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Revelstoke Herald Dec 24, 1902

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 (fJfl*A>  r~  ������  VEL  ^zetid  /  ���������  f- f -���������**-, I  ���������*������������������ !'r;i  *-*������*���������*  *���������'<���������*-'���������  RAILWAY    MEN'SJOURNAL.  ,   Vol    V.'.No"  168  REVELSTOKE B.C.   WEDNESDAY,   DECEMBER 24\ 1902  $2 OO a Year in Advance.'  -*     v.-*-* ,*���������; ���������  - *���������   r* ���������������   ���������  ������������������,-������,  .-5*  1,  V  1.  1  f  <  ���������n  *-(j.^   (  t,   -_  * -  i  '. r  /���������  3  j  '       *  It -.'  5  -*?  St-.  1902 1902  Christmas  A NOT HER'.YEAR IS JUST ABOUT AT A CLOSE  -and it ^terminates  one of the   busiest years jn the  history of Our Firm. We can look back with marked  , appreciation���������not on our own merits���������but to our numerous  h customers,   both'far and near,'-for their-past .patronage,  hoping <to be able to merit the game for the coming year,  ' l9������o*"  -We extend our Heartiest wishes for --l   -  *���������-  AND. A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR  r*\_  TO ONE AMD ALL.  v * "ft* ���������> -���������    *     * *"��������� ���������> ' *���������  1 * i".  ���������c -���������  it  C*    .'  *-.*���������*��������� j������  Cl-S-.C-r^  THE SCHOOL  EXAMINATIONS  gg  ���������i    .   < ���������-.   *i  ��������� -��������� -^"S--r*-.-ji-  -tf*-    -c*^���������. i*. *���������  t     -  p -  ^r- *-_  y*VWe-?areCparlicularty  'A stronj-Kon' the'-follow-  **ving'lines : *-_*.--���������',    -    *  -". *���������*���������.  Ladies* .and Gents ,Silk'Um-   ' i*  ,   .-.brellas'"fi-oiu.'...-. $1.50 to $o.00*  .'   "-*   -     *���������----, -  ��������� '/���������"< t  'Ladies'    Silk. Handkerchiefs1 r -.  y~, .'*. _..:*.25c, to $1.00;  ������������"''������������������.-- ,    " -T  -��������� Ladies', Fancy - Embroidered'" ���������  *-<'" Handheiehiefs.l"    "     loc to 50c v  **���������"- f*r .^fT.-'i ���������".,--.  "���������-Ladies' novelties in Silk Belts %  -���������   . "\ .-..--.:'. A .".���������...- $1.25~and $1.50..  y   ^ < <    "*���������- ���������*"���������'-  - Alexandrian   Belt and Sash"       '  i -_���������, Clasps: ' 50c each  t *"*-���������-   *      ^ ,       ii'-    -*-*.  - "Ladies' -Lined-, Kid     Gloves ���������, * -  - * from.*. '...$1.25 Lo$2.00"  ,*--*"-*    -���������    -S.    *-      ��������������� -*" *  ^ -   jl* * **        *   i -' .,    -1- *,->*������������������������������������.���������;������������������  Ladies' Silk Ties,"up-to-date    w fc  '-"from :;.... \.. 35c to $1.001  ���������fa*   ���������*-.*'      *^ -     "*'      .     .--������.*"    "^ " -  ' Ladies' - Black  >' ChiifonTies".  .      -          ^ - -  Children's ^Imilation'Grey- > *  Lamb.Gauntlets.r .90-;. up  ������.���������'--1 "."*"  and"-'Cream' "'   '  ;...' :.$1.00 each.  ,',. .Children's Silk Handkerchiefs  - ...."   .:*..-*..:. ,-r*."'. . .10c. rip,  j,--^"^--"-.,-}*-;,'. '-*-' ������������������-    ' ��������� T-  ' -Gents'.'Fancy Col'd Satin and    .  ^L.,Silk Biaces(iuboxes)75c to $2.  ff;-.-^K.^.*-^ :-.v-y --L  ���������*- Gent's-Soft*.Mocha'and Kid-  '-*- . Gloves, silk and .wool Jined.   u  <^-: J-.'..-.-..'.... fronr$l'.50 to $2.50 *  "** **���������-���������*-{. :   ' '-   *----- t *;'  ���������  v'Gents'"Silk  Scarfs-'tox'wear.  ,,-"  -. "  under^Ovei-coat and .Gents'  ''* Silk Ties, "Perbys, Flowing-^ -  ���������"���������>. --Ends'from.-- > .-...25c"to $1.00",  '.-"v ." -*v*-, ^������.  :.,-">-  C'Table'-Napkins 'from-;-.1   .*��������� -    '-TV.-. :v.'.".-."'.*r.$1.75'to'$0.00.-  - '*���������-���������" ,C'-..-*-i-~**i ir"*"'' l     -j-'- -  ���������-    *  ������'"V"--*4    ^ /** *;  ^     *��������� ****** *^ ^, **   ^-*.       *.    j-     ���������    ^r*  ''Bleached  Table'-"Linen.   *. j "-  - '- 7. TA.-A .y...'... "f.oOc to $1.35  . ^ i - ,-ri~-        r     -       1*1      i    "    1  Japanese Bugs  It-      ������������������'       -,,-v  ._*"     ���������*  Tapestry Bugs..  ..^.L....$1.30  J.75c to $9.00  - -, -i  CHINA DEPARTMENT  i^'.OTTBiBTO'CK'OF'CHItisfMAS CHINAWABE'far surpasses in  "*-*.' extent^variety and completeness anything we have ever shown:  ti  xv  fj  China'Dinner Setts .'. /.!. .-.$12 00  y China Tea setts/.. .$4 50 to $14 00  -"China Toilet* Setts.$3 00 to $10 00-  China 5 o'clock'Tea Setts with  Trayr..^..-. ���������..-**-.......  .$6 00^  ' China i3-Piece Fruit Sett *:..$2 00-  - China Porridge Sett .'. .50c "to 60c*  ,China Plate, Cup and Saucer  ;     Setts>.{.'...- .*.. ..50c to,75c^  ' China Cream and Sugar'Setts "**i*J  y ;.-..'.".:.....'. :... 60c to 75c  Colored China. Cups and Sau- --  -^   cers.'."...'....' '... .15c to 25c t  j Larger.' ��������� Chinas Cups    and      I  ���������y,-,-Saucers... -.." ,.... 20 to 75c  -'-Fancy'-Colored Shaving Cups * -*������������������  -j-*" *������-���������"      --j>~-, -     -   .9ar tn SSe-  *   ���������������������������*���������*������������������.���������'������������������>���������>���������������>���������-���������*'������������������-���������*.������������������ .������M\j,   li\J *LKlt- ^  Fancy Colored? China Mous- ' - *  r tache^Cups... Ay.........40c up  Fancy ��������� Colored China ' Salad  ..Bowls"...    .j .60c to $2 00  Boyal Crown JJerby Cups and   *  "^Saucersr"."..;'-... V'."*.$3 OOeach-1-  Royal  Crown  Derby  Plates   ' .  ..: $300 each  Limoges Tea Setts (40 pieces)  .     ." , ....$10 00  Limoges Assorted Pieces    .,  *. ---jfrom...-. A..K..$1.25 to $7 50  China Jatdinieies ~ 75c tO 2 50  China Biscuit Jais ... :....$1 25  China Cocoa'jugs.. .$1 OOto $3 00  China Bread and ButterJPlates j-  '' ..... :���������. .$2 00 to $3 50 per dozen   B  Japanese Fancy Vases :'. ,\7  ?- ��������� .;���������., 50c to $3 00  "Japanese Trays, 50c to $2 00  Nickel Plated.Tiays *. 40c to $1 00  The Public School Closed for  thev Holidays on Friday.Last  ���������An   Excellent   Programme  Rendered by 'the Children    " v  ** i  Tin- public school,' closed for the  Cliii->lii..is holidays on Fiiday last with  an I'XcelU-iit pi������gilimine tendered by  the childien. The L-xaininrllion ofthe  pupil*, wns concluded early-nnd the  i-losing e-tpuises under _*,he diiectioil  of Puticip.il Wilson, commenced at 11  ������������������'���������.Un'kr There was a laige turnout of  pau-nts ami friend*.'of - the childien  'which liiust have been veiy gratifying  lo the Piiucipal and his stuff. The  proginiiiiiie iendeied by the childien  whs veiy interesting und instructive.  The' di ills were pat ticularly'good and  showed ca'ioful training...The Herald  will not Darliculaiize as the-.entite  piogr.imiuu was most creditable in  eveiy respec*, and consisUd of the  following niiinbei--.: ^      " '  bong by School "A Song lor All tlie Britons"  Recitation .     ..        .   I\an Sutherland  Stick Drill Boys ol Mias "Dent's room  The Snow Brigade Bo>s of Mis* Grant's room  Song���������"A Lament Ior Summer" '. enlor Girls  Drill   . . Girls oIMisi Smltb'd room  S ng by School .. "Ralljiug Round the l"lag"  Dumb Bells . , Girls of Misb Fraser's room  Mother Goobe     .Boj s and girls ol Miss Grant's  . .-     r ..     . . room  Song���������"Beautiful Kl\er".. *. ' Senior Girls  Dialogue        ' GlrU of Miss Dent's room  MalORue . Bo-<��������� of Miss Robinion's room  Song b> School .     .',. .'"The Maple Leaf  Drill ~ . - .Bojsof Miss Smith's room  Dialogue A.' .Boss ot Mlas Fraser's room  - xT." "GoVsave the Kino "       ** -    '-���������  ... .}---*. -* "*J*V ^,  . During the ".rendeiing vof 'the"pto  gramme the children of ���������Miss Rubin-  son'������ division - piese*hl*\l "'her with,.a  handsonie/gift a.s\a token' of^-their  appreciation'of her."work during'the  lei m. to which Miss Robinson suitably  teplied.'       '       "       *'    ���������. -\  '���������    -"   *        i,     PROMOTIONF.*''   .  ' Fioni -Division HI. to Division ll.-j-  Elsie/ Hriol eyY * Ed -Ta*" Bi lite��������� TKtiriis  P.iuick.'Ethel   Blackberg, Hairy  Mc  Nab,   Nellie- Robinson,' Rosie-Malch.  - i  'Hauy Dunne.      ,,   .  Division III��������� Fionri Jr. Second to  ,Sr Second:���������Geoige-Woolsey, George  ���������Blake, David Mitiuiie,, Albeit Abrahanison,- John* Gallicauo, Albeit Anderson, Oliver Ainslie, Sandy McRae,  Meile Calder, I. iwrence .Shaw^John  McRuiy, Emilia AUan, Zelia Biaul J  Mamie Fleming** Mai joiie Bourne'.  ..Fiom Sr. Second to Thiiil:-Mary  Bonlay, t' Doiis Bennet, M. Dunne,  Emma Moiga'n,* Biuce Caldei, 'Erie  Coursier, Esther Floyd, WiUie.Galll-  cuio] Ralph'Bell,-Kathleen Andprson,  Ethel Beam," Rheta"Johiison���������Dniic-an  Kennedy, Aubrey Doyle, Eiuest McMahon," Frances Lawson.  -No piomotions in the other rooms.  Division III. was too large in com-  pctison with fhe others and had to be  teclastified.  Instructions   having   been  received  by Pnncipal .Wilson fiom the.Depait*  for new lines which will open up  ten Hoi y heretofore closed to settlers.  That is to say,.the C. P. R. iu about to  ptovide facilities in tegic-ns hitheilo  untouched with this object in view���������  to meet the demands of intending  settlers.  Theie aie va������t bt retches of country  yet to be settled quite upmt fiuin the  loute * which has lieen chosen by the  Giand T.iunk, and the object of the  6. J?., R: 'is to induce settlement by  providing in advance just what the  settlers need.  Curling.  In the semi-final of the green curlers  competition" Kincaid defeated Holten  13 to 8.' ; "i '      ���������}    "     -  The" opening game in the Equitable  Life Cup ion-petition \sjs played  Siitm day evening between Blown and  Pinkham, ^resulting in favor of the  foi mer.., The.tollowing weie the rinks:  Walker *;*>, " Douglas  Jackson    C ~ r Rose  Coghlan ' *-. ^ " ^Edwa'ds  Biown, skip IT -' Pinkham, skip-2  , A match/is-.being -ariatiged for  Christmas ..moi ning, Scotland vs. Canada. ''-'iSeotland will he repiesented by  K7~A'.-'Brown, Di'. Catiutheis, W. M.  Lawrence, D. M. Rae.  . .   ;, -l.:o. l. ,  At the last meeting of L O. L. No.  1058. held on.���������Fi iday" evening,, the  following offlceis' were' elected'for the  ensuing 'tein^'V-E. Adair,-, W-M ; A.  Johnf-on.-P.^ftl.; Jas. Smiley, D M.: W.  Johnson, Rec. Secy.; Rev. W. C. Calder," Chaplain; Thos. Steed,' Fin. Secy,  mid .Treas.'j-yW.'.Brock, -Lectuiei: J:  Shaw,, Directoi'"*"of r Cei'emonies; H.  Sashaw'.-I^Gf-^M.sHouse, O G: -At the  next" iegiilaVj! meeting'.oil Jan. 16th,  1903, tlie~installiiti"on _of officers' will  tjk'e place - antl a large "attendance of  mc-mbeis is reqnested.* ,      ,      s "  i OUR GROCERY UBT  -.-.-"Away-biCtk���������-Ten-years''or more ago���������we planted a Grocorj-De- ' -  partment in .Our Store. -Like many other things that are likely  to grow big, it began to take root among the ideas of a big lot of  ..Customers,'and its'been the greatest possible pleasure to us to see  \\   thait Department <&pand and grow. "We are selling more GROC-'    '  '   ERIES^ better GROCERIES, hfgher'class GROCERIES.no-w than  .* "ever before.-'People seem_to think it" is woith something to get  ,  everything they.bny, guaranteed to be wdrth-.every cent we ask  "'-'for them, and if not, to be fully recompensed. * "  "  ~J" '      Jj   ' ���������   ,���������     :' I   -. <" '..-.-*���������--* . .  *,rArrivals this week in Our "Grocery"Department suitable for  -���������- Christmas Trade."*"'; Washed New Seed Raisins, New Carrants,  '   'Fancy, Crystalized* Orange,-.Lemon^and "Citron Peel, Japanese  ~   OrangeSjtjxCaHfo'roia Oranges,  Fattcy* Evaporated Apricots aud   .  .��������� ^Peaches, .Cranberries, Fresh FigsVand-Dates, Spanish ��������� Grapes, ,,  t <..London Layer Raisins,*'Sweet' Sliced Mango Chutney, Biscuits, ' ,  - Fruit Cake, Iced AJuioad, Cake and Plum Pudding.  G.  Hume  arid Company.  Goods delivered to all parts of City.,    Telephone No.*-8i  ment nf Education, not to rank pupil  nor to publish any 'results except  promotions, no class repoits are given  this mouth.  *   A Good-Gold'Proposition.  " RIe8gis..T.iyliih,Bros. & Georgpiclaim  to have" the best -gold- proposition *jn  the countiy.-. The claim is-exhibited  iu one ot -their windows,and consists  ot a locked box containg. $20 in gold.  Wilh every $2 t.ish..purchase is given  a key wah -which ithe purchaser hau  the privilege of trying, to unlock the  box containing'������the,*gold. Only"one  key will open thelbox and the gold  belongs (1to the persou who holds the  lucky key. * On New Yeai's Eve those'  holding keys will have an' oppoituuity  ot trying them,   ,*  ���������What is home, without a Singer, H������  Manning, agent." ���������    -     -   -  WILL KEEP  The   Fred   Robinson   Lumber  Company are Making Improve-  . ments to Their Steamers and  Building an Ice Scow.  The Fred Robinson Lumber Co. aie  making extensive improvements to  their steamers "Archer" and "Lardeau'-  for the purposes of winter traffic over  the Arm. The Lai deau is now on the  ways receiving a thorough overhauling, and when she is finished- the  Archer will undergo repairs and alterations. "It is the intention of the com  pany to keep the Arm open this season.  They have just constmcted.a large ice  scow   that  will   be 'used   to  keep  a  cl i an nei through the ice. The travelling puhlic into the Lardeau country  can rest assuied that they will be ible  to imiku the trip to Comaplix and  Beaton by the steamers from Arrowhead eveiy..day on time. The manager,  Mr Robinson, has determined to give  prompt service as ovidanced by the  action he has taken to provide for  emeigeticies. ,  '   School for Goldfields     -  The citizens of Goldfields held a  puhlic meeting last week in connection  with school matters. The meeting  decided to "go ahead with thn const ruction'of the schcol building, and ������  petition for a school teachei- will be  foiwaidedto the Education Department. . . '  --  ���������This Chtistiuas is going to ha a lively  one. Sue that yon do not forget youi  oider to the Revelstoke Wine& Spirit  Oo. -    , ,  &J&r MerryChristmas  4- ���������"-.-''       Jo One qnci JUL  &  Once more as the second-year of the  twentieth century^ draws to a close jt  becomes ���������the Hekat.u'8 pleasing task  to*.ex'pi-ess 'the -best wishes -of the  season'to all its patrons and readers  who^constitute'so- large a proportion  pf the total population of this city and_  "district. The yeais pabs by rapidly.to  be sure. It seems but yesteiday  since the Christmas of 1901 was being  celebiated in Revelstoke. with Christ-;  mas gifts, and * Christmas carols; since  our children weie dreaming, of Sai-ta  Claus andc all his treasures; since the  bVl old" story - of -Bethlehem, was^being"  told 'in'1 tho'uaands^ of \ churches ,and  homes,, since family gatherings without number*, hailed Christinas as the  grandest day of all the*year and since  multitudes on the last ev'e^of this great  Christmas festival,- raised their song  of gladness, with'" which, was mingled  the-hope"- that "thus- they,would] all  meet in coming years. And so from  east to west as- the day is born the  sound of.praise wjll be caught up by  people'of every tongue, and all round  the world the' familiar Chiistmas  hymns and carols will be_beard in our  own English speech, and men buildiug  up the great Empire, whether amid  the .snows /of Canada,' by * the,"fever  haunted livers of South Africa, or  among the broad pastures'of Australia  now ,withering in .the midsummer  lieatf will'tliink of the old'i-oine'and  the "old Christinas ways, and keep the  season .as near"* as .possible after the*  familiar fashion of the race. Here :n  Revelstoke, where "men 'ofthe same  indomitable stock, are building up, as  they hope.'a great centre"of commerce  in a land destined. tq.-he the greatest  mining pountry in;the Empire, we too  shall set" lip "out Christmas trees'^aiid  decoiate oiir houses with green boughs  and hblly^and mistletoe,~all emblems  of the primitive nature worship of-thie  race, and. keep Christmas as well as  our brethren the wide world over with  joy and thankfulness'with confidence  jn the future based on progress in the  'past, rejoicing, as is. the way of J the  race, to preserve our 'old customs  among new surroundings. .'After a  year of unexampled development and  with the brightest prsspects for those  to come, Revelstoke can with good  heart take its Christmas holiday and  it is with every feeling of congratulation that the Herald wishes"' its  subscribers and patrons* "A Merry  Christmas." -   , -  ���������aid &^oujpg^  Christmas Tree Entertainment.  v A laige number of friends of the  Methodist Sabbath School assembled  at the chuich Monday,evening,--at the  annual Christmas Tiee entertainment.  An excellent progi amme of choruses  and recitations^ was rendered by the  children and weie much enjoyed by  those present. After the progi amme  tbe heavily laden Christmas trees  were stripped *"and the hearts of the  little ones gladdened by presents from  the Sunday sc'hool and friends, includ  ing nags of fruit' and ~candy. Tht-  church was, beautifully detoiated' for  the occasion. ;      .'  ta  ' ���������   * -i      ~ *   -  Plans of C.-P.-R. for 1903. -  The plans of the C. P. R. for next  year aro most cotnpiehensi-re. They  include double tracking.'tbe building  of a number of new lines west of  Winnipeg, and a scheme of irtigation  which will reclaim two and a half  million acres of land between Calgary  and Medicine Hat, a scheme which has  been thought out for some time past  and which will be cairied into effect  just as soon as the plans aie approved  by the executive. '  In the scheme of irrigation the water  will be taken from the Bow river, and  it is calculated that it will take tht ee  dollars per acre to turn this watsr  upon the land, which is otherwise  admirable in qualit"*-', and which needs  this application to make it profitable.  The plans, which  were submitted to  the  executive   by, William ' Whyte,  I assistant to   thc   president, and J. G.  Griffin,  land   commissioner,  provide  Wish  Their  Many  Patrons  I December)  At  This  Festive  ��������� - j,  i  Season  -A  'Xmas  We  Also  Extend  ���������  to all  IthursdayI  Our Customers  A Bright,  Prosperous,  and  H appy N ew Year  LATEST NEWS  BY TELEGRAPH  AA\'~;  ������������������*���������-'���������-. 4*, I  *��������� ������������������.yr.-'v -1  y   .������������������������������������������  *<V*S'  v&  "''I  j ���������*        "*H  *���������" V   *** I  , *.&<k -*.-";- L  ���������-      " " -c-:-^  The News ofthe World ia" Bftet-v;^; Jl!  As Received Over the Wte������}^^  From'Every Corner of the* '''*.r.*5  Globe.      *    "* '"   yy.'fM  The -British cruiser. PallM, now at --^^'C*?jl  Halifax, has been. ordered toVen**** ,^'*^"*<|  znela. "' - '   .    -        --"''  '"r..   '?$$������$  Former. U. S. Senator 8������Wn*Jieii" ;������;;5*J*|  -juddenly of heart failure ymfagfavjX-i-J^i^Z.  morning  at  the   Auditorium, ItoUl,~'tJir&%k.  Chicago:'       ^   r*Av������' 'r"'4^t-������!  . New York and Chicago OT"pWi*-JlitoV^'*l>:.������  have joined forces to launch lnOU(-*i*f**r* V^^-jS  an   underground    railway    tt>    -mat'" ������y^f$������\  .���������555,000,000. .  .   : - ���������-   \ .<.>-��������� V -J  "- * i'i ^LL j-".,*.-:^";  Butter Uh factorj- A-ndvnttmhwiMtm'mty^''~J*r.''  the Escanaba Woodemntri 'Oa.l.'tt 0?*^=---*-,  Escanab.i was burned laat* Bight, too^'''','A5������il  8i5o",ooo."     ,   ' "       -1-; ���������-��������� V. Cf^'ii^:  ' It.- is   estimated that or** -tOOOEir*** ^V^?i  were lost in the recent eiic*-tlt������*iuiiki^^":-^yfti  -ABkahad," Turkestan.     AlpuAj1 JBO^-^-Xj^!  bodi-M-have been found.  *V,CV- -*'-" ^-rr^K  '   < }-. i.    - '    ,yv*J^5jJi  Crown Princess of, Saxony hMbeta^^J^g^:s,  located at Geneva, Switzmrhf^'.iuaiur^^^Jfgl  an assumed'name. "Her brother niklT^������-h^*^i|  Prof." Giron are at the lamehotel. j? -TM?4-S;f|'  Most Rev. Frederick Temple, Are6f-?<siX&-^S:.  bishop of Canterbury and Prim*������Wof j'-'vs'*-*?  all England is dead. The funaral ���������urill'" ������j**f���������*  lake place on Saturday at noon froni" -��������� A--'--  Canterbury Cathedral*    "       -'"'- \ - Ac  *** - '* -     - \   . .-  t    ���������*-,*"**aS  Jeffries' manager. has posted"91000 V4; f*^^  which he will pav 'Monro if he can st*yv Syv^,  four rounds'-with-Jeflfries - in m beetle l^'&S,^-  for a knock out. Munro is/ tta*.*fi������������nv"s"?'f^?***:  who nearly.'puC Jeffries "-out' In the *^;---?|B5"'  fourth round at Butte.Mont:, Ttcentt-ft'^-y^'g^l  - An important and lengthy commdni-7*$ rJlffifey  cation.-"dealing*.withjBritish'vie--|-������"OiL^-;,iw4,'i*s  arbitration" of - Venezuelan". dimm^m;^yi<y-'' fxd  waa made by Foreign; SecreUry lMna-7 -*< "^"5"J*r  downe.to 'U.\S^Charge d' Affturs, Mr.* ^ >Vl ^a  .White", last-evening, and-"transmltt������d *.ry#5-������i^  Imn^i...!., ������... -wr*.*:u:���������.���������  .- f,      '*?-V!S-"5S'  ���������*i-**3tj  ti "��������� * ."^���������-���������1  .* * i**i  :mm\  .White, last;evening, and- transmltt������d .rv"-#*r^ii>]  immediately to .Washington.*. ���������,,   ** .���������"?,'?l3  .;v;."c-'.ii isms* *.*-".*. '--' ���������'  v .-.'V-'^a  -   - ��������� *��������� "*   - *���������'    ' k't.-.jL-  Jt'iUvt.  ������������������?iv -** 'StfV&r-'&Si -:y> -1   --*. WT^^rM&l  PATTERSOHe  y %; IIS ELECTED  . ��������� -    -j -. .   *>. ^. "��������� ^ *   -_   ���������  The Opposition Candidate Wl88^  ��������� in   North;;Victoria- byJFottjzi  Three of a -Majority."   .  ;'  "--  Vic-*t*ORiA,1B.jb., Dec.,2*.-^Tbebyti/  election in North yictorin yesterday r  resulted in the election of Pattewoa"' <  by 43 of a majority over Robe-*t*ibm the," 5  government candidate,   y - *    '' ll^~  ��������� < ���������  > ^  Dealers in   \  FIRST-CUSS  ..o Hilary's  *.' fipas/Stoyes  piiwiire, (ritewire  Blieiifyai  zi    %"���������   '-.-'\.    *-;,..       .    -���������  ^Slielf Hardware  ^Stores at  Revelstoke  Nakusp  ;  New Denver.  *   *^*I  ������������������'  -CM*I  ' -*������v 1  ���������"������-'*-"51  ^ ^"^ 'r  S.-J* */f-1  "tt.A -*'"-*iI  '"  '   ?$??  -���������'-ftur.'i  tr -������*-;^1  !  *~~t"^i''*'/it I  ��������� ���������������������������-*������-?i|  , ���������   ���������*.-. 1  r  - - /-4.-V.  <  *���������*������"'*  -j-Js-1  i'y'^  l-.'-a.X-'f I  ���������:i -. -**'���������-!  ' ��������� ���������;���������*���������������  *->j' iTyp x .*������&-���������������*.-���������"���������- i* <.rvj.t&f ."^- ** *���������-  7i*WSriW-*'*,''-****ii-.A .-* (, i ���������VCKtC1"**- .!"������"      ���������"  ^c������ilttof,c l-ftfalil and ^nilujau  lien's journal.  I'libliabccl By  The  Revelstoke Herald Publishing Co  Limited Liability.  A. JOHNSON,  Editor ami Malinger.  ADVERTISING KATES.  Di������pUv ad~.,"l.iO per inch; -.ingle, polu-nn,  "J per Inch when inserted on liilc i������n-;c-  Legal ads.. 10 cents per ineli (nonpnricl) line  Inr fir������t In-u-rtlon; 6 conii for enc-li additional  In-erlion. I.ucnl nonet:-, lucent" per line each  l.'ue. Birtb, Marriage and Death Notices  free.  S".'BSCP.I"TIO.S";itATl*S.  Et mall or carrier *S" per annum; $1.25 Ior  -.lx iiic-nth-, strictly in ail'.aneo.  OUR JOH  nr*P.-!!TMI.ST.  Isoue of the be"t equipped prim I ni? office*, in  'be Weal and prepared to execute all kind*, of  fiiiming fn llritelass style nt lionet price.  Oue price io all. No job too large���������none loo  M-jall ��������� Joru*. Mail order*, promptly atiended  to.   Ghe us a trial on yourne.M order.  TO COBBEoI-OSHK.NTU.  We invite correspondence! on any subject  o' iutere-,1 io the general public. In all cii-.es  the bona nde name of tbe writer nii.sl accom-  panv manuscript, but not necessnrilj for  publtcaiiuti.  Addrets all communications to the Manager  nf   the   Gliienc-o   Trilitine, there  were  10.0.52   in   ISO;!, und   only o22T> in 1S00.  HuLllic- niiiiibu)'  nf dual lis by railvond  .iccidc-nt*.   increases     nnniially.      The  figures for  1000   were  7S0.5 killed, and  50,:i20 injured.    The number of Jlrili&h  soldiers who  li-.*>fc their lives in Smith  Al'iica   is  iilmo-*t  exactly  the mhiic-in-  the   number   ol    pel sons  killed in lht  bitme space   of   lime   (three  j ears) on  out-  railroads.     "We   are loo careless,  too   iiulilTerent, not   only   in the waive run railroads, hut  in most mattei s-  .that   involve   the h.i/..trd of   aeeidei-t.  Take,   the   liruworks   explosion on tin  nit-lit  of  election   day.    "What  a pro  pohLerou.*.   accident!      Thirteen    dead  ai.tl fifty hurt   because fireworks weie  carelessly handled.���������Harper's Weekly.  \  LEGAL  .   K MA..STKI' A: SCO'IT.  Hamsters -"Olici'ori, lCto.  Kevelsioke, 11. C.  I.M.Scott,1I.A..LUM.   W.du .'.leMuiatre, M.A  H  NOTICE TO COBBEbl-OXDESTtj.  1. ���������All correspondence must be legiblj  written on one side of tlie paper only.  2.���������Correspondence containing personal  mailer must be signed with the proper name  ot the writer.  Thursday. Dkokmiiku IS. 11)02.  AUVEY, M'CARTE'*. A* I'lNKII AM  Iiarrlslcrs. Solicitors, Ktc.  Solicitors for Imperial Bank ol Canada.  Company muds to loan ac8 percent,  l'nisr **fiu*i'T. lte\elstoke IJ. C.  SOCIETIES.  1  C.P.R. Employes Get More Pay  Two thousand employes of the C. P.  R. company, coinpri.Mii'* all their conductor**, trainmen ai.d yardmen, easl  of Foit' "William, weie f-i,uiU-il an  inciease in waj-es. The advances reach  well up to 15 per cent. The increase.--  were f-ianted ny the cuinp.iiiy, nflei  negotiations covering a period of ovei  six weeks wilh a joint committee o.| j  the Order of Railway Condurlois and  the Brotherhood of Railioad Tiain  men.  Passenger conductors north of Lake  Snpetior will receive S125 a mrinlli instead of $10S. On lilies east of the lake  the increase is from .$300 a month lo  SllO.-md $115. Passenger conductois  on braiic.li lines will he paid $00 instead^  of SSOa month. Tluough fielirht conductors, who were paid $2.75 per hundred miles, will receive $2 00. Through  freight biakeinen aie increased eight  cents per hundred mile;*! making the  rate S1.05. The increase on way  ..freight trains'is about 10 pel cent., all  round.  Baggagemen receive an S per cent,  advance in their wages, which will  range from $5S to $70 a month: Yaid-  men's wages are advanced about 15 pet-  cent., making them the best paid in  Eastern Canada. The men in large  yards will receive 25 cents an hour and  others 21 cents. In the smaller yards,  the rates will he 23 and 10 cents.  Roughly estimated the increases will  aggregate a quaiter of a- million  dollars.  Mrs. or Miss?  *-*r TJST as a sort ot" New Year's card,  tbe   "Woman's   Suffrage   Society  of Paris hove issued a manifesto conlendin-- that, as woman In.  her maiden  iume accomplishes  all   the   duties  of  a  citizen,   she  does  prejudice   to  her   interests  by  -sinkins  her identity and losing her Individuality  ln  adopting   the  name  of  her  husband when she marries.   Consequently,  it  seems   on  the   lapis   that  In   future,  when Miss Smith  marries Mr. Brown,  she will still retain  her .maiden  patronymic   of  Smith.    Being  married,  she  must of necessity be Mrs.; therefore, if  she retains her maiden name ot Smith,"*  we   shall   have   the   weird   anomaly   of  Mr. Biown and Mrs. Smith as man and  wife.   Now, supposing Mrs. Smith, otherwise Mrs. Brown, should, by any unforeseen event, meet with -a Mr. Smith  in -the absence ol" her husband, and it  should go -foruh to the world���������in a hotel  visitors'   boolc,   for  instance���������that they  were   actually   Mr.    a.nd    Mrs.    Smith,  where the dickens, in the event of trouble,   would  Mr.   Brown   come   in?    Mr.  Brown  might   swear  by  all   tha.t was  holy that Mrs. Smith was Mrs. Brown,  ���������but  if Mr.  Smith  swore   that she  waa  Mrs.   Smith   and   Mrs.   Smith   did   not  stoop  to deny  lt,   what jury outside  a  lunaitic    asylum    could    convict    Mrs.  Smilh   of  playing last und   loose with  Mr   BrownV    It is a complex problem,  to say the least of lt;  but if the Woman's  Sum-ago   Society  of  gay   Paree  aie not content to let well alone, I suppose they must put up wilh the conae-  r-uences.  UrSS^Wfi '.*   .1 .  Red "lose rie'tree meet* second aud fourtl  Tuesdms of each month; White Kose Decree  meets third Tue-il-iy of ench quarter, In Oddfellows Hall.   Visitini'brelhren welcome  S. l'.CKOWI.K, T. II   I'AICER,  -   ''resident. Act. Secretary.  LOYAL ORANGE LODGE   No. 1658.  itcpular meetings are held iu  tlu  Oddfellow's llall on  ihe Third  l-'ri-  ��������� day ol each month, at 8 p.m sharp  Visiting brethren cordially invited  100 A. JOHNSON, W. Nl     ,  Vi. JOHNS ION, l-.ec.-Bee.  If you are looking for possibilities in Estate  Speculation that will double your capital,  it will be to your interest to invest RIGHT  NOW, before the best of the properties have  been taken up.  HEAL ESTAT  AT GROUND FLOOR P   IOES  $^-������ UNION ������--������#  Cigar   Factory  REVELSTOKE,    l"i.C.  ������1  W>  ������������>  !������  fl  I-l  Wi  ii  n  u  ���������S������������-\ Cold  Range Ledge, K. of P.,  No. 26, Revelstoke, B. C,  ���������a���������-/..     -.viEET-5   EVERY   WEONESnAY  *&������"     o'clock.    'Vl'iiling   Knights   are  cordially invited.  B, VAN IIOil .E, C. (J.  G. II.  IS HOC'*:, K.of It. .tS  CHURCHES  METHODIST CIIUKCII, KEVELSTOKE.  l-rcr-cliini* services at 11 a. 111. and 7:30 p. m  Class liicciing at the close of the iiiurimig  ���������ervicc. Sabbath School and Ilible Class at :i:''u  Weekly "'raver Meeting every Wednesday  evening at 7":S0. The public are cordially  invited.   Seats free.  Itev C. Ladner, Pastor.  "'��������� Are you looking* for Business Lots, Residential  Lots, or other Real Estate? Qoldnelds is the  Payroll Centre and Resident Town of the  Famous Fish River Free Milling Gold Oamp,  and has a Future unequalled by any other  Town in the West.  For Terms and Particulars Write  ROGER   F.   PERRY,   Manager,   GoidfieEds,    B.C.    .  st. rr.ri:n s ciiukcii, Anglican.  Klglit a.m., llolv Euchnrlsl; II a.m., ma .as  bitanv and scrmn'n (Holy lliieharisl  lirst Sun-  ���������lav iii the' monlh); '2:.Xn   Sunday   school, or  children's service; 7 ::'.0 Kvensong (choia.1) and  sermon.   llolv Dajs���������The  Hulv   Kucharist is  celebrated in 7 a.m. orS a.m , as announced.  Holy liaptism afler Sunday School al3:15.  c. A. i'iiuiunieii.    cctor.  ,**-t***l*+****'-**"*-"-*-fr*^  H. A. BROWN, ��������� Prop,  OUR  Brands:  SPECIAL   and   THE   UNION  I'KEM'.YTEKIAN ciiukcii.  Service everv Sundav at 11 a.m. and 7:M p.m.  to which all aie welcome.     I'rayer meeting at  1 n. m. everv Wednesday.  "  Kev, Vi. C. Calder, Pastor.  ROMAN CAT IIOLIC CIIUKCII.  Ma-*-*   at  10:30  a. m ,   nu   Hrst,   second and  lOtirlh Su.iili-.vs in the moulh.  KEV.   FATHER   THAYER.  SALVATION   A KM-*.  Meeting everv night in their  Hall on Front  Street.  OUR NEW PHOTO STUDIO  Railway Pass Unavailable.  J. Atiii-.tronp. O. X. R. surveyor,  "-.-ho has been away with a paity since  Oct. 1. exploring the so-called Smoky  -=-^Eiver���������pass,���������shown���������on���������the_mapjialf  way between Yellow Head unci Pine  River passes and almost in a, .-tr-tight  line between Ediiiontonand Fort.Siinp-  son on the Pacific, finds that no such  pass exists.  Smokv River really heads in the-sauie  glacier as the Grand Forks of the FraJ  ser and runs northwest after leaving  the mountains. Wliere no river is  shown on the maps at all, asi-ia.ll river  called the Porcupine comes cut of the  mountains by a very difficult pas-..  where the Smoky River pass is -hown.  The result of the exploration i-> that no  pa-*s available for iailway c-in.-ti notion  exists between Yellow Head and Pinf  Itiver pas-.es foi a railway 10 Fort  Simpson from Edmonton. The Yellow  Head i- too far ������outh and the Pint- ton  far north. TheSmokyRiverpas*. would  be exactly right if it really existed  where it is shown on the maps.  Xexi toll. IIOWSOS'S rnrniture Store, i*  making both Miniature Photos and thc  regular larger styles. Cabinet Photos in  tlie popular platiuo tone-* at reasonable  prices.   Our Mantcllo Cabinet is M.00 per  do/en.  Suiuc Pretty "Mountings for our Photo  liroaclie*, Watch Charms, Lever and Dumb  Hell Cuff Links, Scarf Pins, ,tc. These are  suegetted as very acceptable Chri-=tnirs  Gifts. I also makedliferent si^es of Plain  Photo Buttons and I copy from any Picture. Bring small children for sittings  either in the forenoon or not later than  two o'clock in the afternoon. Sunsbine is  not iiecc-sary.  k  Hi  ������������?ii.yp.  ������-. r-^32. "Vrs\  EDWARD  TAXIDERMIST,  DEER HEADS, BIRDS. Etc. "MOI*Is*TED,  Furs Clcan--d and Pc.-aircd.  JUST EAST OK   PRESBYTERIAN*  CHURCH  Third Street.  H  *r  *  ���������*���������  *  *  *  *���������  *  *  *���������  *  *  4*  ���������5*  ���������5*  <i-  ���������*���������  ���������*���������  *���������  *  t  *���������  *  >*���������  *  *���������  *���������  t  *  t  *  *  *  *  *���������  *  *  ���������*���������  ���������i*  Baker and  eontectioner  A lull and complete  line of  GROCERIES  *  ������*���������  ���������������������������  *  ���������*���������  **���������  *  *  ���������**  *  *  ���������*���������  *  X*  *  -^-���������^1^-*  Railway  ROUND TRIP TICKETS  Christmas and  New Year Excursions  HOWARD KING,  "PiroTOcrfGn"-nT."*-7  ''eve'stoke, U C.  GC^fo"  |  ��������� C&-   ���������*-"*!  ill  FOR VOUR  Patent Rubber Heels  and Rubber So.eing  in all size* and coli r:  IJoot and Shoe Repairing a Specialty  H. HOLDICH  ANALYTICAL CHEMIST  AND ASSAYER.  Roval School of Ifines, London.    Seven years  at "Mor'a   Works,  Sa-anMa.     17   years  Chief  Chemist  to Wiuan Coal and  Iron Co.,   Eng.  Late Chemist and Assayer, Hall Mine1*, LW.  Claims examined and reported upon.  Fertnison. B.C.  T    A. KIRK.  Domini n and Provincial Land Surveyor.  RF.VEI.STOKE, Jt. C.  Cor. Mackenzie Ave.  and Railway Street.  -Hf*-**-***-*"*'-!-*'*^^  Jas. I. Woodrow  BTJTOHH  Some Startling  Death Figures.  According to the stalisticnl report of  the Interstate Coimneicc commis-sion,  21,847 people were killed on railroads  in the Vnited States dining thc three  years ending June 3ft. 1000. In the  same three years ahout 21,500 persons  were murdered. No statistic-* aie at  hand, which show what number lost  their lives by accidents in mines, mills,  faitories and other places of labor, but  the number must have been very  great. We are altogether too prodigal  of human life in this country. In the  matter of murders we seem to be  Smprovin*-.      Accoiding to the fif-ures  4-W++.l4.++''M-'b************lr*  I PELLEV/-HARVSY, I  I BRYANT & GiLMAN |  ^ Mining- F.nginccrs ������  S and Assayers, <|  r{   VANCOUVER, li.C.       Kstabllshed !������!K)    fi  ���������g   (|  5 A8SAY V/0!*K OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS  (J) UNDERTAKEN.  ������    A Tc������l-made up in 2,0C01l������.  '*-' A specialty made of checkim* Smelter  ,5 I'lilli".                "                                              ������  p. Sample" from the Interior hy mall or    Q  p. e-.r.re"������ promptly at'ended to.                     ������j  g l'orrc������|.onden'u.soliclicd.                          Gj  ������     ��������� VANCOUVER, B. C. g  ^^H+WW*****'***********'*  E. MOSCROP . ...  Sanitary Plumbinff,  Hot  V-Zater  Ar.d Steam Heating. Gas  Fittins*-  '" Second St., REVELSTOKE, B.C.  OOD  Retail Dealer in���������  Beef, Pork,  Mutton, Etc.  Fish and Game in Season....  All orders promptly filled-  Co���������MS1.". KBYBiS������0KR B.8  DEC. 23, 24, 25  DEC. 30, 31  JAN. 1.  Good  to return Jan:  1ST S^81  If you -ire'contemplating.going South dtiring-  the winter of 1902-01* 1903 you can get valuable informaUon free of charge. ���������   ,'  .Vfrite to'  3rd  Fare and  One-Third  For full-information call on  or address  T. W. Bradshaw,  -Agent  Kevelstoke.  E, J. Coyle.  i.i^Assls!.. Uen   FaBsenger Agent  .Vancouver  "=^P^ 7  Oriental HoteS  Ably furnished with the  Choicest the Market  affords.  Wood for hale !neli"dlne  Dry Cedar, Fir and Hemlock.  BELGIAN    HARES  The quickest breeders .ind frn-atcst  money makers   in   the   *irn"ill   s-tock  line of lhe present day.      Full   bred  .      stock of FASHODAS.  Price���������$6 and Sic per pair,  according to ajfe.  THOS. 8K1NNER.���������Revelstoke'. B. C.  All   orders  loft nt W.   M.   Lawrense'.i   will  re'f-ive prompt attention. ^  W. FLEMING.  BEST WINES, LIQUORS, CIGARS  Large, Light bedrooms.  Rates $1 a day.  Monthly Rale.  J. Albert Stone ���������   Prop.  iv hat is a 110MK ���������vrni'ii'T A  SINGER  Singer Sewing Machines  are sold on easy monthly  payments.  A full supply of machines  needles and attachments arc  kept for any make of machine on earth.  H.MANNINC, : MACKENZIE AVE.  0 ' Kevelstoke, IJ. C.  ���������fl* Pinebluff, N. G. .-'���������*'���������#���������."  SHe can save you money'in hotel rates."     *          ' ' '  x  He can direct you .which is, the'best-railroad '" . *$t  S             route to travel.                                .-".*���������          -     ���������   . v    &  He can direct you where to rent'neatly-fur- ��������� '."-*P  ���������*&      '���������'   "nished cottages or single rooms. ���������' '"                "' *x^  t*t*t **!** r*fri r*l*i T*l*t r*t*i r*it*t r*fri r*A*i r*i*ii **fr* **!** t*t*i f*i^i t*i*i **i*? t*fr* T*fri r*Jt*i r***Ti r*J*i'f*Jri t'j'i r*j*i A. r*^*i  lff lff lff lff iff lff lff lff lff iff lff '+*l4>*'VlV'V. V V.* *l* +' ���������<!��������� *k + + 4*  REVELSTOKE  THIS  FURNITURE   CO'Y.  SUPPLY     HOUSE     FOR!    NORTH     KOOTENAY.  rr*rsxSX-9-jXSXSSXi)S^^  1   HOW ABOUT  I   THAT SU8T  g Of (Jlotlies yon promised  & yourself'.his* FALL.  ������ 0'ir Fall Sto-'k is noir the-,  most t-omplete in B.C.  Our Faney Corfl- nre all  ncw.vvith  new   rotors  and',  the latest fltripcfi.  H"-* thftn   trf-fore  leavin*?'  your order el-iewhen.*.  R. S. WILSON.  FftHhiormMp Tailor.  Next the iMtCaity Block.  B������-r������E*iiXiXS������c^^  WOOD  For Sale.  Tlie iindcnl-fiicd having contracted for the  whole of McMnhon llros. wood Is prepared to  supply Mill wood at  $2 Per Load  ������*"**-CcdHr Cordwood������������������a.OO delivered.,^  ������B**-Harclwoo(l at equally low rates.        ������  ..Thos. Lewis.  OrdcrK left at O T*. Iinme ic Co.,   Morrf-i ic  Stoed'K, or at mill will have prompt attention.  WE keep a 1-u'ger and better stock than nny_ liouselbetween  Winnipe-* and Vancouver.   Quai-tered  Oak TublesV Rockers.  Bedroom Suites. . A splendid   line- at   Couches,   Morris'. Obairs, and ''  *-;everything-a-*FirstrClas8'House-cames. ���������"���������-���������"���������������������������-��������� \ ���������_" ��������� ..���������-���������. 1..-������������������'.-t ���������  - Cabinet Making, Upholstering, Picture Framing, etc.      -  EXTRA SPECIAL  ,  SCOTCH    WHjSKY,  -The bent reanlta In Hootch Whisky are obtained hy xi  blend of the best dlatillorlos.  Messrs. OrcenlCRS Brothers, of Argylcshire, con-lduri'ii  thc greatest vvliialcy experts In the world, have siei-t-  their llfo's cxpcrlcnec in tlie Scotch whlskv buslius-, and  the result ta the world's Greatest Scotch,  Kins Edward.,VII. Scotch Whisky  Distilled on the Kstato of the Duko of Argylc, Scotland.  Revelstoke Wine & Spirit Company, Limited, Agents  FltKE BUB MEETS ALL TJtAINS.  l'lItST CLASS   ACCOMMODATION.  HEATED-BY HOT AIR  REASONABLE KATES.  For Sale  TWO Itaqideneeson M<-Krn*lo A venire, with  modern Improvements, ".-'SOO each  un e������sy  - terms.  TWO ItPNldu-ippa on Third atrect, east, very  cnnvcnlcnt for railway inen,|I800 ������ai:li, eauy  terms. *  ONB Itcsldenee ou First Street. Past, cash  required f������0. Subject to mortnairo.  Apply to,  IIAR\*E-r,McCATKKR<tPI*SKHAM'<  THE GITY EXPRESS  E. W. B. Paget, Prop.  Hote8 Victoria  '.y.  Brown & Querln, Props.  ELECTRIC BELLS AND LIGHT IN EVERY ROOM.  IIOUHLY STltEET CAlt " *-AK WELL SUPPLIED BY THE CHOICEST  A  MEETS ALL TKAINS.  Prompt delivery of parcels, bai*K*ec, elo.  to any part of the city  Any Kind of Transferring  Undertaken  All orders left at It. M. Bmythe's Tobacco  store, or by Telephone No.7 wlllrccelve prompt  attention  Carpenters Wanted.  Fifty carpenters- wanted* at once,  ix months work. Apply to J. Ker*  nt-ghun, Revelstoke or Laggan.  WINES,   LiqUOIlB'AND CIGAUS  P. BURNS & CO'Y  Wholesale  -.nd Retail Dealers  PRIME BEEF.     PORK.     MDiTON.     SAUSAGE.  FISH AND GAME IN SEASON. ���������V-  IV*  \Ka\  T0  r/t *  imi f*-r>rri* ;���������.>���������.. ���������>, i. #vi mTTrti"ir*i-*fii.^ **rarT*Tij.    ���������^*t*frjyt*''*T;r*-'-rrri-i     i inr���������---     - ( i   -r ���������   nr-       ^  .<* v  New System of Air Brakes.  Experiments now being made at the  Rio Grande shops promise radical impi ovi-nipnt*. in the piesent mei hod of  n���������.in." .iir brakes. The new device is  tho Hursl automatic air brake, atifl  the advanta-J-es over the "Westinghousi  sj-stem are so pronounced that its  advantages cannot he ignored liy  manufacturer!*. The experiment^  have been so thorouj-h that the success  of the brake is no longer speculative.  The strik'ng advantage of the brake is.  apparent in mountain railroading,  where its superiority over other systems is indisputable.  In descending steep grades its value  becomes immediately apparent. The  entire train is in control of the engineer, on'l with the Hurst system he  is enubled lo set the brakes gradually  and apply any amount ��������� of power  desired. This insures a uuiform  amount 'of resistance. "With the  piebent system the air is applied, and  then released.  "When the speed of train increases  air is again applied, and ieleased. In  other words the speed is reduced by a  series of applications, which affect.the  'momentum only temporarily. It is  like biinging a" descending sled to a  stop, and then releasing it .until the  momentum again becomes too"great.  ��������� Another advantage of the system is  that the air cylinders can be recharged  while the brakes are set, and by an  automatic arrangement there ia very  , little waste of air.   The other systems  ���������waste the air when it is released from  the brake. The advantage of recharging the Hurst "cylinders while  the brakes are at work is apparent ln  descending long grades where there is  a-heavy demand-for air pressure. In  the Hurst cylinders, the air cannot be  . exhausted., '/"--''  An automatic arrangement sets the.  brake,if a.train pulls apartfin.cliinbiug  a hill with the Hurst system of-brakes.  , A train.is more evenly "managed at  depots and can be brought to a stop at'  the'precise .'point, desired. This cannot be done with other, systems'.'. The  ��������� brakes can be used with other systems,  as the couplings are made like those of  ' the.Westiughouse pattern.���������Salt Lake  Herald.    , w ' .        ' ��������� * .  J,   ' _,; ,  ~tjjf -.  "Mr. Fielding'.s Generosity.--/  .. - ";���������?."' ***-������**" x"-i     **'".-,'"-(fSJ*-*      **." i".   *  * The  Dominion   Coal. Company has  entered into a contract' to supply the  New'England Coke and.Gas.Company  of Boston, with Canadian coal at .*t>1.95  .     .  ���������j  per ton.^ Today  Canadians pay from  $4' to   $5   per   ton   for the same coal.  Hon.   "VV.   S.  Fielding, as Premier of  Nov* Scotia, refused to impose dn the  Dominion 'Coal Company any restric-  "tion   tTiat   would   guarantee to Canadians a"reasonahle'protection fiom the  demands of the coal barons.   The selling pf coal to Americans at .less than  ��������� half the' price   charge'd' to Canadians  - resulted.    This. is hardly flattering to  theFinance Minister.." "   .    -  s  When .the "Crow's. NestCoal'cbm-  pany  sought to market t.their fuel in  the.. United  States,   Hon. --J." Israel  m-.  Tarte insisted on an agreement which  ���������would render the 'company'liable to'a  1 penalty, of $3 "per ton'for'coal sold  abroad at rates below, those quoted to  Canadians. That was a patriotic  move. The Crow's NestCoal company  were checkmated and Canadians protected. _, _   -  ��������� In Mr. Fielding's case it was different. He gave away our rights without a murmur. That is, whywepay  double priceB for our own minerals.  And, by the  way, Mr. .Fielding has  been   chosen   to  succeed Sir Wilfrid  Laurier as leader of the Liberal party.  ���������-, v*       "  It  looks  bright  for  the Crow's Nest  Coal company and the Western States.  W|'-  Down in Dixie.  Just now a number of our 'renders  are planning where they will go for  the winter and no doubt the majority  of-them will do as Ihey have done in  'the pnst, buy round trip excursion  tickets, good for six. months,', to  Southern Pines, N. C, and those who  want to make side trips of a few weeks  te Florida, Louisiana or Texas can get  round.trip tickets from Southern  Pines to the points they desire to  visit at the most favorable rates and  thus save unnecessary expenses.  Southc-rn Pines is the hend quuiten*  for northern tourist. It is located in  the hiah sand" hills among the Long  Leaf Pines on the Seaboard Air Line  Railway, whieh is the most direct  route between New York. Washington  und J.ickfionvilli'. Florida."  We advise, our readers who are  expecting to make a Southern trip to  write to M<*. John T. Patrick, Pine-  bluff. N. C, and he will send them.  Tree of charge, printed matter that  will be of much interest.  RANCH FQR SALE.  The administrators of the estate of John  D. Boyd deceased, offer for sale by lender  the property in the Big Bend District,  known us "Boyd's Kanch," also the  chattel property thereon, a list ol" which  may be seen at the oflice of the undersigned. ' .  Tendeis will be received up to Feb. ist,  1903. The at'inini.Mi-alors will" not be  bound to accept the highest or any tender.  HARVEY, McCARTKR &  PINKHAM,  Solicitors for Administrators.  Revelstoke, B. C, Nov. 271I1, 1902.  Notice to Creditors  Tn   the  county   court    of  *- Kootenay holdcir at Revelstoke. In  the matter of the estate of Charles G.  Donnelly, lato of Albert Canyon, B. C,  deceased.  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that  all persons having claims against the  estate of the* said Charles G. Donnelly,  who died on or about the Jisl day of  September, A. Ti., 190-, are required to  send by post prepaid or to deliver to  Harvey, MeCarter and Pinkham, solicitors  for the administrators, on or before the  27th day of December. 1902, their names,  addresses and descriptions and a full  statement ol" particulars of their claims  and the nature of the security (if any)  held by them duly certified, and lhat after  thesaid day the administrators will  proceed to distribute the assets of the  deceased among the. parties entitled  thereto, having regard,only to the claims  of which they shall theii have nolico.  Dated this*27th day of November, 1902.  Harvey, McC.vkti'r & Pinkham, .  Solicitors  for George  A.   Donnelly,   and  Geo.    S.   MeCarter,  Administrators   of  the said estate.  Land  Registry   Act.  Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, in Block 48, in  Town of Revelstoke, B. C,  Map 636 B.  A CERTIFICATE ol indefeasible Title to the  above property will be is-med to Frank'Bernard Lewis on the 28th dny of Februarv. . D.,  1903, unless in the meantime a valid objection  -hereto be marie to me iu'writing by a person  claiming an estate or interest therein or in  any part thereof. '..  .. II. F. MACLEOD,  ' District Registrar.  Land Kegislry Office, Nelson, B. (J . 17th  No*.ember, l'JO'j.  TIME TABLE  S. S. ARCHER OR S. S. LARDEAU  Running between. Arrowhead, Thomson's  Landing and Comaplix, commencing October  Mth, l'JOl, will sail as lollows, weather permitting:'   - -    ' . ,* ��������� -'   \  Leaving Arrowhead for Tliomso'n'������"Landing  and Comaplix'." twice daily���������10k. and 16k.,  - * Leaving- .Comaplix- and   Ihomson's Landing  for Arrowhead twice dally���������7:15k and 12:43k  Making close connections with all C. P. B.  Steamers and Trains.      .       ' ��������� <  .  The owners reserve the right to change times  of sailings without notice.  The Fred Robinson Lumber Co., Limited  Your Winter Supply'   -  Qf sVegetables . . .->> '].  ���������"-";. -.'   "Slionld   bp'your.first consideration  at  this  time of  ���������        '  .;        the  year.     I   have h large  -   .stock, .all  s home ".'-grown,'  <"      ���������     --      includm--;  Potatoes,  Cabbage, Carrots,^ Etc., Etc.  "      ''        Also: a  large   quantity "of  -    - firsfrlass       --.    -  ,, Timothy and Clover-Hay.'  Write .fur-prices and par-  *ticiilars,to. < _  S. Crowle, Revelstoke, B. C.  GO TO THE  REVELSTOKE DAIRY  FOR  Pure Milk  C. h; Lawrence  PROPRIETOR.  ���������Write for our interesting books" Invent- ���������'  or's Help" an'l " Hotv you are ������wlndl������J.';A  Send una rough (ketch or model of yoxirltir  vention orimproveincut and we will tell you  fret) our opinion os to wlielhrr It I*. probubl/  jjateulable.   Re'rctcd application* have often  bec-n   successfully  prosecuted  by us.    We  conduct  fully equipped offices in Montieal  and Washington ; this<|iinlif������cs us to prompt-,  ly dispatch work and quickly ������������. cure Patent!,  as bro i cl an the Invention. Highest references,  furnished. ,  Patents procured through Marion & Ma  tion receive special notice without charge lu'  over too newspapers distributed throughout,  the Dominion. ,  1   Specialty:���������Patent business ol  Manufac ,  turers and Kngineers. ,- *>  - MARION & MARION -'  <  ,    Patent Export*- and Solicitor**..   ?  (Offlces:  -f  1^^_X?r!������Mie..,?'^,'-'-l,-*lt^������-**'.  Atlantic Bld**;"*i"2*l3*g*f"-*> {!���������������<  NOTICE.  Notice is herehy given that thirty days  after date I intend to apply to the Honorable the Chief Commissioner of Lands and  Works for permission to cut and carry  away timber from the following- described  lands:  Commencipg at a post on the East bank  of the Columbia River, about two miles,  above the mouth of Wood River and  marked "J. Ringer's soulh west corner  post," thence easl 160 chains, thence  north 40 chains, Ihcnce west 160 chains,  thence south 40 chains "to the point of  commencement.  J.  RINGER.  Dated this 20th day of September, 1902.  ! Certificate of Improvements.  NOTICE.  Halifax and Gibraltar No 2 mineral eltiima  siiuate in the Arrow Lake mining division of  West ICootenay District.  Where located���������Two miles Irom tbe head of  Canyon Creek.  Take notice that I. A. It. Ilcland, agent for  J. K. Jamieson, 1'. M C. I'GbUlS; T. ..lathcws,  1 Ml! H63111; .IB Hall, U'5M2; J I Fanvig,  B72922; intend sixty da.\s from the date hereof  to apply to the 'llnin-r Uecorder for a ccrilleate  of impri.veraents for tue purpose of obtaining  a crown grant of the above claims.  And further take notice that action under  section 37 must be commenced before the  issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Sated this 3rd day of Sept, 11)02, A. D.  A. R. Hkyi.and.  39*-  ZTrTOTIOE  NOTICE is hereby given that thirty  days after date I intend to apply to the  Honorable the * Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for a special license to  cul and carry away timber from the foHovt-  '���������������������������"��������� described lands situated in Nortii East  Kooienay dislricl:���������    -  Commenciiif**)a.( a post planted alongside  tho Wood River' trail about 60 chains  north of thc head-of navigation landing on  the Columbia river and about 2^ miles  southwest of the upper-.trail crossing of  Wood rivet-and marked " R. M. Hume's  southwest corner post," thence north 80  Chains, thence east 80 chains, thence  south So chains, Ihence west 80 "chains to  the point of commencement.   .,���������  Daled this 25th day of September, jqo2.  R. M. HUME.  3STOTIOE  NOTICE is hereby given that thirty  days afler dale I intend to apply to the  Honorable the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works, for a special license- to  cul and carry away" timber from the" following described lands, situated in North  Easl Kootenay district:���������  . Commencing at'a post planted "on the  east side ot the Big Marsh about 30 chains  soutli east of Wood river and at" a  point about one mile south of" lhe upper  trail crossing of Wood river and marked  " C. B. Hume's northwest corner post,"  thence east 80 chains;, thence south 80  chains; thence west 80 chains; thence  north 80 chains to the point of commencement.  Dated this 24t"*Tdav of September, 1902.  C. B. HUME.  UOTIOB.  NOTICE is hereby given that thirty  days after"date I intend to apply to the"  Honorable the* Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for a special license to  cut and carry away, timber from the- following described lands siluated in North  East Kootenay district:��������� ���������     -.   .    '  Commencing at a post planted "on the  east sidei of --the 'Big -Marsh, about ��������� 30  chains south east of Wood river, and at a  point about one. mile'south ol the'upper  trail crossing of. Wood river, and marked  "C. B. Hume's south-west corner" post,",  thence east 8o.~ chains;.' thence" north 80  chains; thence west 80 chains; thence  south 80, chains to the point of commencement. - '  , -Dated this 24th dav of September, 1902.  C.  B. HUME.  ; {���������   ,,*  JsrCTIOS  o-NOTICE -vis* hereby' given lhat 'thirty  days after date I intend to' apply to the  Honorable the* Chief, \Commissioner of  Lands and Works for a "special license -to  cut and carry away, timber from the ��������� following described lands:���������   ',       ,    v -' -. "  Commencing at a' post planted on the  north bank of the Columbia river, just  above. the mouth of Canoe river, and  marked'-"Rr M. Hume's.north west corner  post," thence south ��������� 160 chains; thence  east 40chains; thence north 160 chains;  thence west 40 chains, lo the point of  commencement. .    .  Dated this 22nd day of September, 1902,  R. M. HUME.  HOTIOB  NOTICE is hereby given that thirty  days after date 1 intend to apply to the  Honorable the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for a- special license lo  ent and carry away _ timber' from the  followiug described lands :���������~"! " ���������      ���������" -���������  Commencing at a post planted on the  north bank of the Columbia - river, just  above the mouth of Canoe, river, and  marked 'R. Davis' southwest corner post,'  thence north 80 chains; thence east 80  chains'; thence south 80 chains; thence  west 80 chains to the point of commencement.  -  Dated this 22nd day of September, 1902  ,  R. DAVIS.  certificate of Improvements.  ���������JtSTOTXCE!.  Londonderry, Golden Rod No. 2, Hailstorm  mineral claims, situate iu the Arrow Lake  Mining Division ot West Kootenay District.  Where located���������On Can>ou Creek, joining  the Londondcry, M. C.  TAKE NOTICE thai I, A. It. Heyland, Agent  forT. Mathews, lf.M.C,, 11 fil'lll, J. It. Jainleson.  II 08013. intend sixty da- s'from the date hereof  to apply to the .Mining Recorder for a Certilicate 01 Improvements for thc purpose of  obtaining a Crown Grunt of the above claim.  And further that notice that action under  section 37 must .be commenced beforo the  issuance ol such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 3rd day of Sept., 1902, A. D.  A. K. HEYLAND.  . NOTICE.  NOTICE in hereby given' that thirty  days after "date'I intend to apply to the  Honorable the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for a special license lo  cut and carry away timber Irom the following described lands in North West  Kootenay district:���������  Commencing at a post planted on the  east bank of the Columbia river at a point  about six miles northerly from Big-Mouth  creek and adjoining the northern boundary  of the lands owned by the American Syndicate, and marked "J. P, Hume's south  west corner post ;' thence east 80 chains;  thence north 80 chains;" thence west 80  cliains; Ihence' south 80 chains to the  point of commencement.  Dated this 4th*'day ol October, 1902.  J.  P.  HUME.  NOTICE.  NOTICE is hereby given that thirty-  days alter dale I intend to apply to the  Honorable the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for a special license to  cut and carry away timber from the following described lands in North West  Kooienay District:���������  Commencing- at a post'planted on the  west bank of the Columbia river about  five miles below the mouth of .Gold Stream  and marked "George Knapp's soulh east  corner post," thence west 80 chains;  thence norths80'chains; thence east 80  chains; thence' south So chains 'to the  point of commencement. ,  Dated this" 9th day of October, -1902. -  ,     "     .   " GEORGE KNAPP.  -*���������  .    - NOTICE.    .  NOTICE is -hereby given that thirty  days after date I intend to apply to the  Honorable the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works, for .a special license to  cut and carry away, limber from -the following described (ands in North West  Kootenay district:��������� ������������������ - ���������, - -  Commencing at a post planted at the  south east corner ol Lot 80, G. 1., according to the official plan of the survey of the  American Syndicate . Lands in the Big  Bend district, and at a' point about AVi  cliains east of the Columbia river aboul  two and .a half miles below .the mouth of  GoldStream and marked ','J. P. Humes  horth! east- corner post," thence west 80  chains; thence south'; 80 chains; thence  east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains to  thc point of commencement.  .' Dated this 8th day of October, 1902.  "     J.  P.  HUME.  NOTICE  TSTOTIOE  NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days  after date I will apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for a  special license to cut and carry away  limber from thc following described lands  in - West Kootenay :���������Commencing at  Peter Agren's south west corner post near  Boyd's ranch about half a mile from thc  Columbia river, thence east_ 80 chains,  thence north 80. chains, thence west do  chains, tbence south 80 chains to thc  point of commencement.   ���������  Dated the 23rd day of October, 1902.  PETER AGREN.  NOTICE.  Notic - Is hereby given that 30 days after date  I intend to apply to the Chief '-ommlssloncr of  Lands and works for permission to cut and  carry away timber from the following described  lands:        ,.    -'  Commencing at a post marked "It. Stelss'  south west corner post." thence north 80chalns.  thence east 80 chains, thence south 80 chains,  tbence westw chains to the pointof commencement.  -   Dated this 25th day ot November, 1902.  K.BTEISS.  NOTICE.  Notice is hereby given tbat SO daya after date  I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of  Land* and works for permission to rut and  carry away timber from the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post marked, A. Y. Ander  son's south west corner post," thence north ISO  chains, tbence east to the west bank of Flsh  river, thence south following the bank of Fish  river to tbe point of commencement.  Dated this 25th day of November, 1902.  A. Y. ANDERSON.  .'_ NOTICE- is hereby given that 30 days  after date I will apply to the Chief. Commissioner' of Lands 'and . Works for a  special license to'cut and'carry away  timber from the following described lands  in West Kootenay :���������Commencing ' at  W. le Maistre's nortii west corner post  near Boyd's ranch about half a mile from  lh"eiColumbia*-river-tllieri"ce--east8o-chain.sr  thence soulh So chains,, thence west 80  chains, thence north 80 chains to point of  commencement. '-   ,.,  Dated the" 23rd day of October, 1902.  W." le MAISTRE.  3STOTIOE  NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days  after date I will apply to the Chief Commissioner 'of Lands and Works for a  special license*to cut and carry away  timber from the following described lands  in West ��������� Kootenay :���������Commencing at  I. A, Kirk's north west corner post thence  easl 40 chains, llience soulh 160 chains,  thence west 40.,chains, thence north 160  chains to point of commencement.  Daled the 231-d day of October, 1902.  J. A. KIRK.  IrTOTIOE  NOTICE. i������ hereby'given that 30 days  a.ftu*^Jate I will .apply to the CliiefvCom  missioner of Lands ' and Works for a.  special 'license to cut and carry away  timber from the following described lands  in West Kootenay :���������Commencing at  Peter Agren's south west corner post near  Boyd's ranch on thc Columbia river,  thence north 160 chains,' thence cast 40  chains, thence south 160 chains, thence  west 40 chains to thc point of commencement.  Dated the 23rd day of October, 1902.  PETER AGREN.  NOTIOE.  NOTICE is hereby given.that thirty days  after date I intend to apply to thc Honorable  the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works  for a special license to eut and carry away  timber from the following described lands,  situated ln North East  Kootenay District:���������  Commencing at a post planted on the "north  bank of the Columbia River st tbe outlet of  - inbasket Lake and marked "B. A. Lawson's  south east corner post," thence north 80chains:  thence west 80 chains: thence south 80 chalus;  tbence cast 80 chains to tho, point of commencement. ,  Dated t     27th day of September 1902.  B. A. LAWSON. *  THE TOWNSITE OF  ST*  IS NOW CM THE MARKET.  ale��������� 2oo  BUY BEtORE YOU SLEEP.  CIRCLE CITY is llio Terminus   of   thc   proposed    Railway   already   surveyed  via liie Lardeau Creek wilh fork to that point. y"'-\  CIRCLE CITY is beautifully situated at the base of the Lardeau Pass, Galena  and Surprise Creeks.  CiRCLE CITY is   absolutely   surrounded    by    Mining' Properties   now   under  ��������� Development. .... . ... . ������  'later - Power  Which will be utilized next Season by Concentrating Plants.  '%\\  ���������**���������*������  p|  ���������*.-o  I**-*****  SEND FOR PARTICULARS AT ONCE  TO. THE GENERAL AGENT,  G. B. BA  Ferguson, B. O.  ��������� **".������;���������  *<..'*>.  ���������*--.-*-*"������������������-  --*"U  f -1".  -' 7'  ������+J*rj*&J*J*������**L^������#**L&J*i**:������J������-i2-- ~r*ftfc������-***-',--J--**-gi**i**-^^  The Smelting Centre-of'the Similkameen Valley.    Backed by the-payrolls of two''.  gigantic coal companies and ithe Copper and Kennedy Mountain Mines.   . , <   ;  A   ;  Surrounded by the following resources:,   Coal, geld, copper, silver and a fine agri-*  cultural country.    Large herds of cattle, fruit jn abundance, with a/climate almost southern ,  and all that could be asked.-*   '       '        ;"-_'" _."'���������* _  " "        ' .   -'"*  ASHNOLA is owned unci lucked by Uio payroll o[ the' Similkameen Valley 'Coal  Company,   Ltd..  imp;  coming city ol! the interior of British Columbia.'  City of Wonder, Progress ami Great Prosperity  Lots,in Aslinol.-i'ai-e sVifc'iuvcjtniciits.   Tn Blocks 1 to 4 and 13 to 20 the price  ���������will be advanced 25c-  per month until May lbl, 1002, ami to ten per cent, in the t-emaiiiint* blocks.    The present price i6 from $50 tr*  $225     Twenty-five per cent, cash, three, bix and nine months without interest.  Arrangements.are already completed for Bi<*ht buildings, including cottages for^the Employees of.  .thecompany at Ashnola.."Thi-* work will be under full headway by May 1st.       - .-  Four years ago the Crow's Nest Shares could bs bouj-ht and were -sold at 11cents. Today they**���������"���������.,  quote 1 at $S0.00. With thc advent of transportation. Similkameen Valley Coal can to'deUvered at ������ay .  point in'West ICootenay or Yale as cheaply as by any other Company in Canada. *    ���������  ���������>       1 ���������  '''-���������I  -a*?-, -II  XI  -m  A  --'���������V  'iy- -"I  A: ��������� V  .FOR-FURTHER PARTICULARS APPLY TO  SIMILKAMEEN   VALLEY   COAL   CO.,    LIMITED.  .��������� NELSON,  B. C.���������:   9^*+������*#*L&J&*J&������&*]H*������*'i������&-La[ **-<*'j*--������!>-**������.������J-^*-������J!������^^  r iJi *jp if) if) if) if? if) ij* if) if) iff'ff ���������f) if) if) 'J' if) if) if) if) if) fy ���������*  IB  ���������   n  HBfara  rA  iw  ���������������������������---��������� <������������������  Do,You Want to Make Your Business Pay? We Can Show Th������ Road to 8uooM*>    4* j>  It Pays to Buy-'An Adwei-tising' Space In iy  '���������-*.' <*'  <���������  iw  <w  iw  i>  '<>  ir  iw  iw  <w  '���������'���������������  aiEwaymen's Journal  IT HAS A LARGE CIRCULATION  IT COVERS THE FIELD     .    "IT GIVES ENTIRE SATISFACTION.  '",  0Vr  SUBSCRIPTION RATE   :    $2.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.  u j     *. :  Our Job Printing Department  Is equipped with the Latest Faces of Type, the Best of Presses and Inks, and  wc guarantee Clean, Neat and Attractive Work. No Job too Large or too  Small.  We Print .  ���������  WelPrint . . .  Dodgers,     Posters,  or-  UKM  - a  Envelopes    Circulars  Streamers,   Dates           ,   .  Note Heads Pamphlets  Bill Heads Letter Heads  -ma  Books.        Visiting Cards '  Business Cards.  ^~j  Stationery of all kinds.  Revelstoke Herald Job Room  First  Street.  ���������*tt������ J9. J^P^ J9* JT. J9. JT* *r"T-t jTi JVm >Ti -T- *i*T������ *-T������ JTP. .'T. *V* ������*T������ JT. .'T* *���������'  %L* "X** Tlr   mV    mV "-X* TC* *tV "X* 'A   *m\r   mV *tV 'X* "X* 1*1**   Xr 'J* *X* '-P1  nH-l'-fH^^H^  <*���������'  iy  ir  4r.  4r  4>'  ���������o  -yu-  ^        IT*  '  '.   Iftl  7.' :u  ���������"'--*-. -H  >������������������������{  .-    '   *-*-l  .. e* I  .%:���������'  ii _  -������  ���������>-** *-i  .���������.���������" *���������  ���������������  "U1C4 **i"Tj-**cKi-rUM-������e=*"***.  ���������^^^IfSSi^rC^^S^^^ ��������� '&-.-  ^n.vrsftr.e^'i'JU-viivii^aiii'-  AMONG   THE   FLOWtRS.  'AH-  ���������M- *  Plp-J*.  Tha vard*n r������t������ swuns to arid fro,  ���������Then came a whin-*-" aoti and low;  -AB-a laid the lily to the rose:  * "Th*t is bar lover, I iwppose."  ���������Says ro������: "He oomcfl here c-rerydaj,  X wonder what, they hftve to siy?'"  "Tney don't soe us I" the ji.nm.no sigUs.  **������^on looks Into tho other's eyes V  ''Ho loves her so!'' the rose replied,  **Oh���������������here ihey couie:" the violet cried.  ���������"He holds her hand," the pansy said,  **Asd like the ro*e, sl.e Mu-shea red."'  -Ana rose remarked : "It is uot riglit  Tor es ;o iwten���������nor polite���������  To nil xi-eir tovv>-una imder subsoil, <iearl-be Ki-fied her I���������.shut your eyes I1*  ���������.M. lmlur Taylor, in Ciodey"*  Dp������. FfiESTON'd JiPiOTIlES.  1 was sister in a large male surgical  ^���������vard of a well-known diospital iu Uie  -north of England at tiie time when Uie  "following incident occurred:  ;   A few mouths previously one'of those  disastrous colln-ry explosion*., only ton  common   in. our    neighborhood," had  taken  place,   and   eight   of   the   men,  pooT  fellows,   all   badly   injured,   had  been  brought  into  ilie   Martin   wnnl.  ���������XVe all had a*heavy  time  of ii. and  .."���������-���������ur ho"uso surgeon���������never very -uroii;*;  ���������bad completely  broken .down tinder  the strain ot his devoted aiu-ii'llou lo  bis patiem.--.  He had the satisfaction of seeing nil  ���������the cases (with oue exception) fairly  ���������"���������tarted on the road to convalescence  "before he. loo, came on the sick list,  and was ordered.absolute, rest for several months. No man ever deserved a  rest more than he.  By his constant" and unwearied labors: of love he ."had. earned the bless-  Jng: pronounced;'on Abou Beii Adhcm  ms, "Oue who loved his fellow-men."  We all greatly missed his cheery presence In. the wards, and felt small interest in the doctor who came as his  ���������"locum'/ feeling sure that no one could  take his place.  ��������� Dr. Freston. the    temporary    houso  ^surgeon,   however, .made  a   l'avorablo  Impression on his arrival, and soon  /showed tha t; he thoroughly knew his  iwork. He had a quiet, reserved manner, and we had worked together some  days before I learned 'any thing more  ���������about Kim.' Then an accident, if there  Is such a'thing,-sfliowed-me the real  "cmni. O.ne evening, on going his rounds  I reported a new case, just come in, to  -liim. It was a uiau wlio had been  "found, lying in the road. lie liad evidently fallen against the curbstone and  ;Jhad received a scalp wound. That ho  :"was a sirancer iu the town was proved  ������by somie papers in his pocket, showing  !iim to have been discharged from a  leaning .vessel at Hull a few days pre-  's-iously.  ', "I have not .made out his history  yet," ,1 said; "he seems to be very  poor, and apparently- has no friends."  "No friends!" repeated Dr. Freston,  ������������������with an expression 1 had not seen on  'his face 'before. "Very few of us ro-  .alize what'those words mean, sister.  ���������It means more than mere friendliness.  It means a man's life without any influence for good upon it���������no restraint  .to keep him from sinking to ihe lowest  '"depths: no amjhor to hold hiin back  Sroin suffering shipwreck on ihe rocks  "which*surround us all; some seen, and  some hidden ones move dangerous than  all. No!"-:r7��������� He seemed to have forgotten'ho was speaking to me, and  remembering checked himself.  "XVe see so many such lives iu our  "work," I said.  "Yes." he, said, slowly and absently,  as it liis tno-.i-rb.ts were, far away, -it  must always be a sad sight, even IC  ���������chose who" suffer arc utter strangers  to us,."  ��������� He paused, rhen turned round io faco  "nie, and spoke .more quickly, as if he  ���������wished to, force himself to say some-  "thiug.  "To -me it is the rao't painful si'*ht  of all. because 1 am haunted by the  feeling that somewhere in this world  there may now bt- a man who Is  - friendless "aud alone throueh my fault.  "Every ire*h face 1 see I think may he  his. Every mnruiu** 1 wake witli tlio  thought * thai 1 may see it before  ���������nigh;."  1 looked at him with intense inter-  -���������*-t. My woman's in-n-uct. which so  -seldom errs, told me that he had never  ���������spoken of this to any oue before, and  "that it was a great relief to him to  . "*do so DOW.   ^._l_lgni*<*d to hear more.    He seemed  to read the synipaTiry-exprossecl'in-iuy-  -face and -vent on more quietly:  *'I "cad a younger brother. There  ���������were oiily two of us. I was older bv  "three years,  and both  in  appearanco  ��������� '.and'"character we were totally unlike.  He had been spoiled by my father,  "wbo always let him have his own way  ���������"���������hieily. I cfancy, on account of the  sirong likeness lie bore to our mother,  .-who died when we were qu'.te "young.  I was at Oxford 'reading for a degree  previous to entering the hospital when  my fa riier died, and I���������hut do I bore  -you? 1 have no rischt io inflict all this  on you. lm* ���������*f>tr.',h'.w you always look  w?  as if you were used to h-.-iriiig other  people's troubles. I notice every one  com-*- so you."  **I*leiu*.<? go on.** I could not say more.  "My father had had a nasty fall in  the hunting ti-ld, ami was alnn������; at  the last he-fore .1'cot to hi in. Ail his  afTaSr' were in perf'-et order, but he  -was an-i'i-u* about .lack���������always hi."  ���������Qret thought.  *' -You'll look after him. Tom,' he  -said. 'Promise hie you will look after  him. If you promise I know you won't  -go back. A promise Is a promise with  "you. Tom: I could always trust you.'  "I did promise, ngainand again, and  God knows I meant to keep; my word,  -and iny 'old father died quite happy  ���������with my promise still sounding in his  -ears and his eyes resting to the last  -on his darling Jnclc. , He never doubt-  . -ed me for a: moment. How could lie  foresee? 1 am thankful he died  happy.- Do you think he knows now,  "-"ster. how I kept my word*'"  I shook my head, but did not speak.  "I went back to -Oxford, and .lack  -entered the same college. Tiiat was  the mistake. At a distance���������if I had  fcnly seen him now and then���������we miglit  "have got on well enough: but at my  ���������elbow, always bursting into my room  when 1 wanted to read, filling his  Tooni with friends as noisy and light-  "hearted as himself. spcmKng money  recklessly on all sides, and turning  ���������everything 1 said into a joke���������all this  was adally annoyance to nie. It grew  intolerable. I had no sympathy at nil  ���������wTtb any of .his pursuits, and I grew  "nore cold nnd reserved, until one day.  ���������fEtasperated mure thun usual. 1 to Id  "him that "If he wanted to so to tlie  doss  be  might   go  by   uln-self.     His  temper was ns quick as mine, nis  ���������harp answer drew a sharper one from  rue, which roused him to a fury. 'You  won't see me asaln, so you need not  trouble your head about it. I can work  for myself,' aud he was gone. Even  then, sister, if i hart gone afiter (him, I  might have stopped him, ibut*l waa  mad with him, and was glad that he  was gone. As glad then to hear thai  ho was gone as I should Aie now to  hear tlmt once again, ou this earth,  1 might hope to see his face. I live for  that, and one day it may come."  "And you neve*; 'hoard of him again?"  "No sound from that day to this. Ho  went without money, and ihe could  draw no'ne except through mo."  "I'erhaps," I suggested, utterly at a  loss what .to say, "ho found some work  or "  "Work!    .Tack    never  did    a  day's  work iu his life; he was not mado io  work."  "Do  you  think  .that some    of    his  friends " I began, i-nlher hopelessly.  "No," he "replied, with a deop tone  of sadness in his voice; "no; not ono  of his friends ever hoard of him���������  that's Com'���������no, live years ago. Five  years���������and night nnd day 1 think of  those words, 'Vou will look after Jack,  Tom.' "  There was a silence I did not know  how to break.  "I think, sister." he added, looking  up with eyes wliich long sorrow had  filled with wonderful dopth.of expression, "I think I should have put an  end to my life before now; but 1 knew  father's first question -would be, 'Have  you looked after him, Tom?'"  The door "opened to admit the  stretcher with a new case from thc  surgery, and Dr. Freston was In a moment the professional man, absorbed  in investigating the extent of the new  arrival's injuries.  Before leaving the ward he turned  to the  bedside of  the" patient whose  friendless  condition   had  led   to   our  conversation.   He took down the head  card to fill up the details.  "Name, sister'.'"  "George Thomas."  "Age?"  "I do not kno*w; he. looks; aliout  forty; but he, is very weather-beaten.  Tlie  doctor glanced  at  the  tanned,  scarred face, nearly hidden by bandages, and stood hesitating, pen in hand.  "Occupation���������do  you   know?"  ."Sailor."  "No  other particulars, sister?"  He laid tihe card on  the  table and  wiped his pen carefully���������a methodical  and orderly man in every detail of his  work.  "I only found a few coppers anil  these old papers in his pocket," I said,  showing the contents of a pocket-book  much the worse for wear. One crum-  tiled t-.iece of paper had the words,-  "15 Back Wells Court, Hull," written  upon it; probably the address of his  last lodging. 1 proceeded to unfold  another piece, nnd found an old, plain  gold lockot, worn thiu and bright; oue  side was smooth, on the other was a  monogram still faintly legible, "J.l-V*  I felt it suddenly snatched -from my  hands.  Dr. Freston had seized it, and, carrying it quickly across tho ward, turned  the gas on full, and gazed on Uio  locket with eyes chut seemed to pierce  it throug'h.  "Ijook, sister!" he said, and his  strong hand shook as he held it towards me, ''tliere can be no mistake.  I 1'emciij.bei' this locket so well. Jack  gave ffiS'to my ���������l'aiiher Willi ih'.s photograph inside before he went to school,  aud alter father died .lack kept it. It  was au old joke of t'heirs to lake each  oliher's things, because they wero  marked with ihe same initials. I could  swear to this anywhere and 1 see quite  clearly how it ��������� came here. Jack' mot  this man at Hull, perhaps lie came oil  the same boat, and if he was hard up  ���������but he must have been hard up before he would part with this,"and"then  It's-not much use .to ,-uiy one else. No  one would give a shilling 'for an old  thing like this, but here it is, aud  here's the address: of w'hero the man  stayed. It's the lirst clue 1 have ever  had, sister," and his face was bright  with hope. "Jack may be still there;  I must go without lo.-ing a minute. I  may catch him before he goes on further. Is there 'anything else you want  me for to-night?"  He was already near the door. "No,  -not_tojiight;__the others are all ^very  comfortable; but do you uot itlTinlcTic~  would lie worth while to ask this man  where 'he got the lockot? It may not  have beeu in Hull at all, and you  would have the journey for nothing.  Give me the locket and I> will ask  him."  He handed it to me without appearing to follow what I had said.  The idea of his brother being within  reach had taken such a hold of his  mind:.that 'he could hardly endure a  minute's delay before going off to seek  him.  I bent over No. 7's bed.  "I found this among your things." I  said. "Is It your own. or did someone  sell ir to you?"  He looked up quickly and suspiciously.  ".Vh-it do you want to know for?"  ha muttered.  "I only want to know whether the  man who owned this lirst was with  you at this adiliv*'*- in Hull."  Ile looked al me sharply, and did  not answer for a   mlnuro.  "Yes." he said, slowly, "the man who  owned that was there when I -was,"  nnd ho turned round, as if unwilling  to say more.  was nothing -nore tootle learned at  that address, he'told me. The people  theue remembered quite well a man  who gave the name of George Thomas  sleeping there for one night a week  ago, but ihey were sure they had no  otlhor lodger at the time. They knew  nothing.whatever about the man. He  was evidently very poor, but h->d paid  for what he had had.  "I ought uot to have built so many  hopes upon so slight a fouudalion," he  replied, with a poor attempt at a  smile, and a tone of ��������� weary sorrow, in  his voice. "1 have waiteil so long that  I ventured to think that perhaps  at last ho���������-" Mien, checking himself,  and with an effort turning his thoughts  elsewhere���������"but I am late, sister. I  must catch up my work. Have you  anytOiing for me to-night?"  "Will you sign No. 7's paper? The  .wound was very superllcial, and Mr.  .Tones discharged liim this monuiug.  He is anxidUs to get on."  "I must speak to him first; he may  lie able to tell me something more."  and he turned towards No. 7, sitting  by the flre, and for the first time lie  looked him In the face���������the first time  for live years, rather; for I saw Dr.  Freston pause its if transfixed, and the  next moment he was at his brother's  6ide.  ���������".Tack!"' he said, ".Tack!" and could  not say another word.  But that was all "he had to say. Jack  had been the thought of 'his life, night  nntl day. for five years. And now  Jack was there, and he held him fast,  what should he say hut repeat "Jack!"  again and again, until he could realize  that; this was no dream, but rather the  'awakening to a: better and 'happier  life than he 'had known before. Jack  said nothing at all.' For one moment  he had looked around as if wishing to  escape; hut if he would he could not.  A'nd "where in the world thnt ho had  found so hard and merciless could ho  hope to meet the warm welcome.whicli  strove to find utterance in his brother's  happy eyes, which gazed on the ragged figure before him as if he could  never lbok enough?  That is all tlie tale. It gave the patients someth'.ii*- to talk about for a  day or.'..two. and was then forgotten���������  in the ward, at least.  Bul then*, are three people from  whose memories no word or act recorded hero can ever be effaced. Need  1 name them? They arc Dr. Freston,  Jack, his brother, and myself, Tom  Frestou's wife.���������Chicago Mail.  It is reckoned that tue household  (ind personal refuse of all kinds and  street sweepings bt a town amount to  about half a ton annually per head of  the population.  Chicago has a bird hospital, the only  one'of: its kind in the world, -where  sick and wounded birds are received  and cared for.  The thirteen Atlantic qahlfts now In'  ase represent a total- capital ot about  ������17,000,000.  In Holland it is the custom for women to wash the china and silver used  at breakfast and tea immediately after the meal and  in-the presence of  A  MATRIMONIAL SHOT.  Tlie Ecc<*ntrinity of  Law.  An action highly interesting to  lovers of both sexes' was uot long ago  heard before Judge Kay, of Boston.  The plaintiff, a young lady, the daughter of a wealthy gentleman, became  engaged to the defendant against her'  parents wish. When the engagement  ���������was "broken off the defendant made  demands for money, and to enforce h'.s  claims, threatened to publish the love  lei'ters that had passed between them.  An application for an injuntion to  restrain him from doing so was made,  and not only granted, but the defendant had to pay the costs.  A peculiar action was recently heard  at a country court. The defendant in  the case possessed a piece o'f forest  ���������land, and on this land a thick crop of  thistles sprang up. When the wind  was high the seed from these was  blown into the plaintiffs garden, took  root, and did damage. He accordingly sued for compensation, anrl recovered $15 damages.  Damages to the extent of 555,000 for.  the omission of a single word in a  newspaper report seems a (heavy penalty for what might, after all, have  been a mere printer's error. Such,  however, was awarded not long since  for the omission of the word "not" in  an  Irish  newspaper.  A curious application was made not  long ago before a justice of the peace.  A baby, having been left liy lis-morher  with another -woman to mind. she. on  hearing that the mother had disappeared, tried, but without success, to get  it into the workhouse. The lawyer  who appeared for the woman told the  justice that unless he admitted the  baby into rhe workhouse! at onco he  would leave it iu his custody. He  then directed the woman to place the  baby on the court table and walk out,  which she did." leaving the feeding-  bottle witli the unlucky infant. "The  child is now destitute and neglected,"  sairl_i'h'-i_lawr!qr..^aj"'^*"o_**r honor can  Wc rather prided ourselves upon being small, but select���������small, that is, as  i community.. "Select!" old Miss  Mayberry Is reported to ihave observed. "They call themselves select, do  they? Wliere were thoy selected from?  riuit is what I want .to kuow." Of  course, no oue satisfied hei* impertinent curiosity. We all knew whera  we camo from, if ������������������he didn't, and somo  some of us held strange opinions as to  Misa Mayborry's ultimate destination;  but that is neither here nor -tliere.  Still, it was "rather a startler," when  old Mr; Bgglestons, of Bermondsey,  came down to Willowtowu to live. Ho  was fabulously .rldli; he swallowed  peas -witli his knife, and called ithem  "marrerta'ts;" "tie was Impatient, headstrong, choleric, apoplectic. Two 1m-  pontant facts saved 'him from social  ostracism���������his aldermanic dinners and  his daughter Sempronia.  It is not very easy to describe Sempronia. Her beauty had ian elusive  way' of defying description. When sho  entered a room people were vaguely  conscious that something pleasant had  happened. If you were fortunate  enough to take her in to dinner she  confirmed that impression. Even mock  turtle lost its mockery wheli she sat  beside you. Not that old Eggleston  often put people off with mock turtle;  he, was far too fond of dipping his  white beard in the genuine thing to  wish to impose imitations on his  guests. Poor Harry Nichson's troubles, however, began the first time he  dined at the Egglestons', owing to Mr.  Bggieston's ambiguous speech. Mr.  Eggleston was^ gobbling away at his  soup, and only'lc-f t off to observe that  he "couldn't 'eat tihe 'ot 'otise."  "But, my dear 'sir," observed Harry  ."nothing.hut an ostrich could eat your  hothouse."  "Don't yon tie Impertinent, young  man," retorted Mr. Eggleston, "or you  and 'me'll 'ave words: I will 'eat lt If  I  like.  'Sompronia threw oil on the troubled  ���������waters, but not before Mr. Eggleston  had remarked to .the remains of his  soup that Harry was "a. nordacious  sparrer."  Sempronia was fond of her rathe*.*.  She didn't obtrude the fact, but skilfully contrived to throw   her - mantle  over him at all the social functions or  the neighborhood.   It soon Deoame an  understood  thing that  any   one  who  poked  fun  at  Mr.  Eggleston  had  no  chance   of   winning   the   good graces  of    his    beautiful i daughter.       Hor  mother     liad     been     a     lady ��������� a  very  feeble one, and married  Eggleston on account of his strong-mindedness.    Mrs. Bggieston's relatives were  so astonished by rhe originality ot such  a reason That they cut her.' It preyed  on  Mrs.   Eggleston a  good  deal, 'hut  she lived very happily with her husband until Sempronia was horn. Then,'  like Mrs. Dombey. "she couldn't make  an effort���������and died!    People who saw  poor Mr. Eggleston at that aw.ful time  said  that  he was  as  one  distraught.  He sat by the dead  woman, tiolding  her hand until she was taken away to  the grave.   Then he fell down in a fit.  He was only pi-evented from following  his wife into tho silent land by hearing the doctors say  lhat he hadn't a  chance of living.    In order to contradict thorn he recovered.    If he couldn't  "'eat the 'ot 'ouse*' it wasn't for want  of trying his jaws ou everything else  he came across.  Still, with all his faults, old Mr. Eggleston was much beloved iu Willow-  town. His speech when he first took  the chair at the "Penny Readings"  was a model of metaphorical research.  "When  I   look   round  'ere,"  ihe  said.  orHer^re^atir^^  "I hnd learned all I wished, awl repeated the information to Dr. Fi\?,ron.  "Thank you very much,-' (lie said,  simply. "f!oo'd night, sister; I may  not see you for a few days." He was  already on the landing.  "Good night, Dr. Freston," but. I  doubt if: he heard rae. He was halfway downstairs.  Next day Dr. Freslon's work was  done by the Junior ."surgeon, and the  'ward'routine went on as usual.  I could find out nothing more of No.  7's history, except'that his real age  was twenty-eight. Ho looked at least  ton years older. He was knocked  about a good deal In the world, he  told some of his fellow patients.  His injuries proved to be very slight  nndron tltie evening, of the second day  he was allowed to sit up for a short  time.  On the day following, When It was  growing dusk, tihe door of the ward  opened, and Dr. Freston came quietly in.  I saw.iat a glance that he had not  been successful in his search.    There  less to say. the baby was soon taken  to the relieving officer and conveyed  to the workhouse.  The action for ���������slander brought by  Mr. George Augustus Sala some  years ago against Mr. Harry Furniss  will be remembered. The slander complained of was uttered hy Mr. FurniRS  in a speech, in the course of wliich he  said that Mr. Sala. in submitting three  drawings of a-head, foot and hand to  the Academy, unfortunately portrayed  six roes instead of five upon the foot  he drew, and so did not get into the  schools. The Jury gave .Mr. Sala $23  damages.  T.inrti* a DriiK  In thi* Mark*.".  "I find thero !*s n general impression," ������ajd Fred I-\ Sampson, an attache of the Cincinnati Zoological Gardens, who was at the T.aclede recently, "that lions arp Ihe most costly wild  animals sought aftf-r by keepers ' ot  menageries and circuses. This is quite  wrong. Lions have for some time been  almost a drug on the market, and except when they are remarkably lnrge  they do not fetch" a large price. The  craze of late yea rs has been after rare  animals which are' Very difficult', to  capture.  "The white wildcat of Ttussla is  worth almost a rfortime, and one was  sold quite recently for the apparently  ridiculous sum or .-512,6-00. These. animals are only found on mountain's of  perpetual snow, and they are so perfectly white that It Is difficult to distinguish them when they are crouching. For this reason also they are very  hard to keep In captivity, a temperature of more than fifty degrees killing  them off In a day or two. It costs a  great, deal more to keep one of these  animals mrppllod with half-frozen air  than to feed It."���������-St. Louis Globe-  Democrat.  Ae'.fitt MIto Children. '  Tlie Cherokee Indians wore recontlj*  paid the $fi.7-"0,000 due on the sale of  Cherokee lands. The Indians acted  like children, buying the simplest articles for tho most exorbitant price,  seemingly afflicted with a desire to  get rid of their wealth as soon as possible, ".j ���������  into his white waistcoat, "I ask myself  what brings me 'ere. anrl I says to my-  ?elf, says I���������Money! I've never been  properly eddieated. but I've made-  Money! I was born iu tlie gutter, so  to speak, but I've made���������Oloney! I  ain't the genuine coine-ovor-Wllliam-  the-Conqueror and other-fine-cld-crust-  ed-tbipves lot (any one can tell I'm not  real Dosset. and only oleomargarine),  but I've made���������Mon������-y! Nobody'd call  me a new-laid Brahma: I'm only ,a  slxte(-n-Co-'the-shillln'ja,id-take-me-back-  if-'igli-Frenc'h-cgg, but' I've made-  Money!' And now I've made money t  mean to spend li on people I like, so  I'll be very glad if you'll all come up  to supper when tiie performance Is  over. Jlr. Niohol-ron'i* going to sing  Tlie 'Eart Hw������l Down.' I don't  know what it's 1w>wcd down about, hut  I des������ny it's very pr<-tty." And Mr.  Ecglcston retired amid thunderous ap-  pwnse.  Harry Nlrihol-son .".in*1,- "The Heart  Bowed Down" with gn-ut effect. "He's  always up at the "all,** Mr. Kgglestort  Informed the people. He liked Nicholson now, although he couldn't resist  calling him "a confounded young  pirr/py for snigger!n' Iiec*iuse I got  flummoxed and said 'Mr. KucU'it'on  will give a SmltV'tiiP other *!til������!it  He's of a good family, Nicholson is.  I "���������"���������/Mild like my daughter to marry  into a srood fam'lv. I never was mucn  of a f.im'ly man myself, though I  rtessay I could buy a crest and a Latin  mortar at tlie 'Es-ald's college. Still,  It's a fine thing to have a picture gallery full of 'beautiful murderesses and  ruffins In armor and Sir'Ugos and Sir  Lunchalcits, and Laily Rdlths of the  white nnd. and stit'-*i'illke."  Sompronia did not object to Nicholson's picture gallery at all. She and  Nlcfliolson were always together. Of  course, Nicholson was poor. Indeed,  h'ls picture gallery was his chlcif possession. He -**as expected to live-up  to it. Peoplo supposed that ho did  something for a living, hut no ono  knew exactly what It was. One day,  however, It occurred to him that ho  tf was In love.  "I'm po'.tig nwny," he said abruptly  to Miss Rggleston.  They were sitting hy tihe drawing  room lire.   It was only 0:30, hut just  nfter Christmas it Is very dark at that  time. Miss Bj-gleston wds cflnd ln  black velvet, and what Mr, Eggleston  called "tihe fam'ly dl-nons" sparkled  on her white neck. Mr. Eggleston al-  ���������ways insisted on her wearing jewels  at dinner. He was mortally afraid of  his susjilclous-lookliig luitler, as that  stony-hearted function-try." liad threatened "to resign" if Mt. Eggleston  dared to sit down to dinner in a shooting jacket. "If people don't respect  themselves," lie had observed, "I do.  When I served,hiy Lord of Ditchwater  he always dresSed for dinner, and I'm  not agoin' to doiuoan myself by .waiting on .a parvenoo. who don't." That  had set tied it. HaOier thau he called  by such nn awful word, as "parvenoo" Mr. Eggleston apologized, and  PorkWis ..hurled the hatchet.  When Nicholson said he was going  away Sempronia didn't like it nt all..  Her blue eyes looked Inlo the lire with  a rather abstracted air. The lli-cllf-M  played upon her beautiful. If somewhat haughty, features. What right  a butterinan's daughter had to rc-  RcmbTe the De Veres of romance lt  was difficult to discover, but she in-  dnbltmlily did so. Her features wero  neither faultily faultlo**fe nor splendidly null; they certainly were very beautiful.  "Going away?" she asked. "Surely,  Mr; Nicholson, .hhls is rather a sudden  freak."  Nicholson, rose from his chair and  stood looking down on her. He was  black as a croi**, hut 'with a prepossessing blackness. He had a very  musical voice, Ms gayety was infectious, and people lingered to listen to  his laughing witticisms. But he did,  not seem inclined to be funny to-night  For so mercurial a youth he was de-'  oidedly serious. His hand twisted tihe  beautiful stud in his invmaculate shirt  front. Altogether he was very preoccupied. The rug wasn't big enough.  He trod on the St. Bernard and was  stricken "jy remorse.  - "Such nn owl is well out of the  way," he said. "Miss Eggleston, I'll  BO."  "Yon forget thnt you dine with us."  "Oh, no; I don't forget. Perhaps you  will let'me off. I'm not fit for tiie giddy throng to-night." ' ' *���������  "It isn't a giddy throng. Tliere will  be papa and Mr. Gubbins. True. Mr.  Gubbins is volatile���������away from Mrs.  Gubbins���������.but you cannot call papa  giddy."  "No. I'm off to-morrow. In" fact.  I've made a discovery."  "In thc picture gallery? Or buried  treasure in the paddock?"  "Don't scoff at my poverty." he said  with  repressed  feeling.    "Don't scoff  at that.   God knows I never felt it until to-night." "  ���������   "And why to-night?"  "To-night?" . with assumed indifference. "Well, even the lightest-hcirted  fellow finds Black"Care perched ifi his  shoulder sometimes. I���������I was actually  thinking this afternoon."  "No wonder you' are tired." But she  '���������''didn't look at bim.  "Yes; funny wasn't it? Actually  thinking. ��������� What do you think, I  thought about?"  "I don't know. Something interesting?"  "I can't say that.    It seemed Interesting���������to me."  She smiled.  "I went-up to   thn   gun room,-and  flung myself into a chair."  "And lit a cigar."  "Weil,   yes.    When .a   man    thinks,  he's b.ouiul to liglit up: can't help it."  "So you lit up?"  "Yes. I lit   uj).    Then I sat    down  again; then I got up; then I sat down."  Nearly woro out the chair before I'd  finished."  "That was serious." '  "lt was. I wanted something. Didn't  know what I wanted, so called myself  names  and   pitched   my   cigar   away.  Wliich   was   rash. t It   was    a    good  cigar,"    regretfully;  "and    I haven't  many left.   Must take to smoking shag  like Old lkcy does.    He-eujoys it."  "Don't be horrid."  "I got tired of walking up and  down, so L stopped short in the middle  of the floor, and fixed miy eye upon  the carpet pattern. It's an awfully  good plan that. The carpet spoke hack.  to mc.   It said "  "Yes?"  "Oh. it said, you   hone-idle   beggar,  you've wasted    your    manhood,   you  jhaye-lpUered in  the vineynrd  (metaphorically, of course���������you can't "loiter'  in vineyards where there aren't any���������  stands lo reason) while others" tolled,  and all that sort of thing, don't you  know.    Yet all the time, some Impossible dream���������a  dream of some  great  happiness���������has haunted me. You have  drifted,   drifted,   drifted,   like  a boat  bottom up with this happiness    quite"  close to 'yon.   You had but to go forth  into   the  world,  and���������nnd    win    you  spurs���������and you didn't go.   That's what  the carpet said.    Extraordinary hit of  Brussels,.wasn't lt^'  "Yes.   Didn't lt say nnything else?"  "Lots ot things.    It said I must lose  this woman I lovetl because I was ruined."  "li'ilned!"  "Yes, ruined; and all that sort of.  thing. I have been living on capital/  Instead of Interest. The only redeeming feature, about the affair is that the  gallery will have lo go. "i oil see.lt's  hard lines on a fellow to/have nothing  but a gallery left to hiin; he can't live  up to It; and yet he has to do so. None  of those ruffianly old ancestors of  mine ever did a day's work ln their  lives. I'm afraid I haven't done ..much.  But why **hould I bore you with this?"  "You dou't boio me, and you suffer!"  "It Is a trifle unpleasant."  "You don't think It would be particularly pleasant?"  "I was horribly bored by that-.gal:  lery. Lady Edith, of the White Hand,  will fetch a'good price, from a soap  man. I couldn't have stood that depressing female much longer. She  had a way of sticking her hand out  at one, as If a fellow couldn't live up  to lt. I'm thinking ^of Joining the  mounted poHco In the Northwest Territory. They're a splemdid lot; nnd  there's always the pleasurable excitement of being scalped by The-Man-  Who-nides-a-MuIc Wlth-Hls-Face-To-  'Phc-Tail. or some other equally long-  named hero."  "The experience wouldn'tbe of much  use to you because It could only happen once."  "Yes, I suppose so. There are worse  things than being scalped."  "Possibly."  "And so good-by to the old times���������  and to^-to "Lady Edith. I wish somo  one would scalp her. When a man is  on the 'brink of ruin it is best for him  to forget everything."  "Yes." she said almost lnaudibly.  "It is best for h'm to forget, ibut not���������  everything. I���������I am very sorry for  you."  He pressed *.her hand Tightly to his  lips. .She knew that this was his characteristic farewell to the hopes he had  cherished. Womanlike, she was angry  at his silence. And then his wretched  pride. She 'had enough monev for  both. What did his poverty matter?  Hadn't he that delight ful gallery of  ancestors, some of whom, if report  spoke truly, w.erelitlh- belter than Uiu  wicked. Vou couldn't buy family portraits like. that. There were plenty of  dubious old masters In the market, but  few undoubtedly "old mlsslsses," as  Mr. Eggleston called thetn. And hero  was this irrational youth, who loved  her, going off to be scalped by Pawnees or '.Comanche*-,; or Sioux, or  Apaches, or any other outlandish tribe  of Indians with whom fate might eon-  front him. Why not slay at 'ionic ami  have his hair pulled only iii the 'family  circle?; And it was such beautiful  hair. 'Now, If the Rev. Mr.' Gubbins  were to be scalped by the heathen, it  would not matter nearly so mucli. A  fringe of dirty gray hair could easily  be removed, but those;' hyacihthiuc  locks! It made her" sick to think of  the scalping knife circling round their  obon glories. However, she dissembled after thc manner of women, and  lightly hade bim good-by.  He disappeared in the darkness, feeling that desperate sorrow which only  comes to a man once'in a| lifetime, for  the simple reason that he couldn't possibly live through it twice. "By Jove,"  he muttered hetween his teeth, - "-it  would go hard with any one who  crossed me to-night."  "Har���������Harry!',' gurgled a choking  voice from the shrubs. " 'Elp���������'Elp!''  The next moment Harry had Jumped Into the bushes. A bullet whizzed  by his ear as he did sto, and a cowardly ruffian, who had half strangled Mr.  Eggleston. fled into the unknown.  "My wife's portrait,'.' cried Mr. Eggleston.    "They knocked me down as  I was coining up the walk "  Harry ran swiftly down the avenue,  his pulses tingling with fierce joy, aaid  all the savage within hiin revelling in  the prospect of a fight.  Just as he reached the gr.te his foot  tripped against ������. rope, which was  stretched across the drive. ;���������' There was  another shot���������-a red-hot, scaring, tear-  \ Ing dart in his sdioulder���������and he" fell  forward on his face, while the cracksmen made off across the fields, cursing their own stupidity In beginning  operations so prematurely. Porkins  disappeared with them.  Harry was   carried Into ' the house  and  laid on  a  couch.    Doctors were  telegraphed for "right and  left.    For-  hours he remained withpallid features  and closed  eyes.    The' doctors  shook  their heads    and looked    wise:    The  wound was a serious one; tlie bullet  hard to find; if certain. things didn't  happen the patient would recover; if  they ' did  happen,   he  wouldn't;   that  was nil that could bo extracted from  them as they nodded with" Sphihxlike  gravity, and returned to their patient.  Sompronia sat beside Harry through;  .the long .night. 'It was .useless'to dissimulate', any   more.     She. was  qu'.te  tearless and as white as wax'.v Every  now.and then she moistened .his lips  or smoothed  the pillow,  but   did  not  give  way  to her. grief.    It was only -  towards  morning  on,the second  day  after  the  doctors  had  extracted   tho '-  "bullet  that she  betrayed   any   excitement.   In tihe cold, gray dawn; a robin  deluded  into momentary cheerfulness-  by the thought that spring would surely come some  day,  began, to  twitter  his  cheery melody  to thc casement's  glimmering square.    The song of the  bird smote Sompronia. ' She shivered,  and bending over, the wounded man,  kissed him - passionately.    "Ah," "she  moaned,  as sho flung herself on her  knees by tlie couch,* "I 'was" cold, and  hard,  and cruel to you," 'but I  never  meant to] let you leave me.    I would  have followed you to the world's end  for ono word of love.'but you wero so  proud���������so  proud���������that  I  could  never-  humble 'myself  to  tell yon so.    And  now���������now yoii will not know It."  She brushed back her hair and stared with wild, won eyes into the gray-  dawn. Then a wonderful thing hap-  "pened.-���������The=sleeping-man-opened_his_  eyes and smiled. From that.moment  he grew hotter, "I- seemed to hoar your  voice faintly, and afar off," lhe explained,'when he was able-to. "sit "up and  take a. little nourishment," as Mr. Eg-  . gleston put it. "I was crossing a gray,  river, accompanied by an old man,  who was half clad ln skins. As we  drew near to the opposite shore.'dimly  dlscernihlo through the gloom, pale  phantoms camo down to meet us, and  then���������then I heard yonr voice, and all  Is well."  "Yes," she made answer softly, "all  was well. God lias been very good to  us, and all Is well."-     .    .,-.."   .-  "And if anybody's got to be scalped," said, old Mr. .Eggleston, fondly'  surveying the young couple, "let's 'ope  ns it'll bo those ruffians as gnrroted  me when that sanctimonious Porkins  (the butler) helped 'em to get my  watch. Anyhow, they'll have their hair  cut short at Her Majesty's expense  for some time, bless hor. It's refreshing, after all these years of paylnR  taxes to get something for It."���������Detroit  Free Press.   ' ���������- .'J_.  "������������������wttny to Oiitc** j*   TiTiin.  The Winchester;girls have discarded  the yellow garter and the pillow stuffed with love letters, and have discovered a new and sure scheme to en-  suare tho wily*Clark county youths, as  Is evldmiced by the'' following paragraph from the Democrat: " The  latest superstition is that if a girl  takes the small.bow; which fastens the  ���������-lining of a man's hat; and wears it Inside her shoe, she will have a proposal  from the youllh within a month. .The  puccprs of tho scheme may be open to  question, hut lt is proving very destructive to "hats."���������Louisville Courler-  THE WIDOW'S COW  ae xiu-t "I"'*' >'������*> *-������������������l-" roor l'ud*tb u  tlio I.uni  HAVE heen over to Widow Oilman's this afternoon and brought  home that cow," said, Farme**  Merrion as he sat.down to sup--  per.  "Why, papa!" exclaimed Dahy.  tTTiat will the poor willow do *}������w-^  "I .had    never thought    of    that,  "aughed the farim-i*. ,,,--'  "Well, I call that real mean, spo.ro  op Joe. "We've got a whole barnyard  full of cows, whilo that poor vomanj  has hut just ono."  "'The widow has been buying provisions of me all along. The bargalni  was that as soon as It amounted to $30 .  If S'he had not the money to pay me,.'  I -was to have the cow. So, you seo,  tho cow is bought and paid tor."  "Oh, papa, It's a Bhame, because*  ahe's half their living. Poor Mrs. VJU-  :nan has been sick so long, you know,  and now that fho Is getting about}  agata, I know sho mii6t feel aluiostl  lost without poor old Whitey." And)  there were tears ln Eva's eyes.  At last, pushing back her food m**������  tasted, she sprang up and went around  to her father, and pleaded with Mm.  to take back the cow.  "I would, father," said hie wHo.  "You know what the Bible" .says abo-ot  belng good to tho poor."  "Tut, tut!".said Jhe farmer.   "Yoa  can all he very free with other peo- .  pie's money.     How many or    you, E  wander, would  give anything out. oil  your own pockets?"  "Papa, dear, you   shall have   m*".'  bank and every dollar in it," said Eva.  "And. you needn't buy me a nevft  overcoat this winter, father.   I'll wear  my old one,"sald' Joe. .   ���������  -.  "Please, papa,  can't I"sell my pot  ..  pig' to help pay for.the cow?"- asked  Daisy. -  '"Well, I declare,' laughed the far-,  mer.   "Tell me where you all learn-so  much "generosity."  "I have tried to instill It Into them,  my dear," said Mrs. Merrion, "as Je-.  sus has taught it'to us through- his  word.   'He that hath pity on the poor,';  you know, 'lendeth to the Lord;  anfl"  that which he hath given' will.he pay-  hlm again.'    God's word is sure."  The result was that the next n*.orn-  Ing tihe farmer^ sold the cow "to his  children; and what fun they had driv  ing her home!     ���������  As they drew near, the cottage theyi  ���������Became so boisterous that the wldowi  . and one of .her. sons came out to tho  gate, and there stood old Whitey patiently, by the fence with the"chlldron}_  around."   ���������     <   . . -���������     .  ' '   '���������      -   ���������  "Good morning, Mrs. Dilman; we ye*,  ijiro'ught back your cow," cried,Joe. -_.  .'���������For'the'land's   sake!" cried-.shoj  "Iiolding up.both hands.     "Don't yoij  want' her?" ' ��������� -;  "You want her worse," .said .Joej  "and so papa sold her to us children)  an we've brought her back a present!  ,to you."     ���������*'.''     ' '���������'.".,..  "You blessed children!! -, God 1)0  /-.raised!" exclaimed the widow, bursting into" tears, and little Mark thre*J������  ���������both "arms around the'cow's neck.  Farmer Morrion's children declared  ns they were returning home, "that  they .never felt so happy., in their,  lives." ' They had learned that .it ia  Indeed'"more blessed" to give than'to  receive."���������Our, Young Folks. . ���������   -  > A l"nniiy sti-cil.  Every'little boy and girl will' bo  pleased to .'see the funny steed that a.  little boy in Ashford, 111.,.has trained  to drive for hie own pleasure. That-is  why we print the accompanying picture. Now plenty of-boys have tho  same'opportunity.to train a pig toi  'drive'and It'must be great eport try  ing" to tral-n ono. Everybody knows���������-  who has driven pigs, not harnessed ,ta'  anything how sure ��������� thoy are to go ���������  the wrong way.- Therefore to undertake to .train one for driving like - al  horse, dog, or "goat must he amusing!  indeed.' Perhaps no pig will ��������� ever.  make a real fast'racer, but the idea ot  *^ur little Ashford friend may bee;mo  <*ery popular  W  m  .   ..     A Cony lltnl for Do-lln.  "    "  *A pretty doll bed can be made from  a grape basket. ' Remove the handle  and replace one-third 'of the way from  the end.   Line the basket neatly with  eilkollne  or cheese  cloth,  and  wind!  the handle with a atrip of the "same, ,  and again with narrow ribbon, ending  in a bow at each end of the   handle.  Put a ruffle, edged with narrow laco  around the ouslde of the basket.   Inclose the short end by fastening acan-.  opy of the material used to handle and  edge the basket.    Fasten lace-edged  curtains to the   top of   the   handle^  drawing to" either   side, whore   they"  may he tied with   ribbon. * Cover   a  piece of pasteboard fo fit theJiattOmi'  of the basket, ana the hed Is ready for  mattress, pillow, etc.   It is fine enougl  (or the queen of all the dolls.  ~L'f>  m  Journal. ���������*���������.  Irrltntlne.   .  "Well." said the philosopher to tlie,  man .who was tired, "you know that  .nothing worth "having can be got without hard -work.''  VThat'a what makes me so tired of  you philosophers." was the' reply; "you  are always making that remark, and  saying it as if it were something to be  thankful tor." ^_ ...  Not Quito  In Sliape.  Mother���������Why, children, what's all  this noise ahout?      ..  Little Freddy���������We've had gran'p3  find Uncle' Henry locked ln the cupboard for "an hour, an' when they get  a little angrier I'm going to play g*--  ing Into the llon'n cage.  A Bure tvnr.  :Mamma���������Bob, dearest, I ^entreated  papa for a whole half hour to-day.  that he would buy you a pony, but I  cannot move him.'  Bob (indignant)���������-Why didn't.; yon  faint, then ? - Couldn't you do that  much: for met /&0  W  %'  m  m  ii-sy  r&A-  Power and  ' Responsibility.  KAUFMANN KOHh/ER, Rab-  | bi :Templo. Fifth Avonue-Sev-  I enty-second Street, Now York  I   City.  aim whicli seeks the peace and wel-  faie ol all claioes alike, oi every home  in tlio land, every soul as child of God  Unions or corporations that crush individual skill and enterprise ��������� are tyrannical powers void of soul, void of love.  Lot responsibility, for all and each become .the leading principle, and power,  becomes a,tower of strength, a protection for all.  tf  1 Tliey helped every ono his riclgtilioi'; ana  : "vevjr one suid to his brother, He of good  courage���������Isnliih, sell., G.  The favoiitc word of our age ia power.  We no longer dread the forces of nature; we have learned to subjugato tha  fiery steeds and hitch them to our  chariot, to cairy us triumphantly with  lightning speed across cuith and sea to  '.lo our bidding; wo havo turned tho  rays of the sun and all tliu things hidden in thc soil into sources of human  'power, and we rato men and nation*,  the trades and tho sciences, even knowledge and character, by the power thoy  .wield.  But thero is something crude and sclf--  ish in thnt universal strife und struggle  for power.   For whoro thoro is victory  on  one  side  there    is   defeat    ou   tha  other.-   Every suocoss hero implies fad-  .ure   there.    Power   cau; bo   no   end   to  .itself; it may bo used wcll'or misused;  .it may become tho means of uplifting  or of  "crushing    others.    Power    is',a  trust.   It emanates from a higher Powor,  '.Which is benign and just.    It  is given  ���������to God's^ children for help, not for h.iriti.  It must,"in order to be a gift of-heaven,  prove    a source    of strength    for  the  feeble.   It must not ovoi.uvc aud over-  Whelm, but protect and shield' the powerless.  The greatness of our age consists not  in tho powerful-machinery" we have invented, in the mighty, s.toam and electric,.  forces  whicli  proclaim   man's'dominion  over nature, nor in the great organizations of labor and capital that mako the  " achievements  of marvellous  enterprises  possihle, nor even in  thoso" intellectual  forces,  such  as    science,  literature  and-  the press," which interlink the lands find  the nations and unify the  world.    The  _decp  spiritual    curreut  undoi lying and  overruling all_.movements    and amis or  our  . ecutury,  "tha still,    small  voice"  heard in the recesses of all hearts today,    Is    tho    word      "responsibility."  fBvery  human  woe  that  comes  to   our  notice, every condition of wretchedness  that    we encounter,    the    iierue    social  Struggles and  tho - exasperating    labor  etrikes   which   we watch with    abated  breath hold" before our minds with even  greater impressivencss the lesson of responsibility.    ' "'  ,     .True, in everyday experience we are  inclined to' regard power as the means  of  controlling  life  for  selfish  purpose-!"  " and each privilege"as the "opportunity of  personal enjoyment and ease." The man  twho stands at tho top of the sociariad-  . der is, as a rule, regarded .by those beneath him as one    who    has great re-'  ,,sources of.pleasure and mighty advantages for peisonal aggrandizement open  ��������� to him, and therefore made an object of  snvy and jealousy, if not of malice and  hatred.    Nor can it he denied that the  freat majority of men are so prompted  y selfish aims and motives as to be ever  eager to abuse power, a.nd privilege by  Indulgence in passion and-greed.   On^the"  ather^ hand,  the less fortunate, no less  guided by narrow, sellish    feelings, be-  .*hold.i*a this inequality of liie"*tho favoritism of Providence and rebel against  this osuelty of fate.    This    is an altogether erroneous view.    There    aro uo  favors in God's world, but involve-also  greater obligations."   Each pmiloge we  enjoy .means     another. duty,    livery.,  ���������power we obtain imposes upon us some  'new   responsibility.. There   is-no such-  thing as equality    in life.    Nature did  not fashion���������all flowers,. iind .trees alike.  Its beauty "consists  i"i    its  variety   of  form aud color, in its contrasts of high  and low, of strong and feeble.   