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Revelstoke Herald 1902

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 \ i *vrVv/vA^..^A  *-j &���������  s?-$5  S  _A_2sTID  RAILWAY    MKN'S   JOURNAL.  Vol    V.   No    169  REVELSTOKE B. C.   WEDNESDAY,   DECEMBER SI, 1902  $2 OO a  Year in Advance;  1903  1903  C.B  ���������-1 *--*���������.  & COMPANY  OUR STORE IS FULL OF USEFUL AND  Handsome Articles suitable for- New Year  Gifts. We have bought at right prices, and have  made a choice selection of these goods.  It will pay you to call in and make your purchases  early"before the best articles have been sold.  )  r-  'O  A Suggestion 5  ���������We are ..particularly  strong'on the follow-'  "ng lines :  Ladies*   and.Gents" Silk TJm-  -   brellas from f*>l.50 to $3.00  Ladies'    Silk   Handkerchiefs ''  ,"..., : '. 25c to $1.00  Ladies'   Fancy   Embroidered"  .   -Handhei-chiefs.l loc to 50c  Ladies' novelties in'Silk Belts ' ' "  ** s.'..."'. r-.:'. "*���������:*.-..-. ..:-J*>l.-2o"*arjd $1.50"  V"**- *������-**       -I       - -.  Alexandrian -Belt and Sash  " Clasps......-,. ."'���������.. r'. .30c each *  Ladies'   Lined * Kid     Gloves  ,   from .-...'." $1.25 to $2.00  .Ladies'. Silk Ties,..up'-to-date   - -  "from.' 35c to$1.00  Ladies'   Black "'and ' Cream  . ^Chiffon Ties .. .* $1"00 each  Children's    Imitation Grey  Lamb Gauntlets. .*. 90*:. up  'Cliildion's Silk Handkerchiefs  ..'.'. -.'.'... 10c. up"  ., Gents' Fancy Col'd Satin and  Silk Braces(inboxes)7jc to $2-  - *.'    "*  Gent's Soft.Mocha and  Kid  - Gloves, silk and wool lined  '       ....'-. .*. .'*.. .from $1.50'to $2.."0  .    /���������'" - * .-       *.-,'-':  Gents'   Silk   Scarfs ..to-."weiir-;. -  under Overcoat and Gents'  ���������" *��������� Silk Ties', Dcrbys, Flowing  Ends from 25c to $1.00  Table   Napkins  from ,  ,. ���������..- -...-. $1.75 to $0.00  , Bleached -Table - 'Linen '-  -    -. 50c to $1.35  Japanese Kugs $1.50  Tapestry Rugs Toc'to $0.00  OUR IMMENSE   STOCK _ OF   CHINA WARE far surpasses in  extent, variety_and completeness anything we have ever shown:  "China* Dinner Setts '...7.7. .$12 00  -> China-Tea setts $4 50 to $14 00'.  China Tiiilet Setts.$300'to $10 00 '  China 5 o'clock Tea Setts with  Tray". '.' .'...:... .'.$0 00*"  China 13-Piece Fruit Sett . ..$2 00  China Porridge Sett .. .50c to 60c  China Plate, Cup and Saucer  y.r Setts \ .- 50c to 75c  * Chi.ia Cream and Sugar Setts - ' *   50c to 75c_  Colored China Cups and Sau-  . cers. ...;.���������_ *.. .15c to 25c  Larger"  China    Cups    and  ',   Saucers  '.. 20 to 75c  Fancy Colored Shaving Cups  .-._..'.. .'....  .:.- 25c to 35c  " Fancy Colored China Mous*"*"*'  ~ tache Cups.."."..." .". .40c up  -Fancy  Colored China  Salad  rt    Bowls r 60c. to $2 00  Royal Crown'Derby Cups and  Saucers $3 00 each  -RoyalT-Crown-^Derbjv-Plates-i--^-   .- $3 00 each  Limoges Tea Setts"(40 pieces)  *     .: "..*. ..$1000  Limoges Assorted Pieces  .,   from .......$1.25 to $7 50  China Jaidinieres 75c tO 2 50  China Biscuit" Jars".".' $1 25  China Cocoa Jugs.. .$1 00 to $3 00  China-Bread and Butter Plates  -... ...*.. .$2 00 t"o'$3*o0 per dozen '  Japanese Fancy "Vases.........   .-.*'���������:...... 50c to $3 00  Japanese Trays,....'.. 50c to $2 00'  Nickel Plated Trays." 40c to $1 00  DISASTROUS  --*���������  OUR GROCERY LIST  Awny back���������Ten years or more ago���������we planted a Grocory De-  partment in Our Store. Like many other things that are likely  to grow big, it began to take root among the ideas of a big lot of  Customers,"and its been the greatest poesible pleasure to us to see  that Department expand and grow. We~are selling more GROCERIES, better GROCERIES, higher class GROCERIES now than  ever before. - People seem to think it is worth something to get  everything they buy, guaranteed, to be woith every cent we ask  for them, and if not, to be fully recompensed.  Arrivals this week in Our Grocery Department suitable for  - Christinas Trade. Washed New Seed Raisins, New Carrants,  Fancy Crystalized Orange, Lemon and Citron Peel, Japanese  Oranges, California Orangps, Fancy Evaporated Apricots aud.  Peaches, ' Cranberries,. Fresh Figs and Dates, Spanish Grapes,  London Layer Raisins, Sweet Sliced Mango Chutney,"Biscuits,  Fruit Cake, Iced Almond, Cake and Plum Pudding.    .    .  C-  Hume  and Company.  Goods delivered to all parts of City.     Telephone No. 8i  At the Molly Gibson Mine, Near  Nelson.���������Eight Men Probably  Killed   and   Several    Others  Injured.  One of thu iiio-*'. destructive snow-  slides lli.it have oocurieil in the  lO-ntenay-* took place Christum'-, night  i("suiting in lhc razing of the Molly  Gilioon bunklioii'.c, probably the death  of eight men, and, the maiming of  s,overai n'.hei-s. The slid'* was totally  unexpected. as since the mine build-  'ngsha.-e I ecu ciecied no slide has  even tlm-atencJ them .The bunk  house, which was n. two-storied fiauie  strticluie, stood on a small ridge, at  the lower edge of a basin" sloping  gradually up to the glacier that can  he seen ��������� fiom NeUon: below the  Kokanee peaks. The mine is above  the timber line, and is about 10 miles  from,Kootonay lake.  Thi" men who were in the bunkhonse  have nut been accounte dfor, although  some of them aie alive, aie:  L. Biunlce.  M. E. llall, assayer, Nelson.  XV. G. Murphy, Ainsworth.  T. Rouse, Silverton.  "W. Coll.tib, Nelson.  Two Italians (unknown).  ���������" Gee Chip,'Chinese cook.  Those accounted for aie:   -- '  "J. A. Campbell, dead.  -D. McLaughlin, shoulder"dislocated  and leg broken. " ��������� '   -  'J. R. Dunlop, uninjured.    -      ������������������ ���������"  --McGinness, slightly hurt..  John A. Bell, foieinan, one arm cut.  McCreath, safe. J '      * '  Hart is, *-afo. , .-"*���������'*.  Johnston, safe. * ' ���������'  *���������' "Billy' ,*s.*ife. " .      '/  3'. MacDonald,"safe. ���������  Italian (unknown) safe.  ���������  .lilies Labelle, .*=a fe. '-      *"   '   *  The first, information as to there  being anything wrong at 'the mine  was leceived at"l:30 Friday afternoon,"  'when Jules Labelle staggered into the  house of Rober^ McGuire, at the Molly  Gibson landing.*-    '"���������*-*  According to L-ibelle's "story, there  were nineteen or twenty 'inen'in* the  bunkli.-iuse-at lha'time-"of "tli6'slide!  Only one shift, 'is .worked, and its" it  was Christmas* Day, they had quit  woik at noon and stayed in aH"uatlei-  noon,- After supper an impromptu  conceit was held, which-was kept up  till after 10. -Then all-turned in'but  Lilielle, and-all lights v-v-re extinguished except i. candle which he slnek  up al lhe head ol his bunk to read by.  After ii-ading fm a short time he blew  out his light and turned over to go to  sleep. The weather was then very  stoimy, it was snowing h.ud, and a  legular gale was blowing. As he was  sinking oif to sleep he heaid a dis:,int  rumble which i.ipidly revv louder.  He-knew it' was a slide, but never  d-.rame*d of it coming close till a veiy  sudden crash came,-and' the building  seemed to go to pieces.  - The" bunk house was about 30 liy 10  feet" ill "dimensions.'- On the gioutxl  floor was the kitchen, dining aiid  silting moms, while the oflice was in a  small, sepaiale huilding,' L shaped,  between the bunkhonse and the  mountain. Upstaiis the bunks weie  ���������iiranged in rtwo- tie:s. in some oi  which' there'weie two men, and in  otht'Ls one. Strange to say, instead ol  stiikmg the office first, the slide seemed  lo-^wing aio.md and struck��������� the-other  end ot the building, sweeping it away.  The only corner left of the upstaiis, so  far as Labelle could judge, was the  upper corner next to the office. He  was in a lower corner^buiik, Johnston  was in the next row in the uppet bunk,  and MtGinness iu the next one to  Johnston.  The ioof came right down on top of  Labelle, but although the upper bunk  was di-sttoyed. he was unhurt, though  there was not an inch to spare between  the scantling and his body, lie managed to crawl out. pulling out his  clothes which hud been lolled up for a  pillow under his head, with . him.  Above -the roar of the wind he could  hear a dozen " voices't-alling for help  aw.iy down the hillside below. He  helped Johnston and McGiuness out.  and John Bell, the foreman, also  showed up. He "and B.-ll then made  their way down the hillside", hoping to  extricate some of the victims. There  was fiom four to ten feel of snow along  the trail, nnd it was only with the  greatest diHlculty thai any progress  was made. McL-iughlin was found  about 300 feet below tha site of the  biinkhoust*. Despite his dislocated  shoulder and bioken leg he managed  to partially crawl out. and then witli  the aid of L-.belleand Ball, was finally  got over to the blacksmith,shop, which  was in the month of No. 5 tunnel, a  shoi t distance aw.iy. Here they made  a. fire and went back to the office foi  some blankets to make a*< easy a bed  for him as possible, and to warm him.  as in common with all who had been  cat Hed down the hill he w.is practically without clothes, the snow having  ripped the thin night clothes and  underwear from the bodies. Campbell was found lying in the snow  wiithinjt in a^ony, without any covering. He could only moan, and had  not strength enongh to rise. They  trie.l to move him towards the  blacksmith shop, but in the loose  stmw could accomplish nothing. Bell  then went for a blanket, but by the  time he got back Campbell was dead,  having died a few moments after he  left.  Johnston and "McGinness were work-  in**; at the up-'er part of the hill, but  Labelle did not come close enough to  ihem to speak lo. and so did not know  what success  they   had.     McCreath  and Harris were next toutul. They  were unhurt, although bin ied in snow  ���������������������������id tangled up in lheir blankets. As  well as (bey could lhey contrived  iiiilgh moccasins and clonks of the  blankets and started down the hill lo  reach the h ilf way camp, two miles  below   the   foot   of thu tram.    James  Dunlop   and   "Billy'        were then  found. Tney weie also unhurt, and  lieing couif'ot lubly wrapped iu their  blankets decided lo stay when; they  ���������veil-, half Inn ied. in the loose snow,  father than risk the climb back  'liinugh the deep snow in the face of  the storm in their aiiy attire.  The other men mention as being  -life were funnel near by. Collin was  ni'iird to cry for help a number of  limes but before they could reach the  place the cries had ceased, and they  could lind no trace of lum.  After at I ending to all whom they  could Hnd, Bell and L-ibelle started for  ihe foot of the ti.imway, the lirst  mentioned lo get the tiamwiiy running  ->o that when assistance (ame it could  be used, and Labelle to make his way  to the landing. It was daylight when  they reached the loot of the tramway,  and Labelle was so fatigued that it  took him till afternoon to cover the  nine miles of roadway to McGuire's  house.  A i escue party was at once organised  in the city and set out for the scene ol  the accident.���������Nelson Daily News.  The-Western Star.  Messrs, ' Clarence McDowell, H.  Bodine and Dairagh, who are spending the holidays in town, have the  contract for 3,000 feet of tunnels'' on  the Western Star property. This fall  they have run in over 50 feet on the  upper, tunnel, following the rich  surface shewings,. and the'jveiu still  continues to hold its good values and  has .widened out- to six feet. The  lower tunnel has been driven in nearly  SO feet., J.' A. Darragh, is the manager of the Western Star and his faith  in the pioperty is being realized as the  work'progresses. The 'Western' Star  is.tho makings of asDlerdid property,  and is situated "-only a shoil distance  from tho Beatrice,'Silver Dollar and  Del Ray groups'*;on 'Mohawk creek,"a  tributary of Pool and Fish Creeks.  t. ,���������   ..*,,,..; *,.L. ���������* -t-j��������� ,-���������-��������� *-'"-  Curling. -  * ^  A match between rinks representing  Scotland and Canada was played ut  the rink Christmas morning, resulting  in a win for the Scotchmen by seven  points, r The rinks were:  SCOTLAND' ' CtXAD.t  ,  Dr. Carruthers      ���������    C. B. Hume ._  XV. M. Lawrence       A. E. Rose  D. M. Rae G. H. Brock    -  H. A. Brown, sk,13  A. McRae, skip 0.  A challenge has been issued to the  Scotch rink by another bunch ot  Canadians and the match will take  place' tomorrow if the ice is in shape.  THE FAMOUS  BEATRICE MINE  The Property Under Development is Showing up to Good  Advantage���������The Silver Dollar  the Sister Property.  Frank Fulmer, manager of the  Beatrice Mine, was in town for a  few days last week, having just come  down from the pioperty where he has  been engaged in looking over the  work. Mr. Fulmer is well pleased  with tho work already accomplished  on the property this fall. The tunnel  is now in neaily 275 feet ar.d the foot  wall of the main ledge has been  drifted on for over 100 feet. In addition to a rich galena vein which  carries high values in gold, silver and  lead, there is also a quartz vein carrying free gold. This vein is a true  fissure and the average values from  samples gave a"return of $13.40 to the  ton. while special samples will run  very high in tree gold. 'Mr. Fulmer  is running two shifts on the propeity,  and I here aie sufficient supplies to run  the camp lill July next.  Just below the Beatrice is situated  the Silver Dollar group, now owned  by a new company���������The Fish River  Mines Ltd. The ^Silver Dollar carries  about the same ore bodies as the  Beatrice aud under development The  Silvei Dollar, with "the Beatrice, will  no doubt make a name for the Fish  River,..camp that "will ��������� be known  tluoiighbut, the mining world on this,  continent.  -  * -   y' The'Band Ball. - '     . -  ��������� Tonight, the first annual ball of the  Revelstoke Independent Band, takes  place in the Opera House., The committee of management have spared  -"-either tune -"nor," expense in their  efforts'to'niake this'the dance' of the  season. For several weeks the band  boys' have' been busy preparing'special  music for the-, occasion, and can  guarantee those who attend, the finest  music they ever danced to in Revelstoke. A flrst class programme has  been ..arranged, the .Grand" March  taking place at" 9 o'clock sharp'.  Tickets, .$2.    . '  Accident on Grand Trunk. .  A serious accident occurred Friday  night last at Wanstead station, near  London, Ontario, on the Sarnia branch  the Grand Trunk railway. It was -i  headon c.-.l.oion between the Pacific  Ex press and an East'Jinind freight.  The express '-.as proceeding West at  its usual high into of speed, while the  freight was under slow headway, -mil  was to h-ivp taken a switch at Wan-  stead to allow the passenger to pass.  Appa-en.ly neither engineer saw the  danger ahead in time to avoid the  accident, for tho two engines came  together near the East switch with a  fi-ightl'.il crash, ovei turning into the  ditch.  The accident was caused by the  negligence of the operator to inform  the freight to take the siding. It is  estimated lhat 23 people were killed  and 30 injured.  The following list of killed is authentic :  Mr, and Mrs. Allen Stewart, Pe-  troli.i.  Mr. A.'Rickotts, Sarnia Tunnel.  Mrs. Trotter, Petrolia. .  Mr. Lawrence, Waterford, Ont.    -  Mr. S. Freeman, Oil Springs, or  llanshall..    "  Mr. Jeffry, London.  Mr. Glenn, Roaley, Port Huron,  Mich.  Guy Depenier, ticketed to Lacrosse,  Wis.  Dr. Penwarden, ticketed to Petrolia.  A lady supposed to b'e Dr. Penwarden's wife.J  J. H. Brock, Brucefield.  O. B. Beurwell, Port Huron, Mich.  Wilson Morton, Chicago.  Miss Geddes, Sarnia.'  Mr. Cameron, Petrolia.    .  Several other bodies are still unidentified. '    ,  Copper Dollar* Sold  , The Copper Dollar and the Marten  fraction, two free-gold" claims adjoin  ing the Eva, on Lexington mountain,  have been sold to El wood, Indiana,  people, who are operating the Western Star here1. The price at which the  . - - .it  properties sold  is withheld," but it is  currently believed to be a good round  figuie. The .manager for "the com  panv, Mr. J. A. r Darragh, states that  development work on the Copper  Dollar and Marten 'fraction., will, be  curried forward on a large scale early  in the spring. : The workings so far  aggregate about 00 feet.���������Camborne  Miner.  LATEST NEWS  BY TELEGRAPH  1  'Q ne c.ty council held a   meeting  on  S:>   ji dav evening' to' make  arrange*  in ntsforthe elections.    Nominations  will   take   place on   Jam   12th,   and  voting on Jan. 15th. -  d & Y~oung^  Wish  Their  Many  Patrons  At  This  Festive  Season a  New Year  Hoping that  Our Past Efforts  Have Been  Satisfactory.  I Thursday]  Thanking You  for Last Year's  Favors.  Yours Truly,  Reid & Youn  The News ofthe World in Briet  As Received Over the Wires  From   Every   Corner  of the  Globe.  London*. Dec. SO.���������The British jror   '  ernment ib endeavoting to secure -.he  sei vice of Gen. Ben. Viljoen to lead u  party of Boeis against the Samolis.  Pekin, Dec. 30.���������Boxer Chief Tung -  Fnh Siting is  on   the   warpath   with"  10,000 rebels, and missionaries  in ~> he  district of Siang Fu have been notified  lo seek safety. v"*<  Indianapolis, Dec. 31.-Train No. 1  westbound continental limited on the  Wabash railroad, has made a run of -  112 miles in 110 minutes, her record"or  one mile during the run was made n  3S seconds*.  Beaumont, Texas,, Dec. 31.���������Fatus  Sing Hpoo, the smallest adult in he  world, being 22 years old, height 28  inches, and weighing only 15 pouads,  was taken suddenly ill yesterday  after an exhibUion and died before  aid could teach ber.  Many Swedish towns have been  severely damaged by recent storm,.*)  and many persons drowned. ' "  The jury   in   the_ Wanstead,  Ont.  railway accident  returned  a  verdict,  of accident due lo wrong orders being  given to the" express,   but  could  not  agree who was responsible.  Prohibitionistaareio meet the Ontario '  government and demand that in view  ofthe   leferendum^vote   the  sale  of  intoxicating  liquo'rs^in   Ontario "b*s,  abolished. ' "    **   " -  Fire damaged"!. ���������the " McLaughli'i-  building and contents at St. John. '���������"*���������"._  B., to the exteut of $40,000. , Seven'  firms bad properly damaged.     -,".'"*  ���������  Mew   Guinea   advices    state " that  natives have'brutally murdered.-two  European prospectors and many otfaei-.-  persons.    lt is feared th.-.l.the droiitlf  caused the natives to resort to' canni' "  balisui. ���������" Th"ousarids"-"are"- starving 'or  subsisting^ on -roots.^   Two" hundred",  and fifty natives were killell in a; rtlJal  light.|    , --���������   * -   s ^n"'-'-  President Loubet, of France, has  sent $2,000 for the relief of the snEfer*  ers from the'recent earthquake"; at  Andijan, Russian"Turkistan.  The.British' schooner *��������� Grace.'  rom  Oporto, reached St, Johns, Nfld., with-"  one   man    dead- from  chicken   pox.*-,  another dying and>"-a -third  seriously.,  ill from the disease. ��������� ,,    **  * The Review and Herald Publishing  Co.'s building at-Battle Creek,  Mieb . .  was burned lost"night. Loss, $350,00)T  President Castro anived at Caracn,**-  yesterday.   Venezuela's answer to the  arbitration   proposal   will  be    given -  today. \  - -*-'-��������� -,*     .  V'-i-S  r        ���������*���������- /* 8  ���������"-J.***-'  ��������� '    3$  . . i.i"'  .,. "J, Jf  - -'��������� ,-yfi,  ' " "''I  ���������"*���������.  "���������.'���������'  v--*;**-'  ^i  ���������*^<  -"-iti  -*M  Dealers in  .   FIRST-CLASS  flour, Feed  McCldfy's '���������'.  Famous Stoves  Tinware, draoiteware  Heavy aod  Shelf Hardware  Stores at  Revelstoke  Nakusp  New Denver.  ���������?���������-.  s.  -a *mmt*m&i*e*.1MiatewJNTttto'V8llt**&l .*5i J>  The D  lvir.e  Ownership.  ) By Taliaferro i".  t'a^koy. Rector  { Emeritus, .St. John's Church,  > DiOadeii, Germany.  i  All souls are mine.���������Kzekiel,  xviii., 4.  In the old calendars November 2 is entitled All -Suiil*,' Day. It is tlie proper  complement to tiie fcsth.il of -Ul Saints,  in tliat il announce'-- a uidi'r truth. Xot  oil saints onlv, but all .-oula belong to  God.  In a vague way ll.is fact may be admitted, but tbe coim-iou-mcsj, of belonging to God i-, s-o feeble in many men and  their faith thai God cares for tboni ns  dear cliildreii i-i so much feebler that All  Souls' I'ay, nntwiUi-tiiii'liii'.* its sweet  hope and solemn .si'.'iiil'u'ancc. lias 'been  allowed to fall out of tlii- (.'hritlian  year. Vie may not bo aide to ic-ston-  the lost day, but wc can bring back tlie  neglected truth and seriou-.iy admonish���������  Eaeh  man  to   think  himself  an  net  of  God,  *3is mind a thought, liis life a breath of  God-  In    other  words, to  acknowledge    the  Divine ownership.  The evidence of God's claim is indis-  ���������jutable.   Wo read in the Gospel history  '��������� "hat the Master once looked upon a  ���������Roman penny and said, "Whose image  and superscription is this?" The answer  ���������was, "Caesar's." Presumably the coin  was genuine, but there was the possibility of a counterfeit. All coins were not  Caesar's. But when one looks upon a  human soul and says. "Whose image  and superscription is this?" the unlicii-  tating answer is, ''God's." God is the  ������ole Creator. The Divine image cannot  be counterfeited, however much it may  bo corrupted.  It is true the purity of the image may  eoon be lost. The Divine lineaments  may quickly be covered over with the  foul accretions of sin. The soul mav  give itself up to work all unclcnnncss  .with greediness. lt may misuse its  faculties, corru-ft its affections, deny ils  faith, hut it continues God's soul, and  becatise.it  is   God's  soul,   and   not  the  . devil's, it will be held to an inexorablo  ���������account. The Divine claim can never  be outlawed; God's ownership lasts forever. This is the affirmation of Scripture; note now the human recognition  of the Divine claim. Hrst of all there  is the testimony of historic religion,  "-gvery race has a creed, every people an  "altar. . The instinct of worship builds,  S3 it were, a great spiritual hearthstone  ���������about which the whole human family  -gathers and says, "Our Father." The Ian-  . guage may be confused, but the .faith is  one. The symbols may vary, but thc  ���������fatherhood of God is thc common ve-  H*elation. Thus universal religion tillers  ibe grand "confession, '"All souls aie  God's."  Tiie testimony of religion is repealed  in art. The creed of the Divine ownership is moulded in in.-.rlili* anil pain Led on  eanv.is. There i= no .uh.-islic ail. Without faith in God it is impossible to express in form or color any conception of  human life that the world will accept  as eternally true. V,"e. have more to  learn from Greece than her perfect tech-  "oique. Her marbles are transcriptions  of her faith. If artists of our day fail  to paint pictures or mould statues that  the world will make pilgrimages to see,  Is it not because the new pictures, the  ���������aew_images_leave   out, the   old_ creed?  The Costot-'s Moke.  The costers residing" in the llorongli  of Wandsworth had an nfternoon oil'  recently, says Tlie Daily Graphic, and  spent the lime in holding a donkey and  pony show on Tooling Bee Common.  One exhibit was "noL for competition"���������  not being owned by a coster. That  was the smart coach and lour driven on  to the ground by the .Mayor of Wandsworth, Councillor XV. 3. Lancaster, who  presented (he prizes. There were three  prizes for the smartest turiicd-oul donkey and barrow, and three more for  pony nnd barrow. In each ease the  coster diiving hail io be accompanied liy  a lady���������a  stipulation  that appeared  ta  'I" oro:  tP"������H*f  At thc Costers' Donkey and I'ony Show-  Daily Graphic.  be most agreeable to all parties. A  piebald pony attracted everyone, but  even he had to submit to be passed  over when the class for "the best jenny  and foal" was being judged. if anyone wanted proof of the kind way in  which the costers and their families  look after their moken and lheir families they could have had it while that  class was being judged. -Then there  wero three more prizes for the. be*t-  eonditioned donkey, and to wind up wilh  there was a donkey race, in whieh the  jockeys���������all sons of costers���������were under sixteen years of age. No sticks or  spurs were allowed, and yet the donkeys made a very good race of it.  Good money pri~.es were given, and  everyone enjoyed their afternoon.  Grent Britain's Debt.  An official return issued by the  British Government shows that the  national debt on "March 31 last was  ������76S,4-13,3SG, of which ������130,000,000 represented Lhc cost of tho South African  war. Since 183G war has added nearly  ������200,000,000 lo Jlrilain's debt. In 1S31S  the debt was -CSo3,-17'3,.">!'7-, a far greater burden then, when the national  wealth, population, etc., avc laken into  account, than it would be now. The  debt reached its lowc-,1 point in tho last  sixty years in IS!)!), when it totalled  ������U';,->,010,!'U5. An interesting fact gle.iu-  cd from the return in the multiplication  of the value of the Suez Canal sliaics,  that splendid investment of the laic  Harl of Heaconslield. Purchased in 1S7U  for .-C.l.fi'j-'.OIO, thev are now valued at  ������*"7,l)SU,000.  DISRESPECT FOR LAW  Art has become something to conjure  with, something to confuse, not to illustrate truth. But when art returns  So her old true story and0 tells something about God and our souls, as when  Hofmann paints the child Jesus, among  the Jewish doctors, taking upon "lis  young heart His Father's businesa und ut-  -rhich all the old prophecies seem ringing  feeling those wise, -lu-ei word.-, through  anew, then all the world will go to Dresden to see it, and all the world will icel  tbe t-u:h���������to which a belie, ing ait has  set its se.il���������that men are not th'-ir own, j  but are bought with ihe price of the;  blood which the young .'luM-child will  grow up to ihed in tha out-kin*,- of Jerusalem.  But there Is a  further  testimony  to  the Divine ownership���������the testimony ol  literature.      From thc Greek poet who  ���������3 eaid, "i'or we are also His    oir.-pring,"  ���������down  to   thc  latest  singer * of    modern  times tbe fatherhood  of God  has  boon  ���������reverently acknowledged.   And not poets  only, but philosophers, scientists, "novol-  tUts and historians together tay: God '3;  all souls arc liis.    It is true literature.'  depicts these children of God as living a  -yery ungodly life, but on the worst cliar-  .    actcr  Ibe  superscription  of  thc Divine  ownership may be read  through    blots  ������f crime and blisters of curses.  But while all literature testifies to the  good and bad in man, to the struggle  and the hope, only one literature���������the  Holy Word of God���������can authoritatively  cereal the transcendent truth of the Di-  srine ownership of souls.  1 have recalled a lost fc-tival 011 this  day once dedicated to All Souls, not simply to broaden our faith in God's uni\e-r-  ���������sal love, but to ledge t'ne solemn truth  in our hearts that we ail belcrg to God  that the Divine paternity is not a v.igii-.-  ���������phrase, but a very einc.-lruth, a -iinie-  ������hing to be held with all the heart, ".oul  end mind until it -lpppcii- into a prisons! experience which ive may call the  0V-olc ������pi;-" of son-.' * -  IS  A CHARACTERISTIC  OF XT.  S.  CITIZENS.  Americans Never Took Kindly to "Discipline���������Liberty Runs to License  ���������"Mr. "Fraser's Articles on Chicago.  leTore Leisure "For Tommy A.  According lo English papers, the War  Ollice is about to promulgate a set of  regulations whieh will give Tommy Atkins more leisure time and recreation.  All roll calls, except reveille, will be  abolished. This will permit the soldier  lo stay out of barracks as late as he  likes. At present he must, unless on  leave, be iu the barrack-room by 0.30  p.m. Soldiers in uniform may at present smoke in the streets after 5 p.m. in  winter and 0 p.m. in summer. Henceforth they may enjoy pipes or cigarettes'  in the streets at any time when not on  duty. Xo soldieis will he employed in  canteens or regini--.iit.il institutes held  on the tenant system. Coal-carrying  fatigues, the most hated of a soldier's  dutiesj-will-not-bs-pcrformed-by-reeruiU-  or trained soldiers. If defaulters are  available it will be done by them. If  not, arrangements will be made with the  contractors and lhe consumers. As far  as possible Sunday is to be the =oldier's  own. Barrack and stable inspections  and any parades but church parades will  cease. Kit inspections for trained soldiers and recruits are to be held bnt  seldom. The most popular change will  he that which directs that the soldier's  time will be so apportioned that he his  at his disposal a certain definite period  of leisure. This period ia not to be  broken into for fatigu-*-*' nr working parties, except under circum-il'ii.'es of exceptional urgenev. Mr. Brodrick desires  to put down that proiilie enuse of div  comfort n������iel mi*-prv "in.iriiv.--i> ofi ,���������>���������*  Etrenatli." He din"-'!-" tha: n, -.-'���������''���������-r  will be p'.ieeil ou the unrric'l establishment without obt,iini:<*" ;h.> sanction of  his command'*!!*; oll'i..rr before marri.v*c.  The following from the editorial columns of The Kew York Tribune is in  part a vindication of Mr. Fruser, the  Scotch journalist whose articles on Gondii ions in their city the Chicago newspapers so bitterly denounced. It is further quite in keeping with the views of  other journals and journalists���������not excepting those of Canada���������whieli even  Kew York papers have objected to:���������  "Miss Jane Addams when asked a few  days ago by William li. Curtis, 'What  is the mutter with Chicago?' replied  promptly that thc great fault of the peoplo of that city was their disrespect of  the law. She added: 'There, is si sort  of good naturcd, happy-go-lucky evasion  on the onc> side, and toleration on the  other, both among thc more educated  nnd intelligent citizens and among the  poor and ignorant classes, when all of  Ihem ought lo stand up for the laws,  nnd not only obey them, but see that  others obey them also.' We are by no  means prepared to believe that this is  the only thing that is the matter with  Chicago, but without doubt it is one  thing thc matter with Chicago,  as ��������� it is one thing the matter with the whole country.  Miss Addams' specifications of the  lax enforcement of unpopular laws, of  ���������neglected tenement house lobulations,  sanitary codes and various municipal  ordinances sound strangely like a catalogue of Kew York's shortcomings. Lawlessness, wc fear, is a characteristic American trait���������not intentional wai fare  on society such as lhu burglar wages,  but just good-natured conli-mpt for  laws whieh do not suit individual taste  or convenience. Poisibly lhis is one of  the results of popular 'government. H  may bo that because the people as a  whole make the laws, the people as individuals feel (hat ihey have a right to  break them. England, however, has a  popular government, yet its people have  a reverence for their own laws and are  scrupulous in obeying them. If the law  there forbids driving on thc wrong side  of a street or stopping on a cross walk,  the law is obeyed. Here everybody does  more or less a.s ho pleases; and the officials whoso business is to enforce law-  are often as lax' and good-natured as  anybody else.  "The American never look well to discipline. In colonial times as a soldier  he was restive under orders, and likely  lo do as he pleased about coming and  going, legardless of lcgulations. Tho  frontiersman's blood is still in the vein3  of our native stock, and the foreign  elements coming fiom countries whero  laws are strict easily learn contempt  for law whiciris not strict, "noi* does  this lawlessness stop at the indulgence  of a. moderate, well-meaning carelessness, lt is carried to whatever point  their passions impel, and a certain part  of the population seem to think it is  one of their rights in free, America to  riot and murder as they have been  doing in the coal Holds. Kative Americans cannot wonder at it. They set  tho example- The lynchers of the south  are largely ptuc American stock. As  Miss Addams suggests, thc educated and  intelligent citizens foil tiie obligation  to obey law because ic is law as little  as the ignorant. The people who in  this city object to a policy of rigid law  enforcement count tlieui-*e!ver* good citizens. There has been much di-cuss-Iou  about the enforcement 01" the excise law  here, but scarcely a person among  those who have clamored for exceptional strictness in ferreting out violators  of this law would fail to rebel against  strict enlorcerhent of thc laws whieh  more closely touched his ow,n conduct.  Suppose every good man wiio spits in  violation of law were arrested, and  every woman who violates lhe sanitary  code  in her    housekeeping, and    every  -merchant���������".'ho���������illegally .obs-x-icts.^sielei^.  walks, and every builder who sends hi?  ������tcel beams clanging through the  streets! The whole city would be wild  with clamor against oppressive and tyrannical ollicials. Yet- wc all want  these laws enforced against somebody  else when hi3 ofTcnce; annoy U3." If as  a nation wo are ever going to cure  whatever i-> the matter with us, wc certainly must, along with Chicago, acquire  more res-peel for thc law. Lawlessness  is an almost unhersal disease in cily  and country, and I hero i-i a disposition  to resent the conduct of 0fTici.1l-' who  nro really active for enforcement. The  u-hool* fail lo teach su'linem. rpvc*vn<-o  for law, hikI thc home*) fail to incuic.-ilfi  it, Wc- are in the main .1 peaceful, well-  meanin-*;. well-cr---.il ml c.I j-cr.ple, but we  eeitainly niu not ������  i.iw-.ihuliiig people."  The Dp ll Instructor*.  Patsy Got r. Job.  "So," paid the lion tamcV to I'litqy  I-I.innigan, "you can't have a job to  look after lhe animals; but our pet lion  died last week, and'we've kept thc skin,  so I'll give you two pounds a week to  dress up as the lion."  "Two pound;*.!" echoed Flannigan.  "Good gracious, is there no much gold  in thc world?    Might, sorr!"  So Fatsy drciscd up as the lion and  lay down in the cage. The menagerie  doors were opened and the peii'oi mancc  commenced.  "Ladies and gentlemen," said tho  keeper, "to (-how the wi.r.d'-rfiii docility  of these animal-, wc -.wll now place the  lion in the cage v.-it'll  the tiger."  "Man, are ye mad?" cried 1'alsy.  "Think  of  me.  wif-. ar.d  children!"  "Get in," icplied the. keeper, "or I'll  run   this  pitchfork   through   you."  Palsy thought he might sis we*f] die  one way a-- another, so he e-r.-wled inte,  the tiger's, cage, and v.hen he saw the  animal's big, ferocious ey.-i lix*"U on  him. he uttered a doleful wail and commenced prayuif* in Irish. The tiger  walked  over to him.  "What's the matter -uid yc?" said lie.  "Shuie, man, yc needn't he afraid- I'm  Oirish mc-s.-'lf!"���������London  Answers.  The Bracelet round.  Thn London Daily Mail says :���������The  mystery of the. DucIicb-" of ISucclruch'j-  biuci-lc-t, lost during thc coronation  ceremony in "Westminster AblK-y, I1.1-*  been cleared up. H will be. remembered  that lhe Duche-s.*, who w.is in atl.-ndanco  upon Queen Alexandra in her oflici'il capacity a-- Mistress of the Kobes, missed  the bracelet���������which was a prized souvenir of the late C'lieen Victoria���������from  her wrist shortly before the enthronement of the Queen. All eiTorts for the  recovery proved fuiile, and thc -whereabouts nf the missing trinket rr-niained  shrouded in mystery until a few days  uso, when the bracelet was returned  none the worse fe,r its temporary absence from its owner's jewel-case. The  Oueh'-s.s n-nd those who have acted for  her in Ilie matter maintain thc strictest reticence as to the exact circumstances under whi"h the inlTcsf.ing link  wilh her laic Msi-jo A,y was recovered.  Inquirie-s, however, make it apparent  lhat, thc brace-let. has lain for somo  wof-k-i in the folds of th" coronation  robe of n well-known Incly of rank, who  vent abroad immediately nfter thc  ceremony. II w'va only when, a dny or  two ago, thei lady in question returned  lo town lhat she instructed her maid to  look over ihe robe, and lo the :i3tfi*iish-  nie-nt of mi--tress and maid, the mis-un-*  bracelet, dropped out. It. was, of eiii-.rse,  promptly lelurncd Io ils owm>r with iv  note cxplainin-* thc circumstances of il3  finilin**.  To a timid man���������to an individual who  h&s spent his days in the hush of peace,  who has gone about not thirsting for  tho life-blood of his fellow-creature,  whose dreams are not those of marching  hosts, imperial conquests, deadly strifo  or the leading of forlorn hopes���������thero is  something to shrink at and become pallid  in beholding your typical infantry drill  instructor engaged in thc active pursuit  of his profession. In your dense ignorance you are ready to wager that he is  infuriated���������at something. In the hopeless density of your peiceplion you believe that when he roar-, at the men his  rage, is unappeasable and thai, his wrath  is like unto thai of a famished lion.  In obedience! to the. briskly beseeching  bugle the men tumble I'roni lheir tenls  and, rapidly fovniing up, cover olT and  -.land ut ca=i>. And now appears thc  drill instructor���������he of imposing mien  and commanding voice. "S'chun!" The  crimson ranks stilVen nnd at tho utterance of the next order you think that  if he is not intensely angry at something, then he is wonderfully clever nt  imitation. His chest expands after the  fashion of thn pouter pigeon. His  features become almost convulsed, and  he. hurls at the ranks���������in 11 tone .significant of undying hatred and ferocious  revenge���������an order. He shrieks "A-lmt-  t-t���������Tr-i-e-e-11" ami tho ranks turn to  the right about. Then in response to  a look of malignant scorn and a burst  of breath which twists into a repetition  of the order, the men resume the original position. "K-r-ritc���������Tr-r-c-c-n (oh,  the intensitv and bitterness of it!)  "Mr-r-r-itch." "Loft���������right���������-lett���������-right  -���������left���������riglit���������left���������right���������left. ��������� right  **-" '"Alt." "Fr-r-ent !" "Slauh���������hat  ���������Lease!" The lines relax and the instructor is really quite all'uble. He is  not cross���������it's merely his way.���������Camp  Kolcs, in St. John, K.B., Telegraph.  "What Papa "Wished to Kj-lo-w.  The agitated young man began:���������  "Mr. Broekman, you may nave-" noticed that I have been a frequent caller  at your house for the last year or  more."  "Yes," replied the busy merchant. "I  have seen you there now and then, 1  remember."  "You will not be surprised, theic-  fore, when I tell you that 1 want to  marry your  daughter."  "But "  "Let me anticipate any objections you  might have, Mr. Broekman. ��������� I am-cf  good family; I am not dissipated; I  have a good business, and am abundantly able to support a wife. All I ask  is "  "Bul, young man "���������*  "1 can bring testimonials lo prove all  1 say. 1 have never wanted any other  girl, and "  "But "  "And never shall want any other girl.  From lhe first it lias heen a'ease of "  "Look here, young man, let nie get in  a word. Which one of_my daughters  is it vou want?"  Saved Prom the Birkenhead.  There died a few weeks ago, aljSouth-  amplon, England, Licul.-Col. -John  Francis Girardot, aged 73 years, one of  the few survivors of the wreck of lhc  Birkenhead troopship off Simon's Bay,  Cape of Good Hope, February 20th,  1832. In song, story and picture, the  heroism of the soldiers on lhat occasion  has been handed down,-and will live so  long as true courage ar.d fortitude are  deemed worthy of praise. Out of 038  persons on tbo vessel, most of Ihem  soldiers, only 18i were saved. In effect the records of the disaster show  that the troops (ollieers and men), after  assisting as far as possible the women,  children and invalids to the boats,  mustered on thc deck, - formed up as  though on parade and went down wilh  the ship. There wa3 no panic ; no unseemly action, "no man played" tho  coward," and all the boats got safely  A!^y_v*ith _aj_;jriany . persons as thoy  eotilcl hold. A few oftiie soldiers-  managed to keep afloat by means of  pieces of wreckage, and were afterwards rescued. Lieut.-Col. Girardot  wa3 one of these, and he afterwards  Fcrved throughout thc Kaffir war of  185*2-73. The Globe of April 22, 1852,  contained an account of the disaster,  in which i3 quoted the story told by  Capt. Wright, ono of the survivors, in  part he said:���������Kvcry man did as he wa*  directed. , All received their orders  nnd had them carried nut as if the men  were embarking, instead of going lo tha  bottom. Ther.: 'was only this eliffer-  pixfr���������that I n������ver "* nny embarkation londue-tcd with ���������*������������������) little n<.lsc or  confusion. ... It is gratityin**  al"o to find that the women and ehil-  elivr* wcr-* all Hi������l. Tl:<*y hod b>'cn  ipnctly collided under the* poop awning, and were got over the ship's hide  md passed into the boats'.  The Jury's Vordlot.  Very broad views on the question ol  what constitutes moderate drinking appear lo prevail in Cuuucrw'-ll, says The  London  Daily Kxpress.  "Wns he a heavy drinker '!" asked  Coroner Wynlt, al the impiest on a man  named Catty.  "Ko, moderate'," replied a witness who  had worked with Gaily. "Ho might  have eight halt-pints of beer a day."  A little later, when this witness was  recalled, he admitted th.it perhaps Catty  might have had as many as twenty half-  pints a day, "as well as a drop of gin."  A doclor stat eel that he, had come lo  the. conclusion that death was due to  apoplexy accelerated bv excessive drink-  in**.  Tho jury were up in arms at once in  defence of n llriton's riglit lo a moderate indulgence.  "I do not believe lli.it death was accelerated by drink," declined one.  "1 consider it a slur on the. family,"  6aid another.  The Coroner���������The doctor says that  excessive drinking is the primary cause  of death.  A Juror���������We don't helieve it.  The Coroner���������Vou are not medical  men.  The Juror���������Never mind; it's our verdict, and we arc going to stick to it,  Kc knew a man, remarked a juryman,  who could drink twenty pints of beer a  day; to which the coroner retorted that  he was slowly poisoning himself.  Eventually the "good men and "���������*���������������������������<���������"  retired to talk it over. They came back  with a unanimous verdict oi "Natural  death, accelerated by ovfarwork."  "We have hoard nothing of that," said  tho surprised coroner, and another animated discussicm followed.  At last the foreman announced that  thc jur- twcre all agreeable lo return a  verdict of death from apoplexy if the  phrase about excessive drinking was left  out.  The Coroner���������That would bo an incomplete verdict.  The foreman���������Woll, knock out the  word "excessive," and say accelerated  by drink.  And so with'this compromise tho inquiry terminated.  Masterstroke by Chamberlain".  The announcement that Hon. Mr.  Joseph Chamberlain is going to South  Africa to study on the spot the condi-  . tions arising from tho termination - of  tho war and settlement negotiations is  hailed by the Brilish press as a mubtcr-  stroke of statesmanship. With tiecoiuing'  deference to.The Times and others wno  so regard the ns;* -��������� r.ero colonial  might be permitted !.< -*r why such  a very ur.ti.jal con;: nud not been  followed bc-lnrt- iu *"outh Africa and  other colov.es. Why, for instance, Mr.  Chambeila.n found il impossible on his  several visits to thc United States to  spend even one day on Canadian soil.  To the average man it would seem tho  most natural thing in the world for Mr.  Chamberlain, as tho head of thc Colonial  Department, even nt somo little inconvenience, to mako , a point of visiting  Canada, on such occasions. In any event,,  .il is to bo hoped that his investigations  in South" Africa will be followed hv  beneficial results lo that country. It  may be lhat thc Boeis will renew, lheir  efforts lo secure an additional grant lo  that aheady-made by Britain for rebuilding anel restocking the farms. The  rebuff of their pro*, ions effort to secure  an increase sucrgested to an artist on  The Detroit' Tribune the accompanying  illustration.  Kipling's Kew Book.-  Mr. Kipling's new 'nook goes straight  to the" juvenile heart. One of the witnesses to this fact ii Mr. James Douglas, ihe English critic. "You may ask,"  he says, "how I can tell whether theso  'Just So Stories' wiii please real children. Well, I tried them on a real child,  a boy of eight. Bimbo ia a fastidious  critic, bnl these tales froze him into an  agony of ecstasy. Thc repetition-- made  him chuckle. 'Don't Forget the Suspenders!' dcli^htr-d him. He. remarked  that thc story of 'How thc Whale Got  His Throat' reminded hirn of Jonah, and  he sugt'csterl that the: man who wrote  about Mr. ISivvenn, A.B., had road the  Jonah story and,_ copied it. Also, he  wanted lo know if thrse storie-i were  really and truly true, f Min-h. to confe-Ms  lhat I ?nid they were-. That nootlicd  his nnsecnl incredulity. The funny  words sent him intei fits. That 'eioshy-  skooshy' sea made him gur-fle with joy.  As to the: Kiplinir pictures, lies voted tlii-in  jolly. He. nlso likr-d the ('".plan.itiiui.s.  That hit of rafl. for instance���������how could  he have found it without instructions?  And the. hard words plensod bim best'of  nil. Why? Because ho liked the difficulty of liinling out their meaning. The  jilace names miitlc him Jiowl with happiness. Wouldn't I let liim 'roll down to  Niei' and see 'the great, grey-green,  greasy Limpopo River?"'  How He "Brought Her Home.,  A Cleveland man who seems to think  that home is the proper place for a wife  and mother took heroic measures the  other day for the purpose of pulling  his theory into'practice, says The Chicago Kceord-Hcrald. After having written many urgent letters to his wife, who  had been away visiting all summer and  who showed no inclination to return and  plunge into the almost riotous joys of  'domesticity-���������with���������an��������� empty-coal���������bin.  and no girl���������at the place where she "had  left oil early in- the spring, he put a  stamp upon a linen collar that he had  worn until it was far from immaculate,  addressed it lo the lady and wrote upon   it   the  following 'message:���������  If you arc not coming home, please  wash this and return il at once.  She arrived at the earliest possible  moment and began putting things in order around thc house. The soiled collar  mi'y not., be .sufficient to 'bring some  wives back, hut it ought to bo cllicii-  cious where lhc lady is capable of taking a hint. But a serious argument  against it is lhc pain it may ghe ciw.s  where sensitiveness is very marked,  hence it sh'Uilil be used only when all  olher plans f.til.  DON'T  SNUFFLE!  7ou niuko poopl-a  sick���������  \on keep j'our-  fl������lf sick.  Cure That  Cold.  You can do It  if you exerciso  com iron   sense  nnd uso only  Dr. A {-new**  Catarrhal  Powder.  It relieves colds  and catarrh and  cures headache  in a few  minutes.  If you have  common senso  and catarrh you  will use it now.  Kev. L. C. McPherson, of. Jnflorson  Sti cet t.Church ot Christ, Buffalo,  N. Y., says:  "Dr. Agnew's Catarrhal Powder  relieved me in ten minutes and Is a  blessing to mankind."   Tlie Ursultne Sisters of St. Bern-  arel's. Grand Forks, N. Dak., state:  " We havo been using Dr. Af*new'(  Catarrhfil Powder in our institution.  We find it a very good remedy.  "f ho Great South American  Nervine Tonic  is first a nerve lood and then a phy*  siclan, searehln** out and strength-  unlnf-; every weak -spot in tho body  of man, woman or child. It means  nerve, health, vigor, hope, liveliness, liglithwrtcdness and life.    38.  H*a*raop of the Hou-**.  r. '.-J  Bunker���������I tsde'a horrible break on  :he links yesterday. My caddie made  me very angry and I yelled, "Get out!"  it him.  H. I'.lr.nor��������� Hut surely that's excus-  iblo, isn't it i  Bunker���������Oh, bless you, no I I should  nave said "Hoot awa' 1"���������Philadelphia  I'rcss.  Stella���������I came near missing a proposal last night.  Bella���������You did 7  Stella���������Yes. lie got down on his  knees, and I tho'-glit he" was -r.crely  looking for a ping pong ball.���������JJ-lifer's  *"azar.  A Judges-and a joking lawyer wero  conversing about the doctrine of tho  transmigration of '..he "on's of men into  animals. "Now," s'n-i the Judge, "suppose you ar.d 1 iv*. ���������" 1 o bo turned  into a-liorse end* anJ ass which would  you prefer to he'l" "The :**.s. to be sure,"  replied tho lawyer". "Why t" rejoined  the Judge. "Because," was the reply,  "I have heard of an ass heing a /udgo,  but of a horse, never." L   ������  "Do you think the train will gel  through on time?" asked the nervous  passenger.     '  "I'm trying lo think it," answered  the conductor. "I'vo been trying to  think it ever since1 I .went lo work. But  mental science doesn't-seem to*do much  good on  this road."���������Washington  Star,  "Going up lo Maine on your annual  hunting  trip?"    -  "No."    Can't  afford  it."  "O, I see."      '   -  "See .what?" ���������*'  *  "You can't got lhc deer if you haven't  the dough."���������Cleveland Plain,* Dealer.  In a llcstaurant.���������He���������Will you havo  a little lobster? '  She���������Oh,  John)  this is  so  sudden!������������������  Philadelphia Evening Bulletin.   ������ ���������  Friend���������But if. there's-no hope of  saving him, doctor, what are.you going  to   perform   the   operation   for 1  Doclor���������$100.���������Town and Country.  Molly���������I was so mad- at'.the parly  last night! Kate Greene had on a dress  exactly like mine.   ''". _ "  Polly���������Yes, but how it must have disgusted her to sec you with a dress like  hers! That ought to make you happy, I  should think.���������Boston Transcript.  rilled tho Order.  The "well-known American wiitcr"  who is showing us "JViiish. Men of hellers Through American Uliu-scs" in The  Pall Mall .Magazine is plesiEnntly iincc-  df'tal this month, &:i yj* The London Star.  Here is a good slory which Mr. Labouchere trils about himself: lie IciiS  one of a bet that he would give White-  ley, who owns a great'departmental  store in London, ami culls himself "lhe  Universal Provider," ar order he coulel  io+ fill. The ureter wns for a .'econd-  kind ccfln, nnd the eollin was duly do*  iirered. "J naked Whitclcy," said J-a-  bouchcre, **rf>v*ily, 'how he happened to  inv<) - * 9':r*ortU-haiid e-oilin." "Sir!" ho  ns-rttrwed, "it waa 11 misiit."  "How tho Scotch Tight.  IT-my stories have, been told of General Dewet and thc latest from The St.  .Jame.3' Gazette ia as follows:���������One ol  tl."* loanlir.'' oflirials in a refugee camp  \rtiB r. Scotchman, who, during the dinner, took ocension in ollerirg the General  a drink to say he must have got n fair  amount of whiskey among his captured  .-nnvoys. Dewet vas much aim.sed at  this, and said that before attacking a  convoy he made inquiries if it were  guarded by Scotchmen. If this were so,  he further inquired if it contained any  whiskey. If the second condition accompanied the first, he always gave the  convoy a wide berth, because he knew  the beggars would fight to the last man.  =^A_Phillipsburg,_Kaji.j_girl_jW"^e^cmio_  from college that she had fallen in lovo  with ping-pong, anel got this reply from  her father : "Give liim up. They don't  no Chinaman marry into this family."���������  Philadelphia Ledger. '   ������ N j   -  "They tell me you have cured yourself  of chronic insomnia*."-  "Yes. I'm completely cured."  ���������"It must be  a great relief."  "Relief! I should say it was. Why, I  lie awake half the night thinking how  I' used to suffer from it."���������Cleveland  Plain Dealer.  WHEN YOU'RE  RUN  DOWN  Just build up your system with  tho (jTeat South American  Nervine, tho health builder, blood  maker and nervo food, that lu quickest nnd most thoroiifth in Its action.  Will put every ortron In Ihe body  In gooel working order speedily and  permanently, through giving thom  a now norvouu energy, and nils the  KVblein with henlth, vigor  ami rich, red blood.  J. XV. DInwoodIo,  ot CarapbolHord,  Ont., -il.ilco: "For  .years I was troubled  with nci-vnusnaiMj  anil Impaired liver  and kielncys. Iwas  treated by several  doctors; tried ovory  medicine. Lanf.'alll  procured a bottle of  SOUTH  AMERICAN  NERVINE. II  I look but a very  few docc-ri and tho  nervous dci-rcs'.ioii  left my entire  torn.    1 -will  bo without li  DR.  VON STAN"  PINEAPPLl  TABLETS  allow tho "-nlTercr from Indlg<>stIon  to cat heartily and heavily of anything lie likes while ourinff him.  for the Pineapple actually digests  ������*, STORY TELLER'S CLUB. *  Che Slory or llio  |-rizo  IU-o-A Little   of  v*- Wlint n������i>i>oiicil.   ������vf."t,     .  This Is what happened, and It la  :>. truo story: One morning last May  a bee set out amoiiff tho 'lowers on a  honey hunt. Perhaps lt would bo  moro true to say that tho boo set  out to hunt tor the swoet sturt ot  which honey is made, for while this  sweet stuff is otlll in lh* llower cup  lt la not honey any mui-o than tho  wheat growing ln tho Hold is broad.  The wheat becomes bread later, afu.r  it has boon cut and gathored and1  threshed and ground and brought Into the kitchen and there changed into  bread, and the sweet stuff becomes  honey only nttor the bocG have curried  it homo nnd worked lt.  As tho boo left homo this parllcu**  Inr morning It mado up its mind that  It would dovoto Itself to the appl*  blossoms, for did you know that-when  a boo goes (lower visiting usually ������  gives all its attention to ono kind ol  llower till it has lln'*"licd that special  round of visits?  So oft llio hoo flow, and In a fo**-l  moments lt saw hundreds of little"  pink and white handkerchiefs wav.nfj  nt it from tho apple orchard.  What, do you suppo-so they were,  theso gay little handkerchiota? They  wore tho flower leaves of tho apple  blossoms. 1 call them haiulkerchijfs  because, just ae boys and girls fcorae-  tltnes wave their handkerchiefs when  they wieh to -signal other boys and  girls, so tho apple tree uses its K~T  flower leaves to attract tho attention  of the beo and persuade it to visit tho  (lowers. ;   -   . ���������  Of course, really, they are not  handkerchiefs at all. They would  hardly bo largo enough for any but  fairy noses, would- they?.  "When tho beo saw so many bright  handkerchiefs waving It welcome,  along it hurried, for it knew this was  a signal^ that material for honey  making'was at hand, in anothor minute, and it had scttTcd upon a' frestily  opened flower and wns eagerly stealing tho precious sweet.  You children know that when' you  nre given permission -to go to tho  closet for a pieco ot caudyor cake you  aro not apt to set about it very, gently. You arc in too much of a hu.ry  for that. Often you come very near  knocking everything over in your  haste to get hold ot what you wast "  Ancl beos aro quite as greedy as any  boy or girl could be. 'So our friend  dived . right into the pretty flower,  brushing rudely ngalnst the. little dust  boxes.'. These being full to overflow-'  ing'with 'golden dust," spilled '.their '  contents-and powdered the bee qu.tn  yellow. * - , '  Having made suro that nothing  more waG'to.be found just .thero, onflow the, dusty beo to.the,next "blossom. Into this it pushed it's tvay.-and  in* so" "doing struck those pins which  havo no dust boxes, and upon their  broad, flat tips fell some o������ the yellow,  dust grains with'"which | Its JOody was  powdered.      ������������������'   _���������      *^    ''    '.'���������   "  Now there began, -to happen * a  strange thing. But before I tell you  more I must stop ono moment to remind you that these pins without dust  boxes are joined below into one piece,'  and that this-piece {sect deep into the  "green cup which holds thc rest o������-the  fio-wor, and I must toll you lhat it you  6hould cut open this cup you would  find,a number of littlo round object's  looking liko tiny green eggs. ..Tho  strange thing lhat .began to happen  was this: * Soon after the yellow 'dust  from tho bee fell upon.Hat tips ot the  pins without dust boxes, tho little  green objects deep within l*ee groan  cup became lull of"lite and'began to .  get larger. And not only .this,'the  green cup also seemed -to' feel new lifo,-  for it, too, grew'bigger, and ' bigger  and jucier aud jucler, until It became  the fine juicy'apple'we have before ua  this morning.   ��������� ,.���������    ������������������  1  NlS ������������<l  !���������'" ������ 1"������-.-.- '  Nig la a fine large black,eat owned  by auntie, who often says he is moro  'life_!Tmoin:ey-;than'=a-cat-he-i6-so-vevy.-  ���������mischievoue. One day my uncle was  repairing a clock. After . he was  through he started the clock*- striking  the hours until, he got the, correct  time. The cat eat on tho table -watching him. Lifting Ms paw, he raised  tho little hammer and made the clock  strike one.- Vve all thought 'it waa .  ���������very cute of. him. , Christmas .- he  climbed the Christmas tree anel  knocked off a lot of the balls.     Uo  SV-Sfc'  the food, letting thc stomach rest  ' T  9  and   **������'t sound whilst you enjoy  Jifo.���������Prico, 35 cents.  ! -.    1  I  would tap them with his pawatlll  they would fall. Aumic could not  think what it .was .till Ehe went closo  to tho tree and saw his little black  lead and eyes. He 16 vcry~fond ofi  oysters, and whenever they have them  Nig has to be shut up in the cellar, cs  he does not give them any pea-.e. but  goes from one to the other and taps  them with his paw as though ho  ���������would say, "Why don't you g,ve ma  eome?" He hides everything he gets  hold of. He hides cork3 up the raln-  epout and spools of cotton and al!  euch things under the sideboard. Ha  is not afraid of anything but the Iceman, end he scampers oft as fast afi  he can go when he hears him coming.,  ���������������  ���������K  fl  ���������I  j  ���������  I  m  ���������  i  i  -ft  - B TKe/.Mpbristorie:  ==Sphirvx=  By Urs. C. Nr WilliamsM,  I  Author of "A Olrl ol Oil People." Etc  xmxoBamavmawimm  Synopsis',    op.   preceding  OIIAPTKRS.���������Tho tale opens at   the  Duke of Clai (Mice's Theater,   by   the  slagc-door'of,   which,  a. youn** man,  powerful,  ami remarkably- handsome,  but looking as if he had just,    conic  from the Wild* West, is    waiting' to  see the manager     lie te'.noticed-,, hy  Winifred Gray, a rising 'young'actrcss  anll also hy .Lionel  , Macaire, a millionaire and Jriend o'f the manager's;  but of rcpulsjvc    appearance and infamous     character.     The    stranger,  ���������whoso name is Hope Newcome, introduces himsclt^as a  friend of "F. E.  -Z.," and "-the initials strangely affect  not only-.thej" manager, but also Macaire. Newcoinc, who announces that  he has cohicfto England.for the purpose of "finiling something,"V isks'An-  derson for an engagement,, ;hut . the  manager .'/prompted- by' his-mi,lionaire  friend, finds'? an _ .c***cusc for-icfusing.  During the performance that' evening  "Winifred Giay is-sent>;foi".to '*Lhc.'boudoir,  where" she "sce"s',jMacai'rc. " The'  millionaire iMormsjher,"that'; he" has",  now a controlling**  interest in     the  * theatre, an<C offers 'her -an engagement  as Rosalinef. "Winifred, who has bexMi-  playing sm-tll parts.-is -'art 'first'  daz-.  zlcd by *the ofler, -.but on a  declaration ot lovd from Macaire she* rcjeils  thO     millionaire's    advances-.,   with  loathmgif Macauc alltfws "liei "to    j-o  for tho rhohient,. but declares that he  will brcakdier���������to������hi*-..'win.Ji"hc same  m-ght  Hope Newcome,   sltl\ lounging  at the stage'door,'sees-a stranger-of  powerful physique mouirt the" box   ot  Winifred ���������s"'-cab .besi-deithe* driver. New-  come ordci's**'Jiii*-."^o"v"*n and  a struggle takes^lace?" Ncwerbirie soon" "elis*-  poscs .of Ellis'opponent, ^and "receives  thc thanks of the young actress, who,  however;; hardly, realizes the   danger  she hasVescapcd^'Nox-fc day VTinifred is  sent fof rby Anderson, antl   evidently  -with great* ".egret on thc ***a*rt of the  manager, ..told tliat she is not   suitable for jtlfe role -she "is to assume vn  a 'forthcoming production, anel    that  .- if she preiers to    leave the company  at  once-she will receive-salary    for  the next'fortnight.   Winifred sees she  has no option "hut to go,     and    she  knows also*   .from -what 'quarter   the  '   blow falls}    for, as   "she lea\es  "-the  . manager's'", oom,.Ma'caire"Jenters with  an- unmritakable 'espression  on "s.'his  > face.     SH*c    visits  all  the .-theatrical  agents rind   managers    in    vain'- for  weeks,' and. is aware that strong^  influences '"are -working against "her������Ma-  caire makes, ariotlrer  jatteipirt. tb en-  -snare Winifred and 'uses liis influence  i to makejher appear in an objectionable, roitT' in Ma**eppa. She makes her  escape from the   theatre antl     accidentally -is thrown into Hope's*, company���������and athey v become^ ^stTCet.. ��������� sing-,  "* ���������* i    Kit"      ���������"���������"���������      ���������*-*"-'  "~i *   1-" S*      "���������       -* -*'       *���������  - ���������fhe man ���������Whom he had seen at the  theater,-.tn'-rthe .very* act���������ofjdoing' per-  eonal Injury.to an''enip!oyee'o* his, could  tiot have bee'n morib' tuan -sis-. 4or- severe  and twenty; .therefore -His irelaflonshlp  ���������with FVE.. Z...pould-hardly have been  that of'ti. lover,"' unless shi'bad by some"'  magical-power carried the charms of  her youth through jhe .Chill shadows ot  ���������middle'age. Macaire's marred eyes, had  ���������studied-the-clear-cut'/a'ce 'lor'traces.bf  _���������*���������. likeness. 'He" had" not^ seen what" he  _*ouKlftpirtllirtheyfancy :**iad-"lurkedTii-.T  bis mind that the^ man for whose sales  J"*.. E., 2t:*"had -spoken iaf tervsali ��������� these  years might have' been" rie'ar anel "dear  to ber through "ties of (blood.-   ���������'-    ������������������  He had not wished Anderson to do.  ���������anything for.-^ thet fellow. , There* had  (been a grim'Joy-in** thwarting a request  of the woman he had loved and-jjj^st,"  feeling that through'time' and'dls'tance.  ' he could stand ln the.waj* of her "desire.  But he had not meant to' lose sight .of  the young man, and he had regarded;  lt as not Impossible' that. he'mlght 'patronize him in the future. Only,,iwhat-  ever was done he. intended should'hf  done'.1;* himself'ana*"in his owh'Vay.  Am* arson had unintentionally thvVart-*  ed his last,design by'forgettlng to en-  ,_quire the address of Hope Newcome"  (an assumed name,' no douht); and In  the quickly follo,wln--*^eyenis, v-which  concerned'-Winifred Gray,* "Macaire'Kail  neglected .to^.fc-llqiv up_. a^cjluc* _that_  might once'liave Taeen'ea'slTy'oIitafned."'  Rather curiously, he. cherished no  personal ,grudge against' Hope. New-'  come for'the fight wlth'the man on the  box-seat of vJV*in,ifred/S .cab .outside the.  ���������tage-door s.on a cM-tain night fall of  excitement** If a" fool "made a_mess of  his work he deserve**' to be, Ignore'd by  his employer and.jpuhisbed'by a'stranger. Llon'el Macaire-had no use ������01.  fools, and was. merciless M;o those wlii>  failed. But, maimecT'"aiid physicallS  handicapped himself In "almqst.~eyer*.  ���������way, he secretly adored-and'respected  strength ahd couj-jige.abdye" all tithe*  attributes of men. " ���������        -''���������".  He was jealous of ther.i, too, becaus-.  of rather than In spite" of his 'admiration, and ^nothing,,on earth afforded  Ihim more/subtleWifriusement ttiah-.to"  make servants of strong men ��������� great  giants who couldftrhave" crushed him  with a blow of their fists, ^yet weie  forced to* become? the slaves" of hi-*,  money .and the position which thai  money hnd won Tor'him."  "-.. "f"*; . "*' ~  He dtij^not hale Hope Newcome for  thwarttrig.hiiTi; bpt If all his'soul had  not been absoibcfd in'.the pursuit of-  Wlnlfrcd.he woulel have-'deslfoel to have,  the young man as a pawn on hi** chesi  board, .fo' he lined, tii I. eh**, up-, am.  throwiTJfown as whlin or occaslt-n su*r  gcsled. ���������*$'  M:ical*;e    regretted,, to-day,    as    h-  thought* of P. 13.-Z.. and,the man she -  had sent"to her'.old friend, that.he hae"  allowed the latter to slip out ui 8-ilf.K '  Not that lt millleieil inuch.    Still, thf  feeling In Ills "iriltid was like  the an*  noyanco of having  caielessly  let   th  i-elns drop when they should have beer  firmly held.  Aa ho walked on, noticed and recognized by many of tho passers-by  Iho sound of music camo to hl3 ears. A  'woman was singing to the nccompanl  .rnent of a-hanjo, cleverly played.  Macalro lifted his heaei iind saw i  couple of masked minstrels; a gli  poorly dressed, with long, curly red  hair falling from under hor hat ovei  her shoulders, her face completely con  c-ealed hy a mask; a tall man, with hi.  face also hidden, and In his hands r  banjo.  The couple played and sang ibelte*  than the majority of seaside "buskers.'  and their masks gave them" a certain  piquancy; yet Macaire thiew them bu1  ,one glance, ^and pushed   -his  way  on.  through   the' small  crowd  which  hai*.  .collected for-lhe music. ��������� He "had no'*  gone far, however, when a sudden 'cr?  *ot' feasor paln-'ln "a woman's *volc������  "paused him'to'turfrhl*- head.   -' "' ��������� "  ' ! The "group surfpunding.^the masked  ' minstrels'ha'd' been pai tiy "made up'Of-  severeil ^swaggeiltig  "young   cockney**  f'rom-the" lower -nliddle class,- who had  pii>i>ably. come",to'Bilshton Tor a Saturday to'vMo'nday. "lai'le;" on* their *bl-  cycles.. C>ne of thoij- numher, perhap;  elaved'tiy his fellows; w.as In the" act of  attempting to pull  off, the.red-hatvp.*"  dinger's mask as Macalre turned, and  It was her protest he had heard.  "What he stopped to see was th*- nen  way -ln"which herLcomp:inlon,':'desp,.l������  the hampering Ibanjo, sent the aggrc--  ������������������or sprawling.     ' .      -  ���������-���������"^Kell, done!'',Macairjr _sa.li!  to .h!n-  _self, hoping for more fun" io "he dearK.  "loved a-flght, and was Tin eiithusiasllr  v patron of the ring. -  He was noUto.be cheatetl^of- the 'Se-*  t slVe'd1 sport; *foi*"lhe.'othpi ^members'-or'"  *��������� eiie"*falien .mail's party^Tallied {touii;1'  h'.ro thirsting for levenge.* LuckU*** fc'*'  the millionaire's amusement, not a po  Iiceman' was "in ^sight. * The .*vurlou"v  nursemaids and their lil'ele.charges .whe>"  had been" listening to the musird sc'atj.  tered -like' frlgntened "rabbits,- and the  townsmen* seemecl* likfily.to iave.it,all  'their .own way-for a 'ttiomeitt or two  withvthermas"kea mtnstiels.^       1  Macaire stood at a aistanop. falntli  * grim-ling,*)-a'' twinkle"' in 'hiav -pale,'eyes  "_rhBt,feWow's got*his work cut out'for  hlrri,"Vhe thought.'"*"I hopeXo goodnes*-  - no one ���������will Interfere." , ���������  -"*;Sbme  of"..the Tnan's Mntlmates   wbo  knew that he had  once,had,.a bear-  ' fight to'fhe death In one -of the cellaT<*  under his  town house;  that men fcael  ^ pomrnejled^each    othei's  bodies    and  ' face's* in'to a "-flood-stalnea jelly in the  bamo.place,"to' *vln an enormous .purse  hnd'alTora jfecret midnight amusement  to'a few .choice spi-dts���������these Intimates  of his would have understood the ex;  prosslon on "his face now and "the -ugly  -glint iii-hls yellow eyes.  He was -*a-*!ar enough    to   'hear  th������  masked 'man   say  to   his" companion  "Run,  as  fast  as  you   can  go!"    He  vsaw^fhe'-eriTl turn anditryjto'ob'ey, and  (jigsaw the spring that'one of the'eads  tiade to  do .what 'his 'prostrate *Aum  had fatfod iii doing'-^toar o'f������ her xmask "  Cp went'the girl's hands*_to^d&feno  herself; 'but the defence was-not-needed., ,A-..s>mashing blovv w.ith_th"*, banjo,  'whicli- -brought   the *"taut> p'archnien.t  down   on   the    cockney's     head    arm  crushed his hat over-a,-red,-astonished  face, rinished him as a combatant,   H>-  letiied'w-ith a bleeding nose to assist  his   fallen-comrade,'while*   the   three*  .others, still in. figlitlng'trim, attacked  he minstrel, "who "now 'stcfod la front  "Look here, bobhy," said  ho m   l:i  harsh voice  which   for  some  curlou  occult   reason   seemed   to   have   gre  power over the    lower    classes,   "11 '  name Is Lionel Macaire.   P-H-hr-ps yci  know It, and I gl\e you my word th-  thls j'oung man is In no v, ay to blam  for what has happened,   I *������������������" the a'  fair from  the hcglnnli*"?,  though   u*.i  fortunately I was unable lo Interfei  One lot  these ruffians  Insulted  a  gi'  who'was with him, singing,, ar.d  tht  lh*in"aefended her.  "Then all the othei  set  -i-po-l  timr-nve   to   one. - He  is  r  brave FelloW, anel linsnl i������ ue Praise.  Instead of reprimanded."  .The policeman was a reader of news  papers, and had known for year's ths*  the name ot Lionel Macaire was fin.ir.  daily one to conjuic* with,   '.'"���������he ini)  JJonaire had been pointed out to'hln  also since U*-s.,*ii*,.saU*jnaljanalr at 'tt.  ���������Thespian /Theate"rr  lihel    once    havlr-'  gscn  lhat frlgiali't'i  fa.*:?  it  %\'oyld -b.  hrnposfilbic to mistake It fo"? ftilolher's.  ^"liy & -nllllonalre's word should b  cpled piarf-.rf-'-iiii* than, a pa.PP1'1'''-  <m"g"nTto he hard lo expkli'i; but sticl  'KCcc;  o-u'fc'Si.   Is human" naCure���������even among police  "/  -.u fcthe^ea-hai fed_gi rt.j.  Two of the men'seemed to have some  technical knou'leai-re of "boxing, as Ma-  -caire's trained ,eye ^.was ��������� quick, to note*.  'and the  thira,  while "his* friends _used  .lheIr"-Rsts,'.raised a "stick"over-'the tall  minstrel's head to avenge the late^at-  -tack with the .banjo., ,^. -,  .-"���������But'the.maslced man was not*to"be  taken unawares.^,Keeping off the two  boxer**,"who/we're "sparring up to"*,him;f  **he spra'ng suddenly toTone side, caught*  .the, thick stick Which threatened him.  ',broke>lt in.twe^'pieces as if it had been  a reed,"'threw-"j*'"in .the owner's face,  ��������� and'turned his .attention agai'n^to the  prfnclpa.1 attack," all- w'ithouCallowing  the boxing contingent' a chance worth'  rhavlng."'r* j v-' *      -*������������������''      ..     .....  ��������� '��������� "By Jove, what aw fellow!" thought  'Macalre.   "Wonder what he plays the  banjo for. when, he might be,,coining  ."mon-sy.wiui.h'ls flstsT'r-T/iTf-e -to ro-elcli  him against Joey the Kid." ���������' ' ,<*-  ., .".Vt-thls Instant a big policeman, In-  fo"rmed'6r what was going on tiy one  of the fleeing nurae-malda, appeared  upon the scene. ��������� t  The man  who had gone down first  ���������-was up now,.and,-seeing the:policeman,.  gave the alarm to his companions.  v   Before"the policeman'could get near  ,them>lhey had turned tall and darted  away-round the first corner- and out of  sight, the masked minstrel not delgn-  -lng to follow.,,He stoad his.ground,  merely stooping to pi������.k up the broken  .���������o-"r-1o, -fyhlch-hf* had flung aside for the  -fight',-after 'erfiashing--. the  frame, too  ��������� severely for t*S8"!n1"Urjiment.*-UU to be  practicable as.ji weapon.  ' 7li Macali'ejiad had eyei'for anyone'  so Inslgnlficdnfi h'e might have seen  ���������that'ln .the* mjtfce'somehow the little  .maskc-d. 'red-hatraa -girl 'had contrived  sto slip away.. But he-was watching the  Lilian,   and   approacliingly .'slowly  that  he might, lf'rnecessary, >*In the young  athlete's-gratitude by bearing witness  , lnJUsjlefe-npe. *_--.-,_,. ji-      v__ _,  ��������� j.- ohaptek xvin.  - ���������   r     - >���������     , r.  ���������>" -A Discovery.'- -  ������������������ Macalre -Was just In tlmez-as lt happened,.to .be ot jeomaa service, for thf  pollcemaiif-Irritated that the-other offenders had escaped, and not too kindly disposed towards a "busking" vagabond with a mask, had opened the vials  ot his wrath wne'n the millionaire  sauntered up. '  men.  nAil right, sir; if '.'oil Say It's .all  right i Suppose lt Is," this member 0!  the force iospontled promptly. "I musi  do my d'A'tyi eslr, that's all."    ���������  "Weill you have done lt, and now It'.-  over," said Macaiie. Al the same time  he produced from his"soveielgn pocket  two gold pieces; and though the man ti  blue honestly scorns bribes���������In silver-  he was not able to resist ;an ofCer of  more than a week's salary, ."all in:one  go," merely for taking a gentleman';,  word. *    .- -. . .  "This Is a little-token that I appreciate-your common"sense and moderation," .went v on"'"the  millionaire;: and  then    tho    two    sovereigns , changed  -hand's".- "The policeman at* that .instant  oppoi tunely spy.ng a* motor-car which  -heithotight might "jo go:nq"too fast, had  theAest of,"excuses for bestowing his  .presence'"where- lt was more.needed,  and  with wai ning "shouts of- "HI-hi!'  ���������Jio ihe 'oblivious ,mo loi 1st he went off  "at a. mn,       *'        V   -  -. "Thank -you,  sir," sala  the. masked  -minstrel/heartily,*;to   Macaire.. "You"  have-saved; me'from 'a lot of bothei,  I'm sure."   He'spoke like a gentleman,  but if he'"were* English his accent sug-  ge'sted' that fee had lived for'years out  <jf his native country.  ../'On the.contraiy," returned the oth-  -er'ln his-most Ingratiating manner, "lt  is for me to thank you for as pretty an  exhibition, of  dash  and skill  as  I've  seen for some ,tlme._ You can Imagine  '���������that'I don't refer entirely to your musical feats, though they were excellent,  no doubt.. 'But-rm-no judge of music  I am, I flatter myself, a juage o������ most  things ln the athletic line, and If you'll  allow me to say so, I wonder that you  careJ-to e'arnjyour living by your fingers  wl-ten- you".-mlgh4'>do it so much more  effectively":with, your .biceps and youi .  lists."* " -  The' young man in-the mask laughed  "Erankly,' and glanced ��������� down .at^his  ''-ruined ibanjo, "I did better work with  this "to-day *lh**.n usual,^perhaps," he  said. ."But'lt-looks-as i������ it had played  its last tune." As tor "the talents you're  good .'"enough to think I possess, sir,  I've tried to make use of them since" X  came" to England, .hut the; market' for  mus'cies is apparently overstocked. Indeed," I tried several things before "I  began making a professional -use of  ���������my banjo; but I can't afford to despise  it, as.-it's been the'best friend in the  money-making line I've found in this  country:" -. .    1 -���������  , "All the worse.for the country, then,'.'  responded the millionaiie. "1 hope,  though, you're not so discouraged "as to  want *to leave It and go back to youi  own���������wherever that may be.'"  'T shan't leave it till I've done what  I  came to   do,"   the  young man  an-,  swered, wilh a nonchalance which perhaps" cloaked a deeper feeling.   "Not lt  -it-ta?kes-me ten years."   j- "��������� _   r  .   '  "Oh, 'so you came to England with  ���������an-object,  eh?';  enquired Macaire,  in  .th?: good-natured way he 'could-affect  'when he.had^a'motive.  ' His   motive   now   was - to    get  this  young  athlete'under    bis - jiatronage,  and match him against a certain champion who ha'd gone about xn s-wa*gger-  ing defiance of rivals long enough.   It  was  something  to  have bis  thoughts  taken off his galling failure with Winifred-, Gray, and he was pleased to find  himself'" feeling so keen an interest in  an alien, subject.  =���������"Don'trmost-mon,travel_-vvith.-an_ob::_  3ect*?" letorted the man with the mask,  ���������'Thfere'd be no incent.ve to a lazy fellow,, else. And for fear I go back to a  condition of laziness I must be off, sir  ���������thanking you again for what you did  for me." *- 1'  -" "Stop ,a bit," ejaculated Macalre.  "I've something to suggest"to you. 'As  you say, few- men���������that is, few men of  brains like you*.s-and mine���������do things  without an object. Now, I had an object in interferiag In ypur interest with  our friend in blue.' It wasn't "entirely a  selfish one, pc-rhapc, though partially  "so, I admit, and I should liko to have a  talk wlt"i >*ou, ah������uJLLClf you're so Inclined. It might turn" out to'be for" our  mutual advantage.'!-,, ._ ,  . 'Again the young man laughed.. "Yon  can gue������s that I'mropen to offers, sir.  U If**** anything of that sort you mean."  -* -"That's -precisely what I do mean,"  ennouneed the millionaire. "Look here,  It's," getting on "towards one's-.dinner  hour. Come" with me.- 'I'll get a private" roo'm, and we'll have a chop and a  bottle o'f Burgundy together If you can  spare the time."  - "I've got more time than anything  else just now,", responded the masked  minstrel, llghlly. "And I'm very much  at your* service." * -  - - '.  " They walked to the nearest good restaurant, forming-a strange contrast;  the tall young man with the black  mask covering his face, the broken  banjo in his hand; the stooped figure  of the 'millionaire, with * his hobbling  limp and his scarred features. -��������� ���������'  .There could hardly have been a more  incongruous pair, and people they mot  turned to look after them. But Macaire either did not notice the attention  _he and his companion aroused,' or was  too independent of public opinion to  care for it. *   .  He was wondering whether th������  masked-mlr.slrel knew anything of  him besides the name which he must  have hoard rpokea when he had mentioned it to the policeman a few mo-  "mentS ago. He wondered ���������whether th*  fellow was aware that he was walking be=:e*e one of the richest men in  England���������a man so rich that he could  afford to do. sty, look and wear exactly what he-pleased.  Macalre   hoped   that   the   other   diO  knOw all th!-*, althoush, as he had ap  parently not long ago come to i-.ni"-  land, he might be In ignorance of hi1*  companion's importance. It would be  awkward to call diiect attention to lt,  especially as the millionaire was on hl'-  best behavior, endeavoiing to appea-  a jolly, modest fellow/not too pioud,  despite his wealth and porltion, to hobnob with a nobody to whom he had  happened to take a fancy.  Wishing to impress tho minstrel lr  some quiet and unobtrusive way he  took tho best private room ho couie  Jiaye, rend, though It was tog early li  the day for him to work up an appetlt  far dln**?r, instead of the chop and bot  tie of Bui gundy he had suggested h  ordered an elaborate fonst, with plent>  of champagne of his own favorite  brand..  "Now," he remaiked, when the hoi  (".'oeuvres appeared,  "ndw is  the  tim-  when you must cease to hide your Ugh  un*Je>*  abushel,   ans".   throw;   ofi"    th  iliilsk���������thnt ts, unli-ss yoii  incTeiy III "  tend to look on while I eat my dlhnoi.'  "3"!2 33.  lnn.1,  JYy2  ll-tsn't   dined,   bu'  only (Salon food,  for some  time,  tha  ���������w'ould bo  too cruel an  aggravation,"  returned the minstrel.    "It Is notlilni  more nor  less  than  mot-bid  self-con  sclousness���������vanity, If   you    will, sir-  that tempted me to pick my banjo fron  behind   a  screen.    I   don't   Intend   tc  trouble you with my antecedents, but���������  people who were onco dear to mo woul *  have been made unhappy If they couie  have known I was destined to get m>  living by 'busking' at the seaside; ane  I. (suppose   I'm     Idiot    enough   to   b.  ashamed, in a way, of what I've been  doing���������though I'm ashamed of myself,  too, for being ashamed.   But, anyho\\  here goes the mask."  It   had been   tied  behind  his   head.  and as he talked he had been fumbling  ���������awkwardly ��������� as   men's   unaccustomed  ..lingers do fumble���������with the knot.   But  the  strings  yielded   at  last    and 'the*  _ mask suddenly  fell,  to show  a dark.  ' handsome, 'clear-cut face,   with    lip*  pai ted  in a rather  shy,  boyish  smile  over, a  row  of  strong,  perfect   white  teeth.  , The mlnstiel's laughing brown eyes  met those of the millionaire, and Lionel Macalie's boasted self-control earar  into play as he .-restrained a stait oi  surprise. ' -  "Haven't I seen you somewhere be  fore?" he asked, hijing all emotion.  As well as he knewi his own strange  antecedents  did   he   know   whon   and  where He had seen that dark face before;'but he aid not wish the other to  guess himself of enough importance to  have been definitely remembered.  * "Yes," the young man answered without an instant's ?-.e-*.itation.    "At least  I have seen you, sir, ana I recollected  "it the moment you came up ,to me this  afternoon,  tnough    I'i didn't  suppose  you'd noticed me pai ticularly that other time."       - _  A "Where -was. it?" . asked    iMacaire,'  ..''And when, if you can' recall that?"  ���������"���������I have some reason for recalling lt,"  replied'Hope Newcome.    "I had a'-bis  disappointment  trial 'night.    I'd  been  at the Duke oE.Ciarence's Theater with  an introduction from���������an,old friend "ol  Mr. Anderson's, -l-o liim.    I  wanted a  . 'short engagement till Iwould get some  thing else to do���������merely as Charles the  "Wrestler In the production- of 'As You  Like It,' whiebvwas coming on. ���������But,  . t.hough I'm nearly six feet, Mr. Andeo-  university In America where I ...o. ������,=-  gan to take a great interest In sport. I  was in rathur a sporting sot, and I took  the fancy of an old prize-fighter resting on his laurels,, who lived in the  town. He and a pal of his taught me  everything I know, and lhey seemed lo  think me a decent sort of pupil.  "Them,' a year before I finished my  college course, family affairs took nie  away fioni home. I lived a very different sort of life after that, but I  didn't forget what I'd learnt from Foxy  O'SulIlvan and his male. I had a  chaiice al 2. wrestling match with a  big man' among the amateurs���������champion he 'was then, and I got the belt  from "him. Two or three matches I had  afterwards, but I kept the belt."  "1Are you any good with the gloves,  or don't you go ln for anything but  wrestling?" asked Macalre, his eyes  dwelling with a queer, jealous, grudg-  I.HJf jaflmlration on the other's splendid  sTio'uliTers, his arms, his wrists���������visible  under shabby sleeves too short for him  ���������his strong brown hands that had  dqfle ?lama_i*e to-day.  "Oh, Wi'Ssillng's 'been my specialty1,  but I believe I'm not a bad boxer,"  Newcome answered, with modes! conr  fldenee in his own powers. "I think I  could hold my own wilh most amateurs, though I'm a bit out of training."  "How would you like to go into  tialnlng again, if you "stood to make  your fortune, oh?."  