owned by  ' "Tom" Mulvey and "Billy" Clements,  and is under bond to Messrs. Mulvey,  King, Taylor, and .Tohnson. They have  been working tbe property about three  months, and on thc night shift on Tuesday struck ore in the face of the tunnel,  which is in 250 feet. Taylor, one of the  parties who - have tbe bond, brought  samplesof the ore to town this forenoon  for assays, and the returns as soon as  they became known set the town wild.  The ore went over 3000 ounces silver  to the ton.  "Tom" Mulvey and ".Tap" King, both  of whom havo been in Kootenay for so  many years that they are old enough .to  bo grandfathers, are now reckoned as  millionaires.  Mr. Macroni dated the previous day  (the Cth) to the company's advisers: "I  may mention that prior to the receipt  of your letter I had decided to discontinue tlie tests and to remove the in-'  struments tomorrow."  Minnesota Flour Mills Suspend  MINNEAPOLIS, December 18.���Four  Hour mills of the Consolidated Milling  Company vrere shut down this morning.  There is every probability that nearly  all mills will be closed before the end  of the week. The cosing of'the mills  results in part from temporary depression in the demand for flour from  abroad.       ."'"."���' .���  Toueht a Duel to the DaatV,  UNIONTOWN, Pennsylvania, December 18.���Daniel Bradburn and David  Fagan fought a duel to the death-last  night, in a small room of a boarding  house where both men lived. ^Bradburn  was killed and Fa5a.11 is in jail with a  bullet wound in his side from the effects of which he may die. .  ,  (i Socialists Win at Northport   ���  ,/ NORTHPORT,   December   IS.���[Spec  ial to The Tribune.]���The city council  JJnt   its   regular   meeting   here, tonight  canvassed " tlie"returns   of' the   'recent  }       ''        municipal  election   and   instructed   the  \ clerk to issue certificates of election for  ; the ensuing year. Tliis action was taken  ,     . in  compliance with  a peremptory writ  \ c      of mandamus, which was issued yester-  > day by judge Richardson pf the superior court. The council had refused  to issue certificates of election on account of alleged irregularities, and tlie  Socialists    who    carried    tlio    election  I                 were  compelled  to  apply  to   tho court  r                  for. a' writ commanding them to do so.  1 -    > He Would Make a Good Miyor.  V>                .VANCOUVER,   December   IS.���[Sji<?c?  "'-,   '   ial to'Thc Tribune.]���F. Carter-Cotton  J-t    has-been oflered the nomination for the  '���''���'    mayoralty  by- the Vancouver  Electoral  Union, and it is probable he will accept.  A report  conies  from  Nanaimo that  I                  the Wellington-collerles are to re-open  , under Mrs. Joan Dunsmuir's own man-  . age'ment.    The mine was formerly  op-  ��� orated as part of the property of pre-  ; mier Dunsmuir, but on account of difficulties with the men the mine has been  closed down.   Tatlow Will- Pnpport Boriwpll  *        VANCOUVER,   December   18.���[Spcc-  xx,    iai  to The   Tribune.]���AVhile   in   Van-  -V couver on Tuesday,   colonel * Prior   of  Victoria asked R. G. Tatlow, M. P. P.,  ���-^ yp;rfu-Hipg���hiR^Riippor-t^-or^otherwise^of=  Bodwell, and Tatlow replied that although he was a Conservative, there  was nothing left for him but to support  Bodwell as against Dunsmuir.  A carnival of thieving Christmas  goods exists here. Thieves are being  driven out of Seattle, and have headed  for other Coast cities.  ;  %  ft-.V  v  Vi  ��  ft.  mm  Cassiar Heard From  OTTAWA, December 18.���[Special to  The Tribune.]���The census department  has received returns from the northern  part of Burrard constituency, which  takes in Bennet and Atlin and the remainder of Cassiar district, giving the  population at 201C.  Edison Now Believes Tt  NEW YORK, December 18.���At his  laboratory at West Orange, New Jersey,  Thomas Edison authorized the following  statement concerning William Marconi's  feat in receiving wireless telegraphic  communications from England: "Since  Marconi has stated over his own signature that he has received the signals  from England I believe him and I think  he will carry it to a commercial success.  It is a great achievement and he is a  great experimenter."  NEW YORK, December 18.���The solicitors of the Anglo-American Telegraph Company have made public the.  following statement: "There seems to  be some misapprehension as to the action of our clients, the AnglOrAmerican  Telegraph Company, .Limited, with respect to the experiments in wireless telegraphy which recently took place at St.  Johns, Newfoundland, by Mr. Marconi.  In a letter addressed to Mr. Marconi by  the company's legal advisers in Newfoundland, after stating the company's  intention.to take the necessary steps to  secure a recognition of their rights in  the colony, the letter proceeds: "How-;  ever, they (the company) instruct us to  inform you that they are not adverse to  giving the most careful consideration  to any proposals which may be put forward by you with a view to the further  continuance of your work. As to the  statement said to have been telegraphed  from St. Johns by Mr. Marconi on t.he  17th instant to the effect, that in consequence of the threatened legal proceedings of the company he was compelled  to discontinue wireless telegraphy tests  between England and the colony we give  the following extract from a letter of  A   REAL   LIVE . QUESTION  The Selection of Coal Lands   .  The following is from tho Montreal  Herald of thc Gth instant, and the gentleman interview calls attention to the  importance that attaches to the immediate selection by the Dominion government of the 50,000 acres of coal lands  to which the. Dominion is entitled in  the Crow's Nest Pass coal field. The interview reads:  William Blakemore, wtio has just returned from a prolonged trip through  the western mining districts, was interviewed by a Herald representative at  the Windsor hotel this morning. Mr.  Blakemore .said:  "The result of the last six months  spent in British Columbia convinces  mo tliat, whilst there are temporary  conditions whicli are interfering with  tho development of the province, there  is no reason whatever to be pessimistic,  for the ono fact has been established  moro fully of late than at any previous  time in the history of British Columbia,  namely, that there is no lack of valuable  and extensive- ore deposits. As these  must form the backbone of future development, it is satisfactory to be able  to speak emphatically upon this point.  "The conditions which I regard as  transient may be briefly' summed up as  follows: Complications in the political  world pending reorganization of the  provincial government; the depressed  condition of the lead market and constant tendency to a'lo\yer price for this  important product; the unsettled condition at the moment of the copper  market; and lastly, the cause which unfortunately wo seem to have always  with us, but with respect to wliich thero  arc not wanting evidences that force of  circumstances will effect what nothing  else bas been successful in doing, I  mean extravagant and ��� incompetent  handling of valuable properties.  "WILD-CATTING.  ��� "British Columbia has been passing  through a phase which is inseparable  from the establishment of any new  mining camp, the stage of "wild-catting," promoting, stoctc gambling and  general rushing round to make a quick  turn and a big profit, regardless of the  intrinsic merit bf the properties handled. This condition never lasts very  long, and in the case of British Colum-  "biaTTt-Has-been short, sharp and decisive.  "It was not altogether a disadvantage  that one or two very promising and expensive properties were manipulated in  such a manner as to secure public and  concentrated', attention upon some of the  methods whicli were being resorted to in  order to exploit mining stock upon the  various exchanges. The result is that  there has been a public awakening and  that it will be difficult for similar methods to be successful again. The natural  sequence has been more legitimate  mining and a���more careful examination  of prospects, together with a more conservative method of entering upon new  enterprises. This policy will in the end  result in the development of a legitimate and permanent mining province,  although it will take two or three years  to settle down on the new basis. In  every part of British Columbia good  properties arc coming Into notice.  "The Lardeau promises next year to  make a fair start towards general development/assisted by the new railway  which will then be in operation.  "The ores of the Boundary camps  whilst low in value, are deposited in  such enormous bodies that with careful  and economical management and moderate capitalization, they should yield  a fair return to investors.  GOAT RIVER DISTRICT.    .  "In the Boat River district the development of the large hematite iron ore  properties, with which I have been more  directly associated, Is attracting considerable attention, and bids fair to have  an important effect upon the future of  the province. We have done a good  season's work - and expended in the  neighborhood $25,000 on development  work. It will take another year yet to  complete this class of ��ork and to fully  determine the extent -of the property,  but without being too sanguine, I can  safely say that we have one of the most  important iron properties on this continent, and although the area is small  compared with what is to be found in  Michigan, and on the Great Lakes, it is  much larger than the Newfoundland deposit, upon which eastern companies  are basing their future production, and  is of a grade not in any respect" inferior  to the best known ore. If it is found  that the time is ripe urter completion  of prospecting work to establish a steel  works in British Columbia, lie benefit  to the west will bo oncra��' s, as the  present cost of iron end stee?. in what  ever form, is exceedingly high and prevents that rapidity of development  which would take place under more favorable conditions.  "Important discoveries of coal have  recently been made in the Kettle River  and Similkameen districts. I inspected  and reported upon these, and while it  is too soon to express a definite opinion,  owing to the limited amount of development work done, I am able to say  that I located at least one first-class  seam of coaking coal which analyzed 62  per cent of fixed carbon and 7 per cent  of ash in the raw coal taken at the outcrop.  "In the Blairmore district, a few miles  east of the Rockies, there'is considerable activity of coal; at least nine different companies are opening up seams,  and one extensive mine has been established and is shipping out three hundred tons daily. Some coke ovens have  been built and every effort is being made  to develop a coking proposition.  / 7 MUCH DISAPPOINTMENT.  "There is considerable disappointment  throughout the Kootenays at the stoppage of operations near Fernie, wliich  the Canadian Pacific Railway Company have been opening up during tho  'past season. These .areas are on the  south side of Morrisey creek and were  intended to form part of the six square  miles of coal lands to which the C. P.  R. are entitled under the Crow's Nest  railway Dominion charter.  "Operations have been pushed forward  vigorously and shipment of coal would  have commenced within a few months,  but in consequence of the delay in making the government seleccion, and the  uncertainty as to what location would  ultimately be chosen, operations have  been suspended, and an important auxiliary to the supply of fuel shut off, at  any rate for the present. As the Crow's  Nest Coal Company are totally unable  to supply the requiremeents of the trade,  this is unfortunate, especially in view  of the fact that the Great Northern, who  are building into Fernie, require more  coal than tho whole of the Fernie mine  can produce, and at the present moment, in consequence of the shortage  in supply of coal, the C. P.' R. are purchasing a large portion of their lequire-  ments from the new openings in the  Blairmore district.  "I notice in the current number of the  Ottawa Mining Review'that Mr. Sifton  expresses his anxiety to make a prompt  selection and to do this in a manner  which will best serve the public interest.  It is clear to anyone acquainted with  the conditions in British Columbia that  the only thing which will serve the pub"-  lic interest is effective competition.  Already the limited competition of the  Blairmore district has . resulted in reducing" the price of coal at least 25 per  cent, and if effective competition can  be established in the pass, where the  best coking "coal exist, if would mean  a reduction of $1 to $2 in the price of  coke."   STRUCK THE" WRONG CROWD  Pro-Boer Utterances Dislikfd,  LONDON, December IS ���David Mcyfl  George, 11.P., speaking in Birmingham  town hall tonight, precipitated -i scone unprecedented in that city 'since the Aston  Park riotK. The majority of the audience  were hostile to the speaker and were enraged by his pro-Roer and anti-Chambet-  lain utterances. They rushed the police cordon guarding, the platform. In the meanwhile ihe building was besieged from the  outside by a mob of several thr.usand pco-  'plo, who smashed windows and tried to  -fqree-the doors.-Whichhad bcon barricaded.  ��� They- fusilladed the audience with stones  thrown-through the windows. The police  reserves wei-o turned nut nnd succeeded 111  dispersing the mob after repi-atcd charges.  A number' of persons were 'njured and  the town hall was wrecked, but a single  window being left whole. Crowds were  awaiting admission to Ihe building I0115  before tho doors of thc town hall wero  opened. The building tilled quickly and t��  was immediately seen that the trouble was  coming. Cheers were raised for "Joe" and  a white (lag was unfurled amid deafening  shouts for the traitor as Dr. Lloyd Georgo  and his friends appeared on the platform,  .-i'l attempts at speechmaking were futila.  owing to the continuous din of hissing, hooting find singing. !n the meantime the enormous crowd omside the building had become more noisy and more menacing. Presently a* stone came through a  window. This caused a stampede among  the occupants of the gallery. From llus  time forward pandemonium reigned In the  building and ugly rushes were made for  the .platform and the police were soon  overpowered.  Lloyd George and his friends wore compelled to n= treat, to an inner room for  ciifetv. Thev were unable to leave the  building for fear of mob violence and were  thus kept prisoneis until 11 late hour when  Llovd Goorge. disguised as a chief constable, left the town hall with a posse  of policemen. Many constables were seri-  ouslv injured in tlieir attempts to clear the  streets. It is said that one civilian has  died of his injuries.   Captain Stays by the Shir.  PARIS, December IS.���Additional dispatches received here from Marseilles announces that 40 of the members of the crew  of 52 men belonging to the French steamer  Kleber. ashore east of tho mouth of the  '���'river Rhone, have been rescued through  the uso of lifeboats. The captain and the  other oflicers refuse to leave the vessel.  Wrecked Off La Libertad.  SAN FRANCISCO. December 18.���A dispatch to. the Merchant's Exchange says  that the steamer San Bias, which left San  Francisco November 2!)tli for Panama, was  wrecked December 17th off La Libertad.  The passengers and crew were saved.  Seeks Safety in Canada.  PHOENIX, Arizona, December IS.���Tt is  announced her today that Loo D. Mills,  local manager of the Southern Mutual Investment Company, has tied to Canada,  taking a large sum of money and leaving  behind local "creditors to the amount of several thousand dollars. It is announced that  Mill's shortage Tor thc past month upprovi-  mates $10,000. lie is believed to be in New  Brunswick.   San Francisco Plague Cases.  DAT/LAS, Texas, Decembor IS.���A special  to tha News from Austin, Texas, says:  State health oilicer Tabor has reported to  the governor that then; wero six cases of  bubonic plague in San Francisco during  September anil four deaths in October and  one case and one death iii..N<j}ayy,*"'f.  QUESTIONS THAT  " c  r,  ARE OF VAST INTEREST TO  -PROPERTY-PWNER .  THEY CAN BE ANSWERED AT THE  BALLOT-BOX tp-MORc-O'^  FRIDAY,  siders that the people of Nelson have  lost confidence, not only in tlie future  of tlieir town, but in the future of tbe  country. Are the people of Nelson prepared to make such an admission?  1. How many houses are vacant in  Nelson?  2. Why are they vacant?  3. Is there a demand at present for  real estate, either improved or unimproved ?  4. If there is no demand, are present  prices likely to be maintained, to say  nothing of a rise in price?  5. Who will a fall *jn prices most affect? people who have all their interests  in Nelson, or people who only have a  small proportion of their interests  here?  C. How many people in Nelson have  their homes mortgaged to loan companies, and in what"way will a fall in  prices of real estate affect these people?  Will it not ruin them?  7. How many people will come - to  (Nelson to locate here through the city's  purchase from the West Kootenay Power  & Light Company of auxiliary power  for its lighting system?  8. How many extra people would be  employed in Nelson by the West Kootenay Power & Light Company were tlie  city to purchase* power from that company?  3. If there are a large number of vacant houses and no demand' for real  estato, what will bring about a change?  10. Can a change be brought about  in any other way than by an increase  of population? (  11. If not, what had best be done to  bring about an increase of population?  12. Would the establishment of manufacturing industries , bring about that  result?  . 13. Are not power arid water and light  factors in operating industries, ana  their cheapness one of the'first things  considered in selecting sites for their  operation ?  14. If Nelson is dependent on the  West Kootenay Power & Light Company, Limited, of Roasiand for power,  is it at all likely that that company  will give anyone any special rates in  order to enable them to locate at Nelson?  15. If the city of Nelson has its own  power plant on Kooteiay river, will it  not be entirely independent of the West  Kootenay Power & Light Company,  Limited, of Rossland, and being independent will it not be in'a position to  -make-such-rates"for"power"and~liglit~as"  will be an inducement to manufacturers  to locate here?  16. Will not the building of a power  station on Kootenay river by the city  cause the disbursement of thousands of  dollars for labor and supplies? and will  not both the labor and the supplies be  procured in Nelson?  17. Will not the city be in a position  to make lower rates for lighting stores  and residences if it owns an up-to-date  power plant of its own? and will it not  be in a position to light the streets  more cheaply than if it is compelled to  purchase auxiliary power from the West  Kootenay Power & Light Company,  Limited, of Rossland?  18. If the West Kootenay Power &  Light Company is so anxious to gain  an entrance into Nelson, what will it  cost the city to get it out once it does  gain an entrance?  19. Was the city acting in good faith  when it applied for and surveyed a site  for a power station on Kootenay river?  If it was, why should it not provide  means to utilize the site?  20. Will not lower electric light rates  and a good street lighting system be  a benefit to the people of Nelson? and  will not such benefits more than offset  any increase in taxation resulting from  the borrowing of $150,000, all of which  is to be expended on a revenue-earning  public utility?     The above questions cannot lie classed  as "vile insinuations" against the honesty of the mayor and aldermen who are  opposed to the passage of By-law No.  102, nor can they be classed as scurrilous utterances against the management of the West Kootenay Power &  Light Company. They are questions  that 'the people of Nelson should well  consider before they mark their ballots  on Friday. In the opinion of The Tribune, the defeat of By-law No. 102 will  give Nelson a set-back from which. It  will not recover in a long time, foi ��� It  will be taken as an indication by cat*  Ker ator Sewell Holding His Own  CAMDEN, New Jersey, December 18.  