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Revelstoke Herald Jul 10, 1902

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 W  W  .> S,���������  r *.  i���������./V /\Mj^/'Jv/  wi'"  i ;��������� *!  ���������f *.*���������>  '*> i. v.*  1 *&'  F'.-s*  U-'  *������������  r  RAILWAY  _A_2sTI3  MEN'S  JOURNAL.  Vol    V.  No    14S  REVELSTOKE B. C.   THURSDAY,   JULY IO, 1902  $2 OO a Year in Advance.  Fresh  Groceries  o  u  R  S  P  E  C  I  A  L  T  Y  We are the largest buyers  of GROCERIES in the  North Kootenay, and are.  therefore able to offer the  very best goods produced  in .the world at the very  lowest prices. Although  times have been hard during the past year, our business has been the largest  we ever had in Revelstoke,  which is very encouraging  to us.  This -year we have made  arrangements which will  enable us to give our customers better prices than  ever before.  W. G. &  Shirts  These Shirts are recognized to be superior* to  any made in Canada-for  Style and Durability.,  We have them in all the  Latest Patterns.  Neck Ties  " The celebratedCurrieTie  ���������The Spring Patterns'  in these Goods have just  been received, and- for  Beauty and Taste, excel  anything yet produced  by this Renowned Firm''  of Tie Makers.  Hats! Caps!  The wor ld-r e n o w n e d  Christie and^Fedora Hats  A ' consignment   in - the  ���������-���������Latest^StyIes���������has-_j ust  been opened up.  The Programme of the Days  Proceedings Which Include.  ���������Speaking, Lacrosse, Football and Athelic Sports-  Theprogrammeandall arraiigcmetil-  for Ihe   Orange   celebration   hero  on  Saturday  are  about perfected and l lie  following   will be an   outline   of   the,  day's piocecding-.:  10 a.in. Grand Orange- Parade.  11 to 12 a.m. Addresses by leadinrr  members of the order- in T.ippinji'.-.  opera house, .to whieh the public are  invited.  Dinner "fiom 12 rio.on to 1.H0 p.m.  1.15. Parade to reform and in,mil to  the gun club gmuiuls.  2 to o p in. I.i-.ciussu male ii. Vernon  vs. Revelitnku.  H p.m. Olistacle.r.ue, 1st. priv." by 3.  XV. Dennett, value $0, 2nd pii'/.e by 11.  A. Crown, value 153.50.    -  100 yard dash, open, l.-t prize by .1.  \V. Bennett, value !*>.*". 2-id pi'/-' by  Keid iV Voung, vulue $2.50.  Mens egg and -.poon nitc. 1-1 pr'xv."  by Guy Barber, value ������5, 2nd prize lij  Reid & Voung, value $2-50 ��������� *.  - Girls race (under 10) 1st' piize by  Misses Shepard k Bell, value $3, 2nd  prize, cash $1. * _,*"���������'  3.30.to -ISO p.m. JFii'otb.tll -iimuli  Vernon vs. Revelstoke. .-  _,.,v  i 30 p.m. "Men's sack; race,  l������l. pii/.t*  by li. li. Smythe, value/ So, 2nd  prize  by Kootenay Mail; 1-yea'i vsnbscriplitni.  .   Wheel bairow i,ice, Isl prize by   \V.  Bews. value .^ST 2nd " prize   W.' Bews,  value $2.  *  '''������������������Greasy-Pig (Ivriiger), prize value $10  the pig. *--.->- - ������������������,  . -The following events will be  run   on  ~ - , -'        i  Second stieet  l'rom, .tho opera   house,  froiiiJJ to S p.m.      .'*---  '440 yard  race- (open)   l--t   prize, by  Roome Bros., value $10, 2nd   prize, by  E'.M. AHum. valiiR'Su:'   '"  *'        "V   .**,  I'm ile bii*j-cle<rai_e,'1-t piize by C. 1!.'  Hump k Co., value" $10, 2nd piv/.������. hy  Canada Drug& Book,Co., v.ilue .*j'5-, :  ,' 440 yards race for Orangemen! "1st.  prize by G. F. Curtis, 'value $3. 2iul  prize by 11. A. Brown, value $3 50.-1  Slow, bicycle race, 1st*'prize iri'3, 2nd  prize $2. , -\  Chiidrens rates and olhrrsports will,  he arranged tor on the ground*, during  the afternoon. ' ������  S o'clock grand concert in lhe uper.i  house. IiidepenilentB.iiKl in attendance  Admission 50c, children 25.*. Pioi-ecd***  to go to the Orange ball Molding fund  and True Blue Orphanage.  Underwear  For Sjjring and Summer.,  -A well- selected consignment of "Imported Scotch  and English fine, woolen  - Balbriggan and Fleece-  Lined .Underwear just to  hand. ,  Hosiery  Ladies' and Gent's Hosiery in Silk,'Cashmere,  and Wool. A complete  stock of the Latest Patterns and Best Quality.  well-known to be fire pi oof. Ihe  committee were instructed to purchase  a s-ufi* for ' the city at a cost not to  exceed S2U0.  The report of II. U. Smith on the  Revelsloke Water. Light and Power  Co's electric lighting and water works  systems which was very voluminous  and complete in every detail, was then  taken up. The Fire, W.iiei. and Lighl  Committee had gone carefullv over I lie  leport in detail and weie much  pleased with same.  Aid. Hume thought the repoit an  exceptionally   goud   om*. lie   had  always beetr in lavor of buying the  plant at what it is worth to city nnd  was of the opinion that cily should  make a proposition right away to lhe  company.  The Mayor pointed out lhat accni fling to the engineers lepin-t there was  no evidence of dam's stability, ils  permanency was open to doubt .-mil in  pm chasing it thev weie pin chasing a  ri***k.  ' Aid. Hume w.is of opinion that  .$55,000 was a fair figure at which to  pun ha.se and that an oiler should be  made at once to the company.  Other aldermen piesent being of the  .������mi' opinion it was moved hy "Aid.  Manning, seconded by'.Aid. McLeod  i h.it the city clerk be instructed to  .vrite Ihe Revelstoke Water. Light  and Power Co. oUVi-iiip* lo pin chase  lheir water woiks and electi ic light  works (with exception of ollice  fniniture) for the sum of $55,000.  Carried. ' -" '  I!   Floyd, ������ecretaiy"of si hool   board,  pointed out to the council  that  owing  to tiie large amount   of , sicklies.-..pie-  'v-aleiit amongst"* childi en ��������� dining  llie  past six months eudiug June 3'Jlii, lhe'  average ^attendance     nt   the * public  schoolsJvul.,dropped -from   220 lo'lGO,  wiii ih* Could -lienn a" reduction fn "the  'ghv&Tiifi'TPiit*"'"Krimt'"of   8GG(>    in" ~six  months pr $1320 .tor   the- year, which  deficit llu* city would have to meet. "'-  - ln view ot tbis it, was moved liy'Ald.*  Taylor,  seconded*! liy"\ AM^vM-i'iii'iing,1"  that the vaiioiis municipalities in B.C.*  .be requested to t.ike-join.l,, art iOj-T7.wil.li'  'this citv looking" t.o[alrif.idius( ni'.-ni -Ifv'  .. o * -i Tl ���������*���������'' i - *    *     , ���������;. *    11   ��������� **s-***-  tile     government*-  -of     tin*,   givm: lu-  itiunicipalities i'or s'l hool purpuses, the  piesent grant, being in vtli������,' opinion ol)  the council ultimately inadequate and  verv unquitable.    Curried.' "  .    *      'I *   _*,* * * ���������.-';. *' I  A.;.iiiimber- ot   accounts   were then  passed an'd^co'uncil adjourned.  C        "V.A'.'t,  il"..    i.  ' -   -     M   A Grand Stand.    ''"-'"  "A grand "sland is "lieing erected on  tli'������ gun club ginunds for the Orange  celebration on Saturday. This stand  will''life' a great, "convenience for the  vi-itoi*S"lo"llre'grounds on that day.  and will no doubt be lully appiecialeil  I1.VEB GUP  SEVERE FLOODS  IN CALGARY  Excellent      Progress       Made  Under the new Management���������  Big Ore Bodies Discovered on  The Sunshine. ���������  .i  In a little over Lwo moi.Uis the new  inaiiageniert of the Silver Cup mine  at Ferguson has taken out J00 tons of  first class ore iind 000 tons of second  class, .amount ing, to it, valuation ��������� of  over $00,000 even- nt the piesent low  prices of silver and lead.  This is certainly a remarkable  record, bul still more remarkable is  the statement, made on excellent  authority, that the quantity of  imstoped ore in sight is larger at the  present time than ,nt any time in the  history of tho mine. -  The change of management seems  lo bo a good thing for the inine,_ the  new owners and tho country too. ���������  "Work has been coininenced on the  continuatioiijOf the long tunnel on the  Sunshine, which is"-a' full claini lying  immediately below" the' Cup. This  tunnel will tap the, big. ore shutes of  the Cup at a depth of about eight  hundred feet, besides passing through  the ore shutes on the Sunshine, one of  whicli is the richest yet discovered -on  the whole- property. The Home Payne  company shipped a hundred tons ' of  ore from this shute'in 1S9S which went-  ������1-10 totlie ton net,", and as .this was  merely taken out of the development  work in running - the "long tunnel  through thd^ top of the shuli. it is  reasonably figured that a good many  thousand tons will be mined out from  this point on the,Sunshine. The new  company will tap tho-'sanie shute at a  lower depth.   -."���������-''"' .  ���������*��������� As the long tunnel * will follow the  big ledge which traverses bolh the  /Cup'and. Sunshine arid **as there'is  'knojvnf to jTe'.Jothai* goo'd showings  along the lead.,'AVe may "look for some  interesting developments on this great  property in the near future.  Card'of Thank's.'  , The Ladies Executive of llie Hospital  Society heft to lender their .sincere  thanks to all the ladies whoso kindly  assisted thcin in the work of^ making  np the linen necessary lor use in the  hospital.  Lv.v 13. Gakiiutiikhb,   M. K. Lawson,  President. Kecretary.  The District Inundated and Life  and Property in Jeopardy���������All  Through Traffic Suspended  Since Thursday Last.  Winnipeg, July 7.