Ncw-comc's daik eyes flashed. "I'd  do anything that would keep me ln  England, and among tho sort of men  -I must-be among, it I'm to do what I  came a good many thousand miles to  do. And as for a fortune���������well, I've  got more than one use for moneys-just  now."  As he finished his face changed. No  longer open, lt became reserved.  Though at first sight he seemed to  have been exceedingly outspoken, even  confidential, about his past and his  piesent circumstances, after all he had  told p'ractically nothing; and despite  his boyish frankness at times he  looked like a man who could keep his  own counsel, a man who would be  strong enough, dogged enough _to die  Cor the keeping of a secret if need  irose.'  Macalre, however, did not now make  these'reflections legardlng his companion's chaiacter. lie thought of him  as a''connecting link with the past,  through P. E. Z. (concerning-whom-he  meant cautiously to put "questions ln  llme-lo come), and as a magnificent  young animal 'to be trained for his  uses, lather than as a thinking, feeling man with ambitions and hopes of  his own. The millionaire was accus- ���������  tomed to.make puppets of others who  weie handicappea in life's race by the  lack of what he possessed in abundance; and one of his most -extravagantly eccentric ideas was taking form  in his brain'for the future of his pies-  "int companion.  '"By this time dinner was well under  way. Here and theie.. they haa pausea  ln their conversation for one course to  "jo and another to come, lest the subject shouia piove -e.0 interesting for a  .vailei'13 ears, an.l Tiey had now passed  by oystefs, soup, ..r.J fi.letcd sole.  (To-be continued.)  Anecdotal.  A Paris journal relates that Prince  Melteniieh once asked ,1ulos Janin for  his autogiaph. J.m'11 took a sheet- of  paper and wiote over his signature:  '"Good for a hundrpd'bottles of Johannis-  ber-r, to be placed in my ccU.11." The  prince scut them.  The Kaiser can notonly speak English perfectly; but he can jest in our language. When he gave a special audience to Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan he asked  one of the ladies of lhe party what she  thought of the German Ocean. She replied that thc voyage on it had been  very lough. "I am sorry," said the Kaiser, glancing at Mr. Moig.in; "but the  ne\t time you visit us 1 shall pour oil  on the waters���������Standaid oil!"  Thomas A. Edison has a keen sense of  humor, iind never fails lo use it when  an occasion presents itself, l-'or instance,  just hefoie he went on a recent trip to  Floiida, he called his manager to his  room and said: "I always notice that  you look very well when you woik hard."  Tlio maiinger looked up, wondering what  son has an inch or. two the ad van tag.  ��������� of me.'-and thought it wouldn't do.- 1  , saw you coming out of the theater witl  him afterwards."   ���������   , , '-  '"Oh, yes!" exclaimed Macalre, as  though suddenly enlightened. "Oi  course. How stupid of me." You were  engaged���������ha, ha!��������� ln much the same  occupation as I found you at to-day. A  que*er .coincidence." -^  1  ������������������*  CHAPTER XIX.  '      , M*caire's Proposition:  ���������       "���������  "You'll think me a very pugnacious  person, sir," Hope Newton said, flushing sl.ghtly under the clear, sunburnt  olive of bis skin���������that kind of sunburn  which does not wear away with years,  unless in mortal' .ilr.ess. He-did not  use the word "su" in addressing'the  millionaire as if he wero kowtowing  to a superior, but as though he, a  young man, adopted lt out of respect  to one many-years" his senior. Though  he had" been seen lighting at* "stage-  doors, ana playing the banjo on Brighton beaoh, he had the air of simply���������  tinconsoiously almost���������taking, it for  ���������granted that he was Macalie's equal.  And Macaire saw this, and was grimly  amused by it, considoilng certain' differences between  tnem. ', 7 *  "The* shoitest ioad to my regard, as  far as that's conceinea," responaed  Macaire, ','is by being a 'pugnacious  person,' as you call It. If I hadn't  'thought you one thiough pur acquaintance to-day we shouldn't "be dining" together now. And .what I've just leurnt  only raises you in my 'estimation. I  'believe now that I even honid you  speak to my friend -Anderson that  night, and I am-usually rather quick  to recognize voices. .But yours sounded  differently when you spoko through  your mask. By the way, as it happens,  that was rather an eventful night for  me, too."  He could not have ..told why he  should volunteer tho admission; but he  let it come bcearsr. he did not see that  acting, upon Impulse could In this Instance'do nny harm. And somehow he"  found himself oddly drawn towards ,the  young' follow. There was a certain  fascination about his strong, virile per- ,  sonallty, which was augmented by the  knowledge that this was he whom F.  E. Z. -had known, perhaps loved. Yet  Macaire was far from sure whether"  the magnetic attraction he experienced  was nearer to hate or affection. He  only knew that he felt It, and desired  to have a master hand over this'young  man's fate. '  "I didn't know who you were that  nightr sir," Hope,New come sala. "But  I remembered your face."     ^     r  The corners of Macaire's mouth went  down in a bitter sneer.  "That's because of my fatal beauty,"  he reto'rted, harshly. "I seldom find  myself forgotten���������even by-a pretty woman. . But I have more Important  things to talk of than personalities,  and my Ideas concerning you are in  no way changed by lhe fact that we  have met beforo. You tell me you  wanted to play the wrestler on the  stage. It has occurred to me that you  might like to do so in good earnest,  since that is your forte. Surely you,  haven't v.ast'd those muscles' of yours  all your life? And as suiely you've  had training?'*  "Oh, yc������, I trained Beth as a wreRt-  ler and bjxer," Newcome answered;  "but I never intpnded tn use the arts;  profession"1!'!}'.    It   was at a Western-  ' Pat dropped everything and leit ror  the Cow and Pail for his three-pennyworth of.whiskey, when the following  conversation ensued between the land,  -lady and himself:     /   ���������  Pat���������This be good whiskey, mum.  Lady���������Yes, Pat.   Can you guess tho  -age of it?  Pat���������No, mum.    ' . "  ' 'Landlady���������Well, it's thirty years old.  Pat  (eying the threepennyworth)���������  Oim a thinkin* it be moighty small for  ' Its age, mum.���������Spare Moments.  He-���������(tentatively)���������What would you  - Bay, dear, if I should ask'you to-marry  me? : ���������'    , ^    y  Sho (thoughtfully)���������What would I  eay?'        " ., ,  ' "He (hopefully)���������Yes, deareist.     '. .. '  She- I would say���������I.would 6ay--    -  "   He (eagerly)���������Yes, dear.   Go on. G(*  on.  , ...   .   ���������v _   ..-  She���������I would saj-that Charlie Brown  had asked me tl"rec weeks'ag'o, and I  had accepted'him.���������Detroit "Jo"urnal.  "My dear," Mr. Finnicky said to hia  _w i ������ etlA ,I_d onltjth I n k-th ose_p liliaJMia-yja.  been taking have done me much good/'  "Why, you haven't been taking any  for three weeks!''      .     " ,  ���������    "Yes, I  have;    I've swallowed ono  three times a day as directed." "  "You'havc? Then" why is it that  there are as many left In the box aa  there were threo weeks ago? What  box have you been taking them from?"  "This one���������marked for me."  "Dear me, John! That is my shoo-  "button box!" jv    ,  Im1lc..tlmi*,.  A certain farmer-living east of Osaga  City, and not noted for his resemblance  to Apollo, has a son-of seven years who  possesses'more wit than wisdom and  reverence. One day last week a strangei  camo to the faini, und uc'clng the lad;  aakod:  - "Sonny, whore Is your father?"  *- "In the pigpen," was the reply.  ��������� ' "fn tho pigpen? Thanks." And as  the hian moved tn tho direction Indicated the boy shouted: "I say, you  will know him 'cause he has a hat on!"  ���������Kansas City Star.  do*  ex*-.  ' *       ��������� Falc.    ;  At tho asylum, we-were 'nhich  pressed by what wo saw.  "A terrible fate. Indeed!" ' he  claimed.    . ���������  ���������*   .'.     t * ,-  "Less terrible, however," Interposed  a tall, dstinguishcd looking maniac,  "than a fete champetro! Oh) by alj  odds!"  Upon Inquiry we learned that this  man bad become mad through being  the husband of one socially, ambitious  ������������������Detroit Journal. _  Mr. Edison would say next. '*>fowi I am  going awav to l'oit Mycr. I hope you  will enjoy good health while 1 am gone."  A popular captain's wife *.\.is_ more  than, usually nuMous o\cr the .-.itety of  hei husband, and accoidniglv handed a  paiish cleik a slip one Sunday morning,  bearing the woids: "Captain Wilson,having gone to Eea, his wife dcsirc3 the  piaycia of this congicgalion on his behalf." TJnfoitunntely, by the misplacement of the comma after tho "sea," the  congicgalion .weie told that "Captain  Wilson having gone to see his wife, desires the piayeis oi this congregation on  his behalf."  During his exile at Elba, Napoleon related that one day his mother's mother  was hobbling along the stieet in Ajaccio,  Corsica, anel that he and his sister. Pau-  line.'followed thc old lady, and mimicked  her. Thoir grandmothei, happening to  turn, caught them in the act. She complained io -Mine. Letitia. Pauline was  at*once "spanked" ami disposed of; 'Napoleon, who was out in remmcntals,  could not be handled liis mother bided  her time. "Next elnv, when her son was  off his guaiel, she cued: "Quick, Napoleon! You aie in\ited to dine with the  governor!'' Tie inn up to his room to  change his clothing. She quietly followed, and when she judged that the  proper time had come>, rushed into the  room, sei/.ed hei; undiessed hero before  he guessed her put pose, laid him acioss  the maternal knee, and belabored him  earnestly with the flat of hei* hand.  One day David Col, thc Plcmi-h genre  painter, was asked by a peasant to paint  a portrait of .his father.   The young artist said that he would he delighted, and  enquired when tho father would be able  to give him a sitting.   The peasant replied, "Oh, he is  dead."    "How would  you have me paint his portrait!'* asked  the  artist, somewhat    amused^   at the  peasant's naivete.   "Look here, sir," said  the peasant, "this picture on the easel���������  whom docs it leprcsentl*' "St. Anthony."  "You are sure it is St. Anthony?" "Yes."  ���������'Did he come here to sit'"   "Of course  not.--    "Then,' you  seo,  you  are" quite  able to make a dead man's    portiait.'  Col, who asked no better than to earn  money, yielded, and, after making enquiries concerning thc old man, set about  painting the poitrait.   The peasant, seeing  it  for   the  first  time,  fell  on  his  knees and cried bitterly.   "Why do you  cry?" asked the painter.    "Because my  father has grown so ugly."  A good story" on Sir Wriliam Mulock is  being told in Toronto, and is circulating  leiund Jiis constituency of North York.  The Postmaster-Geneial has been busy  in the Old Countiy booming Canada up  hill and down dale, in 'season and, ac-  coiding tb this story, out of it. Imbued  wilh a desire to test the colonial know-,  ledge of tho^oidinaiy Loneloner Sir, William took a friend along the Strand with1  him and cast about for tluee likely sub--  jecls. The friend, a distinguished London lawyer, was'unwilling to ������believe  that English people were as ignorant on  matters Canadian as Sir William repie-  sented. Thc first person accosted had  notcr heard of Canada, "anel said so shortly. Tho second was an>.ious to assist  the befogged ��������� sti anger, and ruminated,  but linally hail lo admit that he was  unable to" give the locality of Canada.  He wa3 sure that it was nowhere near  tlie Stiand, as he had lived'around those  paits for nearly seventy year-;. This en-  couiaged .Sir Wiiliiun. , Changing his  question n little, he went up to a cockney llowci-giil. Tie asked her if she was  -familiar-wirh���������Ocraw-.i.-"'-"P.uiiiliar-with-  who?" she asked. ="Yoa go "long or I'll  smack your dirty face.','  Minister Wu-Ting-fang promises to  wiito two books on America when he returns to China, wh:Ui������r he has been  called to lake charge of the work of revising and codifying thc laws of his  country. His experiences in the United  Stales" have been many, and some of  them unique. On ono occasion he nnd  .Cail Schmv, were both to make addresses  hefoie a university audience. ��������� Schurz  had spoken to the'students bciore, and  when they saw him on the platform  they called out, "Schurz!" "Schurz!"  The",Chinese Minister, conscious that his  silken blouse, worn outside his trouscr3,  might have awakened what he knew to  be the easily pro- okr-d irreworcnee of  undcrgrnduate*), mistook the -salutation  for '.'shirts." Whereupon lie rose, bowed  and smilingly adjusted hia robes, display*,  ing the evident comfort, he enjoyed in.  wearing them. -Xow-'tlio students took  up the cry in earnest, and "Schurz"  readily became "shirt*'." The uproar of  their merriment rang lustily throughout  the "auditorium. Kven the bland and  philosophic Minister Wu began to display embarrassment. "Don't pay any  attention, to* .thi-m," whispered. Mr.  Schurz; "they mean ine."* "Oh, is that  nil!" e\claimed the Chinese Minister, and  sank back into his chair, vastly relieved.  BOBBY-BRIGHT-EYES.  Tru������ Story of a Smart I 111 lo Squirrel T*i������>  I.i->ctl lu n llctrl.  ���������*������-������**. ERHAPS one of -the great big- ���������  * * trees in Winona Like P'rkr  could tell just where Bobby-  Bright-Eyes first came from; 1*4  what warm nest and in what   particular tree he was born-  Still, they kept the secret, though Alice had gone from tree to tree aaet  asked them time and again.  Ono morning, after a    heavy  wind*  and    rain-storm   she   found    Bobby���������  Bright-Ejes on the steps that led up-  to the long, wide porch, where all the  girls liked  to play so well.    What a.. -  tiny, helpless,  wet little squirrel b'ab****-  he was.    Glad to'be cudellcd up. too,,  ho seemed in Alice's warm, ied jacket..  So  Alice ran  in  and showed  him to>  h<>r papa, who owned the hotel, and.  papa had a little box made fo* liobby-  Bright-Eyes, who took it all as a matter    of    course,  and  did  not  try, aa*.  many a squirrel would, to get away.  He seemed perfectly happy, and in-  a few days ho-was so tame he would,  go in and out of the cage, run over-  the baulstradcs of the long Torch an*,  even come to the cook's ki chen door,  where he was fed dainties that wero  rich enoiiffh to kill Sir Bobby-Bright-  Eyes. Instead of getting sick, bes-  grew fat and saucy. If strange childien tried to catch him he would keep,  btill until they could almost touch his  pretty "striped back; then away ho  would dash up to the top ot the very-  highest tree then he would begin to,  chatter and scold, as much as to say-*  "You didu't catch mc did you?" J     \  Bobby-Bright-Eyee liked the sunny-  corners of the hotel porch, and oncer  the captain of the sceamer Welcome,.  -Tho fallen brought Bobby nuts' from,  town, found the squirrel in his pockt*.  when he was steering the boit ac.ee 3  the lake. He seemed to be fiightei* U  at the noise of the engino and ke..*;  very still.  Svt-ry one laughed when the captain-  found-him and perched him up on hhs.  shoulder.���������Cincinnati Commercial Tribuna.  t*  Tlio Grandmother D^lsj. ' -  "Le-t's  make  a  daisy  graa'-namma,-"-  The children cried one day.  And to the meadow oft they sped  To have a merry play.  They chose a daisy tall and fair,      . ,  And snipped and pressed, until -   '  They shaped her snowy petals to  A dainty cap, and frill. ^ ^      - ���������,  Upon the velvet centre, next   *       . "-  They traced a kindly face  And draped a kerchief round the 6tera,  With sweet, old-fashioned, grace. ,*  When tired o������ play, they homewar?  ran, "        -  What did that daisy do? ' -     ���������  She nt-dded on her slender stalk:  And "made believe fwae true.  1?  ',���������.*>  ���������*-.*.. "���������'-.>  .--������--/ ���������  l>Iii*ruosctl.  A song with the title "There's a Slgm  tu the Heart," was sent by a young man  to hie sweetheart, but the paper fell  into tho hands of the girl's father, a  very unsentimental physician, who exclaimed:  "What wretched, unscientific rubbish  fa this? Who ever heard of such a  case?"  Ho wrote on th<* outside:  "Mistaken diagnosis; no sigh ln tha  fieart pejfisible. Sighs relate almost entirely to the lungs and diaphragm!'"  Dinner Invitations.-  "I find w ith men it succeeds better t*  ask them personally" to come to dinner,"  said, a fashionable; younfr matron the  other day. "In the first place they are  not so apt to refuse, and secondly, you  get an answer at onco, which saves a lot  of worry." "But it is so awkward fcir  a person to be asked point blank; he is"  obliged to accept whether he want3 to  or not," returned her companion. "That's just what I want," laughed the younr-  matron; "it is'" the men I need," and if  they come, I do not o~.re if they feel it  obligatory "or not." Hostesses who do  not desire to be considered bores, however, should avoid ghing invitations ia  person. Many men con-flf-in of the use  of the telephone in dr-I:."cring invitations as giving them r.o time to mike up  their mif.da. "or to cor.coe-t a plausible  excuse should tbey not feel inclined to  accept. . _.��������� ���������   .ifr*'  Then all   the   daisies   laughed   witli.  t glee,  "How human like we are!  And what a lovely thing it is   ^  -To have a grandmamma.'."     1  * ���������Jean Moulton, in the Bio-mi Bs  -.of BostQn.     r  Booir  "���������~f*"*j Hie New "Pa".'-  _^~*- - I** . ,  She is a very little girl, only flra    ,  years old, but in the abort period"; oC.  her few years she has enjojed a large*  e-cperience   ot .life with dolls   ot alt'  kinds  and  descriptions,  who." in   the"-'  course of their   existence   under   hep'  loving but not always kind admlnis-.-"'-  trations, have undergone many vicissitudes, says the New York Times. So  the   little    five-year-old, when   there" "���������**  c'ame a real live baby into the house,  felt herself tobe something of a connoisseur in children.      When it was,  put into her arms, this real live baby,  she  regarded  it with    a critical" air^  "Isn't that a  nice "baby?" cried, tha  nurse with    the joyous    pride    -with,  which a nur"*e always regards a new  baby, in which she feels that she haa  a proprietary Interest.    "Yes," replied  the little girl hesitaungly, "it's'nice, .,  l=-il5-=acad's-  ���������U'lial Hurt Hix:.    .  Little   Fn**-*-;: *"--'o    playlnr   In the  kitchen garden, when he was stung one.  the toe by a bee.   Ue raised a perfect -  csvarwhoop as he ran to bis mamma.  "Oh, mamma! oh, mamma: my tcc*r  my toe!"  "Why, what    in    the world    is th**.  ���������natter with your toe, Frank."  "'Oh,  it"s bit!     It's stung!"  "Bitten!    stung!    How?"     cv'.ed hj������  mother.    --"S'hai stung you?"  "A drate big fly wid a splinter in his*  tail!*'���������Exchange.  r  Literary l-rt-Miript'on*.  For clearness read Macaulay.  ���������  For logic icad  Burke and"'Bacon.  For action re.������*d Homer and Scott.  Fcr conciseness    read    Bacon    ane)  Pope.  1    For ���������sublimity of    conception    read  "Milton.  For common sense read- Benjaml*>  Franklin. *5"  *"   For .vivacity read    Stevenson    an*  Kipling. J ,  For imagination read    Shakespeare)  and ..lob.  For elegance read Virgil, Milton an*  Arnold.  For simplicity read Burns, Whltt.e**-  and Bunyan. * * \  Fcr  smoothness  read  Addleon  an<J "*  Hawthorne.  For interest in common things reaej*.  Jane Austen.  For humor read Chaucer, Ceivantt*.**  and Mark Twain.  For choice of individual words reae*"  Keats, Tennyson and  Emerson.  For tl*>e ttudy of human nature read  Shakespeare and George Eliot.  For loving and patient observation  of nature read Thoreau and Walton*  "*-***!  Child-en's frocks are often dlscol*.  ������red by grass stains. Wash the spots  In alcohol. If there are sttll traces oC  the green left soak la al. ohol for several hours, and rub again as ia  washing. Then put the article*,  through the usuai process of waaiu-ag:  with *oa-j. and wa.-'r. <    -    ������������������.>-*- Z^ast������*es3iK������X*l&&&rsla>lW'i,'je~je^*1^-'  3J*rt'-U,iil".t %ttaU attd l|ailt������ag  [tu** Journal  I ('ourrieror' a small village of the Pas-1  LEGAL  Hisl  Published By  The Revelstoke Herald Publishing Co  Limited Liability.  A. JOHNSON,  Editor and Malinger.  ADVERTISING P. (.TES.  Dlsplav ads., 11.50 per Inch; single column,  fr" per fnch when inserted on title lmge  Legal ads., 10 cents per inch (nonpunc-l) line  fni Brit insertion; 6cents for each additional  ln ertlon. Local notices 10 cent" per line each  i *ne.    Birtb,  Marriage   aud  Death    "-.oilct-i  'TC-0.  s-������Jesceiption*;eates.  Un-mall or carrier   ti per annum; 11."*. for  alx months, strictly I" &efv  j de-Calais in the north of France,  [ early   life   and   his artistic career, a.* J L  well as his theories   of   art, recounted  in an   autobiography   published a fev  years   ago,  is   interesting   reading t.  any one interested in art.  Every month to subscribers to theii  Weekly, theFi-eePiessgives an admii*  able   picture. '   The  subjects   are   al,  good, being  reproductions in colors o  world famous paintings.  E MA1STRE <fc SCOTT.  Barristers, Solicitors, Etc.  Kevelstoke, B. CJ.  M.Srolt, tl.A., LL.B.   W.de i/.le Maistre, M.������.  '.jARVEy, M'CARTEI ic PINKHAM  Barristers, Solicitors, Etc.  Solicitors for Imperial Hank of Canada.  Companv funds to loan at 8 percent.-  Fibst Street, Kevelstolce B. C.  vance.  (Hilillng  One price i.  f uiali���������Ior ua.  OCR job department.  none of the best equipped -.rinilniiofllcci In  ���������be West and prepared to execute all kiwis ol  In  tlnitcla*-! style  at honest prices,  price to all.   No job too large���������none tno  Mall order*, prom-iili* attended  to.   Give ua a trial on your next order.  10 COKEESPOSDENTS.  We   invite  correspondence- on  any stitijent  o' iut*r������st to the general public.    In all cases  the bona tide name of the writer must accoiii-  ���������jianjr  manuscript,    but    not necessarily lor  publication.  Address all communications to the Manager  NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS.  1.���������All    correspondence    must   be   legibly  written on one side of the paper only.  2.���������Correspondence    containing      personal  - -   -lermm: be signed ivlth the proper name  m writer.  Wednesday, Deckmbeic 31. 1902.  SOCIETIES.  The Same Old Story.  [ Bi-iti-.h Coluuilna has lieen given  ���������"���������aotl-erdose of liroken Liberal pledges.  Sir Wilttid Lam-iei- long ago promised  his assent to any bill dealing with  Oiiental immigration, which had the  sanction of British Columbia Liberals.  Tho legislature of the piovince passed  a law on the lines of the Natal Act,  already concurred in by the Imperial  authorities. Sir Wilfrid's word proved  'neffective,   however,   anel like many  "*ious pledges, this one was prompt-  .-u-f*qtteii.    The  people   e*>f  British  lumbia are up  in  arms at the coer-  *--_,n exercised   at Ottawa, and strong  resolutions cordemuing  the disal'ow-  ��������� nce of the Act have bee-n passed by a  V Vancouver   Liberal  convention.   The  . "S -tsplanation    of    the     government's  V course, as undetstood at Ottawa in  that monied employers of cheap labor  have forced the   cabinet to turn down  *     the people of the west.    It is the same  -'d story.   If one has, pull  enough to  . a deal, the people are not in the  "A'-^^ii'i.Se'           hi \ist<  An Old Liberal's Opinion.  The  Winnipeg* Tribune,  a staunch  Liberal paper of the old school! tbvows  some light   on  the recent Yukon elec-  L tionl in tho following :  ���������  **In the   Yukon, the   expected���������one  might almost say the inevitable���������has  happened.     The   district,  both in its  geoj-r-aphic-al and   in it* social couipo-  ���������lition, affords unlimited opportunities  . for the exercise   of  Siftonian election  methodi, and  the need for exercisin*-  thetn was elesperale.    Exposure of the  Yukon  administration  by a i-epresen-  tative   from   the   Yukon   had   to   be  cert-kl at all costs, both by the minister   and   by   the  Yukon     grafters.   ^-*tpoliing^booths^-far-away_on_lonely_  'i   1 creeks, a mining camp population, an     ^opiKisition without funds or organize-  "' tion���������these affo-ded ample icope for  "--', tbe work that was to lie done." Few  .people who understand the influences  "V *t woik, doubt that no matter what  -���������"--"the vote might be. precious good care  -T -would Be taken that the returns would  ���������-."-be in favor of  the government candi-  *+'.date."  ���������=-' ,.*!,���������.   think   the Sifton Yukon election management has been most mod-  orate-     They at first took a majority  of only 400.      Finding,   however, that  there was  no great  public outcry, the  majority  has   been   increased  to 800,  ������������������with   some   places yet to hear from.'  If no surprise is expressed, the figure*)  ���������*���������."��������� doubled, and the rei-ult heralded  great  victory   for and sweeping  ication t^f   Saint  Cliffotd.   By all  ins   let "'the Yukon majority be as  *C*i-**-e as possible.  The White Metal.  The recent decline in the price cn  -iiiver has caused considerable sinkint  ��������� >f hearts amongst those who live it  camps where it abounds. Many can set  no hope in the future and swallow tht  statements sent out by the k������'<- >������������������'*���������  plutocratic press without utiiring tin  gray matter that nature planted in  their upper slopes. We see only gooi;  signs in the rapid falling of silvci  prices. It is due to manipulation fen  lhe purpose of eventually pushing the  price over GO cents, where it will bt  within a year, and these are Unreasons:  Men of money have taken advantage  of a favorable opportunity to hamuiei  the price so that they can load up witL  ihe white metal at easy rates. Tht  famine in India drew such heavj  contributions of s-'lver that the government tlid not find it necessary tt  purchase any this year. ThiB is somi--  thiug unusual, but just as soon as th*  coins are absorbed by the vast  population of India the necessity foi  large purchases of silver will come  again, as water jumps a dam. Rich  men are aware of this fact and they  are busy just now crying down silvei  on one side and buying silver niine.-*  on the other. The game is old as the  bills, hut still fools those who do not  think, ln addition to this the great  amount of silver let .loose in China  will soon be out ol sight and that  countiy will be compelled to reach for  the white stuff.  Silver will always be profitable to  mine. Tho world cannot get along  without it for currency and manu-.  facturing purposes. Gold can never  take ils place with the millions .who  are too poor to get anything but  copper and silver, ai.d with whom the"  bank note of paper :s unsoughtjjand  practically unknown. America is not  the only button on the pants when it  comes to using silver. .  So dei not be afraid if you live in a  silver camp and are shy of plums for  your pudding, for the day is not   far  distant when the white metal will be as  popular as a village belle at a country  dance.   The present depression is not  caused by an excessive production.   It  is entirely due   to   manipulation and  when the proper moment arrives  the  price will plunge   towards   the   skies.  if this is not the  tiuth   we   will give  our  printing    palace    to   thos* who  never advertise, and with our bulldog  by our side, hit the pike for some land  that is full   of honey,  pancakes and  real     maple    syrup. ��������� New   Denver  Ledge.  ��������� ���������  iJ^Pk  If you are looking for possibilities in Estate  Speculation that will double your capital,  it will be to your interest to invest RIGHT  NOW, before the best of the properties have  been taken up.  Red Rose Degree meet" seooml nnd 'mirth  rue-days olearh month; White Rose Degree  ���������ncets third Tueselay of each quarter, ln Odufel-  lowa Ii alt.  Visiting- brethren welcome  S. P.CKOWLE, T. B   BAKER,  President. Act. Secretary.  LOYAL ORANGE LODGE   No. 1658.  Regular meetings are held ln the  Oddfellow's Hall on the Third Friday of ench month, at 8 p.m. sharp.  Visiting brethren cordially invited  A. JOHNSON, W. M  W. JOHNSTON, Rec.-Sec.  REAL ESTATE  AT GROUND FLOOR PRICES  Cold Range Lodge, K. of P.,  No. 26, Revelstoke, B. C,  MEETS EVERY WEDNESDAY  in Oddfellows' Hall at 8  o'clock. . Visiting Knights are  cordially Invited.  8. VAN HORNE, C. C.  G. H. BROCK, K. ol R. <St S.  CHURCHES  METHODIST C1IUMCH, RKVELSTOKK.  Preaching services at 11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m  Class meeting at the close ol the morning  -lervice. Sabbath School and Bible Class at 3:3U  Weekly Prayer Meeting every Wednesday  evening al 7:30. The public are cordially  Invited.   Seats free.-  Rev C. Ladneb, Pastor.  Are you looking for Business Lots, Residential  Lots, or other Real Estate? Goldfields is the  Payroll Centre and Resident Town of the  Famous Fish River Free Milling Gold Camp,  and has a  Future unequalled by any other  .    Town in the West.  ���������" ������������������   '.   *   -'----���������    , -' .���������...  For Terms and Particulars Write  ROGER   F.   PERRY,   Manager,   Goldfields,   B.C.  *.,  -> -'-' ST. PETRI" S CHUKCH, ANGLICAN.  Eight a.m., Holy Ene-harist; 11 a.m., ma .rn,  Litany and sermon (Holy Eucharist first Sun-  dav in the month); 2:3o Sunday school, or  children's service; 7-SO Evensong (choral) and  sermon. Holy Days���������The Holy Eucharist is  celebrated at 7 a.m. or 8 a.m , as announced.  Holy Baptism alter Sunday Se-liool tU3:15.  c. a. PiioctiKiEB,   ector.  PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH.  Servlcecvery Sunday at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m  to which all are welcome. 'Prayer meeting at  8 p.m. every Wednesday. .  Rev, W. C. Calder, Pastor.  *****1-*>>M***+*IHH-**^  .  **,'   ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.,  Ma-mV at 10:30,a. 111.,  on  first,  second and  fourth Sundays in the month.  REV.   FATHER  THAYER.  SALVATION   ARMY. '  Meeting every night in their Hall on Front  Street. y  Baker and  Confectioner  A lull -and complete-  line of  GROCERIES  -���������^IW-  -���������$.-*��������� i|i ifr ifr <t' "fr fl-fl* 'I' ���������$! ���������!' 'I' '$"$' '$' ���������$-)& 't' 'ft -I1 ft 'M8 *V '$������  y '���������������������������-I.     *(     ���������*     -*_'**-_ <��������� - "~ -*���������***���������*������������������  Canadian Pacific  Railway  Down in Dixie.  Just now 11 number of our renders  are 'planning where they will go for  the winter nuel no doubt the miijority  of them will do as they huve done in  the past, buy round trip excursion  tickets, good for six months, to  Southern Pines, N, C, and those who  want to make side trips of a few weeks  te Florida, Louisiana or Texas can get  tick"ets"fro*n "Southern  desire   to  H  EDWAR  TAXIDERMIST.  DEER'HEADS,.BIRDS, Etc. MOUNTED,  Furs Cleaned and Pe-aired.    JUST EAST OF PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  Third Street.  ROUND TRIP TICKETS  Christmas and  New Year Excursions  Going South  for  H. HOLDICH  ANALYTICAL CHEMIST  AND ASSAYER.  Cor. Mackenzie Ave.   - X  "and Railway Street. %  t- ' *  H'-"HH'WHI I'M I **' I Il'jU-i-H*  Jas. I. "Woodrow  -foTJTQHER  ���������v-f.  If*'*!  round-trip"  Pines to  the   points they  visit  at the most  favorable rates and  thus    8a~ve     unnecessary     expenses.  Southwrn   Pines   is the head quarters  for northern tourist.     It  is located in  lhe high   sand   hills   itmnng the Long  Leaf Pines on   the  Seaboard Air Line  Railway,   which   is   the  most  direct  route between New York, Washington  ���������.nd Jacksonville, Florida.  We advise our readers who are  expecting to make a, Southern trip to  write to Mr. John T. Patrick, Pine-  bluff. N. C, and he will send them,  free e>f charge, printed matter that  will be of much interest.  Royal School of Mines, London.    Seven ye""  at  Morfas Works,  Swansea.     17   year*  Chief  Chemist  to Wigan Coal and Iron Co.,   Eng.  Late f.hemlDt and Assayer, Hall Mine-,, Ltd.  Clalirui examined and reported upon.  Ferguson, B.C.  T    A. KIRK.  Domini n and Provincial Land Surveyor.  .   ' REVELSTOKE, B.C.  Retail Dealerin-  Beet, Pork,"  Mutton, Etc. "  Fish and Game in Season   All'order* promptly filled.  Corner Dougla.    .������BYgIr'X'K)SB) B.<5  KlBC Street*.  DEC. 23, 24,25  DEC. 30, 31  JAN. 1.  .Good  to return Jan;  5th  Fare and  One-Third  For full information call on  or address  T. W. Bradshaw,  _   .._ Agent.     .      "       cievelstoke.  E, J." Coyle.  AssiBt. Gen.  -Passenger-Agent  Vancouver. -  -^jjp--  If you*are contemplating going South' 'during /.  the winter of" 1902 or 1903 you can get valu-"-  able information.free.of charge.   ;.     '"!',">-*  .'-.   ,..--*--' -writ������to.--������������������-' :'";;..1.^:r"Q  John T. P^nekl  '���������'--���������'     Pinebluff, H; C.        ,^ V ;  He'cah-sa've you money in hotel rates. . ���������'  -,'. ;"  He can direct-.you which is the^best' railroad ���������'  'route to travel. - *���������;"-* ���������.-   ���������-  He can direct you where''to. rent neatly- fur-.,,,  nished cottages or single "rooms. - ���������  ."���������'-  *.t  i>  ��������� i K  i K  -i'ty  '���������i ir.;;  :: 'i ���������>"*  :*.'t  i>:  "O1  r ������t* '$������ 'I' ������$' *t"l* -I1 'I1 lXl $1$ 'I' }tipjtl '^ '^' '^"^' ft <*t-"^N> *^*  m-  *l..r..        -'-'j  <*'������������������������-���������������.    .'  rir-}tri'-y)-.  ..."      1.5-  -ov  O'  50"  it-  REVELSTOKE  SUPPLY  THE  FURNITU RE   OQ'Y.  HOUSE' FOR - NORTH  KOOTENAY.  V  Oriental Hotel  Ably furnished with the  Choicest the' Market  affords.  E. MOSCROP . . .  Sanitary Plumbin-f, Hot  Water  And Steam Heating-, Gas  'Fitting-  Second St., REVELSTOKE, B.C.  The Shepherd's Star.  As a painter of French peasants,  Jules Breton holds a place nearer to  bis illustrious predecessor, Jean Francois Millet, than any other living  artist. "While the figures of peasants  ���������which he paints have not the grand  elewenUl qualities of those of Millet,  ihere are among them some superb  types. The subject of the Free Press,  "Winnipeg. Christmas picture gi ������*en to  A^ubscriberf* to the Weekly Free Press,  ���������U a variant of one which he has fre-  q-MBtly painted, but tbe "Shepherd's  Star* ranks with ths best of the work  ef this celebrated painter.  Jul-Mi  Adolphs  BEST WINES, LIQUORS, CIGARS  Laige, Light bedrooms.  Rates $1 a day.  Monthly Rate.  WOOD  Wood for sale Incln'llng    ,  Dry Cedar, Fir and Hemlook.  Daily  WE keep a larger, and better stock- than any house .between  Winnipeg and Vancouver.   Quartered Oak Tables, "Rockers.  Bed*  x-ooin Suites.   A splendid %line, of. Couches,   Morris'' Chairs, and  . wyorything a First Class House carries.      ���������    _.   r..-.,,^  ;,-...,.*   .  S   ' Cabinet Making; 'Upholstering, Picture Framing,' etc' *���������  ' *      ���������������������������       1 *ofjch oipilyc ���������iplji)   By Royal  1848  Warrants  J. Albert Stone ���������   Prop.  THE CITY EXPRESS  E. W. B. Paget, Prop.  Prompt delivery of p������rce1������, b-.i-g-.-je, ete.  to an** part ot tbe city  Any Kind of Transferring  Undertaken  All order* left at R.H. 8m-*tbe'i Tobacco  .    gtore, or byT������l������phOB������"'o.7wlili������c������lT������ prompt  Breton was born at  attention.  All  offltrr* left fit W.   M.  Lawrence's  receive'prompt- intention.  W. FLEMING.  will  WHAT I.S A HO*.!** WITHOUT A  SINGER  Singer Sewing Machines  are sold on easy monthly  payments.  A full supply of machines  needles and attachments are  kept for any make of machine on earth.  H.MANNINC,: MACKENZIE AVE.  Kevelstoke, B. C.  TO CAMBORNE AND GOLDFIELDS FROM BEATON  Shortest and  Host  Direct Route to the Fish. River dold Camps.  Dally Hinge lr:im n**atoii for Onlil Campi nn nrrlv.il of   BonU   at  12  o'clock   noon,  arrivlm- at il*-*tln'*tlon that "am* afternoon.  Double,   Hailill������ and Pack llnrfWH and Freight Team"  SUhlen  iiiippll������l   with   Hingle,  for any part of the Dlitriat.    ANDREW M. CRAIG,  Proprietor.  JOHN   BEGG'S  Royal   Lpchnag&r v;  BALMORAL WHISKEY .  aOOTLAM*** "  By appointment to His Majesty the Kinff,'1901.   ....  By appointment to Her Late Majesty Queen Victoria, 1848-1900.  Revelstoke Wine & Spirit Ccmpany. Limited,-Agents.  h"  \|  FHKB liUfl MKBTS ALL THA INS.  1*1 BBT CLASS   ACCOMMODATION.  HEATED BY HOT AIR  REASONABLE KATM. .  Ip1  >H)  SIBBALD & FIELD,  Real Estate 1  -   fi. P. R. TOWNSITE.  *-   MAKA TOWNHITE.  *-   OERKAHD TOWNSITE.  **���������   CAMBOKNE TOWNSITE,  t-.w������t .' >r/*f 1 T    (Canada Permanent A Western  H[\IANl  I A I ���������*t       Cannda MortKago Corporation.  A 111.f-**.''<-���������*������**"**'   'colonial Inveitment and Ixian Company.  r  Insurance \  Sun Flre, Caledonian Flre.      Atlaa Flre.  Canadian Fire.   Mrrcantlle Flre.    Northern Fire.  riuardlan Flre.   Manchenler Flre.   Oreat Went Life.  lO'ean, Arrldont and Onaranteo.   Confederation Life  {.Canadian Accident Aaxurance Co.   Connecticut Fire  HOUSES FOU 8ALE AND BENT.  CONVEYANCINO.  SIBBALD, Notary Publl-. CHAS. M. FIELD.  REVEL8TOKK. B. C.  m  COAL FOB SALE.  J. D.  Hotel Victoria  HODnLT STREET OAR  MEETS ALL TKAINS  , Brown & Quarin, Propia.  ELECTRIO BELLS AND LIGHT IK BVERY ROOM,   .-������_  ������ > ���������*- ** -������a to   *-f**t***o'T t   annei tvn  -rta'-tr  fta  BAR TTELL SUPPLIED BY THE CHOICEST  WINES. LIQUORS AND CIGARS-  .-. ..... .'t  P. BURNS & GOT  Wholetal*' ind Retail Dealer**.  PRIME BEEF.     PORK.     WUiTOIf.     SAUSAGE.  FISH AND GAME IN SEASON.  ������y ->*wi ~*i 1^1t1>.j-*^ft���������-i���������(,aAjufifruiHti-CUUSBii\������  w  A Ghostly, Game of Chess.  "The International Hall of the Cafe  Slonloo is a truly palatial chamber,  ever so many feet broad "by ever  so many more feet Ion**:. On the  evenln*r*3 , of Friday an-d Saturday  of last week," Bays London "Outlook," "tt was divMed by a barrier Into two -unequal parte. In  the smaller Bat, each at his board,  the British chess-playera competing  -*t*raln*rt the A-merlcan el.ess-ple.yers���������  ���������who were not there. Throu-fh the larg-'  ���������r roamed a -"election of the chess  public. .- . . .Xnaido the.b-arrler, and  next It, -cat Mr. James iMaeon at a  chess-board, "acinar ue. "We seem to  have known Mr. Mason as a fine player ��������� these���������welt, oajr twenty years. On  thin occasion he le opposing Mr. J. H.  Barry of America--.who Is not here;'  iMr. Barry la alttln-r in "o room In  Brooklyn three. thousand miles away,  under the eyes of American-spectators.  It le easy to say that the twx> men are.  connected by electric telegraph- but It  te not wise to dispose of the mystery  ond romance of space ln so rude a  ���������way. . . . But Mr. Mason, in this  -frand International Hail, seated opposite nothing better than a man with a  ���������book of telegraph forms who waits unconcernedly for, the move, can he play  thus dumbly and in absence against  Mr. Barry ln Brooklyn and think lt  chess? It' Is a %very ghostly business,  and we wonder M-r. IMaeon can get  through with lt at all. But he does.  He Is aa solemn, ae rapt in thought, as  oblivious'of all .-but the game as If Mr.  Barry were; opposite" to him ln the  flesh, and "not opposed'to him only by  electric telegraph. Clearly,to him'the-  play is everything, whether the opponents move comes to "him by a-ctuil  touch, by t**l������graph, or by psychic suggestion. But for our pan .we cannot  -throw off a dread of the "uncanny, na.-'  ture.of .the buainees. * *We ' feel .inclined to look ".'about for "some 'rnani-'  featatlon of Mr. American' Barry's"  ���������pint. "What .better evidence" of lt  could we have; than the arrangement.  of . these wooden, pieces on that  ���������wooden board?? There is".Mr. Barry���������  -mot* effectually Mr. Barry, for he Is  causing Mr. Maioh to think, and think,  ���������nd think; to purse his lips in the old  familiar way, to fall into Immovable  ���������Hences, -wherein you .would think lie"  .-waa revolving schemes of a-new order  ���������f creation orpuailing'out the mystery  of luan'a origin' and'"de*rtlhyT^and"'Mr.'*  Mason Is doing the like to him ln far  Brooklyn. *A etrang'e'a'nd fascinating  pursuit is chess, strange and unproflt-  .rnbie. Not'. pp4ltlos^i*nor.l feme,? nor-  wealth, nor, Jove "can so 'engross a "man.  "T'he-re,obJecte^"are usually'compassed  toy flashes of passion; insight, and darling;- but this alow, prolonged struggle  ���������f-hraln against brain, through the  medium of. pieces of -fantastically  carved .wood. Is pure .devotion to an  ***-"****������*>ctlon.1 The. man "who wine, who"  * mo heme in the'-plece ef wood called a  kSn-g that he '.may not move, galrJ  nothing, prove*-, nothing, estabUehei  nothing but���������-'.'checkmate." .Yet when  Be accomplUtoes" that he "tastes''of a  aaUs-faotioo, deeper and more' -permanent .than" is 'accorded to statesman or  ���������over, merchant or gambler.    To* ac-  - ec-mplUh  It  he.'dellberately,  and   for'  - rary love of the'dolng of It", undertakes  - an  enormous * mental  effort, -a  thing  whkfc .riwntondsjn general ahuna as.", it,  tt were, Satan ^moelf. ��������� TtnXtfi. 