The physicians attending United States  senator Sewell announced tonight that  the senator is holding his own. He has  been resting quietly during the last 24  hours and seems quite cheerful.  Offer of the Bank Accepted  WINNIPEG, December 18.���The offer  of the Canadian Bank of Commerce to  purchase $50,000 of Winnipeg school  debentures at par was accepted by the  school board tonight.  Transport Thomas Arrives  SAN FRANCISCO, December 18.���The  transport Thomas arrived   today   from  Manila, via Nagasaki.   She has 91 cabin  passengers on board and 13S4 soldiers.  TO SETTLE LABOR DISPUTES  Hanna and Gompers in Command.  NEW YORK, December IS.���The labor  conference called to consider plans lor  healing of tlio differences between the capitalist and labor interests of the country organized today, elected oflicers and issued a  general statement of its mission of peace.  Senator Marcus A. Hanna was chosen as  its chairman, with Samuel Gompers second in command, lt retains its connection with the national civic federation and  becomes the industrial department of that  organization. A statement issued expressed  a determination to strive for industrial  peace, to aid in establishing rightful relictions between thoso who toil and their em-  plovers, to confer and advise with employers* and employees when in conflict, to encourage agreements under which labor shall  be performed, and to arbitrate disputes  when asked by both .sides to the dispute.  Determination to avoid discussions of abstract industrial problems was avowed.  The following statement was given out  at the conclusion of the executive soisicn-  This committee shall be known as the industrial department ot the national civil  federation. The scope and province of tliis  department shall be to An what may seem  best to promote industrial pea.ee, to bo  helpful in establishing rightful relations  betwen employers arid workers by its good  ofliuss. to endeavor tu obviate and pi event  strikes and lockouts and to aid 111 renewmp  industrial relations where a rupture has oc-  c.u-iod.  That at all times reprosentalives of workers and employers, organized or unorganized, should confer- for the adjustment of  differences or disputes belore an acute  stage is reached and thus avoid or minimize *the numb-sv of strikes or lockouts.  That mutual agreements as �����> conditions  undor which labor shall be performed  should be encouraged and where agreements are made the terms tliciel'ore snould  be faithfully- adhered both in letter and  spirit bv both parties.  This department either as a whole, or a  sub-committee by it appointed, shall, vlu 1  reciuested, act as a forum to adjust and decide upon fiucstions'at issue between workers and their employers, provided in its  opinion'the .subject is one ot sufficient importance. 1  This department will not consider abstract industrial questions.  This department assumes no power of arbitration unless such powers be conferred  by both parties to a dispute.  Further Keduc'ion in Copper.  NEW YORK, December IS.���It was announced in Wall Street today that tin-  United Metals Selling Company, who  handle the output of the Amalgamated  Copper Company. lias further reduced  pi-lees to a level of about 1 1-2 cents Irom  the rate fixed last Friday, when .1 reduction was also made. Quoted prices .ire now  14 .-ents for Lake copper; M 7-X cent" for  electrolytic and 13 Tor casting.  LONDON, December 18.���So settlement  has been arrived at In the copper situation.  A   representative   of   the   Associated Eress_  learned to day on thu highest authority  that the oflicials of the Rio Tinto Company  look forward to an arrangement bins made  between the Amalgamated nnd the other  American producers before any settlement  is made with the European  interests.  Short Terms of Imprisonment.    "  CASTL13BAR, Ireland, December IS.-  The hearing of the charges of holding  meetings and delivering intimidating  speeches in deliance of the police brought  against Connor O'Kelly. M.P., chairman of  the Mayo county council, and several other  oflicials ot Mayo county, was concluded  today. Mr. O'Kelly was sentenced to two  months' imprisonment and four olher defendants were sentenced to undergo terms  of Imprisonment ranging from 11 fortnight  to a month. All the Sentence!! imposed wore  without, hard labor. The court refused tho  demand of thc defendants for leave lo up-,  peal from the jurisdiction of the court.  The refusal of the court was duetto the  fact that the defendants declined to speak  publicly In.the interim.  Jacksotis Plead Not Guilty.  LONDON, December J.S.���Theodore and  Laura Jackson (Ann Odelia Dis Debar)  pleaded not guilty, when arraigned at the  Old Kailey this morning to stand trial 011  the charges which have been so fully  threshed out in the Mnrleybonie police  court. The prisoners were not defended.  There was a very large crowd In the court  room and In thc vicinity of the court  when the solicitor general, sir lidward Carson, opened the case, reviewing thc point*  already published. Discussing the working  of the "Thecratic Unity.' sir Kdwurd Carson characterized the prisoners as a "Hellish gang."   To Visit Lord Strathcona.  NEW YORK, December IS.���The prince  and princess of Wales loft London for  Broeket Hall, HaUiehl, where they will be  the guests of lord Mount Stephen, cables  the London correspondent of the Tribune.  It is considered highly appropriate, adds  the correspondent, lhat one of the first  country visits on returning from thoir tour  around the world should he lo the man who  for manv vea.rs was tho head of the Canadian Pacific railroad over which they traveled  so  much.  Detective Under Arrest.  SCRANTON, Pennslyv.inia. December IS.  ���Daniel McAulifl'e, one of the three men  shot In a riot nt West Scranton by Scranton railway oflicers who wero attempting  fo arrest a man accused of attacking an  imported motorman and conductors, died  today at the Lackawana hospital. Detective 'Cosgrove of New York City Is under  arrest charged with  th? fatal  shooting.  Walcott Had an Easy Victoiy.  BUFFALO,   December   IS.���Rube   Kerns.  the welter vjeisjit champion, went down lo  defeat at the hands of Joe Walcott,  tin:  Bartjf.does  nlgfjcr,   In  live  rounds  in   thi  arena of the International Club House at  Fort Urie tonight. Walcott battered down  Kerns with ten-ilk- blows and right and toft  swings lo ihe head. To save Ferns from being completely knocked out referee Mc-  Hnde slopped the tl-vhl and awarded the  decision to Walcott. In tho fitth and last  lound Walcott put Ferns to the boards  upon two occasions and twice did Rube  take the count. Wncn he rose the second  time he was in a weakened condition. Ferns  landed some lerrillc blows, but Walcott  was in tho pink of condition and laughed  at Rube's eltorts. Feins iicg.xn to weaken  in the third round but fought gamery and  desperately. Go tli went to the door In thc  fourth round in a clinch and Walcott assisted Ferns to rise. In the fifth round Walcott almost sent Rube through the ropes  and had Ferns almost out when the referee  interfered. The men met at 112 pounds and  the bout was for 20 rounds.  Stampede to Mayo Creek,  SEATTLE, December IS���Dawson advices of November 2Cth tell of, a great  stampede lhat 'is going on to Mayo creek,  in tha Stormont river district. Prospectors  v.-.uiduring in the country lato in the sure ���  m��r discovered evidences of several years'  development on the Mayo, but ne one was  found, the operators evidently having gone  out for the winter. Cabins well stocked  Willi tools and provisions were found. The  news started the stampede anil iviw the  creek is slaked Irom end to end. The original locators, having failed lo record  their claims, will return to find that they  have no holdings In the district. It is not  known in Dawson how iich the pav dirt Is.  the sole reason for the rush being the mysterious developments.  Trade With the Orient.  -WASHINGTON. December IS���A large  delegation from the Asiatic Association,  which iss composed of merchants, manufacturers and others espscinlly interested  in the trade between the United States  and China calld at tho White House today  and presenred to tho president a memorial  In which the hope is expressed " that no  contraction of the commercial or other  rights guaranteed to our citizens bv the  treatv wilh the Chinese empire will be  permitted under cover of special privilcgi.i  extorted from the Chinese government by  anv other powers."  It is regarded of supreme importance lo  the future of the roinr->prce nf the United  States that the principle of the open door  to the gre.it undeveloped markets of eastern  Asi.l should  be preserved  intact.  Robbery of Registered Mail.  ST. LOUIS, Missouri, December IS.���A  daring robbery of a pouch of United Slates  registered mail occurred at Third and Olive  streets. Oscar Kelling. a driver of a mail  wagon, was knocked down by the bull end  of a revolver by three men as he va-s  leaving the building and robbed of a sack  of regisleied mail, which he was taking  outside. The robbers succeeded in escaping  with their booty before Kelling <-o lid give  tho alarm. The'lobby of thc postofhee wat  crowded with people at the time and tlie  sidewalk thronged -with, men leturning  home from bnsincis. The exact vilue of  tho contents of the lost sack is not known.  Pedmond Very Sanguine  DURIjIN, December .IS.���Mr. Redmond  and his party were warmly welcemed hero  tonight by the lord mayor and civil authorities, 'lie addressed au -enormous crowd  from tho slops of the Mansion House. Mr.  Redmond assured the crowd that if they  made ilK-fr crusade sliong. mi-meing and  dangerous enough to England, they mignl  count upon the united support or Lisli .Americans, as well as that of the people oi"  the United States.   EASTERN CANADIAN  NEWS  Wired  in Brief  OIL SPRINGS, Ontario, December IS.���  Kersey Bio's, store at Edy's mills was  burglarized last night. Thu safe was  smashed and $1300 stole.1.  MONTRI3AL, December is'.���James Martin and Charles Smith, two notorious Nov  York burglars, were convicted of burglary  tonight and  will be sentenced  tomorrow.  TORONTO, December IS.���The Ontario  cabinet decided tc lake no action on the  petition of some 2359 citizens of Ottawa  praving mat the disqualification of ex-  mayor Morris for breach of the law respecting drinking In hotels after hours, be  lemoyed.   HALIFAX. December IS.���The wife of  Dr. IJ. W. Kimi, city medical health ftillcer.  has been removed lo the smallpox hospit.il  suffering from the disease, contracted, il  is .thought, from her husband, who had  been engaged in the examination of smallpox patients. ������  HALIFAX. December IS.���Jerry Lapiorro,  nn aged resident, of West Chczzetook. is  lost in. the forest, whiter lie went last  Thursday to attend rabbit snares. It is  feared h" has ���suenumbed ' to (he vinlnn*  storms last night. Search parties are belnc;  orirunized.  MOKTRKAL. December IS.���La Pa trie'  states tonight that th^ remaining bye-elections for tho house of commons will take  place January li'lh. nominations -'.'. week  earlier. Ten divisions will elect members.  The Lisgar election will take place later.  Victoria Us not mentioned.  HKLLKVILLK, Out., December IN.���The  1'elleville street railway has been nur-  chased by A. H. Lewis and Walter Alfred  of this eity. The prico paid was SiKW. They  havo also to assume the obligations.  MONTRKAL, December IS.���Llouleiiaiil-  coloncl i-I vans, who commands the third  contliigi'iit, left today for Halifax by llio  ���Maritime ex.'i-ess.  'MONTREAL,' Decembor IS-J.' W. Arkell.  a director of the American Locomotive  Company, was ln this city today. He said  ho was here for the purpose of looking  over the ground for the erection of a big  locomotive works, which according lo Mr.  Arkell would construct locomotives for export. He believes they can be built more  cheaply in Canada than In the Slates. .He  left tonight for Kingston to look over ihe  plant there.  TORONTO. December 18.��� Sir Wilfrid  Laurier speaking at a reception -In honor  of postmaster-general Muloek hero tonight  repented tho statement that no more deputations would go to Washington. Canada  could produce nil the United States could  produce and in 15 years lie hoped Canada  would catch up to the United States as a  wheat producer and the Canadian steel  industry would rival me United States.  Canada in tlio long run would displace the  United Slates in the British market. He  stated that the deficit in the postollice department would be onlv Sir.n.OOO. Sueechss  were macle by Muloek, Fielding and premier Ross of Ontario.  No Action Was Taken.  LONDON, December is.���The stewards of  the London Joekev Club deny the report  circulated In the United States by a news  agency that at tholr meeting yesterday it  wits decided that Lester Relit, thu American jockey whose license was revoked in  Oet'>i)er. Is entitled to imnlv for a license  in 1W>2. No action la regard to RelfC was  taken at the mooting.  Chili Will Not Agree.  BUENOS AYRES, December IK.���It is  nurtured here that Chill will not agree lo  the proposed modification of her recent  noli4 to Argentina, as outlined in thc recent communication from tho Argentina  Republic. The Naicon litoWes that if this  is true the situation' will become more  serious. j -  BEYOND (MTBOL  MAD   RACE   OF   A   RUNAWAY TRAIN.  EXCITING    TEIP   OF  A   NELSON  & FOET SHEPPARD FREIGHT  ,  TRAIN CREW. -   ',,.  '->.���%  -M  >&  "���vl  ' Z7ZM  z-41  fo  The most serious wreck that has occurred .  on   the   Nelson  &   Fort   Sheppard   branch' v  since it was opened occurred last evening '  by  which some twelve cars were reduced  lo kindling wood and the members of the -  train  crew had an' escape which  they will  relate   for   several   months   to   come.   The -  wrecked train was No. 5(>, which was due to  arrive  In   Nelson  on  Tuesday  ovoning., Ic:  was delaved  and  what there is left of it  .is  now  being picked  up'by  the  C.  V.  K.. ,^'">^1  wrecking outfit. From the best information >'  obtainable   it  appears   that   the   train -be- -,  came unmanageable shortly after crossing  'the summit and,. Increasing Its speed as.it   ���/,*$��  took the grade, plunged through the open-**", "V2)j  switch   ut   the  junction-of  the  main,  line ""'  of  (JlQ  C.  P.   r. ' t  When the news of tho wreck was first  reported at Nelson it was said that the  driver and fireman were both missing and  wore supposed to be underneath the wreck  of the locomotive. Dr. JJall was at once  summoned, but by the time he arrived at  the depot it was ascertained that neither ���  of the men were under the locomotive and  the attendance of a medical mun was not  considered necessary. ,  W.   11.  Peterson,   the operator at Troup  Junction,  had a uairow  escape,  i-le heard    -  ihe an?ry wnn 1 of the runaway train as^it" >  made the curves on Hie line from the summit,  but he had  nol  time to make up his  mind of thc uanger in which tie was until   _,  a portion of a Hying car took out a side of  the building'in  which  he'was housed.  lie   -  sav he ov��,s his escape soi��iy to the fact  that  he  was   not  in   the  way  of  the  car.'  IJ-id  it  been otherwise he realizes  that he,-'  would   nut  have  sent  word  of  the  wreck,  t-.it i.s all.  The train was iu charge of conductor C'   -1  li.   Hibbaid,   with   Zwlslor as  driver, and  A.   cockw'.dl   as   fireman.   In   conversation  with   a   TiiDuno   reporter   a   few   minutes  after   the   wreck,   conductor   Hibbard   saul  lie  had  had  the experience of his life.  He  had  been  iallroading for 20 years, but he^  had  never   ben   called   upon   10  experienca" ,  the  sensation   he  hud   iu   making  the  trip  down    the   mountain    from    the   summit.  When  liis  train arrived at the summit he  says thy air brakes wore tested-and foun4   ->-  to work all  right and  tlio start down the  -  hill    was    made.   Then   the   trouble   com-  '  menced.  The train  started to move pretty -  fast,   but  it  was  lllDb.ird's  first-trip  and . .  ho  thought  tho driver knew  what he was  doing   JJv  ihe  limo  ihe mountain- station  was   rcu-heil   Hibbard   became   rather  un- *  easy.   The  train  wos  moving  too  fasffor,  him, but he suil tluuglit tne driver knew:  what he was doing. So far as he knew there  was a .sump in  the lino which required to ,  be  nrovidfii   tor  and   he  was  prepared  to  lake   his   chances.   After   they  passed   the'  mount nip   station   it   was   evident   to   the _  conductor  that  he  was a passenger on a  runaway   train,   and   Hie   hulo  caooosei in  which   lie  was  riding  was dacing all over  tho  track.  He then  ordered  the  brakemen  to sot   the  brakes.  Some'five or six were  set. but tho sliced of the train was on the  increase all   the  time.   Uy'this time It oc--*  cm-red   to   lhe   conductor   that   the   driver  might have missed his guess 113 to the na-  ture-of the read over wliich he was going.   -  In    any   event    Hibbard    figured    that   he  could   be 01   no assistance in  stopping tho  train, as all   the brakes  that could be set  had been attended to,"and it was just possible  that  Ihe caboose could  be stopped if   "  tho train could not. He therefore gave the  hi'ikeman  instructions  to cut the caboose  oft the train. The dinky thing kept 'jumping along  the  track at a  lively rate,  but  kept   on   the   rails   in. a   most astonishing  iniipi'er.   The rest of the tiain appeared to be gath-  crlnu- spec<r as it went." As it passed the  water tunic at lhe mountain station the  ���Iranian made up his mind that he had had  all he wanted of the trip and staked his  cli.-mees on a jump. The driver stayed with 1  his train for some time longer.* He had  found that the air was not working.and he  was endeavoring to see what was the matter. Ho was still engaged in this,work when  he Massed ihe semaphore In front of Tioup  Siding, and by some fortunate chance was  thrown from the train. The only other mii!  op tho forward part of the train was the  hrakemar. of the front end. Ry some freak'  of luck he escaped without a scratch. He  tried to get oft the train, but could not  make it. When lie saw the train gettine  iiffiiv from him lie set all the brakes he  could on the front end-of the train ami  then started back for the caboose. He got  as far as a car of machinery, but the train  was moving so fast that he could not get  bovond il. On tliis car he made the trio  down the mountainside' which was never  before exceeded, and wliich the trainmen  .-sav must have been at the rale of at least  PIO miles an hour. All the cars In front of  him wore plied up in a mass of wreckage  and everv car behind him followed suit,  but the car or machinery on which he  made the trip did, not leave the rails, at  least one-half of it did not.  Naturally everv man on the train thought  ���lie was the only one who escaped Willi Ills  life. When the cars .came to a standstill,  hraki'inan lJul ford thought lie was tho  onli' man left to tell how Ihe thing happened. Whon he pulled himself together he  was overjo'.ved to lind that the. caboose had  been slopped a short distance from the  wreck. On this, of course, were the conductor and brakeman (Jrillin. This accounted for three out of the crew of live, j  and it was at once presumed that tho driver j  and fireman were underneath the locomotive, which was pulled up on the main lini  of the C. P. It., and accordingly word was  telegraphed Into the city for medical attendance. It turned out later that the  driver had made his jump when the train  passed the water tank at the mountain  station and that the driver had been  thrown   off tho train a few moments late.".  Po far as Injuries are concerned, tho fireman is the onlv man hurt. His face Is bad-  lv cut and there is a chance that his skull  lias been injured. The other members of  the train crew had dinner together and exchanged thoir experiences during tho time  they spent oh the train.   ,  Transport McLellan Nearly Founders.  NEW YORK, December IS.