���������The Calgary  floods are reported very serious but no  details have reached here since Satiirdny, when the flats of tbe town  adjoining the Elbow river were under  water, and th<* people compelled to  niiike I'or higher ground.  Thomas Davis and William Kemp  were drowned in lhe Row near  Cardston while attempting to cross the  flooded stream. A telephone message  Irom Ciirdhton states that six frame  houses, mostly new, have been carried  away hy tbe flood.  One large sized house was passed in  midstream, bul it is not known from  \\ hat locality it came.  The C. P. R. bridge over the St.  Mary's bus sagged fully six feet and  crossing it is now dangerous for foot  passengers.  Five hundred Indians are camped  on the prairie in the vicinity of Kipps  Coulee, feiiing1 an inundation ofthe  reservatiou. -    " -  They predicted some weeks ago that  tlie country woiikl experience iTsecoud  flood this year which, would be greater  than the disaster which occurred last  Miiy.!'-Tlie'ruelLiiig snow in Lhe Rocky  Mountains is helping to fill the aheady  raging rivers tliere and altogether Llie  outlook is'far from favorable.  Since Thursday last Revelstoke ha?  had no mail communications wilh  Eastern Canada. Tlie Canadian  Pacific has had enormous difficulties  to contend with beyond the Rockies  on account'of the washing out of lhe  track caused liy the excessive rainfall  in the vicinity of Calgary. People  who have been in Calgary, recently say  that the rain has seemed som'etiines to  descend in sheets and that it. has  praclically been -pouring-for three  monlhs. The railway truck is built  upon a. sandy foundation and the  downpours have washed the. soil fiom  the sleepuis.  Tlie Bow river will, ere it has  returned to ils normal height, have  cost the Canadian Pacific Railway  Company many thousands of- dollars  in damage to properly and great  inconvenience to the travelling puhlic.  IL was thought Saturday lhat the  river would po down Sunday, but  instead uf this,   it   has ln-'come worse.  The flood is the worst that the railway  company has heen called upon lo fight  for years, and this inoriiing repoits  from Calgary stated that the water  had not diminished more than a few  inches. Tlie track is covered to a  depth of four feet at different sections  between Calgary and JJanff, and the  Indians and others are tiaveling about  in canoes and dug outs. The water is  highest about five, miles tliis side of  Calgaiy and for a mile and a half the  track is completely hidden from   view.  The company is running a local  sei vice on lhe Pacific-division.  Not only is the main line blocked  bul there b ive also been a series of  land slides and washouts on the Ciow's  Nest branch between Lethbridge and  McLeod, and trntlic is practically at a  standstill there also. A large'patty of  American toutists who passed through  the other day en rtuilc Kast, stopped  off a day at Banff but returned to  Vancouver.  Hardware  A carload of Assorted  Hardware just opening  up.  C.B. Hume  &Go.  The City Council.  The regular meeting of the council  was held Friday evening last. His  Worship Mayor O'Brien , in tbe chair  and Aid. Mantling, T.iylor, Law, McLeod and Hume, present.  A cotiiniunicalion was rend from T.  W. Bain, Chief of Police, drawing  attention of council 'to 'thistles and  obnoxious weeds growing on' streels.  The, Public Works OiiuimiUeo were  authorized to have, sti eels cleared of  same and that properly, owners be  notified* to clear up thistles and'  obnoxious weeds onllieii-'property.  A communication from II, Jit. Smith,  O.J"! , Rossland enclosing reports on  Power and LighL System of, Kevelsioke  Water Light and Power Co. On  walerwoi'ks system" of siime Co., on  proposed pumping* system of water  supply from Illecillewaet. river, mid on  water supply fiom Might Mile Crick,  together wilh account for pwpsiration  of same amounting to SnCO for per-,  sonal services and !*J175 for expenses  incurred in ohtaitiint. sum".  From the proprietors of Chinese  laundries in the city protesting.'i'.'ainsl  the lemoval of t-.unc outside city  limits.  After a lengthy discussion the  following boundaries were struck  inside of wliich no Chine.se laundries  would be allowed : On the east the  Arrowhead branch line, on Ihe north  and west the C.P.It' main line, and on  the south Kighth .St. to Connauglit  Ave. thence noith to Fifth St. thence  west on Fifth St. to city bouinbiiy  The city solicitor was instiucted to  ���������irepate a by-law di fining ihoe "limits.  Moved by Aid. Manning, secoialed  by Aid. McLeod lhat bylaw be inter-  duced fixing limits for Chinese  laundties as per itisti uctions to city  solicitor.    (Juried.  Aid. Hume, chairman of finance,  committee, reported lliat committee  bad looked at safe- with a view to  puichasing smile for city. The price  I'or mime was $12.*> but tould not  recommend purth.i***e. as committee  weie not acquainted t witli make of  safe.     Considered   it a bargain if safe  EXCEPTIONAL VALUES IU SUMMER CLOTHING AND SUMMER,UHDERWEAS. SUMMER VESTS AND C0RSET8.  The arlicleyou.want, tiie quality that will "please and surprise you ; the  prices that insure your pockctbook againsL.a vaccum���������all-are.here.  Wide-a-\vakc_buycrs should  all  be .here,,too,   to "claim their.share of  what is waiting for them.                     ',* "   .V,               ...  If you want to see a parade of reasons1 for purchasing-now, just call and  examine' the fine lines wc quote :-���������"_". ."." '       '  _  FOOTWEAR  -  This is how this Shoe Chief wins fresh laurels in. , On Saturday we  offer choice new lines of Summer Footwear at prices that would average about one-half tlie regular values. ,VVc keep so closely in touch  with the Shoe Trade that wc invariably get first chance to buy the best  Shoe Snaps that come to thc .surface.*'The prices are convincing proofs  that we know when and where to bttyiso as to savc^big money for those  who are looking for Bargains in thc Shoc'Linc.  Clothing Hints for Saturday  There should be J.ig doings in our.   .  Clothing Section on Saturday.    Wc  have  several   gilt-edged   values   to'  place before visitors.  Charming; New Summer Hats  ^Ncxttothc price, the most'noticeable feature for Saturday is the wide  variety of styles. We don't know  when wc had a collection of Summer  Hats showing so few duplicates.  Dry Goods"  Merchants  Young  Mackenzie  Avenue.  AROUND THE  RAILWAY YARD  Person 1    Paragraphs   Pertain  ing to Railway Men Picked up  By the Herald   Man   on ��������� His  Daily Rounds.  The Lulu Island, Roil way the latest  branch of tlie C.P.It. has just been  completed and the first passenger  train was run oter the line on Monday.  The new line is 15 miles long.  3. D. Fraser and family leave ou  Saturday for Vancouver. Mr. Fraser  lakes a bimilat position in the C. P. R.  despatchers ollice at the coast to lhat  held by him here.  - . The construction department has  prepared a set of tbree standard plans  for the C.P.R. stations, the secondand  third . of which bave dwellings  attached, while No. 1 is for larger  localities: ' The designs are very  artistic and the idea in time is to have  uniform design of stations all o.-erthe  system. ' " ' -  The C.P.R. Machinists, at a recent  meeting held in Winnipeg, voted a  day's..pay , each month from every  maii on the Western and Pacific  divisions of the big road, to assist the  striking machinists on the Canadian  Northern Railway. For the month of  June each machinist in the local shops  sent %'i to headquarters, and a, rough  estimate, of the full amount from both  the Western and Pacific divisions is  betwesn $1,500 and $1,800. It is  understood that the machinists of the  Eastern divisions are also assisting the  strikes s.  The engineering department of ths  Canadian Pacific railway is at present  undergoing a process of re-organization. Hitherto there have lieen two  departments, one.of maintenance'_~and  another of construction. The former  was originally under the supervision  of P. A. Peterson, H. lust., C. E.; hue  upon his recent indisposition was  taken over by II. K. Vautelet. who  was given thc title _of acting chief  engineer, and Mr. Peterson that of  consulting engineer.' The department  of construction was under "the charge  of Mr. Tye, who hue. a, large staff and  drawing office. Now it appears the  two departments are to be merged  into one, all under the immediate  supervision of K. H. McHenry, the  new engiueer-iii-chief, and there will  be but one drawing office. The most  urgent work the department will he  engaged in for some time is the  improvement in the alignment nnd  gradient of the main line, the relaying  with heavy rails and the substitution  of steel for wood in bridges and  trestle*. When this work is completed hy the end of next year, it is  anticipated the uin to the Pacific will  lie cut down neatly a day. y  Mt. George Mel... Brown, for several  years executive agent of the C.P.R. at  Vancouver, and one ofthe hei-t known  and most popular of the chief officials  of the Canadian Pacilic in the west,  has been promoted to an important  position in .Montreal, that of general  vuiperintendent of the sleeping and  dining car service and hotel' department for the entire system.  