Neither  "'aro all men moulded alike, physically or  .. intellectually; -otherwise human    exist-  ' "eice would be bereft of all charm, of  '-'all ambition.    *   '' -   "" '   "'. "        *'  - There is only*one.way of countenancing the contrasts of life.    "Let not the  "'  wise glory in his'wisdoni," neither let the  mighty glory, in his might,', nor let the  rich glory in his iichne=s; .but let him  "tha* glories glory in this, that he under-  standetlfand-knoweth me, that 1 am the  ���������-Lord-"- .who "���������exercise ���������loving���������kindness,-  judgment    and    rightcoitauess    ut    the  earth;-for  in -these    things *1* delight,  gaith the Loid"  (Jer. ix., 23,24). .Eveiy  .   distinction .-in rank aud,..power, must,  mean higher tasks, greater responsibilities; every privilege gi anted must rouse  a. keener"sense  of  duty    and  assert" a  ,'greater"claim of helpful lovu'and.pro'-  tection for the less privileged.   Mutuality is the'magic spoil ot happiness; it "is  \. tho watchwoid, tha message of tho age:  life is assuming a new moaning for us.  The  upper  classes  dare  no__loiiger  idle  away their time in mere ploasurc-seel*.-  ing, shutting' their eyes to tho misery  and woo of those huddled - together m  filthy quarters," and saying, with Cain,  "Am   1 the   keeper  .of my   brother 1"  Thej_aro learning" tho.lesso-i of responsibility. *They can no longer-in lalso conceit hold aloof fiom the child, of  the  -'rgUttcr,-whose ignorance "and shame are.  :     suro, to  become a���������g"ourco    of 'peril to  them.   '., ,\   -y   .j '    - . '*  Responsibility has hecomo tho rallying  cry of the better classes throughout our  land, throughout tho world. The-wide  gulf yawniug. between tho highland  humble," between tha enlightened and  the ignorant, everywhere clamors for  heroic actions to. counteract tho physical,  -:' and moral coi ruption exhaling its deadly , poison among the' poverty-stricken  ' -* ahd thteateiiing the safety and tho purity of every home and every Ide. Our  churches and synagogue*-.,are':more and  more turning religion from a policy of  life insurance, for the world . to come  into a system of mutual responsibility  for tho life, the salvation,-tho'-joy'and  the happiness and purity of all.' Char-!  ity and education .are becoming' fcvyr  broader,-truly philanthropic,* ever eager  to study- and to supply the needs qf all,  and even when dealing with crimo we  are loss ready to condemn, hut investigate the conditions^ that caused it and  share 'in the blame cast upon society,  of whicli wc are members as well as  transgressor?    '  And this - principle of icsponsibilty ii  at work    also in    bringing    lalior  and  -   capital ever closer together.   Linked together hy mutual    interests,  tliey can*  not fail to make that hh-kerunion -their  Hl������ Bfotlier Knew He Wtin Out.  The Duko of Leeds, -who has just celebrated his fortieth .birthday, will chiefly be remembered as tho youthful candidate for Parliament, who, when asked  by a scoffer at one of hi3 meetings  whether his mothor know he was out,  retorted, "Yoa, and at 10 o'clock on  the polling, day sho will know I'm in."  He was in, sure enough, and for eight  years, as Marquis of Carmarthen, sat in  the House of Commons as member for  Brixton. Tha Duke's connection with  tho city d*.t*M back to the sixteenth  century, when one of his ancestors, foi-  lov-iiig the custom of tho time, married  the daughter of tha nicrchiuit to whom  ha was apprenticed, and afterwards he-  came Lord Mayor. This was Sir Kdward Osborne, who, occupied tho Man-  ���������ion House in 1582.  Abandon  the Saloon.   -  Tha way to prevent a complete extermination of thc liquor trallie through  prohibitory legislation is to abandon thc  saloon. This is the striking conclusion  reached by JBoufort's Wine and Spirit  Circular (Hew York), in-a recent review of the "trade situation, it says :���������  '"I'he, average saloon is out of line with  public sentiment. Thc average saloon  ought not to bo defended by our trade,  but.it ought to be condemned. In small  towni the average saloon is a nuisance.  It is a resort for all tough charauteis.  and .in the south for ..ill idlo_*uegioas.  It i������ generally on a prominent street,  nnd it is usually run by a sport who  cares only for.the almighty dollar. From  this resoit the drunken man starts reel  ing to his home; at tliis lesort the  local lights ara indulged in. Tt is ������  stench ui^'Jie nostrils of society and a  disgrace to the wine and spirit trade.  How, then, shall we defend the aveiage  saloon . We answer, Don't'defend it, but  condemn it. Wc must stand abreast of  the most advanced public sentiment; wo  must oppose prohibition,' but tavor only  decent trade; we must oiler society a  substitute for the aveiage -saloon; we  must ask society to join with us in  securing model licenso laws; wc must  demand character qualifications and g������t  men in the retail liquor business who  will conduct their places as drug stores,  for instance, are conducted. . We must  help to clean, the .Augean stables; we  must lift the business out ot the rut-  into-which"-it has run "for bo long, a  time; we must'prove that-.we are the  friends of law, order, decency, temperance." '  LnrEC  Suiu For^Mlsalons.  At' Xew York on Sunday last pledges  for $53,470, for* missionary woik were  gi\en on Sunday by the people who assembled at the-Gospel Tabernacle, 003  Eighth avenue, and listened to the appeal of the Kev. Dr. A. B. Simpson. Over $0,100 in cash was given. The pi onrushes to pay have a year to run. Dr."'Simp-  'gon says .they'always are paid���������that is,  less- than "1 per coat, -of tho note givers  default in payment, and this loss is made  up by contributions from other sources. -  The collection was the last for the  year of the Christian and Missionary Alliance. , From similar sei vices at Old  Orchard, Me., and other places Mr. Simp-  on has collected "ilOO.OQO, so ho has ������150,*  000 pledged. He expects to get in ������200,-'  000. Last year he collected $186,000  The largest-gift was a promise of $5,500.  Three pledges of f"5,000 eaeh were found  in * the baskets, one. of . $4,000, one ot  $3,000, and of $2,500, two of $2,000, and  one of $1,500.". , t  Dr. Simpson will be". remembered hy  many Totontonians "who attended the  conventions of the Christian and mi-siou-  ary alliance at'Munro PaiK-for the past  two or three summers as a quiet, earnest''and impressive speaker. -His methods aro utteily devoid of sensationalism  and his appeals for "funds are based on  calm argumentative" reasoning i espoct-  ing the needs 'o'f the mission field, and  the duty of all Christians in^ that connection. *        ? \ >  Advl:** to Young Men.  In the last edition to hand of "Our  Young Men," a d-Mer little penny  magazine, . publish---*,', in l-iondoii, ling.,  theie appeals lit* lollowmg shoi l, do-  cidodcly inlori.-"ting- aiticle by Sir Uillicit, Pai ker, il.P., bearing" the talc,  "Unlo You. Yo.ui!,. -Men":���������  "Jt is very easy to give advice, and  for my own part i have taken very little advice in the; world, chieily, 1 suppose, because I,have asked so little; also,  because, unless the matter on which advice is sought is ono to which a general piiniMplc can he applied, it is as likely to do harm as good. I am speaking now  more paiticuhirly of advice upuu tlio  mutters connected with the business ol  life. L think vse can all help each other  a great deal by advicu in personal and  moral affairs. In Uio work of life, however, in the making of a career, i believe  the toot of the thing is in the mau  himself, aud no advice is of much value  unless tha man feels iu his bones it was  tho true counsel to receive. I havo been  asked abmetimes by ; people very near  and dear to mo quvstions as to what  course to pursue where tho business or  professional interests of lifo were concerned, and my reply invariably has  been: 'What do you feel that you must  do? 1 know what I should do if tha  circumstances were initio, but 1 do not  think or feci or work quito in the samo  way that you do, and to suggest a course  which would be my couiso might bo to  advise a path unsuitable to you.'    *  "I believe that the secret of success in  life is what l: may call a woll-delincd  policy, a goal, an object in view���������to  make tho most of yourself; to test yourself; not to be impelled by a. wish for  woi Idly honor or profit, but first to secure that competence which makes every man a better citizen of the Stale,  because self-supporting, and then to use,  as is his duty, every energy and every  ability he possesses "to its utmost. !No-  thing is sidder than wasted eneigy, misdirected foice. Ok the other hand, nothing is so useful as conservation of energy. I believe that a great "number of  young men are continually -.-.orknig \i?c-,,  lessly in order to be ncti\c, to be constantly hammering on the an-.il; to keep  thing3 going seems to them the-tiue  way to succeed. It is well to stiike  when the iron is hot, hut it is also well  not to strike until the iron is hot. To  act is good;.but to chooso wisely tha  " time ior action is what makes it good  To do things in season and out of season is an axiom wliich 13 followed much  too  often, I believe.  "Action, without the watchful eye, thc  careful and obsei\ant mind, which sees  the moment to stiike and then promptly delivers the blow, as often as not  mars chance and foi tune. The danger  of our age is that we do too much and  think too little. There is nothing more  -splendid than energy and force applied  to an object with enthusiasm, with an  ardent purpose. "There is also nothing so  good as seasons of passive thought, of  apparent idleness, of meditation fiee  from the imp of restless action constantly nudging the elbow.  "While being diiect of purpose one  should avoid being,narrow. The main  idea should be at the back of thc head  all the time, but the greatest elasticity  of action in detail should be cultivated  so long as it is uot out of harmony with  the general puipose of life. With all  these things -nothing is so valuable as  self-reliance. I have seen this joined to  extraordinary shyness and modesty. Shyness is not a bad fault. It is more to  be desired than a personal aggressiveness. The chief thing ia to know what  you want, and then to move steadily towards , it, remembering always to play  the game fairly, and realizing that you  never get safe foothold on the ladder  of lifo  by pulling  another man down."  As Enduring" as Brass.  After three days spent in examining  the antiquities of the home counties the  members of the .British Archaeological  Association will have had their op.iuon  sti engtliened that, of tlie various his-  tone, records���������stained gluts, stone mon  umeuts, and so forth���������-those writ by man  in brass are the niost-'reliuble and satisfactory, because the most dm able.  Scotland and Ireland arc almost devoid  of such memorials of tlie past. Of tho  three to four thousand iu England which  have survived the Kefornuitiou, the Civil  Wars aud the Puritan iconoclasm most  are to be found on the east coast. In  this matter Kent and Norfolk arc rivals.  But the oldest, dated 1277, has its place  in tlio Church of Stoku d'Abernou, a  small village near Loatkerhead. Like all  other early brasses, it is life size, uud  gives a perfectly pieservcd impression  of a figure in chain armor. Of smaller  size and more plentiful are thc brasses  ���������f the next three centuries, all'ording  between them '.'.unmistakable fashion  plates of the changing attire both ol  men and women in every class of life���������  not only the nobleman,who alone could  afford the stone .monument,' hut the  merchant and tradesman. Always: the  date is attached,- and it: is invariably  found that thc oldest are the finest.  A Mi-uorlnl  Church.  -The  Greek chuich  which was opened  recently at the Shipka Pass was erected  hy the Russians as a memorial of the  r.epulsion by combined Russian and Bulgarian forces of the Turks at that placo  twouty-frve years ago. The church is ol  Greek pattern, the architect being Professor Vosnesenski. The double Russian  cross is a feature of the minarets. Ship  ka is a pass in thc Balkans, ou thc  sido neaiest to ltoumeha, about fifty  miles northeast of Phihppopolis, and  eighty-seven miles southwest of Rust-  chuk, on the Danube, lt was held  stoutly hy the Russians in the war ol  1877 in an entieuchcd camp against the  desperate assaults of the Tuiks, undei  Suleynian Pasha, from the 21st to the  20th of August, and later fiom Sepleiu-  ber*the 9th to the 17th. These battles  were, in fact, thc  turning point of the  /War. The losses on both sides were enor  mous.   The church was opened dining a  HAD MADE BIS WE  Fully .Expected   to Die, Had Ar  ranged all hia Earthly Affairs.  -*i "  (low Death was Disappointed by the Happy  Restoration to Health and Strength of  Mr. Tceiy.  Sumner, Assa., Oct. 20.���������(Special'.)  ���������Mr. Louis Teeny ot this place" was  so ill with Inflammation or the Bowels'and Kidneys that no oie ever expected him to recover.. All hope bad  been:. abandoned and Mr. Teeny had  made his will, fully expecting that he  would die.  In this extremity Mr. Cosgrave,  Postmaster, thought of Dodd's Kidney Pills and immediately gave -i- Mr.  Teeny a dose. This treatment; was con  tinucd at intervals with the^ result  that in a very short time the man  who was thought to be dying, was  on his feet and goiug around as' if  nothing had happened.  . This remarkable cure of such an extreme case-has created quite,a sensa-  sation in the neighborhood and many  kind words are heing said of Dodd's  Kidney Pills for the wondeiful work  they did in Mr. Teeny's case.  This remedy has always been recognized among the people as a sure,  cure for Backache, Rheumatism _and  all Kidney Troubles, hut this is the  fust case ever reported in this ,vicin-  lty where they have been used with  such quick results.  Mr. Teeny himself is very grateful  to Dodd's Kidney Pills for his_ happy  restoration.  People in and about Sumner have  just about concluded that theue is nothing in the way ol sickness that  Kidney Pills will not cure, and there  is scarcely a home to be found in the  neighborhood that does not contain a  box of this wonderful medicine.  Men, women and children are findin  out every day some new virtues m it  and it is very interesting to hear  them get together and compare notes  as to what Dodd's Kidney Pills have  done in their various homes.  J?*on tne Farmer.  ������������������ When butter is gathered in the churn  in granular form it is never overclaimed. Pounding it after it is. in a  lump,or large mass is what ovcrchuins  it.  ,Tho feeding of pumpkins, beets, car-  lots, tin nips and potatoes to cattle  should bo dono^'with a view more to  adding variety to the food; than to 'giving. Buch articles ns portions of the  regular rations. Grain and ha>' are the  best of all foods for cows in winter  but.the.animals appreciate a chan-j  from the dry foods to ensilage or vegetables.' Pumpkins, beets and eai rots  may be sliced and fed raw, while potatoes . should he; eonk-Vl and thickened  with bran and cor...'..al by way of adding to the variety.'  Hott Mnch   Shall Wc, Feed Poultry I  Cnn we feed hens too much ?; How  shall we know when they have enough.  These are question-j every poultrymati  has 'asked moro than once. Some  would reply that thc hen bhould he  kept hungry, so that Rhe will work  harder, and so, by very reason ot her  exertion, produce moie eggs. Not taa-  nway from my. home lives a man who  eertuinly is making,'poultry-keeping pro-  litable. A friend passing through thc  yard of this man a few days ago reported that all about the yard on the  ground could be seen grain which the  hens had neither the ambition nor thc  apparent desire to pick up. lhey were  walking about thc yard happy and contented, stopping now and then to pick  up* a bit of corn or othei toothsome  morsel. This man has sohed the problem of "how much," to his own a.itis-  Snclion, at least. Knough mituis all  the hens will cut. - Less is not enough.  Every few days tlii=5 maji sliip*- aw\y a  nice crate of "assorted ce<-=. TIil white  ones bring him two or three cents above  tho market. The colored ones take  their chauec3 with those sent bv men  who do not fare to take the tiouble  to sort them. The eggs of this ii-un  are not peddled out to thc cnituian  who pas-ses thc door nor tiaded at th2  store. He expects cash for then an-J  is ready to pay cash tor what he buys,  at the" store. ln short, he hai his  poultry-keeping on a-business foundation.���������15.   h.   Vincent.  'Humor of tii* Hour.  Amateur���������When 1 stand on the stage  I see, nothing and I am "conscious of nothing but the role 1 am playing.     The.  audience disappears' entirely.' ���������.   '  -.<. "Friends���������Well, I can't blam's'the audience much fcr that.���������Exchanga. ���������  > ��������� +���������*���������>     '        ���������   -.     . .'  '3?  The Cafe to Health  la a "mis k*������rt, uid tha better the blood  pus**, th* mr* vl**orau-. ths vitality.  ,   S������ma know tkoy have *reo������c hearts :  oUMI-a o*-"j* knew that Uisy're Ol aad  deaf ���������aapect tha heart.  But sure;t*M heartat-rea every part.  Ne heartia toe se-a-ul: aihsty-nmeont  eta hwadred are diaordered or diseased.  Deotora e* aat a* I- 'Ne butt of the  eahject; teheeSeetive -��������� Uwhatmed-  ieine la-tat do.  D Br. AfiMBW'S HEART CURE  " aathroaee health where diaeaae reigned,  la the ffreat center of the system, the  heart.   Thei*. good blood pumps in lull  Rmeaettre, sand*, new life quivering  through every organ and tissue oi the  eedy. It meana aeir oourage, new cheer,  a new lease ot life. ' _  Dr. AONBW'S PILLS      J  scavenccrs ot the digestive system and  healers of the dinar ered apparatus.  Purely vegetable and mild;'forty doces  fer tea veata. One-n'th the price ol the  next best eampetlaa; pliL 13  Col. He-aderaon of Ioveu.  .  Some capital stories are told about  Colonel David B. Henderson of Iowa,  Speaker of the House or Congress, who  has_ announced his. intention of resigning. -It is said that he does nothing  half way. Often his political opponents  at ''���������Vashington ^ had considerable fun  with him because of the light he showed  in pushing certain measures, whicli to  them did not seem to demand such a  bellicose spuit. Such an opportunity tor  sport was offered to the Democrats when  Colonel Henderson became the earnest  champion of free seed distribution, lt  was a delight to him to send out seed:  to his ruiu.1 constituents, and one'of the  -pobtal-cards���������which���������he-received���������in~ao-  kuowlodgment bore this message:-.  '���������John's influence can't be got' with  fifteen cents', worth of seeds, but if \ ou  will send me a box of hairpins, 1 v. ill  look after  him. John's Wife."  His spirit of frolic "-.as shown at tlie  end  of a'Democra-.ic    Congress,   which  had been one of s;    il incapacity.    An  impulsive occupant of the pi ess gallery  had sprung to his feet, waved an imaginary baton, and began singing thc 1)ecology.    Instantly somo members began  to join in, but in a feeble way, when  Mr. Henderson pushed his way  to  the  front, turued-his cane into a batou, and  started to sing at the top of his "lungs.  Thc  chorus    grew  louder    and  louder,  until at the close every one who could  siEg was singing.   A few thought tho iu-  ��������� cident unseemly, but -when llr. Henderson  heard of  such    criticism    he  said:  "Those Democrats needed something to  keep them from eternal eunisliment, so  I tried to do.all I could for them."   Col.  'Henderson  was born is .Scotland..:; Ilia  family, emigrated to the United   States  when the Speaker was only a boy.   lia  was renowned    for his    strength .ana  prowess    at    wrestling.    One   time    a  strange*', tallar and moro muscular than  "Dave,"  same  to  the lowan  home and  challenged    him.    Despite    the unequal  contest, "Dave"  vrent into  it with   liis  characteristic impetuosity, and as a result tha stranger threw him and broke  his wrist and forearm,    lt was a long  time-1 before ha aould   do-manual work  again, and in the interim David "began  to    atudy.    Finally ha    made up    hia  mi*td to go to college.   In speaking recently to a friend about his college days,  he said:  "I -wish I could find out who broke  my arm in that wrestling match, and  thank him. -I don't believe I would  have ever b������������*i Washington if he hadn't  licked me "  I    hate  these  magazuai  May���������Oh,  aerials !  Editk���������Why T  May���������You ean never tell how a atorj  ends until it is finished���������Town and Ooun  trv.  Tha Shipka Pass Memorial.  six-days' celebration by the Russian*!  and Bulgarians, - in commemoration - oi  the victory. Special postage stamps  were also issued to mark the occasion.  These were good only while the fetes  lasted. They were of three denominations, equal in English money to l-2d,  Id and 1 l-2d, and the design, on all,  was a somewhat crude representation  of Bulgarians, hurling rocks and stones  at the Turks attacking' the pass. .The  illustration is from The Daily Graphic.  Stories of the Queen.  The Brown Book of Boston tells the  following, among other anecdotes, in a  little sketch of Britain's Queen:���������"One  afternoon, when the Queen was little  Vrincess Alexandra Christina of Dcn-  xuaik, she, with her two sisters, Princess Dagma aud Princess Thyra, were  having tea in the woods of Bernstoill  Castle. They fell to talking as childien  will of ivhat they 'wanted to do in lite.  l-rmces3 Dagma wished to be very gi and  and have all the "people obey her.. I'lin-  fess Thyra desiied to be the most beautiful -woman in tho woi Id. When it  came Pnnce33 Aloxandia's turn she  -Eaid':_'I-wbuld~like=to~b6--vcry-good aiul-  ha*ve everybody love me very much.' The  good faiiy has granted Alexandi a's wish,  for she has won thc heaits oi the British people and is thc host beloved woman in the laud." ,,1'ho article dwells  upon her-Majesty's goodness ��������� ot heait  and her passionate, fondness for childien, and  continues:  "On 'day Alexandra came upon a tiny  mite of a child crying bitterly. A comfortable, fat old lady who seemed to bo  in charge of him was entirely-unmoved  by his distress." The Queon, who is  quickly touched by grief, especially that  of a child, inquired ol tho woman what  the trouble was, and if the"littlo fellow  was ill. 'Well, ma'am,' tho old lady  agreeably replied, 'he ain't exactly ill,  but no btouitt.h can't stand uinc buns.'  The country folk around Sandringham  have many tales to toll about 'lylty.'  One eld woman tells with tho utmo3t  pride how she was strugglm-- to get over  a stile with a largo head of cabbage  under one arm and a bundio under tho  other. The Queen was on hor way to  aid and heal some poor laboior, when  aha saw. the old wom..a. Her Majesty  ���������went to tha rescue, and he-c thc old  ���������womau's voioa thrills with emotion.  'And, ma'am, the Queen held the cabbage in her beautiful arms while I climbed over the stolle.' ,  "Almost accomplished nurse, her Majesty personally visits the children's  hospitals and ministers to them. < Some  little' girls, inmates of different wards  iu the great Orinomd Street Hospital,  tvere having a spirited discussion ono  day as to which -ward was the most favored by the royal lady. Finally one little girl triumphed over tho others by  saying, 'The Queen visits our ward and  gives flowers���������a bunch to everybody���������  and mine was tied with red;;;ribbon���������a  ribbon she had worn, mind you.' With a  nerve as true ;as steel, infinite' womanliness, tenderness that is thc essence ot  kindnebs and usefulness, and a divine  sympathy, such arc the attributes that  make the United Kingdom rejoice that  tho crown of England ia worn so worthily."  Jcvra of Ro-umniiia.  * In connection with the piesent action of thc United States in the mattei  of the'Jews of Koumama, lt may he pointed out that it was mainly 'owing to the  influence of the Earl of llciconsfii-ld thai  the treaty of Berlin ,**,as made to ineludf  stipulations in their favor, says The l.on  don "Chronicle. At first the old Emp-ior  William, ".-.ho at heait,was" a decided  anti-Semite, would not hear of anylhin,  so dreadful; but Beaconsucld '"woikc.l  the oracle" with Bismarck, who, in turn  "managed to .talk over," as he slid  "anew if he could not succeed in convincing" his 'alter Herr.'" It was 13ea  -contjfield's skilful diplomacy in favoi" oi  the Jews which was uppermost in the  mind of Bismnrek when, at one- of hi-  "Parliamentary soirees," ',he was asked  by one of his guests whom he deemed  to be the ablest plenipotentiary at the  Congress of Berlin. '.'Well," replied thc  Chancellor, "I can't say wlio was the  ablest, but I am quite certain that th*  seeond ablest was the Earl of Beacons  field." - < ���������  ��������� Iudiu's Population.  India's weal and woe are expicssed in  some astonishing figuies in the Statistical Abstract-for 1901. The vast population of the Biitish Einuiie in the .East  contains 450,808 blind pcople,l!)li,8*fl deal  mutes, 74,279 insane, and 120,2-14 lepeis.  The religious statistics are intei estmg.  The Hindus outnumber all othcis with a  total of 207,731,727; next come Mohammedans, 57.3*21,104; .aboiigmals, .0.2S0,-  4G7; and so on down tho list. Oi Christians.there aie 2,0111,313 natives, 80.251  Eiuasians, and 100,077 Europeans. In  dia possesses 0,807 newspapers-.punted  ^n_ the _vernacular. Last year the wild  "TTiiiuials-de5tToyeU~l'oi'~the_i-iake-; of-the  Government rewards weie as follows:���������  17,2,30 hoabts and S7,')10 snakes. The"  numbers for the pievioiis year were  16,518 beasts and il>,150 biialccs. Ou tho  whole the auiuuils got the best of tha  fighting. *��������� For we' lead that there were  25,833 human beings and 01,430 "cattle  killed by wild beasts und snakes lasl  year.  Selection   of  Brce-ls.  Any breed will lose its prestige it the  selection of the hest individuals 13 not  strictly adhered    to;  and all    breeders  rely moie upon the exploits of certain  members  of their  heids  or ilocks than  upon the whole,    for, no matter    how  careful   the    breeder   may   be,  or   how  judiciously he may mate    his animals,  he will have .some that will tall below  the    standard    of    excellence.    11    the  experienced breeder of pure-bred stock  is compelled to continually,   select and  breed from the best sires and dams it  should be more important tor the farmer not only to improve with pure-bred  sires, but to use only the    best to be  obtained.   But the majority of farmers  are disposed to purchase the "culls" ol  the bieeder for breeding   purposes, and  are disappointed if they do not secure  good lesults. ,lt is'never prohtable to  uso an inferior animal for any purpose,  more especially when grading up a herd  or dock, as the .better tiie sire the greater his influence.   Worthless sues should  rather be avoided, as they  entail loss  of "time, labor and . money.    The male  is "half of the herd," tor every young  animal partakes    of his cnaraetensties,  its value  depending more upon the excellence of the sire aud the advancement  of the herd, and in exact ratio with the  influence of that parent.    J'cdigree is a  safeguard and    protection, but pedigree  alone, is  not  to    be  lelied  upon.    Thc  form,, disposition, health  and other  indications must assist   in selection, but,  as  some  sires can give no evidence  of  their  value until    tried,  the    pedigree  Bhould never he oveilooked, as it points  out  the  seveial  families  among  breeds  that  have   excelled,   and  also   the  best  individuals among those families.   Every  fanner,should endeavor to he a breeder,  and albo to breed to a standard of excellence, by selecting the best to be obtained of any bleed.���������Philadelphia Kec-  ord.': '---,��������� .-,-���������    -... , .-. =__*=  THE STRIX FAMILY" ',  Xlieie Oirli nt Our   Zoo Cuuae  Jfo   nnd *���������"**(  Trouble to Tliclr Nclslihora  One   ot thc most   serious    disturb"- ���������  ancc-s In the records of animal juris-* ���������-"  prudence is that of* "the    Kew York* ;  Zoological Society, landlord, versus tro '  Strix family, tenants."  The gentle fallow deer, whose .range- .  lies directly east of and next to the-;  owls' roost, congratulated themselves '  when they heard that they were to* 1  have the Striseb for next door neigh*. '  bors. ���������  ���������'Such nice, quiet, orderly people* j  and so intellectual too," they thought*. J -  '���������What it we had been obliged to live. 1  next door to Mr. and Mrs. Lion, or Mr.. J  Hhlnoceros, or disagreeable old Mr��������� | -  "���������"lephant? Well, we simply couldn't!- !  have Btood it at all." I  And then the Owls moved ln. "Hiecff "  (mean enormous family, "pretty, near- \  IT:twenty altogether, "married and in, ���������  termarr.od in rather promiscuous'* 3  fashion, thought wise and prudon������t |  Mrs. Deer, but nevertheless n learue* ,  and intellectual family, and as suctl" ;  deserving of due respect. ' r  In the first place there was 0IS *  fJme. Nebulosa Strix, the great-grand- I  mother of them all, whom people call -  the "Barred Owl," because of the great/ -  plaid patches on her wings. ?  Then there was a solitary;white *������**������ *  or barn owl, who called himself Mr., ^  Flamraea Strix, and who is "reputed to '  he one of the wisest of bis very ftlsit j-  family. '  Mr.    and Mrs. "Virginian Strix   and  -  eight sons  and  daughters  were    tho *  next important faction of the family,  ,  and  are  known  to  thc  neighbors  aa I -  the great   Homed Owls   for   obvious],,  reasons. Tf  And last, but not least by any* 4  means, were the Screech Owls���������a *  whole aggregation of littlo brothers }  and sisters. ' ;  The Owls hadn't spent one night la   ^  their new home betore'the 6torks and! *��������� -  the pelicans    and  other _ respectab'.e* ,  birds over in the" flying cage ami the ���������  gentle fallow deer in the range'wero _,  uttering    all    sorts    of    imprecations   ";  against the new tenants.   Unsocial', re- *  served and exclusive in daylight, theyj  *i  made the night one long, hideous orgy; J  with      their     demoniacal      hootinj-.  -,  -Waugh Hoo!   Waugh.  Hoo!"  awoka   "-  the slumbering echces in all the lone-  1  ly "wilderness from the Bronx river tot  *  Pelham bay. :  This dismal aud ominous hooting ofi  fhe owls begins shortly .after night-*  ,  fall nor ceases until the first peep of"  dawn.   And as a consequence the ul-   -  tra-respectable   storks ..and.   pelicans   ������.  and the gentle and quiet loving fallow,  deer are giving their" keepers no end   .  of trouble.   Instead ot dozing-m 'their  comfortable  quarters  as all' well  fed   t  and cared for birds and beasts ot their;  ������  species     ordinarily    do,    they    have*  grown nervous and restless.   This can   -  be readily understood by any one who   1  will spend- pait of the   niqht within!   j  hearing of the dismal "Waugh. Hool'   -  Waugh, Hoo!" ot    these,wise    birds;   -  Such a person will readily"sympathies   -  with the long suffering storks and pelicans, but most of all with thc gentlo.   ���������  fallow-deer.  HI  i**?wi-r  Still  .Tho'l'eril II !S������ tllrl it'ColIrce.  Enumerating upward*of fifty meth- .  ,  ods by which a girl can work her way*    f  through    college, a Cornell-  graduate - *  ���������writes in the Ladies' Home Joural: "Al   \  college education is possible for- an**S���������, "-  one who is determined to have it.   Its  may- happen ,that the prospective stu-    *  dent is obliged to stay, at borne antj "r  work eeveral * years before   entering:,   *  but intensified desire brings compea-   J  sation. ��������� It ts not advisable,' however,  to defer entering until every cent necessary for a four years'  course    has?,  been earned.   Many girls perhaps give*    -  up  the idea  of going.at all  becausa  they cannot go soon after' leaving tho, "  high school,  but nowadays''"it ie noil     l  unusual to find in attendance at uni-������.  versities, open during   tthe    summefl  quarter, teachers, well, along, in.   tho  fifties, who in their"youth were denle<3 ~  a college education."- >*  "Mm--  THESE  MAIDS KNOW  that 'tho Ion*; agony  of female weaknesses,  tha torture of their  more mature * sisters,  may ba all avoided by  the use of the great  South American  Nervine Tonic  which giveg impulse,'  power, vigor and^yim '  to .every vital organ,  thus   producing   or  preierving  BEAUTY  of "FACE and FORM  by feeding the nerves  directly until they put tbe sya-  ' tern in order. ^   Edward Purrey.of Sydney Centra,  Brlt'sb Columbia,states: "My wife  was takon' down with nervoai proa*  tratlon -which later developed > Into  paralysl*t of one tide. Thre.) bottles  of SOUTH AMERICAN NBRVINB  -.worked wonders for. her. ..We can-  ' not speak too highly o" the remedy."  Dr. Von Stan's Pinoapplo Tablets-  digest thc food in tlft stomach  without the aid.of the stomach,  giving the stbmacn a rest.���������  They heal the itomach by the  best curer���������th<* rest cure.  Price. Stic. 21  PiK  Por If.  The day of the four-year-old steer is  past.   No up-to-date stockman thinks in  these days of rapid growth   of feeding  a steer  after he    has pasted his  30th  month.   Iu the same way the big hog  of 300 to SOO pounds    weight has also  disappeared.   A young ummal makes its  most lapid giowth during the hrst days  of its existence.   The rate of growth decreases gradually with age.  .The secret  of success in suine raising, then, is to  ������ell the animal as soon as it ceases to  couvcit    feed    into  llesh    with    profit.  This means, ot course, a quick-maturing  type, aud the result is "pig pork-"   Thc  pig has been forced    by a sort of hothouse process to make ut 200 pounds a  close imitatiou of a futly-inutured hog,  junt aa baby beef  has,  by  special    development and (election, been  made  to  take  the    place  of  the    ripened  steer.  Keep no pigs during the winter months,  except    for    breeding    purposes.    Sows  should farrow in March   or April, und I  with their litters well protected against  inclement weather they will get a good  start, so that   the husky    little wean*  lings will go on summer pastures is tine  order.    Good  pasture*,  should    be  the  piece de resistance of young    porkers'  k diet, with middlings and skim milk* on  the side, garnished  with  charcoal,  and  don't forget that a pig takes water lik������  a duck.o A most successful pig feeder  in St. Louis County has a clean pond,  where  pigs   may  swim and  cool  themselves, but they are always clean.   Finish off Mr. Porker with    a little corn  and put the money he brings   in your  Chribtmas    stocking.    Then    you    will  iknOw what Mother Goose meant ..when  she handed down the classic line,  "This little pig went to market."  Most farmers will want to raise two  litters a year, but if cost of production  is carefully followed up the spring far-  | rows -nill undoubtedly pay best if they  ���������ua* k-cnt crrriwin**.���������Kuxal World.  \fvr llan*;er'l'''rom'l-.olticil. '  It has been discovered that' many 0%  the prairie fires that  hava .d.cstroveeV  the grabs on_ the j-angea  "in ^lontana*  1nrdTn~th^''wesFe"rn    parT^bf^DlkotaJT^  have been'started by the.conccntrat*?-T'.^V.'-Jj"  ing of the rays of the'sun'upon brok-*^- ... v.- '_,  cn beer bottles that are scattered free-      >'    ,,:/_  ly along the cattle trails and wagon   *    ."*;'-  roads, which offers a  new aVgumentf, ' * y-��������� ���������*"'  ^  for the use ol the temperance    folk.} ��������� '-'-���������, '���������*-���������������* *  Numerous fires have started far awayj  from human haunts and   habitations-,  miles beyond the reach ;of sparks, frcim  the smokestack of a locomotive, and  tbe farmers and ranchmen have been*  so mystified as to their origin    that!  several      in-vcstigatlon3     have   been-  snade.    When a fire has teen traced"  to Its source, in almost every in-^ta-ico :-   -  a broken bottle has been found with*  evidences around   It to convince tha -<  investigators that it was thc cause ot  the mifcehief. The curved glaes was  found in such a position ns to focu-8*  the rays of the sun upon a tuft of d**sj  bunch grass and start a flaute.���������Baa*.  'gor News. * '  WM  wmi  TheJ-qulrrel's  Arltluii������-tle.  High on the branch ot a walnut tre*J  A bright-eyed squirrel sat;  (What was he thinking so earnestly!  And what was he looking at?       '.  ' ti  He was doing a problem o'er and .o'er*}  Busily thinking was he  How many nute for his winter's stori  Could he hlde.ln the hollow.treet  *.  He sat bo still ln the swaying boa*-**  You might have thought him asleep*}  O no; he was trying to reckon now   .  Tbe nuts the babies could eat.        \,'  mm  :""������������������*. I  n  ���������SMI  ���������SW  Then  suddenly _ he frisked  about/  And down the tree he ran;   ' ".    --y  "The beet **-ay to do, without a doubts 1  Is to gather all I can."   -   * ',���������!  ���������Normal Instructor. '  ������������������������������<"-*ri  Ought not the -place where newspaper articles are killed to be called the- ���������---&  decomposing room?     ��������� V   I-'  W-.��������� !*.*>  ��������� 1>-Ui... ^.^..--ir.--*--'-.-,'-L''.Jrra ,4T-'-.'.VJ..l-.*'*-������'<--.--^^  ,.^v-*������r*.^r.v-'-**--*-v^-*' ''-.  _���������..*.".. -*"*'" '        i  '���������5-J-  lompli ments of the Season  In wishing all our present and prospective Customers  the " Compliments of the Season," we would like to point  out that -with the passing* of the year a new order of  affairs takes place in our Business.  