���According to  dispatches received here today by the Maritime Exchange, tho transport McLellan has  put Into Bermuda short of coal. A New  York mercantile Iirm engaged In the3Her-  mmla trade received a dispatch sayim***-:  "McLellan had a fearful trip and nearlv  foundered." Af the army building it wus  >*aid no news had been received of the Mc-  T.ellan since she left Gribraltar on December Ith.   Lived Over a Century.  WATERTOWN.' New York, December18.;  ���Mrs   Virginia  Young,   the  oldesJ.*^p5rsi>nu.  In  Northern   New York,  is do.".'~ at  Redri\���,  wood. JercerSiin eountjr, aged IM. She vnuixUit  grandmother of "Tommys Ryan, the weHi-.-'-Jn  ...   ..no-Ill..! - '. M ,1. X, i  I  ���       . " l$B&- "'  r  known pugH'st ���x-*KA^t^*-Z:^.��>_��U.2_';2__z:z.  re-.***".*-  ^^^eW^?*^*^^  : iii  ;>  Vfc  Mi  Mi  i*  *  tf  tf  tf  tf  tf  tf  tf  tf  tf  tf  tf  tf  tf  Ml,  ���fi***.*.*.*.***.***.***.**.*.*:*.* **.*.*.*.*.***.**.*.*^  IN MAKING YOUR CHOICE OF CHRISTMAS PRESENTS DO fJOT OVERLOOK  THE FACT TI(AT WE CARRY THE LATEST LINES OF  THE tfELSOJST TRIBUTE   WEDNESDAY   MORNING,  DECEMBER.  18.  1901  PERFUMERY  Clothes  numer-  From  all   the" best   makers,  also   Hair   Brushes,  Brushes, Hat Brushes, Millitary Hair Brushes and     ous other kinds, made with genuine bristle and with ehher  Ebony, Wood or Ivory backs.  A fine line of Ebony   backed  Hand   Mirrors  which  we  are offering at very reasonable prices.  i��  W  W  *  ��  m  m  ��  w  w  **��  m  m  m  m  RAILWAY TIME TABLE  CANADIAN PACIFIC SYSTEM  1.KAVK  Daily.  |CROWS NEST RAILWAY  Kuskonook, Creston. Movie,  Cranbrook, Marysville, Fort  [Siocle, Klko. Fernie. Michel,  Hlainnoro, Frank, Jlaoleod,  Lethbridge, Winnipeg, and  all Kastorn points.  AK1UVB  I p. ni.  Daily.  W. F. TEETZEL & CO.  ^***-99*99***9***999'999'999'9999**.*9*****9-*999'99******i^l  For the Boys  LEAVE  6:40 p. m  Daily  0:10 p. in.  Daily  8 a. in.  S a. in.  ICOLUMBIA & KOOTKNAY  1 RAILWAY  Hobson. Nakusp, Arrowhead,  ltevclstolio, iuhI all points east  [and west on C.P.R. main line  Itobson, Trail and Rossland  Robson, Cascade, Grand  Forks, l'liojnix, Greenwood  and Midway.  (Daily except Sunday)  Itobson, Trail and Rossland. 11:35 a.m.  I      (Daily except Sunday)      I  AIUUVE  10:10 p.m.  Daily  10:10 p.m.  Daily  10:10 p.m.  vincial police otlicer or to the police ollice  in this city. And It is further pointed out  that in case of a conviction one half of tho  line goes to the informant.  leave    SLOGAN RIVKR RAILW'Y  10 a. in.   Slocan City, Silverton, New  Denver. Throe Forks, Sandon  (Daily except Sunday)  AIIRIVE  |3:10 p. in.  Having added to my stock a large  range of Youth's Boy's" and Children's  clothing,  I am now prepared to offer  -'to"..the .public the best variety of these  goods ever shown in Nelson.  ".Everything is new and up-to-date  and are selling at the very lowest prices.  Intending purchasers will do well to  examine my stock and get prices before  purchasing elsewher.  LEAVE  ���1 p. ill.  i p. 111.  "217 and 219  Baker Street  J. A. GILKER  'KOOTENAY   LAKE  STEAMBOATS  , Half our, Pilot Buy, Ainsworth  Kaslo and all Way landings.  (Daily except Sunday)  Lardo and ull points on Uio  Lardo & Trout Lake Branch.  (Tuesdays, Thursdays and   Saturdays.) I  AKltlVE  11 a.in.  11 a.in  W. A. Martin of Rossland was in Nel-  .'-���on yesterday. He says his brother "Jim,"  who represented the Rossland riding in  the Se.-nlin administration, is down with  Brights disease. Personally he has not  given very much attention to the new senatorship, and has not yet been satisiied in  his own mind that there will be a new senator.  The first samo in the president and vice-  president competition of the Nelscn Curling Club was played last evening, and resulted in u. win for the vice-president's  side. N. T. Macleod's rink upheld the honor  of the president, but was beaten by tlio  Fox rink with a score of 10 to U. This evening the Taniblyn and the Rao rinks will  come together.  There were three new locations recorded  at the Nelson record ollicc yesterday. Klondyke, one mile up Wild Horse, by IS. Peters; Ore Mountain, on Ore mountain about  one mile south of the Queen group, by  William- McArthur; ���and Ore Ren, in the  same neighborhood, by John A. Benson. A  certificate' of work was Issued to Percy  Chapman on the Stemwinder mineral claim.  GREAT NORTHERN SYSTEM.  LEAVE  Depot  0:10 a.m  Mount'in  tu:3(l ii.ni  Daily.  A Beautiful Home  NKLSON  &  FORT  SHEPPARD  RAILWAY  Ymir,'Salmo, Kric, Waneta,  Northport, Russland.-Colville  and Spokane.  .Making through connections  it, Spokane to thc south,  east and west.  Big- Show  A visit lo our  \<YzYf     vince you that wc have  home beautiful.  Rooms just novv will con-  all the requisites to make a  |ARTISTIC FURNITURE    LOVELY DRAPERIES  LEAVE  KilSlo  7 a.m.  Nelson  0:00 p. in,  Daily  KOOTENAY LAKH  STEAMBOATS  Balfour, Pilot Bay, Ainswortl  Kaslo and all Way Landings  AKIilVK  Dcpol.  0:15 p.m.  .Muuiit'iii  ���Wi!) p.m.  Dnily  I.i. A. Rankin, who for several month-;  past has been connected with tho firm of  Carlson & Porter in the building of the  Lardo branch, leaves today on a trip to  his home in Mattawa, Ontario. Mr. Ran-  kin left the east live years ago, when con-  Hi-iietlon was commenced on the Crow's  Nest branch,"and has not been oast since.  He expects to be away.about a month.  AHRIVE  ivit.slu  *::>0 ii. in.  Nelson  *l:.'JU a.m.  Dnilv  CITY AND DISTRICT.  A marriage license was issued yesterday  lo William .1. 'Laird ana Miss May Young.  iti  lift  lil|p|i'**.j.  Kit  , High-class goods,  the  newest   designs,   rich   finish.  the ~ very    latest   Novelties" in   odd   pieces.     Easy  'Chairs,   Rocking Chairs,  Reception Chairs,   Elegant  Parlor and   China Cabinets,   Desks,  Bookcases, etc.  Thomas-Sproat, who ��as operated upon  in tlie Nelson hospital a few weeks ago  for appendicitis, is now convalescent and  his friends expect he will be able to leave  the hospila), within the next week.   .  J. A. Sayward, the sawmill owner, has  confidence in Kootenay. He will increase  iiis plant.at Pilot Bay so _that lie will be  able to turn out (10,000 shingles a* day and  he has the timber on hand to keep such a  i*ihint in operation constantly. He has also  In contemplation the erection of a mill',-it  Creston that will have a capacity of a carload of slv'ngles a day. Tho market for tho  shingles  is  in  tho  Northwest Territories.  m  q\  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  q\  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  ESTABLISHED 1892  4*.  ���-s.-  Portland Cement  Fire Brick  Fire Clay  Sheet Iron  ���    T Rails  Ore Cars  Blowers  Exhausters  Pumps  Granite ware  *Tinware  to  to  HARDWARE AND IRON MERCHANTS   $  to  to  HEATING STOVES      I  COOKING STOVES  AND  RANGES  -<?  NELSON, B. C.  STORES AT  KASLO, B.C.  SANDON, B.C.  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  Beautiful  Carpets, Oriental Rugs, Rich Curtains  No-.house in Nelson can show a finer display.'  We  do L the. business.    Why? "Because  we  substantiate- -  what'we say���we have the goods and our PRICES  ARE  RIGHT.  .I'1. W. Peters arrived in the city last evening from iho Coast He is one of the directors of the local tramway company and is  iii: the city for the purpose: of/attending the  annual meeting of the tramway company,  which is to be held today.  The somewhat celebrated case of Hall  .t Rose vs. T-iaBau came on for trial in tin*,  county court yesterday before his hour  Judge Leamcy of Itossland. Good progress  was mado with the case and it is expected  that it will be finished by.4 o'clock tliis afternoon. The case for the plaintiffs was  completed yesterday, and a couple witnesses for the defense were heard. Tlil<>  time tho,Jurors who have the trial of the  cas are James Noelands, S, Q. Campbell,  G. E. McLaughlin, W. W. Bradley, and  John Fraser, foreman.  V^y.;.... ,-  t:&  CHRISTMAS PUDDING  J. ��� K. Strachan returned'from': Rossland  last evening, where he'was in attendance  as a witness in the suit of Dr. Armstrong  vs. Hartline- for a commission on the sale  of the horf-es to the Nelson'.flre department.  Judgment In the case has'been reserved.  James A. McDonald, ***��. well-known Slocan -miner,. on renewing his subscription to  The Tribune, says: "I'expect to be' iii tlie  I5ast this winter, and- I* Know of no better  means .of keeping in to'iich with this country, than by reading The Tribune, as the  stand it- takes*��� on public 'questions is the  'right one In my opinion."  An enterprising French Canadian sought  to'turn the sheet of ice on the lake to account yesterday. His scheme:was to fence  in all the ice that, was fit for skating and  then charge an .admission fee to those who  desired to skate,'upon'it. The attention of  the provincial police officers was called to  the matter, and. ttye intimation , was given  that any form ,of fencing would not be permitted. This'..wa!5'hailed with overy manifestation of glee by a host of youngsters  who had, courit'e<*l' upon, skating on the ice,  but were afraid "tp do, so iri view of the  preparations to fence it in.  J>  We have purchased the Madson Stcck at a lev, ra<e on the dollar.    ,t consists of  CLOTHSNe, CENTS FURNISHINGS,  RUBBERS    AND  BOOTS, SHOES, HAT, CAPS,  BLANKETS.  ALL THESE  GOODS TOGETHER WITH "  WLL BE SOLD  ATOR     UMDES-   THE  DRY GOODS  "Ht   BALANCE OF OUR  WHOLESALE COST  ������This is a rare opportunity at lhe right time of the  GOODS at pric s never before heard cf in Nelson. We  stock of Men's Suits, Boots and Shoes and Underwear,  see for ^ourselves. -  11  85,'-  ���sg-Up-uston Block;  kf^vNesson, B C.  We have the best stock of peel and Christmas  fruits in the cry. Everyihing tresh. This season's  lemmon, orange and citron peel, cleaned currants  "and  raisins.  J. A. IRVING & CO.  ���Iti*  With respect to the alleged killing of  game in violation of: the game laws along  the Arrow lakes the provincial police have  to say that any reported infractions of tlie  law will receive tlieir attention, and is  much more likely.to cause the punishment  of any offenders that there may be than  the publishing of-letters ia the press.*.'If  the law is being broken, as it is said to be.  the people who know about tho violations  iiave the remedy in their own hands by reporting such violations to the nearest pro-  The : fire department made a test yesterday with ihe Eastnian.deluge nozzles. That  the..new nozzles will: be a great Improvement was manifest to .everyone who saw  rho tost. .*.They are supplied with wal ir  from two linos of hose from the hydrant,  and oven while throwing a two-Inch stream  of water could be directed with one hand.  In addition to the advantage of easy handling the Eastman nozzles are also more  eflicient than the ordinary nozzle, throwing tho water much farther. Altogether  tlie tests with the different. nozzles were  highly satisfactory.  The   license  commissioners  for  the  Nelson license district have granted renewals  year  to get   FALL  AND   WINTER  have  a   specially heavy and choice  Our  prices   will   talk:   Come  and  P. 0. BOX 197  PHONE 10  New For  of licenses to thirty-one applicants and  refused licenses to two. .mo unsuccessful  applicants, included David Church of Erie.  This .'license was not granted in the lirst  place.without'several meetings of the commissioners. The refusal to renew was based  on the contention that thc house was not  up to the requirements of. the place and  that in.any event the license was not necessary. The other unsuccessful applicant  was Fred Fisher of Kitchener. All told  the fees for tlie licenses issued by the commissioners for the Nelson district will approximate $3000 per annum.   Jftobor.t^Rober-lson.-op.c-of-lho-bosl-known-  mochanics and -property owners in Nelscn,  who is .now working at Blairmore,-Alberta',*  in .writing to a friend in Nelson, says: "I  hops theby-law regarding the power plant  on Kootenay river will carry, as the city  will, when tho plant is installed, be in a  position to supply power for industries,  which is" a much better plan and a much  cheaper one than cash  business."  IF BROWNSOiiD IT IT'S GOOD  The Finest Christmas Present  A Gold Watch  We are showing some exceptionally fine designs in cases  Jor JJie_holidiys,_especialfy-in-Gold-Filled-Goods7  Every case is guaranteed by the manufacturers and  almost every movement besides carrying our own guarantee.  We can show yon the principle American makes and the  leaders in Swiss.  00  9 99  Peels, Raisins, Currants, Dates, Figs  Spices, Icings, Extracts, Cake Trimmings  Oranges, Lemons and  Grapes  OUR   STOCK   IS'COMPLETE  -. * ���  Mail or Phone your order.    It will   receive prompt attention.  Holly and  Mistletoe arriving Y  The boys  employed  by  the  C.  P.   R.   ia  Nelson   ar-j  all   athletes  from   superint-2M-  rtent "Uownlc* iloyvti to station ticket, agorit  .!*toasle.y. A mooting was hold last night iri  tho company's general oliiecs for the pur-  ���i0So*'0l: orgaulzlns;' a G. ^. R. hockey team,  at winch tlie foMowiiig-nauicd wore elected  I'fllcora:   Wlllinm   Downie,   honorary   presi-r  dent;  II.  .10'.  Macdonell,  president; captai.i  .1.   C'.   Gore,   yicc-prosident;   R.   AV.   Drew,  .-iccoiid vice-president; C. II. Crandon, third  vIco-pMsidcnt;  J.   S.   Garter,   manager;   O.  II. neckor, seorotary; JV-A. Newport, treas-  uror;   VV.   I.i.  Si.-iry,  captain;  .7.  Tt.   Fox,   13.  (���},  (3ni.vi.ho, C. 10.  Be.-i.slcy, aiid  IT. E. Opn-  lioii,   management   cotaniitteo.   The   club's  colors vvil|  ho black and  whilo.  Tlie iiuus-  lion of organizing a city league was also  discussed,  and  it  was aocided  lo  ask  tho j  officers  of  the   other   clubs   to   co-operate  in this direction so that a series of games I  for 11)0 season could be arranged.  BROWN BROTHERS  JEWELERS  BAKER ST8EKT  NELSON,  "&G0D CHEER" STOVES AID RANGES  AT TSE HOTELS.  . TKEJHONT���John Newman, Erie; John P.  l-'orrcslell, (Slocan.  MADDEN��� I'klward Cole, Tmir; C. J. Dit  ter, Ymir; P. -J. Nichols, Fern luinn.  UI.JME-.I. G. Ryan, Kaslo; James Dun--  bar, Winnipeg; liarry C. Cooper, Vancouver.  UARTkl'JTT���A. Holmes, Manchester; ti.  Glassford, Forty-nine creek; J. Schmidt,  Republic.  We are in (he market again this season with this line of  Stpves. After handling" ihem for a number of years we are  convinend lhat they are the only Stoves that give  ABSOLUTE SATISFACTION.  Call and see our large and complete line.  Rossland;   J.  Mrs.  13.  Mc-  Docksloadcr,  J.   Pcardon,  CjUEION'S���W. H. Jlartin,  T. Freeman, Arllilgton mine  Lellan, Greenwood.  GRAND   CENTRA*!,���A.   B.  Sandon;   Gamoron   Clark  and  Moyie:  l-l.  B.  Groen,  Fern  mine;  Mrs.  M.'  McDonald. Fort Sleele; M. J.  Fox, Sandon.  PHAIR���Vornon W. Smith, Kaslo; C. G.  Major, New Westminster; E. J. Boswell,  Trail; S. F. Farrlsh, Greenwood; Robert  Hell, Erie; F. \V. Peters, Vancouver; J.  AVilson, Vancouver; XV. 11. D'Arcy, Winnipeg.  LAWRENCE   HARDWARE  Importers and Dealers in Sholf and Heavy Hardware.  BUSINESS MEFTI0N".  Steam skato sharpener at Thorpe's  factory.  When at Erie, B. G., stop at thc Mersey  Hotel. Mrs. M. Collins, proprietress.  Stenm skate sharpener at Thorpe's  factory. _.  Tjost���A siiring scale for an ice wagon.  Return to -Nelson Ice Company and get  reward.  To Invito the King of Siam.  WASHINGTON, December 17.���Senator  Fryo today introduced - joint resolution  authorizing the president to invito the  king of Siam to visit tiie United State.*-:,  it is set forth in a preamble the fact that  the king of Siam has mad-* known to our  minister at Bangkok his desire to visit thel  United States and the resolution provides  that he shall be invited-.'to. become the  guest of the nation whilo h;;re. An appropriation for his majesty's suitabl-a entertainment is provided, but the sum Is left  blank for the present.  NOTICE  TO OUR CUSTOMERS:  Owing to our large losses on collections  during the past year and determining to  treat all alike hereafter, we have Instructed  our drivers to allow no credit on and after  January 1st, 1!)02. Hoping you will recognize the justness of the change, we'rem'aiiijj  jour obedient servants,  KOOTENAI STEAM LAUNDRY* ���  Nelson, December 1701,. 120L. ___._] KJBBsisjr... rr- vrfrv.rrr^rfr.  ~^z^^~^+L*M&r^jcr-m*mrrnar~.~,  wawstWHii  r-j..*.  ~:." s��a  ESTABLISHED  1892  -  ..   *- -V.**iT>  THURSDAY MORNING,  DECEMBER  ID   1901  DAILY EDITION  SETS PEOPLE OF SLOCAN  WILD WITH JOY.  Mr. Macron! dated tlie previous day  (the Cth) to the company's advisers: "I  may mention that prior to the receipt  of your letter I lind decided to discontinue tlie tests and to remove the instruments tomorrow."  ONE  OF  THB   MOST  IMPORTANT  STRIKES EVER MADE IN  THE DRY ORE BELT.  SLOCAN CITY, December,IS.���[Special to The Tribune.!���Slocan is jubilant  this afternoon because of n. strike made  in thc Ottawa, a mine situate on  Springer creek, about four miles distant  from town. The Ottawa is owned by  1 "Tom" Mulvey and "Billy" Clements,  and is under bond to Messrs. Mulvey,  King, Taylor, and Johnson. They have  been working the property about three  months, and on thc night shift on Tuesday struck ore in the face of the tunnel,  which is in 250 feet. Taylor, one of the  parties who have tlie bond, brought  samples-of the ore to town this forenoon  for assays, and the returns as soon as  they became known set the town wild.  The ore went over 3000 ounces silver  to the ton.  "Tom" Mulvey and "Jap" King, both  of whom have been in Kootenay for so  many years that they are old enough to  he grandfathers, are now reckoned as  millionaires.  Socialists Win at Northport; '  NORTHPORT, December IS.���[Special to The Tribune.]���The city council  ii��it its regular meeting hero, tonight  canvassed " the~*retiiri;s of tho "recent  municipal election and instructed the  clerk to issue certificates of election for  the ensuing year. This action was taken  in compliance with a peremptory writ  of mandamus, whicli was issued yesterday by judge Richardson pf the superior court. The council had refused  to issue certificates of election on account of alleged irregularities, and the  Socialists who carried tho election  were compelled to apply to tho court  for. a- writ commanding them to do so.  P  f  He Would Make a Good Mnyor.  VANCOUVER,  December   IS.���[SAfC?  ial ,to' Thc Trilnme.]���F. Carter-Cotton  A    has been oflered the nomination for the  .*���   mayoralty by the  Vancouver Electoral  Union, and it is probable he will accept.  A ��� report'comes   from  Nanaimo that  the Wellington collerics are to re-open  , under Mrs. Joan Dunsmuir's cwn man-  '; agement.    The mine was formerly op-  ���' crated as part of the property of pre-  ' mier Dunsmuir, but on account of difli-  ,   culties with the men the mine has been  ���   closed. down.   Tatlow Will- Purport Bodwpll  ,*       VANCOUVER,   December   IS.���[Special to The   Tribune.]���While   in   Vancouver, .on Tuesday,   colonel^ Prior   of  )   Victoria asked R.yG. Tatlow, M. P. P..  ,l^regaudirig^his=siip_M  Bodwell, and Tatlow replied that although he was a Conservative, there  was nothing left for him but to support  Bodwell as against Dunsmuir.  A carnival of thieving Christmas  goods exists here. Thieves are being  driven out of Seattle, and have headed  for other Coast cities.  i:  Cassiar Heard 'From  OTTAWA, December IS���[Special to  The Tribune.]-rThe census department  has received returns from the northern  part of Burrard constituency, wliich  takes in Bennet and Atlin and the remainder of Cassiar district, giving the  population at 2016.  Edison Now Believes Tt  NEW YORK, December IS.���At his  laboratory at West Orange, New Jersey,  Thomas Edison authorized tho following  statement concerning William Marconi's  feat in receiving wireless telegraphic  communications from England: "Since  Marconi has stated over his own signature that he has received the signals  from England I believe him and I think  he will carry it to a commercial success.  It is a great achievement and he is a  great experimenter."  NEW YORK, December IS.���The solicitors of the Anglo-American Telegraph Company have made public the  following statement: "There seems to  be some misapprehension -as to the action of our clients, the Anglo-American  Telegraph Company, .Limited, with respect to the experiments in wireless telegraphy which recently took place at St.  