5r*Sst'-  m-ratlo*-' busdneeo this cheasX* inPara-'  -SI**-*, you will flnd politicians reading,  poetry,   and  poeti    studying .morals;  -merchants wUl'be cultivating the arts,  and critics weeping on other people's-"  necks;--but the-chess-players will   be  *ala*rtiw.chee-s.*;*-T?- >  , -**    - *  Dfopehstag With Early Rising:  8*>me genius-has," according "to -his  ewavad-rer-tl-fe-nerirt,. invented ^antap-",  pej-atus 7t-"> dlepe--ii*e with' getting" up"  -*o early in' winter time to set the  kettle'. boiling, " -"Aa '** far J as - we un-  deratand. it.' you fix- the, new. invention,  on your clock, and :at:the" hour required  It starts a flre",under-a kettle of wa-  , ter; 'As soon ���������aa .the ���������w-ater-holls a'beli<  rings,.and-you^wake'up."  Tlrfs'is' not  the-sort'of" thing that.Cakes .the-cake;  it simply grabs'!*.   *<..--",  "We once sa-w a" remarkable Invention  mt tiMs nature tn Sheffield.-'It consisted  of a ***T*ill, but -powerfully- -built bed-'  artaad which had 'ah llngendous clock-*  work" art-angement" attached, ma you  --"would-eVpect-Tto���������the-ticklng-ofTthe-  tnatti-ess. * In "-the morning  a phono-  ar-aph-got  up ;f rom Sunder, the vbedr  walkod.-round������ to, your'side, and "an-  nonihced' rt -waa' seven' o'clock.""' After  giving-you two",minutes to reply, one  of the-hands of.the clock reached up  and pulled your ear playfully.-*--These  were Just preliminaries so to speak.   If.  ,*rou dldn'.t move then, the--patent bed]  .began buainesa. ��������� tt got "up on'Its hind,  legs and'ran downstairs'wlth you In-  -Bde K till It got to the garden, where"  you  were  shot - Into  a  modest" little  (heap*under the pump.   By a clever.ar-:  faangement'of  the process of suction,  you were drawn, up to the- mouth and  ���������a. refreshing atr-earn    of , cold*, water  crawled down your back.  If this didn't  wake you,'jrou had to watt for Gabriel's trumpet. * *",-*',  Aa a matter of fact, the inventor explained, tt did wake: most 'people.*- But'  (a case you.were.too sleepy to collect  -four thoutfhU ,'i'hto- fitting shape, -by'  ���������pressing a "lt*l������v knob In one of the  blankets, a second~~ phonograph would  ���������grind out a llttle'*approprl������te profanity to ease your feelings. -The Invention  ts patented; anditwhen It;Is put on the  martlet It will b-jatatl the spring mat-,.  tf������aa*m going, aa It-does tor. sum-ner,  autumn and winter aa well.-���������"Pick-Me->  Aa '?I*iX*������iiai*'DittiMr...  *"  -. -  ��������� tiny girl eC seven1 gave a dinner-  ���������party the ether day, for which -twelve  severs were laid, and* that number of  ���������mall maidens aat down to dine. It  was a real Mttls *-trl*r*.udltHier..and.the  Utile hostess herself presided,*sitting at  the bead of the table. She., had been  vetry anxious, in looking (orward^to It,",  te do everything1'as it should be "done.  "Manr-ma," ahe asked, ."'shall we aay  grace?" "Ko," aald mamma; "it will  be a very li-rforrnal dinner,'arid I'think*  you need not do tbat." That meant  one c-rremony the leas to be gone  '���������hi-eutj-h, and waa ������ relief. But the little lady was anxious to have all her  -trueats understand. It. * So, aa they  ���������athered about'the -table,'ahe ex-  plained: ���������rUamnim saya that this !���������  -e-aetk an l-tfe-rnal dinner that we need  (Mt nave ipnoa t������>4ayi''  * RAualefAka *  8"  Revelstoke  *     Skating  Rink  Skating e\ery Kvcning from 8 to 10        **-  o'c-loi-k. "$  BAND EVERY WEDNESDAY NICHT     %  Admission���������-Z.lc  *  *"���������  *  "?*  *  "K  *  W  * i  *  Season Tickets  La-lic- -. >*3j oo  Ofiitlenien  s oo  TICKKTH FOK SAI.l* AT  Caniula Drue A; It(iuk������tore.  J. A. M.'kr A. Co.  Hoy Sin j thu's Tobacco Store.  Rink Conipan-..  &  OUR NEW PHOTO STUDIO  Kelt to K.HOWSON'S Furniture Store. In  making bolh Miniature Photos and the  regular larger styles. Cabinet Photos In  the popular plallno tones at reasonable  prices.   Our Mantello Cabinet is f-i.OU per  doxen.  Somu   Pretty  Mountings   tor our   rhoto  Br04pnes, Watch Charms, Lever and Dumb  "Jell Cuff Links, Scart Plus, ice.   These aro  suggested as   very  acceptable Clirlstmab  Gilts.   I alio make different sizes of Plain  "Photo Buttons and I copy from any Picture.    Bring small children for slttini*-.  .eitherIn the forenoon or not later than  *'two o'clock In the afternoon.   Sunshine is  ^not necessary.       '' '"  ���������      "* ..   "  HOWARD .KING, SSSSSl^I^-"  SL, Schnider  FOR YOUR  Patent Rubber Heels  and Rubber Soleing  ���������'*���������'���������   " ** In all sines and color".'   '-",- '��������� ���������' --'  Boot and Shoe Kepalrlnt* a Specialty  ���������4 *l* l.*********'!'*********^*  | PELLEW-HARVEY, . '  {  Si       BRYANT & GiLMAN  f  .    .Mining Engineers  ,   .  s4 "-.-and'AssayerSj;..-���������% j--a ig  '���������**   *    -"X   * i "*������ ���������**��������� -Li *���������     ���������* ���������*' 3 '**i   ������������������"(������?���������  VANCOUVEBSB.C. "-rEstabUshecriS-X) f  S ASSAY WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS  *"'      *-*. -.-,?-. ^.-- ,."i ���������*"  ? &  TeBtx made up to 2,000 lbs.  A specialty made of checking Smelter  (g Pulps.      "... ���������.     ,  g    ' Samples from the Interior by mail or-  express promptly attended to.   , .     ',,  correspondence solicited. .,"  *���������'-*> *    VANCOUVER, B.V: "(g)  T-������*r������������l-r*ir^  ���������/������������������i*--.-      ���������*-������������������;>���������  ������^������%,UNION <*&&,  {|)iv  S.Pigar; Factory  'REVELSTOKE,   B.C."  J' H:;A-.;BROWN,' Prop  *������> .'    '" * "--r"-"   ;  ���������  W) ��������� vi-*-iit' -B-l'--*-r,d-i:-- ------'- -��������� -  OUR  8PECIAL'anel THE  UNION  ALL .GOODS. UNION/MADE,  1T0O D  For. Sale.  The undersigned having contracted for the  whole of McMahon Bros, wood is-orer-ared to  supply Mill wood at--.--,   ^ i-   -,,--,;,--'.  %2 EeELoad  *r*-ff*-:Cedar Cordwood-^-������8.'oo',delt'v'ered.  THardwood atjequallylo'w rateB.  ������������������  -",1  ��������� B  Orders left at O B. Hume ic Co.,' Morrfs.-J:  Steed'i, or at mill will have prompt attention.  BELGIAN    HARES  *r    * I  .    r< i . -    . -'  The quickest breeders and greatest  - monej- makers _ in the' small stock  ���������'-' line of the present day.     Full bred   '  stock of FASHODAS. .  ��������� 'Price���������$6 and Sic per pair!  .       ��������� -     according to age.  TH08. 8KINNER,���������Revelstoke. B. C.  HOW ABOUT   t  THATvSUIT:r - - /  -* ���������-   .-.    . - . *  * * -,  -Of Clothes you pi>oi*->?sed  yourself this^ FALL.  . Our'Fall Stork is.'no*v the  '-'' 'most complete Id'B.'C.  . Our, Fancy, Good** are all  ,A new'with new colors and  the latest ptripea.  See thfm before leavint*  ., .your order elsejvhere..  Ri S. WILSON,  . Fashioimble.Tailor.  - Next the McCarty Block.   _*���������  RANCH FOR SALE.  The administrators of the estate of John  D. Boyd deceased, offer for sale by lender  the property in the Big; Bend District,  known as "Boyd's Ranch," also the  chattel .property thereon, a list of which  may be* seen at the office of the undersigned.* ��������� !  Tenders will be received up to Feb. ist,  1903. Thc administrators will^not be  bound to accept the highest or any tender.  HARVEY, McCARTER  &  PINKHAM,  Solicitors for Administrators.  Revelstoke, B. C, Nov. 27th, 1902.  Notice to Creditors  In   the  county   court    of  ���������** Kootenay holden at Revelstoke. In  the matter of thc estate of-Charles G.  Donnelly, lale of Albert Canyon, B. C,  deceased.  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN lhat  all persons having claims against thc  estate of the said Charles G. Donnelly,  who died on or about thc 21st day of  September, A. D., 1902, arc required to  send by post prepaid or to deliver to  Harvey, MeCarter and Pinkham, solicitors  for thc administrators, on or before the  27th day of December, 1902, their names,  addresses and descriptions and a *' full  statement ol" particulars of their claims  and the nature of lhe security (if any)  held by tlicm duly certified, and that after  thc said day the administrators will  proceed to ..distribute thcl'assets of the  deceased> among- the parties--entitled  thereto, having regard .only, to the claims  of which lhey shall then have notice."  (''Dated this" 27th day of November, 1902.,  Harvey, McCarter' & Pinkham, "  Solicitors for George. A. .Donnelly,   and  Geo.   S.   McCarter," Administrators of  ' thesaid estate. -���������.*     -       .  Land/ Registry,  Act.  . *   * V i ":      1      . .-������������������"'  Lots 1,' 2, 3,-4; 5, in Block 48, in  Town -of- Revelstoke,' B. C,  Map 636 B.  A CERT FICATE of Indefeasible Title to the  above property" will be issued to "Frank Bernard Leu is on the 'J8th day of February. -. D..  1903, unless in tbe meantime a valid objection  thereto be made to me in writing by a person  claiming an estate or interest therein or in  any p<*rt thereof.  -   . .**   ���������,--._.  .'     .*-��������� H.F. MACLEOD,   ^  District Registrar. ���������  Land   Kegistry  Office,   Nelson,  B.   C, 17th  November, 19������2.  '   " I   -TIME TABLE  Certificate of Improvements;  NOTICE.     ,  Halifax and Gibraltar No 2 mineral claims  situate In the Arrow Lake mining division of  West Kootenay Dlstrlet..  Where located���������Two miles Irom the head of  Canyon Creek.  ���������Take notice that I. A.R Heland, agent for  J. K. Jamieson, F.**M C. B680I8; T. Mathews,  1 MC B631U* ,1 B Hall, 1)40992; i L Farwig,  B72S22; Intend sixty dajs from the date hereof  to applv to the Mining Keeorder Ior a cerIdeate  ot Improvements for the purpose of obtaining  a crown grant of tho above claims.  And further take notice that action under  section 37 must be commenced before the  issuance of such certlOcaie of improvements.  Dated this 3rd day of Sept, 1902, a D.  -   .     -���������       A. R. Heyland.  certificate of improvements.  ���������JSTOTICES,  Londonderry, Golden Rod Ko. 2, Hailstorm  mineral claims, Bitiiatc In thc Arrow Lake  Mining Division of West Kootenay District.  Where located���������On Canyon Creek, joining  the Londondery, M.C.  TAKE NOTICE that I, A. R. Heyland, Agent  for T. Mathews, F.M.C,, B 63111, J. R. Jamieson  B 08013. intend sixty davs Irom thc dale hereof  to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate 01 Improvements for lhc purpose ot  obtaining a Crown Grantof the above claim.  And lurtber that notice that action under  section 37 must ho commenced before the  IssuaDce of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 3rd day of Sept., 1902, A. D.  '" '   "    A. R, HEYLAND.  2*TOTIOE  NOTICE is hereSy given that 30 days  after date I will apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for a  special license to cut and carry away  timber from the following described lands  in West . Kootenay :���������Commencing at  \V. le Maistre's north west corner post  near Boyd's ranch about half a mile from  the Columbia river, thence cast 80 chains,  tbence south 80 chains, thence west 80  chains, thenceforth 80 chains to point of  com'mencemenl.  * Dated the 23rd day of October, 1902.  XV. Ie MAISTRE.  NOTIOB  S. S. ARCHER OR S. S. LARDEAU  .���������Ru'nuing.-'between Arrowhead, Thomson's  Landing and Comaplix, commencing October  14th, 1901, will sail as lollous, weather permitting: ;*    ,   ; ,.v/-'T-- .   ''.       ��������� .-"  Leaving Arrowhead for Thomson's Landing*  and Comaplix  tw lee dally���������10k. and 15k.  '.���������Leaving Comaplix and Thomson's Landing  for Arrowhead....'twice daily���������7:15kand 12:45k  ��������� Making close connections with all C. P. R.  Steamers and Trains.  The owners reserve the right to change times  ol sailings without notice.  *       - tt . .- ";'������       - "���������  The Fred Robinson Lumber Co., Limited  NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days  after date 1 will apply lo the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for a  special license" t"ol'"ciif"' an'd carry away  .timber from the following described lands  in Wes,t Kootenay :���������Commencing at  [. A. Kirk's nortii westcorner post thence  easl 40 chains, thence'south ��������� 160'chains,  Ihence west 40 chains, thence north 160  chains to point of commencement. -  Dated the 23rd day.'of pctober. 1902.  :���������:-. ��������� J.;A.:KIRK.   '  Your Winter Supply  ���������-> ..,-*'���������  Of Vegetables . . . .  -*.��������� Should "be-' your first  con-  ,si'deiaLion  at'",his*'time ol  ���������. the  year.     I  have, a lnr**f  .',-stOfk,, nil    home ' grown;  .,- including  Potatoes,.Cabbage, Carrots,  Etc., Etc.  ., '* "Also "a* large  quantity   of  .    "     -" . first class  ' Timothy and Clover Hay.  ._,.,-*   Wi'ite  for pi-ices and par-  '""'��������� '*'*"  'Micularsto .'     ". .,'  S. .Growfe; "Revelstoke, B. C.  h--v.-'  "GO TO THE  REVELSTOKE DAIRY  '       ..     '  FOR   .  lBure_*MlJk  J. G; McCallum  .    PROPRIETOR.  UNION HOTEL  RUST CLA88 S2  PER, DAY HOUSE  Choice Brands of Winecr, Liquors  -' and Cigars.  J. LAUGHTON, Prep. I^t  * For Sale  TWO Rtaldencei on McKenzie Avenue, with  modern Improvement", "U500 each on easy  terms. ;,  r\VQ Roldenceaon Third Street, eut, 'rerj-l  convenient for railway men, $1800 each, tatxy j  tt-tmi. I  ONE Realdenc* oa Flnt 8treet. eut, cash I  rtqulrtd *JO0. Subject to mortgage.  -     -   * Appl-rto, '  -   HXB"*"eV,McCXTE"tEi*PI.SFHAM.  wmm  [promptly secured]  Write for our interesting books "Invent.  or"������ Help" and "Ho**-.vou are awlndled." .  Send us a foa**h sketch br model of your invention oritnprovejnent and we-will tell yon,  free our opinion ns to whetln-r it i������ probablir  patentable. Rejected applications have often  been successfully -"prowcuted by ns. we  conduct fully equipped offices in Montreal  and Washington ; thisqtialifies us to prompt-,  ly dispatch -work, ami quickly secure Patents  as bro* d at the invention. Highest references.  furnUhed. .       -*.r    '  Patent* procured through Marion at Ma ;  riou receive special notice -without charge lu  over 100 aeirsiiaper* distributed throughout,  the *>>*nlak>*i. .     i  ���������   Specialty:���������Patent business of  Manulac-.  tax***-* and Eirpaeers. I  MARION & MARION     S  ;    Patent Expert*; -and Solicitors     I  'inaav���������.   /  New York Uie B'Wg.nontrtail/  ' ^||'**������jAllt������*l- Eldg -Wuhfiigton DX^j  ISTOTIOB  -/NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days  after date I will apply to the Chief Com  mis.sioner of- Lands and WorUs, for a  special license' to cut and carry, away  timber from thc'followinj**-' described lands  in ,West Kootenay r-^Commencing- -at  Peter Agren's south west corner post near  Boyd's ranch on the Columbia ~ river,  thence norlh 160 chains, thence east 40  .chains, thence south 160 chains, thence  west 40 chain's to the point. of .commence"-  ment.   ������������������ J- ,    _ .   , -  Dated the 23rd day of October, 1902.  ���������'-"**���������' -"        PETER"'AGREN.-'".  .TSTO'TIOTi.  NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days  after date I will apply ' to 'the' Chief Commissioner of Lands" and* Works for a  special license ..to cut 'and : carry away  timber from the 'following described lands  in" - West Kootenay :���������Commencing at  Peter Agren's south west corner post near  Boyd's ranch about * half- a mile from the  Columbia river, thence_' east' 80 chains,  thence north 80 chains, lhence_west do  chains, thence south'' 80 ' chains " to" the  point of commencement.  Dated the 23rd day of October, 1902.,  PETER AGREN.  '   '     '     -     . <���������   ' >>  t ������������������   "  NOTICE,  Koticr- is hereby given that SO days after date  I Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for permission to cut and  ������������������nrry uwaj tiinberfroiathefoHowlngdescrlbed  lands, situated in West Kootenay:  Commenr-inir at a post planted at the south  east corner ot Ka'e Seott's timber claim and  marked ������������������A.Y.Anderson's south westcorner  post," thence north 120 chains, thence cast to  the west bank of FiBh river, thence south  following the bank of b"lsh river to tbe point of  commencement. , ,    .  Dated this 25tb day of November 1002.  A. Y. ANDERSON.  NOTICE.  Notice Is hereby given that 80 days alter dale  I intend to aiiply to thc Chief Commissioner of  Lands and \\orks f.ir permission to eut and  carry away timber from tho following described  lands, situated in.Wcst Kootenay:  Commencing at a post planted at the north  west corner of A. Y. Anderson's timber claim  and marked "B Steins' south ������ est corner post,"  thence north 80 chains, thencu cast 80 chains,  ihcnce south 80 chains, thenco west 60 chains  to the pointof commencement.  "Dated this 23th day of November, 1902.  R. 8TKIS8.  Notice to Creditors.  IN  THE.8UPREMB   COURT    OF   BRITISH  COLUMBIA. "  In the matter of the estate of Daniel Robinson,  late ol Revelstoke, B.C., deceased.  NOTICE Is hereby given that all persons  having claims against the estate of the said  Daniel Robinson who died on or about the 19th  day of November, A. D., 1902, arc required to  send by post prepaid or to dellever to Harvey,  McCarter ic Pinkham, solicitors for tho Executors, on or before the 18th day of February. A.  D,, 1903. their names, addresses and descriptions and a full statement of particulars of  tbelr claims and the nature of the security (if  any) held by them, duly certified, and that  after tbe said date the Executors will proceed  to distribute the assets of the deceased among  the parties entitled thereto having regard only  to the claims of which thoy shall then havo  notice.  Dated this 18th day of December, A.D., 1902.  HAKVEY, McCARTER & PINKHAM,  Solicitors for the Executors  Notice.  If the party or parties who 'removed the  cap from a field glass at Watchman William  Maekle'? Cabin at the Columbia bridge last  summer, will return the same to A. McRae,  Postmaster, they will receive *,5 reward,  M,  THE TOWNSITE OP  .CIRCLE  CIT  IS NOW ON THE MARKET.  2oo ���������Lots on Sale��������� 2oo  BUY BEBORE YOU SLEEP.  CIRCLE CITY is the Terminus   of  the   proposed   Railway   already   surveyed  via the Lardeau Creek with fork to that point.  CIRCLE CITY is beautifully situated at the base of the Lardeau Pass, Galena  and Surprise Creeks.  C-.RCLE CITY is   absolutely   surrounded   by    Mining   Properties   now   under  Development.        .........  Splendid  Water  Power  Which will be utilized next Season by Concentrating Plants.  SEND FOR PARTICULARS AT ONCE  TO THE GENERAL AGENT,  G. B. BATHO,  Ferguson, B. C.  f  I-.'.  *-  -*-* 'i.  ��������� -��������� ���������*, ���������**  i,  jf  1  -*"**<  J  ,    'V,'  \  "I"  \  1  -*���������"���������*���������  i  *r������js*-J>>������t*������j������Ji*-J-M'^^  .   ���������   '        The Smelting Centre of the Similk'ameen.yalley.    Backed by the payrolls of two  giganticcoal companies and the Copper and Kennedy Mountain Mines.  * -     ' ���������   Surrounded by the following resources:. .Coal, gold, .copper, silver and a fine agricultural country..   Large herds of caltle, fruit in abundance, with a climate almost southern  and all that could be asked. - -."..-   ,-���������.-,. -*..'- * -I.'     .  ASHNOLA is owned and kicked by the payroll of the Similkameen Valley Coal Company,   Ltd.',.  which is "a guarantee in itself of its success.   The equipment and development of their coal mines, unfailing  of water, electric light and power plants, ave already * arranged for." The .development of the'Ashnola Coal  ,-Company's mine bj* the Eastern Capitalists who have established then- payroll at ASHNOLA,  makes it the  .'coming city of the interior of "British Columbia.     -'--..       ,       - .        - ..-*..*  City of Wonder, Progress amd Great Prosperity  -"-Lots in Ashnola are safe investments. IaBlocks 1 to 4 and 13 to 20 lhe price" .will be .advanced 25c,  per month until May 1st,' 1902, and to ten Der cent, in the"*remainin(; blocks.. The present price is from ������50 to  $225    .Twenty-flve per cent, cash; three, six and nine months without interest: " - *  -'*"'  " ' Arrangements are already completed for;Ei(?ht .buildings, including cottages for the Employees of I  thecompany at Ashnola.   This work will be under full headway by May, 1st. _   ,' " ..","*������������������������  V - Four "years ago the Crow's'Nest Shares" could be 'houfjht .'and were sold at 11 cents.   Today they are '  quote-1 at $80.00.  "With the advent of transportation, Similkameen- Valley Coal can be delivered at any  ��������� point in West Kootenay or Yale as cheaply as by any other Company in Canada. - '     '_'���������,"���������"  ?.'  ������'    .  y.  tf,A.  .iii -  l* :  'iiSl. -  ������  : &Js *  -*���������*���������-,"���������"  -   ���������������������������;..*  '-' "S.''":-  j- ...'j. j  1 * ���������������  FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS APPLY TO  SIMILKAMEEN  VALLEY   COAL  ���������-NELSON, B. C.���������  CO.,    LIMITED.  V ;  u  -v  t  ������J**t������J������*IS*t**t������J**)>)**"^^  fo-$��������� i|i t|i ���������$' -ft ifo i$i *$* *|������ t|i i$i *$��������� ifr i|i i|i ������$> i3.i*$i i$i \%t i%y<t* ������|������ $) ���������$������������������*$! ������|i ������$' ���������*$������ ������$* 't������ *$*��������� ������|* ������t* '$' '$' ���������  i'i   .''     .'       \ i- ��������� y  ��������� - ���������' '  if               '"-   -     - ~ -    . ��������� '   . ' - -. .'  \jf ���������+    Do You Want to Make Your Business Pay*? Wo Can Show The Road to Success  It Pays to Buy An Advertlslnit' 8p*oe In  * ���������'  , *.        ���������.-���������->'   . -  ���������  *.t  **"  + +  it  i't  -i't.  i't  it  .i't  it  i't  i't  i't  i't  i't  i't  it  i't  i't  *['���������?  it  it  it  it  it  it  it  i't  i't  i't  i't  *.t  i't  i't  The Reveistoke Herald    ^���������  and Rail way men's Journal  IT HAS A LARGE CIRCULATION  IT COVERS THE FIELD  IT GIVES ENTIRE SATISFACTION.  SUBSCRIPTION RATE  :   $2.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.  Our Job Printing Department  Is equipped with the Latest Faces of Type, the Best of Presses and inks, and  '  "-we guarantee Clean, Neat and Attractive Work. "   No Job too Large or too  Small.    , ���������>  We Print ...     We Print . . .  ��������� .*  Dodgers,     Posters,  Envelopes    Circulars  *   Streamers, -Dates           ' Kv,  Bill Heads Letter Heads  car  Note Heads Pamphlets  Books.        Visiting Cards  Business Cards.  *���������*.������������-%**---'  Stationery of all kinds.  Revelstoke Herald Job Room  ">>*  First Street.  x - .   .     , .. .....    ���    .������-.������-I---*:-.'.. /,--."^^
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<'.
COST SOMETH1NGTO SQUARE
die N02" lim* !*. friend Wutito Accoma
���-litlmi Ik-lli'laHllCmlCull.
A young bachelor met a friend���a
ranied man���and poured otit hia talo
>j-. woo insomething like this:
"1 say, old clinp, I'm up against it.
Vomorroiv is the birthday of my best
r.irl, end, of course, I .want to nialco
Iier Koffie sort of a present To. tell
you the truth, 1 have promised her a
���'{���.old��� belt ���ir.<-Ulo that sho fancies, but
ihu darnel thins coats *��25, and all tho
money I can rake and scrape just now
is a'l:as***��rly $10. Now, if you'll .lot
T-.e havo the otlu'r *UB I'll hand It back
the next pay day."
The married man ivaa not flush him*
: reif. just  then,  but aa" he  know   hia
f:icr.d v.-.-vs all right, and really wished
t ��� do him a favor, ho Baid:
"I hrivf-n't lhe money about mo, but
Til tell you what. I'll do. 1 have an
t.ccount at II .auk **i jewelry shop. Idol's
j-o down there and soo the buckle. I'll
���buy It and have it charged to my account, and you can hand me the *i25
< ny time before the first of.the-month,
���when the bill'will be rendered."
1 be scheme worked to a charm. Tlio
young man with ".lie "best girl" was delighted, and the buckle was carried off
In triumph. That would have been tho
end of the episode-doubtless, had not
the "wife-of tho lender got hold of tho
bill during lhc absence.of her husband
'.on a business Irip. Judge of his consternation upon, receiving a telegram
': in these words:
"Come home at once.   I know all."
Tak'ng the f.i.~t train he reached tho
'������ city,  took  a  cab  to ride home,  and,
dashing upstairs three steps at a time,
��� Me"enter*.-.!' his l*edroom and found hiii
wife in tears, while engaged in pack*
. inK Iier'.-trunk.
"You'..'wicked, deceitful wretch!" sho
(-"���claimed, between soba. "Who would
havo believed that you would deceive
���me In this way? I am going home to
..i���i-ta���-aoiu... ! I wi���wi���wish- I
had nc���nev-���never left her-at all-1
: boo-hoo-hoo!"
"Deceive ycii'." cried the frantic and
' bewildered   husband,   "what   do. , you
mean'-   Who. what���why, I never deceived you in my life."
"Oh, you.needn't stand there anil try
to lie out of it!    I know all!    I know
nil about the hussy.      Look, here  is
tho bill fcr the rioid belt you bought
; her!    To  think   that  it  should  ever
como to th���this���boo-hoo-hoo!"
Then followed tho copious tears and
���Eots.   W.hen the wife's grief liad about
-spent Itself in tears, the husband got
tin opportunity to explain, and it took
rcmarkcblc eloquence and .abundanco
of carresses to straighten matters out.
"But wasn't  it  a narrow   escape?"
-raid   he,   as   he   detailed   the   story.
'"Everything was agaiust me.    It had
. e.   suspicious   leak,   certainly.    After
".this, when a fricn-i wants an accom-
-.medation he gets it in cool cash, if 1
-.I'.ave to go out aad borrow it"���Ciu-
���cicnati Er^-uircr.
HOW TO LITE WELL'
FOR THE   LEAST    MONEY  Al . LA.3T
TO BF SOLVED.
inlc.it HequcBt.
S
Ti
l\
"""�� "Say, Wormy, can I have the core?".
'-". ��*-*"" He Win iuitOssC-. *'
��� ..lie was a dissipated looking individ-
-Jj-al. though dre-ssc-d in the latest style.
"*-'2ie va*tl hl3 fare and sat in the car
* ..quiec'.y for a while. Then he opened
^"his lips "*.jjd 5.ivciden!y carolled:      . j
""I'm oiily'a bird in a gilded cage,
,/i**^-""beautiful sight to see."
��� _'.U the par-seLsei-s turned and looked
������Ci"t:;in"l**i*iu*.riai'iy.   The dii-sipated individual paised aud looked at Uie pas*
���-���sengers  ana  smiind,
"I beg iar'o:i." iu* said, "I beg par-
^fcm^AlWl.    KO sharm done.    I ain't
-no bird.   Bir's got wing's:   rh"aln't"got���|
'ifo win*-s.    I'm camel.   Thash what J
tun:"
'���";r*r'i;f:.->d his voice and sang again:
"Tni only a camel in a gishled cage."
I"e, paused again'.    "No'  I  ain't no
-cc*:":-��L      Par'oa    me    ladies,    pleash
-��Ii-i:'on me.    I ain't no camel.    Camel
-can go iheven clays without drinkin".
"3 cDuIdn't *ro ci-cven minutes wishout
drink-in".     I'm   hippopotamus.     Thasli
-whai I am."
"I'm   only   h'p'pot-mus   in   gishled
*-.-ti*.
A her.j Cul thir.*; shee."
"No,; aia"t v.o  h:p"posh-m>.;s.   -Hlp'-
-poJhi-ius l��t< 'n Wttter.   I cc-.Udn't livo
in  water.    L.-CJ t like water.    Ish all
- lite to v.aoh c.othes In.   Ain't no good
to'Hvc- in.    1 seshl'm a bird after all.
-3*or  If   I'm   bird,  then   I   can   Hy   to
thloon.  ITm'soin* fly now."    And ho
got oH tin* c^r and disapi.eared, sins*
ing:
-rm  just   an   ostrich   in   a   gishled
"lie's a bird, all right," s.aid the coo
* -tVi'tor.
W
i
,-i*i-*ge
. rf .
-*"t
"As
Jules
.fl-bU ill<
��� cois   1
-''"'artist,
���which
elemei
there
types.
*\Vinn*
,^-rabscr
iaa va
qnantl
,St-n*""i
ef thia
Jul*
, M.e nutlerttouil I:.
. ^^Ira. Eparl:**���1 do wish. John, tnat
-"you -wo-Jlil explain this Chinese ques*
-tion to me. i
Mr. Spaiks���It's very simple, Maria.
SToUssee, li.-.* llusslans don't want an
���ope> door, but desire to Iceep'a slice "of
"JChlna for ; ..*>mselv-*8. Kow, the Japa-
jteaa *��ac'. un open door and wish to
���Iteep"Russia, from keeping a slice of ths
;^oantry.   On the other hand, Germany
'���Via trying to keep Japan from keeping
"Russia from closing the door, and also
ftcantB to keep her from keeping Russia's keeping a slice of Qliina. Now,
i-merica only has a trade interes1:. but
"it-sbe can keep GerBxany from keeping
-���a slice of territory, the door can ha
-kept open.   See?
Mrs. Sparks���Oh! yes. Anyhow, tho
weather's so warm there ti:at the Chi-
���saesewill find it more comfortable to
Sleep their doors open. Still, I can't
���see -why the Powers are making ench a
���toss over a little thine like that���Phila-
jdelphia Enquirer.
""���Yon remember that bank teller who
iaade hi-msc'f so solid with the oflV'ir'.la
"by sn^c. ;ting that the bank employes
���should wear clothes witl.or.t pc-i.-ts
during banking hours:"
""Vea.  J"Vhat about him?"
*^ei*J-atl'fi''ux-w.ith 560.000 by throwing it out of the window to a confetl-,
��***rtek"-*rj?levela&'- "Plain Dealer. -���'
Prorcsior Atirntor, in Spccinl Ap-ent of llio
' .'pepavlnioit of A{*^-li!ulturo Is Con'liK-tln;*-
U SorluH ol I'mimI luvo-|ti*;ntloiis W'lthTlilit
l-'nil In A'iow.
Uncle Sam Is looking Into his mius?-
kecping. Ho hae a big and viirleil
family, of many tastes and several
colors, and-hels at present engaged
in spending $17,500 In .'finding ouf
iWliat this.big family cais.
- He Is going about his investigation
in a systematic way/looking Into fa.m-
ily larders, stato by state and r.ectlon
by section, and jotting down ln hi3
'notebook item by item what thoso
people of these United States eat.
Not only what thoy oat, but what
-lhey waste; how much they pay for
their food, how much - nourishment
they get from it, and how much
i-nergy; how much they overeat and
how much they undercut; and all with
tho purpose of bettering the conditio**
of tliu people.
Trofessor If. O. Atwater, ns special
ogent of thc department of agriculttiro
Is with this sum conducting a series of
food  investigations in  this country.
lie has already made studies of th".
dietaries of the people o�� nine states
and one territory, and lie has so far
discovered, among -othor things that:
The people of the United States arr��
the moat abundantly fed and the mosr
wasteful.
That they have the greatest variety
of food.
That, as a rule, it is poorly cooked
and worse served.
That palate and convenience aro
considered in the selection of.food before wholesomeness, nourishment and
economy.
That the dietary that most nearly
nppi't-aches the scientific standard cf
a man's food requirements is the dietary of the most isolated,., the most
bated, (lie most barbarous foreigner.'
in the United'States���the Chinese.
That the smallc&t sum any man has
heen actually found living on in thi*:
flountry ��� is three and one-half .cent;
per'day.
Trofessor At water's investigations
have a'range that swings from thn
dietaries of. university .students'" club a
to the dietary of the cotton field negroes and the tortilla frying native.-
of New "Mexico, from families ' who
live on 5100 a month to families who
live on $100 a year.
Strangely enough he found familie-,
living on ?100 a yoar better fed���from
the scientific point oi view���than
families who have ?100 a month.
A man. says science, rcauirr-s " so
much of carbohydrates In older to
live and work.
The -protein, or nitrogenous portion
of food, is the muscle-forming constituent and of It nil the,working machinery,of the body is composed.
The fat and carbohydrates are necessary to supply the heat and energy,
and a certain amount of fatis rioces-
Eary for storage against the rainy day
of illness or other overdraft.
The physical equilibrium depend!
upon the proper proportions of these
food constituents taken into thoisystem.
. By Investigation and comparison
science has determined that the: average nomal man .requires these constituents in his daily food in these proportions: -.
Th man with little physical oxer-'
else requires 3.20 ounces ot protein,
the same amount of fat, and i0.5i>
Ounces of carbohydrates, which together have a fuel value of 2,450 calorics.
The calorie Is the! unit of heat ot
energy:
The man with active,work ratitiirei
5.2S ounces of protein, the same r.-i
fat.  17.CO  ounces    of    carbohydrate-;,
and=-reccives-4,Q60--__c-aoi'ic'- in    fuel  1
value.
For improvidence and .Ignorance
and unlnvitingness o�� food the pain
goes to the tenement districts of Chicago and Kew  York.
The families in the congested
"districts of these cities live with a
certain -similarity. The* same improvident feature is characteristic of both
���that of buying food in snaaU
amounts, sending out just be'nre a
meal for only enough for a meal, and
considering the taste and convenience
only.
Tho Bohemians, who ma-i'.iga to
live on an average of 11 cents per
man per day, are conspicuous for their
judicious marketing, buying food in
which there is the least waste B**d
which there Is the lote-t waste and
most nourishment, and, until they g'=t
accustomed to the prodigality of tho
new country.squfi.dp.ring vory lltt'fi
on such luxuries as green vegctable7
and'-fruit!*.
The Italians. Uncle Sam '"finds-, aro
very conservative in their diet, sticking to the Chestnut*' cheese wine and
macaroni of their, own country, and
even refu-jin** to go to hospitals or
other public Institutions for fear ot
the' strange food3. In spite of tho
prices they must pay for their imported foods, tho Italians manage to
live and find sufficient nourlshr-ioi't
on a fraction of what the America*)
.mechanic or laborer: can.
Tho happy-go-lucky darky of t!i<**
Alabama cotton fields has perhaps th'*
���least variety and the meagrest supply
of food of any human being in tho
United: States.
The darky who lives in a little !pr*
cabin on a one-mule or two-mule ���"*."
three-mule farm, who has nothin-; >o
cover him but a hickory shirt and -.
pair of blue jeans trousers, whose o,"i-
epring gambol in the light and i:i-*:-
pensivc attire afforded by a gunny-
sack, can live contentedly on a -Leary. that includes not more than thn o
or four articles of food and that cruu
per man per day but three ccnU.
-���"."- WITTY SAYINGS"	
As Utardllj- Justin McCurtlijr, Author mi*.
j^  IStutcHiimu.
It has always been held to bo rash
to attempt to reproduce-witty oayings
one has heard, as so much of tho wit
depends on .the'manner, of tho person
Who says them,'and the'circumstances
under which thoy are uttered. In splto
of this 1 venture to set down some ot
the sayings of some of the witty men
and women I have known, and it my
readers should not find every saying
quite as witty as I thought It was at
tho time I heard It I hope they will
put down the fault to the chronicler
and not to tue author of the witty
���saying.
I was traveling onco with Dick I'ower and somo other Irish members on a
night journey on an Irish railway dur.
ing tho storm and stress of a gonoral
election. Siiddonly the train camo to
a dead stand at a placo whoro thoro
was no station. Amazement nnd
alarm tilled tho inluds of somo of ua.
"What could have happenod?" wo
BBked ourselves menially. "Could Mio
Tories have, torn up the rails? Could
the. Orangemen have barricaded th/
line?"*
It took a great deal to alarm Dick
Power. Ho quietly rose ' from his
seat and thrust his head out of tho
window in tho hope of finding t soma
explanation. "What are we stopping
for?" he inquired of a railway ofllelal
who happened to be. passing just at
the moment. "It's nothing, sir," was
tho reply, "only wo have had to detach the engine;" "All .right," said
Dick Power, "only tako caro yov
don!t go on without it!"
Dick Power once had a sharp contest for one of the Irish Constituencies. The contest was the more unpleasant to him because his opponent,
who was formerly a political colleaguo
had changed his principles and gono
over to the other side. Dick ifouglit
the battle gallantly, according to hiy
usual fashion.'and won the seat.
On the night when the result af tho
election was* made known": Dick was
sitting with some friends in tho principal hotel of the place. Suddenly in
came the defeated candidate, and, cast,
ing an; indignant glance at Dick, he exclaimed: - "All is lost but honor!"
Dick cheerily said in reply: 'All right.
I have got the seat and you have got
the honor, so we have both got .what
*we most -wanted."-	
Whistler���"The Master" as his followers ielight to call him, "Jimmy"
ae most of his friends designate hiin���
was once painting thc portrait of a
distinguished novelist who was extremely clever .but also extremely ill-
favored. When the portrait was finished the sittor did not seem satisfied
with it. "You don't seem to .like it,"
Whistler said. The sitter confessed
that he did not and said in self-justiii-
cation: "You must admit that it is a
bad work of art." "Yes," said Whistler, "but you must own'that'you a.ro
a bad work'of nature."
- A. great friend of mine, T. P. O'Connor, is known to everybody in Bag-
land and in America as a brilliant parliamentary and platform orator and
Is known also to his friends in both
countries as a moat amusing talker
with a wonderful power of expressive
phrase-making. Some of us wero
talking once about a. friend of ours,^ a'
member of the House ot Commons. *A
lady who was one of the company said
it was a pity for the sake of his personal appearance that he had sucli
very large ears. "Yes," said T. P.,
"and the worst of it is that while they
are too large for ears they are too-
email for wings,"
" At another time we were talking cf
an absent friend who iTancied that ho
had a great gift tor ..music." and Likewise a faculty for regenerating tho
world. Some one asked: "Is he airways playing the fiddle?" "Well," replied T. P., "I do not know that he is
always p'f-ying the fidd'-e, but he certainly is always playing the iiddle. or
the *ool."       ' '���
I7ady���Dorcftn*r=-^'-feviHe^Gne^ol���the-.
wittiest women m London society, is j
weU  known ,to meat Americans who
\isit L'ondon during the season.
I was ta'.king with Lady Dorothy
one day about a lady to whom 1 was
giving h:sh praise and. Lady Dorothy
seemed inclined to disparagejier. "Sho
.-���fTTHE'BANK uauT<-Tc.-ri
"'.* ��������� -..''I I
*cry ".Tuny Ailitl-.lli-- I hiilitmitfl,. 1'nlte I>I,ioo
O.vUi-; t'�� MLi-H-uoe-iUini cl* Simple I-*oi-int*
An authority on banking in a recent
(nibllontiou tells us .trait "even unionj(
lidut-iitcd people, tsome are to bu found
lo whom tho simplest tonus of bun-K-
Ing are-stllL subject* of secret'wonder
und curious misconception." This curious misconception accounts tor very
rauny of the amusing Incidents which
take place at the bank counter. Every
onu has heard iheBtory of the old lady,
who, presenting a cheque at the bank,
and asked "how she would have It, replied:
"Oh, I'd like it hot, thank you, with
/nst a Utile lemon in it."
Tho misconception of this ordinary
fluiiitry as to what description ot
money should be given lu exchange tor
a cheque is the cause of .many amusing
answors being given.
Iu one Instanco a farmer presented
his "little cheque" at ihe counter of a
provincial bank, and, to the .cashier's
"How will you take this, air?" replied
r.s lie fumbled In an Inner pocket of hia
waistcoat, "Oh, I've a little bag here I'll
take It lu!"
Ho wondered,, no'doubt, If.the cash*
for thought he'd brought a wheelbarrow, for It.
On auother occasion, at the same or-
fice, a cheque for a large amount wa3
presented by "a client from the country." The teller, thinking the most
convenient method of payment for his
customer would be large notes, said:
"I suppose you'll take It short?"
Not understanding the meaning ot
���he term "short," and evidently thinking the cashier was having a bit of a
joko at his expense, he replied, shaking
his head and'smiling:
"Na, na, I'll tait" it a'."     "
Old ladies, unaccustomed to hanking,'
often show sign** of distress when Mr.
Coigne inquires how lhey would liko
their cheque paid. In'the embarrassment of the moment tliey usually say:"
"They're not .at all particular���anyhow will do." After being paid, they
Eecm to feel more composed and begin
to think calmly; and the result is that
Mr. Coigne has to change the gold he
lias given for a nolo which "will he
more convenient, and just ' a . littlo
change, say ten shillings iu silver, it'll
be so handy."
A*good lady from a .country village.,
whore a bank is unknown, and consequently looked upon with a certain
amount 'of wonder and awe, had occasion to go to a neighboring town to
get a cheque, which had been paid to
her, cashed. Arriving at the bank and
presenting the document, the cashier
politely asked, "What would you lika
for this?"
Whatever did he mean? Whit would
she like? Why, money of course. Had
he mistaken her cheque for. a charity
ticket for which you can get literally
.what you like from a tradesman; to the
amount'named 'thereon? '
Perceiving that she wai3 a little "at
sea" over his question, the cashier
varied it to "What kind of money shall
I give you for lt?" A ray of light now
seemed to accompany the question put
in that way, and she hastened to say:
"Oh, English money, please!" -
On one occasion a little girl, standin?,
on her toes and presenting a cheque for
'��2, said she would take two half sovereigns "if you have them."
Croased cheques often afford amusement to the bank cashiers and clerks
by the anxiety and concern displayed
hy the holders when told they are not.
payable in cash. One old farmer, being told that the chequ** he-tendered
was crossed and fould not"be paid over
the counter, exclaimed: "Can't pay
me tbe money over the counter. Oh,
then I'll come round for it!"
-*", TvT��ntj--t-*ro .-ftl-j-Caliroriiliiin.
Tor height, broad shoulders and herculean-build, the party of twenty-two
Californian cattle raisers who registered at the Stevens House on Thursday
night, could hardly bo surpassed.