Our Premises are doubled.  We have established a first-class Grocery Department.  Our Stock has been made more select.  We have patronized Union Labor as much as possible  and have brought prices down.  an  <mp  BEFORE   MAKING   YOUR   XMAS PURCHASES  We invite you to call and inspect our stock.    It is  Complete, Well Selected and Well Bought in all Lines  Groceries, Dry Goods, House Furnishings and Boots and Shoes, ail of which are suitable to  select Christmas Presents from.  TAYLOR   BROS.   & GEORGE  LIMITED.  Mail Orders Solicited and Promptly Attended to.  BEAUTIFUL  'Xmas  Cards  CALENDARS       BOOKLETS  So-nt-thiii}** Entirely  New  SOLD 0S1.Y BY  Cdnatfd Drug &. Book Co  MARRIED.  ���������Strutt���������Beck��������� At Cnlgai-v. Dei-. 9th,  - "by Rev. F. Langfotil, William A.  Strutt, uf Bealou, B. C,   to Annie  Beck, Of Calgary.  Bl*������tox-Dodd���������At Calgarv, Dec. 10th,  by Rev. F.. Langfor'd, Win. E.  Burton, C. P. R. agent rtt Donald,  B. C. to Etta. Belle Dodd, of Calgary.  NOTES OF NEWS  .  Fr������8h Candies at Manning's.  ' Capt.   Gore  spent a few days in the  ������ity this week en route west.  ���������Lemons and Confectionery at Man  sing's.  Mrs. Christopherson and,. son of  Goldfields were in the city hist week  for a few day*-,  ���������"What is home without a Singer, H.  Manning, agent.  The telephone strike at Vancouver  haa be*** settled to the satisfaction of  the union,  A French scientist is just adding  jagless whiskey to wireless telegraphy.  When visiting Goldfields or Ciini-  hni-iie, take Andy Craig's stage frum  Beaton.  The r.iffle for the silk quilt, will he  held in Selkirk hall tomum w afternoon at '3 o'clock.  Miss Thompson, of Beaton, who has  heen spending a few days in Revelstoke. left tliis  morning for her home.  The C.P.R. will spend $10,000,000 west  of Winnipegnaxtlyeariniuiprovement'i  and the construction of branch lines.  ���������This Christmas ingoing to be a lively  out*. See that you do nnt forget yonr  older to the Revelstoke Wine& Spirit  Co.  Mrs. Pettipiece left on Monday night  foi Vancouver, where she will spend a  few weeks for the*' benefit of her  health.  Fred Manning, Mrs. Manning and  family left by No. 2 this morning on a  three months'- visit to relatives .in  Ontario.  XV. Cowan returned on Wednesday  evening from a vis.it to Trout Lake  where he has been looking over his  timber interests".  J no. J. Voung, MX. A., of Calgary,  passed through the city on Saturday  en route home from attending the  Ophir-Lade Syndicate meeting held at  Ferguson on the 9th inst.  The Methodist Church Sunday school  will hold their Christinas entertainment on Tuesday evening next, 23rd  inst. A splendid programme by the  children will be rendered during the  evening.  B. E. Drew and Mrs. Drew, of  Camborne, left by No. 2 on Friday last  en route for England where they will  spend the winter with relatives and  friends, returning to Camborne in  April next.     ' <���������    -*'  ���������For Revel-stoke Souvenirs go to the  Canada Drug k Book Co.'sstore. Tliey  keep them. Very suitable for 'Xmas  gifts.  R. A. Upper left yesterday morning  to take the position of mining recorder  at Trout .Lake during the absence of  F. C. Campbell on sick leave.  ���������Handsleds, Rocking Chairs for  children and Morris chairs, rocking  horses, toy horses, etc.-vall prices ab  the Canada Drug k Book Co.  * 5.-  Arriingemi-nts ' are progressing  satisfactorily for the band ball on N'ew  Year's Eve. The orchestra are practising regularly and will provide first  class music for the occasion.  ���������The Revelstoke Wine.& Spirit Co.  request .their friends to get their  orders in early so as not to make too'  big a I'UHh at the last moment.  The Empire Coronation Company  gave two pcrfoi mances in the Opera  House this week to fail-*audiences,  presenting views* of the coronation ot  King Edward, the .'eruption of Mount  Pelee, etc.    '  The, raffle for the silk quilt, by the  Ladies Auxiliary of the B. of R. T.. will  he held in Selkirk" Hulk- tomorrow  (Friday') afternoon at 3 o'clock, instead  of 8 o'clock in the evening as atino.unced  in the last issue ot the Herald.  REVELSTOKE SCHOOL BOARD.  NOTICF.  IM.iei.t--} an.l ���������-;im<]i.iiw will  the   uiiilL-iHitfiitHl   tin int."-.  of  Jligli School.  ul.liuo liy -.eiulinf; to  L-liiMrvn   elitfibU* foi  II. FLOYD,  Secret m y.  CORPORATION OF THE  OF REVELSTOKE  CITY  NOTICE.  I-THK att  Actihtay  are prepured to fill Christmas orders of 1    Persona , .   .  not less than two gallons, or one case    -Iji^r'leT^TriS. subjccls.being of full age  hut, if't.o   desired, several varieties of \ of a*, years, ami   .  .. tention of the public is  calleit  to  tho  imeiulments made in tliu Municipal Election  this year.- ". " '  Persons qualified to vote for Mayor, Aldermen  wines and  package.  - The second annual hospital twill  under lhe auspices of the Ladies-  Hospital Aid Society, will be held in  tne opera house on Friday niirnt.  January 23rd. Tickets Ladies'  Gentlemen S2.C3.  ,  years.  spirits  can be   put into one!    1.   Being owner of real estate assessed at "flOO;  ' 2. Repre.sentafcives of incorporated Companies  ivbo are assessed owners of lands or improvements: r - ���������  3. Trade- License holders paling not less than  *5 per year;  4. Householders.  The two last must have paid all dues to the  - m\ * Municipality for the yeai -,not chargeable on land  ���������pi..1*1" j and niust each year in Deceinlier make and deliver  j to the City Clerk the statutory declaration. -  ���������Christmas   Confectiouery   at   Manning's, McKenzie avenue.  The annual ball at the Halcyon Hot  -Springs Sanitariuni_will.take_place_on  >ew Year's Eve.  Candied   Peel at C. B. Hume  W. B. Pool, manager of the Ophir  Lade Syndicate, spent a couple of days Book Co.  in town this week, returning to Fur-  i*ubon on Wednesday morning. Mr.  Pool reports the Oyster group as look-  int-itv-fine shape. -   -  -���������-���������-���������.--  ���������Books���������This year we have some  the choicest " and daintiest bound  books for 'Xmas gifts by far the best  ever shewn in Revelstoke. Come and  see the variety at the Canada Drug k  I    No person can be twice entered on the Voters'  0p } List e\en  though  owning property in more than  ' nnt. wr    *  ���������Fresh  k Co's.  Fsank Holten was in town fi-om  Ferguson on Saturday collecting fundi  for the Ferguson Hospital.  ���������A sensible Christinas box���������a Singer  Sewing Machine, H.  Manning, agent.  -Miss Fraser. of the city schools,  leaves tomorrow to spend the holidays  At her home in New Westminster.  ���������Corn on the ear the latest fad in  gi-oceriea to be found at 0. B. Hume  & Co'*.  J. A. Kirk. P. L. S.- who has been in  Che eastern and lower Kootenay districts for the past month, returned to  town this week.  ���������Have tou tried. Force hreakfast  food, for hi-eakfast. it is something new  and nice at C. B. Hume k Co'-i.  lion. AV. AV. Mclnnes was re-elfcctrd  -������-i Monday for tbe Nanaime riding by  10*3 majority over the Sociali.-* t candidate Parker Williams.  ��������� If vou want anything in ladies' or  geot'a skating shoe*., yon will find just  what you want nt C. B. Hume &  Co's. i  The kindergarten scliool closes tomorrow afternoon for the holidays.  Mrs. AVilkes is giving the children a  party in view of the occasion.  ���������Don't forget lhat our currants, C. M.  raisins, Vnieneia. raisins and Sultana  raisins, are this seasons fruit t nd aie  extra fine at C. B. Hume k Co's.  Thos. Cunningham, provincial fruit  inspector, was in town for a few days  the first of the week. Mr. Cunningham is making i tour of the Kootenays  xT The Presbyterian Church Sunday  school entertainment will be held on  Friday evening the 26th inst. A pro-  gramrae will be rendered by the  children.  Ben Leaky, who is building ths Reception Hotel at Camborne, was in the  city last. Mr. beaky is a first class  hotel man *u.d the Reception will be  ���������run up-to-date.  The all-Canadiau rugby football  team which is touring the Old Conn try  played their first match on Saturday-  last at Belfast, Ireland, defeating the  Irishmen by a score of one goal and  two touchdowns to one goal aud one  touchdown.  AV. A. Strutt. one of the best known  prospectors of the Fish River gold  camp, returned to town on Friday last  from Calgary accompanied by his  bride. Mr. and Mrs. Strutt left on  Monday .morning for Beaton where  they will reside.  Mr. Grant Hall, late muster mechanic of the Pacific division of thc C.P.R..  who has lieen promoted to the head  oflices of the company at Montreal.  was tendered a complimentary banquet by a numlier oi his trie*;*.-* at the  Hotel Revelstoke on .Monday night*!  Mi'. G. A. Knapp, who has resigned  thu leadership of the Methodist Church  choir, was presented with ���������a silver  shaving mug and hrush on Friday  evi-ning last by the members of the  choir. Mr. Knapp will still continue  to assist the choir, and Mr. James  Taylor has been apjiointed leader.  A. M. Craig was in the City on Tuesday last on a business visit. Mr. Craig  has inaugurated a. daily stnue line  between Beaton, Camborne and Gold-  fields. The stage meets the bont at 12  noon eveiy day nnd proceeds direct to  the gold camps, reaching Goldfields in  less than two hours from Beaton.  The C. P. R, are giving an excursiovi  rate of fure and one-third for round  trip to any point on their system during the holidays. Tick������sts may bo  purchased on the following dates:  Dec. 21 st to 25th inclusive, and Dec.  30. 31, and Jan. 1st., good to return up  to Jan. 5th.  One of   the   most successful   social  events of the season was the liachelois  At_ Home   in   thjs   Opera   House last  m usic" and-"a-good  night-    With  good  floor the large crowd presert spent an  enjoyable time.   Dancing was kept up  till 3*30 a.m.  one want.  Copy of the .Vet can be seen at the City Clerk'H  office.  H. FLOYD,  City Clerk.  Notice.  if the party or parties who removed the  cap from a field glass at Watchman William  Maefcie's Cabin-at-the-Coluinbi**���������bridge-last  summer, will return the hame to A. McRae,  Postmaster, they will receive ti reward,  ���������Perfumes���������We keep the best and  have them in fancy boxes, perfume  atomizers, etc. Canada Drug k Book  Co.  Yesterday afternoon Jim Hutchison  was hauling a big load of logs, about  3,000 feet, with a l-horse team, up the  big hill from Sam Oowle's ranche,  when the whole outfit took a slide  over t.he hill. Luckily tbe horses  escaped without a scratch. Jim went  out this morning to pick up the .n*-,-*.  Curling-.  The season opened at tin' rink on  Saturday ^ftei noon when thr preniilent.  and vice president of'lhe club uiet# in .*".  friemllv gam*, which resulted in x  victory for tbe latter by a score of 10 to  8.   The following were the i-inks :  VICE f'RKSlDKNT  NOTICE.  J*otIc<- is hereby given that 30 days after date  T intend tn apply to the Chlaf Commissioner of  Lands and Worts for permission to cut and  carry away Umber from the'cllowingdcscribed  land**, situated In West Kootenay:  Commencing at a post planted at tbe soutli  easl corner of Kate Scott's timber claim aud  marked -A. V.Anderson's south west cor-jer  post," thence nortii 120 chains, thence east to  thc west bank of Flsh river, thence south  following the bank ol Fish river to the point of  commencement.  Daled this 2Jth day of November 1903.  A. iw. ANDERSO!*.  PRE8IUKST  LeM-tisii-v  McK.us  Flindt  Brown, skip���������S  The  following  Hume  Carriithe."*  PinUham  .McDonell. skip 16  game**   in   the green  Chris Foley has resigned from the  presidency of the labor party. Chris  Foley like Ralph Smith found it im*  1 o-sible to hold the confidence of the  working men of B. G, and the leaders  of the Liberal party at one and the  same time. There are no two men in  British Columbia who have done more  for the Liberal party than Messrs,  Smith and Foley.  curlers competition which was unfinished last season, have been played  this weak:  Lewis 2. Foote 13; Baker +, Holten 12;  Lindmailc 8. Foote 12; Jackson 11,  Holten 12; Flindt. 7. Philips 13; Edwards  11. Kincaid 12; Foote 11. Phipps 13.  A meeting of the executive committee was held last Thursday evening  when skips were elected for the season  as follows:���������H. A. Brown. A. J. McDonell, Dr. Cftrruthurs, Ci. H  A. McR-ie. A. M. Pinkham,  MeCarter, D. M. Rae.  Brock.  G. a.  The Dell Rey Group.  Mr. J. A. Darragh, has an option on  the Dell Rey group, situate near the  Silver Dollar, and has shipped a large  consignment of samples east. There  is every prospect of the deal going  through as good -responsible parties  are interested and the recent sale of  the Silver Dollar which is adjoining,  should materially aid the transfer of  the Dell Rey group.��������� Camborne Miner.  NOTICE.  Notice Is hereby Riven lhat 30 days alter date  I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of  I-nn<!������ and Works for permission to cut and  carry away timber from lhefolIowiu-*de*-crlbcd  landfl, situated In West Koo-enay:  Commencing at a post planted at the norlh  westitorner of A. Y.Anderson's timber claim  and marked "R 8t������'������s' south we-.tcornerr.ost,"  thencenorth SO chains, thence east 80 chains,  thencesouth 80 chains, thence wfst 60 ubalni,  to tne pointof commencement.  Dated thisSSth day of November, 1002.  R. STEI8H.  NOTICE  SHERIFF'S SEIZURE AHD SALE  MOTICK IS *n**tKBY rifVKN" that- tiwl'-r and  by virtue of a Warrant of Kxcrilt'on laaiiwl  out nf the County Court of Kootonay holden at  Revelstoke and directed to the Sheriff of North  Koot������.nay, a-rainst the goods and chattels of  -Inhn flrmnan. J have th������ day sp|/.ed and taken  in execution all the Interest of tho said John  Brennan in the mineral claim " "Daffodil," situated  on Lexington Mountain, in the Lardeau Mining  T>ivUion of West Kootenay. Anil I give notice  th.it 1 will on  Tuesday, December 30lh.  1B02, at the hour of 2:30 in the afternoon, at the  Court Houie, in the City of Revelxtoke, offer for  xale publicly all thc Interest of the aald John  Krennan, in the aald mincr.t.1 claim, or inch part  thereof a* shall aatinfy the aald Kxccutlon.  Dated thin Sth dny of Deccml-er, Iff-!!.  JAMKS TAYLOR,  Deputy to the Sheriff of North Kootenay.  !  II  asid Young, Happy  This can easily and cheaply be done by selecting HOLIDAY  PRESENTS from the Large Assortment just opened up, consisting  of Rretty Presents and Toys of all kinds.  LARGE AND HANDSOME RANGE OF  Japanese and English Crockery  IN CHOCOLATE, COCOA, AND TEA SETTS, &c.  Our Stock of Christmas Groceries  IS FRESH, CHOICE AND COMPLETE.  MORRIS & STEED,  Front Street.  ���������S  Bews'  HAS IN STOCK  Confectionery  rHiur> Webb, Turonlo  Mumifactiued by   -: A. J. Stcv.i-.it, Toronto  VMcCoiiuick, Loudon.  Maracalbo Chooolates���������bulk or boxes  Maroaibo Chocolate Blsouits���������  40o per Ib  Webb's   Fruit 350, 500, SI, $1.40  "        Cliocol-itcs  "        Mar.slimallows  Peanut *1  Walnut -���������  Cocoanut J  Taffy  Fresh Butter Cups.'..  Gold Nuj-*gel*.   Maple Pudding* '.  and many, other lines.  350 per Ib  . .40c per IL-  ..30c per lb  .40c per lb  ALSO���������  Larue Line of Souvcnii Cups ami Sauccis  bcuring view of llevclntoke.  Limogc's China anil muny other piudon of  China.  ALSO���������  Piayer BoakH, Hymn BooI*9, ot������.  ���������Xmas Cards in abundance.. -   c, - ,  Girls'and Boys''Own Annuals.  Suuday at Home. ' "'. "' * '  Leisure Hour.   *". * *.-  Chatter Box, etc. ~  WALTER BEWS Phm. B  Druggist and Stationer.  ���������" ���������������-,H:o*ii*r*E3 - *-ta.  New Stand Next to the Hume Block.  -eta.  r  CRESSMAN'S  ��������� Permit us to draw your  attention to the wisdom of  presenting your family with  Choice Lot  AS A CHRISTMAS PRESENT  The flrst "step toward provid-  inp* for them a" home.of  their own.  A part onlv of the amount  usually spent on pretty but  useless presents will make  the first payment.  REAL  ESTATE  Ik the basis of all wealth,  and you can now lay the  i foundation of your own -  prosperity while making  someone else happy.  Cull and investigate, , we  have other things to "tell  yon on the subject of How  to Own a House of yonr  Own.  LEWIS BROS,  AgMits Smalttr Tcmnwlta  .... Built to Order Garments  .... For Ladies and Gentlemen  Are cut to individual measures and constructed  by the  most expert Tailors.    Only hand labor of .the.'very'best can  produce a well-shaped.collar and give to the shoulders and  chest the proper moulding.     On  this  depends-the'fit  and  .shape of the garment and the permanence of that shape. '  OUR COATS =  '   Will   not develop  those  unsightly  ' draws     and  wrinkles   all   along . the  ���������shoulders and down the"  front which so beautifully  and -unmistakably "adorn  ' all the  ready-made store  ;'���������" clothes you  can  buy  at  , one half'the,tailor's'price.  Overcoats and Rain" "d>*t E   -.."AAe  . proof-coats ..-...-.oJiPl9:XO 900  $15 to $35  Suits  Suit, from  bross  Suits     . ne J.A cn  we are offering at... WW ������*U  Trousers,"all the" way A ���������"-������������* 10  .- from ......". ?.'.. *������,lO, \i.  \.  Ladles'Tailor-made'     40 x.     ������������������**���������  .-uits.....'..:  IO 10 .70  Ladles' Skirts...' fi +_ ' rt JI  Ladles' Skirts -.**..   '"  ,  O TO     20  ��������� *��������� Ladles' Ralnuroof Coatss ,.*!14to|35     >    "'   ...^ "���������.';J���������  We Carry the Largest'Stock-  British Columbia.  '  J; B. Cressman, Art Tailor  M  (X HAVE IT I.  The largest stock "of the" latest'-WATCHES,'  CLOCKS; . RINGS, SILVER WARE, '. CUT  GLASS, 'FASHIONABLE 'JEWELRY, Etc.,  My many years' experience enables me to buy  goods at: the right prices,: enabling me* to  sell to the public at reasonable prices.  -X.  aUY.,BARBEB,  r,.~ "  ��������� *--*--^ATCH-REPAIlUNa-'A-8PBCiAL--*y;rT"-  \  ! SUITS FOR BOYS AT HALF PRICE!  **************************  I        Revelstoke        |  %     Skating  Rink     f  % &  *��������� ��������� *  *  *  *  * BAND EVERY WEDNUDAY NICHT    *  *  *  *  * *  I       Season Tickets       |  J       Ln<lic������ ������3 00       $  *���������      Gentlemen SOO      *  * *  * *  * TICKETS FOR SALE AT *  * Cana<l*. Drug; & Book-tore. *  Ut J. A. Miller & Co. *  "t" Roy Smythe's Tobacco Store. *  "K Rink Company. *  *K *  wm  $7 Suits for $3.50.  $3.50 Suits for $1.75.  $5 Suits for $2.50.  $2.50 Suits for $ 1.. 25   .  $4 50 Frieze Overcoats for -$2 25  ii EDWARD J. BOURNE,  ]['    Revelstoke Station. Bourne Bros.'Old Stand.  ;L -   ���������      ;��������� :,���������������������������:���������_   \__  ���������**--y**-*<i>***^-������*'*w^*i*������^  iVi  -.Vatl-iK erery KvenlnK from 8 to 10  o'clock.  BAND EVERY WEDNUDAY NICHT  *m*m***������M*^***ii*Bm*****m* *  Cheap Bedroom Suite-* Dresser Stands, Tables, Ohairs, .Ete.  ���������o *  A CARLOAD OP  FURNITURE  JUST ARRIVED.  Ft. HOWSON & CO.'S.  Oalt In and Examine This New Consignment of Furniture  *������J  S ��
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V. .
RAILWAY    MEN'S   JOURNAL
Vol    VV.No"   168
REVELSTOKE B. C.   WEDNESDAY,   DECEMBER 24\ 1902
$2 OO a Year in Advance.
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1902
1902
Christmas
��� A-NQTHER5VEAR IS JUST ABOUT AT A CLOSE
f\ -and -it   terminates  one of the  busiest years.in the
. history oi   Our Firm.      We can look back with marked
, appreciation-���not o_n our own merits���but to our numerous
".customers,   both far and-near,' for their- past patronage,
,' Hoping/to be able' to merit the Same for the coming year,
*. <90>3,.">   -We extend our heartiest'wishes for   -
AND A HAPPY -AND* PROSPEROUS' NEW, YEAR
<   v
���\i- V"
TO OWE ANDALL-B
~'   -ft- - -     --,.��*���.     .   *;<*���"���
-j.^-X'i.^.-'iA"    < \  '<?���
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��-v7' WeNareJ- particularly '
THE SCHOOL
EXAMINATIONS
J     >'-     ' -TL'-Jf "      -t*'*.   *,-.��-'*-/^ *-       ,."'."'-       , *���*"*
loc to'oOc"-
.-*"�����.
^Ladies", 'and Gents - Silk'Um- r ""*.
* "- brellas"from.*...*. $1.50 to $5."00
- lid ies'    Silk'x Handkerchiefs' , " -
.\, ...'_...VV :...,. ...-.25c toJJllOO;
.Ladies'" Fancy >���-Embroidered "      s
,i"'Handhei-chief6.J     '-    15c to
J-~--J-V *. r-t/f J    " -    , .    . .
-���"IiAdieV novelties in Silk Belts *  ?
,    '.:...:.:-. .*.*.*. *. .*.*���. $1.25 and $1.50
' Alexandrian   Belt and Sash1      i
^ *. Clasps.-.-.. v_. .v  .50c each'
ladies'- Lined-. Kid    Gloves    "-
from' $1.25 to $2.00
-.-t -'   ���"   . \< ."'-- -.,;*-    ���
Ladies*. Silk 'Ties.-up-to-date
"from :.*...?. ..35c to$1.00.
"   I   ... .  �����- t* -. * -* -.   "*   --��� ���     "      *     -,o*   3.
Ladies'   Black     and1"-** Cream' -* **'
" Chiffon Ties*.:;.... -..'$1.00,eachj
Children's.��Imitation Grey-- ---
Lamb'Gauntlets 00;. np
t Children's SilkHandkerchiefs ,
-, "t -..**..-.....'..-.  ..*.-.'..'.. *.10c. np
* *i* - s.  " -," . _���* ���   , -'    " ~l -   "*'    '
? -Gents', Fancy Col'd Satin arid'
"��� .^ySilk Braces(in boxes)75i; to.$2
��� I.   f   1       C.      '.���,'1'    *   "'"".-"V '.5-     ,"'*���       '*     "
-'Gent's'-Soft"-.Mocha'and' Kid""*.
-*-    .Gloves, silk and wool Jined,   ,
���Aiif .".'.'.-". .'..'.from $1.50to'$2.50 '
*-,'- **y" - .'   - ���**�����-*. . ,"- ,-_-   , -
v Gents' -SilW'- Scarfs toj- wear   -.
-;    under Overcoat and Gents'  "���"
Silk'Ties.-'JDerbys, Flowin--; ** .-
���"' '-Ends' from. r.'..." .25cJto-$1.00 .
. L"^    "j   .i    ~-^ .-- - .      <       *   ^
"v" Table-vNapkins ' froni-!"??; a ..    ,
-v ���'-- :\*.-.V: r/.:^.'.5.*:.$1.75'to $6.00.
"*-"'-"'   i,   ^ **.,-* ���*s *��*   **   '*--*���"-..
'"' Bleaclied1 Tallied Linen'. .-'.'
''.7 u'ij..'.'...-.:.':.'.r.oOe to $1.35
". Japanese Bugs ..
;' Tapestry Rugs.. <
...... -.. $1.30.
.75c to $9.00"'
y CHINA DEPARTMENT
ZA' OUBJ8TOCK'OF'CHRISTMAS OHlNAWAREfar" surpasses in
.'''jextenti.variety and completeness anything we have ever shown:
;>
-China Dinner Setts $12 00
." -  ,.*���-.-     -           - , -   .->.
China Tea setts $4 50 to $14 00
-China-T��*ilet-Setts:$3 00 to $10 00_
China 5 o'clock Tea Setts with
- -Tray.:-.: T.-.y......, .$6 00^
China 13-Piece Fruit Sett . ..$2 00
- China Porridge'Sett ... 50c to 60c*
,China Plate,- Cup and Saucer. ���*. *-
SetU'.-. u.'...: '.-...- 50c,.to 75c_
China Cream and Sugar Setts -r ;'-v
..    ". '. '.... 50c to 75c
Colored China Cups and Sau-    *
^     cera. i...'.A.'. 15c to 25c
1 Larger���  China    Cups ' and
.i r Saucers.'.. .." 20 to 75c
' FancjrColored Shaving Cups -
��� .A.tL/::'..'.^:^.:.rv..2Sc to35c.;
Fancy^ Colored** China Mous-    - ���
.   tache Cups..;���.:.-..' 40c up
^*     *���-..-     -*      ^ j i  -
Fancy-Colored China   Salad
Bowls?.* 60c to $2 00'
Royal pro wn Derby Cups and
"T-"TSaucersT77T7*:1.: :\Li $3 00 each-
Royal  Crown  Derby- Plates
__ '.:  ..-:.$300 each
Limoges Tea Setts (40 pieces)
,- j...$10 00
Limoges Assorted Pieces
- *: .from...''..'...-.:. .$1.25 to $7 50'
China Jaidinieres 75c tO 2 50 "
ChinaBiscuit Jais ...".."... .$1 25
China Cocoa" Jugs...$1 00 to $3 00-
China Bread and ButteV.' Plates' *
-..."..'.': .$2 00 to $3 50 per dozen
Japanese Fancy Vases..' *.. iV
-- .,. 50c to $3 00
Japanese Trays 50c to $2 00
Nickel Plated Trays.. 40c to $1 00 "
L>.    .,
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li  "r
.;'. ^RtSROCE^YVLIST;
" . Away back���Ten ^years' or, more ago���we" planted a Grocory'*De-'    -
partment in .Our Store. .'Like many other things that are likely
to grow big, it began to take root among the ideas of a big lot of
><-Customers, and its been the greatest possible pleasure to us to see
,.   that Department Expand and grow." We are selling more GROC-
*   ERIES," better GROCERIES, higher class GROCERIES.now than
- ever before..-/,:People'fieem to think it is woith something to get*
everything they buy, guaranteed to be worth every cent* we ask
, for themrarid if not, to be fully recompensed.
*N i ,'Arrivals this.week in Our" Gi-ocery"~Department suitable for
.K Christmas Trade>"-Washed New Seed Raisins, New Carrants,
' * Fancy,,Crystalized, Orange, Lemon "and JCitron Peel, "Japanese
. JOi-ange*i, f California Orangps, -Fancy. Evaporated Apricots and
u .-Peaches, Cranberries, Fresh Figs" and Dates, Spanish Grapes, ,1
��� h.,". London Layer Raisins, Sweet Sliced "Mango Chutney, Biscuits, -.
-��� Fruit Cake, Iced Aluioad, Cake and Plum Pudding. ��� .  *
GiB, Hume
and Company.
Goods delivered to all parts of City.  - Telephone No. 8i
The Public School Closed for
thev Holidays on Friday Last
���An Excellent Programme
Rendered by tbe Children
Tin- public: school ' closed for the
Chi isln.,is linlid.iys on Fiiday last with
nn '-xc'-IIOuL piogilimine lendeied by
lht* childien. Tlieexiimiimtion ofthe
pupils wiib 'oni.liii.lL-d early nnd the
cli-sin.* ('-fere ie.es under J,he diiettioil
uf Piuicip.il Wilson, commenced at 11
n'llui-k. Tln-re was a lurga turnout of
pmI'lits*and fiiends of the childien
���.vliiih must have been" veiy gratifying
to the Piiticipal and his staff. The
progi amine rendered by the childien
was vi-iy inteiesting und instructive.
The drills, weie pinticulnrly good and
shu wed cuifful training. The Herald
will not DarUciiliuize as the entiie
piogt-tiuiuie' was mo-it creditable in
eveiy respect, and consisted of the
foHn-Aing nnmbei*.: .      *. '
i        ' ' ' A.
���joiig by Scliool . "A Song Ior All tlieBrltona"
Recitation. . ". . .. . Ivan Sutherland
Slick Drill       . Boja ol Miss Dent'* room
The Snow Brigade Roys ol Miss Grant's room
Song���"A Lament for Sumi-aer" . enior Girls
Drill*    . . . Girls of Miss Smith's room
S lig by School . '. "Rail) lllg Round the Hag"
Dumb nells . Girls ol Miss Fraser's room
Mother Goose      Bojs and girls of Miss Grant's
  ....*.   "... , room
Song���"Heauttful Rl\er". . . . Senior Girls
Dialogue '      Girls of Miss Bent's room
Lialogue Bo>soI Miss Robinson's room
Sous bv School       *.   ".V...."The Maple Leal'
Drill--   .    -���    *:        'Bojsof Miss Smith's room
Dialogue ~* ��� , "..Boys of Mius Fraser's room
"""Gob Save the King ", -    ��---**
r . i  -   2> ' *
.. Dining the" rendeiirig'.of the, pro
grat-une the^t-hirdrtri of Miss Robing
son'-i division -"'pi esenl'd her with^ a
handsome gift "as 2,1* token of their
appreciation of her work dining the
lei ui.' to which*Mis*> Robinson suitably
replied." \ * .     '.    7
7 '        '       -'     'PROMOTIONS. '?*._"*      v
Fioni -Division 111.-to" Division H.���
Elsie ����� Hnoley,"��Edna"lfBluc-*,7Thnnis
P.TuitH. Ethel   Blackberg". H.uiy  Mc
Nab," Nellie- Robinson,   Rosie Match,"
"Hany Dunn-*."
Division   IIJ���FiomJ-Jr.   Second toT
Sr SecVmd:���George- Wciblsey, Grorge
Blake,'Daviil. MiCriiiie,   Albert Abra-
hiimsonr- John   Gallicauo; Albeit. Anv
i       -���
dei son; Oliver Ainslie, Sandy McRae,
.Meile'C'lder., Liwrence, Shaw^-John^
McRuiy, Emma Allan, Zelin Buml J
Mriuiie Fleming, MaijoiieBourne. -
"*,Fioin Sr. Second to Tliud:-M.iry
Boulay, ,_Doris- Bennet, M. Dunne,
Emma Moigan, Buice Calder, Eric
Coursier, Esther Flo>d, W illie.Galll*
c-ano^ Ralph'BellrKathleen 'Anderson,
Ethel Beam, .Rheta Johnson. Dnn'can
Kennedy, Aubrey Doyle, -Emest McMahon,' Frances Lawson.
No promotions in the other mom*..
Division III. was too large in com*
pniison with fhe others and had to be
leclitssified. * ^
Instructions having been repeived
Jiy Pnncipal Wilson fiom theJDep.u-t-
ment nf Educition. not to rank pupils
nor to publish any "results extept
promotions, no class repoits are given
this mouth'.
for now lines which will open up
tenitoiy heretofore closed to settlers.
That is to say,<tbe C. P. R. in about to
piovide facilities in regirns hitherto
untouched with this object in view���
to meet the demands of intending
settlers.
There are vat-t btretches of count* y
yet to be settled quite apart frum the
loute -which has been chosen by the
Gland T.iunk.' and thc object ofthe
C. J1. ,R. ,is, to induce settlement by
providing in advance jiiat what the
settlers need.
-Curling.
In thc semi-llnul of the green curlers
competition. Kincaid defeated Holten
13 toj��     V   .  '    ".     '
The'openiiig game in the Ecjuitable
Life. Cup competition was played
Siitmday evening between Brown and
Pinkham, 'resulting in favor of the
foi mer. The following weie the rinks:
Walker . .\ * Douglas
Jackson   "*T> ��� Rose
Coghlan ^ '     Edwa'ds
Brown, skip 17 i , Pinkham, skip 2
v A match ~ is Jsbeing arranged for
Cliristnia��rmoining, Scotland vs.'Canada. ''���''Scotlandxwill be represented by
~H./A^Browjii. Dr. Carrulheis, W. M.
L.twiente, D.'M. line.
-   :'    -v';   L-LO. L. '    ���"
At the Ust" meeting of L O. L. No.
1058, .held 6n,rFIiday, eveuing,. the
following ofHceis were elected'for tbe
ensuing t'eiin: -E. Adair, W-M.; A.
Johnson/P.M.; JiisT Smiley, D M.: W.
Johnson, Rec.,Sec-y.; Rev.'W. C. Oal-
der," Chaplain; Thos. Steed, Fin. Secy,
nnd - TreHS.^-W/.-Brock, Lecturei: J.
Shaw,', Director of Ceremonies;" H.
S.ishaw'SLGXM.* House, O G.' At the
next 'leg'ulttt-j meeting on. Jan. 16th,
1003,-.the'installiition*.of *. officers w ill
t-ike place j and- a* large attendance'of
membeis isVequested." '      >2
-      '2    J*--   " �����; ' TZi-"       i---.        '
. - ' <|�� ' ** 1
-i,A Good? Gold 'Proposition.
" --. h""-,"> - L>- ,, ; '.'
^Me8i-rs.VTiiyltii".Bros.'& George-claim
to have the^j besL .���gold-'ipropositioTT 'in
the conn tiy.- The claini is-exhibited
in one ot^their windows, and consists
Vit a locked box containg $20 in gold.
Wilh eveiy'$2 cash'spuichase is given
a key with-which tbe, purchaser ban
the privilege of trying to1 unlock the
box containing 'the gold. Only*one
key will open the* box and the gold
belongs \to the pei son who holds th'e
lucky kef. On New.Tear's Eve those
holding keys will have an oppoitunity
ot trying them.
'���What is home'without a Singer, H��
Manning, agent.
WILL KEEP
The   Fred   Robinson   Lumber
Company are Making Improvements to Their Steamers and
. Building- an Ice Scow.
Th*S Fred Robinson Lumber Co. are
making extensive improvements to
their steamers "Archer" and "Lardeau'-
for the purposes of winter traffic over
the Arm. The Lai deau is now on the
ways receiving a thoiough overhauling, and when sbe is finished the
Archer will undergo repairs and alter;
ations. It is thc intention of the com
pany to keep the Arm open this season.
They have just constructed.a.laigc ice
scow   that -will" be' used 'to   keep   a
channel through the ice. The travelling public into the Lardeau country
can rest assured that they will be ible
to make the trip to Comaplix and
Beaton by the steamers from Arrowhead every day on time. The manager,
Mi-Robinson, has determined to give
prompt service as ovidanced by the
action he has taken to provide for
emergencies.
<   School for Goldfields     -
The citizens of Goldfields held a
puhlic meeting last week in connection
with school matters. The meeting
decided to go ahead with the con-,
sti action of the school building, and n
pelitiou for a school teacher will- be
foi warded to the Education Department, i .
���This Christmas is going lo hn a lively
one. S��e that you do not forget youi
onler to the Revelstoke Wine& Spirit
Co. -    ,
Jj Merry Christmas
Jo One and JUL
&
Once more as the second year of the
twentieth century draws toa close it
becomes the Hdhald's pleasing task
to" ex'pi-ess the . best wishes ' of the
season to .all its,patrons and readers
who"constitute so .large a proportion,
of the Cotal population of this city and
district. The years pass by rapidlyJ.o
be sure. ^It seems^ but . yesteiday
since the Chiistmas of 1901 was being
celebrated in Revelstoke w^ith Chiistmas gifts, and Christmas caiols; since
our children were dreaiiiiug. of Santa
Claus and* all his treasures; since thu
old 'oldfscbry?"of Bethfetfeiiivwas,being
told'fin* thousands ''ofi churches���and
homes,, since "���'family, gatherings without number "'hailed Christinas as the
grandest day of all the year and since
multitudes on the hist eve of this great
Christmas' festival," raised their song
of'gfadness.'witji * which was 'mingled
the hope' that- thus .they would] all
meet in coming years. And so from
east to west as- the day is born the
sound of praise will be caught up by
people of every tongue, and all round
the world the" familiar Christmas
hymns and carols will be���heard in our
own English' speech, and men building
up the great Empire, whether amid
tbe, snows ,*of Canada, liy - the" fever
haunted livers of South Africa, or
among tlie broad pastures of Australia
now withering 7in' the ' midsummer
heat,' will'" think of the old'homeland
the old Christinas ways, and keep the
season .is near,,as possible after the
familiar,fashion of the race." "Here "n
Revelstoke,* where"1 men * ofthe same
indomitable stockV are building up, as
they hope/a great centie of commerce
in a land destined to 'be the greatest
mining country in-the Empire,,we too
shall set" up" out Christmas trees 'and"
decoiate our bouses with green boughs
and holly 'and mistletoerall emblems
of the primitive nature worship of the
race, and keep. Christmas'as well as
our brethren' the wide world over with
joy and thankfulness," with confidence
in the future based on* progress in the
past, rejoicing, as is the way olfj the
race, to 'preserve our old custom*
among new surroundings. -After a
year,of unexampled development and
with the brightest prsspects for those
to come, Revelstoke can with good
heart take its Christmas .holiday and
it is with every feeling of congratulation that ��� the Herald wishes ' its
subscribers and patrons   "A* Merry
CHRISTMA8." ..- '
Rjeid &^^ouhar
Christmas Tree Entertainment,
. Alaige number of friends of the
Methodist Sabbath School assembled
at the chuich Monday evening, at the
annual Christinas Tieu entertainment.
An excellent progi amine of choruses
and" recitations was'rendered by the
children "and were much enjoyed by
those present. ' After the progi amme
the heavily laden Christmas trees
were stripped" and the hearts of the
little ones gladdened by presents from
the Sunday sdhool and friends/including oags of fruit and^candy. Thw
church was beautifully dec oi a ted for
the occasion. a -.
,  <s
Plans of-C P.-R/for 1963.,-.
The plans of the C. P. R. for next
year are most t-otnptehensi-re. Tbey
include double tracking, the building
of a number of new lines west of
Winnipeg.' and a scheme of in igation
which will reclaim two and a half
million acres of land between Calgary
and Medicine Hat, a scheme which* has
been thought out for some time past
and which will be carried into effect
just as soon as the plans aie approved
by the executive. '
* In the scheme of irrigation the water
will be taken ftom the Bow river, and
it is calculated that it will take thiee
dollars per acre to turn this water
upon the land, which is otherwise
admirable in quality, nnd wliich needs
this application to make it profitable.
The plans, which were submitted to
the executive by William ,' Whyte,
assistant to thc president, and J. G.
Griffin,  land   commissioner,  provide
Wish
Their
Many
r
Patrons,
JPECEMBEI-fl
At
This
Festive
Season
-A
'Xmas
We
Also
Extend
to all
(thursoay!
Our Customers
A Bright,
Prosperous,
and
Happy New Year
LATEST NEWS
BY TELEGRAPH
i"1"   .-Jj,,
*%;
* .-...���RJi'l
The News ofthe World in Brie*
As Received Over the Wins,
From ' Every Corner of the*"
Globe.     ��� -.. '
The -British cruiser P-Ulae. now at
Halifax, has been ordered to Ven**'
zuela.      *       -       ' -        * -*!
Former U.1* S. Senator' 8��Wtfdie��4i' , ^ ���,,.
luddenly of heart f-Ulura ymmtrntiiY^ ;v"^/Ju
morning at the Auditorium Hotel,'" Cr^nf
Chicago. * . * ' -r:;r   ;.���   ^-"-v^t
New York   and   Chica***o^*li*-iift--**toto->^
have joined forces to launch hi"Chi(9Kgi�� * "-"^Sr
an   underground    railway "' ta   �����*���""*" -X* i3'
$55,000,000. *- .."* - - ";..* T ~^~?��?,%l
Butteiish factory and *��|-m**eho*--B-s-i.af '"'y^fA-'
the Escanaba~Woc^enw-M*e ���3a.',it'~Ti<^i^^,
Escan'aba was burned last night, tat**- "',3,-.'i*9C'?
8150.000.' * -'   A j   y.flCA^^l
It' is esti mated.that orefc'-tOOO- B��<*e�� *; -����j-.j> >��\
were lest in the recent eaVthgtiAlti*'��! *\'^(^Zi\
Askabad,* Turkestan. A^mmAr^7800^1, 'c'-jj^1
bodtes'have been found.^    - 7 7    *. ��� 7'' .?�����������*? ?��-*��,
Crown Piincess
located at Geneva,	
an assumed"name.   "Her  bj*ethei-'"
���*-   -.'i��*J!;l
r*>V*-**-.*"Tl
** fA.     ,-t. * I
'" ' '*j!t"1
��*&?,
Prof. Giron are at the tame hotel.-- - - ^,v^#i*?i*.|
��� Most Rev.  Fi-ederick Teinple, Aicb*-*->5V^,3sf
bishop of Canterbury and Primate of.**-.''-C^fe*1
.which he will pavMonro if he can ��t**>T *^? >--s��SiF
four rounds - with i Jeffries , ia m bmUle 'Kri��?~?jiW,t
for a knock out.    ^Munro. is- tbe-nt-ui 1 .;*��ft|!*J3f
I lengthy 1
mpc a .,       .    ..
cation.* dealing-' with "British" vie-jre^ol^-^JV^^il
arbitration * of*"- -Venezuela*;, di-mwta.' .'"-���;*v>.-..,^j
was made by Foreign^SecreUry ����na-"'*'"���;:Tk'^p.
downe^fco-U.'- S.Ghnrge d'AftairB. Mr. -7-, ���**-i\-M^
White, last.evening, and' transmitted'" 4 f1- *^*j
immediAtely to Washington. _->,,-". '-. *".";iv v
'. i. " - i"7'y.'' -��� ;l-,', *--.-- .,        "���*���.. A?- * -.- "*���'
���c-'is^y,.
'.'���*s��x*.
.^*kr'.^nAAA"r^-^ f-
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[SELECTED
"f.-'i
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The Opposition Candidate WIbs  . -
," in; North .tyictoria*. by Forty*"-.; ;
Three of a��� Majority/ -      ",'    '<.''-*
Victoria^B. C.,-3>ec .2L���'XtoahrijJ,yj:r~
election in  North  Victorii-ye-rter-Jay"', -"a >*
resulted in the election' of  Patteir--ea -      7A
by 43 of a majprity oyer Robertaon til*;,,-.""'**��,'���,*$���'
government candidate. .' - ""  - ,<
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Dealers in
FIRST-CUSS
Groceries
:    -    ���       ~   ;
- flour, feed
' McClary/s
famous Stoves
lifiware, dranitew are
'"*"' -*-       1   s     -   -
Shell inlwtfe
��� Stores at
Revelstoke
Nakusp :;
New Denver.