Johns, Newfoundland, by Mr. Marconi.  In a letter addressed to Mr. Marconi by  the company's legal advisers in Newfoundland, after stating the company's  intention.to take the necessary steps to  secure a recognition of their rights in  the colony, the letter proceeds: "How:  ever, they (the company) instruct us to  inform you that they are not adverse to  giving the most careful consideration  to any proposals which may be put forward by you with a view to the further  continuance of your work. As to the  statement said to have been telegraphed  from St. Johns by Mr. Marconi on the  17th instant to the effect that in consequence of the threatened legal proceedings of the company he was compelled  to discontinue wireless telegraphy tests  between England and the colony we give  the following extract from a letter of  Minnesota Hour Mills Suspend  MINNEAPOLIS, December 18���Four  Hour mills of tho Consolidated Milling  Company wore shut down this morning.  There is every probability that nearly  all mills will be closed before the end  of the week. The cosing of the mills  results in part from temporary depression in the demand for flour from  abroad.  Foutht a Duel to the Diat)-,  UNIONTOWN, Pennsylvania, Decembor 18.���Daniel Bradburn and David  Fagan fought a duel to thc death last  night in a small room of a hoarding  house whero both men lived. Bradburn  was killed and Fagan is in jail with a  bullet wound in his side from the effects of which ho may die. .   ,  A   REAL"LIVE~IU��STI8N  Tho Se'ection of Coal Lands  The following is from the Montreal  Herald of thc 6Lh instant, and the gentleman interview calls attention to the  importance that attaches to the immediate selection by the Dominion gov-,  eminent of the 50,000 acres of coal lands  to which the Dominion is entitled in  thc Crow's Nest Pass coal field. The interview reads:  William Blakemore, wtio'has just returned from - a prolonged trip through  the western mining districts, was interviewed by a Herald representative at  the Windsor hotel this morning. Mr.  Blakemore .said:  "The result of the last six months  spent in British Columbia convinces  ino that, whilst there aro temporary  conditions which are interfering with  the development of the province, there  is no reason whatever to be pessimistic,  for the ono fact has been established  more fully of late than at any previous  time in the history of British Columbia,  namely, that there is no lack of valuable  and extensive ore' deposits. As these  must form the backbone of future development, it is satisfactory to he able  to speak emphatically upon this point.  "The conditions which I regard as  transient may be briefly'summed up as  follows: Complications in the political  world pending reorganization of the  provincial government; the depressed  condil ion of the lea'd market and constant tendency to a lower price for this  important���product; 'the unsettled condition at the moment of the copper  market; and lastly, the cause which un-'  fortunately we seem to have always  with us, but with respect to which there  are not wanting evidences that force of  circumstances will effect what nothing  else has been successful in doing, I  moan extravagant and incompetent  handling of valuable properties.  "WILD-CATTING.  . "British Columbia has been passing  through a phase which is inseparable  from the establishment of any new  mining camp, tho stage of "wild-catting," promoting, stock gambling and  general rushing round to make a quick  turn and a big profit, regardless of the  intrinsic merit of the properties hand-  Jed. This condition never lasts very  long, and in' the^Melof^ritish_Cj3jujtk  ever form, is exceedingly high and prevents that rapidity of development  whicli would take place under more favorable conditions.  "Important discoveries of coal have  recently been made in the Kettle River  and Similkameen districts. I inspected  and reported upon these, and while it  is too soon to express a definite opinion,  owing to the limited amount of development work done, I am able to say  that I located at least one first-class  seam of coaking coal whicli analyzed 62  per cent of fixed carbon and 7 per cent  of ash in the rawcoal taken at the outcrop.  "In the Blairmore district, a few miles  east of the Rockies, there 'is considerable activity of coal; at least nine different companies are opening up seams,  and one extensive mine has been established and is shipping out three' hundred tons daily. Some coke ovens have  been built and every effort, is being made  to develop a coking proposition.  MUCH DISAPPOINTMENT.  "There is considerable disappointment  throughout the Kootenays at the stoppage of operations near Fernie, which  the Canadian Pacific Railway Company have been "opening up during the  past season. These areas are on the  south side of Morrisey creek and were  intended to form part of the six square  miles of coal lands to which the C. P.  R. are entitled under the Crow's Nest  railway Dominion charter.  "Operations have been pushed forward  vigorously and shipment of coal would  have commenced within a few months,  but in consequence of the delay in making the government selection, and the  uncertainty as to what location would  ultimately be chosen, ^orations have  been suspended, and an important auxiliary to the" supply of fuel shut off, at  any rate for the present. As the Crow's  Nest Coal Company are totally unable  to supply the requiremeents of the trade,  this is unfortunate, especially in view  of the fact that the Great Northern, who  are building into Fernie, require- more  coal than the whole of the Fernie mine  can' produce, and at the present moment, in consequence of the shortage  in supply of coal, the C. P.'R. are purchasing a large portion of their requirements from the new openings in the  Blairmore district.  "I notice in the current number of the  Ottawa Mining Review'that Mr. Sifton  expresses his anxiety to make a prompt  selection and to do this in a manner  which will best serve the public interest.  It is clear to anyone acquainted with"  the conditions in British-Columbia that  the only thing which will serve the public interest is effective competition.  Already the limited competition of the  Blairmore district has resulted in reducing the price of coal at least 25 per  cent, and if effective competition can  be established in the pass, where the  best coking coal exist, it' would mean  a reduction of ?1 to $2 in the price of  coke."   struckThe wrong crowd  THAT  ARE OF VAST INTEREST TO  i  PROPERTY-PWNER .  THEY CAN BE ANSWERED AT THE  BALLOT-BOX Tp-MORUO^,  < FRIDAY.  "bia,  it has been short, sharp and' decisive.,  "lt wa,s not altogether a disadvantage  that one or two very promising and-expensive properties were manipulated in  such a manner as to secure public arid  * concentrated^attention upon some of the  methods which were being resorted to in  order to exploit mining stock upon the  various exchanges.0 The result is that  there has been a public awakening and  that it will be difficult for simitar methods to be successful again. The natural  sequence has .been more legitimate  mining and a^more careful examination  of prospects, together with a more conservative method of entering upon new  enterprises. This policy will in the end  result in the development of a legitimate and permanent mining province,  although it will take two or three years  to settle down on the new basis. In  every part of British Columbia good  properties arc coming into notice.  "The Lardeau promises next year to  make a fair, start towards general development, assisted by the new railway  which will then be iu operation.  "The ores of the Boundary camps  whilst low in value, are deposited in  such enormous bodies that with careful  and economical management and moderate capitalization, they should yield  a fair return to investors.  GOAT RIVER, DISTRICT. ,  "In the Boat River district the development of the large hematite iron ore  properties, with which I have been more  directly associated, Is attracting considerable attention, and bids fair to have  an important effect upon the future of  the province. We have done a good  season's work ������ and expended in the  neighborhood $25,000 . on development  work. It will take another year yet to  complete this class of **ork and to fully  determine the extent of the property,  but without being too sanguine, I can  safely say that we have one of the most  important iron properties on this continent, and although the area is small  compared with what is to be found in  Michigan, and on the Great Lakes, it is  much larger than the Newfoundland deposit, upon which eastern companies  are basing their future production, and  is of a grade not in any respect' inferior  to the best known ore. If it is found  that the time is ripe utter completion  of prospecting work to establish a steel  works in British Columbia, lie benefit  to the west will bo ��ncna��'. s, as the  present cost of iron ant? eteeJ, in what-  Pro-Boer Utterances Dislikfd.   ���  LONDON, December IS.���Davi.-I Lloyd  Georgo, M.P., speaking in Birmingham  town hall tonight, precipitated a scene unprecedented in that cily "since the Aston  Park riots. The majority nf thc audience  were hostile to the speaker and were enraged hy his pro-Boer and anti-Chambcr-  lain utterances. They rushed the police cordon guarding the platform. In the meanwhile the building: was besieged from the  outside by a.mob of several thousand peo-  'ple, who smashed windows and tried to  =force=the^doorsj=which=ha'd=becn=barricaded?=  They fusilladed the audience with stones  thrown- tli rough the windows. The police  reserves were turned nut* and-succeeded in  dispersing the mob aftor repeated charges.  A number of persons were 'njured and  the town hall was wrecked,-.but a single  window being left whole. Crowds were  awaiting admission to the building Ions  before the doors of thc town hall wero  opened. The building tilled quickly and 1'  was immediately seen that the trouble was  coming. Cheers were raised for "Joe" and  a while flag was unfurled amid deafening  shouts for the traitor as Dr. Lloyd Georgo  and his friends unpen red on the platform,  all attempts at speeehniaking were futil-3,  owing to the 'continuous din of hissing, hooting and singing. In the meantime the enormous crowd outside the building had become more noisy and more menacing. Presently a stone came through a  window. This caused a stampede anion;,'  the occupants of tho gallery. From Ibis  time forward pandemonium reigned in tho  building and ugly rushes were made for  the platform and the police were soon  overpowered.  Lloyd George and his friends were compelled to retreat to an inner room for  rafoty. T-ioy were, unable lo leave the  -building for fear of mob violence and wore  thus kept prisoneis'until a late hour when  Llovd George, disguised aa a chief constable, left the town hall with a posse  of policemen. Many constables were seri-  ouslv injured in their attempts to clear the  streets. Tt is said that one civilian has  died of his injuries.  Captain Stays by the Shir.  PARIS, December IS.���Additional dispatches received here from Marseilles announces that 40 of the members of the crew  of 52 men belonging to the French steamer  Kleber. ashore east of the mouth of the  river Rhone, have been rescued through  the use of lifeboats. The captain and the  other oflicers refuse to leave the vessel.  Wrecked Off La Liber tad.  SAN FRANCISCO,-December'18.���A dispatch to the Merchant's 'Exchange says  that the steamer San Blas.'whfeh left San  Francisco November 2!)tli for Pa'nama. was  wrecked December 17th off La Libertad.  The passengers and crew were saved.  Seeks Safety in Canada.  PHOENIX, Arizona, December IS.���Tt is  announced her today that Lee D. Mills,  local manager of the Southern Mutual Investment Company, has lied to Canada,  taking a large sum of money and leaving  behind local creditors to the amount of several thousand dollars. It is announced tliat  Mill's shortage for the past month approximates $10,000. lie is believed to be in New  Brunswick.   San Francisco Plague Cases.  DALLAS, Texas, December 18.���A special  to tlie News from Austin, Texas, says:  State health ofllcer Tuber has reported to  the governor that there were six cases ot  bubonic plague in San Francisco during  September and four deaths in October and  one case and one death in Noyemjtsr.;  1. How many houses are vacant in  Nelson?  2. Why are they vacant?  3. Is there a demand at present for  real estate, either improved or unimproved ?  4. If there is no demand, are present  prices likely to" be maintained, to say  nothing of a rise in price?  5. Who will a fall j'n prices most affect? people who have all their interests  in Nelson, or people who only have ,a  small proportion of. their interests  here? .  6. How many people in Nelson have  their homes mortgaged to loan companies, and in what way will a fall in  prices of real estate affect these people?  Will it not ruin them?  7. How many people will come- to  Nelson to locate here through the city's  purchase from the West. Kootenay Power  & Light Company of auxiliary power  for its lighting system?  8. How many extra people would be  employed in Nelson by the West Kootenay Power & Light Company were the  city to purchase*** power" from that company? /  9. If there are a large number of vacant houses and no demand' for real  estate, what will bring about a change?  10. Can a change be brought about  in any other way than by an increase  of ^ population?  11. If not, what had best be done to  bring about an increase of population?  12. Would the establishment of manufacturing industries,bring about that  result? -        .  13. Are not power and water and light  factors in operating industries, and  their cheapness one of the first things  considered in selecting sites for their  operation ?  14. If Nelson is. dependent, on the  West Kootenay Power & Light Company, Limited, oi* Roasiand for power,  is it at all likely that that company  will give anyone any special rates in  order to enable them to locate at Nelson?  15. If the city of Nelson has its own  power plant on Kooteiay river, will it  not be entirely independent of the West  Kootenay Power & Light Company,  Limited, of Rossland, and being inde-  pendent will it not be in" a .p_ositipn_tQ.  siders that the people of Nelson have  lost confidence, not only in the future  of their town, but in the future of the  country. Are the people of Nelson prepared to make such an admission?  Rera-.or Sewell Holding His Own  CAMDEN, New Jersey, December 18.  The physicians attending United States  senator Sewell announced tonight that  the senator is holding his own. He has  been resting quietly during the last 24  hours and seems quite cheerful.  Offer of the Bank Accepted.  WINNIPEG, December 18.���The offer  of the Canadian Bank of Commerce to  purchase $50,000 of Winnipeg school  debentures at par was accepted by the  school board tonight.  Transport Thomas Arrives  SAN FRANCISCO, December 18.���The  transport Thomas arrived   today   from  Manila, via Nagasaki.   She has 91 cabin  passengers on board and 1384 soldiers.  TO SETTLE LABOR DISPUTES  make such rates for power and light as  will be an inducement to manufacturers  to locate here? . ���  16. Will.not the building of a power  station on Kootenay river by the city  cause the disbursement of thousands of  dollars for labor and supplies? and will  not both the labor and the-'supplies be  procured in Nelson?  17. Will not the city be in a position  to make lower rates for lighting stores  and residences if it owns an up-to-date  power plant of its own? and will it not  be in a position to light the streets  more cheaply than if it is compelled to  purchase auxiliary power from the West  Kootenay Power & Light Company,  Limited, of Rossland?  18. If the West Kootenay Power &  Light Company is so anxious to gain  an entrance into Nelson, what will it  cost the city to get it out once it does  gain an entrance?  19. Was the city acting in good faith  when it applied for and surveyed a site  for a power station on Kootenay river?  If it was, why should it not provide  means to utilize the site?  20. Will not lower electric light rates  and a good streot lighting system be  a benefit to the people of Nelson? and  will not such benefits more than offset  any increase in taxation resulting from  the borrowing of $150,UO0, all of which  is to be expended on a revenue-earning  public utility?         The above questions cannot be classed  as "vile insinuations" against the honesty of the mayor and aldermen who aro  opposed to the passage of By-law No.  102, nor can they be classed as scurrilous utterances against the management of the West Kootenay Power &  Light Company. They are questions  that the people of Nelson should well  consider before they mark their ballots  on Friday. In the opinion of The Tribune, the defeat of By-law No. 102 will  give Nelson a set-back from which, it  will not recover in a long time, for tt  will be taken as an indication by cat*  Hanna and Gompers in Command.  NEW YORK, December IS.���Tlio labor  conference called to consider plans tor  healing of the differences between the capi-  - talist and labor interests of the country organized today, elected oflicers and issued a  general statement of its mission of peace.  Senator Marcus A. Hanna was chosen as  its chairman, with Samuel Gompers second in command. Jt retains its connection with the national civic federation and  becomes the industrial department ot lhat  organization. A statement issued expressed  a determination to strive for industrial  peace, to aid in establishing rightful roln*-  tions between those who toil and their employers, to confer and advise with employers and employees whon in conflict, to encourage agreements under which labor shall  be performed, and to arbitrate disputes  when asked by both sides lo the -dispute.  Determination to avoid discussions of abstract industrial problems was avowed.  The following statement was given out  at tha conclusion of tho executive sossicn-  This committee shall be known as tho industrial department of the national civil,  .federation. Tlie scope and province of this  department shall be to dn what may seem  best to promote Industrial peace, to bo  help!ul in establishing rightful relations  betwen employers and workers by its good  oflicas, to endeavor to obviate and prevent  striken and lockouts and to aid in renewing  industrial relations where a rupture has occurred.  That at all times represent!!! ivos of work ���  ors and employers, organized or unorganized, should confer for the adjustment of  differences or disputes bolore an acute  stage is reached and thus avoid or minimize-the numb-!.- of strikes or lockouts.  That mutual agreements as to conditions  under which labor shall bo performed  should be encouraged aud where agreements are made the torms therefore snoukl  be faithfully adhered both in letter and  spirit by both' parties;  Tills department either as a whole, or a  .sub-committee by it appointed, shall, vh-j i  renuested, act as a forum to adjust and decide upon quostlons'at issue between workers and their employers, provided in its  opinion the subject is one of sufficient importance.  This department will not consider abstract industrial questions.  This department assumes no power of arbitration unless such powers be conferred  by both parties to a dispute.  Further fSeduc'ion in Copper.  NEW YORK, December IS.���It was nn-  nounced in Wall Street today that thc>  United Metals Selling Company, who  handle the output of the Amalgamated  Copper Company, has further reduced  prices to a level of about 1 1-1 cents Irom  the rate lixed last Friday, when a reduction was also made. Quoted pricos are now  14 cents for Lake copper; V. 7-S cents for  electrolytic and 13 fnr easting.  ��� LONDON, December- IS.���No settlement  has,-.been arrlved_ati.in'_th*e_coupor-aituatlon.-  A representative" of the Associated Press  learned to day on the highest authority  that the officials, of the Rio Tinto .Company-  look forward to an arrangement bing made  between the Amalgamated and the other  American producers beforo nny -"settlement  Is made with  the European  interests.  