Mr. Brown will take thc position  jutt inade vacant in Montreal by the  resignation of Jlr. J. A. Sheffield, who  has been in ill health for some time.  Mr. Brown is taking the position with  much wider powers than those previously held by the pcciiD.mt of the  oflice, and the scope of work ofthe  department will be much extended.  Theetitire hotel system of the company  will also come under the purview of  the oilic'i'.  LATEST NEWS  BY TELEGRAPH  The News of the World in Brief  As Received  Over the Wires  From   Every   Corner   of  the  Globe.  A new Engineer Corps ol 100 non*  Commissioned officers and men is to  be established in Montreal.  Tiacy. the fugitive, convict "and  outlaw, is still nt large in the vicinity  of Seattlel Ile was last seen al eight  o'clock this morning. Several hundred  aimed men ate trying to capture him.  Later���������Xo one appears.to know for  the time being the exact/whereabouts  of Tracey. the Oregon convict. 'Three  men have been arrested as accomplices  It is now reported for cei tain that  Merrill has joined Tracy.  King Edwards progress is .uninterrupted. He sleeps well and is gaining  strength. The wound is slowly  healing.  Hon. Joeeph Chamberlain left the  hospitaltoday foi* his home. Physicians  order he must have perfect  quietness  Six deaths from,'pvostration were  reported at Pittsburg since yesterday.  Tin onto was , the hottest city in  Csnada yesterday^ahd, the fourtli  hottest in North America. ThermoncteL'  rggistered 91 de'gfrees'iri the shade,  A cloudburst did 'great" d image in  Northampton County,"Pa.  The  'freight   'handlers ,-strike    at  Chicago is not yet  settled,   but  it  is  hoped   that'  before night.  ' Later���������The strike of fi eight handlers  at Chicago is virtually settled.  A terrible electric storm'passed over   *���������  the Indian reservtrat. Onendaga"TOnT.,"*  yesterday..-' Chief Levi **>Jpiiuliiun was  killed? * ��������� '-"- " '���������' i .";^.,*.,^U"."*,, "  The Montreal Street T?aihvay"Co.  has voluntarily raised the pay of.* its  conductors and motormen ten percent.  1800 men are affected. "    ' _  The   Canadian   arch   in, London  is  being divested of   grain   to make'way ;  for Hag designs for reception   of  Lord  Kitchener. '-,'"���������  The grand jury tetumed indictments  against tha Mayor and Superintendent  of Police of Miuue.ipolis foi* accepting  bribes. "-.'--'.'  Ahead, on   collision on the'Hudson"  Valley  Railway,   at   Colwell,"..N. .V.'.  resulted   in-the   death1 of :one.person  and injury of 25 others.        "',   'V  *  Catholic Church Bazaar.' !  The ladies of   the   Catholic -church'  have arrangements   welf..in: hand'fot*  the holding of their bazaar next week. "'  The"-"date has-been-deflnitely^fixed^fdi*^-^  Thursday 17th inst., and the event will  take place iu the Opera House.    In'the  ,,  afternoon a  sale   of   work,-.including  useful and fancy articles will, lie held,  and afternoon tea will be -served."--   In "-  the eveniug an   entertainment will be    '  given al which Miss   Loretta   Garvin,  the accomplished young musician .and  other   well   known   local ' talent. will  assist.       The  Independent   Band will  also be in attendance.     Admission"  in ;'.  lhe evening 25 cents, uncharge will bo  made in the afternoon. -    *  -  arbitration . will    prevail  Big Strike on the Triune.  Word was brought down last night  by one of the men from the Triune  that an immense strike of oro had  been made on the property in' the  crosscut now being driven. 'A couple  of days ago they broke."into the lead  and up till yesterdAy they had  penetrated into the' lead 10 feet antl '  w������re still in ore. Of course all of this  is not solid ore hut over half of it i������  and th������ grade of this ore is higher  than anvthing yet shipped- from the  mine,���������Trout Lake Topic.  Big Bend Transportation.  The s. s. Revelstoke had a hig 'cargo  of freight for the Big' Bend -.camps on  Tuesday's trip, besides twenty passengers. The inauguration ot the  steamship service to tho Bend is  having a good effect already and in  the course of a very short time* when  the fact of easy mode of transportation  to points in the Bend becomes better  known there will be a big rush of  prospectors and others bent on inspection of the different camps. Iu  Seattle a Herald re'portcr met> with a.  few parties there who were interested  in the Big Bend district and who  having heard of the boat service  intimated their intention of visiting  the camp the coming fall. Thcwealth.  ofthe Big Bend in gold, silver and  copDcr is possibly as well known to  mining men of Seattle and possibly  better known to them than to the  majority of the citizens of Revelstoke. J.���������  Ml-  The Friend rf M'damj  r.nn  toid  i::lc* story which was  ..ie ii the twilight, when  w? nnd  iVilshod our tea and  sti!! .-.nt. cups In hand, loth to  say i.-'no-I-hye.   We were talk-  ii'.;,' of a  sown far down east,  near which "ihf-rf*  Is  a  queer  old  gray  ���������stone   house   which   has   not   heen   Inhabited in i*.v.*ii;y '.'oars.  Once, said th" visitor, It was one of  the preuio.-t p!"'*'s In Canada. A  ���������handsome young mistress ruled over  It and over two rn those old-fashioned  *3oyal family snv "*:s who are now out  '���������of vogue. Th.: ni'ister was a traveler,  often away for a "innth.at a stretch,  ''but Jean nnd Jnccm 'line and "M'dame"  -were as h.ippy an1 contented as three  people could be. "M'dame" had her  ���������jogs, her hor***..". her pigeons, her  books, her piano .'id -her needlework.  She was convent- ni-nd, and had married from school���������in orphan, who had  never been to a nance or a play or a  race meet, noi- even a big dinner. The  ���������Cure dined stum���������:lines at the Stone  House, the. doctoi caine to smoke a  pipe with the nm- iur and play cards;  ihe master Invited no one else, and the  mistress withdrew herself from the  Jew gentlefolk's wl.u would have entertained her in th*3 neighborhood. She  was gently'born ������.id convent-bred���������  you know how thai type can be happy  In a.seclusion sha; would maddon you  and me.  One day Jean and Jacqueline were  made anxious by .Hie delay in the return of m'd.ime fr-.ni 'her drive. Long  after the'Simple; lime dinner of flsh  end fruit was : spoiled by waiting  m'dame came heme���������was brought  borne, racher���������by a strange gentleman  ���������who had startled her ponies in an unfrequented road, and after a time  stopped their runaway career and taken them in hand. The gentleman came  ���������up to the verandah with m'dame, and  because It was so warm, and he a bit  tousled and dusty, Jean took him Into  the dressing-room . of monsieur and  brushed him, and Jacqueline made him  a famous drink of frult-syrup and ice,  with a dash'of something French and  llqueurish.  "I shall look In to-morrow, it I may.  to see that you are none the worse,"  they heard him s-*y. as he lifted his  hat in farewell to m'dame, and Jean  said to JaequelV": "He 1s not Cana-  dlan. nor of the Republic, but English,"  and Jacqueline .'.nodded, "So It appears  to rne, my friend."  To-morrow i"d on many other morrows the similiter sat on the rose-  wreathed ven.ii.1ah, Jean and Jacqueline always 'watchfully chaperoning  their mistress. M'dame read and played  and sang to Hie stranger, who was  courtesy and ��������� i oivpliment personified,  ���������and Jean .aii'l.In-.qiieliiie agreed -.that  never had they served', a finer fellow  than this one v.-hcun they always mentioned as "the friend'��������� of m'dame."  Monsieur w.i.-- awuy on a long trip,  somewhere in t**nt region vaguely  known as tho North-West, but just betore he might he expected home the  Fervants henid :he Knglishman regret-  Ting that home' n'nvs had.arrived calling him back in i.n*_rland.  So he went :i*v:iy. and monsieur duly  returned. ���������'*. M'(i*jir*i drove, to meet him,  and on ihe v**- "���������"���������'.������������������ii. in the hearing of  Jean and Jiii.*-*.t..;lnie.7 detailed the story  ;of   the Tun;nv'.*:.\   mentioned   that   the  stranger hail  ..*.:lii.I.  and had   gone   to  ���������England.       li   was   strange   how   her  story gave the iv, nression 'that he had  only called one';'!    Jean and Jacqueline  -���������-thought h.'strKin-'t*.. though neither one  ' inside1.any xei'ni.iii-.'. e.ich: belnir secretly  a Ut ashamed*: of���������'having noticed It. at  ail.  lt wa? about U.'..-*. time that Jacqueline began to be anxious about the  health of m'dnin*.-. i*:.d: ventured to give  '.monsieur, a few* timid, words; in that  ���������connection.  "M'dame'not strong?" cried monsieur  ...ibeartily.'. "Xo'r.siuse!".'   "Monsieur  was  u very big, wry. Vcbust and .very/slow-  witted person, il teems.   Jean was also  ���������moved  to re::::.'..  t'.f.t m'dame needed  ;" change of .air.  did   not sleep  well,   ate  less   than   fo;:i.*_i'y,   and   rarely   sang  those brilliant ar.d * somewhat "risque"  French  songs    which    monsieur   preferred. ��������� Monsieur, protested.''. "You and  Jacqueline   have   ..bsurd   fancies,"    he  tail, testily.  