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""^rt&^S"^1^ ^z^^^^^^^^^^^^^ff^^^^^^'^  y  v  x\  Little Lilliputian castle  ���������Cnrloalt.T tn V.tr ftrm Amo>|th. Mountain*  ^ ol Virginia.  'N a recent number of St. Nicholas., Hilc-u Uarnett tells of a miniature stone    cattle in tho,   mountains    of Virginia,    and    how it  cams to te built:  :��������� "fiifcMa spending the summer of  *1S'j7 at E'lrlrhurst, ��������� Virginia,-amid tlio  ���������-"wild ruKS-d scenery ot the Alleghany  "Mountains,    tv.*o young    ladles    who  "were  fond of  exploring the beautiful  .������������������country, were seated one afternoon at  ���������the base cf a waterfall.   Being deeply  '���������.-npressed by the beauty of tho spot,  one    exclaim*'":    "How   charmingly  romantic!     I  can almost bellcvo that  "Flora Maclvor 'will any Instant appear  -sealed on that moss-covered rock, discoursing sweet music on her harp."  Carried away by 'such; romantic  thoughts, they began to build an im-  ���������aginary.casll'-: peopled with baron and  f-crf, besieged and defended, of a captive princess and valiant warrior  knights.  ��������� "Let's niskc one!" they cried. Ac-  "cordingly. the next day the undertaking -was begun.  A large purplish bonlder, overgrown  tvith moses a'nd lichen, on the lawn of  Earlehuret. the summer home of tho  builders, was selected as-the site on  ���������which to construct this miniature  castle. Euilding material there.were in  plenty, but  sand  and mortar  had   to  * be carried for some distance. Tools  ���������were limited, and using a screwdriver  In lieu of a chisel to enlarge the slight  indentation in the foundation : rock,  "which was designed to be the dun-  caon, proved but slow Tvork.  This task accomplished, a sauarebox  ���������was placed over the excavation, in-]  ���������which were cut openings for windows  and a door.: The windows���������eighteen in  *��������� aH���������were' put, together with greatest  , care, every stout wooden, frame being  crossed and recrossed with a heavy  ���������wire to imiiate; gratings, then built tn.  the stone w'alls over the openings.  They vary in style!and size, from the  ��������� Sarge* casements in the protected parts  of the structure to the 6mall -windows  in the watch-towers. After the box  liad been built over,on all sides wilh  rocks, held in place by mortar, another smaller box was placed on top'  ."-of it, and co-fared'in "like , manner.  *33oth were first    roofed with tin    to  - -prevent leaking; but this has .been  carefully concealed. There are also  liidden drains both in the.castle and  =--causeway. The towers are built solid,  ���������"Except behind the windows, where  -_f"*aces are left to give the    effect ot  " '-looms.   Alter four months ot not un-  * interrupted  labor the castle was fin-  "���������-,*:*-hcd.    Cr-ie. of  the  architects  carved  l<ttle fif-rrt? out of wood, and dress-  " et\ them to represent the household ot  -"^-ft "baron. " The knights are clothed ia  * --tinfoil armor, each carrying a lance  ' find batCa*:.x; all the ladles are ar-  . .rayed '"in. bnghtly colored silks. Aa  --tinned sentry stands on guard ln ������ach  *'-watertower, -and'a captive princess  *- peeps-through the bars 'of a lofty rase-  ��������� ;-*Juent. imploring aid from every bravo  '��������� "-arnight-errant.  ^       The castle's    height   is about   two  "���������-*Ie3t j>n("i a na-f. ana the rock on which  "���������--Jt stands measures ten feet in circumference, and  is three feet high.    Ths  - epproach to the castle is by a cause-  -���������:*way rising gradually from the ground  -at the rear, and forming a semi-circl9-j  or wall until  it reaches the entrance  ���������gate, where it stops abruptly.   Across  "--the space between the castle walls and  ���������* the causeway is thrown a drawbridge,  ���������which  can   be  raised  or  lowered   by  - --its iron chains at a moment's notice.  On the.   platform of the   .causeway  "-tends    the  handsomely    caparisonsd  ��������� '   -war-steed of a kn'.ght who has just-dls-*  - ��������� -mounted   tp "j-ay  his  respects  to  tho  -lord and.l3dy or" the castle.   They wait  -to Teceive  him. at. the entrance gate,  surrounded by their   household   reti-  '-*line.   A diminutive page, clad in siik-  -*������n doublet and  hose,  stands  at    tho  "horse's bridle, while beyond the court-   *y3rd-can-be-.c.-.ught-a-glimpsfL=.o"_*.he.  "Tools    motley.     The    banner    which  "-"���������floats from the highest to**-er, has tho  ���������crraorial bearing, or, a lion rampant,  ���������culcs. that is, a rampant red lion on a  - .-yellow    field.      The    same    standard  ���������paves proudly over the great gate.  -s-^he Floating Hells ofthe  .  .    Atlantic.  If the sensational charges made in a  book recently published in London  ("At tho Closed Door," by Kobert II.  Sherravd) have any foundation,  there nro indescribably hellish scopes  enacted in tlie strange cabins of many of  tho Atlantic liners. ."--The book is reviewed and some extracts given in  "Truth." In order to spy out the nakedness of the land,. Mr. Shcrrnrd took  steerage passage in a French liner to find  tho ship a floating hell to those who  were too poor to bribe tlio stewards:  "One of the most cruel weapons used  by the steerage stewards to'bring to reason persons who wero unreasonable ns  to paying the feo they woro ordered not  ���������to'pay, was Uio privation of drinking  water. The women and littlo children  suffered 'dreadfully for want of itduring  the throes of sea-sickness. Yet water  there was in plenty. On the night of the  14lh a body of women, with children in  their arms, went aft, surrounded tho  padlocked cistern, nnd .clamored for water. Thoy were driven oil' with abuse  and violence."  HciU'o water for washing was, of  course,' unobtninnblc���������if it was wanted;  but such was tho indescribable, inconceivable filth of many of Mr. Sherrard'*.  fellow-passengers that .tliey would not  have washed nt Elislia's bidding in Jordan itself. "Of "aU'ariiinuls in creation,"  he says, speaking from the depths of this  poignant experience, "man, whon he is  dirty, is the veiy dirtiest." But the un-  washen Jews found their way to the front  of this crowd and crush''with their usual  6inuous'and pushing perseverance:  "The timid, and diffident went to tin  wall; the others, and amongst these .the  Jews, wero noticeably prominent, encroached, and widely extended their  privileges. There were; three hideous little Jewish boys, whom I saw during tho  whole of the voyage, laden with delica-  .,cies from first-class kitchens. I often  . noticed them walking ahout ou tho first-  class deck."  - The sufferings of this "middle passage,"  however, wero as nothing to tho sufferings which���������7according.to Mr. Sherrard���������  the 'penniless emigrants had to endure  on Ellis Island, where they are detained  by the New York authorities for weeks  and even months together, before being  packed back, as destitutes, to Europe.  From '-Havre onwaid3 we had been  treated ^much as sheep, or,' perhaps, as  pigs; but on" landing we might consider  ourselves dangerous and maleficent a-n-i-  ' mals." ln truth, men, women and ehil-  drcd were bludgeoned���������their jailers were  all nrmod with bludgeons���������on little or  no piQVOCiilion, Here is one specimen  scone:  "At five o'clock we were ordered upstairs for supper. A man wilh filthy  hands filled our hats or handkerchiefs  wilh mouldy prunes. - Another thrust  two lumps of bread into our hands. Supervising the" uislribiilion Waa a foul-  mouthed Bowery rough in his shirt*  sleeves, who danced upon one of the tables and poured forth upon nt loncnt-s  of obscene and blasphemous abuse. Nor  ��������� did) he content himself with this demonstration of the contempt in which he held  us, for I saw him drag one old man, a  long-beaided Polish Jew in a gaberdine.'  past lhc barrel of" pi lines by the hair of  the face, and I saw hiin kick another  emigrant, a German, on tho head with  his heavy boot."  Perhaps it may be said that these penniless people had no business lo -rive the  States Government the trouble" of re-  shipping them to their homes. But, in  the fust place, many of the telegrams  entrusted lo the jaileis ior forwarding to  well-to-do tela lives in Xew York were  buiked, nnd the money���������often a gros3  overcharge���������pocketed; nnd, in ihe second place, these hnplc=s wi etches on this  Devil's Island were lured lo New York  by an unscmpulous emigration agent-  "In the in.iny conversations X had that  afternoon willi various people of vai ions  .nationalities, in almost every instance I  heard the blame for all suliering laid on  the agent who had sold the steamship  ticket without tiouhling to explain the  American emigration laws." :  " Surely it would save the United States  Government much expense, and such  wretches unimaginable misery, if the  consuls at European ports were instructed to advertise the immigration lows in  every necessary language and place.  A Present Duty.  It is a mistake 16: postpone tho ple-  sures    and    reci nations    of    life ��������� until  one "has    done    his hard work; a mistake    which    a    great      many    frugal  nnd   otherwise   sensible   people   make.  There are hosts of men and women working with might and main for the purpose   of  enjoying life  when  they  havo  laid a solid foundation of fortune under  their feet.   They nre noting upon the belief that it is possible'to get the hard  work of life done, to press it into a few  years, ahd then to begin to live.   This is  'a'misleading belief, says "Outlook." "In  tho first place, the work of lifo is never  done, nnd ought never to be done; nnd,  in  the second place,  ho who postpones  indefinitely. :tho hour when lie will begin  to enjoy.life, postpones entirely lhe possibility   of   enjoying   it.    No   man   can  work, with might nnd main for twenty  years,"committing   nil   his  strength   to  liis,;-task  nnd  permitting himself  to bo  entirely absorbed hy it, without suffering  atrophy or deadening of tho faculties of  enjoyment.   At the end of twenty years  he will find nothing left of life for him,  so  far ns occupation is concerned,  except   tho   things    he   hns    been  doing.  He   will    have    so    fashioned    himself  that    he    has..', become    only    a    blind  or   a   tool    to   do    a   specific    thing;  he will hnve lost the capacity of turning  from ono occupation to another- of taking  up  one  interest  after  another,  of  giving himself out freely, on many sides.  He who would enjoy nature cannot begin   too early.    The' first  acquaintance  with  the  outward  world  ought  to  ho  made at the time one begins to talk, so  that one fits his words to trees and flowers and'birds and clouds just as soon as  he sees them, and sees them just as soon  as he :is able to fit words to them.   Tho  boy who grows up with access  to  the  woods and fields and knows the habits  of birds, because he learns them iu tho  leisure hours of childhood, will acquire  a knowledge of nature which the mature  man can never obtain.   It is impossible  to   shut   oneself  up for ' twenty  years  and then step out of the room and enjoy  the sky and the landscape.   It ia impossible to work with might and main for  twenty years with the expectation that,  at the end of that time, one will take  up music, painting, sculpture, architecture, and find delight in them.    Delight  in  these  things  comes  with   education,  with  early and intimate  contact;   and  when one comes'out of;a business'which  he has made a prison for twenty years,  he can no more, see what'art has to reveal to hiin than can a blind man.  '"' Tlie power of enjoyment must be educated by use just as truly as any other  .power; it witheis and dies by disuse.   If  one is to enjoy life he. must  enjoy it  from day lo day; if he postpones enjoyment, lie loses lhe power of securing it  at the end.   There conic brief moments  in'life, swift crises when everything is  put by for the doing of fl piece 'of work,  Uie  performing of  a  specific  task,  Iho  facing "of a great peril;  hut those are  only  moments.    The  lives  are  few   in  which there are not opportunities of enjoyment ns one goes along which will  minister to one's working power and not  subtract  from  it.    Ho makes  the hest  living who keeps himself fresh by keeping his interests varied; and he only can  mnko a life who lives in.every pait of  his  nature.    Enjoyment  is  ns* much   a  necessity as work;   to  find pleasure in  life is as much a duty as to' find profit;  and   the  only man who lives  a* wholesome, normal, successful lifo is ho who  combines pleasure and work, toil and recreation, from day to day, from the beginning to the end.   Pleasure is a duty  wliich cannot be postponed.  Eating", Drinking* and Table  Conversation.   J_  When, Boswell   complained    to    Dr.  Johnson of having dined at a splendid  table   without   hearing     ono     sentence  worthy        of        being        remembered,  Johnson said:      "Sir, there    is    seldom  suiy   such'  conversation."   .   -'Why   then  moot at, bible?" Boswell asked.   "Why,  to eat and drink together, and to promote kindness;  and, sir, this is better  done where there i3 no solid conversation; for when there is, people differ in  opinion, and   get  into   bad   humor,  or  some of th'o'company,'.who'.are. not'capable of such conversation,'are'left'out,  and feci themselves uneasy.   It was for  this reason, Sir Robert Wnlpole* said, he  always tnlkcd  bawdy  nt his  table because in that nil could join."   The stouthearted old doctor, by-'the'way, was not  of Sir Robert's opinion, for Boswell elsewhere relates that Dr. Johnson; received  the greatest compliment ever paid to a  layman when ii certain person apologized  to him for having used profane words in  a story whicli he had just told.  ' The man or woman who cnn bo relied  on to talk well at table or in a parlor  will never lack invitations. . Good conversation is the finest product of brains,  breeding, society and civilization, but it  is very rare, and one who is a master of  it is welcome in every compnny and a  friend in need to every host.   How anxiously, in "making up a dinner party, do  people.run over till their friends to find  one oi- two who will help keep the tabic  talk from  flaggingl    No  one,  who has  not sat at the hcnd of a table heroically  warding off the silence wliich threatens  to fnll at any moment, cnn appreciate  duly the gratitude a host feels for the  man or woman guest who catches and  tosses back to him-.the ball of conversation and keeps it in the air, who helps  him draw out the more taciturn members of tho party by gentle banter and  artful questions, and who lightens thc  talk, when it becomes heavy and serious,  by  throwing in  some jest  or  frivolity.  Such a jest, if hosts were judges, would  do-more to gain the sweets of heaven  for the jester than a rosary of prayers.  ���������Much is said and written of the duties"  of hosts, but have "guests no reciprocal  duties? Are they not hound, hy some  hospitable rule of honor, to., prepare  themselves to entertain thc company and  bandy conversation? lias a guest a right  to sit silent, receiving much of the golden coin of table talk and giving nothing  in exchange' except, perhaps, a copper  penny or two, a "yes" or a "no" in an-  Jewish and Christian Intolerance.  *"*"    M**.nT.l*la<1ed Knlvca.  This knife, known as the "Norfolk  ������������������:--*kalfe."-*a'ade' at Sheffield/and contain-  "*In*j   *ninety-five   blades    and    in=tru-  "ments. no two alike, has boen showD  ct .several English exhibitions.  -On its large motber-ot-pcai-1 handles  Pumping a Sea Dry.  . The pumping dry oi Harlem Lake,  iu"* Holland, was pronounced by  many engineers to be impossible;  yet it was successfully performed. Zuid-  er Zee is many times the area of Haarlem Lake, and presents from its depth  and character many more difficulties,  and yet the fiat of "doom of the Zuider  Zee has gone forth. Iu a very few years  many thousands of ��������� acres of smiling  Dutch pastures, of prosperous Dutch villages, of poplar-bordered roads will  characterize what is now merely the bottom of the sea. Science in the. twentieth century will have hardly any tale to  tell more astonishing than this.  The Zuider Zee, colo.br.ited in Dutch  legend and history, occupies some fourteen hundred square miles, the" area of  a  large  European    province.���������:    On   it*  I have known Jews,t)and, doublles**,  you have, who, despite education  and so-called culture, were so narrow, so bigoted, that they practiced a  spirit of aloofness; who, though willing  to buy from or sell to the Christi.ni,  and to receive from or render professional service-lo thc non-Jew, were unwilling to cat or drink with him, to  worship with or cultivate a feeling of  fellowship for a Christian neighbor.  I have known Christians, and so have  you, who, likewise, despite education and  so-called culture, were the creatures of  such narrownes-s of spirit, such littleness  of soul, that they would draw thc line of  fellowship at the non-Chri-tian.  Sews-mfgnt"-l*ie"---rrCTod���������e*i--itfg!r-to���������hava  given them their Bible, their Saviour;  good enough to have given - them thoir  moral code, and their religious spirit;  good enough to do their .share1* in thc  world's great economic, industrial and  commercial work; but not good enough  for fellowship, whatever might be their  moral, mental   or social excellence*?.  What, think you, would happen if the  Galilcean rabbi,, Jesus, were .to coma  back to life and appear before them as  the meek and humble Jew that he was?  His Jewish name and face and lineage  would cause them to bar against him tlio  doors of their homes, their hotels, and  their club-houses, despite the fact that  they would continue in their churches lo  how down, worship and adore him an  intcil.  God's only ano.. ..  u,   .**.���������-   ���������������������������-! -    .    . God   have pity on such Jews and on  shores arc thr- ancienl towns of Modem- 'JfiU(.h   Christians.     God    hav������ mercy  on  . carved representations of a btar  ��������� feu-it and a stag hunt.   The blades are  all etched with pictures of some kind  ������*���������"Windsor.  Castle, "Westminster,   the  -Queen arid so on.  A i^iant knife made by a Sheffield  "Drm contains as many blades as there  ���������axe years m the Christian era.  '���������"Pride as a begg-ir is the equal ot  nraat ��������� and a great deal more  9*os&j*rA* '���������*-*_ _.v ' ' .,  blik; Hoorn, ITarderwijk, Norden nnd  Enkhuizen, once large cities in the halcyon days of Dutch commercial and naval supremacy. It cncompasivs the islands of Marken. Schoklahd and Urk.  "The present plan consists of building  a dam or embankment across the northern part of the sea from Wieringen, in  North Holland, to Piaam, in Vrieslnnd.  Then will follow the creation of two  "polders," or areas of dry land reclaimed  from the sea. The water will be. pumped  ���������ut by means of steam-pumps.  Thc entire work is to be completed in  eighteen years. The enclosing dike from  Wieringen to Piaam will be finished in  the ninth year. In the eighth year will  be commenced the work for diking the  Wieringen Polder, which in the fourteenth year will be. dry and ready for  sale. In the eleventh year the similar  works on the Hoorn .Polder will be begun, and will bo completed in the eighteenth year, making up to that date a  total area of upwards of six hundred  square miles of reclaimed and fertile soil.  It is as if Lako Ontario or Lake Erie  were to be pumped dry, and the lake  floor of each added to tho area of Ontario.  .. ��������� ���������  . "These teachers," growli tho first  jnan,* "ha\c no" mercy on the young  minds entrusted to fhcir care." "What  have thoy done now?" asks the second  man. "Why, my lwy came home yeutcr-  dsiy in a state of collapse because hU  teacher insists upon his telling her how  many times the Philippinn war was ended in 1901."���������Baltimore -'American."  such petty, narrow and misguided souls.  Such as these surply need your sympathies and mine, despite the fact thnt  their conduct carries with it its own  punishment���������thc pi-nitbiricnt of depriving themselves of the benefit and hies****  ings which come from contact with good  men and womon, whatever their rac<*, or  creed, or belief. How small would such  souls seem to the hrond and tolerant  Nazarencl How he would lay the lash  on the back of Jews and Christians,  whose arrog.inco would lead them to  look upon themselves as b*ttcr than  their neighbors, no matter how great tho  virtues of surh neighbors!���������From  "Jesuit the Jew," hy Harris Weinstoclc.  penny ....  swer lo a point blank query?  Except to a blessed few the gift of  conversing does not come hy nature.  Many" fine minds there are who, like a  much-quoted college lad, are chock-full  of ail elegant vocabulary, but can't get  it out. Olivet) Goldsmith, who wrote so  well, was dull in company; and oven tho  great Dr. Johnson, who tnlkcd so wonderfully when ho thawed, wns ordinarily  silent. IIow many hosts loved thc crafty  Boswell for drawing out the lion, as  only lie could do it? Boswoil confesses  that in order to start the doctor's tongue  he used to utter some heresy in religion  or politics which, he was aware, would  rouse tho great man to a fury of disputation in' whieh poor Boswell would be  crushed by the fust sentence. But the  Boswellian ruse never failed to set tho  doctor"going, and we owe many delightful'pages, of the "Life" to'the canny  Scotchman's trick. Would there wero  more Boswells at our dinner-tables���������and  more Johnsons!  Conversation ought to be' learned and  cultivated,.just as music or any other  entertaining art is learned and, cultivated.   Young women will employ expensive  masters to give-them lessons on the piano or the violin or to train their voices,  so   that   they   may   havo   "accomplishments" and appear well in company, but  they   totally   neglect  the  greatest  and  finest of all accomplishments, the art* of  conversation.   There ought to he masters  of conversation to teach meri and women  how to talk well at a dinner table.   Tho  girl who  can  interest a table for five  minutes at a time three or four times  during a dinner has a more graceful and  ingratiating accomplishment    than    sho  who cannot talk, hut who can play all of  Chopin  beautifully and by  heart.    The  tongue is a gieater instrument than the  pianoforte.   Let a girl take conversation  for her accomplishment; let her give to  reading and thinking the lime which the  pianist gives lo practice; let her go.iu  seriously  for. com ersation,  though  not  entirely   for   serious   conversation,   and  , she will become the paragon of her circlo  [-.tnd_mcn .will-fight duels for her hand.  And men. too, ouaht tb^slffdy^convcTsa*-*-  tion  a.s they  study  anything'els", and  practice,  practice,  practice.    In  Fritnee  conversation is esteemed u fine art, and  it i3 the conversation of Trance which  proves it the mo3t polished nation.  Eating and drinking seem to be necessary concomitants of conversation. If a  man invited friends to Iub house just for  conversation, and gave them-iiolhing to  eat or drink, he would soon be- town  talk. Doubtless some people could traco  a subtle connection between dining,  drinking and talking, dragging their1 audience through a psychological mn/.c, but  thc vulgar^truth seems to be that when  a man���������or, strange to nay, a gentle wo-  man; either���������has a full stomach and feels  thc pleasant afterglow of wine, there is  a tendency to sit at ease and'unburden  thc mind of whatever lies upon it.  However that may be, it is a fact that  hungry people will not converse and  n*nt. nnthin** 30 expands the mind and  . Curious Courtship Clubs.-  The city of New York boasts a club  which lias for its object tho promotion of aiinlc-.s courtship, in so  far as matrimony is concerned. A���������num-  ber of young men there have'banded  themselves together to make love to  damsels who; instead of looking for pro-'  posnls, are content with what is called  ."a good time."  Their knights escort them to theaters,  picnics, and other amusements, make  them presents, and arc generally attentive even to a greater degree - than the  ordinary enamored .swain. Couples who  break the rules of the:club by mnrrying  hnve to pny a fine of fifty dollars, nnd  are forever banished from the club. Ono  or two couples" have already paid this  fine and entered into the forbidden slate,  a dinner on each occasion being held-by  the club to console the members for their  loss. .-.  An equally curious club has for somo-  ,timc been in existence in Chicago. It is  composed of young men, nil of whom  benr lhc Christ inn nnme of Joseph, and  who hnve entered into n solemn compact to woo no girls except thoso hearing the; Christinn nnme of "Mnry. The  club has a considerable membership,'and  it is n,noteworthy fact that, so far, its  rule has .never boon broken. From the  nniiics it might be thought thnt this novel orgnni/ation was of Scriptural oii-  gin; hut such is not the fact. .'  It originated in this manner: Whilo  out on nn excursion one .summer three  couples chanced to meet whose names,  by a strange coincidence, happened to  be Joseph in the case of the males and  Mary in the case of the damsels, -lt was  thereupon decided to form a club of Josephs, who for sweethearts should only  ���������look nmongst thc Maiys of Porkopolis,  nnd thus the club'was'', formed.  What may be termed a mutual protection courtship club exists at. Areola,  in the State of Illinois. Tho object of  this order is tG"*kccp young men who are  not members from pnying attentions to  nny lndy friends of a member. One outsider who came poaching on tho club's  preserves was rather roughly handled.  In yet another town a lovers' club was  started which its promoters were soon  very glad to drop. Ils object was to  compel the courted damsels to pay their  own expenses wherever they might be  escorted, the members undertaking only  to "pay for themselves, either at the the  ater or elsewhere.' .,''  This put the girls of the town on their  mettle, and they soon gave their stingy  swains to undeistand that if Ihcy-hiid to  pay their way ihey would choo3c* theii  own company. To show their independence, they took their pleasures without  male escort for some lime, but when due  apology had been made the old relation  were graciously permitted lo bo lenewcd  And, ,as one of them-'put it, the gill;  then had a "perfectly lovely lime," thc  young men lavishing Llieir money right  and left upon them as evidence of repentance and reparation for the past.  ' The Man Behind the Mask.  ���������'  Animal Emotions-  It is told of a certain Lord Holland,  who was very eccentric, lhat he  used lo give nis horses weekly concerts in a gallery specially creeled for  tlie purpose. Ho maintained that if  cheered their hearts, and improved  their temper, and a witness says that  they seemed to be delighted with the  pcrioiiiianee. Much lias been written of  the efl'ect of music upon animals. The  "American Xaluralisl" gives some of the  results of experiments made in Lincoln  Park, Chicago, to determine tho efl'ect  of violin-playing on diffeionl animals.  Music wliich was slow and sweet, like  "Home, Sweet Homo," or "Annie Laurie," pleased lhe panthers, it jaguar and  a lioness and her cubs.: Tlio panthers became 'nervous,' and twitched their tails  when a lively jig, "The Irish Washerwoman," wns played to them, but relapsed  into their former, quiet when the music  again became soothing.  Tho jaguar wis so norvous'during the  jig music that ho jumped from a shelf  to the floor of his cage and buck ngain.-  When tho player ceased and .walked  away, the jaguar reached out his paw  to him ns far as he could, with* claws  retracted.  The lioness and her cubs were interested from,the first, although when the  violinist approached the cage the mother gave hirn a hiss and tho cubs hid  behind her. At the playing of a lively  jig the cubs stood up on their hind legs  and peeped 'over al .the player. ' When  the musician retreated from tho cage  the animals came to the front of' it,  und did not move back when he gradually drew so near as almost to touch  the great paws that were thrust through  the bare. When the musician was playing "Home,, Sweet Home," the entire  family were very attentive, and remained  motionless except thai tho cubs turned  their heads from side to side. ��������� Then  another jig was played, and thc cubs  danced about. '' -  The coyotes, in a den, squatted in a  semicircle and sat-in silence while the  music continued. .When it ceased they  ran up and pawed at the player through  the bars. He began afresh, and again  they formed in a silent semicircle. This  experiment was made several times, always with the same result.      ^,   .  Doctors Held out no Hope to  Mrs. Huffman of Napanee  A Wonderful Case and One which  goes to Show tho Wonderful Advancement Recently made In the  Science of Medicine,  M  Proof-Positive.  A sympathetic picture of tho Chinese laur.clryman ia painted, by a  writer in thc New Oiloaus "Times."  "John" lives among us, patient, industrious, and often despised by those who  know too 'lillle of him even to. regard  him as a fellow-being.' Yet if wo knew  the human history that lies behind that  yellow mask we should not doubt that  here also" dwells a soul of liko dignity  with our own.   Says the.writer:  .  Next door to my lodging is one of  those squat little houses which now and  then you find.next to a hig mansion. On  the lower, floor of ths small house was a  Chinese lauadry. In it was a ..Chinaman  about twenty-five years of age. His faco  was as imperturbable as the sky. He  went about his business with tho unde-  viating regularity" of the solai" system.  At first he was an ordinary _Chincsn  laundry-nan to mc, bul my attention  became liveted upon him and my curiosity was awakened.  The man seemed to live merely for  his work. When I came in at two o'clock  in the mornin*- I found him with tho  lights turned high, patiently working at  his calling. If I rose ea-rl*������ in the morning, that prodigy of industry wns up bo-  fore me. I gradually became filled with  wonder at the untiring persistency of the  man. Becausa of his neatness and politeness and exquisite caro to please, the  neighborhood never thought of sending  its laundry anywhere else. ;  I began lo carry my things in person  ,lo_the Chinaman, urged on by the desire  of "finding-^out-sdfffothihg-about-hiui-=i-I  reasoned that no ma'n, white or yellow,  could work as ,he did without being  dominated liy an all-absorbing purpose.  I found hiin intelligent, no could speak  Knglish well. Finally'I won his confidence.  The young Chinaman was in love. A  girl in China was waiting for him, and.  he was patiently and bravely undergoing  the hardest kind of toil in order to' go  hack to his native country and marry  her.  When he told mc the story I forgot  that ho was a Chinaman; I remembered  only that he was a man, working liko a  man to earn a wife, and withal,, despite  these meagre, unpoetical surroundings,  cherishing all the dreams of a young  man whose sweetheart is far away.  ��������� This year's Summer Girl is, more  than ever alert. ;As-' witness the  following incident: ~ First, know  that the young' man irteant only  . to 'revive that .good old custom of "a  pair of "gloves" as a forfeit. When, he?  found her-curled up iu the hammock, a  magazine slipped from her .listless*fingers, he���������well, who wouldn't 1 Of a'siid-*  den she opened her blue eyes on'him, and  remarked' accusingly, a tremble-in hor  voice:-"You kissed me!" - .  "    ,  lie lost nerve, and stammered* a denial, '"x.y i '. -A. -i*i  "I know it was you," she [insisted. -  "I am not tho only person "about," ho  ventured. '.'There's Wilcox going over  the" links liow: He had to pass here.-  And doubtless Dandy Williams���������"  "No," she inlenupted, "it was you, 1  know it." - - '   ���������  ner look froze him, but he gathered  desperate courage. "How do you know?"  he demanded triumphantly.* A fluslv  spread to her. pompadour. "Did I ever,  kiss you before?" lie asked. ��������� ["Granting'  -I did kiss you just now���������" he'was pushing his advantage hard, '��������� and. she  squirmed���������"I think I' ought to . be  cleared!" He. was getting ' indignant  now., "There is only one way," he went  on, "to put the matter to a fair test,  and I propose to have that way adopted." He paused] and she looked troubled,  but did not interrupt. -"If I kiss.you  now, you can decide whether or no I was  guilty .before." .    ,   '���������     ...  It was "an"- awful risk, but he hoped a  second time might soften her., She went  quite pale, then replied"firmly:        ..,.  "I feel you have n right to vindication,'  Mr. S., and to "show that I am porfeotly  fair-minded,* I will submit to the teat."  At this he almosf shrank '-from" continuing.. But a second kiss! "Delicious!  And .would she not relent? Would not  all opposition be'drownod,'that isi.amalT  gamatcd iii a mutual third? Great .as the  ��������� risk was, it was worth taking.--",   .-���������-.  'II wish to be perfectly fair," he said,  briskly, "and' I suggest "that you close  your eyes that you* may give undivided  attention, lo the'character and quality."  "But I was asleep before,',' shc��������� urged.  He almost said, "Really," hut slopped  -in-time,.and_substituted: -"Simulation of  sleep must do now." ���������*-*",-  "You will hurry,    won't you?" ��������� ahe  ���������asked, her,,voice trembling.   ,  But he'was judicial.,   "It-should be  Napanee, Ont., Oct. 27.���������(Special.)  ���������This town has furnished a case  whicli has caused considerable talk in  the county.  ' Mrs. 'John "C. -Huffman had been  troubled for" oyer six years with female weakness] ���������a*nd kidiicy trouble.  The pain was-so great that sfic could  not hear il.and her kidneys gave her  so much bother that she' could not  etUcrtain any company in her home or  take'any "social pleasures whatever.'  Her urine -was very much discolored  and gave   her   great trouble in pass-  i"g.  In additions to these symptoms she  had'all the'', pains,' headaches, and  weakness-of ;Fcraale Trouble.  Mrs/ Huffman tried ;,-physician's  treatment -and many othe'r medicines,  but .instead of getting better she was  gradually growing worse and was very,  much discouraged. : , ";  . Many of'-her .friends, thought she  would never get better, but one day  sha-picked up a\nc"wspaper'"' and. read  an advertisement" "which /-said that  Dodd's Kidnej*. Pills would cure Female Trouble-.' " ���������  As ,shc had tried"'so'-many other  things without, .being able'to get anyi  help, she was very doubtful, but concluded -to try "this remedy.,  She used six'boxes;and*was completely cured/. She is,' to-day sound  and well, without a single symptom,  of her old trouble left. ' .,'  7 She was"' cured ' nearly..; five   years-  ago"and'iis,*to;rday -'as sound and well  a"'woman - as {here -is.'in. Napanee. She*    "���������('  says:.-.*'.' /' ~.  ;.     - ,\    >     '.  **- j  - "I ���������" can confidently T recommend  Dodd's Kidney, .Pills to every womam  in Canada for they cured me completely and mine was a J very, bad  case. "���������'.-���������  "They are certainly a great - medi-   a  cine "and' I * will ~ always .recommend \ W'  tlicm' to women who' may *bc suflcring -  ���������-'  as-I'was*'with*"Fcmalc Weakness and  Kidney ".Troubfe.'-'iA     .;''.  1  that nothing 30 expni  loosens the   tongue.as, a good   dinner  does. *  The Snail as Food.  Proper Dresa For a Groom.  One of the largest rendy-made clothi-i'*  houses ill the city received not long ago  from i remote place a letter, the substance of which was, "What is the' proper dress for a groom in the afternoon?"  The clerk who opened the mail, naturally enough, referred the* cnqnlry to tha  livery department. The hend of lhat  branch1 in turin dictated a brief reply,  something like this: "Bottle-grcon coat,  fawn-colored -trousers with top boots,  silk hat with cockade.''Wo can iriako  prices as follows, et cetera'.'' A week  elapsed, and tho hig Htore received a  plaintive littlo note.:."I always knew it  w.os expensive to get married; but can't  you siiggest aomethinf a little less el-ib-  'orateT** -  -  , ��������� _    -���������    ,  Thc popularity of thc snail as on article of food is not confined to Paris, but  extends throughout Southern Europe ami  ���������ome  parts   of  Africa.    Dr.   Edrard,  a  French writer, in a pamphlet says that  ninety  thousand   pounds  of, snails  aro  sent daily to Paris from the gardens at  Poitou, Burgundy, Champagne, and Provence.   Those reared in gardens are fed  on aromatic herbs to improv-n their flavor.; Their market price is from two td  three franca a hundred, while tho** from  the  hedge?,  wooda   and    forests   bring  tomewhat less.    Tho proprietor pf one  ������������������nailery  in   tho vicinity of  Dijon   net*)  over   seven   thousand  francs   annnally.  The snail m reared and fattened  with  great car* in some cantons of'Switzerland as an article of luxury, and ia exported  in  a  picklsd  state.    It  is  nlso  eaten ns a retisk and nutritious article  r>f food in Austria, Spain, Italy, and in  some sections of the United States. Tho  Ashantees'' and    other    African    tribes  irnoke them an'l fat them' ns daily food  nil,the. year around.    In Algeria, in the  "nnxkets, large heaps of -mails arc sold  oy   lhc  bushel  and   the  hundred  as an  irticle of food.   "Vendors hawk tb"-..i in  the ntr-iols of Cairo.  Tn modern Rome  Ire.sh -fathered snails are hawked by wo-  *ncn fron door im door.      ..  _,���������., .. ;  All in the Point of View.   -  ' "What an immense undertaking some  people seem to make out of nothing at  all,   said a mation.   "To thoso who really benr the burdens and heat of tho day  the strenuous efforts of* the self-indulgent woman would he nmusing, if it was  not'no provoking to hear her complaints  when   they  consider  the  why  and   the  wherefore.    In  a' month   or   two   from  now, fortune's favorite will have to open  ��������� Iier .house. In town, and she .'will undoubtedly be perfectly worn out with tho effort  of  having the  rooms cloanod  and  more or less reorganizing her household.  To be imr������, she will not personally hard  to exert herself in the very least; neither will she have to nay the bills.   Nevertheless, she will feel the task to bo herculean, and will'talk to all who will listen to her as if she,could not stand the  strain."   "Such a rush and a worry!    1  am nearly dead!" said one of these heroine'), apr-aking of hor groat ��������� obligations.  "The amount of work l havo dono and  still  have  to do is appalling.    Just ait  soon as I have a breathing spell I shall  have to go to the Hot Springs to recuperate."  "Now, what do you suppose she has  really done?"'said one of the group to  whom the overworked woman had been  ���������.peaking, as the latter rustled languidly  away. '"Done!" echoed another; "why,  ehe hns probably told one woman to  acrub the paint, and another to put up  ' the curtain**.'* And tuey all laughed un-  tympatlieticaTlr.   ^..^jj  done properly," was nil he would reply  Sho closed her eyes and doubled-.her  fists, the color wavering froni carnation  to-white rose in her cheeks. Ho drew a  long breath, bent lingcringly, swept her  trembling mouth with the. tips of his  moustache; softly fitted his lips to hers,  gently pressed' their yielding ripeness till  ulmost the littlo white too th wore, felt,  lifted thc lingering prcssuro till the tips  of his moustache swept her trembling  lips, and���������it was ovor! ������  She lay quilo 'still then, her eyelids  fluttered. Presently'they lifted over the  blue, which was all dreamy-and soft. She  sighed, clasped her hands, spoke:  "I don't think the other was you!" she  murmured with deep conviction." 'V"  Then he fainted.  A balky hor&e'is much like a stubborn"  boy., when ' he gets., his; mind set on not  pulling��������� the more you whip hiin the moro  he determines lie,will notrgo^-so the best  way is to use kindness and .a little strategy  to-divert'his-attention/and he forgets-1 nil'about' it,"aiid' goes   along   all  right.    Tlie  Huniaiie'Jouriinl,' -Chicago,  saya:���������One "who, knows  snys that    tha  vice of balking in horses is nlmost invariably- caused by improper' breaking and  handling'-the ���������animals', while  young.    It  is onlv ��������� high-strung an'd sensitive horses  that  balk,   and   these  arc;handled' far  more-successfully by humoring itnd patience  than by  sevef-e'- measures, which  usually only make mailers worse. "Horse  sense" in these cuses..is1qiiite-as essential  for the unini'a'l that drives as'the  animal lo.be driven. _' No twocases can  ���������be treated exactly-; im thei'same way���������  cither in respect to relractory animals,  or, - children'���������therefore'' thefe  should- bo - -  uo.ironclad rule.. Anticipation and careful watchfulness are the first essentials'. r  -Obseive���������'-the-animal-closely    in places  where it would -be likely to balk, and *  with the first >,sign^ of stopping, get oS ,  your \vaggqif,mnkes*some_re_ncwal or pretended change in* tlie'harness, then raise  .a foot and tap the'shoe,with a stone.   A.  few   moments' spent' in   this  w^ay   will  cause the animal totfo'rgetshis wayward-  inclination, and he will.be ready to movo  onward at the first-word!  'A kindly pat,  a few gentle .words, a slump of sugar,  or.-a-bit-of^appj9=.will_do^far:imore_uto-__W  wards breaking your'fforse'jof this trick  than all thc oaths, blows, and kicks you  can administer. ��������� Honey, not; vinegar, for.  XX  catching flies, remember���������yjbu know how, *  it is yourself I *��������� ���������������������������'������������������iil������  /,  -***-  Jennings���������Have' you' heard the story;  about the coal bin? ?.'     ?  Mitchell���������No, what .is it'?  "'  _  Jennings���������There's"nothing in it.  Mitchell���������That's nothing; every time  I look at mine I.get a;.'lump in my,  throat.'  J  The Only Way. -  Mistress ��������� Bridget, tho clock * haa  stopped at twelve' ��������� Maid���������Yis, mum. Ya  told me not to let it run down, so Oi  shlopped it ot.twilve.  i *��������������� i  -.  Pro Bono Publico.        -   - '  ' Discontented Artist���������I wish I had a  fortune.   I would never paint again.  