arena of the International Club House at  Fort Erie tonight. Walcott battereil down  Kerns with torriiio blows and right and lert  swings to iho head. To save Ferns from boing completely knocked out referee Mc-  IJride stopped the light and awarded the  decision to Walcott. In the lltth and last  lound Walcott put Kerns lo the boards  upon two occasions and twice did Uube  take the count. Wnen he rose the second  time he was in a weakened condition. Kerns  landed some terrific blows, but Walcott  whs In the pink of condition and laughed  at Rube's oli'orts. Kerns began to weaken  in the third round hut fought, gamely and  desperately. Roth went to the floor In the  fourth round in a clinch and Walcott assisted Ferns to rise. In the fifth round Walcott almost sent Uube through the ropes  and htid Ferns almost out when the referee  interfered. Tlie men met at 112 pounds and  the bout was for 20 rounds.         ij  Stampede to Mayo Greek,  S1SATTLR, December IS.���Dawson advices of November 2Cth tell of a great  stampede that "is going on to'Mayo creek,  in tha Stormont river district. Prospectors  wandering In the country late in tho summer discovered evidences of several years'  development on the Mayo, but nc one was  found, the operators evidently having gone  out for the winter. Cabins well stocked  witli tools and provisions were found. The  news started tlie stampede and now tlio  creek is slnlcd from end to ond. The original locators, having failed to record  tlieir claims, will return to lind that thoy  have no holdings in the district. It Is not  known in Dawson how rich the pay dirt Is.  the sole reason for the rush being the mysterious' developments.  beyond mm  r-V'M  ,   Trade With the Orient.  "WASHINGTON. December IS.���A large  delegation from the Asiatic .Association,  which is^ composed of merchants, manufacturers  and  others especially  interested  in the trade between the United Stales  and China calid at the White House today  and presented to tho'president a memorial  in which the hope is expressed " that no  contraction of the commercial or other  rights guaranteed to our citizens bv the  treatv with the Chinese empire will bo  permitted under cover of special privllegj.-s  extorted from the Chinese government by  anv other powers."  i It is regarded of supremo importance lo  the future of Hie comi->erce of the United  States lhat the principle of thc open door  to the gre.it undeveloped markets of eastern  Asia should  bo preserved  intact.  MAD   RACE   OF   A   RUNAWAY TRAIN.  EXCITING    TEIP   OP  A   NELSON;  & FOET SHEPPABD PEEIOHT ''���*-.  TEAIN CEEW. Z'Z,;  '- -il  <A����  ���sm  ���Pm  7 '���*�����&  Robbery of Registered Mail.  ST. LOUIS, Missouri, December IS.���A  daring robbery of a pouch of United Slates  registered mall occurred at Third and Olive  streets. Oscar Kelling, a driver of a mail  wagon, was knocked down by lhe butt end  of a revolver by throe men as ho wu-?  leaving tho building and rubbed'or a sack  of "registered mail, whicli lie was taking  outside. Thc robbers succeeded in escaping  with I heir booty before Kelling oo dd give  the alarm. The lobby of the postollico wa-  crowdod with people nt the lime and the  sidewalk thronged .with men .returning  home from business. The exact v-iluo of  the contents of the lost sack is not known.  Redmond Very Sapguine  DUBLIN, December -13.���Mr. ltedmond  and his party were warmly welcomed here  tonight by the lord mayor and civil authorities. 'He addressed an Piinrmous crowd  from the steps of tho Mansion House. Mr.  lied mond assured the crowd that if they  made ihr.fr ,crusade strong, menacing and  dangerous enough to England, thev might  count upon the united support of lush Americans, as well as that of tlie people of  thc United States. '___   EASTERN CANADIAN NEWS  - The most serious wreck that has occurred  on the Nelson & Fort Sheppard branch  since it was opened" occurred last evening  by which some twelve cars were reduced  In kindling wood and the members or'the  train crew had an* escape whieh they .will  1-i'liile for several months to come. The  wrecked train was No. 5G, which was due to,^  arrive In Nelson on Tuesday evening.,ItZ,'.Z^f.  was delayed and what there is left of It'-,.';>X;<  is now being picked up" by the O. -P. 'it'*'_."*'��;%  wrecking outfit'. Prom the best information " ~Zf&-j:g  obtainable It appears tliat tho train be-y^YA  came unmanageable shortly after crossing . <'--,-'-C%.  ' the summit and,, Increasing its'speed'as It i'i~ZZfffZ$  took the grade, plunged through thc oi'eixf:*\^^l  switch   at   the  junction-or  thc   main" Hne'��-'t-'��T  Of   Ilia   C.   P.   K.  AVhen the news'of the wreck was -flrst;,'* .^X'-ISi  reported at Nels'on it was said that'the^ Z^ffM  driver and fireman-were both missing and' "^-''-y  were supposed to be underneath the-wreclc , V"i��''Sil  of tho locomotive. 'Dr. jJalt was at once v - "��$_?  ���summoned, but by the time he arrived at- . ,t^.  the depot it was ascertained that neither:.- --J��  of the men^were under the locomotive and'- o"$wi  the attendance of a medical man. was not.--'"i-jj!  considered necessary.    , -        ������.'���-,.   ;.'   'ryd$_.-  vV. Li. Peterson, the operator 'a!t -Troup '-.~.ibS?\  Junction, had a narrow escape, j-te heawt'M^ty'SS]  tho angry whirl of the runaway train as" lt"-^'fo-fe.  made the curves on the hne-from the sum-" y fit?,,  mil,  but he had  not' time to make up hia sSi  mind of tlie (lunger iu-^whlch he was until          -  a portion of a. Hying car'took out a side oC  the  building in  which  ho "was.housed.'-,He "-  ���say; he invm his escape solely co.the fact   -  that  he  was  not  in   the way "of .the, car.  '     rf-&-.  I lad it-been otherwise he-realizes'-that Nie? ,  <^S%|  would  not  have  scut word  of the wreck, t1 Pi-t'i  t-.iL is nil.       . '  ' _-   ���     y*   f'-��  The train was in-charge of conductor C~*  11.   Hibbard,   with   Zwisler  as .driver .and'  A.   Cockwelt  as   fireman.   In   conversation  wilh   a   Tribune   reporter   a - few , minutes  ' -IF  v.  .*i'J  *   /*���  Short Terms of Imprisonment.  CASTLBBAR, Ireland, December 1S.���  The hearing of the charges of holding  meetings and delivering Intimidating  speeches in defiance of the police brought  agalhsl Connor O'Kclly. M.P., chairman of  the Mayo county council, and several other  oflicials of. Mayo county, was concluded  today. Mr. .O'Kelly wus sentenced to two  months' imprisonment and four oilier defendants were sentenced to undergo terms  of imprisonment ranging from a fortnight  to a month. All the sentence.'! imposed were  without hard labor. The court refuse',1 the  demand of the defendants for leave to ap-.  jioai from the jurisdiction of Ihe court.  Tho refusal of the court was due lo the  fact that tlie defendants declined to speak  publicly In.the Interim.  Jacksoi.s Plead Not Guilty.  LONDON,   December 'IS.���Theodore   and  Laura   Jackson    (Ann   Odelia   Dis   Debar)  pleaded  not guilty  when arraigned at. tlie  Old J'iailcy this morning to stand trial on  the charges which have been so fully  threshed out in the Marleyborne police  court. The prisoners were not defended.  There was a very large crowd in tlie court  room and in the vicinity of the court  when the solicitor goneral, sir Ijdward Carson, opened the case, reviewing the points  already published. Discussing lhe working  ���of lhe "Thecratlc Unity,' sir Edward Carson characterized the prisoners as a "Hellish, gang."   To Visit Lord Strathcona,  NEW YORK, December IS.���The prince  and princess of Wales loft London for  Brocket Hall, Hatfield, whore they will he  the guests of lord Mount Stephen, cables  tlio London correspondent of the Tribune.  It is considered highly appropriate, adds  the correspondent, tiiat one of the (lr:=t  country visits on returning from their tour  around the world should be lo the man who  for many years was the head of the Canadian Paeific railroad over which they traveled  so  much.  Detective Under Arrest.  SCRANTON, Pcnnnlyv.inhi. December IS.  ���Daniel McAullffe. one of the three men  shot in a riot at West Scranton by Scranton railway olllcors who wero attempting  to arrest a man licensed of attacking an  imported motorman and conductors, died  today at the Laekawana hospital. Detective'Cosgrovo of New York City Is under  arrest charged with   the  fatal  shooting.  Walcott Had an Easy Victoiy.  BUFFALO, December 18.���Itubc Ferns,  the welter wcislit champion, went down lo  defeat at the hands ot Joe Walco! t, the  Bartif.<lo'es  nigger,  In  live  rounds   in   the  Wired in Brief  OIL SPRINGS, Ontario, December 18.���  Kersey Jiro's. store at Kdy's mills was  burglarized last night. The safe was  sm-ishod and $1300 stolen.  MONTREAL, December is'.���James Martin and Charles Smith, two notorious New  York burglars, were convicted of burglary  tonight and will  be sentenced  tomorrow.  TORONTO, December IS.���The Ontario  cabinet decided to take no action on tho  petition of some 2.550 citizens or Ottawa  praying that the disqualification of. ex-  mayor Morris for breach of lhe law re-  ^siLeetiiig^di-inking-iii-hotelK^^ijli.eE^liours.-lbc^  removed.     -. '  HALIFAX. December IS.���The wife of  Dr. D. *W. Finn, city medical health-ofllcor.  has been removed to the' smallpox hospital  suffering from the disease."contracted, it  is thought, from her husband, who had  been engaged -in the examination of smallpox natients. -  HALIFAX. December IS.���Jerry Lapierro.  an aged resident of West Ohe'zzetook. is  lost in, the forest, whiter lie wont last  Thursday lo attend rabbit smires. Il is  feared h<? . has* suoeumbod In the yinloM  storms last night. Searcli parties are bein;,-  organized.  MONTREAL. Decembor IS,���La l-Vifrle  stales tonight that tin remaining byo-oloe.  lions fur tiie house of commons will take  placo January' 15th, nominations .?. week  earlier. Ton divisions will elect members.  The Lisgar election will take placo later.  Victoria i.'i not mentioned.  MKLLKVILLK, Out., December IS.���The  liellevllle streot railway has been tiur-  chased by A. K. Lewis and Walter Alfred  of this city. The price paid was $11500. They  have also to assume thc obligations.  MONTREAL. December IS.���Lieutenant-  colonel Evans, who . commands the third  contingent, left today for Halifax by Iho  Maritime express.       ,     .   ' ���  MONTREAL, December IS.���J. W. Arkell,  a director of the Amcricon Locomotl'".-  Company, was In this city today. He said  he was here for the purpose of looking  over the ground for the erection of a big  locomotive works, which according to Mr.  Arkell would construct locomotives for ex ���  port. He believes they can be built more  cheaply In Canada than in the Slates, lie  left tonight for Kingston to look over lhe  plant there.  TORONTO, December IS.-Sir Wilfrid  Laurier speaking at a reception -In honor  of postmaster-general Muloek here tonight  repeated the statement that no more deputations would go to Washington. Canada  could produce all the United States could  produce and in 15 years he hoped Canada  would catch up to the United States ns a  wheat producer and the Canadian steel  industry would rival uie United States.  Canada la tlie long rim would displace the  United States in the British market. He  slated that the deficit in tlie postollice department would be onlv Sinn.oof). Sneeehes  were made bv Muloek, Fielding and premier Ross of Ontario.  n.*V5 j  No Action Was Taken.  LONDON. December IS.���The stewards of  the London Jockcv Club deny the report  circulated In the United States hy a news  agency that at their meeting yesterday it  was decided that Lester Reiff, the American jockey whose license was revoked in  October, Is entitled to iinnlv for a license  in lfl02. No action In regard to ReltT was  taken at thc meeting. ,-**  Chili Will Not A'gree.  BUENOS AYRES, December IS.���It Is  rumored hero lhat Chili will not agree lo  the1, proposed modification of her recent  note to Argentina, as outlined in the recent communication from the ArgentiiV!  Republic. The Naicon Wfcilpvcs that ir this  is true the situation' will become moro  serious.  afier   the   wreck,   conductor  Hibbard  said  he had  had the experience of his life. He  had  been  railroading for 20 years, -but he  had   never   ben  called   upon  to  experience  thc sensation-lie  had  in  making  the-trip  down    the   mountain    from    the   summit.  When liis  train arrived at tho summit he ,        ���.. ���  says tliM air brakes were tested and found /** "VAvS  to work all right and  tho start down the't      }-^\  hill   was   made.   Then   the   irouble-.com-  menced. The train started  to move pretty        s   -^  fast,-but it  was .Hiobard's ��� lirst.-trip ,and     j^Vk  he thought  the'drlver knew," what he-was     - **> XS'  doing.   By  the  time   ihe  mountain  station  was   re.u'hpit   Hibbard   became  rather 'un-'." -<.- ��J"J  oasv.  The  train  was moving too" fast"for,"        ^  bin, but he still tluuglit tne uriver'knew  what he was doing. So far as he knew thero  was a sump in the lino which required to  -'-  be  provided   for  and   he  wus  prepared  to.    .  tako   his  chances.   After  they  passed   the  �����  mountain   station   il   was   evident   to" Hie   -  conductor  that  he  was  a passenger.on  a _  runaway   train,   and   the' little  caooo.se   in  which  he was  riding was dacing all > over,  ihv track.  Ho  then orderedthe  brakemen*  r-  to  s-ot  the  brakes.  Some  five or six Wfre  set, but the speed of the train was on 1he "  increase all   lhe time.  By "this time it oc���  cm-rod   to   the   conductor   that   the   driver  might have missed his guess a.s to thc na-  tufc-of the road over which he was going.  In   any   event    Hibbard    figured    that ~ho  could   bo oi'  no assistance In stopping tht^  train, as all  the brakes  that could be set  had been attended to,'and it was'just possible that the caboose could be stopped If  *  the train could not. He therefore gave the  biakeman instructions  to cut  the caboose  o'C the train. The dinky thing kept'jumping along  lhe  track at a  lively  rate,  but  kept  on   the  rails  lira- most-^astonishing  The rest of the train appeared to hei gathering 'speed asit went. As It passed the  water tank at the mountain station the  ���ilrsman made up his mind that he had had  all "ho wanted of the trip and staked his  chances on a jump. The driver stayed with,  his train for some time longer. He. had  found* thai the air was not working.and he  was endeavoring to see what-was the mat-  tor. He was still engaged In this work when  he passed the semaphore in front of Troup  Siding, and by some fortunate chance was  thrown from tho train. The only other m.iil  on. the forward part of the train was tho  ��� brakeman of the front end. By some freak'  of 1'iok he eseapeil without a scratch. He  tried to get off the train, but could not  make It.'When be saw the train getting  awav from him he set all the brakes'he  could on lhe front end of the truln and  llieri started-back for tho caboose. He got  as far ns a car of machinery, but the train  was moving so fast that he could not get  bcvoiul It. On this car he made the trip  down the mountainside which was never  before exceeded, and which the trainmen  /iav must have been at the rate of at least  100 miles an hour. All the cars In front of  him were piled up In a mass of wreckage  and everv car behind -him followed suit,  but ih��' car of machinery on which he  made the trip did, not leave the' rails, at  least one-half of it did not.'  Naturally every man on the train thought  ���he was tlio only one who escaped with his  life. When the cars .came to a standstill,  brakeman * Pulford * thought he was the  on!" man left to toll how the thing hap-  pon��d. When he pulled himself together he  was overjowod to lind that the caboose had  been stopped a short distance from" tho  wreck- On this, of course, were the conductor and brakeman UrllHn. This accounted for three out of the crew of live,  and it was at once presumed that the driver  and* liremun were underneath the'locomotive, which was pulled up on the main line  of the C. P. IJ., and accordingly word was  telegraphed- into tlio . city for medical attendance. 'It turned out later that the  driver had made his jump when the train  passed tho wator tank at the mountain  station and that the driver had been  thrown   olt tho train a few moments later. -  So fnr ns injuries are concerned, the tire-  man is the only-man hurt. His face Is badly cut and there is a chance that hisskull.  lias boen Injured. The other members'of  the train crew had dinner together and exchanged their experiences during the time  they spent on the train.   .  Transport McLellan Nearly Founders.  NEW YORK. December lS.-According to  dispatches received here today by the Maritime ICxchange, thc transport McLellan hag  put into Bermuda short of coal*. A New  York mercantile Iirm engaged In the .Bermuda trade received a dispatch savins-;  "McLellan had a fearful trip and nearly  foundered." At the army building it was  said no news had boon received of the McLellan since she left Gribraltar on December tth.         -  Lived Over a Century. . ,    .,  WATERTOWN, New York, December 18.   *���'���:_'_  ���Mrs  Virginia Younjr,   the  oldesj ni^ragip^  In  Northern  New York, Is deaC at Red-  wood, jerters.m cqtmty, aaed IM. She was��y��-g  grandmother- of "Tommyy Ryan, the^weil/'V*  known pugilist.  ./. THE NELSON TRIBUNE   THURSDAY  MORNING,  DECEMBER  19 1901  ���^^tg^"--^?  _^   fij^ S^* *^=5>*-^i **=*** ���i^'' ^ ' "^ ��� ^  4f  %  COMPANY.  INCORPORKTED    1670,  HEADQUARTERS OF  SANTA CLAUS  THIS WILL BE THE  231st Christmas  ���iy    Which this Company, whose business operations ex-  NEW SHOW  ROOM  Our New Show  Boom for  TOYS  is now open  The public are invited to inspect our immense stock of  Toys, Musical Instruments, Souvenirs and useful articles for  Christmas and New Year Gifts.  r_M  WS'-'        . K ���   '"  W^fJz  f -iB  tend over half a continent, has assisted its Friends and  Customers to celebrate and enjoy, and this is the  FOURTH CENTURY  in which we have been doing business. Our long,  experience and our capital obviously give us an  immense advantage in supplying the best value  to our patrons. This year we have made special  efforts and have now- a collection  of  CHRISTMAS GOODS .   '  which cannot be surpassed in any city in Canada.  OUR DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT    -.  is well   worthy   of  its   reputation,   and   is   replete  with articles suitable for  PRESENTS POR MEN, WOMEN  AND CHILDREN.  No pains have been spared ,to decorate in honor  of ''Good Old Christmas" and an inspection ��� will  please you as well as enable you to select exactly  what you want at  MOST REASONABLE PRICES,  :  .,.     ,        We cannot commence   to enumerate,  but  would  ��'Y ���ly^K-'draw special attention to our  ; TOYS AND DOLLS,  and to_ our Ladies' and Gentlemen's Ties, which  ;;wc have in all shades shapes and patterns, as  weir as to our magnificient line of Handkerchiefs  in linen aind silk, and of Gloves of every.description,  including the Paris Price Kid Gloves and of  Ladies' Blouses, etc. Every conceivable article  necessary or ornamental for Ladies' and Gentlemen's attire is here to choose from. There is  nothmg a women can wish for in the way of Dress  Goods that this Department cannot supply, and at a  saving. The very newest and most exquisite weaves  and colorings will be found in this vast collection,  and the quantity will astonish you as much as the  quality and little  prices.  "'   _. :   GROCERIES.      -  ��� With Groceries and Eatables quality is everything. Price is a'consideration, but its importance  is second to that of quality. You must have the  finest and freshest foodstuffs obrainable, because it  is healthiest, because, in fact, in the long run it pays  best. Hut when you secure "top notch" quality at  the^minimum_reaso-nable_pr.ice,_nothing_more-can_be^  WW wanted. This is the combination you obtain at  these Stores���quality tbe highest, prices thc lowest.  OUR CHRISTMAS SPECIALTIES  include a  direct  shipment of Peek, Fivan & Co.'s  Biscuits, Pascall's Sweets,   Rowntree's Confections,  Christie's and McCorniick's Kane-/ Biscuits, English  Plum Puddings, French  Crystallized   Fruits.    Gor- ���  ganzola, Roquefort and English Stilton Cheese.  