And  then lie  told   m'dame,  and'she,  " wonderful to relate.' f.rew, suddenly furious  at   her   two   .s. rvltors,   and   rated  :*hem for .officious* meddlers.   You could  _ ������ o t iPi c in re_l h p__h_i__i_or_and_chag__in__o__  those   two!     M'dame,   their   cherished,  petted,  adored   o-i*.-.   abusing   them   ir:  wrathful tone*?!   '"Certainly she Is ill,"  -said  Jean,  with  sorrowful  pigheaded-  v:ess.   "We must In* very, ven-y good to  1 **r, until she* is quite recovered."  'Vhen monsieur went away again,  i lis time on a sho' ter trip, he asked  i.f dame to come v. Iii him. She promptly refused. "!n th--- heat I should die  of the railway train, smother in the  country inns ^i-.d '.'*_'.l 111 of the viands."  .-he,saiJ with; a ..wave of her pretty  hand.**, cons'.ivnlr.g the whole scheme to  limbo.  "On the w.-i;- to the train, monsieur  met the phy.*-!.'!an; "I wish you'd take  a look in oci?'*-.-illy at my wife," he  said*, "she's not IH. but silly old Jean  and Jacqucii'i" ;, ��������� 1st she Is, and I  think she is */*.!': ^rl, jf from the heat."  "She has been driving about so much  and walking too r ir: The English are  -uch waikf-rs. ���������*-������������������! that young man has  made her -.vail: too far every day In the  sun." said the *V<*if>r testily, for he  "liad not once i.Lt-rx asked to *.-mok<* a  Tip* while monsieur was this time at  home.  Monsieur was boarding, his train at  the instant and -p.-rcely comprehended  the remark. It went in at I.i.-- ears and  did not at one* *-n-ich his brain. But  v.-hen he h.:d seined himself, some moments la.cr. su.l.*<*nly it arrived Ue  started. "Y._u:v_- Knglishman���������walking  la the sun *:*vei v <lay!" the physician's  words Jo������tied e;.eh other to the tack-a-  tack of the train over the rails.  Morisit-u,** t-ir-ii^.i a very d*-t*p red.  (. -'Good thing jv.-'.-, left the country'." he  i-.tid in a v-ry n-ly tone, and ther. ,;ot  rodder >*���������-. for :*.-* next neighbor "p ir-  doned" and aski d what monsieur'had  remark*-*'!.  "tth. nothin--' nothing!" he' shortly  r-plied, r.*_*:-\-..ii--|..- unable to think 'if a  tactful :  nproy  ion.  . . Meanwh:;  Jacqueline  ���������.*.**  stone J.O!j:*c  \ t  ;before   on;  more   ar.d  mc  ..sitting   mu  ch  lhe a;bor i  'ro  long wr-y d  ���������J'.V  The   oi.-l  }*'  sober p.r.'i  Sii'  line went d  Jersey  c-ov.  and  can  I;  :jc  in'il'ipie    and     Jean   and  :-��������� jiving In  the old  iir.xy  ;.e .';me equable live.; as  ii'w:ivs   m'dame   grmvinir  '��������� t  difliclle.   passing   Jnc-  **.-*. .*-��������� .ups and entrees and  ::i   !.ei-   hammock   under.  :n  wi'.'ii.'h one*eould see o.  I t:.._* dusty country rij.n.i.  :*::.:.   .people    Brew    vory  ::;.     ;*2ven   when  J.-iron ���������  r. ���������.:.... orclmrd to rniik ' .���������  "h-   quite   forgot   to   sii.A  u,  I'.-.a poodle,  to  trot at  her side.' She prayed often to her good  Baint Anne, and opened her fat little  savings bank and took out her coin and  bought four big candles, which burned  gaily the next Sunday before the altar  of Bonne Ste. Anne in the church of the  village.  One day m'dame came in from her  drive a bit late, and as s*he pulled up  her ponies at the gate she cried: "Jacqueline, ma bonne, hast thou a good  dinner? I am hungry again!" And  Jacqueline, hastily crossing herself and  sending a sort of telegraphic "thank  you" to Bonne Ste. Anne, told of the  little chicken roasting and the late  salad and the early Crawford peaches  on the ice, with Devonshire cream, and  then, In gratified tones, mentioned that  m'dame's favorite potage was just'  ready to serve.  It was the old merry dinner-hour,  when Jean and Jacqueline almost  quarrelled about who should serve  m'dame. though lt was well known that  lt was to Jean to serve, to pour the  wine, to enquire If the dinner was as  m'dame liked, while Jacqueline stood  humlily by the door-until lt was time  to remove the different services.  Jacqueline was a bit bumptious when  she remembered her four candles and  the evident complaisance of Bonne Ste.  Anne, and so far forgot herself as to  march in with the roast chicken "and  actually place lt herself before m'dame.  Only the exceeding content of Jean  with m'dame's appetite and spirits  made him overlook this breach of privilege!  After dinner m'dame and Bijou  strolled down the orchard as usual, and  Jean gently reprimanded Jacqueline,  ���������who Immediately demolished him with  the revelation of the four candles and  the complaisance of Bonne Ste. Anne.  Then Jacqueline trotted -busily down  the orchard with a little shawl, for  m'dame had gone out with her beautiful shoulders bare. She, good Jacqueline, paused at the prettiest ot pictures,  m'dame reading, a letter. Bijou sitting  up before her, begging; tihen : m'dame  kissing the senseless, sheets of paper  and crushing bhem to her bosom and  crying: "He comes, Bijou, my little  one! Only; you must;; know it! He  comes!    He cannot leave us, Bijou!"  Jacqueline came forward all smiles.  "A little shawl, m'dame," she said,  archly; "Monsieur will not be pleased  to find m'dame with a cold," then  shrank back from her flushed and  frowning mistress. In one instant the  letter was in m'dame's pocket and she  had recovered herself.  "Some day, Jacqueline, you will  frighten me to death.; Don't follow me  about, my good soul!" she said quickly.  "I am going in. I shall not need the  little shawl, and you know I never take,  cold," and, like a Hash, m'dame swept  by, calling to Bijou to come in for his  forgotten lump of sugar at once.  There was.an envelope on the grass,  which Jacqueline picked up. It was  not addressed, and it was crushed and  a little rubbed and dirty. The old woman dropped It as if It were hot.  "I have wasted my four candles," she  sighed, as she went hurriedly back v. to  her; kitchen.  That night m'dame slept like an Infant, as the anxious old woman assured herself by many.....visits.; to :her  bedside, but Jacqueline slept not at all.  Instead'she prayed, but not once to  Bonne Ste. Anne.  /For several days m'dame came home  from drives or walks tn ��������� famous appetite and spirits. Jean chortled, and  teased his glum companion, enquiring  if she begrudged the four candles now.  and being overcome by her fierce rejoinder: that she did.  At last one evening Jacqueline's forebodings were realized; the rustic gate  swung, on its: hinges; with a bang.-and  the tall form of the friend of m'dame  came*'to : the. verandah: Jacqueline  stood behind the shutters and remarked '���������',the meeting.' "M'dame was  neither flurried nor surprised. Indeed,  she barely held out her hand, but Jacqueline could see how her whole frame  trembled. .  The old woman hurried out to the  kitchen garden, where Jean was picking some; herbs for drying.  "See here!" said she, explosively.  "This will not do. Here is that cursed  Englishman back again!"  Jean; dropped his tray, of . herbs.  "Where?" he gasped.  "But there on the verandah. "What  must be done?"  "Calm; thyself, good Jacqueline. I  have not.been kind with thee;lately. Is  .U_-_no_new_____hjjng,_^l^_idea_^2f: thine?"  Jean's voice was tremblingwlth"^o"n'~  fusion and distress. "  "New! New! And I vowing candles  to Ste. Anne and spending one whole  night on my' knees,; while thou In bed  snore.d and snored! It is this cursed  Englishman, only him! She was so  content and happy, here. He has ruined  us all!"  Jean put his hand over her mouth.  "Shut up! you are dreaming!" he said,  fiercely.  "Oh, am I, indeed? "Well, one.  awakes!, Let me tell you���������"and in a  torrent of wh!spers;She told of the letter, the changed spirits and the word3  to Bijou. "Now, isn't this too much  for us?" she cried belween sobs.  "If only monsieur were here!" said  Jean distractedly, A heavy hand fell  on his shoulder.  "Well, my good Jean, he Is here," and  so was he, In traveling dust-coat and  valise, having come c'up between the  ranks of vegetables and herbs from  the back gate. "Don't be frightened,  you two. Ton, at least, need not fear,"  said monsieur, kindly. "I gather from  you, good woman, that the serpent has  entered my Eden. Woll, I shall.put.the  serpent-out. It will not he a mighty  task, never fear. Jacqueline,'will you  very quietly give me a biscuit and a  glass of wine, out here?���������as quickly and  as quietly as you can���������not to disturb  m'dame. Jean, take my valise Into  your own room and return here to me  directly."  = Monsieur aat down on a rustic bench  amid the vegetables and herbs,'while  Jean .and Jacqueline stole Into the  house.  "I shall tell m'dame," said Jean, "lt  monsieur shoots me for it."  "You will do as you like," said Jacqueline, rooting in her biscuit-box. "I  know enough to obey." Jean hung his  head and softly mounted to his own  chamber with the valise and coat.d  Monsieur drank two glasses of wine  and ate a biscuit.  "I am going out as I came, and shall  meet the se:p:nt outside paradise," said  monsieur. "Unless m'dame rings for  you, you will remain hore, you two."  Then he went back down the narrow  path between the vegetables.  "Hold my hand. Jean!" said Jacqueline in a shrill child's voice.  "I am sore afraid, too!" sighed Jean.  