Generous "Brotlier Brush"���������By Jovet  old man, I wish I had onel I'd give it  to youi " '.','"  SdaedPtK Stat.  A Philadelphian who apsnt many years  in the sunny. South, who, in. fact,-was  born and brought    up    there, tells an  amusing story of darky wit, and one well  worth repeating.   It was some years ago,  whon he lived not more than; 100 miles  from New Orleans.   One day he returned  Irom many' hoUra pf driving,' and was.  agreeably surp'rUod to 'see a fine plump  turkey served up for. dinner.   Wonder--  ing where it came from, he called Itastus  and enquired by what means the beauti-"  ful bird had    reached his dining-table.  "Why, sah," replied Eastus, "dat turkey,  done bin roosting on our fence dis tree  nights, so dis morning I seizm him for de  rent eb de fane-*.** . ^..;^._ .^-, , -----,.^ti  *B������t,' ������Ff������k 'attd b* BMs-ry whll*  -rl-rinjf th. ���������Hgottlv' -.p-watna a  ' kMlIs**, wbelMwra*- **Mt I-,  ' It can b������ in* bjr th������ nit of  M.vw-n-M'9,      '. -.  rmMAPPiMjAnuBn.  I**a������*.**|*U -witli -al"*****. aeat In a  4Uk at J*-****.-.'th.-.ntt -jore ia th*  "- l-wat asrc, t*������V caljr cur������"lcr dyspep*.  lia.' That's tit* whol* ato-rj* ���������zcept*.  that tk.larg.1MMailgut1.od, th.  'muH **aaa' Ua* "���������"-** ���������Um ���������Uf-othra'  *||*i atiM.���������Prio-i SS e-mtB.  if-.       *  Br. AfiNw's Catarrhal Powder  ���������perns' a sew'tttacal In tc choked np  nostril aad lines it with anew mem-  braaa. In ten minute*, will relieve  cold or catarrh or cure the most  obstinate headache. A quick cure���������  ��������� safe enrt-���������not a slow remedy.   17.  \  i  '11 s,y  ������6*  m  i  "rwraa  TKe Moonstone^  :Sphirvx=  By Mrs. 6. N. WWisawoa'  Author ���������* -*��������� en at an rtt"���������j." n***  **3ie -waa not there now! The place 01-  fored. little "or. no" chance, of concealment; yet he could: see. the girl nowhere. \   ��������� 7 * *        ���������  Bis -face Cell i Into utter tolahkhess,  than darkened Into fury.  "What's thia .mean." he ejaculated.  "Where's Mias Gray?"  The old woman turned and gave back  his look ooolly, her eyelbrows rounded  In*: surprise.  ."Don't get In a .wu, sir," ahe responded.   "The poor young lady oame  to hei*-*elf Just as ��������� we wero finishing,  had a drop out' of that very brandy  ������������������: bottle as ever was" (indicating with a  motion  of *her . head1- a: hlack-' bottle  . atAnoittf* among scattered "make-up"  oa the dressing-table) -"and felt qulti  W6ll ar>d sensible." 6ay������ she: 'I can'ro  oat by nay'self.-   Just you pick up mj"  blU ot thin-*-*;' *an"d" out she goes.    3  wonder you didn't meet, her, sir.". .-  ^**"lood craclous!" was Jeffrey's onlj  ..- Bxurmr. -  'K ^ *-���������"' '     -  Be darted** away, "ahno-st pushl-o*.  tim*m the bt*-f soreen^wTilah'haxl beer.,  pat lnrft-o*at of'SeUiji.'ttiat the pro-cosr  ot a*tre|-*i**Lrt������r'' Mazeppa-'on the* horse's  **"he*c need not.be stored, art* by ever}  pauslnt* attage-hand. ,,..- .,' ' ,'".  . vIt-*-fasMppssIble.,that Winifred might  have gone-.straight." to", this ^.corner.  which had arways been put to the seme  usa during her rehearsals' wlth-Sellm,  though, it eo. It was strange Indeed  '���������that he; (Jeffrey)" had missed' seeing her.  ���������;But there-stood the groom and the  horse. In. the semi-dusk; and. there was  no one*'besides. -   *��������� '.        --*,  *  ���������"Cutting   it   rather   fine,   ain't,   she,  sir?"  asked  Sellm's    attendant,    who  knew all the cues toy this time as well  ;as did the -actors.,    ,_ ,      ,  ��������� . *'..--  v'"C-attingf it fine, l"ehould'think* sol'"  -f-roaned  the ,stage-manager.   .What a  fool he had "aeen to go out: of sight of  _  Winifred Gray's door for an  Instant!  ���������HioWf idiotic-"; toj have- trusted ;,to'-tthe  ' common  sense, o������ a drunken old' "Woman.   (This.aspersion was a grave injustice to the respectable Mrs. Purdy:  'but \t was a necessity to rey41e''Bome--  ohe, and'she answered as well'jas another for a scapegoat.)  "��������� Jeffrey tore back   to   the dressing -  -room, for there was timo even yet,*ys_  -that-fiend of a girl could be found and  ,dr*gg*ad to her duty.    - . "   . j *-  "For Heaven's-sake,, which, way did  - she go?" he adjured; the dresser,, who*  was still "calmly "putting the* room to  rights;   ' brushing, '* shaking, -' folding,  " -hanging.        A ,.   ,    ���������  "I don't know," retorted the old' woman.    "I'd  done  all  you  told  me  to".  "vVhen she went out by this door, sir,  she was off my hands."    ,-  ", "With an oath" Jeffrey, flung away.. He  'had no time-to bandy words ,with this  stupld'-'old 'creature?*  The"girl "might  's-till be somewhere about the stage.  A- Half mad with Impatience, lie hiin ied  this way and that.   Every nook, every  "corner" was searched;* not - an,, empty,  dressing-room was forgotten. Bu*  ���������Winifred was" not" to be "found, and the  'moments were flying.   Already it was  ...close upon the(cue for llazeppa's sen-  - satlonal 'entrance.' "Wantage, who had  '"been in the box, \vtth Macalre; .was.be-  uhind the scenes again now, in a pas-  '  slon of rage, ^blaming .the stage-mana-  -."���������ger,*swearlng"at everyone.'-"  -Jr. *"..*-)."  "When there could be no longer wait-  . ln-j, - Jeffrey   .desperately, phiyed   the  card which, al] this* time, he had been  v,keeping.up.his sleeve....V*" V,���������    '.,, ;  Prom the 'moment,- weeks ago,  that  ".he had,been-^varn-*d_not,to mentton(to  -iMiss Gray the'-kind of-attire she'"would  ** be - required   to"^wear   in *her   "great"  scene^e-had' feared a'hltch-'at'������the*last  \moment.   Of course It was vital to the  ^success. of ;the (play  that  she  herself  "should .  appear    strapped   'upon   ' the  ,'.hor*-e;~'but  from 'the'stagejmanage'r's  ������ point of vlSw, at' least, any thing * was,  -4-**>etter-thlan_triat_a scene-should bejeft  ���������'but, or the "curtain rung.dowrT'ln'^tne"  mldst.ot-an. aot on flat failure.  V * That* this might* hot happen,', if the.  worst .came to the���������.wprst, .Jeffrey-shad  secretly 'prepared" an understudy,' of  whose readiness he had not chosen to,  speak- even-.tq ^.Vantager lc'st^it should-.  . scem'a confession of weakness���������a?-fear  that his^authoi-ity as stage-manVget  might not'Toe enough to* dominate'-a  rebellious actress. *i'7' '-.���������������������������*- ��������� "*'- ;.  If-"Winifred herself had known -the  ���������truth.- of .course It .would have-been  futal; she* would h.ive salld: "Let the  understudy do it.'-* % But,-as ^"matter of.  fact, one of the ladles" ih-the" ballet-'to  whom 'he" had taken 'Jrather a fancy,  and whose'figure 'somewhat resembled"  "Winifred Gray's, was at this moment  dressed for the^scene ln.fleshings froni  neck to foot, and with a wig like Mazeppa' s.,i;Shei-was called,, Hung upon  "the 'horse", strapped^- oh, 'and" Juit In  ' -tlme-jiot to-be-late.for.the eue, Sellm  galloped upon the stage with his living  (burden. -���������  '~;r  Lionel Macalre sat ln his box, half  hidden by the curtains, yet - leaning  eagerly-forward:��������� ��������� He," too, knew -the  cut tor the great entrance, and���������Ignorant at the latest developments slnoe  "Wintage'^had'-'left him���������his ."..eyes had  not tfor'-soirie -moments strayed froih-  the stage. ,   - -  He heard the galloping hoofs in-the  wings; then the noble iblacte,horse with  a pearly-pink, slim body thrown'across  his back, "-prang'into sight.   ���������,,,.'  Macaire's ,lips   were, apart.    He .littered   a  faint," hissing  breath,   which  gave  a "vent" to~'etrong emotion  long  .peat up. *' ....  "They've-* made her do ltl" he said  -*, between"his teeth.       ' '  Then he. looked" closer, .bending out of  the *box7 jdeaf;, to* 'the| murmurs that  went xound  Use.audience below.    In,  -       i vV."    *V* ������������������*���������-*-.  ���������Uie rage of disappointment at realTzrng  !hls -*hlatak"e," he "co'dld-: have��������� ^shouted  ^aths aloud.   But he had succeeded In  . doing many things in his eventful life  i by sheer self-control, and he had Bel-  ( dom lost lt unloas he had chosen oc-  ' llberately'.to let'himself'go.    He did  not lose lt, or let himself go' now  It was (Miss Gray herself; . utnei--  vowed that 1,| was another gill In her  place.  From the stage-manager's standpoint the act was saved, whatever  might have to happ-m later; but to  Lionel Macalre the substitution of an  understudy 'for thc girl whom he ha.l  meant to shame and. humiliate was  only an aggravation. He cared nothing whether the pl-J y went on .or was  stopped In the midst on the flrst'high't.  It was:only "Winifred he had .'thought  'of'from'the.flrst.  No answer had come to the .note he  had sent behind the fje'enes; and In this  v case he .knew well enough 'that silence  did not mean consent.  If Wlnifre'd had  intended to .fling herself' upon h'ls mercy she would have replled-wlth"a,-written  line"or veifbal  message.  'And   no  word having been'deigned ho^hadibe-  . lleved  Wantage's,, assurance  that  the'  -girl,would go through^the scene on.the  home, even.If she had to be forced to  ���������t-      "\  *, The" Instant he saw" that the slight]  , apparbntly ;nude_ figure bound to Sellm's'back was', not "Winifred Gray's,* he  rose-, from vhls' seat   without..' showing  /signs o������ haste and; left th'e box.'    ' ** ���������'  "s. Behind * It" was "a  do'or" -which,  led  through a1, short passage to the stage,  and the' first person he met there wa*  Jeffrey., * , , *",.'  "Why did not Miss Gray play that  scene?"   Macalre   questioned,   stornly.  Grotesquely ugly at all times, he wis  appallingly hideous when in a passion,  and, though his voice w.as merely cold,  - Jeffrey saw by' the purple face' and- the  Jelly-like quivering o������ the marred features that .the millionaire's wrath was  held ln check by-an effort.      .  '  '  ' '.'".Miss Gray can't be found;.she's*disappeared,"   the -stage-manager   stammered, his castles in* the air rocking on  their foundation, built above, this rich  rnan'-Sj money'',and*-favor."..'v  w.c   ".,  ' Then liohel---Macalre" muttered' an  oath between his teeth.   "What do you  mean?"- he said.    "Wantager,came out  and told" me that the girl-had fainted,  but ,-*-a!s-being'*dressed fo?"ithe scene,  ''and"*woiild be put'through'it "somehow,  .without fall.   He had your word for.lt  ���������as  -stage-manager.      What  do you  -mean'.^then, by'sayIng' she has dlsap-  '-peared?"'7i-;' T".' i:iir-    ���������        l-y  Jeffrey* dld, not dare to lose'his te"m-  per,'though he had a hot one, quickly  flred.' "It Is "a most mysterious affair,"  he answered. "I,don't know what to  think of It. But certainly I am not to  blame. And, if MJss Gray Isn't found,'  her understudy can get-through some:  how, though It will be a great misfortune���������on the flrst night of all nights.'  The only thing_wlll.be to go out before  .tfhe".ourtaIn- ahd ,*nabe,.a careful an-,  nou'ncemenf,-'working up some-sehsa-'  tion that will fetch the newspapers and  rouse, the public's curiosity. It "may  even create a certain boom."  .."Boom be..hanged!" ejaculated Macalre. ' "The girl's played you false,  then? -But what a'foel-you were to let  it happen! t Do you --emember It is-my  money you've been' letting her make  ducks and drakes of?" * -**-.'  "She's,certain jto.be iound,". faltered  Jeffrey, "drooplrig under"  the    millionaire's anger.   "She can't possibly have'  .left, the theater.." If you'll, comef with  'me, Mr. Macalre," to"her'dresslng-ro'om  door, where Mr. ^Wantage Is catechizing the woman' who" tia'd'eharge of he'r/  after  she , fainted,* you'll  ..understand'  that1 lt must be so.".-    "���������     '        *'"  "Very well," .saidJ:he-other, and to-  "gether they ,**valked*across the stage,  behind the setting which was going up  fgr^the^next act./~..y^     .. ���������,- ,-* ,  .;:"    ,    ' -_i-  -     (.iA-.  .,,.   ..,      cCHA-*"*TER.X-v*T.        #5?,'  !���������-;    .���������,:."--���������.,    Escaped..ji,., . ''  "itltri'rWantage,. afra!d'sto" go out and  face liis prjtron  after-what'had  hap-"  -pened,*-,was-standlng-ln-.the*topen-doorrli  way of Winifred Gray's dressing-room,  talking' excitedly ..'to 'Mrs.-Purdy. .-At  sight ,of --Macalre advancing upon him  he"flushed'darkly,"-*then grew pale."*-*'"  "This Is a mystery, Mr. Macaire!" he  .'exclaimed, with a shaking,voicev -"Miss  '/Gray^has.'dlsappeare'd: '"'A 'most'-'obstln-  *'ate "girl. *j I knew that she/objected to  go'through* the' scene In^the .only suit-  'able way," and. Jeff rey knew It.   But we  ^'Betklnd enough to state exactly  ' what occurred after .'Miss Gray fainted," 'Maiialre^broke in,* addiesslng the  ...woman, without a. glance at Wantage.'  "She .was then brought Into this room,  Iwas'she not, and-*, placed In your  'charge?"  "Yes, sir, she was, sir," returned the  dresser, staling'at tKe'hideous face of  thc-man with .undisguised; astonishment,; even'"' repulsion. '���������* "Bhe ��������� did'not  know that,'though so .villainously, ugly  to look upon, he was worth many times  his weight ln solid gold. Macaire was  not so uncommon a 'name that she  should associate him with millionaire  - Lionel of that Ilk, even If she heard  ;; him addressed.1 by Wantage or Jeffrey,  and.lttdld not'Oocur toher'that he was  to be-fawned-'upon.; "Ugly beast! I  wonder what the* dickens he means by  poking his nose into it?" she was p-ro-  bably.asking.herself. ..'/.Who's he, any-  how?"-i A.nd, aloud, she enquired: "Are  you Miss'; Gray's father or���������or any-  thlngf-slr?"*- -. '- .- -  *"I ani���������a friend^ of her family. And  I am, unfortunately, .financially interested" In/this company," the great man  condescended to^ explain. "It Is not  pleasant hearing* that' the star has rum  away on the flrst night." "  ' -   ' * y  "She can't have run far," cut ln Jeffrey.' "This'woman here will tell yeu  .that." > : \: ., r.y->  '��������� "ulo'nel Macaire looked at "Mrs. Purdy,  and she accepted the look as her cue  to speak/ '"I managed tq get the young  lady Into the things she was to ride the  horse In,, sir, when she was fainting'.  And a rare Job It was, too."  "What  happened  then?" question ed'  Macalre.     . ;���������������������������.-  'Why, this   gentleman,  the  rmally, 1 did" have the young lady  rrrady, and at the last moment,. as I  was tellln' ihim, she popped, open those  great eyes of hers. She'.d been wild  about the flesh In's' before, sir, say in*  nothin" on earth would induce 'er to  put'em on. But she seemed wonderful  calmed, down  like,  after  her falnt'.n'  ���������yell, ������nd, says she��������� Jet me see, what  was it she' says first?���������oh!. 'If-you've  got a drop-of spirit handy I think I  could'go on all right and do the scene.'  Those'were her very words."  "And then?"  "Well, and then, sir, I gave her the  spirit. There's the'yery bottle on the  "make-up* ��������� table.' - 'Twas my -own;; I'd  "brought It on purpose, thinkin' it might  be needed-^which It was. When my  daughter faints away, sir, which; she  does sometimes, without no warnln', at  all���������--"  'JNever mind about your, daughter at  present," Interrupted Mac-Mre, his curious, pale eyesjlxed-keenly on the woman's .commonplace little face. "You  gave Miss Gray the-spirit, and "  "And.up she"jumped, most.as soon aa  'twaa-down. 'I believe I've"been silly,'  she says to me.' 'I'don't .like this; but  I've got. to. do. It.' You see, I'd been  tellln' iier ,how she'd be sued for  breach of;contract, and if -she'd no  monc*y," she'd' be,put ln'prlson, maybe  ... nm, min *si*iiii*!iiiii.u, im- stage-  ������nnulckW"������ld'tJ.e scene 1-i.ss by that. manaBCr str(ihe kept comin* to the  So ���������4������-cK'*^.uaiencc were certain that    a d worrUm. me, till I thought I  'Z flgurhe tn'tlie horse -������^e^   should have gone off m* head, But.  jiaderstud^.t:?'-  *H������'*PP'1*    *"? ; ,',.-,-���������..  "��������� .'/When did you tell her. that?;' quickly broke In the millionaire.  * The' old woman looked somewhat  nonpluBBed for an Instant,; but then appeared suddenly to recollect. -'"Oh, It  must have been before she went off In  the Xalht; 'Tou.see, I was:helpln' her  '.early In the evenln'. And then, anyhow, "tlie young'lady seemed all right  and'as sensible as could be. I was go-  In' out of the room-with her,'but she  vwouldn't have It, She was quite strong;  enough-to go alone,- she 'says, and I'd  better stop, where I -was.and'pick up  the nice new costume -which I'd pitched  on th'e floor piece by piece as I dragged  'it off of her. So thinkin'"no harm, and  havin' had no, instructions "What to do  after I'd got the lady ready, I let her  go. I thinks no more about It till a  minute or two later along comes Mr.  Jeffrey again, askin* ".Where's Miss  Gray?' "   ��������� * - '������'*.-  "Tou haven't told me yet why you  are; all so sure she's ln the theater,"  said iMacalre.  ���������Mrs. Purdy pointed to the walls of  ,the dressing-room,. "There hangs her  clothes, sir," she announced. "There  was some talk .of takln' 'em away,  when .she was so obstinate, but that  wa8..">efore she fainted. There they  hangs. And as theie are modern times,*  and 'Miss Gray ain't- the Lady Godlva'  the,poetry's about! It*stands to reason  she can't have' got far." *  , "I've sent for the door-keeper, who  swears that he hasn't left his post tonight, and���������that Miss Gray didn't .go  by," added Jeffrey.,- "Yet the theater's  been searched from below the stage up  to 'the files. The girl's nowhere. She's  -..vanished"into air.'-' ;���������* ... -  " Winifred Gray, had disappeared -as  mysteriously as the bi*.3e in the ballad  'of "The -Mistletoe Bough." No trace of  her could be found at the theater or  elsewhere,-,either, on the ^night when  'mys'tery had'swallowed her up or during the days to come.  "    - .  "ftacaire had. neither ''expected nor  greatlyjiesired the play produced with  his' mon'ey ,to be a. success; but,  strangely enough, the very'event which  caused his keen discomfiture created  an artificial vogue for. the "revival of  "Mazeppa."'- ' "-"--' ������������������*���������'  \ The scenery, was magnificent if the  company .(save "for the vanished star)  '���������was poor. .Most qf thebest people had  .been engaged when M-j*. .Wantage had  iflrst begun his .quest for actors, and he  .had, been given-to understand .that if  !"MIss Gray were-secured the rest of  ithe cast mattered little to the backer;  ^therefore he had been easily suited for  'most of the parts. But scenery "alone  "and*-" the disproportionately���������, large  "amount of pictorial advertising which  :had;been done could not have saved  /'Mazeppa'", from failure"! The length  'of Its"cdnt!nuance on 'the boards would  have depended upon the sum of money  -Mr. 'Macalre was -willing to throw  away. But,the sudden disappearance'  of the star gave a fillip which perhaps  ^nothing else could;have;given. ;  i A story had been circulated'that the  .well-known millionaire had been Induced, to "back" the production because, of his Infatuation- for the Miss  .Gray- who had lately been * discharged  ironi the Duke of Clarence's Theater  'for~extraordinary-and-mysterious_rea-T  ;sons. People, even in London; talked  >a good' deal -about It, and harsh things  'were said of Winifred,* *-lio was represented as a bold young woman trading  'upon her charms, to;handle.Lionel Ma-  -calre's money, and her "brazen front  of 'Impudence" ' vvas" *prov*ed*"without  shadow" of doubt by the startling: posters she--had, allowed to be^exhibited,  representing hert-elf as Mazeppa bound  to the horse. a She would certainly not  ���������have undertaken to play the part and  .dress It as it had once been dressed by  Uhe actress who had made the play fa-.  mous,-'if4was''ar]gued, had she really'  rbeen the/simple, rhoaest..glrl_jshe���������"had  hypocrltlcally-'trled to appear "during  'her brief months-of popularity at'the.  Duke of Clarence'F. *���������;,",- . ���������. ���������*���������; ,> -  t Then, on the' top df this gossip" which  associated her name with" that of a  iman notoriously connected with other  scandals, more or less of the same sort  (thouf-h he was not too notorious to be  a target for match-making mothers),  came the actress's disappearance.  Among all the things which had been  said about her, no one had dreamt of  starting ahe. theory that she had been  deceived as to the part of Mazeppa and  its requirements. She was an actresj,.  and actresses went ��������� through life'.with  their-eyes open. -Arid the-old story ot  the;thwarted:elopement which,had,'in  some, inexplicable .way, cost the girl  her position' in Mr. Anderson's company, was revived. It had been freely  said before that tliemanln the "case  had beeu, Lionel Macaire himself, and,  though he posed as a bachelor, there  liad been many rumors; that he had a  wife fcom whom he was separated. But  how It was thought;.that the sca-ndal  had been connected with ��������� a married  man well iknown ln London, society,, and  '.that the plan which-had failed befera  had,been successfully brought oft ln  Brighton.- Miss Gray was supposed to  have thrown up'her engagement and  left her manager In/the, lurch, to, run  away with a man, differently Identified  by almost every person who helped lo  keep the tile In circulation." All "agreed  |. ln one particular alone. The man, had  a lovely wife, who was heartbroken at  her husband's' treachery, and by and  by, a divorce case would come * on  which would make a tremendous sen  sation in the "highest circles."  Brighton people flocked to the new  Thespian Theater;' where Miss; Gray's  understudy,; a, pretty, girl with a good  figure and no absurd scruples of  squeamlshness, made the most of her  "great chance."; Others even ran down  from town to the seaside, ostensibly  because "Brighton; was so Jolly In No*  member, you know," but really to seo  for themselves the scene in which they  might have been shocked at Winifred  Gray!s boldness, If she had hot run off  the first night of the piece with Lord  .So-and-so.  As If the fates were tireless In agitating the - "boom',',: which ;had saved  ������������������Mazeppa'.' for the (benefit of Its needy  manaser and Its company ot actors,  Brighton was favored with another  sensation on the very morning after  the girl's disappearance.  The startling posters which had bean  put up only on the. afternoon of the  first' performance were all either torn  down from their hoardings or destroyed  beyond recognition, the name ot Winifred Gray being stripped away from  underneath the picture ln| every case.  ( Other posters of. the same design  were Ordered and put up to replace the  damaged ones after a day or.two's de;  lay (for LlonerMacaire still" had it ln  his power to take this mean; revenge);  but on. the following morning they  were seen to have gone the way of  their predecessors, even "though a reward had been advertised for the detection of the guilty person.  ; 'Meanwhile'Lionel Maealre remained  In. Brighton, having: sent ..for, a detective from a certain well-known private  agency, not to be on the watch, save  Incidentally, for the destroyer of the  posters, but to take up*the "scent from  the start and track down Winifred  .Gray. '  He did not move openly ln the matter, Wantage, as business manager of  the company, acting for him. But even  if the Interest which he, took in finding  the girl leaked out. It could not damage his reputation. He It was who had  given the flrst kick to the football of  scandal which at the time;of the Duke  of Clarence's Theater Incident had  linked their two-names together. Now  he was to, be pitied, both as the financial backer of a company :treacherously  deserted by its principal member and  as a lover deceived by her upon whom  he had heaped benefits.  The detective was certain that by  'some method,' whlch.lt was his duty-to  discover, th'e girl had contrived to get  away not only from the '.heater but  .from Brighton. Everybody else believed this, of course; -but then only  two or three persons knew the real  reason why it would have been���������espe-  clally, difficult for the actress to escape.  Only jWantage, Jeffrey, - Mrs. Purdy,-;  Lionel Macaire, and now the detective,'  were ���������,aware, that \ Winifred had been  prepared for the'"great scene" while'  fainting, and that, so ttar as could bs  -ascertained, she-had.had no. possible  opportunity or.even time for changing:  In spite of this fact, however, the man  from* Sleigh's ">'���������������-���������..������������������.-, iicr-^-tcd - in '��������� his  theory. The girl "must have hfixueh"  herself somewhere ln the,, theater for  hours, and then - received assistance  from outside. Once away' she would  naturally have taken steps to leave  Brighton as soon ������as' possible. Her  brother, who had just returned to London, was shadowed, but in vain. It  was discovered that'Mrs.'Gray was ill  ln a nursing-home in Welbeck street,  and that she!had within .the last few  days suffered a relapse;,-tout nothing  could be'learnt there'about her daughter. - . "Z  - Lionel Macaire, however, could not  be brought to share the detective's  'theory. He was utterly without religion, yet his was a superstitious mind.  (He believed in the warning power of  dreams, or} curious coincidences "which  ha& sometimes ruled his conduct.on tlie  Stock" Exchange'or in'racing. '.He had  a conviction that Winifred Gray was  "not far from hlmj, and.-whlle lt kept Its  -....-...*- ,.������*..* i.i-u.:i;-.''n.'i-;i;'A^'.:.'ii������������AWM������  ,'grasp upon him he', wished" to linger ln  Brighton.   '���������    *   "<���������  '���������  *"'* ���������_"  '6o a week passed on, and still "Ma;  zepp'a"-flourIshed-at the^hesplan-The-  ater; and- still the detective had been  able to learn nothing of... Importance  about Winifred.'}   ,-"        ..   ,[/ .1    .t  ~ii !"*:, '." j^APTER'xyn.'    iv^ -  -The Masked'Minstrels.  On  the eighth day after Winifred's  disappearance Lionel Macaire .went out  late in the .afternoon from the Hotel  ���������Metropole,'where h'e was staying,'and  -walked-slowly!-along-.the-.Klng's���������r'oad..  vHe was thinking' of Winifred, as he almost always was now,- not sure whether he  most, loved  or  hated her;, and  with   thoughts   of    the  girl   came  up  memoiles.of his strange past.   Before  the  eyes o������ his 'mind  rose the-Imago  of a woman far more beautiful  than  Winifred,  of whom tho  girl reminded  him  ln  some  of  her "moods.    If  that  chapter  of  his  life  could have  ended  differently," perhaps    he   would, have  been a dlfte-ient man.  "P.'E. 7j." ��������� Though the woman's fair  face' was only a memory-rdistant  though never dim���������and ; her.-: place ln  what* he called, his heart'"had been  usurped by a girl thirty yenrs younger  fthan she���������those Initials had the power  to call up a thrill even now," half dell-  Jclous, half painful. Oddly enough, Just  , as he hntc_d and loved' Winifred Gray  at tbe sanie time, so he had loved and  hated that olher woman. Since he  could,not have her, he would kill her  If he could; It she had had a son he  believed that It would have: given him  a subtle pleasure to be revenged for  the past, through him. .  -.Suddenly he remembered the dark  young man who had'called at tho Duke  of Clarence's Theater,- with an* Introduction to George Anderson from V. E.  ���������������.' ' -     . -  *  It had been ln Macaire's thoughts at  the time that; the.good-looklng. young  fellow ln the odd clothes might have  been more than a' mere friend to the  beautiful,woman whom so many had  adored. When'F. E. Z. had vanished  from-the,world where she had scintillated as a.bright; particular star���������*yan-  lshed as mysterlously,as Winifred Gray  ���������she had been oldeiv!' than Winifred  ���������was now; twenty-three or twenty-four  perhaps. -. ,      '      >!'  That was" now , twenty-seven:"or  twentyrrelght years ago. He had been  a young man then, poor and,obscure,  though he' had already, secretly sown  the seeds of his great future.: Now he  ���������was rich almost beyond his own'knowledge;'and; he was fifty-six years old,  -past, middle age, though his heart was  ho>. oo it ���������*<>d been In his youth.  (To be continued.)  Mainly About People.  Scotch piety is generally-tempered with  common -.ense. A lioating party on thc  Clyde were caught in a storm. "Let us  pray," su-rf-eated someone. "Ay," said,  the boatman, "let the little" man over  there pray, but let all the stion<" ones  take an our, or we shall he drooncd."  The Gieek philosopher Zeno believed  in piedeslination. One day he caught  his servant robbing him,. and he. gavo,  him a good hiding. "Was I not-destined*  to rob?" pleaded' the seivijnt. "Why,  then, do you heat me?" "Certainly,"  replied Zeno, "you' were destined td'rbb,  and'you were also destined to be caned."  When tho fretful critic, Cumbeiland,  said of a pcrfoiiimncc of "The, School  for Scandal" that he was surprised tlmt  it provoked such inimodcrale-luughlcr,  as it did not make him even smile, Sheii-  ,dan, the wit, orator and playwright, is  said to have .remarked: "Cumberhiiid is  tiuly ungrateful, for 1 saw a tragedy of  his played a fortnight beforo nt Co\ciit  Garden, and 1 laughed from beginning to  end." .  A young doctor, wishing to' make o  good impression upon a. German farmer,  mentioned the fact that lie hud received  a double education, as it were, lie had  studied 'homeopath}', and was also graduate of a "regular" medical scliool. "Oh I  dot was noding," said Uie farmer. "I  had vonce a calf vot sucked two cows  and he make noding but a common  edhteer after nil."  ;������������������ An old .London .omnibus driver was  standing beside his 'bus one day, when  he-was approached by a very ������������������ comely  young woman, who evidently wished to  ascend to the outside-seats on top, but,  hesitated for fear she could not make'  ��������� the difficult ascent with becoming modesty. The driver, evidently understanding her dilemma,' shook his head and  Baid: "Climb up, miss; don't mind me.-  legs ain't no treat-.to me." ,.     .*   ^  Oliver Wendell Holmes was one day  seated near.the refreshment table,-at an  entertainment, and observed a little girl  looking with longing eyes at the good  things. He said kindly, "Are you hungry, little girlt" "Yes, sir," was the reply. "Then why don't you take a sandwich?" '"Because I haven't any fork."  "Fingers were made before forks," said  the doctor, smilingly. The little girl  looked up at him and replied, to his delight: "Not my fingers."  1 Down in Georgia, the other day, in  tiie good city of Macon,* they were telling of experiences during the earthquake  disturbances of 1880. This' was given  hy an old town official: '.'The council  was in session that night, and when the  quake shook the city hall from basement  to attic the councilmen ran out,.thinking the house would* topple over. The  minutes of the meeting, ns can be seen  by the records, conclude with' the following sentence: 'On motion of Jthe city  hall, the council adjourned.'"  Agood story is related of Henry Clay  Dean, an' orator famous in the United  States a generation or so ago., Mr. Dean  was generally 'referred to as "Henry Clay  D^ean df Iowa," even long.after he..had  estabVsife.l a v>n-me,injMissouri.' He ex-.,  plained his change -of. hal.lt? *'on' in this  way. "You see, they passed a nefailcis  prohibition law in Iowa, and' there's  your, whiskey" gone. Then they abolished  capital punishment, and s there's your  hanging gone. And now the whole population seems to be 'drifting tpward ulii-  versalism, and there's your hell gone." I  can't live in' a State that has neither  hell," hanging, nor whiskey." - ' -*,  To illustrate the unfairness of judging from appearances, Daniel- Webster  used to tell how, once upon'a time, on his  way to Washington, he was compelled  to proceed at night by stage from Baltimore. He had no traveling companion,  and the driver had a sort of felon look  which produced no inconsiderable alarm  in the Senator. "."I endeavored to tran-  quilize myself," said Webster, "and had  partly succeeded, whcn-'.wc reached the  dark woods between .Bladenshurg and  Washington���������a proper scene for murder  or outrage; and herc,-I confess, my courage again deserted me.. Just then the  driver turned to mc.and, with a gruff  voice, enquired" my name. I gave it to  him. ".'.'Where 'are you .going?" "said" he.  The reply was, 'To Washington. ^I.am  a Senator.' Upon this the driver"sei*"cd  "me" fervently by the*h.ind*-and exclaimed,  'How glad I am! I took you for a highwayman.'".,        -     ,       , .-"* '-"*  Drumming; up Business.  Explorers  and, scientists '/who ' havri  -returned Ifrcmt^^ai;tiiiique Jind5, St.*  "Vincent tell * many -inlciesting '-stor""  ies'of'their experiences. One amusing  incident has to do _*". ith a visit.to Kingstown. One of thc cxploieis wn$ walking  about the town when he was accosted, by  a colored man. "You have got to have  your hair cut!" decl.ued the negio.  "Gol lo have my hair cut? Why is  that?" asked (lie scientist. '  "Order of the boiird^of Jicallh..-If you  don't, I "shall have" to put" you "oil 'lhc  island." .1.        .-*,,������������������*      , .      ,;  The negro nei/ted the explorer by the  shoulder and stalled him toward the  wharf. "   " *  "IIold'en there!" said the now excited  visitor.   "Who nro you anyway?"  "I nm the. ollicer-of the honril of  heallli,", wa*, tlii; reply. Just nl this  juncture' another of tire parly*came up.  "I-.guess we shall have to' have onr  hair'eut," snid lilfe flrnt. '"Tliis innn s.iy-i  so, and snys thai he in au ollicer of tiie  board of;.health.".  "You'll hnvo" lo gel it cut quick if  you want to stay on thc island, broko  in the,negro..  ' The'other scientist still had a little  light in him.  "Why, you black scoundrel," ho  shouted at the negro, "I have traveled  all over the wbrldy iind I never heard of  ���������uch, a, hculth-ollicc regulation anywhere!"      -���������'-'���������  By this time a policeman had appeared:  Thc negro edged awuy, -nnd -was- soon  quite a distance down the street.  "Ollicer,1 do   you    know. that   man  thorc?"..asked one;of the strangers.  '"Yet," replied the policeman.   , s""'-  ,V'"who-iB'i*e?"    ���������    y-y    '���������- ,���������-������������������'  "He is the barber wlio'haa-the. shop  wound the;corner."  Interference.         "YVs," said niy "friend; sadly, "you  may play poker witli a stranger and an  unlimited raise, and mny come out all  right; you may '���������hoot l'ons and  tigers and tlie Falls of Niag.ua,  and never sin.or in your health;  you may play with lire, and  take no harm.���������" .Hut never meddle in  the.least degree with anyone else's lovo  affair; I'or you will eoiiio out of it with  flic'reputation of a fool, with fool  ���������stamped all over you back and front,  nnd1 you will deserve it. "A helpless, unendurable fool for all time���������that is what  you will he. If you see a .pure-minded,  refined girl on the verge of marrying a  coarse, vulgar brute, let her: don't stand  in the way. Probably the brute will  never forgive you, and it's' absolutely  certain the girl never will."  '��������� "You speak with some warmth and  .bitterness.. You have some personal experience in your mind?"  i "I have. ..As you know, I am not a  married man. But at one time I was engaged, lt was years and years ngo, and  I was never one" of those men who arc:���������  well, silly ahout the,; girls; they nre going  to marry, l'ut,'speaking in sober fairness, 1 must say that Jessica was a really remarkable girl."  ; "Yes; engaged girlt* always are."  "Her hair was a "  "I know.   It would bo.   Pass that."  : "Don't be an idiot.   There was a look  in that girl's eyes " '  -  ; "I know it by heart. Skip it."  '��������� "And her mental powers were equally  out of the common,  i "The mental powers of every engaged  girl are quite out ol thc common. Just  say that you loved Jessica and Jessica  loved; you, and leave the rest to the fertile imagination of a thoroughly practiced : journalist."  "Now that just shows where you are  too hasty; for I'm by no means sure that  Jessica did love me. I can't help think-  in** that if she had really loved me,  things would have happened differently.  Mind, I admit that I was wrong in interfering in any way with Ernest Budd."  , "And who was Ernest Budd?"  ' "I think ho .was the most nauseous  "beast I ever met in my life. He was  short, thick and ugly enough to s^op*the  clocks. He was also a vain sentimentalist.' He talked ahout women -by the  hour. He believed himself a woman-killer. To listen to him made you feel sick  and tired. I've heard him say that tho  beauty of women was practically the  only thing he lived for���������just that���������in  those words; and - the, other man to  whom, he said it died a week later. Well,  at this time Budd had come to an understanding���������he said it was not actually  an engagement; but was, to come to that  ���������with a washed-out puss from Wimbledon, called Emily Chater. I saw the girl,  and I was sorry for herj she,was a wsak  and playful little thing, and there was  no harm'in "her. I was very happy myself, and I wanted to save her from Er-  mest Budd and infinite sorrow in her af-  "ter-life.. Knowing the Tapid, "mjscellane-  otis and volcanic temperament of-Ernest  Budd, my task was easy;"T had but to  introduce him to a more attractive girl  , than Emily, and I intioduced him to Jessica." _ ' *  "Seems Tough" on Je-������������iea." ��������� -  ' "I'd talked it over witli her, and she'd  agreed lo ii-. SJie .wasso happy herself���������  we were both very happ..-,'.-*. these days���������  that though she" had never met"Emi"*r  she' wanted to save her. Jessica had implicit trust in mv judgment then."  "But after she'd met Budd?"  . "I own', she didn't like it. She said T  might at least have told her what an ap.-  palling bounder Ernest Budd was. Well,  I'd told.her what'I told you,-and t. think  that ought to have been enough. * As I  pointed out* to her. within a very short  time of Budd meeting her he" would  throw over EmilyiChater." * -. ,;...  "And you were wrong?" ~* *:" ��������� -"'  ��������� "I was-absolutely- right. And when  Emily'was* saved by our intervention,  then, so I.told Jessica, she was perfectly  free'tos drop Budd. * In-frtct, I hoped she  would.s> "And 'Jcssica-'kncw how*'to drop  people", too. She never seemed to say  anything in particular, and they just  knew that it was no. good to go on and  that she hnd'^no further'U3e forCthem'.  She was a girl of wonderful tact,-always  perfectly, polite, but., ,   " *.,."-���������  "Leave- out the descriptions, I know  them."  "Well, as I Bay, I pointed all thi.s out  to'-hcr,"but she-still was rather averse  to it. She said the man's attentions  were becoming perfectly insufferable,  and'that���������knowing as he-did that'she  was alicady engaged���������he ought ,to. ba  ���������shamed of himself. "��������� -However, she Wept  ���������n- meeling-him,-and,in-ru.week-Jie_ hroke_  ofT'his'undcrslanding with'-Emilv Ohat-  er." ��������� ' ���������  .'   "Well?" I asked.   "What then?    Dia  'Emily commit suicide?"  "Not a. bit of it. She must have known  that Ernest Budd was-no fit husbsnd for  a decent gill." No, she married a solid-  tor, nnd is .cry happy, they tell rae." '  "But you started this story to show  me the dangcia of inteilerencc.''  "Exnctly."  *   "Apparently everything went right ���������  just" precisely as you wished and intended." " . '   -  "   "Well, it didn't then."   . f  -   "What was the nutter? * Did Jessica  lose,.her ,c.\'iuiaito_ tact, ,hcr ability for  letting 'people sec  that she did' not require them?"  "S'o, not that cither. She was as good  in thnt respect as c\er she was. The  ^troubla\wn*i���������put in. a few word*���������that  it"*-.ns hie she chucked, and Ernest Budd  whom she married."  He pauped and ridded vindictively:  "And-I'm glad to say that they're both  bcustly unhappy."  .*     ������.....-*��������� r   r���������      j \-j    *"'  Now pie ^\.yj y  M , &  luio    vvt-rol.  sy_     <S-'-l\  KITCHEN CHArs      ~---  (Some Delicious *tteclp<-i������ Whicli **������'o J*e*-t '������  Our *������**"<iir*  HILDBEN are always fond ci  ices. I once i.eard a very pai  story on this point; which, will  bear   repeatir-3.  The mother of two bri-r'nt*  boys said to th m one mornl j**:  "We are going to h;*.ve ice cream, ton  'dinner to-night, when lhe .' minister  and his wife will be i.jre.  don't     act     as     tiiL-iit-a        an   unusual   thing,    but   as    though  you     had     lt     every     dey."       Ar-'. ..  <ordlngly,     when     i he     ice     cream-rNs.  was    served,    the      c". i'.Cren,     bein**.   !L-  specially anxious to p*.e***3a their mam-| .*"-  *ma, shouted out at  il-.e  top of thei.-l--j? '  lungs, "We have lt ev^r/ day! we UivoL *Jfe-i  It every day!" V*���������������.-"���������  At a, luncheon not    long    ego. tha���������"Si  dessert was frozen puddi*.*;, ar.d It wasf- .^._  lerved in cantaloupe, wh ch w&3 a ntv*'  Idea to some    of the -r-jests.     SmalS-  nutmeg  cantaloupes  were  used. ; one-  hnlf served to each guest, on a dolKy-    *  covered  plate,    and   the    centre, wa\  filled with the frozen cream, maklu**r  & dollclous combination and very   at--,  tractive onr*   nany to serve and eae*r���������*  to eat  At thia season Of the year.1*^,"���������"J*-*i-^>  eold desserts ot all klnds*ap~5n_        ^^  ���������palate;   hyglenleally    s'peakli_(t_  cannot be recommended for aa  course ot a. dinner, as they r^u*,  temperature of t*M stomach .  retard digestion: but how -ttla(  they we, and, wkMi eaten sit "���������,,-���������_  ml  It!  t'3  - liii  i it*  il  I'-*  I  ^^������-<***toBa".������  v i**,  *C   '-'Swfe'  v-lT'-^t  Ice Served la Cantaloupe.  -  l"Sw"(l  tt"5:-f*^,--."fili������j|  -tfi^r-V* 4L-.8-.I  are also nourlahlng. The f������������*������.*. -,>SS,;S  kinds of frozen dishes are called "Wa���������w^ - -i*^  ter ice���������which 1* fruit juice. sweet-r-; ->*5;j'  ened   diluted with water and   troze**-*.1- -*-.-.*.-"|- |  Bkarbert, whlca la water ice 'to which..  la added some, dissolved  gelatine ..   the beaten whites of eggs. '   Frar;  which Is water So* frozen to the- --  etfte-acy  of  tatuH.    Punch,  whit''  ���������water,Ice to vUk haa    been   a".  ������������������"���������Irtt and splaa,.    Sorbet, which,''  ���������rtfWU-f speaklm*-,   troz:a    punch���������-,'  saaae, saually  -riven  to  a  water   ".'r.  whtrm tieveral kinds of fruit have b**,.  tieed.