CROCKERY, CHINA AND GLASSWARE  This department is very complete. Dinner Sets,  Tea Sets and Bedroom Sets in all qualities and'at  all prices. We have a nice line of specially selected  "little things" very suitable for presents, and a  choice collection of more expensive goods for the  same purpose.  WINE AND LIQUOR DEPARTMENT  consists of direct importations-from all over lhe  world. ���  DEPEND UPON IT  we    can    assure    you.     Our   liquors  of   ex-y'ry.   dependance.       For   years  we     have     been     selling     Liquors,  and during this time we have built up a fortress of  confidence in us and  our lines which  is absolutely  unassailable.    You run no risk in  purchasing from  us.    The quantity and variety of Liquors which you  can   obtain   here are larger than you could secure  elsewhere in  Western Canada; so great, indeed, is  "the  variety  that Ave believe we can satisfy almost  any  individual   fancy   in   the  way   of Wines  and  Liquors.     The  lea^t you can do at any rate is to  give us a trial order and  thus allow us  to demonstrate the advantage of trading with us.  '������.*'.;, PRICES RIGHT IN ALL LINES.  WATCH OUR WINDOWS  m  MORLEY & LAING  B.MCrcit STItK  T. NELSON. B. O.  Showrooms Mason & Ri eh Pianoj.  ��He f&vxbxxm  SUBSCRIPTION   RATES.  Dally by mall, one month $   50  Daily  by mail,  three months 1 25  Daily by mail, six months  2 5!)  Daily  by  mail,  one  year  5 00  Semi-weekly  by mail, three months...    au  Semi-weekly by mall, six months 1 00  Semi-weekly by  mail,   one  year  2 00  Postage to Great Britain added.  ADVERTISING   RATES.  Display Advertisements run regularly  per inch  per month J4 00  If run less than a month, per inch per  Insertion         26  msrrS'^ '00'00 '00 '00 '007*0 ��� 00-00 - 00712> -0*1^3, r^T^r^i  to  to  to  to  to  to       Special   Novelties   in   Latest   New   York   Silk to  to Waists and Silk Toffeta Dress Skirts. to  /Jy Just received the most up-to-date shades and /J\  ff\ styles in American Silk "Waists suitable for Xmas (f\  W trade, of "which we are making- special attraction of (ft  �� for Monday and Tuesday next. -J*  /f\ SEE OUR XMAS STOCK OP DOLLS, TOYS, ETC., AT PRICES AWAY DOWN. /f\  *       " ��� to  to to  ii.  Classilled Adi and Legal Notices, per  word for first Insertion   on.      additional    Insertion,   .per  #  m  For    each  word           i-i  Wholesale and Business Directory Ads  (classified), per line per month..-.      60  Notices of meetings of Fraternal Societies- and Trades Unions, per line  per month      s>  Addresu all letters���  THB   TRIBUNE   ASSOCIATION,   Ltd.  John Houston, Manager. Nelson, B. C.  ���H~K-H~H~H~H-*  ���H~$"H~M~M~W~H-  +  *  *  *  *  *  *  NOTICE  TO SUBSCRIBERS  BY   CARRIER.  *  *  *    *  On Saturday next, subscribers ��� *  whose Tribunes ar,e delivered by   +  carrier -will be expected  to pay -fr  the carrier TWENTY CENTS, the *  subscription price for the current +  week. .j.  '     -  *  T��'ft-M">'H"M"H"H'   ��H*<"H"M"M*"H~H-.  w  m  You  may,  are   worthy  and    years  m,  S:       X  ��*=?��� c=?'(=?'C=? 'CZ)-c=3 'C3'CZ>'C3'(Z7>'C3'(Z?*fcZr.'f=3 ���&  -��%?  '!~~>.*:^>0~-J>. <3|�� V  The   opponents   of  By-law   No.  102  claim that if the by-law is carried the  city will not be in a position to give the  refinery a cash bonus of $50,000.    The  question might bo asked these people:  " If the city gives   a   refinery   a   cash  " bouns of ?50,000, will it still be in a  " position to install  a power plant on  " Kootenay river?"'  If the city had a  power plant on Kootenay river, it would  not need tb give   the   refinery   $50,000  cash, and no one knows it better than  mayor Fletcher.   Mayor Fletcher knows  that the Wes J; Kootenay-. Power- & Light  Company is willing to sell power to a  refinery at Nelson  fo��   a less  sum per  horse-power than it will sell power to  the city.    He also knows  the reasons  why the power company will give ,the  refinery a better- rate than it will give  the city.    He knows that the requirements of. a combined lead smelter and  a refinery are in thc  neighborhood of  350 horse-power.    He also  knows that  the projected   refinery  would   pay   out  something in the neighborhood of ?12,-  250 a year for power iHt built at Nelson  and is compelled to purchase the power  required-fronrtbe-West"Kootenay"Power  & Light Company.   He knows that free  power and light and water mean much  more to the refinery people than any  cash bonus the city of Nelson is able to  give them, yet he and  his friends' are  trying to befog the people by leading  them to believe that. Nelson can only  get a refinery by giving its promoters  a cash bonus.  The reason a cash bonus was  substituted for free power was that tho  refinery was to have been built at once,  and the city was not in a position to  supply power by thc time the refinery  was to have been completed and in operation. The location of the refinery  has. not even been decided, let alone  work commenced on it. The people of  Nelson hope that" the industry will be  located at. Nelson; but is it wise to place  the city in a dependent position on the  West Kootenay Power &)Light Company,  for power to operate its electric lighting  business successfully, a business that is  now netting the city $1000 a month,  merely on the supposition that are-  finery may at some future time be built  here?  The defeat of By-law No. 102 on Friday will be official notice to the provincial government that the City of Nelson  was not in earnest and was not acting  in good faith when it applied to purchase a site for a power station on  Kootenay river. Are the property owners of Nelson willing to make such an  admission? If they are not, then they  must turn out and vote FOR By-law  No. 102. ,     -   ��� Mayor Fletcher was exhibiting a telegram yesterday which he received from  someone in Three Forks who wanted to  know what inducements Nelson would  offer for the location of a lead smelter  and refinery. The mayor was using the  telegram as an argument against the  adoption of By-law No. 102, saying that  if the by-law was carried the city would  not be in a position to give? anyone a  *  to  m 36 Baker Street, Nelson. to'  ^*-'��*<00* <SfL'^' ���^���gf- 'cLf*0' 1&Z'm ' gf ���g'- gT'-gf ��� <Sf ������***' ��� 0*'   ��X  -^^ ���^���JS?"��&'i^' "tS-'JS? '.JS,jgt 'iS-'Sj** '���*iS'*��?' '-JBt'imt' ���? ���>*"^  'V*"*k. -^ ���-^���'^^'"^t. "^ -*S^>���� --Sf" -^ -*SJ^*55^-S^<**, ���55^*32T'  W/ ��� 00x,00^ ^'00-*0'^00-^0-00-00'00-00-00'00'00'00'**"&' ���  cash bonus.    The   mayor   forgets   that  free power, or power at a low yearly  rate per ��� horse-power, is a greater inducement   than' a cash   bonus   to men  who mean business and have the capital to erect and ��� operate a smelter and  refinery.    The mayor also forgets that  if the city was in a position to offer free  power to a refinery it would also be im  a position to supply the people of Nelson with electricity for power, heating,  and lighting purposes at a rate much  cheaper than the same are supplied the  people of Rossland   and   other   towns  who are entirely dependent on power  companies.     But,   then,   the   mayor of  Nelson   is   in  the   habit   of forgetting  some things.   He has apparently forgotten that about a year ago he caused to  be published an address to tiie electors  of Nelson, in which the following words  appeared:    "I  [Frank-Fletcher] believe  "that the city has valuable assets in  "the water and electric light systems,  '���' and while in- the,Council I did every-  " thing possible to safeguard these as-  " sets;  and if elected mayor no act or  " vote of mine will' be in favor of allow-  " ing any outside .corporate interests to  " become a competitor with the city in  " the   business   of electric   lighting,   a  "business in'which the city has already  "invested $70,000."   As Frank Fletcher  has  expressed   a' willingness,  so  it is  said,   to- succeed 'himself as  mayor of  Nelson, his next address will probably  declare that as the city's electric light  business has not paid the city a cent,  he is in favor of turning tho whole out- ���  fit,  including the  plant and  tbe franchise,- over to the West Kootenay Power  _&Jj_ight_Cpmpany,'_Limited,_oLRossland,j  if only that company will take it at its  own price.  The Fletcher-Selous-.Cameron-Carley  party have made up a ticket for mayor  and aldermen, and it has been christened by the boys, "The Do-Nothing  Ticket:" It is as follows: For mayor  ���Frank Fletcher. For aldermen in the  East ward���John Paterson, W. G. Gillett, and David Mark Carley. For aldermen in the West ward���John Hamilton,  Harold Selous, and A. L. McKillop.  Five of the names are of men who have  voted solid every chance they have had  for the West Kootenay Power & Light  Company. David Mark Carley will do  whatever mayor Fletcher and Deacon  Cameron want him to do; but The Tribune does not believe that ex-adlerman  McKillop will be found in any such  company.  It is not unlikely that F. C. Cotton,  who was minister of finance and chief  commissioner of lands and works in  the Semlin government, will be a candidate for mayor of Vancouver.-If elected, Vancouver would have an able man;  for chief magistrate, and. an official who  would earn every dollar paid him for  salary. During his ten years' service  in the provincial legislature, Mr. Cotton was seldom found advocating unwise legislation, and were he mayor of  Vancouver the minute books of the city  council would be free from buncombe  resolutions and bad b.y-laws.  The Economist ventures the opinion  that By-law No. 102 will be. defeated,  and that the other three (even including  the one which alderman Selous is so  "sweet" on) will carry- Well,- it is a  relief to know that the Economist has  an opinion on* one Question that concerns the people who patronize it.  Schley Presents His Objections.  AVASHINGTON, December IS.���Admiral  Schley lato this afternoon, through his  counsel, presented to the secretary of the  navy liis bill of exceptions to the iiiHlinjjK  of the majority of thi court of iii(|iury.  Tho bill concluded with thc statement liiit  (lie procedings of the majority of tho court  were irregular;-that admiral Schley's rights  have been prejudiced and his testimony  in many particulars not considered and  that the evidence is .-lbsoluiely iiisu.ll''ieni  to sustain the opinion which has been  rendered and tliat therefore a. grave and  irreparable Injustice has been done admiral Schley. Admiral Schley, through  counsel, also has served notice-that if admiral Sampson objects to tho findings of  admiral Dewey, he. will claim tlie rljjht to  be heard in such objections. Hi rcsrard to  this claim, secrotary Long informed counsel that it was not tlie practice of the department ti have oral hearings on matters  of tliis kind. He intimated that lie would  entertain a written argument.  NOTICES OF. MEETINGS,   FRATERNAL  SOCIETIES.    '  KOOTIWAV rUK'J^Is'O. 7, K. O. T. M.���  Keyul.-u- meeting.-, lirst and third Thursdays of each mouth. Visiting Sir Knights  aro cordially invited to attend. Dr. \V.  .Hose, Jt. J\.; A. W. Purdy, Com.; G. A.  Jirown, 1*. (J.  Gobbling Up Tobacco Trade "~  BfillT.TN, December IS.���The Kleins Journal says president Duke of the American  Tobacco Company lias acquired tiie Jas-  matzi Cigarette Company of Dresden, ami  also Kryiazi Bros, of Berlin. Two other  Dresden concerns, Lafermcz and Salima,  will be amalgamated and then will bo absorbed by the American Tobacco Company.  Mr. Duko. who lias been spending several  days in Berlin,- has gone to St. Petersburg  for the purpose" of buying cigarette factories. ���        .   <-  CLASSIFIED ADS.  .  .ARTICLES FOR SALE.  Sla'A'ING   MACHINES   OF   A 1,1.   KINDS  for sale or rent at the Old Curiosity Shop.  FOR   SALE.  NELSON l.OnOIJ, NO. 23, A. F. &-  A. 2,1., moots second Wednesday in  each month. Sojourning brethren  invited.  N13L.SON A ERIK, NO. 22, V. O. E.���  ���Meets second and fourth Wednesday of  each   month   at   fraternity   Hall.   George_  Bartlett,   president;  J.  .tary.  V.  Morrison,  secrc--  NELSON ROYAL AKOI-1 CIIAPTI-JK NO.  12.!, G. Jt. C���Meets third Wednesday. Sojourning companions invited. Charles G.  Mills,   Vi.; Thomas J.   Sims,  S.  JO.  TRADES AND LABOR UNIONS. '  "MINERS' UNION,~NO '*3~W.T/\~or~M^  Moets in Miners', Union Ilall, northwest  corner of Uakor and Stanley Streets, overy  Saturday evening at S o'clock. Visiting  members welcome. J. It. Mcpherson, president; j nines Wilks, secretary. Union scale  of wages ior Nelson district per shift: Machine men Su.fiU, hammersmen $o.an, muckers, carmen, shovelers, and other undor-.  if.-uuiiu  luuorurs !;3.  -Oi  .FOR    SALE ���BLACJCSMITI-IS'     TOOLS  Apply to Benjamin F.  Nesbitt,  Eric, H. C  FOR_RENT.  FOR RENT���A LAUG10 ' BURNISH WD  room; centrally located; modern conveniences. Apply A, Tribune Ollice.  WhoSsale^d^otoet   ASSAYERS^ SUPPLIES.         -W. F. TI3ETZEL & CO.-c67{NER Of  Baker and Josephine Streets, Nelson,  wholesale dealers in assayers' supplies.  Agonts for Denver Firo Clay Company.   . ELJ5CTRICATL. ^IJPPLJES.  KOOTKNAY ICLECTKIC SUJ'PiTy .t  Construction Company��� Wholesale dealers  in telephones, annunciators, bells, batteries, electric lixtures unci appliances. Houston tilock, Nelson.    FRSH AND SAJ/r^MEATS.^   P. BURNS & c"67"b'Ii'CER -STKISKT.  Nelson, wholesale doalers In rresli anil  cured moats. Cold storage.  GROCRIES.  David Mark Carley, the political editor  of the Economist, it is rumored, has  sheathed his knife, and that from now  on he and "Willie" will be as two little  political kittens in the one box.  KOOTENAY SUPPLY COMPANY, Limited, Vernon Street, Nelson, wholesale  grocors.  JOHN CIIOLDITCII &. CO.-FRONT  Street, Nelson, wholesale grocers.  A. MACDONALD~*rc~d.^CORNER OF  "Front and Hall Streets, Nelson, wholesalo  grocers and jobbers in blankets, gloves,  mitts, boots, rubbers, mackinaws, and miners' sundries.  ..JV* Y.  GRIFFIN & C���FRONT STREET,  Nelson,   wholesale* dealers   in   provisions,-.  cured meats, butter and eggs. ��->���-  ;_    LIQUORS AND DRY GOODS.      ~~  TURNER, BEETON & CO.���CORN WR  Vernon* and Josephine Streets, Nelson,  wholesale dealers in liquors, cigars, and  dry goods. Agents for Pabst Brewing Company of Milwaukee and Calgary Brewing  Company of Calgary.'  BUSINESS DIBE0T0EY,  "_ ^ _��H2��,5��H1R  PIONEER v^HOP HOUSE,-- JOHN  Spear, proprietor, opposite Queen's Hotel,  Hi-fr Stre i Nelson. Open day and night.  Lunc-es a specialty. Traveling parties supplied on shortest notice.  BARBERS' UNION, NO. I'M, OF THE  International Journeymen Jiarbers', Union  of America, meets first and third Mondays  of each month in Miners' Union Ilall at  S.-aO sharp. Visiting memhers invited. Jt.  McMahon, president; J. J I. Matheson, secretary-treasurer; J. C. Gardiner, recording  secretary.  . LAUNDRY        AVORlvERS' UNION"���  Moets at Miners' Union Hall on fourth  Monday in every month at 7:30 o'clock p.  in. BI Pape, president; A. XV. McFec,' sec-  re tar;'.  CARPENTERS' UNION MEETS WED-  nosday evening of each week at 7 o'clock,  in Miners' Union Hall. John Burns, sr.,  president,   William  Raynard,  secretary.  PAINTERS' UNION MEETS THE FIRST  and third Fridays in each month at Miners'  Union Hn.ll at 7:30 sharp. Walter 11. Kee,  president; Jlenry Bennett, secretary.  _^COOKSl_A N l.>_W_Am��US:_U.N -LO-N ,^N O.-  111, W. 1,. U.,--meets at Miners' Union Hall  second anil last Tuesdays in each month at  JJ.-30 p. m. sharp. A. B. Sloan, president; J.  I*. Forrostell, secretary; II. M. Fortler, financial secretary.  PLASTERERS' UNION MEETS EVERY  Monday evening in the Elliot J31ock, at ii  o'clock. J. li. Moyer, president; William  Vice, secretary.   P. O. Box llil."  Purity in Prescriptions.  You'll appreciate the value of pure prescriptions.  ��� Impure prescriptions are dangerous. We take special  caro in compounding and use onlythe purest drugs.  KOOTENAY   COFFEE OO.  999************.***.**.*.***.  Coffee Roasters  Dea,er8 ln Tea and Coffee     ���  ************************  Wo aro oirering at lowcRt prices tho best  grades o Coylon, India, China and Japan  Teas.  Our Hest, Motha and Java Coffoe, per  pound  9   40  Mocha and Java Blend, 3 pounds  1 00  Choice Blend Coffee, I pounds  1 00  Sporisl F.'enri Coflco, 0 pounds  1 CO  Rio Blend Coffoo, fi pounds  1 00  Special Blnnd Coylon Tea, por pound SO '  A TRIAL ORDER SOLICITED.  KOOTENAY COFFEE CO.  Telephone 177.  P. 0. Box 182.  .WEST BAKER STREET, NELSON.  ACOMPLETELINEOF  Front Doors  Inside Doors  Screen Doors  Windows  Inside Finish  local RDd ooai-t.  Flooring  -local und ooauti.  Newel Posts   -���Stair-Rail-  Mouldings  Shingles  Bough and  Dressed Lumber  of all kindfl  ir what vou want is not iw stock  WU WILL M : KB  IT FOU TOU  CALL AND QiCT PKICHP.   ARCHITECTS: ......  A. C. EWART. A.RCJJITECT���ROOM 3.  Aberdeen Block, Baker Street, Nelson.   _DRAYAGE.  FURNITURE, PIANOS, SAFES, ETC.,  moved carefully at reasonable rates. Apply J. T. Wilson, Phono 270, Pressor's Second Hand Store, Ward Street.  '. - We handle a complete line ot"  FROST KING  Chamois Vests for Men and Boys, made of  chamois lined with flannel.'  FROST QUEEN  -.Chamois Vests for Women and Girls, made of  * ���'.   chamois covered with French flannel.  Perfect "protection against cold and sudden  changes���against coughs, colds, pneumonia, and c-.ll.  chest and.lung troubles. Just the thing lur children  eoing to school.   Price, $3 oo.  Children's sizes, $2.00.  CANADA DRUG & BOOK CO.  J. A. Sayward  I HAM AND LA KIT HTHKKTfl. NITRON  fc* **********************-  .IT _5Vj!  W - W-.  ^      OF     COUItSB    VOU    WANT    THB     BEST'      (fi  �� T11ICN   OO  TO jjj  S  ARTHUR    GEE 8  ii;    in Tremont Block.   Uo will suit vou.    $  i*     Largo slock of imported season's goods.    W  \ : : '. l^p  .- '*********-**-***-***-9*-*i99*-$*' *.,  WEST TRANSFER qp.  N. T. MACLEOD, Manager.  All Kinds of Teaming and Transfer  Work.  Agents for Hard and Soft Coal. Imperial Oil  Compauy. Washington Brick, Lime & Manufacturing Company. General commercial agents  and brokers.  All ooa] and wood strictly cosh on delivery  TicmynoMiD un.   Office 184 Baker St.  ffxxix:txixii��xiiizixisxxxijxxziijxiixianixrxixixxsxix  K.-W.-C. Blook.  Corner Ward and Baker Sts  FURNITURE.  li. .1. JIOBEKTSOA' & CO., i<'UJtlS tTUKB  dealers, undertakers, and embalmers. J3ay  'phone No. VJ2, night 'phone No. aw.'Next  y.v nostofllee building, Vernon Street,  JJelson,  Tklepiionk Mo  ORDER YOUR  TKI.ErilONB 35  THEO MADSGN  MANUFACTURER OF  FROM ,.  NELSON FREIGHTING AND TRANSFER CO.  ANrR8M,|rE Pi.HU ROSLYN  ALWAYS ON HAND  Office: Bakor Street,  TENTS AND AWNINCS  KELSON,  B.C.   I  &*  r,<  ft  T. O. Box 76  tuiT (KrxxxnixTXTrr :isinxirixTxixni:nrTcxxx:ax  NEWLING .& CO.  AUCTIOKEEHS, VALUERS, ETC.  Kooteniiy Stroot, next door to Oddfellows' Hal  P.O. Box 633 NKLSON, B.C. ^  V^  BANK OF MONTREAL  CAPITAL, aU paid up���..$12,000,000.00  BEST     7,000,000.00  UNDIVIDED PROFITS       427.180.80  TfTB  NELSON  TRTBUNE,  THURSDAY  MORNING,  DECEMBER  Lord Btrathoouu and Mouut Royal ...Prcxldcui  Hon. Qoorge A. Druiumoud Vice-Prenidon'  B, S. Cloi'dtoo Gonoral Mmiagp  NKLSON UIIANCH  Cornor Bak-r und Kootonay Streets.  A. H. BUCHANAN, Manager.  THE CANADIAN  BANK OF COMMERCE  WITH WHICH 18 AMALGAMATED  THE  BANK  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA.  BEAD CFPICK:   TOKONTU.  Paid-up dapitttl,  Reserve Fund,  Branches ln London (England) New  Youk,  Chicago, and all tho prinoipal oltieu in Canada  $8 000,000  -   $2,000,000  ACCSECATE RESOURCES OVER $65,000,000.  IMPERIAL BANK  oe1   o-a.:et.a.:d.a.  Capital (paid up)  Rest  Buy and sell Sterling Exchango and Oabl.  Trausfers.  Grant Commorcial and Travelers' Credit,  available in any purt of thn world.  Drafts Issuod, Collections Made, Rbo.  Saving's Bank Branch  CtTRRKNT RATK OP INTRRK8T RAID  Hon. Geo. A. Cox,  President  B   E. Walker,  Goneial Manager  London Ollice, 00 Lombard Street, ��1. O.  New  York  Oflice, to   Exchange   Place.  aud tia Braiichen in Canada and thu  L'niled Stales.  TALE OF WRECKED HANDCAR  SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT:  Intorest allowod ou  deposit*,    fi-eseut rate  tn-ee per cent,  GRANGE  V.  HOLT,  MmuiK'or N'elxon brauch.  