Outside on the dusty road  monsieur  paced to and fro.   Presently,  an hour  or so later, the rustic gate swung back  nnd two figures came out.  "You will come with me to-morrow!"  said the strong English voice. "Promise me!" Then monsieur listened as  one listens to. the nails, driven in his  scaffold.  "Not to-morrow," said m'dame, pleadingly.    "It is not possible!:'  "But the ship sails next day, beloved,  and if he returns." M'dame slipped  inside the gate, trembling, warned by  some psychic current, who knows? and  faltered:  "I cannot go to-morrow! I must  think, r will toll you In the morning,  at the old place, when I can go," and  then her white dress and pale face  llltted under the trees, up the verandah  steps and Into the shadows.  In a moment her hell tinkled and  Jacqueline's voice was heard crying,  "A l'lnstant, m'dame!"  The Englishman laughed.  "Cursed French tricks." he said,  loudly. "I've a good mind to sail without her."  Monsieur strolled down the road; tha  Englishman stared at him curiously.  "Bonsoir, monsieur! Could you  oblige me with a light?" said monsieur.  The Englishman handed him a match-  case.  "Monsieur resides here?" politely enquired he, striking a match and lighting a cigar.  "No," said the Englishman, shortly.  "Just making a call."  "Ah, you know tho afflicted one?"  (politely to a degree).  "Afflicted one? What do you mean?"  stammered the stranger.  "I mean," explained monsieur, "but  I detain you. Lot us go together, If  agreeable; I am walking to the village."  "But, you mean?" Insisted the Englishman, anxiously.  "Only this, that the beautiful lady is  mad. Surely you know-her sad history?" queried monsieur in surprised  tones. '  "Good God!";crIed the Englishman.  "Mad! Why, : she goes about everywhere!"  "But always Watched, my dear sir.  Y.ou would not remark It, but it is true.  When she receives friends there is always a keeper concealed close at hand,  within earshot. When she drives she is  perhaps in peril, but she has never  come to much harm; Once .she was  rescued in a runaway by some tourist,  whom she has since spoken of in her  times of delirium. Her physician sent  for me to-day to decide whether she  should be put under restraint. I am,  monsieur, the superintendent of the insane asylum.' We await the return of  that much-to-be-pitled, man, her husband. Monsieur will pardon me, but,  seeing you emerge from the gate, I fancied you might be he.' However, no  such tragedy; darkens your life, for  which you may be thankful."  The Englishman walked mechanically  along beside monsieur. He stepped  high as if his feet were numbed.-Presently he shook himself together.  "Good God!"* he said again. "What  an,escape!"   -Monsieur "pardoned."  "Oh, nothing! nothing!" said the  ���������Englishman hastily. "If you don't  mind,; I'll just hurry along. I believe  my train leaves at midnight, and I  have some things to pack."  ���������Monsieur stood; watching him as he  strode through the dustr "A fine, handsome fool!" said he, bitterly.- "I am  glad, she took time'to think: It. over!"  Then* a sudden fury shook him. "How  I'd like to feel his neck 'between my  hands!, ; How I'd enjoy running ,him  through. -What pleasure to pitch him  over the cliff!" he gasped, and laughed  as devils might.  Presently monsieur re-entered;,. the  vegetable garden, where old Jean stood  waiting.  "Well.'.my good Jean," said monsieur  cheerfully. "The serpent has left Paradise. But.; to be quite, sure that he has  ���������to satisfy yourself, good Jean���������would  you very much mind walking to the  station about', the .time the midnight  train passes here? It Is late, I know,  but; to satisfy yourself���������"and monsieur  paused. Jean; looked curiously at him.  "And monsieur?"  "Oh, I shall smoke here, until you  return," said, monsieur, sitting tranquilly down. "I always enjoy this  kitchen garden, and; I want to enjoy it  greatly this autumn because, good  Jean, I think of moving into town a  little later.  When Jean got home at one of the  morning, monsieur still sat smoking in  the moonlight. He nodded when Jean  1 cajH.'-r aTYi gn*i.*rfi**.d. monslgm.*." anrl.rft.  marked: "You might ask Jacqueline tJ  tell m'dame when she . takes her the  morning coffee that I arrived home by  the midnight train, Jean, and am sleeping in the guest-chamber rather than  disturb her."  M'dame slipped from her lace-draped  bed and ran across lhe hall to the  guest-chamber when    Jacqueline    had  duly delivered herself of this message.  There   she     found     monsieur  soundly  sleeping.     He   was   awakened   by, the  clasp of her arms about his neck  and  her glad cry:   "I have wanted  you  so  badly!    I am glad you'are; here!"  Jacqueline, shamelessly eavesdropping, said under her breath:  "J''orgive  me, m'dame!    Forgive me. Bonne Ste.  Anne!    And  thou shall have four more  candles for Christmas!"  Warning: Off the English.  An Ingenious method of obtaining a  reputation for patriotism cheaply has  been Invented by certain Berlin publicans. On'theirtshop fronts they hnxtg  legends to this effect: "So long as the  war In'South Africa lasts I forbid any  Englishman to enter my premises."  The use of this placard is. it is said,  entirely confined to houses of a class  that never entertained an Englishman  in the course of their existence.  Intellect vs. Morals.  It Is the tendency of a sophisticated  age like the present to overestimate Intellectual as compared with moral and  emotional gifts. The-material civilization upon whloh we pride ourselves Is  almost entirely the achievement of the  intellect. Fame and wealth, luxury,  cultivation and leisure���������all the big  prizes of the world, in fact���������are obtained by the successful exercise of tho  intellect. Thc moral qualities/of them*  ���������selve**;, can procure a man nothing but  a clear conscience, and the npprov.il,  perhaps mixed with contempt, of. his  neighbors. And yet, when the intellectual qualities are brought to the tost of  reality; when one's view of them is not  clouded by pride, avarice, or passion,  how amazingly does their value shrink  and shrivel!���������Henry Chllds Merwin in  "Atlnntlr Monthly."  Revolutionary Proposals.  /T must have struck many of the  admirers of the melodramatic  stage that the various outrages  to which the 'h.w'o Is subjected  during the course of the four acts,  when he Is "up against it" good and  hard, are as like each other as a row  of Japanese dolls. The locomotive, the  fire-reel, .the buzz-saw, the mine ex-  ���������ploslon, and the shipwreck, have been  ���������worked over and over again. What we  need is novelty. And lt I might make  a suggestion, some new and startling  climaxes could be worked up from the  modest Incidents of our dally life. For  '.here are climaxes In the domestic circle Just as distressing as any depicted  on the stage. Even when the canvas  buzz-saw is advancing on him with all  ������he energy: a perspiring stage carpenter can impart to It, the hero does not  suffer the agony ot apprehension that  convulses the soul of the average man  when he arrives home at three o'olock  in the morning and hears the contemptuous sniff which apprises him that the  wife of his bosom is awaiting him at  the top of the stairs. (Nor does the  heroine, when starving to death In the  latest black cashmere "Dally Hint from  Paris," evince more trepidation than  does the average matron, when the  leader in her particular brand of "sas-  slety" drops in and finds her ln a cotton wrapper with'.her store teeth In a  tumbler of water and her magnificent  chevelure 'lying on top of the bureau.  There are calamities just as soul-harrowing in the domestic circle as ln the  drama. The trouble is that the playwrights have never taken hold of them  in the true spir.lt ;Of discovery.  We will take as an example one heroic incident that lately happened in this  city when a prominent citizen induced  a small girl to save her life by jumping  from the .windows!.] of a burning house  on to the tails of his ulster, which she  ���������accomplished without even breaking his  flask. ; We can easily picture  to7 ourselves how this could be worked up for  the stage.   The Angel cheelld Is backed'  up on-the windbwsill will a pound of  red fire 'burning on a tin shovel behind  her.    The hero'comes tearing on from  the side scenes. He sees her, and clasps  his hand to his forehead.    (Heroes always do that.   It is a kind of a, send-  off.)    He seizes a handful of clustering  locks.from his wig and tosses it into  the air.   It comes down "Tails!"- The  cheelld  must be  saved.    With  a  wild  wrench he whips off his liver-pad and  holds   it ; outstretched ' in   his    strong  arms.   The cheelld jumps and rehounds  from it like a half a brick from a hopk-  agent's cheek;.'; Once more she. springs';  and again he is foiled.   With a cry of  anguish he hurls  the liver-pad at the  sheering villain and catches her on his  breath.'And as she is lowered in safety  to   the   ground   we  see   the   quivering  .body of the villain nailed fast  to the  blazing ruins by the faithful livei-rpad.  There  is   another  point  to   which  I  would   like   to   draw   attention.     