-   Ice cream, of tv.o k'n-ls���������tha^'-r. -  first which Is thin cream, sweetentd^*^"*-  fiavered and trmes,  and    the    o'.hsrj.*-''  whlei*ls ji. custa-rd foun.'.atlon. flavor���������""^  ed and "frozen.      Mous<*e���������which* is-vr.--  -heavy cream, henten^unt 1 stiff, sweet������������������-  ened,' flavored,    placed  In  a  "mould^-  Tjacked In equal parts o^.palt an**>lco  aad allowed to.B*������**.-i;f-iT .:.r������*������ 'o&i&L.  -1  m  m  -Isl  * s-*-*  .'���������Hii  ������**  We  -re    some'  delicous* re'cip:r>  to at-lea-jt"-'  -���������*-   li  -    i  H  which we hope wlll.be nc\  some ot our readers.   ,  "CURHAKT IC:  Four cups water.' one md* cae-hal_  cups  sugar,  two cup6-Vv'rr-ir..t r.JWCO-.  Make a,syrup by bc-IKr:-    ^e'-yate---.  and'sugar twenty rmmitcs. cool.'; ad.t��������� .  currants mashed" and so.*.'" iz 'd thron?^.  double cheese cloth, and,letr-on,Juice..  Strain and,freeze.   * ���������- ,    '  *    . . MILK SHER31.T.       ----'.J    ,  Four cups milk, one i-iid    o-ie-hal. ,y  cups sugar, juice of three lemon**. Mi- :  the Juice and the "sugar, ft'rr.ng.oon- .  stantiy while slowly, add ing the mLk.-r -  freeze. - . _������������������.     "i-l  .PINEAPPLE  FRAPP-1!.     ;-��������� * .  -  Two cups water,,one,cup sugar. J-Jie-*----  of three lemons, four cups Ice water-^-S  one can grated pineapple, or one pine-*  apple shredded. *" Make   a-syrup -tor;,  ���������boiling water and sugar fifteen mill--  utes; add pineapple and lemon   Julce^,  cool,  straln.-add icewa'er and ������ee-:������;  to a mush,, using equal pa*"ts ot.���������-**-?''-'  and Ice.    If freak fruit is used, moms  sugar will be needed. " "'    'A,  ROMAN' PUNCH.   ,..*-, _   v  Four  cups  water,  two  cuir*' ������������S*������^-i^tf  one-half cup lemon Juic*. one-halt cop---'*1**- "-*,  ��������� orange Juice_one-half cun tea  i-otns-v  ion, one-half cup rum. "llake-a **xift!*c:  r*&**%i  ��������� -"���������&������������������  mi  **;  IT  **  f  *>  Poddy's Letter.  A Foreigner's Dilemma.  An intelligent foreigner recently c~-  oresscd himself thus a-j to what Ftruck  lim as the nbsurdilies of, lhe English  anguage: "When.I discovered that if I  vas quick I was fa3tfif I stood firm I  vas last; if I spent loo. freely I,.\\n-*  ast; and that not "lo eat wns"to f.isl,  . was 'discouraged; and when I cainc  icross the sentence, "i'he first one won  t one dollar prize,'-1 was tempted to  ���������ive up English and try some* other lan-  fuage.-'  Those fond A Irish bulls may find  some nmuscm-nt ,in. the following letter,  wliich was written by an amorous swain  of thc Emerald Mc to his lady fair.  "My Darlin' Peggy���������I met you last  night" and you never came! .i'll meet  you "again to-night", whether you come  or whether you stop away. If I'm there  first, sure I'll write my nnme on thc gat������  to tell you of it, and if it's you that'*  first, why rub it out, darlin*, and no ona  will'be the wiser. I'll never fail to bo  at th'e tryi-tin' place, Pegjry, for,"faith!  I can't keep away from the spot whers  you arc, whether you're there or whethil  you're not.     . ^7   .        ���������.         "Your own *f".iddy." .  "It's wonderful," said the meditativo  man, "how one small word, insignificant  in itself, may indace an endless train of  thought, sneaking volumes in fact."  "Yes," replied the caustic man. "Tako  the word'but,' for instance, when a woman says: 'Of course, it's none of tnT;  business, but.'"���������Phii."dclphia "Press."'  S'V-'-'S  *,-' r        * **   *������  j       Roman Punch....., ......-..,'��������� .*;-���������-  ���������Dy boiling water' and sugar twentjr'  minutes, add fruit Juice and tea untr  freeze to a mush; then add tho riva**  ind continue'- the freezlns.  BORlftlT. Ay  TtctTcups **rater, .two cups -n*-*-a-r-*v  one grated pineapple, one and ooe-'  third cups orange Juice, one-halt x&xgjL  lemon Juice, one quart Apolllna**l**-J  Prepare and freeze eame as plneain)d#r  trappe. '  _ -. ,',  COFFEE ICE CREAM.'; ^." -rfj  One quart .cream,-one and one-VaiBE*'  cups milk, one-third cup coffee, oner  and one-fourth cups" sugar, one-fonrttt.  teaspoon . salt, yolks of    four   ecs**-^*'  Scald the milk with the   coffee, fed**  one cup sugar; mix yolks ot -j-fgn -etitht  one-fourth cup sugar- and- salt; combine mixtures,  cook over, hot *mit������r-  untll thickened/' add one cup ' t**-ea-n*r  and let Etand on back of range twenty-five minutes;  cool, add remaining  cream    and    strain    through    doublQ  cheese cloth; freeze.      -       ��������� *     " *,^*-  BROWN BREAD ICE CRE1AM. \  Three pints* cream, one and "si*  fourth cups dried brown blfeacl.  crumbs, -*cven-elghths "cup *re**ar*.'  one-fourth teajpobn salt' Soak, tha  crumps In one quart ��������� cream, let standi  ,'. fifteen minutes, rub through sieve, ndd.-  sugar, salt and remalnln*t eKsa'ttBA,  freeze.    . _-_ ..,.>_. ^. -        i.-. * -*-. "-  M  *���������������**>������������a������������5s-rosr*-i.---'-wi���������T������*������*^r������-  i-l*"'-*  **-%?  j ~*r-^'t  u%ro,-\  , -    ' 3-, ������'x\ I  "''.i*vS*I -ttre-i'i'Kt^^  *-Aae*Baa*������3B***Mi*i*rtsew  ���������te*W=***"^>^^  *;-  Little lilupotian castle  ��������� ���������Cnrloslt*' to 11c Seen Amcmg th* Mountains  \ >.< Virginia.  J*N a recent number ot St. Nicholas, "-.lieu (."arnett tells of a miniature stone    cattle In the    mountains    of Virginia,   and   how it  cams io be built:  WhMe spending the summer ot  Hi'ji at C-irlehurst, Virginia,-amid tho  ���������-���������wild ��������� rugged ficenery of the Alleghany  Mountains,    iwo young    ladies    who  ���������were-fond of  exploring the beautiful  ,-country, were seated one afternoon at  ���������the base c������ a waterfall."' Being deeply  "Impressed by the beauty ot the spot,  ."one    exclaimed:    "How   charmingly  romantic!     1 can  almost bellevo that  "Flora'Maclvor will aay instant appear  ���������sealed on that moss-covered rock   "_  -vtT'he Floating Hells of-the  Atlantic.  dis-  ^T-  >m -  i  *���������*  coursing sweet music on her harp."  Carried away by .'such romantic  thoughts, they began to build an Im-  ��������� -aginary "castle; peopled with baron and  fierf, besieged and defended, of a captive princcs3 and valiant warrior  "knights.  ��������� "Let's make one!" they cried. Accordingly, the next day the undertaking was begun.  A large purplish boulder, overgrown  ���������wilh moses a'nd lichen", on the lawn of  '.'-".'Karlehuret. the .summer home of tho  -���������- builders, was selected as .the   site    on  .   which,  to    construct   this   miniature  castle. Building material there,were in  plenty, but sand  and mortar had   to  -'���������' "be carried for some distance.      Tools  - -were limited, and using a screwdriver  ���������-������������������������������������'in lieu of a chisel to enlarge the slight  V indentation in the   foundation ; rock,  ���������which was designed    to he the   dungeon, proved but slow work.  , This task accomplished, a square box  ���������was  placed   over    the excavation,- inr\  which were cut openings for windows  and a door. The windows���������eighteen in  .- . aH���������were    put together with  greatest  ������������������*;:���������' care, every stout wooden frame being  crossed   and  Tecrossed  with  a  heavy  wire to imitate gratings, then built !n  ;the stone walls  over    the    openings.  ���������They vary in style and size, from tho  .   "large* casements in the protected parti:  of the structure to the small -windows  in  the  watch-towers.    After  the  box  '���������"bad been built over,on all sides with  xocks, held  in place    by mortar, another smaller box was placed oh top'  '  ,"-ot it, and    covered"in 'like    manner.  '-""Both were first    roofed  with  tin    to  - -prevent   leaking; but   this has   been  " carefully concealed.      There  are  also  -'���������Siidden drains both In the castle and  ;~ causeway. - The towers are built solid,  "���������"except    behind    the   windows, where  *-_f-*aces are left to  give the    effect ot  - -aooms. After four months ot not un-  -" ' interrupted labor the castle was fin-  '-.,-:--bed.    Cne, ,of  the  architects  carved  little figure? out of wood, and dress-  * c-d them to represent the household ot  -"-"*^*Tbaron.    The knights are clothed in  1 - -tinfoil  armor,  each "carrying  a  lance  --  find battle*:.3;    all the ladles are ar-  "���������_ -..rayed "In  brightly  colored  silks.    An  -i������nned sentry stands on guard in ������ach  "watertower,   .and"a captive, princess  - *- iieeps through the bars "of a lofty c-ase-  "���������_ *\-ment. imploring aid from every bravo  ������_".*-**kniebt-errant.,-  * ' The" castle's height Is about - two  "**��������� -jnzt and a half, and the rock on which  --"-"---St stands measures ten feet in circum-  -Terence, and is three feet high. Tha  , . -approach to the castle Is' by a cause-  *- -way rising gradually from the ground  -at the rear, and forming a semi-circte-  ~<ot wall until it reaches the entranco  .. gate, where it stops abruptly. Across  ������---*the space between the' caslle walls and  - -���������"��������� the causeway is thrown a drawbridge,  "���������which   can  be  raised  or  lowered   by  _4ts iron chains at a moment's notice.  On the.   platform of the    causeway  -���������.--st-ands    the  handsomely    caparisoned  -war-steed of a knight who has jusfdls--  ,-  ..mounted   fp pay   his.,respects  to  tho  -lord and.l.ady, of the castle.   They wait  ���������to receive  hiin  at  the entrance gate,  surrounded by their    household;' reti-  '-������ne.   A diminutive page, clad in silk-  -en doublet and  hose,  stands  at    tho  ���������;*h'tysVs bridle, while beyond the court-  "yard-can-be'-caugbt-a-glimpse-oC-the,  -fools    motley.      The    banner   -which  "-���������floats from the "highest to���������er, has the  crmorial bearing, or, a lion;rampant,  ���������***ulcs. ,that is,'.a rampant red lion on a  ��������� -yellow    field.      The    same    standard  - {paves proudly over the great gate.  If the sensational charges, made in a  book recently published in London  ("At tho Closed Door," by Robert II.  Sherrard) have any foundation,  there are indescribably hellish scenes  enacted in the strange cabins of many of  .tho Atlantic liners. ;The book is reviewed and some extracts given in  "Truth." In order to spy out the nakedness of tho land,, Mr; Sherrard took  steerage passage in a French liner to find  the ship a floating hell to those who  were too poor to bribe the stewards:  "Ono of the most cruel weapons used  by the steerage stewards lo bring to reason persons who were, unreasonable as  to paying the feo they woro ordered not  to pay, wns tho privation of drinking  water. The women and little children  Buffered dreadfully for want of it-during  tho throes of sea-sickness. Yet water  thero was in plenty. On the night of tho  14th a body of women, with children in  their arms, Went aft, surrounded tho  padlocked cistern, and clamored for water. Tliey were, driven oil with'abuse  and violence."  Hence water for washing was, of  coui-se, unobtainable-���������if it was wanted;  but such was tho indescribable, inconceivable filth of many of Mr. Sherrard's  fellow-passengers that .they would not  have washed at Elisha's bidding in Jordan itself. "Of all 'animals in creation,"  he says, speaking from tho'depths of this  poignant experience, "man, when he is  dirty, is thc very dirtiest." But tho.un-  washen Jews found their way to the front  of this crowd and crush with their usual  sinuous'and pushing perseverance:  "Thc timid and diffident went to tha  wall; the others, and amongst theso tha  Jews, were noticeably prominent, encroached, and widely extended their  privileges. Theie were three hideous little Jewish hoys/whom I saw during tho  whole of the voyage, laden with delicacies from first-class kitchens. I often  noticed them walking about on tho first-  class deck."  - The sufferings of this "middle passage,"  however, were as nothing to tho sufferings which���������according^to Mr. Sherrard���������  the "penniless emigrants had to enduro  on Ellis Island, where they are detained  by the New York authoiilies for weeks  and even months together, before being  packed back, as destitutes, to Europe.  "From '.Havre onwards wc had been  treated -much as sheep, or, perhaps, as  pigs; but on landing we might consider  ourselves dangerous and maleficent animals." ln truth, men, women and chil-  drcd were bludgeoned���������their jailers we're  all armed with bludgeons���������on little or  no provoeatipn,    Here is one specimen  scene:  "At five o'clock wo were ordered upstairs for supper. A man wilh filthy  hand3 filled our hats or handkerchiefs  with mouldy prunes. - Another thrust  two lumps of bread into our hands. Supervising tho distribution Win a foul-  mouthed Bowery rough in liis shirtsleeves, who danced upon one of the tables and poured forth upon lis torrents  of obscene and blasphemous abuse. Xor  did) he content himself with this demonstration ofllie contempt in which he held  us, for I saw him drag one old man, H  long-bearded Polish Jew in a gaberdine,  past the barrel of'prunes by the hair of  the face, and I saw him kick another  emigrant, a German, on the head wilh  his heavy boot."  Perhaps it may be said that these penniless people had no business lo ���������jive the  States Government thc trouble" of .re-  shipping them, lo their homes. But, in  the first place, inany of the telegrams  entrusted lo the jailors for foi warding to  well-to-do relatives in >"cw York werq  burked, and the money���������often a gross  overcharge���������pocketed: and,' in the second place, these hapless wretches on this  Devil's Island were lured to "Sew York  by an unscrupulou** emigration agent:  "In the many conversations I had that  afternoon wilh various people of various  .nationalities, in almost every instance 1  heard the blame for all snli'cring laid on  the ngeul who had sold the steamship  ticket without troubling to explain the  American  emigialion  laws."  Surely it would save the United States  Government much evpense, and such  wretches unimaginable misery, it the  consuls at European ports were instructed to advertise the immigration laws in  every necessary language and place.  A Present Duty.  It is a mistake topostpone tho ple-  surcs    and . .recreations    of    life ��������� until  ono -has    done    his hard work;  a mistake    which    a    great      many    frugal  suid   othei wise   sciioible   people   make.  There are hosts of men and women working with  might and main  for  the pur-  po-,o   of  enjoying  life  when'  they  havo  laid a solid foundation of fortune under  their feet.   They are acting upon the belief that it is possible'to get the hard  work of life done, to press it into a few  years, and then to begin to live.   This is  'u'misleading belief, snys "Outlook?'   In  the first place, the work of life is never  done, and ought never to be done; and,  in  lhe second  place,  he who  postpones  indefinitely, tho hour when he will begin  to tnjoy lifo, postpones entirely the possibility   of   enjoying   it.     "No   man   can  work, with might and main for twenty  years,'committing'  till   his   strength   to  his  tusk  nnd  permitting  himself  to be-  entirely absorbed by it, without sulTcring  atrophy or deadening of thu faculties of  enjoyment.   At the ond of twenty years  he will Iind nothing left of life for hini,  bo far as occupation is  concerned,  except   tho   things    ho   has    been' doing.  Ho    will    have    so    fashioned    himself  that    lie    has -become    only    a    hand  or   a   tool    to   do    a   specific    thing;  ho will have lost'the ���������capacity of turning  from ono occupation to another, of taking  up   one   interest  after   another,  of  giving himself out frcery\on many sides.  He who would enjoy nature cannot begin   too early.    The   first  acquaintance  with  the  outward world  ought  to  bo  made at the time one begins to talk, so  that one fits his words to trees and flowers and birds and clouds just as soon as  he sees them, and sees lliem just as soon  as he-is able to'fit words to them., The  boy who  grows up with access  to  the  woods and fields and knows the habits  of birds, because he learns them in tho  leisure hours of childhood, will acquire  a knowledge of nature which the mature  man can never obtain.   It i3 impossible  to   shut   oneself   up for ' twenty   years  "and then step out of the room and enjoy  the sky and.the landscape.   It is impossible to work with might and main for  twenty years with the expectation that,  at the end of that time, ono will take  up  music,  painting,  sculpture, architecture, and -find delight in them.    Delight  in  these   things  comes  with   education,  with  early  and  intimate   contact;   and  when one come3 out of a business whicli  he has made a prison for twenty years,  he can no more see what'art has to reveal to him than can a blind man.  '  Tlie power of enjoyment must be educated by use just as truly as any other  .power; it withers and dies by disuse.   If  one is  to enjoy life he must  enjoy it  from day to day; if lie postpones enjoyment, lie loses the power of. securing it  at the end.   Tliere come brief moments  in life, swift crises when everything is  put by for the doing of fl. "piece of work,  flic  performing of  a  specific  task,  tho  -facing of a great peril;- Uut these are  only  moments.    The  lives  are  few 'in  -which there are not opportunities of on-  Eating, Drinking and Table  Conversation.  i   ���������~���������.  When-, Boswell complained to Dr.  Johnson of having dined at a splendid  table without hearing one sentenco  worthy        of being        remembered,  Johnson, said: "Sir, thero is seldom  my such conversation." "Why then  meet at table?".- Boswell asked. "Why,  to eat and drink together, and to promote kindness; and, sir, this is better  done where there i3 no' solid conversation; for when there is, people differ in  opinion, and got into bud humor, or  some of tho company, who are not capable of such conversation, arc left out,*  and feel themselves uneasy. It was for  this reason, Sir Robert Walpole* said, ho  always talked bawdy at his table because in that all could join." The stouthearted old doctor, by the way, was not  of Sir Robert's opinion, for Boswell elsewhere relates that Dr. Johnson-received  the greatest compliment ever paid to a  layman when h'certain person apologized  to him for having used profane words in  a story whicli he had just told.  The man or woman who cnn bo relied  on to talk well at table or in a parlor  will never hick invitations. Good conversation is the finest product of brains,  breeding, society and civilization, but it  is very rare, and one who is a master of  it is welcome in every compnny and a  friend in need to every host. How anxiously, in making up a dinner party, do  people run over all their friends to find  one or two who vrill help keep the table  talk from flagging I No one, who has  not sat at thehead of a table heroically  warding off the silence whicli threatens  to fall at any moment, can appreciate  duly thc gratitude a host feels for the  man or woman guest who catches and  tosses back to him thc hall of conversation and keeps it in the air, who helps  him draw Out the more taciturn; members of tho party by gentle banter and  artful questions, and who lightens the  talk, when it becomes heavy and serious,  by throwing in some jest or frivolity.  Such a jest, if hosts were judges, would  do-more to gain the sweets of heaven  for the jester than a rosary of prayers.  ��������� -Much is said and written of the duties'  of hosts, but have guests no reciprocal  duties? Arc they not bound, by some  hospitable rule of honor, to,; .prepare  themselves to entertain the company and  bandy conversation? Has a guest a right  to sit silent, receiving much of tlie golden coin of table lalk and giving nothing  in exchange " except, perhaps, a copper  penny or two, a "yes" or a "no" in answer to a point blank query?  Except to a blessed few the gift of  conversing does' not come by nature.  Many*nnc minds there are who, like a  much-quoted college lad, are chock-full  of an elegant vocabulary, but can't get  it out. Olivet" Goldsmith, who .wrote so  well, was dull in company, and even tho  great Dr. Johnson, who talked,so won-  derfully-'when he thawed, was ordinarily  joyment as one goes along which will  minister to one's working power and not  subtract from it. Ho nukes the best  living who keeps himself fresh hy keeping his interests varied; and he only can  make a life who'lives in.every part of  his nature. Eujoyment is as* much a  necessity as work; to find pleasure in  life is as much a duty as to find profit;  and the only man who lives -a' wholesome, normal, successful life is ho -who  combines pleasure and work, toil and recreation, from day to day, from the beginning to the end. Pleasure is a duty  which cannot be postponed.  Jewish and Christian Intolerance.  ;Pumping a Sea Dry.  *"**  ,.3I**tnv-r.lafled. Kulvna.      ''  This knife, known  as the "Norfolk  -knife," made at Sheffield, and contain-  -'���������Ing   ninety-five    blades   and    in*tru-  -menbs. no two alike, has been shown  dt several English exhibitions.  On its large mother-of-pearl handles  The ��������� pumping dry of Harlem Lake,  ih"' Holland, was pronounced by  many engineers to be impossible;  yet it was successfully performed. Zuid-  er Zee is many times the area, of Haarlem Lake, and presents from its depth  and character many more ,difficulties,  and yet the fiat of doom of the Zuider  Zee has gone forth. Iu a very few years  many thousands of acres of smiling  Dutch pastures, of prosperous Dutch villages, of poplar-bordered roads will  characterize what is now merely the bottom, of the sea. Science in the twentieth century will have hardly any tale to  tellmore astonishing than this.  The . Zuider Zee, eclobra ted in Dutch  legend and history, occupies lome fourteen hundred square miles, the area of  -   large   Euiopean     province. '    On   iti  I have known Jews, and, doubtless,  you have, who, despile education  and. so-called culture, were so narrow, so bigoted, that they practiced a  spirit of aloofness; who. though willing  to buy from or sell to the Christian,  and to receive from or render professional service to thc non-Jew, were unwilling to oat or drink with him, to  worship with or cultivate "a feeling of  fellowship for a Christian neighbor.  I have known Christians, and so have  you, who, likewise, despite edricadon and  so-called culture, were the creatures of  such narrowne-a of spirit, such l:ttlenc-5-s  of soul, that they would draw the line of  -fellowship at the.i^on-Cnristian.  Jews might be **oo<l ^"augh~tS~ha-v������-  given them their Bible, their Saviour;  good enough to h3ve given them lheir  moral code,, and their religious spirit;  good enough to do their .share-* in the  world's great economic, industrial and  commercial work; but not good enough  for fellowship, whatever might be llieir  moral, mental   or social excellences.  What, think you, would happen if th������  Galilecan rabbi,. Jesus, were to como  back to life and appear before themras  the meek and humble Jew that he was?  His Jewish name and face and lineage  would cause them to bar against him tho  doors of their homes, their hotels, and  their club-houses, despite the fact that  they would continue in their churches to  bow down, worship and adore him as  Cod's only anointed.  Cod   have pity on such Jews and on  ucriun^- **.n_i. .... .���������   -_,  silent. How many hosts.lovcd the crafty  Boswell for drawing out tlie lion, as  only'lie could do it! Boswcil copf esses  that ih order to start the doctor's tongue  he used to utter somo heresy"in religion  or politics which, he was aware,-would  rouse the great man to a fury of disputation in which poor Boswell would be  crushed-by the fust sentence. But the  lioswellian ruse never failed to set tho  doctor going, and we owe many delightful-pages of the "Life" to the canny  Scotchman's trick. Would tliere were  more Boswell*! at our dinner-tables���������and  more Johnsons!  Conversation ought to be learned and  cultivated, just as music or  any other  entertaining art is learned and, cultivated.   Young women will employ expensive  masters to give* them lessons on the piano or the violin or to train their voices,  so   that   they   may   havo   "accomplishments" and appear well in company, but  they "totally   neglect   the  greatest  and  finest of all accomplishments, fhe art of  conversation.   There ought to be masters  of conversation to teach men and women  how to lalk well at a dinner table.- Tho  girl  who  can  interest a  table  for five  minutes at a time three or four times  during a dinner has a more graceful and  ingratiating accomplishment    than    sho  who cannot talk, hut who can play all of  Chopin beautifully and  by  heart.    The  tongue is a greater instrument than the  pianoforte.   Let a girl take conversation  for her accomplishment; let her give to  reading and thinking the time wliich the  pianist gives to practice;  let her go.in  seriously   for, conversation,  though  not  entirely   for   serious   conversation,   and  she will become the paragon of her circle  ancl-mnr^wi!!xflght_di:_els__foxJ*^'^Jiand  . Curious Courtship Clubs.-  The city of New York boasts a club  which lias for its object llio promotion of aiuilo=*s courtship, in so  far as matrimony is concerned. A number of young men there have banded  themselves together to make lovo to  damsels who, instead of looking for proposals, are content with what is called  "a good time."  Their knights escort them to theaters,  picnics, and other amusements, make  them presents, and are generally..attentive even to a greater degree than the  ordinary enamored .swain. Couples who  break the rules of the club by marrying  have to pay a line of fifty dollars, and  nro forever'banished from the club. Ona  or two couples" have already paid this  fine and entered into the forbidden Slate,  a dinner on each occasion being held by  the club to console the ineiuhers for their  loss. , .   - -  An equally curious club has for sometime been in existence in Chicago. It is  composed, "of young men, nil of whom  bear thc Christian name of Joseph, and  who have "entered inlo n solemn compact .to.woo no girls except thoso bearing the Christian niiiiio of Mary. The  club hnn'n considerable membership,.iind  it is a no'leworlhy fact that, so far, its  rule has never been broken. I'roni the.  names it might be thought that this novel organization was of Scriptural origin; bul Mich is not the fact. '  It originated in this manner: While  out on nn excursion one summer three  couples chanced to meet whose names,  by a strange coincidence, happened to  be Joseph in (he case of the males and  Mary in thc ease of the dniiii'cls. .11 was  thereupon decided' to form a club of Josephs, who for sweethciiits should only  -look amongst the Marys of Voikopolis,  nnd thus the club was formed.  What may be tcimed a-mutual protection courtship club exists at Areola,  in thc State of Illinois. Tlie object of  this order is to keep young mon who are  not members from paying attentions to  any lady friends of a member. One outsider who came poaching on the club's  preserves was rather roughly handled.  In yet another town a lovers' club wns  started which its promoters were soon  very glad to drop. Its object was to  compel the courted damsels to pay their  own expenses wherever they might he  escorted, the members undertaking only  to pay for themselves, either at the theater or elsewhere. " ...' .  This put the girls of the town on their  mettle, and they soon gave their stingy  swains to understand lhat if thcy-hnd lo  pay lheir way they would choose their  own company. To show their independence, they .took their pleasures without  male escort for some time, but when due  apology had been made thc old relation *  were graciously permitted lo bo icnewed  And, ,as***bi'c of them put it, the girl-  then hud a "perfectly lovely lime," the  young men lavishing their money right  and* left upon them, us evidence of repentance and reparation for llie past.  Animal Emotions.  It ia told of a certain Lord Holland,  who was very eccentric, that ho  used to give nis horses weekly concerts in a gallery specially erected for  the purpose.' He maintained that it  cheered their hearts, nnd improved  lheir temper, and a witness says that  they seemed to be delighted wilh the  perioiuiance. Much has been written of  the ell'ect. of music upon animals. The  "American Naturalist" gives some of the  results of experiments made in Lincoln  Purk, Chicago, to determine the effect  of violin-playing on different ���������uiiiniiK  Music which wus slow and -*weet, like  "Home, Sweet Home," or "Annie Laurie," pleased the panthers, a jaguar and  a lioness and her cubs. Tho panthers became nervous, and twitched their tails  when a lively jig, "Tho Irish Washerwoman,'.' was played lo them, but; relapsed  into their '.former quiet when the music  again became soothing.  Tho jaguar was so ncrvous'during the  jig music that ho jumped from a shelf I  to the floor of his cage and buck again.v  When the player 'ceased and .walked  away, the jaguar reached out his paw  to him; ������s' far as lie could, with* claws  retracted.  The lioness and her cub3 were "interested from the iirst, although when the  violinist approached the cage the mother gave him n hiss and the cubs hid  behind her. At lhe playing of ii lively  jig the cubs stood up on .their hind legs  and peeped over at ,tho player. 'When  the musician * retreated from the cage  the animals came .to the front of "if,  und did not move buck wheii'lie gradually drew so near' as almost to touch  tho great paws that were thrust through  the bars. AViien the musician was playing "Home, ..Sweet Home," the entire  family were very attentive, and remained  motionless except that tho cubs turned  their heads from side to side. Then  another jig was played, and the cubs  danced: about. -'.   "  The coyotes, in a den, squatted in a  semicircle and sat.in silence while the  music continued. .When il ceased they  ran up and pawed at the player through  the bars. Ho began afresh, and ngnin  they formed in a silent semicircle. This  experiment was made several .times, always with the same result.       ;   .  SHE WASMN DP  Doctors Held out no Hope to  Mrs. Huffman of Napanee  m  A Wonderful Case and One which  goes to Show the Wonderful Advancement Recently made in the  Science of Mediclnei  Proof* Positive.  The Man'Behind the Mask.  svinpathctic    picture  of  the  Chi-  ���������  1 ^ -...,.,       X...  t-horcT arc the^ancient towns of Mcdem- ' 6Uch "christian-.."    God    Imvo  nrnrcy  on   , carved represent-ritlone of a bear  ��������� *kan.t and a stag hoat. The blades are  ���������all etched with pictures of some kind  ���������Windsor, Castle, -Westminster, the  a*iueen and so on.  A giant knife made by a Sheffield  fDnn contains as many blades as there  -are years in the Christian era.  "Pride as a beggar is the equal ot  -wast ��������� aod a great deal more  ���������3-*W*aii>"'.Ji'  _.  blik, Hoorn, Hardcrwijk, Norden and  *Enlchiii"-.cn' once largo cities, in the halcyon days of Dutch commercial and naval supremacy. It encompasses-the islands of Mar ken. Schokland and IJrk.  The present plan oonsist-i of huilding  a dam or embankment across the northern part of thc sea from Wieringen, in  Korth Holland, to Piaam.vin Frie.sland.  Then Will follow the creation of two  "polders," or areas of dry land reclaimed  from the sea. The water will be pumped  ���������ut by means of steam-pumps.  The entire work is to be completed in  eighteen ycara. The enclosing dike from  Wieringen to Piaam will be finished in  ihe ninth year... In .the eighth year will  be commenced the. work for diking the  Wieringen 1'older, which in the fourteenth year will in-, dry and ready for  sale. In the eleventh year the similar  works on the Hoorn Polder will be begun, and will be completed in the eighteenth year, making up to that date a  total area of upwards of Rix hundred  oquarc miles of reclaimed and fertile soil.  It 13 a3 if Lake Ontario or Lake Erie  were to be pumped dry, and thc lake  loor of each added to tho area of Ontario.  ��������� ,��������� ���������      .        >  . "These teachers," growl3 the, first  "���������can,5 "have no mercy on the young  minds'entrusted to their care." ' "What  have they done now?" asks the second  man. "Why, my boy came home yeslerday in a state of ^collapse because his  teacher insists upon his telling her how  many times thc Philippine! war was ended in lOOl."���������Baltimore ''American."  such petty, narrow and mi-vguided sonU  Such as these surely need your sympathies and mine, dr-spite the fact that  their conduct carrie!' wilh it its ow������  punishment���������tho punishment of depriving the.m"iclve' of the benefit nnd ble**v  ings which come from contact with good  men and women; whatever their race, or  creed, or belief. How small would such  souls seem to the broad and tolerant  Nazarenc! How he would lay the lash  on thc back of Jcw,3 a nd Christians,  whose arroganco would lead them to  look upon thcm-tolves as better than  their neighbors, no matter how great tho  virtues of such neighbors!���������From  "Jcsua the Jew," by Harris  Wftinstock.  Preper Dreaa For a Groom.  One of the largest ready-made clothia-f  houses in the city received not long ago  from a remote^ place a letter, the substance of, which was, "What is the proper dress for a groom in the afternoon?"  The clerk who opened the mail, naturally enough, referred the enquiry to' the  livery department. The head of that  branch; in turn dictated a brief reply,  something,like this: "Bottle-greon coat,  fawn-colored -trousers with top hoots,  silk hat with,cockade.-'Wc can make  prices as follows, ct cetera." A week  e!ap3cd, and   tho  big  store  received  And men, too, ought to study, convcrsa-"  tion as they study anything'else, and  practice, practice, practice. In Franco  conversation is esteemed a fine art, and  it i3 the conversation of France which  proves it the most polished nation.  Eating and drinking seem to be necessary concomitants of conversation. If a  man invited friends to his house ju*t for  conversation, and gave them nothing to  eat or drink, he would soon be- town  talk. Doubtless some people could trace  a subtle connection between dining,  drinking and talking, dragging their au-  dienec through a psychological nins-.c, but  thc vulgnr truth seems to be that when  a man���������or, strange to say; a gentle woman, either���������has a full stomach and feels  thc pleasant afterglow of wine, there is  a tendency to sit at ease and'unburden  the mind of whatever lies upon it.  However that may bo, it I������ a fact that  hungry people will not converse and  that nothing so expands the mind and  loosens the tongue as a good dinner  docs.  . m . .  The Snail as Food.  The popularity of the 3nail as an article of food is not confined to Paris, but  extends throughout Southern Europe and  some   Darts   of  Africa.    Dr.   Jvlrard,   "  nese Inuhilrynmn Is palnled. by a  wriler in tho !NTew " Orleans "Times."  "John" live-i among us, potiont,* industrious, and often despised hy those who  know too little of him even to regard  .him as a fellow-being.' .Yet if we knew  Ihe-huiuaii history that lies behind that,  yellow mask we should not doubt that  liere nlso dwells a soul of liko dignity  wilh out own.    Says the writer':  Kext door, to my lodging is one of  those squat little houses whicli now and  then you find-next to a big mansion. On  the lower- floor of ths small houso was a  Chinese laundry. In'it was a^Chinanian  about twenty-five years of age. His face  was as imperturbable as the "sky. He  went about his husiaoss with tho undo-  vialing regularity" of the solar system.  At first he was an ordinary jChincsa  laundryman to tne,' but my attention  became riveted upon him and my curiosity was awakened.  The man seemed to live merely for  his work. When I came in at two o'clock  in thc mornin** I found him with tho  lights turned high, patiently working at  his calling. If 1 rose ca-rly* in tho morning, that prodigy of industry was up .bo-  fore me. I graduallybecame filled with  wonder at the untiring persistency of tho  -man. Because of his neatness and politeness and exquisite care to please, the  neighborhood never thought of sending  its laundry anywhere else. ��������� '  I began to carry, my things in person  i o_l heJ3hiimjinui,^rged_on_hy^ho desire  of finding out something ahout liim. T  reasoned that no man, white or'yellow,  could work as he did without being  dominated by. an all-absorbing purpose.  I found him intelligent. He could speak  Knglish well. Finally I won his confidence.  The young Chinaman was in love. A  girl in China was.waiting for him, and.  he was patiently and bravely undergoing  the hardest kind of toil in order to' go  hnck to his native country and marry  her.  When he told me the story I forgot  lhat he.was a Chinaman; I remembered  only that ho was u man, working liko a  man to earn a wife, and withal,, despite  .theie meagre, unpocfic.il surroundings,  cherishing all the dreams of a young  man whose sweetheart is far away.  This year's Summer Girl is,- more  than ever alert. As-' witness thc  following incident: * First, know-  that the young man ' nleant only  to 'revive that .good, old' custom of "a'  pair of "gloves" as "a forfeit. When;he"  found her curled up iu tbe hammock, a  magazine slipped from her listless* fingers, he^���������well, who wouldn't 1 Of a" sudden she opened her blue eyes on him, and  remarked'accusingly, a tremble.in her  voice: "You kissed me!"  " ..  ' '  He lost nerve, and stammered a, denial. . * *��������� *r '* /-:] t .">���������-,  "I know it was you," she "insisted..*- -  "I am not tho only person about," he'  ventured. '.'There's Wilcox going over  the' links now: He had to pass here.-  And doubtless "Dandy  Williams���������"  "N'o," she interrupted, "it was you, 1  know it." --...,  Her look froze hiin,"but he gathered  desperate courage. "How do you know?"  he demanded triumphantly.; A flush  spread to her.'pompadour.,- "Did I ever,  kiss you before?".,ha asked. '"Granting  I did kiss you just now���������" he' was push-"  ing . his. ndvantago hard, '- and she  squirmed���������"I think -I' ought to be  cleared!" He. was getting ' indignant  now. "There is only one way," he went  , on, "lo put the matter to a fair. tost,  "and I propose to have that way adopted." He paused, and she looked troubled,  but did not interrupt. ."If I kiss.you  now, you can decide whether or no I was  guilty .before." " '-       ' .   '  It was "an'awful risk, but he hoped a-  second time might soften her/ She went  quite pale,'then replied firmly:* .   ,  "I feel you have, a right to vindication,  Mr. S., and to sho'w that I am porfeotly  fair-minded, I will" submit'to the-test."  At this h'������ almost shrank from Continuing..,, But a second kiss!   Delicious!  ,And ^would she not relent? .Would not  all opposition be" drowned,, that is,, amalgamated ih'a mutual third? Great as the  ��������� risk was," it was worlh taking.     .." .'* - '���������  *;i wish to he perfectly fair," he said,  briskly, "and I suggest thai you clo������e  your eyes that you' may give undivided  attention lo' the character and quality."  "But I was asleep before," she,.urged.  ." He almost said," "Really," but stopped  in-time,-and-subslituted:=-i'Siinulalio]i_of  6leep must do now." '    '     i -  "You  will' hurry,    won't you?" ���������' sha  asked, her voice trembling.;  But lie'was judicial.    "It: should  be  Napanee, Out., Oct. 27.���������(Special.)  ���������This town, has funushed a case  which has caused considerable talk ia  the county. "        ���������  ' Mrs. -'John rC. -���������Huffman had been  troubled for1" over six years with fe-  mals weakness .-and kidiiey trouble.  The pain was'so gi:cat_ that she could  not bear it and her kidneys gave her  so much bother that she"' could not  entertain.any company in her home or  take' ally ���������'social pleasures whatever.'  Her urine -was very much discolored  and gave   her   great trouble in pass-  i-'S-  In additions to   these symptoms she  had'all the'-pains," headaches,    and  weakness "of -Female Trouble.  v'Mrs. ', HuH-naii     tried ,-.,physician's  treatment-.-and many other medicines,  but .instead qf getting .better she was-  gradually growing Worse and was very,  much;discouraged.' . .       '"r  . Many of'.her '.friend**,  thought     she-  would never "get" better,"but one day  she picked up .a^newspaper5 and read  an advertisement' 'wliich ��������� said     that  Dodd's Kidney,-, Pills "Would    cure Female Trouble*;, . ?** .       -.  ���������  As'she had tried^-'so'-many- other  things without, being able^to get anyi  help, she was very doubtful, but concluded -to try "this remedy:  She used six1 boxesyandl was completely cured/ She is, to'-day sound  and well, without a' single symptom-  of her old trouble'left.',' ^  " She was; "cup.ed   nearly^',five   ycars-  ago"aiid''is;'tOrday/'as1,sqund and well  a* woman as ihere -is'-iii.Napanee. She*  I       -,     -        ,        -*;i   '-    "    >  says:.-*- .'*��������� r.-i.    ,-r.'.,v   r -- '"  ; '"'I..:  can    .confidently ..recommend  Dodd's Kidhcy-.-Pills^to every womani -  iii Canada for1'they cured me    completely and   mine was a ,1 very,    bad  case.      .        . .   .  "They arc certainly a great   medicine   arid' I "will^alwafs recommend'. ;y  tlicm' to"-women who'; may -be ^suffering -  4  as I'rwas''.with-^Female Weaknbss.^aiid  Kidney;,Trouble.!'~;i.:..     .;';  '     '."- ,.  --' -, , -' ."''**- *''  '- ," '<*'  %\  W.  .."...,-��������� - A '"Bulky.. n-������r������e.  A balky.'hor&e is much like a stubborn'  boy. when'he gels" his-mind scl on not  pulling���������the more yoii'whip'hiin the moro  he determines he.will not!go)--so the best  says:���������One  who, knows^ says  tlint    tha  vice of balking in horses is almost invar-   -  iably caused  by improper .breaking and  huii'dling'i'the*animals*while  young,    lt  is only high-strung and'sensitive horses  thai' balk,   and   these   arei-handled   far  more successfully by humoring und pa-,  "tie'nee  than.by'severe-mou'suies, which  usually only mnke mailers worse. "Horse-  sense" in these cases is* quite, as essen*'-  tial  for the 'animal that drives , as, the ,  animal lo,be .driven.   .No two cases can  ���������be treat