They were on their way from L03 Angeles to the Argentine Republic,'whero
they intend to raise cattle on a much
more extensive scale than-they could
in California.        " .     ���
The party consisted of the thre-e Pallet! brothers and their families, with
five cowboys who had thrown in their
lot with thc company in the hope ot
ma'dng a fortune- in tbe fertile valley
.o*^-*h.eJ^**jt^r]xci\___   __
The three Pallett "STOthe'rs'""aTe_each-
fully six feet in  Ueisht,  have  broad,
muscular shoulders, and tip the scale.'
at 200 pounds.   Their wives are nearly
as   tall   and  muscular.    Two   of   tin
���brothers have each four daughters, and
tho   third   brother  ha**   three-.    Those
, eleven girls range in ages from IS to
is -very clever." I paid.   Lady Dorothy , 23 years, and take after their parenl**
shook her  head  scornfully.    "But." I ; in  build.
pleaded, "hbo is so very well read." ] "Never before," said the night c>r"-
* Cc-me, come, repli.jd Lady Dorothy i at the hotel, "have* v,-e had guests who
with a srr.'.ie, ���'rhe is evidently much I attracted  so much  attention.- and  wa
cleverer than I thought, -since she haa
been able to make you be'.ieve that
she ever read anything,'*-,
One night a group ot members wore
talking in ih*- smoking-room of the
House of Commons about a measure
which it was proposed to recommend
to the consideration of the Government and on wbich we were ail understood to be in coraplf-.te agreement.
Suddenly a member who had up to this
time'offered no objection and had, lir-
deed, sat in absolute. silence��� though
he was well known for an extraordinary aptitude in spinning out talk on
the most trivial subject���broke in wlta
the words: "I suppose there is something to be said oa tne other side."
"I dare Bay there is," Thomas Six-
ton observed, "and if we had a couplo
frequently have some peculiar peoplo
���stopping here. The other gue-rts in the
house ������'���.-med llk*> dwarfs as compared
-with" this western party."
*W. A. Pallett. the oldest brother,
when asked for his reason for leavins
'America said: "\Ve are all sorry to
leave lb�� United States, but all tha
grazing land Is rapidly being settled,-*,
and, with the Increase of the population, the cattle raisers are being
driven further West. My family was
interested ln the l/usinesB. and ilrst
had extensive ranche* in Ohio. From
there we followed the frontier clear to
the Pacific coaat. We go now, to flo-
sarlo, iind thence up in the mounUUn**,
about fifty miles to the broad valley
of the Platte river. Great inducement-1!
exist there' for profitable cattle raising. We bave the European marko+B
to sell to, where prices are much higher
ADVICE TO THE LOVER.
  i
9"Iio" Way to. CnniliiatnCourtship'With ^
- llnp-iy ."nillng.
Don't be too sudden about It." 'Many
a girl has said "no" when sho meant
���yes" simply because her lover, ,-lldn't
choose the right timo and pop' tho
���t-ucstion gently.
Take a dark night for it. Have thc
("blinds closed, the curtains down, and
the lamp turned most on. Sit near
enough to her so that you can hooV
your little finger Into here.
Walt until conversation bqglns to
flag, and then quietly..remark:
"'Susie, I want to ask : you so-mo*
thing."
She will fidget about a little, and)
probably reply:
"Yes?"
���   After a pause, you can add:
"Susie, my actions must have shown
-that Ih, you must have uoen���I rneai*
you must bo aware that "
Pause hero for a while, ��� but keop
your little finger firnniy locked. Sho
may cough and try to turn the subject off by asking bow you liked.tho
sermon, but she, only does It .to encourage you. Alter a pause you can-
continue:
VI was thinking as I was coming up
the street to-night,'that beforo Invent
away 1 would ask you���that is, t
iwould broach the subject nearest my
������I mean 1 would know; my "
Stop again,.'and'give her hand a gentle squeeze. She; may - make a * movo
to get away, or she may not. In either case lt augurs well for you. Wair
"Wait five minutes, and then go on:
"The past year has been a very
"happy ono to me, but I hope that future years will be still happier, llow-
'ever, that depends entirely on you. "1!
am here to-night to know���that is, to
ask you���I am hero to-night to hear
from your own lips the ono sweit "
Wait again. ' It isn't ,best to be too
rash  about  such  things.      Givo    her
plenty of timo to recover her composure, and then put your hand on your
:-heart; and' continue:
"Yes, I thought as I was comint;
���here to-night how happy I had been,
and 1 said to myself that if I 'only
knew���if I was only certain that my
heart had not deceived  me, and you
"were ready to share " <
����� Hold on���there's no hurry about it.
Give "tlio wind a chance to sob and
moan outside amongst thc trees, 'tins
will make her lonesome, and call up
all the love in her heart. Whon cho
begins to cough and grow restlest,.
you* can- go'ou: > ,
"Before I met you, this world was
a desert to me. -I didn't .take any
pleasure In life, and it didn't matter
whether the sun shone or not. But
what a chango in- one short year! lt
is for you to say whether my futuro
shall be a prairie of happiness or one
long and never-ending pathway of
thistles. Speak, dearest r Susie, and
say���and say that���'-" ,       -   ,
Give her five minutes more by the*
���clock, and then add:
"That you���you will be���that 19
that you will���be'mine!",,
She will heave a sigh, look up at tho
clock and round Jhe room, and then,
as she slides her head over your ves'
pocket, she will whisper:
_ "Henry���I will."
"'   "A PRACTICAL JOKE.
.v, 	
"Pl'iyed bjr a Sclrntliit   ou   �����   1'rorcmJunj
\ ... rh���>tin*i-M;)li*.'r.
'A professional photographer tells ��
'���"ale of a practical joke.
One.day a young man came to sit for
his likenoss. To the ordinary eye ho
looked llko any other young man. A
couplo of plates were exposed, and then
tho assistant who was operating went
Into the dark room to develop the neg.v
tives.
Ho was gone much longer than u-sual,
and was heard berating the junior as-
eistant pretty soundly... for playing
pranks with tho apparatus. When ho
returned to the studio ho .asked for
another sitting, and apologized, for having beforo used spoiled plates.
This timo when he went away to develop ho was heard to utter a ullght
scream, but he reappcarednndsaliltliet0
was a peculiar effect In the negative
which he couldn't accouut for, and
would the sitter oblige" hiin ugain.
-.������'. Once more ho wont to dovelopi then
tho bell 'rang' violently for tbo master,
and the two held a long confabulation
ln tlio dark room;!together,:',This time
the master tried his hn'nd, ��� and;* went
nway to develop. ���' It was not long before ho returned and said he was sorry
'not to be able to get a satisfactory llke-
nc'u, but a skull and crossbones appeared defined on the young man's
forehead.
"Rubbish!" said the sitter. "My fore*
head's all right. Can you see anything
the malter with my forehead?" and ho
peered inlo a mirror as he'spoke.
"No, there's nothing Uiat I can see,"
answered the photographer. "But I
should be obliged if you will please go
away and not como here again; this
sort of thing Ib just a we-e bit creepy."
Upon this there was >a" dreadful
scene; but the upshot was lhat the
young man-hud to go, and up to tho
present has not returned. ' *���
Tho explanatioii'of the matter Is that,
the young man was a bit ot :x scientist, and had been playing a joke on-
tho photographer. Jiisulphate of qui-
.nine.is a chemical which..is white.in
the naked-eye, but se'en. black by *,tho
camera. Anything that I13 painted on'
the skin, therefo-re, with the chemical
will be ordinarily invisible, but will
conic out prominently In a photograph.
���London Tit-Bits.,'      -   '
"Kin I have the pleasure cf teachl**"
you to skate, Miss Nellie?"
"No, I'll learn by myself.    The last
_two lm en',   that .started to, teach mo
was makin' lovo inside o'.flve miD-
utes!"
ofUmonthJTc& "TpTro'you r-reJu.-rtThe | than ln thi.-- country   and the cost oC
very man to say it;; ��,��.^ yo,, ^ j rai. n^catt^not hair a^much ��� tt
the w^L?.0���^1:^ ��ttxl-J/r. \ rtio.    W-, have, a ca��h capital of ?tr,.-
after to-morrow and there really is no
time." So tho little group broke up.-
Chamber's Journal.
A pair of eyes to see the bcr-iutifnl.
the good and the true���(Jod's fing.-r-
print in flower and field and snu.v-
�����3ke.=-Bostoa Herald. .   *   "*
Tcss���Oh, I like him well .enougr..
hut it's so hard to make him understand anything. Last night he asked
me several times for a kiss, ahd I ���Mid
"No!   Ko!" each time.
Jess���My "goodness! I should think
that was emphatic enough for any man.
Tess���It certainly should bo for nn*>
one who knows that, two negatives
make a positive.���Philadelphia Pi-tj-.s.
I
"Y011 call yonr parrot '.Money
Money talks."
"Not at all.., Don't tell any one, out
i c.t\\ liim lhat licr-ii:*.-. nouoily abo-i*
the housi* can n>.*-Hr- ii'.ui tlv -is well n:j
sty wife cau."���Uliicago TriDuno.
000, and cx-/->ct to !><j Joined in Argentina by another sharoholdftT to the extent of $3,000. The ranch will be managed on a cooperative basis."
Aftpr looking at a few sights ot thi
city tho party stalled for the Argentine
Republic rri'la.y. Thf* regular -juo-jm
at tho Stevens Hrmse hnvo not yet
stopped talkinK al-ronit the quoer arrivals Thursday, and they arc now wondering what fata awaits the eleven
young, handsome daughters In tho
wilds of South America.
Victim���Say, hurry, up and get
lliroiif*;h shaving mo us quick as you
! can.
Barber���Why, you said you had
plenty of time when you got into tha
chair.
Victim���I know, but that was beforo
jou tried lhat razor on mo.
:���, Tlie:<*l;avc<lip:f��;ers Ci'livo Doubt.
This is a story told .by tho publish*
er of a big religious weekly' of h-,3
peiv.onal experience. It is a queer
etor.*, hut true as preaching.  He ia-,0-.
"Yuti know I live over in thc o!tl
Greeu ivich village section, and tb a
best established families thero, those
who have occupied the same houses
for half a century, hold that one
might almost as well bo dead as not
to have your death notice in a paper!
A few �� days ago my brother-in-law,
died, and though .1 had promised to
have a death notice inserted the next
morning; 1 neglected it. The following
day'l'I- arranged for tho notice,* and'
went over to llackensack to havo a
grave opened. Several of: the Ninth
.ward, families have lots in the iKsimm
cemetery. e
"I' entered the oflice ofthe cemetery
and    stated to   the superintendent," a
Bober, faced    German,    that Mr. 	
was dead and a grave must bo dug im,
mediately in the family lot.
"'Mr.   dead!" tho head grave-
digger exclaimed; 'why when did h��
die?"
*" 'He died day before yesterday.* >_
"'But aren't y&u mistaken? 'All
those families have: their death notices
in the paper. I read the paper carefully" this morning and yesterday
morning, and .his name w-as not in
the list. Why, when tliere 13 a notice
you don't have to make auy other arrangement or give, mo any.funeral* notification. I always bave the grave
opened at once."
"And, grotesque as it apperas. I had
all that I could do to persuade the
faithful old man- that Mr. ��� was
really dead and that the grave must
he dug, notice or no notice. But I
honestly believe that he would havo
turned me out as an iropostov it 1 hai
not explained how the slip occurred,
apologized abjectly and promised solemnly that the ��� paper of the next
mc-rning should contaia the notics."
���New York Herald.
.AVllS'M��lllit..ln All lit llcnltllfill.
It is well known that'the chemical
condition of the atmosphere differs but
little, if any at all, wherever the sam-
plo is taken; whether it be in the high
Alps or at the surface of the sea, tho
lelations of' oxygen to' nitrogen and
other const!luents Is the same. The
favorable effects, therefore, of a chango
of air are not to bo explained by .any
difference in the proportion of Its gaseous constituents. One important difference, -however,-Is 'the'bacteriological one. ���' * -1-.   ".- >""      /
-The air of high altitudes contains no
:*microbes, and is, in fact, sterile, whilo
near the ground, and somo 100 feet
above It,'microbes are abundant...Iu
the air of towns and crowded places,
not only does the -mlcrobic impurity
increase, but other Impurities, such aa
the products of combustion of coal, accrue also.' Several'investigators havo
.found that traces of hydrogen and certain hydrocarbons in the air, and, especially in the air,of the pine, oak and
birch forests. It is to these bodies,
doubtless consisting of traces of essential oils, to which*tho curative effects
of certain health re-sorts are ascribed.
Thii3 the locality of a fir ^forest Is
said to give lelief in diseases of tht*,
respiratory tract. But all the samo,
these traces of essential oils and aromatic products must be counte'd, strictly speaking,,as impurities, since, they
are not apparently necessary constituents of the air. As^ recent analyses
have shown, these bodies lend to disappear in the air ae n higher altitude
is reached', until they disappear altogether. It would seem, theiefore, that
miorobos, hydrocarbons ���and entities
other than oxygen and nytrogen, and
perhaps we should add aigon, are only
incidental to the neighborhood of human industry, animal life, damp'and
vegetation.       - ,     ,
'A COLONIAL SHREW.       -^
fl-uinoro'���  Stor, ot Hovr On. TormBB-**-** j
- -v WM Kff.ctivoly Tmiicil. I
In colonial days, It was customary,   .
tor betrothed young women to ride to ,
the nearest town, mounted on a pl.-,
[ton behind totHW or lover, for��� tho    .
purpose of purchasing their wedding
outfit,  says the Youth's    Companion.
Ono such prospective bride, the fair,
but quick-tempered Nancy, went up to.
Bo-sto-a   with   Ebon, whom   she wa3,
soon to marry, and the pair achieved,
an exhausting but satisfactory -day'a
shopping.   When, in tho cool ot tha
early ovening, they started on  their
twonty-mllo journey homo, they carried, stowed snugly about pocket und
saddle, some dozon of their pieclou*
���purchases. ,**���'���
About haltway,   tfaftcy   mlss-jo   a
package, and wished to turn back and
look tor lt���sho was' sure lt had   been
droppod.   But Eben ramliidcd her that'
at the moment of leaving, two puicela
had been, hastily  combined  Into one,"'
and assured her that nothing was los_f,l (
she had merply miscounted.    But sho.
was not convinced.
"There should be thirteen!" she do*
clared;   "a ��� bairer's dozen."
"Twelve only���a dozen, but not a'
baker's dozen," Eben malntaihofj..
���stoutly.   ���
,   Then Nancy-lost her temper.     She-
vowed she wsa right, and    that'   Bha(
meant to recover the missing parcel,'
Would he ride back at once?   Amiably, _
but decidedly, ho would.not;   it was '
getting too late to' waste' time.   Very
well,  then1; would he stop and allow,
her to dismount?   IIo could do as he'v.
pleased  himself;" but  she  was  going*
back   to_ look  for. her  parcel,   If  sho >
went alone and'on foot! -. But-he'da---.
clined to stop.    Then Nancy tempest- 1-
uously flung down one ofjier -bundles "'
on tho highway, and sarcast'cally teTl-"1
ing him,that this time something was *.
missing beyond' question, imperatively ]
demanded  that ho shoul'd    stop    tht*'"'
horse. '     .   -,     " * '
But Eben,-big, lazy, and good-tern- '-
pered, *"WT.s not without, spirit when *
aroused,.and? ho repiied that*If sho-*<
chose to, throw things away in--"a tan-' -.
trum, ho could not stop her, but neitu*. ���
er would he stop for her. -In a- fury.' )
she tossed away a second parcel/ and '"
continued to dw so���onc;at each mllo-. c
stone���until her journey"ended. W^her*."
at length he set her down on her o'wii,,,
door-stone, she was ' sobbing , and, _
storming in .her wrath, while, he .was ',
still to outward appearanco placid and ,
-fEI-ene.' "��� , ,-,,,.' ��� , ' *������������}
On that same door-stone "the; next"**
moming'she found her twelve parcela"'.-"
"Ilylng In a row, each neatly* numbered!'"-';
'���He had"ridden back alone and-collect-*' "
cd "them,  and their 'contents " pfov'edij'r
that he, had been right, for , nothing' ,f.
"-jyas mussing" ' .*"   \    _' , . '��� "j.
, As a vcry'old lady,' Nancy;used*Vi,,
tell  this' talor,against, herself .to  her.*
- great-grandchildren,  always   -conclud- **
ing with:    "And seived me right.'. IE ~
anyhody hut your gran'ther.had'.mar-'""""''
ried, me, * I'vei doubts  he1- might* Ji-r-w-'J
.married  a. shrew." -  " - '"'^,1'
' To   Ellen, however,.local 'tradition; *���*,
attested thnt the   hot-tempered ' laa*";,/j
had,proved an affectionate and excel',.1, ���
lent wife.    '"..".,' I :> - !��- *���
: ���*���**"**������- Yeais uf llavolt. 1 . ,
,.It has been asked which is the\ bes-
.historical illustration'of * the saying,
"It never raima "out it pours!" The revolutions and emeutes* all, over Europe,
-in-the anmis_'mir;lbilis_lSlS^bc-sMUus^
trate   this    proverb,    says' Pearson's
^Weekly. ��� Commencing-with'the Februi
ary Revolution of- Pai is, tlie popular,
insurrections, successful and unsuccessful, of this memorable'-yoar form
an amazing chapter of"European.history. In Italy'there was revolt in Sicily and Milan, Venice -shook off tho
Austrian yoke, aud-Sardinia definitely
headed.the great movement which, after many vicissitudes, Di*de*d. in emancipating all Italy... Iu-Germany'there
was a perfect epidemic of insurrection,
almost every state being afflicted. Sim:
ilar uprisings took place in Austria-,
and the Emperor was compelled to
leavo his capital"and ultimately to abdicate, In-Ireland, terribly devastated
by the famine, a trivial rebellion took
place, and even in Great Britain there
was ah.unrest, which happily subsided
without any serious consequences.
There can be no doubt that there-was
a"- subtle connection between theso
events, and that a successful "revolt In
one country suggests #imllar attempts
Wherever discontent Is: strong.
***      ������������"������ AvelilK SlaapUwi l*!**ht��.
Sleeplessness is -generally due not tc
���piiyslcal strain but-tb mental.'bverwor'r
and worry.        "*. *.,'"''
The best cure for*lnso**B"Q.la Is exer-
efee ln the open air. When you find
that you can't sleep get up at once,
dress and go for a long' wallr.ii Jt-.will
be much better than to He in bed ant*
keep tossing about.
When you get back from: your tramp
the bed will feel good and sleep will
come quickly to the tired body and
brain.
Don't wi.lk along, however, in a lazy,
half-hearted fashion. .Go at a; brisk,'
half trot. Expand your chest, 'stretch
your legs, breathe steadily and get your
blood purified by the exercise of your
.whole hody.
And don't think about the things
that have wo-ried.you during the day.
Ilnntlng With Good J*.e��-ilU.  I'-** .*
SAd-nd .Ix*"*
Mv-Jigger���I saw Holler out for 8
cood time the other night.
Thingumbob���Yes; hesa gay old
boy, i=n't he? .
McJiggcr���That's what he is. and ��13
ron i** a chip oft the old block. He's a
���rounder, too.
Thingumbob���Ah! yes; he s a sad
;->uiig dog.���Philadelphia Pres3.
Wliere Could IIo H��io I��..rn*-il It? [���"" '"
Just to show how the serenity of.
the most flawless'temper may give was, '-
under sufficiently exasp-vriiting circumstances, the following instance' is re*- '
lated:    A prominent business man re-,,
siding in Jennings avenue -is known--
for his very preclte 'use'of the Eng-   .
lish language, as well as for his suave- .'
and exceedingly correct.'deportment'atr,
all  times.    So particular is this gen-^.*
tleman that he frequently hits notifled"*-"'
"his family to be extremely' careful an *
to what they "say "Before "a. three-year-
old grandion residing in the house, as '
children are so ready-to pick up im- '
proper expressions.'-""* *-**���-���' -
*" This "youngster ia -a3* great favorite,
with the old gentlemtm, so much so
that in the absence of the nurse* girl
on a recent morning he offered to as- -,.
sist the little tellowat his toilet.   All
went wei! till lt came to*a shoe that '
.-was co peculiar in Its fit as to need ai *
shoehorn to bring it to place."     The- -'
horn-didn't happe*lto be at Hand, but.
grandpa   wasn't   one of   the kind to"*
give it up. .,..,._   \
Still ie was pretty late, when-the palt
appearded at breakfast; ;and some -one. i
remarked: "Well, lt took a long timo-,
; to dress.   "What was the matter??"
The youngster promptly replied:      '-
"Why, we  got along all right/."ill"
.we came to that damned. shoe!" *
And, shocked as they were, .not", on-y-
of .the family asked:the--llttle feilcrar-^
rjwhere he hda   heard :such- bad;-:bail
'language.���Cleveland Plain Dealer,
;fcfo
���'��fcSsx^l^m^iz^&.
ara...;..**-;'../ - V"">"*<l-'i'-t"*'J**-|",B*r 'ti^C^S^CyZ
i-'i*--'^;--*-;^
iTO-ST .A'-T-"*.**-****'"'*- ���������pfrt  Stories of the Czar of Russia. >  X Talk of  the  Cznr's abdication  ia  reeved by tho unfortunate occu: rence in  1 Russian imperial household whieli haa  v ngain dashed  llie wish of Nicholas  ir an heir. The young ruler of all'tho Rus-  *Ls is a perennially inlerosting pcr*onnli-  m Sic is a curious contrast lo hi4 father.  K disposition, as well nt in bodily pros-  Fence, ho differs strangely from his parent.  Alexander  wns  not  11' highly  educated  man.    His  elder  brother  Nicholas liad  been carefully taught and trained for tho  responsibilities ho was to bear, but his  'death, at the age of twenty-two, placed  L \lcMind(>r iu llio position of heir to the  jjnone, nnd he wns llicn (00 old to learn,  Jor could he nll'oril llio necessary lime,  jforo  lie succeeded   lo   the   lln'one,  a  ly unloi lun.itp incident ncciu red which  lived linw nucl lie could he.    An ofll-  ��������� cit of *-'iii>iliili iiiigin had boon sent to  ���������".lio Un'trd States lo order rillcs for tho  l>'u*.*si,in H11..V. On his return lie liad to  ri-jmri   tn     .    ���������"������ircwiteh, who was ap-  ��������� ���������i.'i*iti*i'    ���������       1-1 intend the re-arming of  ..J1'!'  ' ���������, Hiirln**   the   interview   the  *'���������     -    .i- l   his   tcmpr-i   and   began   to  ���������..���������.-<l  -'., ,-!���������.-.    Tlie oli.orr replied  with  ������-,.='--i:v, uLi-iPiipmi Ah-.\:>mler fell into n  it of fm y, and Ion -Ir-! (he man with in-  ult.   The 111.111 bowed liisu-iulf out of the  pyal present-?, wi-ni  imiuo and wrote a  ���������Iter  to  lhe lipii--*ippiii>-it, asking him  1  npologizp  within   l\v->tily-foiir hours,  Jding 1 hot if the apology'did not come  c would'slioot himself.   The Cznrowilcli  ok  no "notice, sending, neither excuse  >r  apology,  and   tho   ofiicer   kept  his  ord.    The Czar-henid  the  story  and  ras very angry with  liis' son, and  ordered him -to follow  the hearse of tho  officer to the grave. _ But even this terrible lesson failed to cure Alexander of  is haughtiness.   The gentle ways of the  Resent Czar, and  his .unwillingness  to  iirfc the feelings of anyone, arc'in sharp  -ntrast to-tho cruelty of the father.  Unlike his father, ho-makes a point  ' enever it is possible, of,driving out  one with the Empress and with a small  tendance...He docs not give notice ol  drives and walks abroad, and is often  ite unnoticed.- The Lite On*, when lie  ovo  out, had  the  stieets  lined  with  ops, and always diove in a'splenuid  uipngc surrounded by his guards and'  ' endant3, while thp police now seldom  ,ow in what direction   their Umpcroi  'ans to drive.    Thc  etiquette  of  the  :ssian court also h.13 become much Ies*  ict since the accession of Nicholas II..  d all his subjects are allowed admis  |m to-his presence.   The peasants will  *,'cl hundreds of miles to bring their  tions to him, for they-know that th'  will  personally  re'eeive  them  arr  himself read what they have writ  .He is grave,!!], public, but ln-privr-t  s full of fun, and very fond of clmli  the members of his intimate eireli-  ���������ne Czarina exactly suits her-husband  nd a'happier family life cannot be im  incd.    Her Majesty is almost alway  ith the Czar, even when he is at work.  More than one" good-story-is told o  e' Czar's sarcasms  and  repartee.*   Or  fie notable occasion he reduced a Itus  an general to. a frightful state of'con  nation.    It happened .=00:1 after hi"  ion, andbefoie his coronation, that  3 cycling in tho park at G.itschiiie.  ng, as was his wont, the uniforp  colonel.-.   Something  having'gon.  "g with his chain -he got off to ad.  it' and, just  at ,lh.it  moment,  a  "us general fronTa distant"province  ���������fc���������Not receiving the salute due "to  no ofiicer stepped  up  to  the sup  -oldnel and'peremptorily ."request  explanation of the seeming dis  "V "I am so Sony," said the C'z.-ir.  ���������"iMiave nofje't had the hoiioi"  ling acquainted with you, owinc  iiortness of'my reijfn, or I should.  3, have done so."  mincnt " Russian- . statesman"i=  ;ierfect double ofvthc C/.ir th.ii  en taken for liis'impeiial ruler   ���������" said the consideiate'rul  fussin", lo his double, "v. by don'i  Iter your appeal.intc somewhat���������  Biave olT your beard, for instance?   You,  blocking about as yo'u'do, and so to'  nibling your unfortunate Emperor,*run  frible risks���������frightful risks."   "What!'-  jaimed the faithful count;   "What, -1  fmbling Your Impei ial.Majesty as I  alter my face?    Nevetvsir, never!'*  -well,   Count  ���������* "   replied   the  li,r,  smiling and shrugging" his"shoul-  "as you will not alter your face  [irself, some of my Nihilist' subjects  111 alter it for you, I fear."        .   . ���������*>  *Ao characteristic story" of  the Czar's  j-vcof  simplicity has  been  going  thc  ou-nds of St. Petersbur*- lately. 'A-ccr-  nin lieutenant who was in a perpetual  jalc-of-impecuniosity was-one-day-seeir  |ding in a street car.   The other officers  the regiment wcrc,furious  at what  hey called an insult to the uniform'and  ktimated to the'culprit'that ho had the  lition of sending in his papers or being  |shiered,' and' tlie    unlucky   subaltern'  ok the former alternative! "Before he  jd time .to  do  so, however, the Czar  Jard of thc affair, and without a- mount's   delay   donned   a   colonel's   uni-  fm of the regiment in.question, and  Juntering out of ,hi3 palace hailed a ear,  ���������leied  it nnd ,.sat  calmly  down  until  [slopped in front of-the barracks'.'. lie  fsired the ofllcers to be.called, and ad-  jessed them thusT "Gentlemen, I have  1st ridden from the" palace in a street  |r, and I wish to know if you desire mc  1 send in my papers?   I presume I have  l-graced my uniform."    "Sire," replied  r    major, nervously,    "Your Majesty  |u1d never do  that."    "Then," replied  C/.ar with  an amused smile,    as I  Ive not degraded thc uniform, Lieutcn-  It D. cannot have done  so, and  will  "fus retain his commission in this region t, even if he, like mc, dares to ride  public conveyance."  [lie Czarina is as fond of a joke and "a  f.nk as is her lord.   During last sum-  J-r's visit to Kiel she and her sister,  lineess Heinrich, were paying a.visit on  Sunday morning to an-art shop in,the  Mnisehc Strasse.    A crowd  of ' inquisitive citizens,waited outside to see tho  idies  come  out, and  it  was  a  crowd  ji-hich inei cased every minute.   Half nn  pur, and an hour went by, and still the  [pedant ones waited  in vain, until a  \sper  went  round   that  the  Czarina  the   Princess   were   luck     at  the  floss.   On perceiving the densencss of  crowd Her Imperial Majesty asked  manager if he had not a back exit  .his hou3C.    She  was  told  the  way  lb*aried by a low wooden fence.   "Oh,  Jean manage that," laughed the Rus  Ii Empress, "if you can lend us a lad-  |."   That useful arlicle was found nncl  Jc-ed against  the boarding, and  over  lang the royal ladies, Ihoioughly cn-  fii"*; the fun.   Tliey went thiough thi  [iiirt, reached  the street on thc othei  |dc, and regained  the Schloss, not fa.  a few minutes.  Curioiss Bits of News.  General Ilooilh has recently acquired  thirty thousand acres of land in Western Australia,, \vliere he will establish a  great Salvation Army ngiicultural and  Industrial colony-, which no will populate  from the London1 slums.  M. Bortholot expresses the opinion, in  the Paris "Temps,*' that tho time will  come when chemists will be ablo to pro-  pure more digestible and nutritious foods  than we now derive from the animal  and vegetable world directly" but he  does not believe, that it wi'l bo possible,  ns homo suppose, to concentrate nutriment enough for a meal into a few capsules.  Over one-half of the total length of  the Capo to Cairo railioad h.is already  been built. Kails have been laid from  Cape Town lo a poinl within 200 mik'3  of the banks of tlio /".liubcsi, a distance  of 1,500 miles, and fiom Cairo to tho  junction of tlm lllue and White Kile,  1,-tOO miles from that city. The gap between Uio two Ici'inlii.ils yet to be filled  is 2,800 miles. The I'ulnwnyn-Ileir.i  11.1 Uway, C00 milc3 in length, joins tho  system"wilh the poit, of .Mombasa on Uie  oaslern seaboaid.  A woman of Kli7nbetli, M..T., lias a  poodle with a diamond set in one of iU  iront teeth, and all over the country  thoro are dogs and i'iits whoso open  mouths reveal bridgo woik, gold crowns  nnd other examples 01" good dentistry.  But the filling of the loeth of horses is  comparatively new. Yet, new -as it is,  already a number; of thoroughbreds  have undergone it,'and. in the'jner  stables of Now York, Philadelphia and  Chicago many horsed car .show glittering  gold teeth. It is snid that a horse in W.  C. Whitney's stables was tho first in the  world to have a tooth filled.  A London physician of largo practice  asserts that, owing to his extremely  'sensitive sense of smell, lw'ca'nVfoiotolI  the coming of death forty;e-ight" hours.  He says thnt when a patient comes,within two days of death a peculiar earthy  smell is'emitted from tho body. When  the fnt.il disease is slow in its progress  the odor makes its appeaiuncc as'|-i*uch  as three days beforehand; but whiln'the  disease is of the galloping kind, thel 'oc-  tor says lie receives much shorter warning, lie attributes tho smell to niwr-.i-  fication, which begins within the llociy  before life is extinct. Dogs aro though\  to have this" sense, for hunting houi\ids  have been observed to begin a mournfful  bayhig a day or two boloio their uiaW  tcrs died. -,  ' A "sweethearts' trust"-hai been "'organized by the young women of "Fremont, Neb., and as a result there is consternation among the men. The new  "trust'' is known as the Young Women's  Reform Union," and Miss liliK-ibeth Mac-  kenzio is,at its head..- Hereafter,"if-a  man who is known to them is seen entering a saloon or is caught'doing any-'  thing against the' moral code of , the  trust, he will be immediatsly blacklistec  by his fair associates; that is, his best  girl will refuse to.have anything to do  with him unless he immediately, mends  hia ways. "-"He will als9 be barred from  parties, and will be snubbed,if he'meets  any of thc members of the union on the  street. Thus far tho union has been getting'along, with remarkable success. It  has boon in existence oaly a few weeks,  yet ln that time a dozen men classed as  , moral' delinquents ��������� have boen . eutdoing  themselves in their efforts -to. have tlie  blacklist against them removed. - Thn  -"club was'formed as t!ie~i<*sult*of a revival meeting held there recently by the  Eev. Mr. Williams, who hurled his entirs  "vocabulary at saloons and drinking men)  Only Knew One Side of the Question/1  |'A lille philanthropy covers a mullilud.  fraud.  What Part Should Reason Play?  A Philosophie Western wriler speaks  thus of tlie part ieason should play in  love nfl'uirs:  Be.ison, unfortunately, is not con-  milled very eften by lovers. Tlie marriage, of reason ia held in conlcmpt by  the young and lomantic of both sexes,  especially in this country, whore children maka thoir own matches and parents aro n������t asked for th(*ir consont.  When a jmir ������-f penniless young fools  run away from home and marry because  their paionts bade them separate or  wait, the newspapers, instead of ridiculing or reproving them, maka much ol ihe.  aflnir, call it a loniintic flight, piint  pliologniplu of tho couple ancl encourage  other couples to imitate their madness.  I.ove is a strange and ���������sometimes a  fleeting emotion, and it behooves all who  feel it stirring in their blood to go slowly ami lo follow the guidencc of llieir  reason rather Limit their passion. TI1010  aie so many imsco of p.issing inf.ild.ition  mistaken for love lli.it a man or woman,  perceiving the symptoms within, should  c.iicfiilly analyze the ''.a-,o and hy many  tests (leteiiiiine whether it he tho genuine uiticle or ono of the many counterfeits. A man should project his reason,  as it worn, out of himself and study himself nnd tho girl impartially as though  they woro strangers. He should ask  himself -aUpUm-i- they aie of equal mental  ability and equal education, whethor  their tastes are similar, whother they are  well matched physically, whether she interests him merely because of her pretty  face and figure, whethor lie could agree  with his peoplo-in-law in the event of his  marrying thc girl, and whether he could  suppoit her in thc degree of comfort or  luxury to which sha haB been accustomed. He should consider, too, tlie probability of the girl's being happy or unhappy with him. He should weigh his  own faults nnd even tell thc girl about  them so that she may be warned. She  will not believe his confession, however,  and thc only benefit in making it is thc  feeling of having done his duty nnd hidden-nothing. .'  Loveis, contemplating matrimony,  should bear in mind that living together all a couple's lifetime is something  vastly different from holding hands in  the parlor on two or throe evenings a  week. It is oasy to be good-humored  "l*tnd agreeable to each other at occasional dinners, but a man and woman, going  into matrimony, should be good-humored  and Rgiecable to each other at bieakfasl  as well a3 at dinner, and at breakfast ev-  ^'oiy day in the year. He who raves  [about the curls in li6r hair,- when he  sees the girl in her hast gowns, must remember that after maniage he will see  Ker sometimes with hair uncurled and  costume none too neat. Any girl can  ^he .attractive in a pretty silk waist witli  "ribbons and bows and "all the help3 tc  lovfllinesa that women know; but the  girl'a man, marries nuijht.to be attractive',^ him at all times, bending over  the kitchen stove as u ell as bending over  th������*p'ano, getting up hi the 1morning a���������*  well as dancing in a ballroom. Similarly,  the .man ,���������*.. *prl->n������rrii������s ought-to please  her ' when' hii beard is two days old as  w������H as'-when it has b������>6n lately shaven,  in" his'business clothes as well as in his  handsomer evening suit. ,  'Courtship is one tUing and matrimony  quito ������inothcr. Matrimony is life,'and  life ia'fuii of dullness and routine. Courtship is a round-of dances, dinners, nribon-"  light oo'iiversations, lomantic walks, per-  fervid .protestations .of love, sentiment,  vowV; ������v>.;gh3, h?.nd-cIa.sp*^Riid ecsi-isies.  Matrimony is the ' constant" companionship" of two people in their riglit senses,  and the question wliich reaso.n should  answer for tho lover .is that of his suitability for a certain woman on the lower,  *le*!3 aoiial piano of inatiiraony. Marry-  iiig is something like betting one's whole  fortune on a-horse race. One may go  it blind, as many do, and lay*one's money on a certain hoise because it is pretty  and steps high, or one may' carefully estimate the form and recoid of the entries and base one's choice on what the  liorse is and has done and what its ancestors are'and have done. .In neither  case .is one certain of winning, but the  -San who bets on form is more'likely, to  -Sin than he who bets on the mere beauty of-a horse. Thcic are some who ad-  ��������� msc people to refrain from going into  fihe nialrimoiii.il gamble, but these are  ite timid who would not go seeking hea-  >ifvl>n for fear of stumbling into hell.. One  laust venture something to win the  prizes of life, and the man and woman  who aie happy in their marriage have  ���������won the greatest of all "prizes.       "  -Receipt."  . "Is life worth living!" '  "*,  /'Never having died, I cannot say."  Caught on the' Fly."  *  Brevity may be the soul of wit, but a  story published in the New York "Tribune" shows that some men can be both  long-winded and witty. The stoiy has  to do with a minister of the old school,  and with the poet and banker, Edmund  Clarcneo Stedraan, and two New York  millionaires, who were his companions  on a fishing trip in Northern Maine.       ,.  The New Yorkers entered the, little  backwoods meeting-house just as ,thc>  preacher began his sermon. He continued speaking for two hours, and finally, when it got late.in the afternoon,  and he showed no sign of stopping, thfe  vacationists began to get uneasy ancl  wonder if they would get out of th'e  woods before dark. At last they feU  that they could stay no longer, so they  rose, and started to file out.  The thread of the. parson's discourse  snapped off short.  "Under the circumstances," he said,  grimly, "we will inteirupt our sermon  and take up the collection at this point."  Inflected Enf-hsh.  While he was being shown ahout Chicago by the mayor of thc I city, tho  French ambassador, Monsieurl Comb**"*,  expressed his thanks, snvs tlho New  York "Times," nnd added:*  "But I am sorry so to coc"j*.roach on  your time."-     /.< j  "Oh," answered the mayor, "den't  think of thrtt. But you drjn't mean  cockroach. Monsieur Camboni; it's encroach you mean." }  "Oh, is itJ I see���������a difference in gen-  iti.- , 1  ^Workmen's_Daredeyiltries._-���������  "I remember," said a bridge, contractor some time ago while on  'the ������ subject of workmen's dare-  [dcviltries, "when working at the big  ! bridge across the Niagara, wlicn the two  t cantilever arms had approached within  fifty feet of each other, a keen rivalry  "as to who should be the first to cross  sprang up among the men. A long  - plank connected the two arms, leaving  about two and a half feet of suppoit at  'each end. Strict orders were issued that  no one should attempt to cross the  plank upon penalty of instant dismissal.  At the noon hour I -suddenly heard a  ���������great shout fiom tho men, who were all  staiting up. liaising my eye3, I saw a  man step on the end of that plank, Stop  a minute, and look down inlo the whirlpool below. I knew ho was going to  cross, and I shouted to him. but he w:>.s  too high up to hear. Deliberately he  walked out until he readied the middle  of the plank. It sagged far down wilh  his weight until I could see light between the two short supporting ends  and the cantilevers on whieh they rested. He saw the cad ia front of him do  this, hesitated, and looked back to see  how the other end was. I thought he  was going to turn. He stopped, grasped  both edges of the plank with his hands,  and, throwing his feel lip, stood on hU  head, kicking his legs m tlie air, cracking his haels together, and yelling to the  terrified onlooker.?. This' he did for  about a minute^���������it seemed to me like  forty. Then he let his feet drop down,  stood up, waved his cat, and trotted  along the plank to the other side, slid  down one of the. braces hand over hand,  and regained the- ground. XVe discharged  him, of coursa. but what did he care?  He got all the glory his fellows envied  him, and he could command work any-  wkere.**  Th*5***������i,"'v"'ro  Mrs. Duzzit has at last discovered  the difference between a "laccipt" ami  a "recipe," through the ministration*,  of an obediont cook and a  careless husband. At loast, she  blames it on her husband's carelessness, although he pleads innocence in  that respaet, but if feminino logic counts  for anything, he merits the accusation.  Mrs. Dux-iit clipped a recipe for a new  pudding from her magazine the other  day and placed it under a book on the  library table. Then sho paid the grocer's bill and threw it with some other  settled accounts in the diawcr of the  same tabic. Concluding one day to try  the pudding, she said to Luanda, the  cook*, us she was mapping out the dinner:  "You go up lo the libiary and tell Mr.  Duz^it to give you that new receipt I  left about the libuiy table. I am going  shopping iind may not get back until  dinner is leady, but all you need to do  is to use just tlie proportion of ingredients giveii in the leccipl, and then we'll  seo whether lhat new pudding is as good  as the magazine promised it would be."  "Yiissuin," said  tiie obedient Luciniln,  Mrs. Du/./.it left aud Lueindii went to  the libiary.  "Please, suh," she lomaiked, "I des  wants dat recoipt Missus Duzzrit done  lef* hyah."  "What receipt?" asked Mr. D1w7.it.  "De one whut tell 'bout all dem flags  I's got ter put in dat new puddin'. Sho  say she put hit on de lib'ry table."  Mi*. Duzzit tossed the papers about,  peered into the drawers, and finally  handed Lucinda a slip which seemed to  be what she wanted.  About half an hour later Lucinda  rapped softly on the door of the library  and apologetically said:  "'Scuse mo, suh, but mus' I use all  deeo hyuh t'ings whut dishyci-e papuh  ear. tor use?"  "Suro thing," answered Mr. Duzzit.  "Do just as Mrs. Duzzit said you should."  Lucinda returned to 'her kingdom  mumbling about thc peculiarities of the  white folks, and for the next two hours  she was busy hunting all over thc kitchen and pantry for the necessary articles  for the pudding.  At dinner she carried the pudding in  on tho largest tray in the house and deposited it on tlie serving table with an  air which said' that ehe washed her  hands of all consequences.  . "What is that, Lucinda?" asked her  mistress.  "De puddin'.'*  "The pudding? Goodness gracious! I  never dreamed it would bo that big. You  may help us to some* of it, though."  When Mr. Duzzit's portion was placed  "before him', he scanned it (critically,  sniffed suspiciously, and turned it gingerly over with his spoon.  '"  Mtb. Duzzit, however, liad thc courage  which comes from an implicit faith in the  culinary page, and she tried a spoonful.  "Mercy!" she cried. "Why, Lucinda,  what in the woild have you put in thist"  "Nuflin' *cept whut de receipt said, ter  use," avowed Lucinda.  "Hum," mused Mr.'Duzzit. "It "-ausb  be a fuany recipe."  "Woll," asserted Mrs. Duzzit, "T never  saw such a looking affair before in all  my life. Lueinda, you surely have made  a "mistake in mixing it."  " 'Deed, I hasn't," stoutly answered the  cook. "1 done uso eve'y-t'ing des lak de  papch said."  "Did tbf.y offer a cash prize to anyone  who would eat the pudding?" enquired  Mr. Duzzit.. "Because, if they, did, I am  about to miss an opportunity to enrich  mj'soLf, for I must deprive myself of the  extreme pleasure of tackling this compound." " > ->  "1 des gib mah two weeks' notice  raight now," announced Lucinda. "Yo'  .all de fust white folks whut say dey  won't eat mah cookin', en I know-whah  dey plenty er quality folks dat glad ter  hab me in dey kitchen. En 1 gwine  right out en foich in dat receipt, en yo'  see fo' yo'se'fs dat I des use whut hit say  ter use."  Lucinda retreated to the kitchen "in  sable dignity, and 'returned solemnly,  bearing the "receipt," wliich lead:"  "H. E. Du//.it to I. Feodum, Dr.  "One can corn, 10 cents; one'box shoe  polish, 5 cents; six eandle3, 15 cents;  two pounds ,rice, 10 cents; two bars  washing soap," 9 cents; one cake yeast, I  cent; bottle olive oil, 23 cents; one-half  peck potatoes, 20 eents; one mackerel,  18 cents; three pounds prunes, 45,cents;  ten pounds salt, 10 cents; six packages  flower send, 30 cents; one feather duster, 33 cents.   Paid." -  "Dah 't is," said Lucinda. '"Dah 't is.  -An'-dcy-all-in-dat-ole-puddinL'ceptin'-de  han'le cr dat feather dusteh.'en' blame'  .'f I knows how ter wuk'hit in whenst I's  stirrin' up all dat otlieh trash. An' cf  yo' all lak dat kin' er puddin', den"yo'  bettch git some othch lady ter ten' ter  de cookin' foK you,' 'case 1 ain' use' ter  hit."  ��������� But Mr. Duzzit soberly took his wile  by thc amvlcd her to the libiary, took  down the big dictionary, and pointed out  the words "receipt" and "recipe" and  their definitions.���������XV. D. Nesbifc in  "Judge." .  Inappropriate.  "Funny names things do get," murmured Benson, as he looked into the  window of a fur shop. "How do you  mean?" asked Hensou. "Why, sec that  thing over there on the 6tand? Meant  for a chin-warmer, and thoy call it a  chinchilla." But when Hciibon turned to  rebuke him, Benson bad moved on.  New arrival���������Well! Well! I had on  Idea that heaven was paved with gold.  St. Peter���������No���������anthracite.  "So Smith declined to prosecute those  Burglars he found in his house the other  aight." "Yes. I understand Smith didn't  have on his pajamas that niglit, and he  fears the disclosures of a public trial  mipht imperil His social ���������tatus."���������Detroit "Jom-naV -_*..'������ rAZzs**!  His'Night Out.  _ j^on't i*Je Too Modest.  Hero is bomp nd\ ii-p for those who  would succeed and -pl aip in doubt as  to tho wisdom of being too uggu-ssive:  Advertise joi*i**plf. l,it(. is a keen  competition and it behooves pvery man to  put his best foot forwaid and lo flaunt  his merits in tlie public eye. The modesty of gicnliiGss is nil hash. There is  no such thing. Oiciitnpss knows the  necessity of holding the center of the  stage as much as possible and seldom  oveilooks an oppoi(unity to do so. The  man who has in him nil the elements  that nuke huccess uaseils himself on  every occasion. In cyciy company lip  docs something to fucus attention on  himself for a while. He st lives lo make  an impression so thai he will be noticed  .uid talked ahoul. lit: i.-, aware that the  public mciiKiiy is Midi I and that the  world must he reminded continually of  tlio existence of its celelnities.  A young lawyer, by nature modest and  lctiring, nvule up hi-, mind six months  ago that modesty did not, pay. He was  conscious of his ability, but his light was  hidden, lie ������,"\v mo-i of lp,is mind and  learning making their way belter than  lie, nnd he ipsolvpd to imitiilo Uiem nnd  push himself forwaid. He joined half a  dozen oiganiyatioiiR, including two fia-  toinal oiders, a church society, a social  elub, a canjeia club and a political club.  He attended every meeting ancl spoke  on every question. Having thrown off  his natural diffidence lie expressed very  positive opinions in n. veiy loud voice.  He had been in the habit of using an ordinary conversational tone in speaking,  but at the birth of his great resolve he  pitched his voice several tones higher  and kept it at that pitch. He became  disputatious and intolerant in debate  He took a front scat always and ceased  to" feel humiliated when rebuked for going too far and not minding his own  business. He rather lelishcd a quarrel,  for it caused talk and spread hi*, namo  among the people. He developed* a marvelous ingenuity for getting his name  into print. Whenever he commenced an  nation at law ho went after the rcport-  eisaud told them all about it. WhcncvcU  he made a Fjieech he sent a copy of it to  all tho np\,sp:ipcis. Ho counted that  week Io-,t i.i ".\iiu.h he was not mentioned  once or (wiee by Hi', piess.  This u 01k b.'s" 1 old. While a few sneer  at him t!'c gie.it niajoiily take him at  his own v'-ialion. Tlie"fioiit scat, to  get \.-.'tii he used lo go early lo meetings, it, i>u v ic-.crvcd for liim, and he  may go Lite. H'e who had trouble catching llie chairman's eye when he wished  lo bie.ik into a debate is now called on  to addicls thojc pvesint. He is consulted on all measures fr-i fear he would oppose them in the assembly. The prominence .which he founerfy seized a"  though he "-ere stealing it is now freely  "given as his due. His practice improves  because lie is talked about. People go  to n lawyer whose name is in the papcis  every day just as they buy a soap whose  name is on eveiy dead wall. They may  "know nothing about the'Iawycr as they  may know nothing about the soap, ex-  , ccpt thc name, but they employ the lawyer as they buy the soap: Why? One  must probe deep into the human mind  to find thc answer, but no matter what  ' the answer the fact stands.  AN AffFDUIlSTAKB.  Physician Prescribes Nuxvorrjr  ica for a Kingston   Lady  with the Risult that she  is Paralyzed  A Thrilling Experience Resulting from a  Doctors's Blunder���������Tortunately She Recovered and tells the Story of thc whole  Incident  Kingston, Out., Nov. 3.���������(Special).  ���������That Mrs. E. Lake, or 112 Clarence  street, this city, is alive to-day, is a  matter for wonder.  She says:  "My sickness was brought about  by overdose of SUyclininc prescribed  by a physician. It brought on Paralysis aflecting my left side, brain  aim and limbs.  "I was perfectly helpless and it  was impossible for mc to raise mj  lutt limb or open my fingers. I got  no sleep and often when I dosed my  eyes remained open. 1 liad not the  power lo close my eyelids.  "I suffered almost continually with  headache.  "My brain felt as though it was  too large for thc skull. My appetite  failed and I became very emaciated,  indeed, I was nothing but skin and  bones.  "I was three years under treatment,  many physicians having me under  their care, but without avail. At  last I became discouraged and gave  up all treatment.  "While reading a paper one day 1  noticed a testimony o������ one who was  cured by Dodd's Kidney Pills.  "My sister procured me a box of  the pills and I started on three pills  three times a day. I soon began to  experience a change for the better  wliich continued until I regained the  use of my-arm, hand and limb. My  headache also ceased and my appetite  returned.  "From this I soon picked up (lesh  and strength until I was as well as  ever. .      *.  " "I thank God and Dodd's0 Kidney  Pills for my health for by prayer and  this wonderful remedy,-I was cured  and -.have remained in good healtb  ever since, although this ��������� was over  fire years ago." --  Tired Tower���������The sinking coal miners want an eig*it-hour day.  Tough Tom���������Well, l'\e got no kick  comin' on a sixteen-hour night.  Sorrow or Self-Pity.  A man seldom feels less confident of  hi3 ability to say the right tiling  neatly than when he sits down to  compose a letter of condolence." One can  sciibble off the usual friendly letter without much care or premeditation. - A business letter may be modeled on set foi ma  and lcqunes little bi.iin energy. A letter of congiiitul.ition may. trip along  gaily, sayii'g nothing in pnifiuular. AX  letter accepting or dcoliinng an invitation sometimes exciciscs the invention,  but never taxes the mind very heavily.  A love letter 13 usually wiitten 'with  amoious spontaneity and, like other  kinds of folly, is easy to tho true lo-, er.  When it is labored it lings lalsc. A letter proposing marriage demands more  thought and couatige in the sending than  in the wiiting. Uufc a letter of condolence must appeal at once to thc mind  and to the emotions. It must not be too  familiar nor yet too foimal. It must.  sound sinceie and yet it cannot be sin-  ceie, for the arguments one makes in a  letter of condolence aie the tiite reasoning whicli is always brought out in  the time of beieavcmesit and which  neither consoles nor comforts those'who  are genuinely mourning. Putting theso  consolatory arguments on paper, one is  aware that they are dictated rather by  c_uslom.__than_ by_his -.owiil^opinionj^ond,  that they will "have as littlo. effect on  the. bereaved family as they would .have  on him if ho weie sorrowing over the  dead body of one he loved.  Tbe hackneyed arguments of consolation are levelled at the wrong point.  Thoy deal with the state of the dead one  and bid tho mourners mitigate grief with  thc thought that thc lamented one has  gone to a world that is fairer than this,  and is in a condition of beatitude. But  the toot of grief is not anxiety for the  slate of tho dead. It is rather self-pity.  Tears aie shed because one whoso company gavo the mourner pleasure has departed and will not come back. Religion  and philosophy both hold that the state  of the dead, in most cases, is better than  Hint of the living. The dead do not need  pity. They have no regrets at leaving  llu'*' woi Id. If death cuds all, then tho  dead rest sweetly in oblivion and aro ns  lilile affected by caie or soriow as they  were ton thousand years before they  were born. If there is heaven hereafter,  as all eiecds hold there is, then thc dead  man, if he lived honestly and well, is better off than he wus ucre below. The  only logical ground of pity for thc dead,  therefore, is fear that thc soul may hnvo  gone to'hell; and what sorrowing sur-  \ivor will admit lhat his grief is based  on that fcai? Do nof'the friends of  saints mourn as loudly as those of sinners?  There ig no shame in acknowledging  that the so-called soriow for the dead is  only pity for the living. Love bereft of  its object will mount its loss and its  giief will bo eomiiiriinurate with tho  strength of tho attachment. When the  mourner becomes used to thc loss his  giief abates acoordine to the rule of  Iciudly Natuif. But who is bold enough  te make this argument in a letter of condolence?  Miss. Kamra Feend���������I'd like to tales  a "photo" of your farmhand at work.  .   Farmer Brown���������-Ul right���������ef yew kin  spare the time. ...  Miss Kamra Feend���������Oh, this camera  -will catch him in just one-twentieth of a  .second.  Fanner Brown���������Yes; but it'll take ye  two hours tew ketch him workin'.���������  Judge.  Bill���������I see, he's a veiy close friend.  Jill���������Well, I don't know about his being a close friend.  "Oh, yes. he is. If lie wasn't close  you'd have boirowed money of him, and  if you'd borrowed" of liim lie wouldn't  havo been a friend."���������Yonkers Stales-  man.  THE HIRZD  MOTHER-iN-LAW  ���������.���������*���������- -  Will !*��������� the Honored r*i 1 *������������������ rt tlio Wrdilln/  Sood to T**������'' I'li-cc*.  '  That ugly old woree:*. mi:*ht prcvon":  the institution of .*" -it3 for dar.'.ii-*;;-  for breach of pro-r,.-:: is sussa*'-*'!.  though not proven, !>������������������ the followin**  sorio-comlc true stc.-y *u=t reported  ���������from Vienna, Austria:  A poor worklngn-.a- ittlr.s enc* pvfiling with some won -, in a tavern,  drinking cheap wine. confes***cd ltlm-  eclt in great trouble, liis sweetheart,  a poor cook, neither ' **>inr- nor beautiful, threatened hir.- ".ith court proceedings it he refusec 11 make good hi������-  promii-o of marryinr her. Ho shook  his head at every -*v ^estlon mado by  his friends. "I kr. . of only ,ono  thing." he sighed, "* it mls'it indticn  tbo girl to rellnqui-:' .it hoi-* on mo,  and that is if I can - -v he.r that he-  proc-pecti'.*'! mother-i. ���������nw !:"** h.ilr on  her teeth and Is po . arcd of -a cvtl  e;.-o."  '"Whoop!" cried on*- cf li!*: *T"*.rn-  tbir.er:*, "my own mo', icr-in-la��������� would  suit e.\!>ctly! If you ain't afia-d of ii������r,  ar. 1 -Mil ray mo for It, I will loan her  to you. The girl w-lli be *~.ire to ru>  away as soon as she Fsai her."  Pepi, tho betrothed, went at one-: to-  look at the old w-oma.i, and found her  as repulsive looking rs described.   Oa  condition that hm pay her $2 -=he agreed  to play  tho ro".**- of hia mother at a  meeting soon to take  place  between.,  herself, her "non" and the girl.   Then,  tho falthler***  lover Informed  his affianced that on a. **Jven day his mother-  would come to Vlaana for a meeting a"     .  a, certain hotel.  'At the ap-Mintad day and hour th-*--  trio met, and Mary, the poor fjirl, near-   .  ly fainted wh������a Pepi  Introduced tho-���������  ugly old woman as bis mother.    But?  .  she soon composed 1 ersel* and tried * .  to get on friendly terns with this supposed mother-in-law.    Pepi grew impatient,    and    slyly    remintie.l    his  "mamma"* that accorling to contract  she must make herseU as dlsagrceablo.  as possible.    She did.    She hegan by  consuming an astonishing quantity oi  wine, and would not leave oE kisGins   1  and  embracing her "dear  boy"  until  the latter, in desperation, trcd viciously on her corns to shew her his disap������-  proval of her tactics.  "Miss Mary," ehe said, "I hr.ve madrr-  Inquiries about you, and find you deserving of a happy future.   I wiii not- -  lend a hand to parting thore be!ongin~  together.   I have enteied into this joka   "  understanding   th*   real   intention   oft.  your betrothed; *M on'y wanted to find.  out If you would mavry him. even it.  his mother was -ruch a hag as I am.    .  Isn't it so, PepIT"    What  else could:���������  Pepi  do  but  murmur  "Aye?"    Jlary  w*as touched, and embraced the ug!y._ ,  but good naturcd old  woman.    Then  came full-pardon, con.p'.ete reconcilia   tion, and at th-s wedd'ng soon to tak-������.,M  place the hired mother-in-law will b**,*;  the most honored guest.    " ".  . ���������-. ��������� "i. I  -���������i  ���������!.  "What did you get, out of your garden  this year!" "I-*ot a day went by that I  didn't have one of my neigiiboi's chickens for dinner."  "How i3 Ann Jfati'da making out ns  postmistress at Elm Crossroads 1" "Getting aiong line. To day siio read twenty  postals, held nine lctler3 up to the lighr,  ai'd opened four newspapers."���������Chicago  "Xews."  A clerical correspondent .of Tbe London Express tells or a wedding ceremony  n which he oiliciatcd,. and- 111 his 7eal  for iubrical observances I.nd himself  open to a comical and crushing retort.  "All went well until the moment camo  when it is directed by the rubric that  the man shall place the ring upon the,  fourth finger of the woman's-lclt hand,  but then trouble began. The yokel, ap-  paicntly from neivou-ness or ignorance,  laid hold of the light hand of the expectant bride, and placed tbe ling there  resolutely. ' ������,  " 'No,' I said, with quiet Iirm:ies3, 'you  must put the ring onto ber left hand.'  To tbis his only reply was a stolid stare.  Thinking he had not undo"!stood me, 1  icpeated my words, but with no better  eflcct.  ���������JiWith-as-much-waru-.th-aiid-iiisistcnce-  -.s was justified by the occasion, I now  look the liimer grburd and said, 'If you  do not put the ring onto her left hanl I  i'.ui-L stop the soivice.' -;  ', "And then ^the climax came. With a  -.-impku-ciit smile, that s-ccined to sho*,i  !*is --.ilisfaition at Laving for the mo-  -.���������ent 'ljes.te,i' the parsjn, the bridegroom  ..-.Hied thu point for all time with tha  i\oidi, Ticiso, sir, she ain't get ncnar"  JOINTS.  The Awful  Twinges of  Rheumatism   Mean  Old Age in Youth.  Relief in  Six  Hours.  Ointments, Salves and Lotions are  positively worthless for Rheumatism.  Get at the cause���������the blood���������and by  purifying that, restore the system to a  clean, healthful condition. The Great  South American Rheumatic Cure relieves in six hours and cures in one to  three days Muscular and Articular  Rheumatism, Inflammatory ^ Rheumatism, Lumbago, Neuralgia, Sciatica, and  any affections of the .joints and muscles  arising from impure blood. Mr. F. E.  Wright of Toronto, Canada, writes: "I  suffered almost constantly with Neuralgia and Rheumatism. I used several  remedies, but nothing seemed to relieve  thc pain until I tried South Americas  Rheumatic Cure. After using a few  bott'es of 'Rheumatic Cure' and aise  "Nervine Tonic,' I was wholly cured."  Pain in the Region of the Kidney*.  Pain anywhere is a danger signal.  Pain in thc region of thc kidneys, meaDf  that they are not working properly.  The Oreat South American Kidney  Cure restores these organs to a healthy  working state. No. 3e  . Mnotlj'a Vot.* of-ninn!**.. *i  Possibly   the   most  novel   rcs-ran-sar*.' ;  ever made to a request to return a votoi  of thanks to a chalrmr-n was made by.-.-  Jfr.   Moody  during his  first  visit tt������t-  -  England.  "He had attended a Meeting at whic'.C^"-  the Barl of Shaftesbuiy was chairman.    ������  The duty of proposing a vote of thank*.   ,  was   asoigned   to  him,   and   tho  an.��������� -  nouneement made. _.        ,    -".  "Our American con-sis, the Rev-.;Mr-*_.  -  Moody, of Cnicago, will no'w move a,.....  vote of thanks to the" r.obie earl who>'--> .^  hai presided on this oc~asion." ��������� '- i  The whole thin*j was -.;uite out ef*Mr**-*  Moody's    l'ne.      English    formalitiea   *  might or might not hs-e come grace��������� .    ^  fully from bis lips had he attempteit.T���������  them, but he did not.   "With an utter-   --  disregard of conventionality ho burst*,- -  upon the audience with the bold announcement:  "The speaker has mad*- two mistakes. -  To begin with, I'm no! the Itev^ Mr_  JMoody  at all.    I'm  plain  Dwight. L.  Moody, a Sunday school worker.   And?  then I'm not your American cousin*-; ' ~  by the grace ot God, I'm your brother^'  interested  with  you  in  our  Father'* ���������_,-t  work for His children. "   .'  "And now about this vote of thani***,-.  to the 'noble' earl for being our chair���������;  man this e'ening.'   I don't see why w*������  should thank liim any more than he-  should thank us.    When at one tlmotr'*  they ofTered to thank our Mr. Lincol*;  for presiding over a meeting in HUn���������"  ois he stopp������d it.   He sa'd he'd tried:  to do his duty, and they'd _tried to da-  ���������theirer~Ile_ihbueht~it~was_aboxit;"u������-* '""'���������  even thing all around."  , That opening fairly tcok the breatlh  away from Mr. Moody's heirer*,. S*ic"S*K  ,  a  talk'could   not  bo  gauged   by  ansjrj,  known standard. - Mr.  Moody carrle'K.  his English audience wilh  hlri  fror*  that beginning to his latest labors.  -*''*'"-"."--������������������ I  IVh-r ".TUIIe W������ll.������ Willi :i *: l-������i! t>-lln*-..|  "Hoo. lux.,  two," ran*; throuth th*. -  house at 2 ,1. tn. "    r,  "Great ���������"������������������",veninr!    "V,*I*-'.   is    that*"*", '  and thc bead of the house- car. up in be* x.  and blinked nt an electric light shir-inr**.  thi-i-i-fli iha -Alndow.  "John, slaj right where **2U r.r'?; Lil  r.ot let yon ���������*���������*��������� down s*r.lr- to be killed  Did yoii ever bear such a noise?"  "Afama. what is it?" came In an agl-  Int'-d whisper from th.-> next room, antl  then tlio il;>i*;hter ru-hsd wildly lnt*r  Urn par'-nUil liedchamber.  "Keep i-ool. now. Don't go Into nt*  hlglifitriko-i I'm. golnc; down to seo ,  what that Is." and ii-- dug up an. o'dP  muzz!������-ltiiiiling pistol he bad canfcstJ-  In thr- civil ������u and that had been load-1  en slnee IS7J. "I'll show 'em. Erer**-'.  man's- bon.---* If hi* own cast���������" . {  "Hoo. boo, hotx" '   "}  Tht? father dropped  thc gun and Vts  blew a  whole corner o.T  tho bureau-.''  The danr.b'rr dived iinil'r the bed ants'  the m-ithw >elled "Murder!" at the to*-"-'-.-  of h*-r lnn**.*<     * .'  "Shut up*" ordered thc veteran, ashts-  reached for his artilif-ry. "Stay rlghlf1  wherp yon Are. I'11-figiit my way to thar'  telephoti** and get tbe police. If the**-"  get to sbt*otiug down there don't show,  a llpht. I know the house and the*-;,  don't."  "Hoo, br*o hoo." just as the old gen-*-,  tieman -"-cached the top of the stairsJi  He went down like a cartwheel and*'  ���������-hot a hole in the ceiling as big as tha'-  bo;**om of a tub.  "Did rou bear my owl?" shouted WIU .  lie. as he d^'bed from the third story.'  "Got him in tbe country yesterday antS"  h."n*r him in the dining room when 76!  get home last night. Hain't he af[  dan-Iy?" j  rc-or vr-Il-le! He walks llko a ho***.}  with inflammatory rheumatism, anoV  the last he saw of M-s u-**l it was flyintf;  over the torn taward Redaeld,���������Uetroia  Tree Press.     - ������-*���������    -��������� ^ : COST SOMETH1NGTO SQUARE  ���������Tlio "Srxl "I irr.c i*. rriond lV������nti������n Accomo.  ������������������alien lie <:<*<*��������� It ta C������ol Cull.  A ycur.g bachelor met a friend���������a  ranfe-d mau���������and poured out his tale  *., wee in scr.-cthing liko this:  "l say, old chap, I'm up against It.  Vc>-2->rro*.v is the birthday of my. best  j-.-rl, end. o������ course. I want to make  her some rcrt of a present To tell  you the irtitn. 1 have promised her a"  sold belt hr.'-kle tbat she fancies, but  the darnel thing coats $25, and all tho  --.maey I can rake and scrape just now  i-, a bograrly $10. Now, if you'll lot  r:e have tbe other **15 I'll hand it back  the next pay day."  The married man waa not flush bim-  relf j.ist then, but as ho knew his  friend was all right, aad really wished  tj do him a favor, he said:  "*l l-.r.ven't the money about me, but  -���������'il tell you what I'll do. I have an'  ���������.ccount at Blank's jewelry shop. Let's  so down there and see the buckle. I'll  "buy It and have it charged to my ae;  < otint, and you can hand me the $25  -- t nr time before the first of the month,  - -    -..���������hen the bill will be rendered."  The ecberce worked to a charm. Tho  j oung man with the "best girl" was delighted, and the buckle was carried off  ia triumph.   Tlmt would have been the  - end of the episode doubtless, had not  -'   the wifeof the lender got hold of tha  -*5. bill during ihe absence of her husband  . -"-Non a buslnc-s trip.   Judge of his con-  - - sternatlon upon, receiving a telegram  *������-' in these words:  "Come home at once.    I know all."  Tak?ng the t.i.-.t train he reached tho  ***    city,  took  a  cab  to ride home,  ahd,  -""*   'lashing upstairs three steps at a .time,  ���������*"���������-. "he cntere-l his bedroom and found his  ' wife in tears, while engaged in pack-  ���������   ing hsr trunk.  "You wicked, deceitful wretch!" sho  .,*  exclaimed, between sobs.   "Who would  " -    r.avo believed that you -would deceive  - me Jn this way?   I am going home to  -i���������;-jo���������uioui^.!"   I   wi���������wi���������wish- I  -" had ne���������nev���������never left her.at all���������  1'Oo-hoo-hoo!"  "Deceive yc-.il" cried the frantic and  "bewildered * husband, "what do-yoii  "liie-in: Who. what���������why, I never deceived you In my life."  "Ob, you needn't stand there and try  to lie out of it!    I know all!    1 know  all about the hussy.      Look,  here is  the bill fcr the gold belt you bought  her!    To  think  that  it  should  eves  come -to th���������this���������boo-hoo-hoo!"  ' Then followed tho copious tears and  . -toes.   "When the wife's grief had about  ���������spent itself in tears, the hu.--.band got  ���������-fca opportunity to explain, and it took  .* remarkable eloquence and . abundanco  of carresses to straighten matters out.  "But -wasn't it a narrow  escape?"  1 - raid   he,   as   he   detailed   tbe   story"  -'���������Everything was against me.    It had  j- .p.   suspicious    look,    certainly.    After  '"(tliis, when a friendr wants an accom-  "-incdatlon he gets it ln cool cash, if I  Shave to go out and borrow it."���������Qiu*  -rcicnati Er-'iiircr.  iiili-.t ltequcst.  "i  "Say, "vVorrsy, can I have the'core?".  >���������������*"       .���������       *=!<: \\*:n  In n l'a*C, -'  ��������� .lie was a dissipated looking individ-  .-^������������������{jisal. though dressed in the latest style.  *^"-'-*He pajd his fare and sat in the car  -��������� ."quietly for a while. Then he opened  ' r" "bis lips and *���������*.-������.denly carolled: . u  ���������v t . "Tin ofily'a bird in a gilded cage,  ",*"1"*JA-~beauuful si-jht to see."   .  . 1.11 the pas-sensors turned and looked  .--*���������TA*-*n"-G-ir1qu*.r;Q*ily.   The dissipated in-  "'4    dividual paused and looked at Uie pax*  - -sengers and  smiled,  ���������**! beg pare:1-.'-' hf* said, "t beg par-  s_J_^c.i*u-_^A2LrL^_^oi_sbaxm_done!_ 1 ain't  '\ *ao bird.   "Bir's got wings^   rfiainTgot"  "So wings.    I'm camel.    Thash what J  *i*r>:"  r ir-r'TIf-.r-d his voice and sang again:  /"* "Tm only a. camel in a gishled cage."  Ve paused again. "No' I ain't no  -ca.B:->L IVr'on me ladies, pleash  -,p-i.r'on no. I ain't no camel. Camel  -can go sicven d'-iys without drinkln*.  *3 couldn't go -*'.=*. en minutes wishout  >drii*iin'. I'm Lippopotamus. Thasl*  -���������jR-'nat I am."  hip'poi-mus   In   gishled  HOW TO CTVE WEIL  FOR THE   LEAST    MONEY  AT.LA3T  TO BF SOLVED.  'Tm   cniy  "A "be-L. ful  -No.  **.***."t  *->  i::p'po<*h-m'','=  Hip'-  -poihmes lUcc !n T>'iter.   1 cc-.iidn't live  zn  water.    L-ou't like water.    Ish  all  rite to wa=h cot'ies in.   Ain't no good  ���������to live in.   I ���������.es:- I'm a bird after all.  -u-*cr  If  I'm   bird,  then   I   can   fly   io  thloon. ������I'm soin' fiy now."    And ho  got off the c-r and disapi.c-ared, sing*"  ing:  "Tm  Just  an   ostrich   in   a   gishled  "He's n bird, all right," :aid the con  --J'i'tor.  Sl.t* Cu'lerfttooii  I:.  . "TMrs. Er?-.k=���������1 do w-ish. John, tnat  ooa "would eiplain this Chinese ques*  *tiora to me- i  Mr. Spaik?���������It's very simple, Maria.  Sou ,see. -L r HuTislans don't want an  "���������ope-a door. -i ;t desire to keep a slice of  -.China fo: '...dinselve*-. Nov.*, the Japa-  jxesa -war.'. .m open door and wish to  -"keep Ttussix from keeping a slice of tha  .country. On the other hand. Germany  ia t**yins to keep Japan fiom keeping  ���������Rossi;-, frcai closing the d-xir, and also  twants to keep her from kteping Ilus-  -sla's "keeping a slice of China. Now,  i-merica. only has a trade interes1:, but  if .she can keep Germany from keeping  a. slice of territory, the coor can b������  kept open.   See?  Mrs. Sparks���������Oh: yes. Anyhow, tho  -weather's so -warm there t'.iat the Chinese will find it more comfortable to  keep their doors open. Still, I can't  sea why the Powers are making ench a  loss over a little thing like that���������Phi ia-  jaelphia Enquirer.  ���������You remember that bank leller who  stone 'r.:-**-'*e*f so soiid with the ofi.'.i:.i3  "by *-.i*:-----ti-:s that the bank empljy(*3  5io*a3d wear clothes wi'.l.cut \,j2'i !s  curing banking hours?"  **Tes.  jVliat about him?"  ���������aie^tar-il-J.ay^'.jth S60.000 by thrcw-  -*ag it out cf the window to a co-iicd-  j*-rit-*.''-rCIevel-*,n'J "Plain Dealer.   ���������'  Prt*rci*or At*rntor, u.l Speclnl A**ent of llio  . ���������pept-.flmeiit of A{rrI<-.ulttiTO Is Contluctln**  a s������-i1l-������ i>i I'ttiut JiiveBtif-ntluus With Tlm*;  Unit In Viow.  Uncle Sam Is looking Into his muis?-  kocping. He has a big and varied  family, of many tastes and several  colors, and'he is at present engaged-  in spending $17,500 In finding out  ���������A'hat this hig family eats.  He is going about his investigation  in a systematic way, looking into family larders, stato by state and section  by section, and jotting down in his  notebook item by item what theso  people of theso United States oat.  Not only what they cat, but what  1hey waste; how much they pay for  their food, how much nourishment  they get from it, antl how much  energy; how much they overeat and  how much they undercut; antl all witli  the purpose o������ bettering the conditio-j  of the poople.  Professor II. O. Atwater, as special  ogent of the department ot agriculture  is with this sum conducting a series of  food  investigations in this country.  lie has already made studies of tho  dietaries of the popple of nine states  and one territory, and ho has so far  discovered, among -other things that:  -The*, people of the United States am  the most abundantly fed and the mosr  wasteful.  That they have the greatest variety  of food.  That, as a rule, it is poorly cooked  and worse served.  That palate and convenience aro  considered in the selection of food before wholesomeness, nourishment an'l  economy.  That the dietary that most nearly  approaches the scientific standard rf  a roan's food requireaaents is the dietary of the most Isolated, the most  halul, the most barbarous foreigner.'  In the United'States���������the Chinese.  - That the smalles.t sum any man has  been actually found living on in this  fiountry is three and one-half cent;  per day.  Professor At water's investigations  have a range that swings from thn  dietaries of university students' club*,  to the dietary of the cotton field negroes and the tortilla frying native*;  of New Mexico, from families who  live on $100 a month to families who  live on ?100 a year.  Strangely enough he found famiiier,  living or. $100 a year better fed���������from  the scientific, point of view���������than  families who have $100 a month.  A man, says science, requires " so  much of carbohydrates ln oidcr io  live and work.  The protein, or nitrogenous portion  of food, is the muscle-forming constituent nnd of It nil the working machinery, of the body ts.composed.  The fat and carbohydrates aro necessary to supply the heat and energy,  and a certain amount of fat is neces-  Eary for storage against tho rainy clay  of illness or other overdraft.  The physical equilibrium depend t  upon the proper proportions of theso  food constituents taken luto the system.  By investigation and comparison  science has determined that the average noma] man requires these constituents in his daily.food in these proportions:   .      ���������  ���������- .  Th man with little physical cxer-'  cise requires 3.20 ounces of protein,  the-same amount of fat, and lO.Sfl  Ouuce's of carbohydrates, wliich together have a fuel'value of 2,450 calorics.  The calorie Is tbe unit, of heat ot  energy.  The man with active work require!  5.2S ounces of protein, the samo    oi  fat.  17.GO  ounces    of    carbohydrate1*-,  and-receives-;4,0G0���������^calories���������in���������-fueJ_=  va'ue.  For improvidence anrl ignorance  and unlnvitingness of food the palm  goes to the' tenement districts of Chicago and Xew York.  The families in the congested  districts of these cities live with a  ceitain similarity. The same improvident feature is charrcteristic of both  ���������that of buying food in smaH  amounts, sending out just before a  meal foronly enough for a meal, and  considering the taste and convenience  only.  The Bohemians, who manage to  live on an average of 11 cents per  man per day, are conspicuous for their  judicious marketing, buying food in  which there is the least waste end  which there is the loiat waste and  most nourishment, and, until tbey g':t  accustomed to the prodigality of the  new country.squpndcrt-ig vory lltt'o  on such luxuries as green vegetable;  and fruits.  The Italians, Uncle Sam find?, aro  very conservative In their diet, sticking to the Chestnuts cheese wine and  macaroni oi their own country, and  even refusing tc go to hospitals or  other public institutions for fear ot  the' strange foods, tn spite of tho  prices they must pay fcr their imported foods, the Italians manage lu  live and find sufficient nourishmei't  on a fraction of what the America:)  mechanic or laborer can.  Tho happy-go-lucky darky of Ih.-j  Alabama cotton fields has perhaps tn*i  ���������least variety and the mcagre^t supply  of food of any human being In tiio  United States.  The darky who lives In a little In-;  cabin on a one-mu!o or two-mule ::  three-mule farm, who has nothin.*; "->  cover him but a hickory sh'.rt an-' ���������*,  pair of blue jeans trousers, who.-.c o.V-  spring gambol In the light and ,r.-\-  pensive attire afforded by a gunr.;---  eack, can live contentedly on a d c-  ary that includes not more than thn o  or four articles of food and that ro.n  per man per day but three cents.   WITTY SAVINGS--       Ab U������ard Ity Justin McCarthy, Author ail".  ^^ tilutcMmu.***  It has always been held to be 'rash  to attempt to reproduce witty sayings  one has heard, as so much of the wit  depends on the,manner of the person  who says them and the circumstancce  under which they are uttered. In splto  of this I venture to set down some of  tho sayings of some of the witty men  and women I have known, and if my  readers should not find every saying  quite as witty as I thought it was at  the time I heard it I hope tliey will  put down the fault to the chronicler  and not to the author of the witty  saying.  1 was traveling once with Dlek Power and some other Irish members on a  night journey on an Irish railway dur.  ing the storm and stress of a general  election. Suddenly the train camo to  a dead stand at a place where theie  was no station. Amazement and  alarm filled the minds of some of us.  '"What could have happenod?" we  asked ourselves mentally. "Could tlie  Tories have torn up the rails? Could  the. Orangemen have barricaded thc  line?"  It took a great deal to alarm Diclc  Power. He quietly rose ' from his  seat and thrust his head out of tho  window In the hope of finding _ some  explanation. "What are we stopping  for?" he inquired of a railway official  who happened . to be, passing :11st at  the moment. "It's nothing", sir," was  the reply, "only wo have had to detach the engine;" ��������� "All right," said  Dick Power, "only take care yov  don't go on without it!"  Diclc Power once had a sharp contest lor one of the Irish Constituencies. The contest was the more unpleasant to him because his opponent,  who was formerly a political colleaguo  had changed bis principles and gono  over to the other side. Dick fought  the battle gallantly, according to his*  usual fashion,'and won the seat.  On tho night when the result cf the  election was made known Dick was  sitting with some friends ih the principal hotel of the place. Suddenly 111  came the defeated candidate, and, enst.  ing an indignant glance at Dick, he exclaimed: "All is lost but honor!"  Dick cheerily said in reply: 'All right.  I have got the seat and you have got  the honor, so we have both "got what  rive mosc wanted."- ���������  "Whistler���������'-The Master" as his followers ielight to call him, "Jimmy"  ns most of his friends designate him���������  was once painting the* portrait of a  distinguished novelist who was extremely clever but also extremely ill-  favored. 'When the portrait was finished the.sittor did uot seem satisfied  with it. "You don't seem to .like it,"  Whistler said. The sitter confessed  that he did not and said in self-justili-  cation: "You must admit that it is a  bad work of art." "Yes," said Whistler, "but you must own that you aro  a bad work of nature."  A great friend of mine. T. P. O'Connor, is known to everybody in England aud in America as a brilliant parliamentary and platform orator and  is known also to his friends in both  countries as a most amusing talker  with a wonderful power of expressive  phrase-making." Some of us wero  talking once about a friend ot ours, a  member of thc House ot Commons. A  lady who was one of the company said  it was a pity for the sake of his personal appearance that he had such  very large ears. "Yes," said T. P..  "and tbe worst of It is that while they  are too-large for ears they are too  small for wings."  At another time we were talking cf  an absent friend "who fancied that he  had a- great gift for. music and likewise a faculty for regenerating the  world. Some one asked: "li he always playing tho fiddle?" "Well," replied T. P., "I do not know that he ig  always playing the fiddle, but be certainly is always playing the fiddle or  the fool."  A pair of eyes to see the beautiful,  the good and the true���������God's tint; ���������>:-  print in flower and field and sao,.*-  t-ike.���������B'.ston Herald. *   "  Lady Dorothy >.������ville. one of^lcs"  wittiest women in London society, is  well known to most Americans who  yisit London during the season.  I was talking with' Lady Dorothy  one day about a lady to whom I was  giving his'i praise and Lady Dorothy  seemed inclined to dupaiage her. "Sho  is very clever," I said. Lady Dorothy  shook her head scornfully. "But." r  pleaded, ���������'i-.hr- is so very well read.'*  ' Come, come, replieJ Lady Dorothy  with a smile, "sbe Is evidently much  cleverer than I thought, since she has  been able lo m'.i'to yon believe that  she ever read anything."  One night a group ot memb-r** wero  talking ln the smoking-room of the  House of Commons about a mea.-uro  which it was proposed to recommend  to the consideration of the Government and on which we were all understood to be in complete agreement.  Suddenly a member who had up to this  time offered no objection and bad, inf-  deed, sat in absolute silence���������though  he "-"as well known for an extraordinary aptitude In spinning out talk oa  the most trivial subject���������broke In with  the words*1 "I suppose there Is something to be said on the other slde."  "I dare pay there is," Thomas Sex-  Ion observed, "aad if we had a couplo  of months tf> spare you are jujo tho  very man to say it; but then, you see,  thc matter Is comlng^up on the day  after to-morrow and there really Is no  time." So tho little group broke up.���������  Chamber's Journal.  Tcss���������Oh. 1 like him well enougr..  but It's so hard to make him understand any tn Ing. Last night he asked  me ecvcrnl times for a kiss, and I said  "No!    No!" each time.  Jess���������My goodness! I rhotild thin.t  that was emphatic enough for any man.  'J'es?���������It certainly should be for anj  one who knows that two n*---ativca  make a positive.���������Philadelphia Press.  "���������rT THlT'SANK: PC*T*T- Ttn  "ci-j Mnny Amunlii* im-iileiit", Tnlie riicu  0������in|*t''l Ml*.������*'������oi*ptliiniir*.lm.ilo I oiiih  An authority on banking in a recent  publuMUun tells us, taut "eveu umong  iducntcd people, some arc to be found  lo whom the simplest tonus of bans-  lug are still subject-, ol seciet wonder  und curious misconception." This cu-  1 lous misconception accounts for very  many of the amusing incidents which  take place at the bank counter. B\ery  one has heard die Btcry of the old lady,  who, presenting a cheque at the bank,  and asked "how she would have It, replied:  "Oh, I'd like it hot, thank you, with  fust a little lemon in it."  Tho misconception of this ordinary  mquiry as to what description ot  money should be given In. exchange for  a cheque Is the cause of many amusing  answers being given.  Iu one instance a farmer presented  his "little cheque" at the counter of a  provincial bank, and, to the casbler'3  "How will you take this, sir?" replied  r.s ho fumbled in an inner pocket of I1I3  waistcoat, "Oh, I've a littlo bag here I'll  take it in!"  Ho wondered, no doubt, if .the cashier thought he'd bi ought a wheelbarrow for it.  On another occasion, at the same office, a cheque for a large amount \va3  picsenlcd by "a client trom tbe country." The teller, thinking the most  convenient method of payment for his  customer would be large notes, said:  "I suppose you'll take it short?"  Not understanding tbe meaning ot  ���������he tetm "short," and evidently thinking the cashier was having a bit of a  joke at his expense, he leplied, shaking  his head and smiling:  ������������������Na, na, I'll tak' it a'."  Old ladies, unaccustomed to banking;  often show signs of distress when Mr.  Coigne inquires how they would like  their cheque paid. In the embarrassment of the moment they usually say:  "They'io not.ai. all particular���������anyhow will "do." After being paid, they  seem to feel more composed antl begin  10 think calmly," and the result is that  -"Mr. Coigne lias to change the gold he  lias given for a note which "will be  moie convenient, and just a littlo  change, say ten shillings in silver, it'll  be so handy."  A'good lady fiom a country villago  wheie a bank is unknown, aud consequently looked upon with a cei tain  amount "of wonder and awe, had occasion to go to a neighboilng town lo  get a cheque, which had been paid to  her, cashed. Arriving at the bank and  piesenting the document, the cashier  politely asked, "What would you like  for this?"  Whatever did he mean? What would  she like? Why, money o������ couise. Had  lie mistaken her cheque for a charity  ticket for which you can get literally  what you like from a tradesman, to the  (amount named thereon?  Perceiving that she was a little "at  sea" over his question, < the cashier  varied lt to "What kind of money shall  I give you for lt?" A ray of light now  seemed' to accompany the question put  in that way, and she hastened to say:  "Oh, English money, please!"  On one occasion a little girl, standinr,  on her toes and presenting a cheque for  '������2, said she would take two half sovereign's "if you have them."  Ciossed cheques often afford amusement to the bank cashiers and clerks  by the anxiety and concern displayed  by the holders when told they are not  pavahle In cash. One old farmer, being told that the cheque he-tendered  was crossed and Could not be paid over  the counter, exclaimed: "Can't pay  me the money over the counter. Oh,  then I'll come round for It!"  *"        Tir������ntj-t*TO T"'z CaH'oriilani.  For height, broad shoulders and herculean build, the party of twenty-two  Califorman cattle raisers who registered at the Stevens House on Thursday  night, could hardly be surpassed.  