And  that is, the way in '..which inanimate ob-v  jects  are  neglected.     We  have  dogs,  geese,-chickens  and  poultry  in   melodrama.   But that is all.   I was once acquainted with a gentleman who played  a cake of ice In the river.scene in "Uncle Tom's  Cabin."    And   the barrel; in  "Panjandrum" was a most lovable personage, off the vstage.   Many friends of  mine   have   also   formed   part   ot   the  "hoarse gathering murmur"'which always arises in the wings when the hero  is getting into a remarkably tight place.  But these, were not: strictly; inanimate  objects.   They drew salaries, and wore  red   neckties  on   Sundays.     What   we  need is a,further extension of the .drama from the farmyard to the grocery  counter, and the hardware store.   And  we  shall:get  it. ; We shall7 yet  see  a  drama   in which   the; leading   comedy  part is played   hy   a   tin   of   canned  salmon    and    the:   heroine ,! is    saved  from the villain's clutches by a barrel  of  patent glue.     And  why should we  not?���������:' There are many comedians now  on the stage who would compare unfavorably from an intellectual standpoint  with;;a   tin   of   canned . salmon."���������������������������:���������. And  there are heroes beside whose personal  charms a barrel of glue would shine as  a   paragon   of   pulchritude.     A   tin   of  canned salmon  would prove  far  more  useful to the heroine when she is lost  on  the sandy desert, or afloat on  the  lonely raft in mid-ocean, than a comic  Irishman with a Coney Island brogue.  If she did hot care to tackle it herself  'she could feed it to the villain and .tie  him up in so many knots that it would  take   a   traction   engine   to  straighten  -Wm-out^-Ar.d-the_dramatic^'POSSiblll__  ties of a barrel of glue are simply; illimitable:.-She could use It for sticking  to   everything  from  the  angel  cheelld  to the papers proving her to be rightful  heiress to the old baronial home. When  the   villain   sprang   upon   her,   hissing  out  "At last I  have you  in  my ppw-  er-r-r!"   she   could   paste   him, to   ihe.  kitchen stove and go out for.'a. walk.  How  would   the band of -Moorish   brl-  eands look If she stuck them all to the  adjacent  rocks by  the  slack  of   their  loose   trousers,   while lhe...manly  hero  went through their "pockets?   A dab of  glue on,her wlndowsill when the murderer was creeping, knife in hand. Into  herloncly bed-chamber; would- compel  him   to. stay   there  nil   night  or��������� complete his crime in a costume which the  management would not stand for'even  for a moment.   And then how useful It  would be to help her to adhere to her  salary.   It Is true that they might hava  to soak  the hero'In  hot  water  to get  him away from her.   But then he often  richly deserves to be soaked.    In every  other' Instance   the   faithful   glue   pot  could give cards and spades and little  casino to the most useful comedian who  ever trailed the villain to his lair.  These are only two. of the Instances  in, which the use ci! Inanimate objectn  In the cast would Increase the novelty  Of the drama, But their number could  be lndefinli'-Iy increased. We have long  had the wi/kIph actor. Why should we.  stick at the Inanimate tragedian?  Herein wv have a bright. Idea for the  budding playwrights .who have, dramatized "very book that has a circulation of ovr:r, t--:n copies, until the principal value v.-<: place on the dictionary  is the far;t that ever, the most arnbl-  ���������tlous of them have never used It as the  ba?*'iM of fi romantic play. Ancl we  charge nothing for this hint to dramatists, ft Is an -absolutely free .������������������raft.--  Montrci!  "Sunday  Sun."  Anecdotal.  After one ot his trips to tho Emerald  Isle Foote was praising the hospitality  of the Irish, when a gentleman asked  him whether h'e had been at Cork. "No.  sir," answered Fdote, "but I have seen  many drawings of It'."  '  Disraeli once said of Sir William  Harcourt in his affectedly cynical way:  "He,has the three essential qualifications of success in politics���������a. fine por7  son, a loud voice, and no principles."  To this, when it was repented to him,  Harcourt rejoined: "Leaving.-out the  flrst two qualifications, it might almost  be applied to 'Dizzy' himself."  Tradition ascribes lo the second Pitt  the dying words: "O, my country���������my  country! How I leave my country!"  What, in fact, Pitt said was: "I think  I could eat one of Bellamy's pork-pies."  Which he did���������and straightway expired, to the intense grief of the nation.  This version is attested* by the head-  waiter of "Bellamy's" (likewise deceased), who told lt to Mr. Disraeli.  Louis XIV. was told that Lord Stair  was one of the best-bred men In Europe. "I shall soon put him to the  test," said the king; and asking Lord  Stair to take an airing with him, as  soon as the door of the coach was  opened, he bade him piiss and get in.  The other bowed nnd obeyed. The  loing said: "The world Is in the right in  the character it gives���������another person  would have troubled me with ceremony."  When, a few years ago, the King of  Portugal was a guest at Lord Salisbury's country scat, the Prince of  Wales���������now King Edward���������asked King  Carlos what had Impressed hiin most  during his stay In England. "English  roast beef Is very delightful," was the  reply.: "Oh," said the Prince, '"surely  something else has impressed you as  well." "Ah, yes," returned Carlos; "of  course, there is'.:-English boiled beef,  which is also delightful."  A.commercial traveler well known in  thecycle trade adds this to the collection of jokes on newly made happy  fathers: The hero is the manufacturer  of the wheel which the narrator sells.  Being compelled to go away on a business trip about the time an interesting  domestic event was expected, he left  orders for the nurse to wire him results  according to the following formula: If  a boy, "Gentleman's safety arrived." If  a girl,' ''Lady's safety arrived." The  father's state of mind may be Imagined  when, a few days.later, he received a  telegram containing the, one :word:  "Tandem."  A certain Scotch caddie named'Math-  ie Gorum was noted for his invariable  remark after a poor shot by the person  he was serving: "It micht haebeen  waur,"..which;was meant to be consolatory and encouraging. .His master, a  clergyman, was wearied; with this well-  meaning flattery.. Accordingly, to make  sure that he: would squash the remark  for once, he told the caddie he had a.  terrible dream the night before.  "Mathie,,my uian, I dreamt that I was  in the place where the wicked are punished. * "I saw the 'wretched ones tortured; ; they were swimming .In a lake  of boiling pitch, and could not get  landed for,red-hot pitchforks thrust in  their faces by demons." He halted a  minute, with his tongue in his cheek,  when, with perfect coolness, the caddie answered: "Aye, sir, that was a  had.dream, jist"awtu'; but-it mlcht h.ie  been waur." "Waur, you fool?. How  could that be?" , "It nilcht hae .been  true." "        .' ,"'   ���������  It, is a'current story.; in Teviotdale  that in7 the;house.,,of an ancient7 family  of.*, distinction;7 much addicted to the  Presbyterian cause, a Bible was always  put in the; sleeping apartment of tlio  guests, along with a 'bottle of strong  ale. On .some..;occasion' there was a  meeting of clergymen in the vicinity of  the castle, all of whom were invited to  dinner by the , worthy luironct:; iand  abode all night. According to the  fashion of the times/seven of the reverend guests were allotted to one large  barrack-room,' which was used, on such  occasions:of extensive hospitality.: Tho  butler, took care that the divines; were  presented each with a Bible and a bottle of ale. But. after a little consultation among themselves, they are said  to have recalled the domestic as he was  leaving the apartment. ".My friend,"  said one of the venerable guests, "you  must know when; we meet together as  brethren-the youngest man reads aloud  a portion of. Scripture to the rest; only  one Bible, therefore. Is necessary!7 Take  -away-the ���������other-six,-and;--in--thelr-place;-  bring six morebottles of ale."  Huxley and the Reporters.  Q>  N his arrival ln Baltimore, Professor Huxley was driven to the  country seat of Mr. Garrett, who  had offered him hospitality and  had invited a large company to meet  him in an afternoon parly. There was  ibut ono Intervening day between his  arrival, tired out by a long journey in  the Interior, and his delivery of the address. He had hardly reached the residence of his host before the reporters  discovered, him and asked for the  manuscript "of his speech. "Manuscript?" he said. "I have none. I shall  speak freely on'a theme with Which I  am quite familiar." "Well, professor,"  said the intorlocutor, "that Is all right,  but our Instructions are to send the  speech to the papers In New York, and  it you cannot;give us the copy we must  take it down*as well as We can and  telegraph It, for the Associated Press  is bound to print: it the morning after  It Is spoken." This was appalling, for  In view of the possible inaccuracy of  the shorthand,' and the possible condensation of the wirehand, the lecturer  was afraid that technical and scientific  terms might not be rightly reproduced.  "You can have your choice, professor,"  said the urbane reporter, "to give us  the copy or to let us, do the best we  can, for report the, speech we shall."  The professor yielded,- and the next  day he walked up and down his room  at;Mr. Garrett's dictating to a stenographer, in cold and irresponsive seclusion, the speech which he expected to  ���������make before a; receptive and hospitable  assembly.  I sat very near the orator as he delivered the address in the: Academy of  (Music, and noticed that, although he  kept 'looking at the pile of manuscript  on the desk -before him, he did not  turn, the pages over. '.The speech was  appropriate and well received, but it  had no glow, and the orajtor did not  equal lhis reputation for .charm and  persuasiveness. When the applause  was over I-sald to Mr. Huxley: "I noticed that you did not read your, address; I am afraid the light was insufficient." "Oh," said he, "that was not  the matter. I have been In distress.  The reporters brought me. according to  their promise, the copy of their, notes.  It .was on thin7 translucent paper, and  to make it legible: they put clean whit*  sheets 'between tlie leaves. That made  such bulk that I removed the Intermediate leaves, and when Ii'.'stood up at  the desk I found I -could not read a  sentence. So 1 have been in a dilemma���������not daring to speak freely, and  trying to recall whatl dictated yesterday and allowed the reporters to send  to New York."; If he used an epithet  before the word "reporters" I am sure  he was justified, but I forget what il  was.���������DivD. C. Gilman in "Scrlbner's  Magazine."  D  Must be'Jbecuay.  Attention has; been'called, says a recent issue of The Speaker, to tlio mysterious plan of warfare invented by Admiral Cochrane, tentlt Karl  of Dundonald   (grandfather  of the present    Lord'  Dundoiinlcl,   our   now  G.O.C.),   early   in  the'last century, which, it was claimed,  would  result  in  the absolute  annihilation of an enemy.     Dundoiiiild himself  believed that if bis plan was once put  into effect it would make war impossible for  tho future, and there seem to  have been some .'grounds for this belief,  alt hough the secret lias never yet been  divulged.      George  IV.,  when   Hcgent,  appointed  a  secret  committee  to  consider it.    Tho committee reported that.  the  method  would    be  irresistible i������n<l  infallible, but* sbrnnk from recommending its adoption,    .forty years later a>  commission  was    again    appointed    to*  crnsidcr it.      They  reported against it  on tlie grounds that if any experiments*  were made tlie secret would be at the*  command of every nation, and also that*  it  would  not accord  with   the  feeling*!'  and   principles     of    civilized     warfare..  Twice during    the  Crimean    war .Dundoiiiild* urged  his  plan  upon  the. .Government.     The second time ho offered  to  reduce Sebastopol  by liis invention,  but  tho  War  Ollice laid down  stipula-v  tiens  which  he  would  not  accept,  and  thc secret remains a secret, still.      Tho*  present Earl  of Dundoiiald, besides being a successful cavalry leader and tho  possessor of one of the reputations nuulo-  in the present war, is also an inventor.  It would be interesting to know wlietlier-  ho is in possession of his grand father's  secret or whether that secret died with  its discoverer.  tyifet-.mxJiW'h  Ho ninny persons are operated 'upon  *.:very clay that It is becoming quite a  distinction to go to the grave nil In one  pioce.���������Atchison  "Globe."  "licir.tm't it make you the least .bit envious' to see what elegant furniture  Mrs. Kyetly Is putting into iier hnusn  next door?" "Not a 'bit. My husband  says it will be sold by the sheriff within  six months���������and I'll.be there to buy."���������  Chicago "Tribune/'  ���������j"--- '**.<.5t^  "Now, Jnmes, please remember: Left  hand���������Ekk**, poultry, three yards of silk  to match my skirt, lining for Mamie's  dress, and a new reefer for George. Rl^ht  hand���������Nellie's ribbons, Harry's algebra,  telephone message to Henry, a box of  starch, and my new bonnet." Suy them  over as you go to town." ���������" Ilarpor'e  "Weekly."  Sue Uretto���������How do you know the  gallery gods threw eggs at you? Ham  Lettc���������'Mow do I. know? Ye gods.'didn't  I catch them In the act?���������Chicago  "News." , -'  A visitor to a farin'; was especially  struck by the great rugged ness and  strength of one of, the stalwart harvest  hand.*, and said to the fanner: "That  fellow ought to be chuck-full "of work."  "He Is," replied the farmer, "or he  ought to be, because I hain't never  been able to get none out of him."���������  From "Success."  "I ste that Mrs. Uptaideiglit Is addressing tlie "Mothers" Scientific Club  this afternoon on The Care of Children." "Speaking of children, who was  that youngster that broke into Snoop's  candy store last night and robV*4 th?  till?" "That���������why, that was Un. Up-  tardeight's youngest." ��������� Baltimore  "News."  A Feat of Memory.  UR1NG a: debate In the House.be-  tween Gladstone and Disraeli,  when the latter In the course of  his remarks had occasion to, quote; from  a recent speech made by his rival upon  some platform In the country, a dramatic scene was enacted, and, is described by Harry Furuiss in his recent  book, "Confessions of a Caricaturist."'  Suddenly Mr. Gladstone started up  and exclaimed: "I never said that ln  niy.lire!"  "Disraeli was silent, and putting bis  hands behind his back; gazed apparently in hliink astonishment at the box in  front of him. Several seconds went by,  but he never moved. The members .'In  the crowded House looked from one to  thc other, and many imagined that  Disraeli was merely waiting for his opponent to apologize. 'But'L. Mr. Gladstone,7 who had a habit, which hecde-  vcloped in later years, of chatting volubly to his -neighbor during any Interruption pf this kind in which he was  concerned, made no sign. A minute  passed, but the sphinx clid not .move.  A "minute and a quarter, hut he was  ���������still; motionless.  A minute and a half of this silence  seemed as if i t was an hour.  When ithe second:��������� mlnute was completed the excitement in the House began to grow Intense, .Disraeli seemed  to be transfixed. Was he ill? Was the  great man sulking?,' What could this  strangle;silence portend?'  - Two minutes and a half!  Some members rose/; and approached  hiin, but Disraeli raised:his hands as If  to deprecate their interference, and  they., stole back . to'. thelr_ places, ..con-_  sclous* that they .were forbidden to; In-  terrupt. .Then at last, when the minute-hand of the clock had passed three  times round Its course, -the most remarkable silence which the House had  ever.experienced within living memory  was broken as the Tory leader slowly  began once more to spealc. ���������  "Mr. Chairman," he said, "and gentlemen," and then word for word he repeated the whole speech ot Mr. Gladstone from which he had made his quotation,, duly Introducing the particular  passage which the Liberal leader had  denied. Then he paused and looked  across at his rival. The challenge was  not to be, avoided, and Mr. Gladstone  bowed���������he would have raised his hat  did he wear one in the House, which, In  the phraseology of the ring, was  equivalent to throwing up the sponge*.  Mr. Disraeli afterward Informed a  friend that, working backward, he had  recalled the whole of Mr. Gladstone's  speech to his mind. Beginning at the  disputed quotation, he recovered, the  context which led up to It, and so, step  by step, the entire oration. Then he  was enabled to repeat It.from the outset exactly as he had read it.  Conservation of Energy.  "You say you never gossip?" "Never," answered Miss Cayenne; "when 1  feel disposed to hear my neighbors discussed, I merely mention a name and  proceed to listen."���������Washington "Star."  ,  An Expensive Luxury.  Mr. O'Toole (entering doctor's ofhee)  ���������Shure, doctor, Oi think Oi have ap-  pindlcitis. Dr. Smith���������Nonsense, ma.i!  You haven't money enough for; that.���������  "Judge." i  The Veal Age.  This Is assuredly the Veal Age In literature. People no longer ask about  an author, How old is he? but How  young is he���������or she, as Is usually the  case. Of the writers on the staff of  Josh, Gosh & Co. 85 per cent, are under  the age of twenty-one, and 25 per cent,  are under sixteen years. Sixty-eight  per cent, of these write historical romances and 25 per cent, write in the  colonial style.���������"Book Booster."  M'  k  Iluirior of tbe  lliiur.  "Why," asked' the nicehouse, sneer-  ingly, "do you have that great bunch.  ol useless hair on your fetlocks 1"���������  "One reason," - said ��������� the imported'  Clydesdale, "Is that I want to look as  much unlike a useless sportHig animal  as 1 possibly can."���������Chicago Tribune.  -M������-  Mrs. Growells���������"Thc idea of you calling ine a goose I When you were courting me you said 1 was an angel."  Growells ��������� Well, suppose 1 " did ?'  What's the; use of twitting a man about  the lies he told three years ago ?