And Its Badly Scared Occupants  Tho reader is not expected to believe  this tale, but if he will take the trouble  to write to thc general manager of the  Pere Marquette railroad, state of Michigan, United States of America, enclosing stamped envelope for answer, I  have no doubt lhat good man, having  by this time recovered from the dreadful shock occasioned by the wreck, will  cheerfully verify the tale even to the  minutest detail.  * -.- * * *  Of course, Kelly, .being Irish, should  have been a Democrat, but he was not.  He was not boisterously or offensively  Republican, but he was going to- vote  the prosperity Jicket. He had tried it  four .years ago, and business had never  been better on the Pere Marquette.  Moreover, he had a new handcar.  The management had   issued   orders  that there must be no coercion of employees.     It   was   pretty   well   understood among the men that higher officials would vote the Republican ticket,  and leave thc little fellows free to do  tho same.    So Kelly, being boss of the  gang, could not,  with  ".Tu" respect to  the order of the  superintendent,  enter  into tho argument constantly going on  between Burke and  Shea on one side,  and T,ucien Boseaux, the French Canadian,    Anglo-Saxon,    foreign-American  citizen ~on tho   other.    This   argument  "  always reached its height at noon time,  and had rnever. been more heated than  now, it being the day  before election.  'Here es Prosper'tee," -laughed Lucien,  holding up   a half-pint   bottle   of  Van  Rouge. -   .  "Yes," Burke retorted. "An' ye have  four pound of cotton waste in the bottom of that bucket tp trow th' grub to  th* top. Begad! I'd vote f'r O'Brien  "wud an empty pail; er none at all, before I'd  bo humbugged."  "Un   I,"   said   Lncicn,   "would   pour  Misseur Rousveau   vote   if   my. basket  shall ail the way up be cotton."  "Sure  ye  wud."  said   Shea,   "an   ate  .   tho cotton too,  if yer mashter told ye  to.    'Tis^ tho like of iyo, yc bloomin' fur-  reigncr, that kapos't.he thrust alive in  the counthry."  ^    When they were   likely   to   come to  blows, Kelly, with a mild show of superiority, which  is second nature to a  section boss, would interfere and restore  order.   All day they'worked and argued,  lifting low joints   and   lowering   high  centers, and when the red sun sunk behind   the   treetops,   filtering   its   gold  through the golden leaves,  they lifted  the car on the   rails   and --started   for  home.  When the men had mounted, Lucien  at the forward handle,-and Burke and  Shea side by sido at the rear bar, they  waited impatiently for Kelly to light  his pipe and seat himself comfortably  on the front of the car, his heels dangling near the towpath.   There-was-no-more-talk���now:���The-  men were busy pumping, the "manasre-  ment" inspecting the fish plates, thc  culverts, and incidentally watching the  red sun sink down behind the trees.  At the foot of a short   slope,   down  which the men had heen pumping with  all   thoir   might,   there   was   a" short,  bridge. The forest was heavy here, and  already  the  shadow  cf  the  wood   lay  over   thc   right-of-way.     As   the   car  reached the further end of the culvert,  the men were startled by a great explosion. The, handcar was lifted bodily  and thrown from the track. The next  .   thing Lucien   remembers   is   that., he  awoke  from   a  fevered  sleep,   fraught  with bad dreams, and felt warm water  running over   his   chest.    He   put   his  hand to his shirt collar, removed it, and  found  it red  with  blood.    Thoroughly  alarmed, he got to his feet and looked.  or rather felt, himself over.   His fingers  found an ugly, ragged gash in the side  of his neck, and the fear and horror of  it .all dazed him.  He reeled and   fell   aga.in,   but   this  . time lib did riot lose consciousness.  Finally,; when he was   able   to- drag  himself up the embankment to where  the car hung crosswise on the truck, the  sight he saw was so ^appalling that he  forgot his own wounds.  On the opposite side, to where he had  himself fallen; Burke and Shea lav side  by side, just as. they had walked and  worked and .fought for years, and just  as they would have voted on the morrow if they  had, been  spared.    Immediately in front of the car, his feetmver  one rail and his neck across the other,  lay the mortal-remains   of  Kelly,   the  boss, the stub of  his   black, pipe  still  sticking between his teeth.    As Lucien  stooped to lift the helpless head his own  blood spurted from  the wound in  his  neck and flooded the face and covered  t.he clothes of the limp foreman. Finding no sign of life in the section boss,  the    wounded,    and     hy    this     time  thoroughly frightened, French Canadian  turned his attention to the other victims.   Slowly now the realization of the  awful tragedy came over the wounded  man.   His first thought was of the ev-  press now nearly due.   With a great effort he succeeded in lsiricmer the car on  the rails, and  then  begran thc work of  loading tho dead.   Out of respect for the  office po lately filled by Kelly, he was  lifted, first and placed on the front, of  the car, his head pillowed on Lucien's  coat.   Next he put Burke aboard, bleed-  ting profusely the while, and then be  gan the greater task of loading Shea.  Shea was a heavy man, and by the time  he got him aboard, Lucien was ready  to faint from exhaustion and loss of  blood.  Mow he must pump up over the little  hill, for if the express" should come  round the curve and fall down the grade  thc handcar would be in greater danger  than ever.  After much hard work he gained the  top of the hill, the hot. blood spurting  from his neck at each fall of the handlebar, and went hurrying down the long,  easy grade to Charlevoix.  To show how the tnrles of life will  intrude at the end, it is interesting to  hear Lucien declare that one of the  first thoughts that came to him on seeing the prostrate figures was that, up  to that moment, the wreck had worked  a Republican gain of one vote, with his  own in doubt.  But now- he had more serious work  for his brain, already reeling from- exhaustion. At the end of fifteen minutes  he found himself hanging on to the  handle, more to keep from falling, than  for any help he was giving the car. The  evening breeze blowing down the slope  behind him helped him, so that the car  was really losing nothing in speed. He  dare not relax his hold, for if his  strength should give out and the car  stop, the express would come racing  down through the twilight and scoop  him into eternity; so he loiied on, dizzy,  stupefied, fighting for life surrounded  by the dead.  Presently, above the   singing   of   the  wheels, he heard a low sound like the  single, smothered cough of a yard engine  suddenly- reversed.- Now  he  had  the feeling of a man flooded with ice-  water, so chilled was his blood. ��� Turning his head to learn the cause of delay (he had fancied tho pilot of an engine under his car)' he saw Burke, one  of thc dead men, leap up and glare into  his face.    That was too much for Lucien, weak   as he   wj.rl   iii.il,   tv/Isting  slightly, he sank to the floor of the car.  Slowly Burke's wandering reason returned.   Seeing Shea at his feet bloodless, and apparently unhurt, he kicked  him,  gently  at flrst,  and  then  harder,  and   Shea  stood  up.    Mechanically the  waking man took his place by Burke's  ���side and  began pumping, Lucien lying  limp between   them.    Kelly,   they  reasoned, must have been dead some time,  by  the  comfortable  way  he   was  pillowed.  When Shea was reasonably sure that  he was alive, he looked at his mate.  "Phat way arre ye reeiin'?" asked  Burke.  "Purty good fer a corpse. How's yer-  self?"  "Oh, so so!"  "The Lord is good to th' Irish."  "But look at poor Kelly."  " 'Tis too bad," said Shea.    "An' him  dyin' a Raypublican."  " 'Tis the way a man lives he must  die."  "Yes," said Shea, thoughtfully.  "Thim as lives be the swoord must go  be th' board."  When they had pumped silently for  a-while,-Shea--asked:���-How-did-ye-load-  him���  Burke?'."*, i        ,.  "Why   I���I    suppose   I    lifted    him  aboard; I had no derrick."  "Did ye lift me, Burke?"  "I'm hanged if   I   know,   Shea," said  Burke,   staring   ahead,   for   Kelly   had  moved.    "Keep   her   goin',"  he   added,  and then bent over the prostrate foreman.    He lifted Kelly's head, and the  eyes opened.   He raised the head a little higher, and   Kelly   saw   the   blood  upon his beard, on his coat and on his  .hands. ... " .  "Arre yezhurted, Kelly?" he asked.  "Hurted! Man, I'm dyin'. Can't ye  see me heart's blood rhin over me?"  And then Burke crossed himself, and  laid the wounded head gently down  ajrain. u(v  By this time they were nearing their  destination. Burke, seeing Lucien beyond human aid, took hold again and  helped pump, hoping to reach Charlevoix in, time to secure medical aid, or a  priest at least for Kelly.  '  When the handcar stopped in front of  the station at Charlevoix, the employees  watching and the prospective passengers  waiting for the express train gathered  about tho car.  "Get a docther!" shouted Burke, as  the crowd closed in on them.  In a few minutes a man with black  whiskers, a small handgrip, and bicycle  trousers, panted, up to the crowd and  pushed, his way to the car.  "What's up?" he asked, for he was the  company's surgeon.  "Well, there's wan dead, wan dyin',  and.we arre all more or less kilt!" said  Shea, pushing the mob back to give the  doctor room.   .  Lifting Lucien's head, the doctor held  a small bottle under his nose, and the  wounded man came round. Strong, and  as the reporter would say, "willing  hands," now lifted the car bodily from  the track and put it down on the platform near the baggage room.  When the doctor had revived the  French Canadian, and had stopped the  flow of blood, he took the boss in hand.  Opening the man's clothes, he searched  for the wound, but found none. They  literally stripped Kelly to the waist, but  there was not a scratch upon his body.  When the doctor blurted out the belief  that Kelly was not hurt at all, Kelly  stood up ready to fight, for he felt that  his veracity was being questioned.  The doctor had learned from Burke  and Shea, while working over Lucien,  that the car had   beeu   blown   up   by  $2,600,000  $ 1,850,000  HKAI>  OFKICK. TuKunTi,, OXTAHIO.  branches in North\M8t Territories, Province* or  Uruuili i.oluuilii.1, M.u.i*-*tjii,0!iuiiound Quebec.  fj- M'.vAILKIlK General Mananor.  tt. UA Y IiiHpeotor.  NELSON   BRANCH,  BURNS BLOCK.  A geneial banking biii-inoss transacted.  Savings Uci.iirimuiit,���Deposits received and  inteivat all->wed.  Draft* .-old, available in all pm t of Canada.  IJmtod Stated and Kuropu.  Special ul ten tion given to codec    ns.  .^��^!i,-2i ~^2 "JSfe 'JS^'^* vJlft r^ft Ofe *-2s*> ��� **��x ��� ���**�����������,. ���*���������>* . *��^. ^ . �����,\M/A^��* ������   ^0  *m~   _���0   .    _  _^�� ^&-���^���g - *����� "^B�� '^w^t^ab ^&00g0 ^t& 00Si -��"a j^tS   nil   ^J? JBf ^S^si&J^L . 00 .0*0 , 00- . gt0.0*0 . fjtf .0x0. .y.,  #1   ���S^ *52^ ^" ��?���' ^** **-��� ���s**  to  to  to  Hurry  Up  for  Christmas   Gifts  ENGRAVING    FREE    OF   CHARGE  J. M, LAY, Manager.  dynamite, and at one time they were all  as good as dead.      ,  Two days later, when the division superintendent, the chief surgeon, and the  chief of the secret service bureau had  visited the scene of the disaster, and  finished' their inquest by examining the  section gang and the crew of the last  train-that passed this point prior to the  explosion, these officials joined in the  following report to" the general manager:  "On November   9th,   at  a  point  between Ellsworth and -r-arlevoix, about  6:40 p. m., handcar No. 22 ran over a  torpedo, which had been placed on the  rail as a caution signal for an extra.  The force of the explosion derailed the  car, a piece of the tin covering from the  torpedo cut a frightful, though not dangerous gash in the neck of one of the  men, and the fall from the car appears  to    have   rendered    him    unconscious.  Foreman Kelly and the two other men  escaped   unhurt,   but,   upon   regaining  consciousness   and   finding   the fourth  man apparently  dead,   with  the  blood  gushing from his wound, they each,~one  after the other, tumbled over in a dead  faint.  Boseaux, the wounded man, was the  first to revive, and, finding his comrades all dead, as he thought, he loaded  them on to the car and brought them  to Charlevoix, where subsequently they  all recovered. They are at work today."  And the "Raypublican- plurality," as  Burke remarked afterwards, was precisely the same in Michigan as if they  had all been killed. '  ��  to  to  to  For engraving, first come, fiisfc served.  Dou'fc delay. Our goods ure here from tlio  manufacturers and you shall havo our prompt  attention. All goods aro gun ran teed for  quality and prices as reasonable as you can  buy in the East.  'ft  'ft  Diamonds  Watches  Brooches  Rings  Chains  .Scarf Pins  Lockets  Karn Pianos  Sewing Machines  Lamps  Electric Statues  Cnyx ar.d Brass Tables  Jardiniere Stands  Finders  Mail    orders   receive   our   prompt  and  careful attention.  to  A most oxtoiisivo lino   of  Cut,   Glass  just  icc-oivccl from Belgium, Arc Clay goods from  Aii.-ti-in,   and   Caiving   Sets,   Pearl  Handled'  KMi Sots, Cake Sets,,Fruit Knives, etc., etc.,  from Sheffield, England.  Call and inspect our sto k  before  buying  elsewlieie.  i  J Links,  Bracelets  Toilet Sets  Baby Fets  Biushes  Miiita y Sets  Jewel' Cas=;s  Fire  Irons  Jardinieres and  Vases'  Manicure ^ets  Sterling Novelties'  Filver Mounted Whisks  Toilet Bottles  Uc, Eic.,--Etc.  A:| -epairing guaranteed.  ewk  \zsY-  - A*��i>i*  Jacob Dover,  C. P. B. Time Inspector  U  to  to  1%    ^Vjft* ^jw ��� ��f *'Sl*^tL.*'Sfc*^^fc' tS__Z- <^L_l ^' C, * ________!&?,'���&'^mi0 ��� 0  v* w. ���������������������������������*--^ ������%��.������*��*������*���*������ ���**,��� ���^���*5r��^^*^;*s^*sr^***s-,v**r  The Jeweler."  . '     .      '   NELSON, B.C.  25 ;^^& ^ !^a -JSs JS --S> -J2* ���:�� j^.  "���a -*��& -VdO **&   0t$& 0&�� r**8JB -��8   0*3   '0O&  00' 00 ��� 00 ��� 00 ��� 00_��� 00 ��� 00 * 00-000 yS  2S3�� ��� "���**��������:  ������Z-0j.-yv.ni  xr-i-r-um  J,.i_:_yi^Ss  \v* C cf'  -^��'^*��- ��flR  &��  Trip to Irt-land Abandoned.  LONDON, December 17.���The World  today says the proposed visit of king  Edward-and queen Alexandra to Ireland, which was to have taken place in  the spring or aftor his majesty's coronation, has been abandoned on account  of the disturbed state of that country.  Porto Rico Lumber Go.  (LIMITED)  Rough ahd  Dressed  Lumber  Shingles  Mouldings  A-1 White  Pine  Lunjber Always in  StocK-  We carry a complete stock of  Canst Flooring, Ceiling, Inside Fin-  ish, Turned Work, Sash and Doors.  Special order work will receive  orompt attention.  K'EP OUR GOODS TO LOOK AT  W�� SELL AND f\f-SUY  You .will find our stock  complete with the most'  up-to-date  FURNITURE  CARPETS  HIGH ART PICTURES  LINOLEUMS  AT LOWEST PRICES  QUEEN'S HOTEL  BAKER   STREET,   NELSON.  Lighted by Electricity and Heat  ed with Hot Air.  Large comfortable bedrooms and first-  class dining room. Sample roomd for commercial men.  '   RATES ��2 PER DAY  P. Burns  IVlrs. E. C. GlarKe, Prop.  Late of the Hoyal Hotel, Calgary  Wholesale and Retail  -;?;  Dealers in Meats-  tyadden House  Baker and Ward  Streets,  Nelson.  Porto Rico Lumber Go.Ltd.  CORNRK OF  HRNDRYX   AWD VfTRWOV STTtJOWTP  MPERIAL BREWING COMPANY  EMKKSON & HEISTEREII.  Don't miss seeing- our  fine line of Xmas goods.  Early buyers have first  choice.  The only hotel ln Nelson  that  has remained under one management since 1890.  The   bed-rooair   irp  -well   furnished  and  lighted by electrlcw*.  The bar Is always stoc&ea  Dy the best.  domestic and Imported liquors and cigars.  THOMAS MADDEN. Proprietor.  Bartlett    House  For/norly Clarke Hotel.  Head Ofkick at  ���    NELSON, B. 0  Markots at   Nelson,    Rosniand,   Trwl,    Kaslo,   Ymir,   Saiuinu,   SiJv^riw^Ser  ' Denver, KevolHtrtko,'For^Urtor.   Oranii   V.-rkn,  (irm-i,-.^, (w%(,   'n\    ''  ���    way, and'"Vranc(JTi>-np ,' ���.  ?it>y,'-MId;:  ,'to'^-^MJ  o^M>r- ni&iisf  6  BREWERS OF THE BEST  LA.GER::BEER  STEAM BEER  AND PORTER  D. IV|cARTHUR  ���&Gby���  The Befit $1 per Day House  In Nelson.  N'ono but wliito help employed.   Tho bar the  beft.  G. W. BARTLETT, Proprietor  SLOCAN JUNCTION HOTEL  J. H. McMANUS, Mu/uiser.  Bar stocked with best brands of wines,  liquors, and cigars. Beer on draught. Large  cnnvfortablu rooms.  Fir��t claaa tabl�� bou-d  0��rf\J</iteyff~T'  /U.*iL<   C&TLs S.��iJ^ ��^  ��^UaXA/.  &cstM/  S  '-'���ZiM-  '<S-',i��l  West Kootenay Butcher Co.  When you want the B<��st, ask for  IMPERIAL BEEP.  "SEAGRAM"  THE LEADING CANADIAN WHISKEY  TRY IT  IN. BULK, 2, 4, and 7 years old.  IN CAS^S, '83 and Star.  Delivered from the warehouse in Nelson  BEAL ESTATE  AND  INSURANCE BBOKERS  Agents' lor Trout Lake Addition  (Bogustown) Fairview Addition.  Acreage property adjoining- the park  And J. & J. Taylor sales.  These safes can be bought from ub on  two year's time without interest'  Ward Bros.  333 West Baker Street, Nelson.  Auction Sale  HOTEL   BOSSLATO.  ^���Third-door from-Grand-CentrarHdTeT  on Vernon street. Best dollar a day  house ln town. House and furniture new  and flrst class In every respect. Lighted  by gas. -Room and board ?5 to $6 per  week. No Chinese employed here.  J. V. O'LAITOHLJN. Propriotor  NOTICE  ALL KINDS OK  FRESH AND SALTED .MEATS  WHOI.KSi��I.K  AND   KKTAM.  FISH AND POULTRY IN  SEASON  K  W. C BLOOK  WARD STRFET.  E. C. TRAVES, Manager  TREMONT HOUSE  321 TO 331 BAKKR STHEKT. NKLSON  B.T. EITHET & CO., LTD.  VICTORIA, B. C.  A. B. GRAY,  Kootenay Representative.  P. O. BOX 521. NELSON, B. C.  NOTICE.  T'> the ma' tor of an application for a duplicate  of a Certificate "f '��� ir.le to an undivided half o  Lot 12. Rlock II in tlm To"n of Vclsnn.  Notice i- hnrehy given that it. i-i my intention  to issue at the oxpiration nf one month from tho  flrrt publi- at.ion hf.reof n dupHcato of the Certificate* of Titlo tn tho abovo mentioned undivided  half of Lot 12. Block II in the Town of NeLon in  tho tnnio of Joseph Bettwinfrton Howes, whieh  Cortifionto is dated lhe 8th day of November,  1897, and numbered lCllc.  H. F. MACLEOD.  Jjand Registry Offlco, District litgistrar.  Y Nels id, B.C., 3rd December, 11)01.      ,   m  REAL PROPERTY  Aclinp under instructions from Maria  RfadKOD, the undersigned will offer for  sale by public auction in his office  THURSDAY; DEC. 19  at 2 o'clock  That desirable piece of residence property  consisting of lots 18, 19, and 20 ln block 100,  havin en frontage of 75 feet on Mill street,  between Kootenay and Falls, upon which  is erected a new two-story dwelling of  wens rooms. Terms and further particulars may be obtained upon application to  the undrsigned.  Chas. A. Waterman & Co.  Auctioneers  ���Rooms 14 and 15 K. "VV. C. Block.  W. P. TIERNEY  Telophono 2fiS.  AGENT FOR GALT COAL   :  To the Public and Union Men :  Thc TradcR and I/ibor Council of tlio City i-f"  Nelson have drolarod all Hotels,. Reslaiiniiils  aiid Saloons employing Chinese In or arour.d lhe  premises unfair to organized labor.  .The following do not employ Chinese in such  capacity:  VICTOHTA UDTKL  CLARK 10 HOTEL  TKKMONT HOTKL  MADDKV HOTKL  RHKRRKOOIcrc HOTKL  CRAVD CKN'TUAL HOTKL  LAKK VTKWVHOTRL  KOSSLAN'i HOTKL  CRANn HOTKL, . .;;.t *'.  KLONDVKK HOTKL    , '"*''���'  JOHN Sl'JCAU  DKLM/iVICO UI*-STAUU\NT  MANHATTAN SALOON  ...HOIlKGA HAI OON  GLUK I'OT S.VLOON  CLUD HOTEL'  R. REiSTEKER &��� CO,  BREW ERR  AND ROTTMBR* 0��  FINE LAGER BEER, ALE  AND PORTER  Prompt .and regular delivery to tlie trade  BRBWKRr   AT   NBLSON  OYSTER pOCKTAILS  AT   THE   MANHATTAN  OYSTER COCKTAILS  AT   THE   MANHATTAN  AMERICA^ AND EUROPEAN  I'LA.VS  MEALS' 25 CENTS  ��oc ms Lighled by Electricity and Heated Dy St am 25 Cents to SI  Office:  Two Doors West C. P. R. Office  The   Manhattan  .JOSKPHI.NK 8TKKJCT  ALL THE BE8T BRANDS  LIQUOR8   AND   CI0AR8  NOTICE    ~  The undersigned has resumed proprietorship of the blacksmith buslines  formerly carried on by me and lately  carried on by R. B. Reiley, in the premises on Hall street'near corner of Baker  street. Al) accounts duo R B. Keiley  are payable U. me.  ;V       r.Vy-   *W..D,:Ar '" *"?&  Nei��on. B.t "  "GOOD CHEER" STOVES AND RANGES  ^ We are in the market ajrain (his season with this line of  Stoves. After handling tlvm for a number of years we are  convinced that they are ihe only Stoves thnt  ABSOLUTE SATISFACTION.  Call and see our large and  complete  line.  give  LAWRENCE!   HARDWARE   CO^  Importers and' dealers in Sholf aadHegiBr; Hardware.  vC THE  NKLSON  TRIBUNE   THURSDAY   MORNING,   DECEMttlSU  11),  190.1  3L  l^s*;  ,4)  0- 0*   0*.*  ^%9r-9r*\  to  Sensible Xmas Presents  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  POR GIRLS  Fancy Slippers, Dre��s and Street Shoes, etc.  FOR BOYS  Slippers,   Hockey   Boots,  Moccasins, Gum  Boots, Strong School Boots, etc.  FOR LITTLE TOTS  An endless variety of Infants' Footwear.  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  jii  aft  FOR GENTLEMEN  Skating Boots, Slippers, Dress Shoe?, Gloves,  Rubber Soled Bools,   Evening  Pump?, etc.  FOR LADIES  Dress Shoes, Fancy Slippers, Felt S'ipprrs,  Turkish Slippers, Skating Boots, Dancing  Shoes, "Julia Marlowe" Walking Shoes, etc.  their esteem and friendship. Solos wero  ivmler<ul by Mr. McLaren, Mrs. Walley,  Mr. Drown. Mr. Clark, anil Air. K.vrtj, and  short ."-peeclies were made ..v 1-tev. Air.  Morgan ol' ihe Haplist choreii and Rev.  Mr. While of the Alethod'st ch'iroh. After  lhe speeches and lhe singing, refreshments  were -served. The gather'ng w,:. one of llv;  most pleasant ever given in the church.  Royal Shoe Store  L. A. GODBOLT, Prop. THOS. LILLIE. Manager  iffi****** ***. *.*.*.*:*.*. ******* **.*.*.*.***:***.***.***.***.**.*.**.*.*i-**iz  IN MAKINC YQUS CHOICE OF CHRISTMAS PRESENTS DO flOT OVE^OOK  THE FACT THAT WE CARRY THE LATEST LINES OF  ���*  tii  i*i  Of  tii  tii  tH  Oi  ib  IK  ifc  tfr  tli  tli  til  tli  Hi  tli  tli  tti  tli  tli  *  *  PERFUMEBY  From all the best makers, aho Hair Brushes, Clothes  Brushes, Hat Brushes; Milhtary Hair Brushes and numerous other-kinds, made with genuine bristle and with either  Ebony, Wood or Ivory backs.  A fiha line of Ebony   backed   Hand   Mirrors  which  are offering at very reasonable prices.  we  W. F. TEETZEL & CO.  %3*^ 33:3 -ijf*'9 ************9** ���999*-*****-*-*-*-****-*****-*-****--ig>  CHRISTMAS PUDDING  We have the best stock of peel and Christmas  fiuits in the ci'y. Everything Iresh. This season's  |. mon, orange and citron peel, cleaned curranis  and  raisins.  Seson,nBBcock J- A.'IRVING & CO.  RAILWAY TIME TABLE  CANADIAN PACIFIC SYSTEM  I.KAVK  5 a. in.  ���Daily.  IcilOW's'-NKST liATMVAY  Iviiskonook, Oroslon, Movie,  (iiiinlirtiiik, TUarysWllo, I'ovl.  .Steele, k'llco, Kornie,. Michel,  Ulairaiore, Frank, Alaeluocl.  l-icthbiidgc, Winnipeg.: and  all Kaslci-n puiiils-.  C:lfl p. in,  Daily  0:10 p. in.  Daily  8 a, III.  8 ft, m.  AKItlVl**  ���1 p. iu.  Daily.  IcOLUAUUA & KOOTKNAY  1 llAllAVAV  llvOliKOii. Nukii.sp. Arrowhead,  Kcvelsl i)l;e, anil all point s cast  and west on (J.l'.li. main line.  Itobson, Trail anil I'ossland.  Ttolw.m, Cascade, Grand  Forks, I'luenix, tiroenwooii  mid Aiid way.  (Da ly except Sunday)  itobsoii, Trail and itossland,  (Daily oxcopt Sunday)  AHUIVI*:  10:10 p.m.  Daily  10:10 p.m.  Daily  10:10 p.m.  11:35 a.m.  I.KAVE  10 n. m.  SLOCAN niVJCtt RAILW'V  SJocan City, Silvurlon, Now  Iloavor. Three Forks, Sandon  (Daily except Sunday)  ARKIVB'  3:10; p. iii.  IF BROWN SOLD IT IT'S GOOD  PEARL GOODS  Tne Pearl h at pre'eit the most fashionab e gem in  "The Smart Set " and are always in good tast-;.  We are -showing some beautiful creations in brooches  and scarf pins combined wilh Opals and o'her ston��s.  Don't forget our wo'kshop for prompt and efficient ser-  vice. Watch repairing, jewelry ma^e to order, repaired or  remodeled, and   engraving.  BROWN BROTHERS  JEWELERS  LEAVK  I p. 111.  J p. IU.  KOOTENAY   LAKE    >'  STJOAAIUOATS-  Balfour,Pilot Hay, AinsworUi  Kaslo and all Way Landings.  (Daily except Sunday)  Lardo nnd all poinls on Die  Lardo * Trout Lake brunch  (Tuesdays, Tlmr.-idaytJ and  _ ��� _Sal.iiriliiyti.)  AUKIVB  11 tt. 111.  lin. m  GRBA.T NOKTHERN hYSTEM.  BAKffiRSTRERT  NELSON,   H. C.  A Beautiful Home  Dopot  ibjua.in  Muiiiil'ii  lil::illa.m  Daily.  I.KAVK  Kaslo  7 a in.  iNuImoii  ll:(H) I-. in  Daily  NELSON  &   FOItT  SII 101'-  i'Al'.D  JtAlljW'AV  Ymir, Salmo, Krio, U'uncla,  Norlhport, Itossland, (Juh illu  ii.nd Spokane.  Making'ihi-uiigli cornice'ions  at Hpokanc. lo tlio south,  cast and wost:  AICK1V10  r.opoi.  (i:l;"> p.m.  Aiount'in  .'>:.*>'') 11. in.  Daily  KOOTKNAY. LAKI1  STKAAJUOA'1'.S   .  Vtalfonr, IMlotllay, Aiiiswoiil  lia.do and all U ay Landings  .MiKIVK  Ktislo  :)::'ll 'p. m.  Nolson  iM.-.'ft'a.iu.  Daily  Mayor Fletcher and alderman Scions say  a power plant, Willi 1000 horse-power in-  slalloil, cannot ho Imill on Koolonay river  l'or Ih'j price estimated oy div engineer  Ali.-Cullocrli. Thoy may * bo right, hill as  neiUier on-j ol' lliom is an electrical export,  tlio cost uf proposed power plants in oilier  places may bo citoil. Tho I'lolso (U'lahoi  f-'talosman is tho authority l'or tho follow-  luy: "Tho iHiilo land hoard has oy'ivod on  u Ions.-.- lo II.. I,. 1-lollistcr of tho f>0 aoros  at She: hone Falls, whloh tho lossoo dosiri'd  for the purposo of eroding a power plant.  Mr. Holllsior has nsTeod to commonco  "work on the plant in the immediate future,  anil his plans aro ol' icltfantie proportions  and successfully carried out will prove of  irreat benefit to a vast territory. It is his  purposo to erect an elocti ie plant ol lil.OIW  horse-power and to cost SteS 000. The power  is to be used at lhe mines in the Hailey  Sold belt, which Is 50 miles distant from  whore the plant is to bo installed."  PEBSOJULS.  ��� D. AV. Moore of tlio Trail smelter is-Li  town. !  Neii Gething; of Slocan and J. F. "Holden  of the Tanuifiic mine near that town were  in Nols-uii last night.  IT. Iv. Livingstone of Robson was in Nel.son yesterday purchasing** supplies.,He says  Itobson may bo wiped oil* the map when the  railway bridge across the Columbia- is  thrown open for -tralllo. ��� *'���"  R. F. Green. M.P.l'., of Kaslo, was in  Nelson yesterday on business connected  Willi the trouble over oblaiuinji'setlleiiien^.s  for supplies sold the firm who haye the  contract for building the .Lardo & Trout  Like b'-anch of the 0. ;P. 11.  ���Frod'.XY. Burn left Nelson last nignt for  Fernie,,-where ho will have charge of l'.  Burns & C.'s branch at that place.''I'l is  the intention of lhe firm to put In cold storage at Fernie -ind make that town headquarters . for the firm's business in ISast  Kootenay. The Rood wishes of many people  in Nelson go with Fred to his-now home.  BUSINESS MENTION.  FOR RENT���On "Mill Street, three large  rooms, wilh use of bath. *flO. Apply or address Tribune office. "  .When at Brie, B.C, stop at the Mersey  Hotel. Mrs. M. Collins, proprietress.  Lost--A spring scale for an ice wagon.  Return to .Nelson Ice Company and get  ruv.'ard.- '  MERITS OF DISINFECTANTS  CITY AND: DISTRICT.  SuiVoriiiloiuleiit T.'ownie has left for.-'Vfin-  coi.iver, wiuii-e no will spend Iho Ulij-iKlinas  luilidi'.u.  If. V. McOcrinid of the Nelson Haw it  Planii.jV Mills, . loaves* Unlay lor. a -visit tb  Ilia homo in -Jlt'iiK'iri'y;. Oiilaiio.  C'.W. McAnii of Kaslo was in town yes  torduy. lie .says ihcre i--! nol much ox.IlO-  int'ML In Kaslo over Uiovapproaehiiig municipal oleclions liinl lhat there is'every reason lo believe lhat mayor 'JaVison wilt succeed himself.  There -wero five cars of ore in lhe train on  the N. it ���!'���. S. railway which was wroekod  last e^eiiiMr^ Mosl -of. the .contents were  sea tiered aiong the road, and as Iho ore  as in tho nature of concentrates from different mines it will, be r.ilhor <!:llicult l'or  ���i Iio * rail way company to say which waa  wliich.  The Jury Disagrees.  The hearing of llio case occupied the  whole of two days, and if was well on to  5 o'clock yesterday ' afternoon' when Ihe  jurors retired to.consider their verdict. In  liis charge to the 'juror.* judge Leamey  said: "You gentlemen-.ure - the 'Judges;'.'of  the question* of fact -in this case, as to the  questions of in.w you'have nothing lo do.  If any inio.stions of. law an.5o they will  have lo bo decided 'by Iho cou-'l. Ueforo  eiuerinfv upon .the consideration of the  facts, however, ii would be necessary ioi  the jurors lo disabuse their minds of the  tiuiiressioii that ihe -people oi:. me lo.mi  were divided *. l.nio.*.*. i Wo-camps, oiiu lor ilie  piaiiniii: ami oi'ie loi'rthe iiui'eiiiiani. 'I'lie.  iiu-is. .sliutuu be'weighed in a dispasaionaiO  A visit to our  vince you  that  Big- Show -Room's, jtist now will con-  we have all the requisites to make a  home beautiful.  ARTISTIC FURNITURE    LOVELY DRAPERIES  High-class goods, ihe newest designs, rich finish,  the very latest Novelties in odd pieces. Easy  Chairs, Rocking Chairs, Reception Chairs, Elegant  Parlor and   China Cabinets,  Desks,  Bookcases,  etc.  Beautiful Carpets, Oriental Rugs, Rich Curtains  No house in Nelson can show a finer display. We  tio the business. Why? Because we substantiate  nhat we say���we have thc goods and our PRICES  ARE RIGHT. *  A practice game was played at the curling rink yoslurday aflernoon botwoiai ritilc.s  '.skipped oy judge Korin and Hert Walley,  ��� and resnlied hi a win for lhe hitler by a  wcore of fi lo il. the rinks Wore m.uie as'as  follows. O Shea., Moor. .). l*\ Weir, an:l  juiigo-b'orin, and Swanncn, Clayton, riniyih,  and Walley.  Captain Gore left for.Kootonay Landing  yesterday, whore he Will look over the  work of dredging which lias been found necessary lor the utilization of the. steamer  slips* during (lie low stage of waler. lie  says if will probably require three w.oelcs  lo complete uie work which the company  has in hand uL-llie landing.  No word has yet bean received as to when  a start will lie iniide in the mutter of replacing the present bridge on tho. Columbia  & Kootenay branch over tlie Koolenay  rivor. Tho opinion is general that as soon  an the contract for the Columbia bridge at  Uoh.son i:-: completed the Koolenay bridge  will, receive -attention so thai a start could  bo mado ua early as possible.  Il, .Pr.   AI  |l\V. flan  unyan & Co.  the Boys  Haying added to my stock a large  range of Youth's Boy's and Children's  clothing, I am now prepared to offer  to the public' the best variety of these  goods ever shown in Nelson.  Everything Is new and up-to-date  and are selling at the very lowest prices.  Intending purchasers will do well to  examine ray stock and get prices before  purchasing elsewher.  '217 and 219 r; -  Baker S|^et  O dfc  rmslrong says Jiis suit against J.  rtline of Uossland is for'$50. lie says  he had an option on Ihe horses that Hurt-  line sold the cily fdr :the lire department,  find that he was to gat all* the' horses sold  for over .f'lf.O.��� As the'horses wero sold to  lhe cily for $500,. he claim's the differonre.  betwen tho selling price and tho prico of  his option. lie was not acting for-the city  in any way, more than calling the attention  of Iho citv oflicials to the horses in (iiies-  f.r.a. .*    ,** :  It Is a trifle strange that the only place  in tho inferior of British Columbia at  .which the Associated Press has a regular  correspondent is Rossland, a town which  is not a news center for anv large area ot  country. But the Assciafpcl i^re^s i-vm* no*  want reliable news from the interior of  British Columbia. Instead, it wants reports  lhat aro colored to suit certain corporate  interests, and Rossland is the one town in  the interior of British Columbia where reporters can be found who are. willing to do  anything lor money.  The .annual election of oflicers of the  Sons of England Benefit Society, Nelson'n  Ouecn Lodge 211, took place last night, and  resulted as follows: President, J. 1Y1. Lay;  vice-president, Eli Sulolifl'e; treasurer, S.  A. Kelly: sccrslary, I2dw.ini Macleod; ixs-  -dsla-'it Koeiet.-iry, .fames A. Newport, chaplain, Arthur VV. Blaney; first I committeeman. I1"1. Hawthorne; second committeeman.  Onslow Newling; third eommltteeman, A.  It. Sherwood; inner guard. Charles Hillyer:  outer guard. P.. V. Clarke; auditors and  finance Committee, .fames N. Davidson, and  Cr. S. Hawthorne; trustees. Thomas Morley and 13. A. Crease; lodge physician, Dr.  Hawkey.  The Lndif-a' Aid Socioty of the Presby-  'erlan church tendered Kev. Pr. Wright a.  farr-wol! r->copHnn a I. Uie cliurihil'i��<t night.  <"!nnli'.f!i D. C. McMorris oeouniwt Ihe chair  anil mad" otic of his noal/'st sp'oodies on  behalf of thn ladies of ihe scoiely. Tho  S'oung Pj}����***''\ SoHotv rf^^flPVChrlslian  Rndoiy-Kft1��*.    k��3^Vsp$E^?^ff v��reBonto.'l  ^0ir-.  .ni.',-.      yw'.>L'..ir(,: ��� ���.'.,,,.*.,���. .SfcV^fi   1i,\r__..    �����.*  the i:  w  manner   and   laken  !as   inoy .were   siaieo  l.om   ilie  witness   oox.   In   lhe   lirst   plu^u  there   had   becii  a great  deal 'of'-.c-vuioiiee  given' us   to: Uie. nierils*. of-.l-jrinalia *. anu  Kulphur,   but  il  appeared-io   him   thai   as  far as tho present case vvas concerned tlie  ���furors, had nolliiiig to do Willi  aeiLli.ir oiut  nor   tlie ; olher.   Tu  ids   miiul   il   would- u<-  Liimece.-isarny   bu'rilening   the   lay   nfiii.l   u.  rcipiiro   il   to   p:iss -on   ilie   respeciu'e   olh  ciepcy of tlie one as against the jiher. Tiu  evidence sumuiiled in the ease was about  evenly   divided  and   there  appea.ud   to   be  about  the same difference among -Hits' ex  perls as to Ihe merits of tlie one disinfeci  ant vwiili   the  oilier.   It. was  .sudieieiii  lor  llio jurors  to  knoW: that sulphur  was  regarded as a good-disinl'ectaiil, although  ii  migiiL have a. deleterious effect on ceilain  aiMicles. The only question that tlio .jurors  had   to  consider  was  one of carelessness.  VVlielher the manner in which the fumig.i-  tion in  question  was.done was  performed  in   a   careless   and   neglectful   manner   or  not. .When the jurors arrived at that .point  th.ey would have ,the solution of the whole  casu. As to. the fiiiosiion of law ha informed  'the jurors that iii .case, a person  was au-.  thorized  to do  certain  .���icts"and did  them  in   a   careless   and   negligent   manner   he  - wonld-he-ivspoiisibii'-foi���damages"*-If-!!!-"7"1  jurors   found   that.' carelessness   had   boon  shown  in  Ilie met hods pursued  by the defendant in (lie fumigation of the premises  he   though   k  should   also   be   taken   into  consideration (hut the plaintiffs wero men  who wore fn mil lar with  the action of sulphur,   and    having   this    knowledge   they  might have taken  some action  to  proven:  injury    lo    their   instruments;    The ���noun  then   submitted ..a   number   of   questions  which, as I hey wont to the jury, wero a;:  follows: Did the defendant* unlawfully outer and  trespass* upon the "premises of the  plaintiffs': Did Ihe defendant a-t in a crive:  less manner ih fumigating, and if so. what  iinir.'inl   of  damn go   was   suffered   by   the  plaintiffs   by   reason   of  such   carelessness*  ��������� I'.-gpirenro? In ^uboiittlng the questions  lo tho jurors his hanor remarked that the  jurors could bring in a general  verdict il  ii fell so inclined and not answer the questions, but he thought the answering of Iho  questions would assist them in arriving ur  th-ir   verdict.   XV.   A.   Macdonald.   for  th'  defendant, llion submitted a couple of qiios  lion's,   which   he  asked   the  court   to  sub.  mil   lo   Iho  jury.   Tho   court   refused   tlie  lirst   question,   wliich   was   not   read',   hut  agreed   to  submit  the second,  which  rend  ns follows: Coiild the plaintiffs by the exercise of ordinary precaution and care have  avoided the damages complained of?  Witli respect to tlio last question, the  Jurors, through their foreman; John Prns-jr.  linked for enlightenment What they wanted to know was whether the reasonable  precaution applied to the time prior to the  fumigation or to Iho-period following the  fumigation. In reply to this the court.ro-  marked that the question would probably  apply as to who!her the plaintiffs should  have taken (heir instruments out. 'or  whether lliev should have f.aken immediate precautions after tho fumigations to  have cleaned thorn. ,  The jurors wore then locked up and the  court adjourned until S o'clock.  Thn jury in the case of Hair vs. LaBau  failed to agree after having been out for  three hours last evening. After the-jurors'  were out for-about three hours they were  brought in nnd his honor judge .Learney  asked them if I hero was no prospect of  tlieir arriving nt a. verdict. John Fraser.  as foreman, speaking for tho jurors said  ihcre was no prosoeot for a. verdict. Judge  Leamev (hen said (here was nothing left  for him lo do but to discharge the jury,  v/Jiieh he nccordlnglv did. This leaves the  matter again just where it was when the  case was first started and th" costs now  more I han treble the amount of tlie damago  alleged to have been done.  The date for the new trial was fixed for  Tuesday, January 20th.  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  ���jj.  to  ik  to  to  ESTABLISHED 1892  Portland Cement  Fire Brick  Fire Clay-  Sheet Iron  T Rails  Ore Cars  Blowers  Exhausters  Pumps  Graniteware  "Tinware  HARDWARE AND IRON MERCHANTS  HEATING STOVES  COOKING STOVES  AND  RANGES  ������ST  to  1 ���<*������*��:  :* NELSON, B.C.  STORES AT  KASLO, BwC.  SANDON, B.C.  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  to  *---to.  to  to  to  to  to  So saith thc Customs Officer  to the United States Shoe.  " Cut away a yard or two of  value,   before   you   cross   our  border! "  Canadians who buy United States Shoes, merely  because they are not made in Canada, are thus fined  25% for their lack of perception and patriotism.  The Canadian made " Slater Shoe " is sold in  Newfoundland, Bermuda, England and France, in  even competition with United States Shoes.  It is sold in Canada at 25% less than any  United States Shoes can be imported.  Note and investigate these prices:  The  "Humanic"  Shoe'retails in  the ��  United, States       -        -      -      $4.00  In Canada     - - $5.00  _^^The^World^Known^-U.S.-pr-ice-$2.50^   In Canada -  " Queen Quality " U. S. price  In Canada - -        -  U.S.  " Sorosis "  In Canada  price  $3.50  $3.00  $3.75  $3.50  $4.50  i  ri.  ^1  r  Are you working for the Custom House ?  Money can't buy better shoes for the price, anywhere on earth, than those which are stamped on thc  sole with the Makers' valuation, in a slate frame  t^P*      lAT*      t00  dXzt Shoe "  ^r^^mM^iB^wzsHmmkYmSi.  <sr��  V  Curling Games Last Nifclit  The second game of thc series between  lhe president's and vice-president's rinks  was played at the skating rink last night,  am] was won hy th' link skipped by "Jack"  Rae. the veteran. This win places the vice-  president's side 10 points in the lead, but  as eight eames still remain to bo played,  there may be a fall beforo the final result   is' announced.   The  rinks  were:  ���Viee-p-e.sl.lpij:'��-*"'. "M.-- Ilrydges. J-tarry  Iteus'or .'.'. O. ' npbell, nnd .John Rae  (rH:0-l  I'resid   V Davison.  James  Nee-  lanrls.   7'-.  j.   Niamey  and  I<\  A;  Tamblyn  (skiiO-10.  ROYAL SHOE STORE  Aberdeen, Block Nelson, B.C.  L.  GODBOLT  (Successor to Lillie Brothers).  NOTICE  TO OUR CUSTOMERS:  Owing to our large losses on collection.-?  during the past year and determining to  treat all alike hereafter, we have instructed  our driver.? to allow no credit on and after  January 1st, 11)02. Hoping you will recognize the justness of tho change, wc remain,  your obedient servants,  KOOTBNAV STEAM LAUNDRY.  Nelson, Dcceinl-ipr 17tli, 1901,  TELEPHONE 39.  P. O. BOX 627.  Planing Mills  CHARLES HILLYER, President. HARRY HOUSTON, Secretary.  ITavo just l oceived :i,000,0 feefc of logs from Idaho, and wo are prepared to out tho largest bill  o( timber of any dimensions orlengthe. Kstiniaies given at any time. The largest stock of sash,  doors, and mouldings in Kootenay.  COAST LUMBER OF ALL KINDS Ol* HAND  I PFFICK AND YABJDSl   CORNER HALL AND FBONT HTBJSmeL^-7 _

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