They were oa their way from Los Angeles to the Argentine Republic, whero  they intend to raise cattle on a much  more extensive &cale than they could  tn California.  The party consisted of the three Pal-  fett brothers and their families, with  five cowboys who had thrown in their  lot with the company in the hope of  making a tortus: .1 the fertile valley  ~o.--*"tB-.i'iaU*--ri.=er-; ��������� - -��������� =-.  The three* Pallctt brothers are each  fully six feet in height, bave broad,  my-scular shoulders, and tip tbe scale.'  at 200 pound?. Their wi\e:* are neaily  *.s tall and muscular. Two of fm  brothers have each four daughters, and  tho third biotber has three. Thee  elevnii girls range in ages fromt,IS to  23 years, and take after their parent 1  in  build.  "Never br-fore," said the night c'.r-rlc  at the hotel, "have we bad guests war-  attracted so much attention, and wa  frequently have some peculiar peoplo  ���������stopping here. The oth*-r guests in tbe  house MiemeU like dwarfs as compared  ���������with this western party."  XV. A. Pallett. the oldest brother,  when a-dced for his r*>ason tor leaving  'America said: "We ..re all sorry to  leave the United States, but all th->  grazing land Li rapidly being settl'-d,  and, with tho lncreaiw* of the population, the cattle raisers are ben;*:  driven further West. My family waa  interested ln the business, and first  had extensive ranche*- in Ohio From,  there we followed the frontier clc-ar to  the Pacific coast. Ws go now to Ro-  ssrlo, and tbence up ln the mount.*in<*,  about fifty miles to the broad valiej*  of the Platte river. Great lnducemenr=i  exist there "for profitable cattle raising. We bave the European mark-*'.*"  to sell to, where prices are much higher  than ln this country, and the cost o������  raialnfj cattlo la not ii.ilf at much as it  Is In TexM, Mexico or Lower California. We havo a cas-h capital of %(ii,-  00ft. and expect to be Joined In Argen*  tins, by another aharehol'J'VT to tho extent of $3,000. The ranch will be managed on a cooperative bajsi-i."  Aftfvr looking at a fevr fight's cf tha  eity the party sall������-d for the Argentina  Republic Friday. Tbe regular gueir-*  at tho Stevens House havo not yet  Btopp'Ml talking about tho queer arrivals Thursday, and thf-y are now wondering what fate awaits the elo'en  young, handsome daughters In tbo  wilds of South America.  ADVICE TO THE LOVER.  tlio Way to Cnml-ict n Courtslilp With ^  It-i-ipy 1'nilln*-.  Don't be too sudden about it. Many  a girl has said "no" when she meant  ���������yes" simply because hor lover.didn't  choose the right time and pop' tho  question gently.  Take a dark night for it. Have the  fclinds closed, the cui tains down, and  the lamp turned most on. Sit near  enough to her so that you can hoot  your little finger into hers.  Wait until conversation begins to  flag, and then quietly, remark:  ''Susie, I want to ask you some"  thing." >  She will fidget about a little, antl  probably reply:  "Yes?"  ���������   After a pause, you can add:  "Susie, my actions mubt have shown  -that Is, you must have ueea���������I meat*  you must be aware that "  Pause here for a while, but keep  your little finger firmly locked. Sho  ���������may cough and try to turn the subject off by asking how you liked tho  J sermon, but she only does it to encourage you. After a pause you can-  continue:  "I was thinking as I was coming up  the street to-night, "that betore I wont  away I would ask you���������that is, i  would broach the subject nearest my  ���������������I mean I would know my "  Stop again, and give ber hand a Gentle squeeze. She may make a-movo  to get away, or she may not. In either case It augurs ,well for you. Wai?  "Wait five minutes, and then go on:  1 "The past year has been a very  "happy one to me, but I hope that future years will be still happ,or. IIow-  'ever, that depends entirely on you. ������  am here to-night to know���������that Is, to  ask you���������I am here to-night to hear  from your own lips the one bwe-it "  Wait again. It isn't vbest to be too.  trash about such things. Givo her  plenty of time to recover her composure, and then put your hand on your  heart and'continue:  "Yes, I thought as I was coming  here to-night how happy I had been,  and I said to mysolf that if I 'only  know���������If I was only certain that my  heart had not deceived me,  and you  "were ready to share "  ��������������� Hold on���������there's no hurry about it.  Give The wind a chance to sob and  moan outside amongst tho trees. This  will make her lonesome, and call up  all the love in her heart. When oho  begins "to cough and- grow restless,  you can- go on: .    J  "Before I met you, this world waa  a desert to me. I didn't take any  pleasure in life, and it _didn't matter  whether the sun shonewor not. But  what a chango In one short year! it  is for you to say whether my future  shall be a prairie of happiness or one  long and never-ending pathway of  thistles. Speak, dearest,, Susie, and  say���������and say that "      . -*���������  ,  Give her five minutes more by thc>  clock, and then add:  "That you���������you will ���������be���������that' 19  that you will���������be mine!"  She will heave a sigh, look up at tho  clock and round vthe room, and then,  as she slides her. head over your ves'  pocket, she will whisper:  "Henry���������1 will."  "Ynu call your parrot 'Money,' I seo  Monpy talks.."    -  "Not at all. D.-m't tell any one. nui  1 call him thai hc-c.v,:i-'. nobody aboi.:  tho bouse can na ki- '.ifi liy ���������'���������*; well aj  ny wife can."���������Uhicsgo Tribuno.  ' A PRACTICAL JOKE.  >������������������  I'rofcaii^un],  Fluyed by a Scieutinl   011   a  \ ��������� l-IioloBrai'-i-"-*  'A professional photographer tells a-  'tale ot a practical joke.  One .day a young man came to sit for  his likeness. To the ordinary eye ho  looked like any other young man. A  couple of plates were exposed, and then  the assistant who was operating went  into the dark room to develop tbe nega*  tivos.  He was gone much longer than usual,  and was heard berating the junior as-  Bistant pretty soundly for playing  pranks with the apparatus. When ho  returned to the studio he .asked for  another sitting, and apologized for having before used spoiled plates.  This time when he went away to develop he was heard to utter a. Blight  scream, but he reappeared and said thUte  was a peculiar efiect In lhe negative  which he couldn't account for, and  would the sitter oblige" him again.  Once more he went to develop- then  tho bell rang'violently for tho master,  and the two held a long confabulation  in the dark room together. This timo  the master tried his hand, and-- went  away to develop. It was not long bo-  fore he returned and said he was sorry  not to be able to get a satisfactory llke-  nea*, but a skull and crossbones appeared defined on the young man's  forehead.  "Rubbish!" said the sitter. "My forehead's all right. Can you see anything  the matter with my forehead?" and ho  peered inlo a mirror as ho'spoke.  "No, there's nothing tliat I can see,"  answered the photographer. "But I  fchould be obliged if you will please go  away and not como here again; this  sort of thing 113 just a wee bit creepy."  Upon this there was *>a" dreadful  scene; but the upshot was that the  young man������h,id to sp, and up to tlio  pi*esent,h*is not returned. '     '"'*  .   Tbo'e'xplanation-of the .matter.is tha*.  the yoiin"* man was a bit ot a scien-"-  tist, nncl had been' playing" a joke on  tho photographer.    Bisulphato of ,qui--  nine is a chomical which.-is white, in  the naked-eye," .but, seen'black by-,the  camera.    Anything that'is painted on'  the skin,' therefore,*- with the chemical  will be  ordinarily invisible,  but will  come out prominently In a pbotograph.  ���������London Tit-Bits.",        -   " *  "Kin I have the pleasure cf teachli"*  you to skate. Miss Nellie?" o  "No, I'll learn by myself.    The last  "two    'm-en'~that~started~to~teacbTmo-  ���������was makin'  love Inside o'  five min  utes!" ���������  Victim���������Say, hurry up and get  through shaving mo as quick as yuu  can  JiarbT���������Why, you said you bad  plenty of time v,'aen you got into tho  chair.  Victim���������I know, but tbat was before  Jou tried that razor on mo.  The tliu- ctll;;n*er*������ Gimo *l>oiil>t.  This is a story told .by the publi-Iier of a big religious weekly" of h;3  per.-.onal experience. It is a queer  6toiy, but true as preaching.  He ia-,*i:  "Yi-u know I live over lu thc o!(l  Green-vich village section, -and tha  best established families there, thor.o  who have occupied the same houses  for haif a^ century, hold that ono  might almost as well bo dead as not  to have your'death notice ln a paper!  A few daj's ago my brcther-ln-Iaw  died, and though .1 had promised to  have a death notice inserted the next  morning, 1 neglected it. Tbe following  day 1 arranged for tho" notice, and"  went over to Hackensack to have a  grave opened. Several ^jt the Ninth  ward families have lots in the Lamt*  cemetery.  "I entered the office of the cemetery  and    stated to    the superintendent, a  ���������sober faced    German,    lhat Mr.  .  wa.s dead and a grave must be dug im,  mediately in tho family lot.  "'Mr.   dead!" tho head grave-"  digger exclaimed; 'why when did h������  die?"  ** 'He died day before yesterday.' "'  '"But aren't you mistaken? 'All  those families have their death notices  In the paper. I read the paper carefully' this morning and yesterday  morning, and .his name was not, in  the list. Why, when tliere Is a notice  you don't have to mako any other arrangement or give mo any,funeral notification. I always have the gray?  opened at once.'  "And, grotesque as it apperas, I had  all that I could Ho to   persuade    th**  faithful old    man that   Mr.  '>/a*i  really dead and that the grave must  be dug, notice or no notice. But I  honestly believe that he would havo  turned rae out as an impostor if I hai  not explained how the t-llp occurred,  apologised abjectly and promised solemnly that llie paper of the next  ino-rning should contaia the not'-C1-."  ���������New York Herald.  ��������� Wliyillniitit.ilii Alr-in llenltliftil.  It is���������well known that the chemical,  condition of tlie atmosphere differs but  little, if any at all,, wherever the sample is taken; whether it be in the high  Alps ort at the surface of ther sea, tho  relations of oxygen to" nitrogen antl  other' constituents Is tbe same. Tho  favorable elfects, therefore, of a chango  of air are not to,bo explained by,any  difference in the proportion of Its gaseous constituents. One important difference, -however,'is-the baeterlologl-  t-al one. -*'   *v. "���������.'-������������������<-.   /.  The air of high altitudes contains' no  ���������microbes, and is, in fact, sterile, whilo  near the ground, and some.. 100 feet  above It; microbes-are abundant. ..In  the air of towns and crowded places,  not only does the mlcrobic impurity  increase, but other impurities, such a9  the, products of combustion of coal, accrue also. Several Investigators havo  found that traces of hydrogen and certain hydrocarbons in the air, and especially in the air of the pine, oak-and  birch forests. It ��������� is to .these bodies,  doubtless consisting of traces of essential oils,-to which tho curative .effects  of certain health resorts are ascribed.  Thus -the locality of a fir' forest 13  said to -give relief In diseases of the-*,'  respiratory tract. -But all the same,  these traces of essential oils and aromatic products must be counted, strictly speaking,.as Impurities, since, they  are not apparently necessary constituents of the air. As* recent analyses  have shown, these bodies tend to tils-  appear in the air as a higher altitudo  is reached, until they disappear' altogether. It would seem, therefore, that  microbes, hydrocarbons and' entities  other than oxygen and n'ytrogen,- and  perhaps we should add argon, are only  incidental to the neighborhood" of-hu-,  man industry, animal life, Camp 'and  vegetation.  A COLONIAL SHREW.        -���������*  auinwom  Story  or How Ono TtsrinBcea* >  .*->., Won Kffocll-M-Ij Tn,-li--<". I  In colonial dnys, lt was customary,'  tor betrothed young women to ride to;  the nearest town, mounted on a pillion behind father or lover, for tha  purpose of purchasing their wedding  outfit,  says the Youth's   Companion.  Ono such prospective bride, the fair,  but quick-tempered Nancy, went up tO(",  Boston    with    Ebon,1 whom   she was,  Boon to marry, and the pair achieved,  on  exhausting  but  satisfactory day'a  shopping.    When, in the cool of 'tha  early evening, they started on  their  twenty-mile journey home, they car-';  'rieiL stowed snugly about pocket nnd',  eaddlc, some dozen of their precious-  purchases. ^ ". i-  About halfway, Naticy missed' a  package, and wished* to turn back and  look for lt���������she was' sure lt had been  -dropped. But Eben reminded her that'  nt the moment of leaving, t*.yo parcels  had been, hastily combined Into one"'  and assured her that'nothing was lost"'  .she had merely miscounted. 'But sho  "was not convinced. ' '  "There shoultl.be thirteen!" she de������  clared; "a��������� balrar's dozen.".  "Twelve  only���������a dozen,  but not- ft  baker's      diozen,"    Eben    maintained ..������������������  stoutly.' .  ���������  ,   Then Nancy- lost her temper.     She>"  vowed she wsa" right, and.  that' she  meant to recover the missing parcel.'  Would he ride back at once?   Amiably,  but decidedly, he would not;   it was"  getting too late to waste time.   Very '  well, then',' would he stop and  allow; .  her to dismount?  .He could do as he   ���������  pleased  himself;, but  sbe  was  going j *  back   to; look  for  her  parcel,   if  sho ,  went alone and'on foot! *. But he de-..  dined to stop.    Then Nancy tempest- *���������  uously flung down one of her-bundles '.  on tho highway, and sarcastically tell-"'- '  ing him .that this time sometli.hg Waa  missing beyond 'question,' imperatively  demanded'that he should,  stop    tho"  horse. '     ;   . _     - ��������� '  - But Eben-big, lazy,'and good-tern--*  pered, Tvas- not .without   spirit   when"--  aroused, and? ho replied that-If    she-.' ;  chose to throw things away in--'a tan- ���������* '  trum.'he could not stop her, but neith; *  er would ho stop ror.,hcr.'   lh a* fury,'-^ '  she tossed awa'y a second parcel,' and :  continued to do so���������one; at-each mile- r~  stone���������until'her journey"ended.' When.*'  at length he set her down on. her own", -  door-stone,    she " was ' sobbing    and '...  storming in her wrath**' while, he'fwas-'.  still to outward appearance placid am*. ,,  ���������"*6Tene.   ' "..'���������-���������'    "_,"���������..*,-.  ' "On-.that'same door-stone "the" 'next**"1"'.'  .moraing she found her twelve parcels"''"''  flying in a tow, each neatly" numbered"/"*',  ��������� 'He had ridden back alone and collect-*"^ .  ed'them, and. their contents" proy'edi"*  {that he_had been right, for .nothing-" -  ���������was mussing*.     '       ,     .  ,.A "* ." ���������'/ _*��������� >^  " As a very'old lady, Nancy, used- td <*  --tell this tale .against herself ,to .her ���������*���������  great-grandchildren, always -conclud- '���������-'  ing with: "Aud set ved" me'right, lt -  anybody but your gran'ther.had .mar-1"1 *  Tied me,. I've doubts he*-might'"ha"v>* -' '  .married   a  shrew." ��������� ���������  .>.   ��������� *.. *  I   ""���������"'I*'-- Vvmis of l.aT<>lt.  - '    ���������     '. "  ..It has boen asked which .Is the be������.  historical illustration -"of * the saying,  "It never raims but it pours!" The rev-  ^olutlons ��������� and eineutes_aU-, over Europe.  in the annus mirilbilis 1S"-18 bestTlllus-"  itratb this proverb, says",- Pearson's  iWeeltly. -Commencing with"the February Revolution of Paris, the popular  insurrections, successful and unsuccessful, of this momorable'-'year form  an amazing chapter "or European .history. In Italy there was revolt in Sicily and Milan, Venice shook off tho"  Austrian yoke, and Sardinia definitely  headed the great movement which, after many vicissitudes, cnde*tl In emancipating all Italy. 1 In Germany thero-  was a perfect epidemic of insurrection,  almofet every slate being affected. Sim*  ilar - uprisings took - place' in 'Austria',  and-the Emperor was compelled-to  leavo his capital'and ultimately, to abdicate. In Ireland, terribly devastated"  by the famine, a trivial rebellion took  place, and even in Great Britain thero  was an unrest, which happily subsided  without any serious consequences.  There can be no doubt that-there-waa-  a'" subtle connection between these  events, and that a successful"revolt in  one country suggests similar attempts  .wherever discontent is strong.  *** Te A Tallin SladpUM Nlj*ht������.  Sleeplessness Ib generally due not tc.  j-iyslcal strain but to mental overwork  and worry. " .' o,    . T  The best cure for'lnsoiBnla Is exercise In the open air. ��������� When you find  that you can't sleep get up at once,  dress and **��������� for a long walk. It will  be much better than to He ln bed am"  keep tossing about.  When you get back from your tramp  tho bed will feel good and sleep will  come quickly to the tired body ant}  brain.  Don't ws.lk along, however, in a lazy,  half-hearted fashion. Go at a brisk,  half trot. Expand your chest,'stretch  your legs, breathe steadily and-gctyour  blood purified by the exercise of your  whole body.  And don't thinl* about the things  that have wo. ried you during the day.  ���������married  a shrew."  ; To 'Eben,'however,, local  tradition.,  attested thut the   hot-tempered   ladj;, '  had proved" an affectionate and excel-   '  lent' wife.   " ,       .   .  *,     f       .-     y\    ."  IItinting"With Good KeBlllU.   ���������-.' ; - -  Sad fUd.T-tr.  Mi-Jigger���������I saw Roller out for ������  good time ths other night.  Thingumbob���������Yes; he's a g2y old  boy. i<-n't he?  McJigger���������That's what he is, and Jjls  ron is a chip oft the old block. He's a,  rounder, too.  ThingumLob���������Ah! yes; he's a set!  Toung dog.���������I'hiladf-lphia Pres3.  Wliere Could Ho Hsii. I*.irn*-i! 'Vt [_'" , "'  Just to show how the serenity of.  the most flawless'temper may give way ,.'-  under sufficiently exasperating "clrcura-  etances.'.the following instance is re* -  lated:    A prominent business man.re-u  siding In Jennings avenue is known---  for his very precite 'use'of the Eng-  .  llsh language, as well as for his suave *  and exceedingly correcti"deportment"at"A  all times.    So particular is this gen-""  tleman that he frequency has notified' '���������  his family to be extremely' careful aa  '  to what they &ay"before a three-year- V  old grandson residing'in the house,-as ,  children are so ready-to pick up lm- "  proper expressions: '-*"  "" ���������  '  This youngster ia -a'great 'favorite.������������������  with the old gentleman, so much so  that in the absence of the nurse 'girl  on a recent morning he offered to as-' ��������� ���������  sist the little fellow at his toilet. * All ���������  went wefi lill it came*to a shoe that ������  .was eo peculiar in Its fit as to need ������ :.  shoehorn to bring it to place.      The  horn- didn't happe?*-, to"be at Hand, but.  grandpa   wasn't   one of   the kind ta >  give it np.     , .   ,. .'."'  Still ie was pretty late/when-tbe-palf .  appearded at breakfast, and some one* r  remarked: "Well, it tooi a long tl*ae= r  to dress.   What was the matter??" ���������  The youngster promptly replied:^'  "Why, we got along "all right "alt **,  We came to that damned"shoe!" '  And, shocked as they were, not oncv.  ef the family asked the little fellow...  ���������where he hda" heard such bad.5 back .  language.���������Cleveland Plain Dealer.  A X  ���������������<?���������  Stories of the Czar of Russia.  Curious Bits of News.  Talk of the Czar's abdication is ro-  ^Jwcd by tho unfortunate occm rence in  ��������� Russian imperial household which has  v again dashed tlie wish of Nicholas  * an heir. The young ruler of all'tho Kus-  fc-s is a perennially interesting pereonali-  " lie is a enrious contrast to his father,  disposition, ns well as in bodily pros-  fence, lie differs strangely from liis parent.  Alexander was not a highly educated  man. His elder brother Nicholas had  been carefully taught and trained for tho  responsibilities lie was to boar, bnt bis  ���������death, nt the age of twenty-two, placed  Lile:*.nndcr in tho position of heir to the  jnone, and he was then too old to lenrn,  or could lie nll'ortl the necessary time,  jforo lie succeeded lo the throne, a  yy uu'oi lunate incident occurred which  li\od lmw cnicl ho could bo. An oili-  <-i'i- of "���������',���������...dish oiigin hail been sent to  ���������tiit* Unit nd Stales to order rifles for thn  l'u--*iun miiiv. On liU return lie had to  ���������������������������peri I" ������������������ ���������'���������'.ircwitcli, who was ap-  V'1",i<*c' ��������� i���������riiitend the re-arming of  ;J'"' ! ', during  the  interview   the  ;''     ���������    !---l    his   ti-mprr  and   began   to  ���������-'''  -   > :!*���������'.    'i'lif'  nl'i.crr replied  wilh  ���������-.x^ni'.y. w.'.i'icupon Al-xt-ndcr fell into n  , :il of fury, and lontlnl the man with iu-  igult.   Tlie man bowei' him-sclf out of the  pyal p-.-cscr.ct>. weni  nnmo and wrote a  Jtter  to  the lieir-nppircnt, asking him  apologize  within   tw<*nlv-four hours,  iling" that if thc apology'did not come  wouliVshoot himself.   The C'zarcwitch  ook  no notice, sending .neither  excuse  pr  apology,  and   the   o.Ticcr   kept  his  *prd.    The  Czar-heaid -the  story  and  j*.vns very angry with, his" son, and  or-  |dercd him to follow the  hoarse  of tho  ^fllccr .to the f*rave.   But even thia ter-  f'ible lesson failed to cure Alexander of  is haughtiness.   The gentle ways of the  lesent  Czar, and  his unwillingness  to  Sirt the feelings of anyone, are'in sharp  ���������bntrast to tho cruelty of the father.  jUnlike his father, he makes a point  "picnever it 13 possible, "of. diiving oul  tone with the Empress and with a small  V*-ndance...He docs not give notice of  1 drives and walks abioad. and is often  ite unnoticed.   The late Czar, when hr  ve  out,  had  the  sliocts  lined  with  oops, and 'always drove in a splenuid  uipage surrounded by liis guards and  fcendant3, whihvthc- police now scldom  iow in what direction  their Empcroi  lans to drive. ,T!;e  etiquette  of the  Jssian court also has become much les-  ict since the accession of Nicholas If.,  all his subjects are allowed admis  to hi3 presence.    The peasants will  [vei hundreds of mile-, to bring their  Itions to him, for they^know that th'  T*  will  personally  receive  them  apt  himself read what they have wi it-  He is grave in public, but in-privr.!  [Is full of fun, and very fond of cliuli'  the members of his intimate circh-  s Czarina exactlv suits her husband  I a happier family life cannot be im  Jincd.    Her "Majesty is almosfalway r  ���������ith'the Crar, even when he is at work.'"  fMore than one good story is told 0.  he  Czar's sarcasms ,and  repartee.    Or  notable occasion he reduced a Ru*  general to a frightful state of con-  rnation.    It happened soon after hi-'  |ion, andbefoie his coionatioii, that  Is cycling in the park at Gatschinc  [ng, as was his wont, the unifom  I colonel. .  Something  having  gon;  with his chain lie got'off. to ad-  and, just  at, that  moment,  c  us general from a"distant province  k^Not'icceivihg the salute due to  [u> ofiict-r stepped up  to  thc sup-  lolonel and peremptorily request  "explanation of  the si-cming dis  :.   "I am so .sorry," said the Czar.-  1"I'have not'yet had the honor  liing acquainted wilh you, owinp  Biortncss of my reig'n, or I should  Io, have done so."  Jmincnt    Ru**--inn    statesman 'is  perfect double of tho Czar .that  Ion taken for Jib impeiial rulei  }-. -" saitl thc eoiisidcrate-riil ���������  tissia, to his "double, "v. hy tion'i  i er your appearance somewhat���������  e 6fT your beard, for instance?   You  king about as you'do, and so  re  ing your unfortunn tc Emperor, run  le risks���������frightful risks."   "What!''  aimed the faithful count.   "What, ?  mbling Your Imperial "Majesty as 7  alter my-face?    Never, sir, never!"  ," "well,   Count   '-"  replied   the  r, .smiling'and shrugging" his shoul-  B, "as you will not alter your face  lirself, some'of my Nihilist subjects  1 alter it for you, I fear."     . ���������.  TA  characteristic  story J of  the, Czar's  bve' of  simplicity has  been  going  the  lounds of St. Petersburg lately:*, A*cer-_  ���������fain lieutenant who .was"~in a perpetual  late of iinpecuniosity was one day seen  |ding in a street car.   The other officers  the regiment wcrc^furious at what  hey called an insult to.the uniform* and  ktimated to the* culprit that lie had the  lition of sending in his papers or being  ���������shiered,-and   thV-unlucky  subaltern"  bk the former alternative.   Before he  |d time .to  do  so, however, tho Czar  Eard of the affair, and without a mo-  |>nt's   delay   donned   a. colonel's   uni-  l.'m of  the regiment in question, and  wintering out of his palace hailed a.car,  tiered it and  sat  calmly  down   until  I stopped in front-of the* barracks.   He  ("sired the ofllcers to be .called, nnd-ad-  [esscd them thus: "Gentlemen, I have  st ridden from the palace in a street  r, and I wish to know if you desire mc  . send in my papers?   I,presume I have  ' **raced my uniform."    "Sire," replied  major, nervously,    "Your "Majesty  |uld never do that."    "Then," replied  :  Czar with  an  amused smile, "as 1  ve not degraded the uniform, Lieuten-  It D.  cannot have done so, and will  fus retain his commission in this regi-  |r-nt, even if he, like me, dares to ride  public conveyance." ,    ''  the Czarina is as fond of a joke and a  link as is her lord.   During last sura-  . -'s visit .to Kiel she and her sister,  iinccss Hcinricb, were paying a visit on  Sunday morning to an-art shop in the  *r"-inischc  Strasse.    A crowd of'inquisi-  [>") live citizens.waited outside to see tlio  Jladie*  come  out, and  it  was  a  crowd  yliich incicased eveiy minute.    Half fin  our, and an hour went by, and still the  " pectant ones, waited  in vain, until a  ���������"riper  went round   that  the  Czarina  the   Princess   were   b.ick     at  thc  iloss.   On perceiving the denscness of  crowd Her Imperial Majesty asked  manager if he had not a back exit  .his  house.'"She waa  told  the  way  A b'ancd by a low wooden fence.   "Oh,  lean manage that," Ixughcd the Rus-  Empress "if you can lend us a lad-  "   Tliat useful articl* was found and  tied againBt the  boarding, and  oven  [.in** the royal Iridic.-*, thoroughly en-  ���������_Jii>,<* the fun.   They went through th*  [fcourt, reached  the street on  the othei  and regained the Schlos", not fa:  bray, in a few minutes.  |'A litle philanthropy covers ti multitude  fraud.  Inocl  \nhS  Iribl  General ""oo'ith hns recently acquired  thirty thousand acres of lnnd in Western Australia, where he will establish a  great Salvation, Anny agricultural and  Industrial rolonj-j which he will populate  from the London', slums.  M. Bertholot expresses the opinion, in  the Paris "Tempi," that tho time will  come when chemists will be ablo to pro-  pare more digestible and nutritious foods  than we now derive from the animal  and vegetable world directly; but he  docs not believe lhat it wijl be possible,  as some suppose, to concentrate nutriment enough for a.nie.U into a few capsules.  Ovor one-half of tho total length of  the Capo to Cailo railroad has already  been built. Rails have been laid from  Capo Town to a point within 200 milo3  of the banks of the Zambesi, a distance  of 1,500 miles, and fiom- Cairo to the  junction of the Jlhie and White Nile,  1,-100 miles fiom Unit city. The gap between the two lermin.ilo yet to be filled  is 2,800 miles. The I'ulawayo-Beira  Railway, 500 milc3 in length, joins the  system with the port of Mombasa on thc  eastern seaboard.  A woman of _ Elizabeth, N..T., has a  poodle with a diamond set in one of its  fiont teeth, and all over the country  there are dogs and cats whoso open  mouths reveal bridgo work, gold crowns  and other examples of good dentistry.  But the filling of the loeth of horses is  comparatively new. Yet, new -as it is,  already a number ,of thoroughbreds  have undergone it, and-- in tlie"dner  stables of Now York, Philadelphia and  Chicago many horses car show glittering  gold teeth. It is said that a horse in XV.  C. Whitney's stables was the first in the  world to have a tooth filled.  A London physician of large practice  asserts that, owing to his extremely  "sensitive sense of smell, ho can t foretell  the coming of death forty-eight, hours.  He says that whon a patient comes.with-  in two days of- death a peculiar <*arth'y.  -"smell i3'emitted from tho body. "vVheii  the fatal disease is slow in its progress  the odor makes its appearance asj-uuch  - as three days beforehand; but wluln the  disease is of the galloping kind thet doctor says he receives much .sU'orter warning, lie attributes tho smell to niW-.i-  fication, which begins within the Hoay  before life is extinct. Dogs arc though1,,  to have this sense, for hunting houi\ids  have been observed to begin a' mournful  bayii-g a day or two before -their m&'fs-  tcrs died. * ,  A "sweethearts' tru--it" has been organized by the young women ot Fremont, Neb., and as a result there is consternation -among the men. The new  " "trust" is known as the Young Women's  Reform Union, and "Miss UliKabcth Mackenzie is ai- its head._ H-irt-nfter, if a  man who is known to them is seen cn-'  tering a saloon or is caught doing anything against . the' 'moral code of-the  trust, he will be immediately blacklistec  ��������� by his fair associates; "that is, his best  gill ,will refuse to have anything to do  frith him unless he immediately mends  his ways. He will also be barred from  parties, and will be* snubbed if he' meet:  any of the members of thc union on tbe  street. Thus far tho union has been getting 'along with remarkable success. It  has been^in existence oaly a few weeks,  yet In tKat time a dozen men classed as  moral dehnrjucnts have been outdoing  themselves in their efforts to hove tlie  blacklist against them reaiovcd. - Thn  'club was "formed .13 llio-result of a re"**  .viva! meeting held there recently by,the  Rev. Mr. Williams, who hurled his entire  vocabulary at saloons and drinking men!  Only Knew One bide of the Question  What Part Should Reason Play?  A Philosophio Western writer speaks  thus of tlie part leason should play in  love affairs:  Reason, unfortunatoly, is not consulted very often by lovers. The marriage ot reason is held in contempt by  the yomi(* aad romantic of both sexos,  especially in this coualry, whore children muko thoir own avitelics and parents aro not asked for their consent.  When a pair of penniless young fools  run away frost home and marry because  their parents bade them separate or  wait, the newspapers, instead of ridiculing or reproving them, maka much ol the  affair, call it" a romantic flight, piint  photographs of Iho couple and encourage  other couples to imiule their madness.  Lore is n strange and -.omelimes a  fleeting emotion, and it behooves all who  feel it "stirring in lheir blood lo go slowly and to follow the. guidance of lheir  reason rather than their pa*>*>ion. There  aie so many casea of p.tssing inf.ittt.itton  mistaken for love that a man or woman,  perceiving thc sj-mplon*-, within, should  caiefiilly analyze the ease and by ninny  tests determine whether it bo the genuine article or ona of (lie m..ny counterfeits. A 111.111 should projoct his reason,  as it were, out of himself and study himself and thc girl inipaifially as though  they were strangcis. He should ask  himself whether lhey are of equal mental  ability and equal education, whethor  their tastes are similar, whether lhey are  well matched physically, whether she interests him merely because of he.r pretty  face and figure, whothor he could agree  with his people-in-law in the event of his  marrying the girl, and whether he could  support her in the degree of comfort or  luxury to which sho haB been accustomed. He should consider, too, the probability of thc girl's-being happy or unhappy with him. He should weigh his  own faults and even tell the girl about  them so that she may be warned. She  will not believe his confession, however,  and thc only benefit in making it is the  feeling of having done his duty and hid-  den*"hotliing.  Lovers, contemplating matrimony,  should bear in mind th.it living together all.a couple's lifetime is something  vastly different from holding hands in  the parlor on two or three evenings a  week. It is oasy to be good-humored  (*tnd agreeable to each other at occasional dinners, but a man and woman, going  into matrimony, should bs good-humored  and Hgreeable to each other at breakfast  as well as at dinner, "and at breakfast cv-  lery day in the year, lie who raves  labout the curls in li6r hair,- when he  sees the girl in her best gowns, must remember that after marriage he will see  h'er sometimes with hair uncurled and  costume none too neat. * Any girl can  he attractive in a pretty silk waist with  ribbons and'bows and all the helps tc  loveliness - that women know; but the  girl'a man,marries ou-,*ht to be attrac-  tivV.io him at all.tiuics, bending.over  the kitchen stove "aa -a ell as bending over  tho p'ano*," gettmg up in the 'morning as  well as dancing in a ballroom. Similarly,  the nian',*. girl marries ought to please  her'wUen''hii beard is two days old as  welbas when it has bien lately shaven,  in his business clothes as well as in his  handsomer evening suit.  Courtship is 0:10 thing and matrimony  quilo ."inothcr. ALitnuiony is life, and  life ia fi*l[ of dullness and routine. Courtship is.a lound-of dances, dinners, moon-"  light ooViversations, lomantic walks, per-  fervjid protestations .of love, sentiment,  vowp; ���������*.\ighs, h'uid-cl-i-'pa "find ecstasies.  Matiimony ia the ��������� constant companionship of two people in their right senses,  and the question which "reaso.n should  answer for thc lover is that of his suitability for a cei tain woman on the lower,  less aerial plane of matrimony.' Marry"  irig is something like betting one's whole  "fortune on a horse race. One may go  it blind, as many do, and lay_ one's money on a certain liorse because it is pretty  and stcp3 high, or one may carefully estimate tho form "and record of the entries and base one's choice on what the  liorse is and has done and what its ancestors are* and have done. In neither  cjise is one certain of winning, but the  fan who bets on form is more likely to  in than he who bets on the mere beau-  ��������� of a horse.   There are some who ad-  tfise' people  to refrain from going into  to" matrimonial gamble, but these are  e timid who would not go seeking hea-  jFen for fear of stumbling into hell.. One  jaust venturei something to win the  .prizes of life, and the man and woman  ,who are happy in their marriage have  won the greatest of all prizes.  "Is life worth living?" '   '  "Never having died, I cannot say."  Caught on the Fly.  Brevity may be the soul of wit, but a  story published in the New York "Tribune" shows that some men can be both  long-winded and witty. Tlie story has  to do with a minister of thc old school,  and with the poet and banker, Edmund  Clarence Stedman, and two New York  millionaires, who were his companion:!  on a fishing trip in Northern Maine.  The New Yorkers entered the. little  backwoods meeting-house just as thi;  preacher began his - sermon. He continued speaking for two hours, and finally, when it got late in the afternoon,  and he showed no sign of stopping, the  vacationists" began to get uneasy and  wonder if they would get out of tha  woods before dark. At last they fe\t  that they could slay no longer, so they  rose, and started to file out.  The thread of the. parson's discourse  snapped off short. .'  "Under the circumstances," he lard,  grimly, "we will .iutciriipt our sermon  and take up thc collection at this point."  Inflected English.  While lie was being shown ahout Chicago by the mayor of the Icily, tbo  French ambass.idor, Monsieurl Camh.tn.  expressed his thanks, says tihe Nnw  York "Times," and added:"  jr"Sixit I am sorry so to coclcroach on  your time." I  "Oh," answered the mayor, "don't  think of thf I*. Rut you "don't mean  cockroach, "Monsieur C'ambon,'; it's encroach you mean." ���������  "Oh, is it? I see���������a diffcrcr-fce in gen-  Ut." 1  I  Workmen's   Daredeviltries.  . "I  remember,"   said    a    bridge, contractor    some     time    ago     while     on  'the j subject of workmen's dare-"  (deviltrics,   "when  working  at    the   big  1 bridge across the Niagara, wlien the two  [cantilever arms,had approached within  fifty feet of each olher, a keen rivalry  'as. to who should be the first to cross  sprang  up   among   the  men.      A  long  ���������plank connected tho two arms, leaving  about two and a half feet of support at  each end. Slrict orders were issued that  no one should attempt to" cros3 the  plank upon penulty of instant dismissal.  At the noon hour I suddenly heard a  great shout fiom the men, who were all  starting up. " Raising my eyes, 1 saw a  'man step on the end of that plank, Stop  a minute, and look down into the whirlpool below. I know he was going to  cross, and I shouted to him. but he was  too high up to hear. Deliberately he  walked out until he reached the middle  of the plank. It sagged far down with  his weight until I could see light between the two short supporting ends  and the cantilevers on which they rested. He saw the cod ia front of liim do  this, hesitated, and looked back to see  how the other end was. I thought he  was going to turn. He stopped, grasped  both edges of thc plank with his hands,  and, throwing his feet up, stood on his  head, kicking his legs m the air, cracking his hoels together, and yelling to the  terrified onlookers. This he did for  about a minute���������it seemed to mc like  forty. Then he let his feet drop down,  stood up, waved bii hat, and trotted  along the pbuik to the other- side, slid  down one of the braces hand over hand,  and regained tlie ground. We discharged  him, of course, but what did he care?  He got all the glory his fellows envied  him, and he oould command work any-  wiere."  New arrival���������Well! Weill I had an  idea that heaven was paved with gold.  St. Peter���������No���������anthracite.  "So Smith declined to prosecute those  Burglars lie found in his house the other  aight." "Yc*. I understand Smith didn't  ha\e on his paiam-13 that night, and he  fears the disclosures of a public trial  might imperil his social ���������U.tus."���������Detroit "Journal." .   .    *     * ������ y?^-s~ii  The-*Vrorigi"*-RcceJpt"  Mrs. Duzzit has at last discovered  the difference between a "receipt" and  a "recipo," through the ministrations  of an obedient cook and a  careless husband. At least, she  blames it on her husband's carelessness, although be pleads innocence in  that respect, but if feminine logic counts  for anything, he merits the accusation.  Mrs. Du-t-ut clipped a recipe for a new  pudding from her magazine the other  day and placed if under a book on thc  library table. Then she paid the grocer's bill and threw it with some other  settled accounts in the drawer of the  same table. Concluding one day to try  the pudding, she said lo Lucinda, the  cook, as she wns mapping out tlio dinner:  "You go up to the library and toll Mr.  Duziit to give you lhat new receipt I  left about the library table. I nm going  shopping and may not get back until  dinner is leady, but all you need to do  is to use just the proportion of ingredients given in the receipt, and then we'll  see whether that new pudding is as good  as the magazine promised it would be."  "Yassimi," snid  the obedient Lucinda.  Mrs. Duzzit left and Lucinda went to  the library.  "Please, suh," she lemarkcd, "I des  wants dat receipt Missus Duzzit done  lef* hyah."  "What receipt?" asked Mr. Duzzit.  "De one whut tell 'bout all dem t'ings  I's got ter put in dat ricw puddin'. She  say she put hit on de lib'ry table."  Mr. Du27.it tossed the papers about,  peered into the drawers, and finally  handed Lucinda a slip which seemed to  be what she wanted.  About half an hour _ later Lucinda  rapped softly on the door of the library  and apologetically said:  "'Scuse me, suh, but mus* I use all  dese hyuh t'ings whut dishyere papuh  sez ter use?"  - "Suro   thing," answered    Mr.  Duzzit.  "Do just as Mrs. Duzzit said you should."  Lucinda returned to 'her kingdom  mumbling about the peculiarities of the  white folks, and for the next two'hours  site was busy hunting all over the kitchen and pantry for the necessary articles  for the pudding.  At dinner she carried the pudding in  on tho largest tray in the house and deposited it oa the serving table wilh an  air which said that she washed her  hands of all consequences.  - "What is that, Lucinda?"  asked her  mistress.  "De puddin'."  "The pudding? Goodness gracious! I  never dreamed it -,yould be that big. You  may help us to some of it, though."    *  When Mr. Duzzit's portion was placed  "beforo him. he scanned it Critically,  sniffed suspiciously, and turned it gingerly over with his spoon.  Mrs. Duzzit, however, had the courage  which comes from an implicit faith in the  culinary page, and she tried a spoonful.  -1 "MercyI" she ciied.    "Why, Lucinda,  what in the world have you put in this?"  "Nuilin' "eept whut do receipt said ter  use," avowed Lucinda.  "Hum," mused Mr. Duzzit. "It" must;  be a funny recipe."  "Well," asserted Mis. Duzzit, "I never  saw such a looking affair before in all  my life. Lucinda, you surely have made  a "mistake in mixing it."     . '   '  " 'Deed, I hasn't," stoutly answered the  cook. "I done use eve'y-t'ing des lak de  papeh said."  "Did they offer a cash prize to anyone  who would eat the pudding?"-enquired  Mr. Duzzit. "Because, if they did, I am  rubout to miss an opportunity to enrich  myself, for I must depiive myself of the  extreme pleasure of tackling this, compound."  "I des gib mah two weeks' notice  raight now," announced Lucinda. - "Yo'  all do fust white "folks whut say dey  won't cat mah cookin', en I know whah  dey plenty er quality folks dat glad ter  hab me in dey kitchen. En-1 gwino  right out cn fotch in dat.receipt, en yo'  seo fo' yo'se'fs dat I des use whut hit say  ter use."  Lucinda retreated to the kitchen-in  sable dignity, and returned solemnly,  bearing the "receipt," which read:  All- E. Duzzit to I. Feedam, Dr.'  "One can corn, 10 cents; one box'-shoe  polish, 5 cents; six candles, 15 cents;  two "pounds rice, 10 cents; two bars  washing soap, 9 cents; one cake yeast, 1  cent; bottle olive oil, 25 cents; one-half  peck potatoes, "20 cents; one mackerel,  18 cents; three pounds prunes, 45 cents;  ten pounds salt, 10 cent's; six packages  flower send, 30 cents; one feather duster, 35-cents.   Paid."  -=-"Dah-'t-i3,"-said-Lueinda.-^i-"Dah-".t-is.;  An' dey all in dat oie puddin' 'ceptin' de  fcan'le er dat feather dusteh, cn' blame'  'f I knows how ter wuk.'hit in whenst I's  stirrin' up all dat olheh trash. An' ef  yo' all lak dat kin' er puddin', den yo'  betteh git some otheh lady ter ten' ter  de cookin' foh you,' 'ease 1 ain' use' ter  -������������������'*������������������" \ ,.    .;  But Mr. Duzzit soberly took his wifo  by the arm, led her to the library, took  down the big dictionary, and pointed out  tho words "receipt" and "recipe" .and  their definitions.���������W. D. Ncsbit. in  "Judge."  ��������� *    Inappropriate.  "Funny names things do get," murmured Benson, ns ho looked into tho  window of a fur shop. "How do you  mean?" asked Hcnson.. "Why, sec that  thing over there on the stand? Meant  for a chin-wai mer, and they call it a  chinchilla." But when Hciibon turned to  rebuke him, Benson bad moved on.  His'Night Out.  , JJoni i*Je Too Modest.  Hero is some nchice for those who  would succeed and -,ct aie in doubt as  to tho wisdom of being too aggressive:  Atlveitise yourself. Life is a keen  competition and it behooves every man to  put his best foot foiw.ird and to lliuiiit  his merits in the public eye. Tiie modesty of greatness is nil traah. There is  no such thing. Greatness knows the  necessity of holding the center of tin-  stage as much as po.i-sible. and seldom  overlooks an opportunity to do so. The  man who has 111 him all the elements  that nuke buceess -is<*cils himsslf on  eveiy occasion. Jn every company he  docs something to focus attention on  himself for a while. JIc sliivt-s to make  an impression so that lie will be noticed  and talked about, lie is aware that the  public memory is .sluirt ami lh.it thc  world must be reminded continually of  the existence of ils ci-lebiilics.  A young lawyer, l.y nature modest and  loliring, made up his mind si*; months  ago that modesty did not p.ty. He was  conscious of his -Utility, but In.-, light win  hidden, lie -aw men of loss mind and  learning mnkin** their way belter I lum  he, and he rosoKcd to imitate tliem and  puoh himself forward. He joined half a  dozen organizations, including two fraternal orders, a church society, a social  club, a camcia club and a political club.  He attended every meeting and spoke  on every question. Having thrown off  his natural diffidence he expressed very  positive opinions in a very loud voice.  He had been in the habit of UBing an ordinary conversational tone in speaking,  but at the birth of his great resolve he  pitched his voice several tones higher  and kept it at that pitch. He became  disputatious and intolerant in debate.  He took a front seat always and ceased  to' feci humiliated when rebuked for going too far and not minding his own  business. He rather lelished a quarrel,  for it caused talk and spread his nam-;  among the people. He devcloped-a marvelous ingenuity for getting his name  into print. Whenever he commenced an  action nt law he went after the reporters and told them all about it. Whenever!  lie made a speech he sent a copy of it to  all the newspapers. Ho counted that  week Ic-,t 111 wliii.li he was not mentioned  once or t.\iee by lha press."   .   ���������  Tins woik hfij* told. Wliile a few sneer  at hi:n the gie.u majority lake him at  his owi vl'ialion. The fiont seat, to  get \. '.���������l'.i l:e litcd lo go early to meet-  iiH'S, is now ic-ervcd for him, and he  may go l.itc. He who had trouble catching the chairman's ej e when he wished  to bie.ik into a debate is now called on  to addiess those piese-.it. He is consulted on all measures fr.r fear he would oppose them iu the assembly. Thc prominence which ho foiineily seized a=������  though he i\ere stealing it is now freely  given as his due. His practice improve'*,  because he is talked about. Peoplo go  to a lawyer whose name is in the papcis  every day just as tbey buy a soap whoso  name is on every dead wall. They may  know nothing about the lawyer as they  may know nothing about the soap, except thc name, but they employ thc lawyer as they buy the soap. \Vhy? One  must probe deep into the human mind  to'find the answer, but no matter what  the answer the fact standi.  AN AWFiy ISTAKE.  Physician Prescribes Nuxvoror  ica for a Kingston   Lady  with the R<' suit that she  is Paralyzed  A Thrilling Experience Resulting from a  Doctors's Blunder��������� fortunately She Recovered and tells the Story of the whole  Incident  Kingston, Ont., Nov. 3.���������(Special).  ���������That Mrs. E. Lake, of 112 Clarence  street, this city, is alive to-day, is a  matter for wonder.  She says:  "My sickness was brought about  by overdose of Strychnine prescribed  by a physician. It brought on Paralysis alTccling my left side, brain  aim and limbs.  "I was perfectly helpless and il  was impossible [or mc to raise my  lc(,t limb or open my fingers. I got  no sleep and often when I dosed my  eyes remained open. I had not thc  power to close my eyelids.  "I suffered almost continually with  headache.  "My brain felt as though it was  too large for the skull. My appetite  failed and I became very emaciated,  indeed, I was nothing but skin and  bones.  "I was three years under treatment,  many physicians having mc under  their care, but without avail. At  last I became discouraged and gave  up all treatment.  "While reading a paper one day I  noticed a testimony o������ one who was  cured by Dodd's Kidney Pills.  "My sister procured mc a box ol  the pills and I started on three pills  three times a day. I soon began to  experience a change for the better  which continued until I regained the  use of my -arm*, hand and limb. My  headache also ceased and my appetite  returned.  "From this I soon picked up flesh  and strength until I was as well as  ever.  "I thank God and Dodd's Kidney  Pills for my health for by prayer and  this wonderful remedy, I .was cured  and have remained "in good health  ever since, although this was over  fire years ago."  Tired Towser���������The striking coal mla*  cr3 want an eight-hour day.  Tough Tom���������Well, I've got no kick  cotnin' on a sixtccn-hour night.  Sorrow or Self-Pity.  A man seldom feds less confident oi  his ability to say the right . thing  neatly than when he sirts down to  compose a letter of condolence. One can  scribble off the usual friendly letter without much care or premeditation. A business letter m.iy be modeled on set foims  and lequires little brain cneigy. A letter of .congiatuliition may trip along  gaily, saying nothing in pavtieul.tr. A  letter accepting or declining au invitation sometimes excieiscs the invention,  but never taxes the mind very hea-iily.  A love letter 13 iiitially written "with  amorous 'spontaneity and, like other  kinds of folly, is easy to tho true lover.  When it is labored it rings false. A letter proposing marriage demands more  thought and coimage iii the sending than'  in the writing. 33i.it a letter of condolence must appeal at once lo thc mind  and lo the emotions. It must not be too  familiar nor yet too foinial. It must  sound sincere and yet it cannot be sincere, for the arguments one makes in a  letter of condolence aie the trite reasoning whieh is always brought out in  the time of bereavement and which  neither consoles nor comforts those who  are genuinely mourning. Putting these  consolatory arguments on paper, one is  aware that they, are dictated rather by.  custom than by his own' opinion, and  that they will have as little effect on  the bereaved family as they would ,havo  on him if ho weie sorrowing over thc  dead body of one he loved.  The hackneyed arguments of consolation are levelled at the wrong point.  They deal with the state of thc dead ono  and bid the mourners mitigate grief with'  the thought that the lamented ono has  gone to a world that is fairer than this,  and is in a condition of beatitude. But  the root of grief is not anxiety for the  stale of thc dead. It is rather self-pity.  '-Lpiiis arc alicd because one whoso company gavo the mourner pleasure has departed and will not come back. Jflcligion  ami philosophy bolh hold that thc stato  of the dead, in most cases, is better than  that of the living. The dead do not need  pity. They have no rcgre.ls at leaving  this woi Id. If death ends all, then tho  dead rest sweetly in oblivion and am as  little affected by cuiu or sorrow as they  were ten thous'ind yeais before they  were horn. If there is heaven hcieafter,  us all ciceds hold there is, then the dead  man, if he lived honestly and well, is better off than ho wus here below. Tlie  only logical ground of pity for the dead,  fht-rcfoic, is I ear that the soul may havo  gone to'hell; end what sorrowing survivor will admit that bis grief is based  on that fear? Do not the friends of  saints mouin as loudly as those of sinners? ���������'  There is no shame in acknowledging  that the so-called sonow for the dead is  only pity for the living. Love beieft of  its object will mourn its loss and .its  giicf will be eomineiisurate with tho  strength of the attachment. When the  mourner becomes used to thc loss his  grief abtle.s accordinir to tht: mle of  kindly "Nature. l*ul who is bold enough  to make this argument in a letter of condolence?  Miss Kamra Feend���������I'd like to taKe  a "photo" of your farmhand at work.  Farmer Brown���������All right���������ef j"ew kin  spare the time.  Miss Kamra Feend���������Oh, this camera  will catch him in just one-twentieth of a  second.  Farmer Brown���������Yes; but it'll lake ye  two hours tew ketch him 'workm'.���������  Judge.  .    ������   Bill���������I see, he's a verv c!o=e friend.  Jill���������Well, I don't know about his being a close friend.  "Oh, yes. he is. If he wasn't close  you'd have borrowed money of him, and  if you'd borrowed of him he wouldn't  have beeu a friend."���������Yonkers Stales-  man.  THE HIRED  MOTHER-iN-LAW  Will !*��������� the nonorert Ct < *.- et llio Wcd-lln/  Soon to T������:.'- :'lnc<.'.  That ugly old wor,".e:>. might rrcven*:  the institution of s-its for dan>.a.---i  for breach of pro*^...= - is si:KSC*s*.pd.  though not proven, i.-- the foliowin.--  Rorio-comlc true stc.-y jusr. reportc*A  from Vienna, Austria:  A poor working-mar - ittlr.-r cn** evening with some cron ;> in a tavern,  drinking cheap wine, confea-etl himself in great trouble Ins sweetheart,  a poor cook, neither : vans- nor beautiful, threatened him >\ith court proceedings if he refusei* :*) make good hi**-  promL-o of marry inr arr. He shook  his head at every tv ."stion made by  his iriends. "I kn * of only .out  thing," he slcbed, *'���������" *t m:?:*.: ir-luco  tbe girl to relinquish* i.-r hold on me.  and that is if I can : *v hir that bcr  prospective mother-i. mv h*:** hair on  hor teeth and is po._ ^**cd of -a. evil  cyo."  "Whoop!" cried o*-,"* cf hi*; sympa-  thietrs. "my own mo*. -.er-in-l"7.* r.-ruiul  suit exactly! If you ain't afiai>l of iier.  ar.i -.-.lU ray me for it. 1 will loan her  to you. The girl will be -"-.ire to ru>  away as soon as she ������3Gi her."  Pepi, the betrothed, went at one*- to  look at the old woman, antl found ber  as repulsive looking as described. On  condition that he pay her S2 she agreed.  to play the role ot hit? mother at a  meeting s-oon to take place betweea -  herself, her "son" and the girl. .The-i  the faithless lover Informed his affianced that on a -flven day his motht-r.  would oome to Vienna for a meeting a*  a certain hotel.  ���������At the ap-tointed day and hour th*���������������  trio met, and Mary, the poor girl, near- ,  ly fainted when. Pepi  introduced ther ���������  ugly old woman as bis mother.    But?  .  she soon  composed  1 crself and tried:  to get on friendly terms with this supposed mother-in-law.    Pepi  gTew Impatient,    and    slyly    reminded    bis  "mamma" that accor ling to contract  6be must make hersei������ as disagreeable,  as possible.    She did.    She began by  consuming an astonishing quantity o;  wine, and would not leave of: kisain-*-' .  and embracing her "dear  boy" until  the latter, in desperation, trod vicious-    ,  ly on her corns to show her his disapproval of her tactics.  "Miss Mary," 6he said. "I have mads���������  inquiries about you, and find you deserving of a happy future.   I will not* ���������  lend a hand to parting thore belanginjj  together.   I have enteied into this joke    '  understanding   the   real   intention   ot  your betrothed; "ft* on*.y wanted to find.  out if you would ma-.ry him, even i*  hia mother was -ruch a hag as I am.   .  Isn't it so,  PepiT"    What  else could*:.,  Pepi  do  but  mtn-aiur  "AyeV"    Mary-  w*aa touched, and embraced the ugly.- ,  but good  natured old  woman.    Then-  came full pardon, coir.piete reconcilia-���������  tion, and at the wedd ng soon to take-.-  place the hired mother-in-law will be *-. ���������  the most honored guest.    ' ,  A clerical correspondent of Tbe London Express tells ot a -nodding ceremony  n which he oiliciated,- and iu his 7e.il  ior rubrical observances laid himself  open to a comical and crushing retort.  "All went well until the moment camo  when it is directed by thc rubric tbat  Lhe man shall place the ring upon the  iourth linger of tlie woman's lett hand,  uut then tiouble began. The yokel, ap-  paiently from nervousness or ignorance,  laid hold of the right hand of tbe expectant bride, and placej tbe ring there  resolutely.  " 'No,' I said, with quiet Iirmress, "you  must put the ring onto her left hand.'  l'o this his only reply was a stolid stare.  Thinking he had not understood me, I  repeated my words, but with no better  "fleet.  "What did you gel out of your garden  this year?" "Not a day went by that I  didn't have one of my neighboi's chickens for dinner."  "How 13 Ann Matilda making out ns  postmistress at Kim Crossroads?" "Getting along line. To day she read twenty  postals, held nine letleis up to thc light,  a fd opened four newspapers."���������Chicago  "Xews."  "With as much warmth and insittence  is was justified by the occasion, I now  look thc Iii mer grourd and said, 'If you  Jo -iot put the ling onto' her left hanl 1  mil "I stop the son ice.'  "And then the climax came. With a  .-v-mplaccnt smile, that s-ocm-.d to show  l*is satisfaction at Laving for thc 1110-  -,;ent ���������bo'.tuii' the pur=jn, the Iri.lcgrjoin  c-t.ttied the point for all time with the  woids, 'Please, sir, sne ain't get ncnal'"  .'"-���������"���������si  ***".  - ������������������-"'-I  : ������������|  *-"M  Mootl-'s Voto orTlirinK-u ������  Possibly   the  most  novel   rcsponser:. ;  ever made to a request to return a voters*  of thanks to a chairman was made by";���������  Mr.   Moody  durins k".s  first  visit to-i," *  England.  He had attended a msctir.g st wine"*-"*-'*  the Earl of Shaftesbury was chairman.  The duty of proposing a vote of thanka^  was   aseigned   to  him.   and -rhe;  art*-- ���������  uouncem-int. made. _    .  "Our American cons:**:, the neT*.*""*"..  Moody, of Cnicago, wl-1 ,*iow move a ���������"  vote of thanks to the r.obie earl who*-; -���������  has presided on this ocsasion."  The whole thing was quite ont 9f'*U>*-*.^_.  Moodj-s l>ne. Engi:?h formalitiea-.,-  might or might not heve come grace-**- ,  fully from his lips had ho attempted^-..  them, but he did not With an utter: t  disregard of conventi oral ity he biirst***--  upon the audience with the bold an.-���������  nouncement:  "The speaker has made two -mstake-*.-  To begin with, I'm not the Rev. Mr-  Moody  at all.    I'm  plain Bwight. !*__.  Moody, a Sunday school worker.   Antfc-  then I'm not your American cousin*-r  by the grace of God. I'm your brothers*  interested .with  you  in   our  Father'* * -  work for His children.  "And now about this vcte of thanTts.-.  to the 'noble earl for being our chairman th!6 e.'ening.'   I don't see why wot  should thank him any more than he*  should thank us.    When at one timo-  they offered to thank our Jlr. Lint-ota*-:  for presiding over a meeting; In IUIn���������  ois he stopped It*   He sa'd he'd trie*  .  io--do-hls-duty.^aad-they'ditriEd_to-d'"-"-i-i  N theirs.    He thought it was about aa-'-  Neven thing all around."  That opening fairly took the breatlk'  away from Mr. Moody's heirer.-. Sue!*?  a talk could not bo gauged by anytj  known standard. Mr. .Moody carrietK  his English audience wilh hiri fro**j  that beginning to bis latent labor-s.  weary, mwm  JOINTS.  The. Awful  Twinges ol  Rheumatism   Mean  Old Age in Youth.  Relief in  Six  Hours.  Ointments, Salves and Lotions are  positively worthless for Rheumatism.  Get at the cause���������the blood���������and by  purifying that, restore the system to a  clean, healthful condition. The Oreat  South American Rheumatic Cure relieves in six hours and cures in one to  three days Muscular and Articular  Rheumatism, Inflammatory Rheumatism, Lumbago, Neuralgia, Sciatica, and  any affections of the joints and muscles  arising- from impure blood. Mr. F. E.  "Wright of Toronto, Canada, writes:, "I  suffered almost constantly with Neuralgia and Rheumatism. I used sevcra!  remedies, but nothing seemed to relieve  thc pain until I tried South American  Rheumatic Cure. Alter using a few  bottles of 'Rheumatic Cure' and aiso  'Nervine Tonic,' I was wholly cured."  Pain in the Region of the Kidney*.  Pain anywhere is a danger signal.  Pain in thc region of thc kidneys, mean;  that they arc not working properly.  The Oreat South American Kidney  Cure restores these organs to a healthy  working state. No. 3c  IVIiT Willie \>������U������ Willi n ���������: 1��������� ���������! t"���������������Hn*-..-  -."Hoo. boo. hoo," ran*;  throur.h th*r. ���������  house at 2 .1. m. . ;  "Great c.overnnr!    T,*:--t   is    that"****, 4  and thc head ot tlie hcus-.-, bat up in bedr  antl blicktd at an elcctrte light shininn;.  thin'-gli llu: window.  "Mobn,"stay right wl'ore rou r.re; I1V '  rot let you -jo down s<.-.lr~, 10 be killed  Did you t>v<*r hear such a noise?"  "Mama, what is It?" came In an a**i-  t.iti'd wii'siter from the "-fret room, antl  then tbo di'iifhter ru-hr:! wildly Intc*  tlm par'nt-'il bedchamber.  "Korp root now. Don't fro Into n*������  Mchstrilxi I'm Rolng down to see).'  what thai K" and li-.* dug up an. oldE" -_  mu*u;������-lt>iLd!n** pistol he had carrie*;  in iho civil war and that had been load--,  rd Blcce IS73. Til show 'em. Erer***--  niao'e hou**-- Is hia own cast���������" , j  "Hoo. boo. hoo." .{  Th<* father dropped the gun an4 19?  blew a   whole comer off tho bureau-."'  The tian.'h-cr Hired under the bed ant**"-  the motii-r yelled "Murder!" a* the to-*r':  of fit-r tun*--..    " [  "Shut up'" ordered tbe veteran, ash*  reached fur bis arliliTy. "Stay right?1 *  where yon Arc. I'll-figlit my way to thaJ  telephone nnd get the police. If they*  get to shcotiu*- down there don't shovr.  a Ilpbt. 1 know the house and thcyl  don't."  "IIco, boo hoo," lust as the old gen**;  ti-man reached the top of the stairsJ;  He went down like a cartwheel an**  6bct a hole* In the ceiling as big as thai  bo'Jom of r\ (ub.  "Did you bear my owl?" Ehouted WI"*...  fie. as be da;-hed from the third story.'  "Got him in the country yesterday anttj *  hting him in U19 dining room when !���������; .  j-bl home last   night.     Hain't   he   ar1 ���������  dan.-iy?" j  Poor "rt"inie!    He walks like a hoy"'  with inflammatory   rheumatism,    an6������';  the last be saw of hi? uwl it was flyin**?"-  over the barn taward I"Ud2eld,���������***-eLrol"$  Free Press.     - *   " ***     " . '.?#"������������������*-*���������?.*>-���������--  [���������yi-ASixif^f: -  . .-Ss?*----'.-.  \Sfti7y."  JL  In ���������wishing" all  Jie "Compliment ��������� ��������� -,     _-  out that with the passing- of the year a new order oi  affairs takes place in our Business.  Our Premises are doubled.  We have established a first-class Grocery Department  Our Stock has been made more select. mi  We have patronized Union Labor as much as possiole  and have brought prices down.  |-**-*T*-*E*-***"-****-2*^^ l"i.'****fl*i  I  **--~2~~,  <g*  fl  ^.   ... i"**"*- Kv**" ������'*'*"*  Wi 3 a t*  Hurrah!  i*>~,T"r'****-Tr-****'*r'' *^*-*~-*****'  J..9,  Maka fh������  Children,  Old and Young, Happy  ���������**���������"**������������������- ..-���������-..-.iiiHi'M j*w-*wa- ���������!*������������������*���������**--'*-*���������-���������  invite vou to call and inspcel our stock,     lt is Complete, Well Selected and Well Bought in all Lines  cerics, Dry Goods, House Furnishings and Boots and Shoes, ail of which arc suitable to  Wc i  Groceries,  select Christmas  Presents from.  TAYL  a-&BK=&X303>etZL-ZSSS  El  Thi.s can easily aiul cheaply be-clone by selecting* HOLIDAY  Pi-UiSKNTS from the Large Asso-tmeiu just opened up, consisting  of Pretty  Presents .uul Toys of all kinds. -  LARGE AND HANDSOME RANGE OF  ���������j-jj-ca  LIMITED.-  Mail Orders Solicited atnd Promptly Attended to.  aneso and English Crockery  IN C1SOCOLATK, COCOA, AND TEA SETTS, &c.  Our Stock of Staple Groceries  IS FRESH, CHOICE AND COMPLETE.  -V  Sc STEED,  Front Street.  \VK KX'I'HXII OUI  HK**T W1.S1IKS  l"t)ll  A Happy  :��������� New Yea  TO OXK AND AM..  CdnadaDrua&BookCo  BORN.  Bui-UN*��������� On llit- 20ih Dec, to .Mr. iiiul  .Mr^K. \V.J3riiliu or (Ji'iiiyi'llficliie.  a. son.  IeMaistke���������At. lli-vclsLiiki*. B.C., un  Wednf&ilnv. Dec. "2Uli. to -Mr. mul  Mrs. W. de V. '.���������.'"Miiis-tr--. :i smi,  Horne���������On the 21th  Doc.  llio willow  of   the   late   T.   K. , 1 lorne,   o������   ������  ���������   daughter (posthumous).  1-*..EMIXC* ���������On the-iSlh Dec, lo Mv. and  Mrs. XV. Fleming/a cluuj*HH*i'.  Birnev���������At   Cilgnry,   on   .S-itiml'iy.  Dec. 27th, to  .Mr.  and Mrs. AN . G.  .  Birney. a son.  Died  rc'iult'i'L-d (luring tlio   (-.'oiliiii*   by   thu  cliildi-un.  Walter f-iuiiLl, mining recordi-i-.  *N.*il* lisp, wns a visitor in thu cily on  .Mui'day.  P. Burns ������V: Co. are lixing up new  otliei's in the. store adjoining Uu;  butcher shop.  I!. H. Oiimpliull c-iiniu in I'roni Kam  loops this mnrniiig and will spend New  Yen's in lhe cily.  Tho Vancouver "Ledger is now being  issued as a daily and will be published  every day al noon, Sundays excepted.  Ceo.   "Ward, of   the  C. P. lt. si ore.*..  has   taken   a   position   in the grocery.  department of Taylor Bros. i\: O'eorgr.  .1. E. GrilTiLhs, of Golden, gold ooni-  missioni*!- I'or "N'orlli fiusL Kootenay.  and Mrs. Ciri Hi ths spent, a, couple of  days in tho cily this week.  iilr. and Mrs,. Howard Douglas, o!  I innIV, spent. Christmas in tliu city  witli their daughter. Mrs. 0. S. Mc-  O.-ii-lcr.  Miss Hell, formei-Iy of Kevelsioke.  came up from Grand Korku "i.Uiuday  evening, and is spending a few days in  the city.  _|     1-:. .1. Wliitiifcll. of   Lhc  Cl'.!". engi-  j ncering department, spent the holidays   j at Vancouver,  returning   to  town  on  places, where  people   had   an   opportunity of meeting.  Ham Donelly, foreman for the Revelsloke '-.Timber (Jn., returned to Town  on Monday from Salmon Arm, wliere  he had been spending Christmas with  his family. Mv. Donelly leit for the  company's camps in the Big Bend on  Tuesday liiorning.  XV.F. MeL-uighlin. minii*.g recorder,  has been gazetted deputy dislricl  registrar of '".Uiu Supremo County  Cuiii-I-. deputy registrar of the Kootenay County Court, registrar under  the Marriage" Act. and deputy registrar of vital statistics for Kevelstoke  division of Vv'esl ICootenay.  The Ladies Auxiliary of the B. of il.  I\, were ** al home" to their friends  on Monday evening in Selkirk Hall.  There   was   a   large   attendance and  which the brethren were addressed by  a number ot' Wor. Bast Masters and  visiting biethien. all of" whom  roiigrutul.ited Kootenay Lodge on its  present, prosperous c onuilioti.  New Year  Resolutions.  "Willi Iho coming of another year it  is a time honored custom to make new  resolutions. Unfortunately, it i** nl*>"  ���������i f-icl thai many of these are more  iiouoi'utl'in the breach than in the  observance. Nevertheless, lhis should  -not deter anyone who can keep a good  lesolution from making it. Your  town and section and the world at  large will be belter for il. The  3 licit ALU hei i' makes a few suggestions  nlong this line thai il believes would  be productive of good if a fail pso-  portion of the people would lake Ihem  FIRST ANNUAL  Umli-r :iii*������p������,i,s of   tlio  UI.YI-.I.ST0K1C  INDiilMlNDKNT   BAND  flew Year's tve  x ia:A.*v--E it i.  The largest stock of the latest WATCHES,  CLOCKS, KINGS, SILVER WARE, CUT  GLASS, FASHIONABLE JEWELRY, Etc.  liy many years', experience enables me to buy  goods at .the right prices, enabling ine to  sell to the public at reasonable prices.  . J".   GhTJY ' -B A.*R,B*Ei"R.. ^  WATCH REPAIRING  A  SPECIALTY.  *McM\.nov���������At  Kr-vclstoke,  Monday. 1 .Monday morning.  Dec.  *29th.  .lames  McMalwn. Sr.. j -,y..���������,..,..   ,,f xe*So���������.   who  has  of Stonewall. Man., aged  ib \ eau-. _ _ .        - ������������������-,,.   -,,,..   c   ���������~=! been visiting her sisler-m-law    Mt.-. (.,. ;        j^,,,,. ,I(J on >-OIl,*-,y.  ied ;  dancing   was  kept   up  lill   the   early \ in hand.     A litltle leaven of lhis kind  hours   of Tuesday   morning.    Messrs. *( will do a world or benefit..  Humphreys anil  Taylor  supplied   the,'     -x.    s pen It   a   good   word , for   your  music and a   mosl.   sociable   time   was ; I.(.;.rl>|ior or your liu-.iness   opponent if  spent bv all. jj vou can.    It will do you and him good  Sir Fi. Wilson l,.., resigned Li.e ? **������ ^e l������.nK . nn. s-.ul l.o will app^-.-ial.-  p,.mci,,d.hip of lhe public sc-huo*. The ) * and lecipro.ate ������ hen you least  .-cboi-1 trustee.-, bave. olleivd    the   posi' * *-���������*��������������� P'"'"I  '*��������� '  lion to Mr. Miller, ol' Dawson m-Ii-'iiI, ' *2 K-ep up a chee! fill heart, and  Vancouv-r. who has been highly ' lalk and act thai way. It may noL be  i-e.-bnimend.-d bv lhe t-.lii.---.iiun =.!! sunshine aud loses just now, but it  dcinrlin.-nl. Mr. Alt'-* Smith, has jj .s a long l.ine that has no Hiin, aud  taken his .-isl .'���������������"������������������ place on the leaching your turn is sure to come in due tune,  staff '  until     "-he      i i-l urns   liom    hei j      :j. Be willing to  help  your   brother.  TIM'. MAXAfil'MEXT  lla\u -iMiml ni'itlu'i' li"i������ ���������������������' i  t*x]i������.-iisu to liinko tlii** Diincu J  tlio ������\ent ������f Hie Sua-ioii. '  **-J>J>g>l*-i*>������***C*J>*-^i*i*-^ ,  SUITS FOR BOYS AT HALF PRICE ii  * -*��������� * *       --" -   i     - '"��������� '.   '   -.���������'.-! i  l-Olt TIIK OCCASION  r-  CRAMD MARCH AT  9  O'CLOCK  SUI'l'Klt W1M. HK SKltVKI)  $7 Suits for $3.."jo.  $3.50 Suits for $1.75. ",  -\,   $5 Suits for.$2".50.'  -'- $2.50 Suits for $1.25  $4 50 Frieze Overcoats for $2 25  Lots of 1).uiciug.  TICKETS $2.00  EDWARD J. BOTJRN:  Revelstoke Station. " Bourne Bros.' Old Standi  ���������j^^*4'-^'-''<re'-**'.-r*^  holidav.-.-    When   -sehuol    uropens    it \ -vvhelhei he belong   to   your   church or  will lu- in the new bnildin-*. ���������.'-hi'.h will  NOTES OF  NEWS  I.M.   Cl.uk.     .Second   street,  i soi.th Tuesdav morning.  teturnc    |     An appropriate way to celebrate the  Write it 1003 tomorrow. usheriiii*   in  of  lhe  New  Year   is  to  ���������     ,       .,      .   ,   . ..���������,.. ���������i.,i,i attend   the   Band  Boy's  Kill   in the  B;uid at the rink tomorrow mt-til. .  Opeia House to-mgnt.  \bout S feet of snow has fallen'here |      .,.,.,. .    ,.     ,.  ,,,   .  .iuu\ii .Subject of the sermon  m tne "Jiellio"  di.-t church on Sunday evening willt.e:  ah-eady tbis winter.  -^Don'UforgeLth-L-13:ind^I-5o^J3all_Jli,  Christmas   niglit  lhe Opern Iionse to-night.  A.   M.     Pinkham   spent   Chrislmas  ^���������ith his parents at Cals-aiy.  "  T. Carey left for Kield lhis   moi ning  spend X*w Year-**-.  Cirrind Masquerade Ball on I*\-h. 2:i  ]J>13. Don't forger.  If you miss the Band Hull, yoii miss  llie most -sociable dance of the season.  The Herald wishes its friends and  pations a Happy and I'l-o-p'-iTiii-.  New Year.  "Watch night service will be held in j w.-..* kept up till   ���������l.iylij*  the Methodist   chuirl  inencin-; at S o'clock.  The soft weather of tin* p:i*-t- few j Carload of Coal Cil;  wliaL  thev take  '���������n.,v   ,,.i*:<iiir* y.>ai"S.    and what they bring."  F. I'.. Ward, manager of the "Mo'.son.-  ha:ik. antl' Mrs.   Waid,   s|**.iig  holidavs at   Xelson  Xmas  with   .Mr.   Ward's  Timothy Tackhammer's Toyshop  St.   Peter's   church   S imlay   school  Remember  theie  are  lodge   or   not  "Miit-is.  4. Do not think your way is the only  one  worth  adopting.    Several   people  ���������have   lived  hefoie yoa,   and   most   of  sthein have changed   their minds  sev-  he!d   i heir animal  Christina-  tn-e  in "j _<.,..(! limes in their lifelinie.  the opera house last night,  which   had)      5   Act and talk as though your town  lie.--'iraiiv.h-cor.ited  for  lhe  occasion j or city wa- the hest  one  in   your  sec-  ���������������������������     .1   ',.    ������������������,   i*,,,*���������   ir.d     ..ver -reen   ���������-.���������ion.     If you   did   not   think so   when  wiln    tlacs.   on--t.nL,   and     . -.er^ien.    ^ ^^. ^  .^   ^y   (]M   y<)n   i.om<; ?  The entertainment  look   the  loini  o. *; ]fv01|.V(. changed your mind, go.   and  '"Atl:*-!|-j+^--,jT*'irkiV-r-to-liie���������one���������you���������thin k-  s-hich     thef'wili-r.     Ten   to   onu   yon    .will     be  PC piity fi,i.ici**n���������  ba miner's,   Toyshop.  children of ihe  S.inday  =chool   repre-. ^-**{>.$���������$'A m���������in(?ss  ,���������,���������,,  RO  to  sented   dilteient   kinds   of   noli"*.    'lu'-} yon, jocal paper and do  business wilh  j youi 'oral p.ipc:  ir's .-������������������in" talkinc: and lUruii:*?  dolls. ��������� ,|���������. editor, mil on .the  charity*   propo-  brother, returning ou Sunday evening, j whUli .h,  ,,���������T,  ,,*,>,-,*   dre-:-ed   as   tin j sitl'.n. Im. -.^^"'^ur'Sk" Kvlxo  The   Independent   Band  held   their   m,I.H**i-,.   cmwns.   etc.     one   ..I   *-> "* r*   ,,,, u i(, thu , ight w.Iv.   and  attend* to  ,111   ���������,-���������!������������������   IV  h-m-mran   ..���������   rep-.c-etiting     Jack io-tln-1'oj,.       w.1*. 1 rf<jvpMisinp.      It   is     the     best  annual blow oul. 111   U bandroom   on 11     ������   i(.n, (,.,v Kf)0(li    K. Taylor took ihe   ;IlVe-*tiiieiit you can make  on  a small  .Song  ami   s..)rj.; . ,���������.-_.,__    T.ic.ic|1;,1.!t,,t....   pit. W*.  "* ������  ci  fee  cake,  elc' -ve���������- the   principal i P-*"*^ "f ?"**'     ^''T'^J^H^'" vour to***,, everything you  * \    il.n,,r,.i,.ii-d p.i.-ioi of  the  icy-hop.     lhe   smg.ng -       * .        yon   need.    The  itemson the menu cud. ^      | ;ll':d   dancing    of    th-   children     was   Th��������� ,-,,   nl?t.f.himfc   ������ enlilli*.! .10   n  \ -,111 prise pmt v went out   to   Will-i .|)!t..,,ijf'   ;,r���������i   ieil-.--<-d     W'tt   < rcdit ) j*,;M-pi ..lit. and yon ;vill never build up  iiunsni.'*,   ranch   l'.-*l   night win ie   a.;! ������������������ rh��������� !n,llH. ,v|���������,,,. -dllicm.    .Xtvi i i'-ir t-vn by M.f,.li.lg all  your  orders  ������������������iijoyali!--time was   spent.      Dani-Si-jr J .���������,���������.  t.n: *-it.L*j-i tn.*ii L  ili>- !i**.nt-*   of  lh'  ht,    when   lh.- ; i;,.],, .,,���������..,   w..,,.   .,i..i|i.   glid   by   the!  Corporation of the City iof  Revelstoke.  .   Furniture  ���������  Dealers, Et*!  Before    entering   upon,  another   year  we . take, this  .'opportunity of expressing our heartiest wish to one  and all of our many. patrons for "       y.7, - ���������.- ���������  -  PROCLAIM ATIO N.  ,  ! To T. F. ii<ii> k Co..   or  any  other   like  i i-ii!iL*-i-n.      Pati-oni'/.e   home  industry,  ll i-i well -.vorlh while.  tonight  cciii-j p.iity letiiriieil to loivn.  ! Carload of Eastern Apples:  days has inteilered considerably  wilh  skating and curling.  Campbell Bros, furniture atoi-c at  Vernon, B. C, was de.-troyed by liie  eaily on Sunday morning.  C. C. Canon,   tormerlv   of  the   Imperial bank-.tafT here, is very  ill witli j  pneumonia vt Vancouver.  Mark Hyatt took up a gang of six  men to work on his timber limits on  the Big Bend on Monday.  J. Giahatn, C. P.R. checker at Kield.  spent a few days in llu: city last week  renewing acquaintances.  J. M. Doyle returned on Saturday  evening from a visit to tlie Lower  Kootenay and Boundaiy district.  The annual Christmas tree entertainment of the Presbyterian church  Sunday school was held on Friday  evening last, with a good crowd or  children, also parents and friends in  attendance. The hearts of lhe iitlle  ones -were made glad with handsome  presents and some of the older ones  ���������were not forgottfen in thedistribiition  ������jf gifts.     A   splendid piognune   was  Carload of Feed ;  Carload ot"Smoked Wleatsj now  unloading at C. li. Hume &Co's.  Clarence Hart, of  the   Hockv Moun-  f    b-iii-l-oni.-    jin-i-rit-'l    3. B*; corj-iiderate  of others,   even   if  -   .-ini*.*,,-.-,*,   tree   mi* ! tli-v don'tsee things exactly the siiimi-  ' ns v*iiir*.ulf-  N'n man has a monopoly  tain Utile-, who has been stationed  for the past two yc-ars al Halifax ar.d  K-'piiniauK. retuined lo town this  week and has taken his old position in { \h���������.. 27;h. liy   Suil-tYim*  MaMer  Wnr,  di-t i-i*iiiti"ii     "  wi'b "hi. h   th-  ;v,-i<l..il.    Tii-ie m-.-i*. .1 Lii-'c   lurr.i.ut 01 j ;���������,*.))l,"-.���������owl,,(ige of the universe, anil  the p.ihli.. u ho  applauded   frr-pie ntly , w,;. .,|| niake en or-".  ���������vt ;he e-<. ��������� lleni'"- of th ��������� en!ert.<ioiii-ul. ]     I).  f.'i-.t. hut not by any n������<>ans lea-,1,  ���������0 1 p-.yfvonr p'->!ilei*, if you owe hirn for a        - '-..jfi-.'-iiptioii     or  anything    el>-e.      ll  o. ������1^    J,^ !-honld have beeirpaid bel'Oie, pel haps,  l,.jr h*-'ll   appretlai.e   il   as  A   F.  Thf-(..li.---'t.- "f  Kout'-n.-iv I-od!":-, N'l.  Ij  A. F. ���������*>" A. M. i'or thf ..ti- img yen:,  "were   in-t.-illi'd   on   St-   .io'nn's "N'ight.  the C. P. "Jl. stores.  The death occurred early .Monday  morning of Mr. McMahon. father of  .lames and Sam McMalun of lhis city.  Deceased was IH years of age. James .  .McMahon took the remains east this  'morning for intei merit at Stonewall,  Manitoba.  C'nristiii.'is day was generally  although fpiielly oli-erved in Iii'vel  sloke. The weathei wns,n"l altogether  the besl. Tliei'- was a good attendanc-  al lhc inorning'-erviresin thechurihes.  The --Ualing rink in tiie evening w.-i*.  well pat ionized. A -pirit. of ilipeirul-  iic-m and good will seemed lo fircvnrli-  the air. '"A Meny ChriHtiiias lo Yon",  and "The Same to Von and Many of  Tlieni," was lo In* heaid every whei e.  in the houses or. the sli'tels and  other-  Brn. K. Trim bit- ar-  lioiv-:������������������  Sew V"ai's compliment.  delii ate  Try   iL and  And we'feel gratified to state that our-business for last.  .-year has far exceeded.that of years-past���������due: to an'  ��������� unstinted and   liberal  patronage,   for'which  we are"  truly thankful, hoping-to*retain same for 1903.  .1. P. M., Wor. Bro. '���������'.. llollrn.  W. M., Wor. Bro.   <*.   A������ I'rotiinier.  S. XV.. lito. II. ***"��������� Coursier.  J. XV.,      '���������    A. Mcltae.'  Tieas-.,    ���������'   T. I**. I-. T-iylor,  Secy.,      ���������'    li-ilit, Gordon.  S. I).,      "    K. McDonald.  J. I).,      ���������'    W. Moil-is.  S. S.,       '*    0. .I. Aman.  .1. S���������      "   T. B.  Bakf-i-.  I), of C. ���������'' B. A. Upper.  S. (>.      "  *B. Sleiss.  Tyler     "    A. K. I'enniion.  Al'l-r installation R:-;ht XV. 'I'm.  Ficil Fraser \v-.:i presented liy the  \V. M. on behair of I.he lneinbers with  a very handsome P. M. jewel. After  llie lodge closed Ihe bielhretr adjourned to the banqueting hall and  partook of a  bounteous   repast,   -"iil'i'  Gorporation of the City of  Revelstoke.  ���������NOTICE  The Citv Council is prepared to receive  lenders Tor die supply ol" Fifty (5������) cedar  pcilc*. for street lighting purposes���������-Length  30 feel, diaim-lfr, 12 inches nl hull, and 8  inches at lop. I'lace of delivery on application In llu* undersigned. Tenders to  rearh lhis   ollice by noon  on January and,  ! II.   FLOYD,  December 24th, 190*. City Clerk  -Pulilic notice if lioreliy shen tn tlio clcctoi*. of  tlm Miniic-ipaliby nf Huvul-tnke tlmt 1 leqn.iie tlie  nresuni'u 11C tin, s.iiil oluetiirM at mv iitiice liil-iii;  llall Nn. '2, in the s.iiil city, un tlie I'Mx ilny of  J.iniiaiy, 1������0", atl2 (.'clock noon, for the purpose  nf i-lc-utiiis iier-ions to i cprweiil tliuiil in the iilinn-  ripnl eoinieil nt Major nml Alilermeii, ami also for  tlie puipiwe <>f i-lectinir n School '1'iiit.tev.  Thp innile of nomiiiatluii of cniuliiliiles sliu.ll lie  us follow s:    _r -  ���������llu. caiiiliiLitPH ulinll'l-e noiniiiateil in wiitlni*.  tliis urlLliiK shall lie snlwciilieil liy two voters of  tlie iniinicipiility as piopowr ami ������ec;iiiiler, nun  shnllliu iluhvpiL-il lo lhe letiiiniiii* othcei lUiiny  timi' l.i.tv.i-i>ii lhe (lite of tliis notice and '2 p.m. of  the iluv of the noiiiinatloii: ami in the ovont of a  yioll liu'iiii* net-essiiry such poll will,lie opened oil  ���������I tmr-tlnv t liu ir.Ui il.iy of .l.-iniiary, Ifliw, 111 the  City of lievelstoke, and kept open between the  hour of nine in the foienoon and the I10111 of half  oast Hevcn in the iifteinoon, for takiii(*and  rei-onlhie the votes of tlie electors of Ike s'lld City,  of wIiIlIi eiery p.-i-M-'" is lu-roliy n-ipiired tu take  notlic and (-mi-rii liinixelf aevonlinijly.  The persons i|iialifleil to Iw- nominated for and  elected an mayoi shall lie such persons an are male  I'.ritWi HiiliiecU of the full ai;e of tueiity-cne  years an.l are not iliHi|lialitied under any law, and  have Wen for Hie six months next prei-i*iUii|* the  d:i> of noinlnntlon the reKihteied nwneiri in the  l.-ind l*.ei!lr.tiy -Hiiro of laud or real .property in  the Cily or the an.est.ed laluu on the last municipal AHnessiiieol. Uoll of One 'I'lioiinaiiil Hollars oi  more 'iv.-r .mil iiIkiv,- any registered liiciiiiilimiici'  or l-harKe, iiml who are otherwise duly quallticd an  lnuui.-ip.'.l voiers.  'I'he iiersoMH 'pnili'luil to lie noininaled anil  i-lectjil imahlerini-n nliallhe aurli pernons as arc  male I'.riilhh -iul-JrcUi of the full age of tveuty*  one \earn iumI are not diw|ii,ililie<l under any law,  iiimIIiihc Iwiifur the nix months next pn-cctliiii*  lhe dav 1 f nonilli.ttion the registered o*ner, in the  l^ind fti-clHlT-y Otliee, of laml or real property in  tin- rity ol tlm imsimsed value, oil the last inuiiici-  pal Akm:<x*'.imiii K"II. of Fivo Hundred Ilollarsor  iimre over and above any rccistered iiifuuiliriiui-e  orI'lmrice. and who are otherwise qnnlilleil no  iiitmieip.'tl votern.  The persons 'inalifled U, 1������> nominated for and  rlerti-il us School 'I'ni-tee nhall 1* such persons as  are linim.-liolrir-r- mi'l heliiK British milyecls of the  full rtt-if i.i '21 icars and otnerwi������e i|ualilied to vole  at an election of .Seliwil Tni'tces.  Kvcry eandidate no-ninattd -hall signify hya  Hrltiiieai-cnnipaii>lni*tlii* noniiiiation paper, Iini  cinisent to "arli nominatinn, except In case such  person U: nl*>.ent from lh" municipality wnjn micli  alisonce shall l*e stated in the nomination paper.  Kvcry candidate nominated shall, on or before  die hour of two p. m. of tho day of nomtn-alion  furnish the ItetnrninE OIBc-t tilth a statement in  writinc. fpecif j im; the land or real property upon  whiclim* qualifies.  (liven under my hand at ReTclstoke thia "tlist  day ol Deceinbe. ll-Oi  HENRY FT.OYD.  Ketu i-ning Officer.  Howson & Co. 5^cnuee"*sie  HAS IN STOCK  Confectionery  f Harry Webli. Toronto  .-.Iumifacttned by   \ A. J. Stewart, Toronto  (..MeConuIck, I/iuclon.  Maracalbo Chocolates���������bulk or boxes  Marcalbo Chocolate Biscuits���������  400 per Ib  Vi'ebb's  Fruit 360, SOC, SI, S1.40  !     " Chocolates  I     "     '   Marshmallows  i Peanut "I  '. Walnut V  1  Cocomiul J  l ;  Fresh Butter Cups...  G Md Niifrf-cts   Maple IVildinf"*   and many olher lines.  ffy  35o per lb  ...40c per lb  ...30c per lb  ,..40c per lb  ALSO -  I.-iree Line of .Souvenir Cujm and Saucers  bearing view of Kevel*.tol*e.  ���������.iiiioK-c'i. China and many other piedes of  China. .'  ALSO��������� I  I'rayer l-iooks. Hymn Boob), etc.  'Xmas cUnls in abundance.  <lirl-'an'-l Hoys' Own Annaab.  rjuuday At Home.  irfi/.ur.  ilour.  Chattrr "jtox, etc.  WA!_*i*ER BEWS Phtnrt- B  Dj-ucftij-t and Stationer.  *-?!*j--*:o'isr-E:  **3-8-  New Sta*hd Xext to the nnme Bloc's. *  Permit  us  to - draw your  attention to the wisdom  of.  presenting youi- family with  Choice Lot  AS A CHRISTMAS PRESENT  The first step toward provid-.  in-*', for  them   a.   home of  their own. '  A part onlv of the amount  usually spent on pretty but  - useless presents - will make  . "the first payment.  REAL, ESTATE,  Is the basis of all wealth? "*  and you can now lay  the  foundation   of    your    own  prosperity    -while   making  - someone else happy.  Cull and investigate, we  have other things to tell  - you on the subject of How  to Own a House of your  Own.  LEWIS BROS,  Asa-it* Sm-rttar TownalU

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