���������Chicago News.  "'Taint de fellow wid'de longcs' line*  dat catch de .mos' lisli," said Charcoal  Kph, in another of his . ruminating  moods ; "hit's de man wid de loiiges'  'maginiilion. Ain' tint so, Mlstah Jackson V"���������Atlanta Constitution.  Dr. P. M. .ltixey recalls" that when  President McKinley's mother sat down  lor the iirst timo to. a White House-  dinner, what seemed lo impress her most" ~  ���������was the prodigal supply of cream, and  she commented on its abundance, and.  then added :���������  "Well, William, at last 1 know what  they mean when they speuk of the cream.'  of "society."  The President .laughed. "1 ndmit."  said he, "that there seems to be an extravagant array of cruum on the table..  but ynu know, mother, we can -afford  to keep a cow now."���������New York Tribune.  A good story is told In a musical  paper of the Principal of n well-known  colonial academy of. music, lie was.  much pestered with letters from young  composers, asking his advice. On one  occasion he received a letter from a  country organist asking in which oi two-  ways he should write a certain musical  passage. The professor, being a blunt  man,   wrote   buck   on   a   postcard,   "It  doesn't' matter  a    ."    liis   oll'erided  correspondent sent  the postcard to  tho  Academy Board, who sat, in solemn conclave on it, and wrote to  the Principal  for an explanation.    He answered thus :���������   .'  ."Dear Sirs,���������1, beg lo acknowledge  the  receipt of your letter.    I have con-ider-    ,  ed the matter in all ils bearings, and it.   ,  really   doesn't  matter  a   ���������;���������.     V'ours,.  ete."���������London Globe.  Little Willie���������Say,'pa, what is the difr  ference between'an opliinist^and a pessimist?  Pa���������An optimist, my son, is a man.  who is happy when he is miserable, and  a.pessimist .is., a. man who, is .miserable  when he is happy.���������Chicago News.  "1 never went back on a friend," snid".  one  politician.  "I never found it'necessary to do'so."'" .  said the other.    "As Boon as 1' was not  in  a  position to favor him,  my  friend',  always went back on me.''���������Washington.  Slur.       ' ��������� :   . ; ,;   .  As    cause    for   the   habit -'tis   surely-  enough���������     ��������� ������    . ,     /  King   Kdward   himself   has    taken   to*  enough.  If applied to your nose  'Twill be felt in .your toae ;  Provided you snougli up enough of tho  stough.  '-***-  "Yes," said the head ot the firm, "Miss  Addie  is  a  good  bookkeeper, but    she-  ninlces some queer mistakes."  -'"What, for instance ?" asked the silent  partner..  "\Vell, she enters our messenger boy's* ���������  wages under the head of 'running   expenses.'"���������Philadelphia Press.  Greene���������1 suppose a man who had no*  knowledge of French would have a good  deal of trouble to make himself understood  in "Paris ?  ���������15ray���������On' the contrary, most people in  J'nris understand Jinglish much better  than they do their own language. I'  tried them in both ; so 1 ought to  know.-^Hoston  Transcript.  ������������������������������������+���������,��������� '  "I am sorry, doctor, youwere.not able*  to attend the chruch. supper last night ;.  it would have done you good to bo-  there."  Vlt has already done* me good.madam;,  1 have just prescribed for' three of thei*  participants."���������Richmond. Dispatch.  We long for rest���������for, rest and play.  Our  heart  give3    forth    but.   weary-  throbs  We long to rest, but never may, ���������  Lest others come and get our job*.  ��������� ���������������    .  London Fun���������Mistress (arranging for  the dinner)���������Didn't the grocer send tha-  macaroni 1  Cook���������Yes, mum; but I sent it back..  E\ery' one of them stems was empty.���������*;.  Xunkera Statesman.. ' *  4  ������������������h ���������/*  I  if?  f-iW  ���������i'.ie  k  Ha  K.  *1  Weeds and  Flowers.  SERMON BY  GEORGE H. HEPWORTH.  Stand fast in the faith, quit you like  Stten, be strong.���������1 Corinthians, xvi., 13.  I have a neighbor in the country who  "has a garden which he treats in a very  peculiar way. Ilia theory is that all  forces of nature are good-natured, and  that all products of nature should be  encouraged. Whatever is natural, he  tells me, is admiroible. A weed is Justus natural as a rose and has just as  clear a right to flourish. It. is, therefore, unfair to <l--criminate against the  weed by pulling it up and destroying its  tltm.  Wishing to see how his theory worked in practice, 1 wandered about his  enclosure and found a curious state of  adairs. The weeds were in a more  nourishing condition than the roses; in  fact, they had taken possession of the  ground and dominated it to such an extent that the flower**, had well-nigh given  .up the struggle for existence, nnd were  on the verge of despair. I vainly tried  to eonvincc my' neighbor that if he  wanted flowers he must pull up the  weedB, for the two do not get on well  togothcr. They can't be made to har-  nonize, because weeds are greedy and  refuse to give flowers a chance.  My neighbor has another peculiarity.  He carries his theory into the education  of bis boy. All natural impulses are  good impulses, he tells me, and it is not  right to give a child/a bias toward this  or that standard. Let him-show himself just as he is, giving perfectly free  ������ent to his good and bad qualities of  character, and by and bye he will  achieve a well-rounded and well-balanced soul. It is the weed theory  transferred to human nature, and so far  bs my observation of the boy goes it  ���������works very badly. 1 rather fear that  later on that father's heart will be  filled with rogret3.  You cannot  build a house without a  ��������� plan.' If you attempt to do so you will  have a curious combination, whose inconvenience is only, equalled by its ugliness. A house without a plan is not  worth having. It is not true that' all  natural impulses are good, for some impulses, when gratified, produce unmixed  evil. Not everything that is is right,  for some things are wholly wrong and  must be held in cheek at any cost. If  you give the weeds as fair a chance as  the flowers the time _\vill come when the  flowers  will  die  and  nothing  but    the  .weeds will be left.    It- is just as neces-  j ,- .j  sary to pull up certain natural qualities as to pull up weeds, .and unless you  do so you will find yourself without  any character at all.  There i3 a stern and awful truth in  tbe injunction to pluck your eye out if  it offends you. It is a bold figure, and  startling, but it has a profound meaning. If, for instance, you give free rein  to your sellishne---. it will grow apace  to. rule and ruin, lt will _creep over  your soul like a smouldering fire on the  prairie, and burn the life out of everything as it goes. You must treat it as  yon -would a. weed, and without any  compunction tear it up and hurl it as  ter from you-as possible. . And if you  ���������fcare a-quick or an ill temper, it is  ���������eeessary to subdue it if you would  bave peace or happiness. Your very  ���������ature must be conquered, no matter  ^feow-feard-the-fight-may-be.���������It-must-be-  ������a.nght, harncj- d, bitted, tamed and  ���������aught that you are its master and wilt  fee- obeyed.  You . are simply a bundle of possi-  Ailitiea in the begiuning, and if you allow them full swing you 'will become  a mass of "contradictions. ' Your business as an immortal soul is to look at  ���������II your'" tendencies,' good and bad,  ���������quarely in the fine, and then set to  work.to annihilate some of them,,to encourage others, and, wilh a definite purpose in view, to give yourself the shape  (if bon est and virile manhood. This is  sot an easy, but it is a glorious, task,  and it ends in the victory over self, the  sublime mastery which brings self-re-  ���������pect and that dignity which comes with  poise and conscience.  The object of religion is to teach you  that this is thc best and noblest thing  to "do, and that it is the only thing  .which it will pay you to do. That  1' struggle is worth your while, for when  you find yourself well in hand you will  \ possess that quiet kind of power which  blesses you and the whole world alike.  This' life gives you that sort of discipline, and when the lesson is learned you  will be ready for any other life that  may- come to you. Earth will become  * Btepping-stone to heaven, for a whole  man _is litted for any world in God's  universe. Plant your garden with flow-  ' crs and then see that weeds do not interfere with their growth.  The following appears on n sign over  a little country store in Georgia :���������  JONATHAN' WILKINS,  Ice Cream in Season  ��������� and Kmbnlniing on Reasonable  Cash Terms.  'Also   Millinery   and   Tootb   Pulling.  ��������� Hoots,     Shoes,     Books     and     Bacon.  CoJIijia _on the Instalment I'Inn.  AS WE GO ALONC3  What shall wo do when tho .autumn  weather  And the autumn duties come together;  When  the golden  days  are  fair  and  sweet.  When the bright leaves  rustle under  our feet,  And the air Is a sparkling wlno;  Yet cares pile    thick and the    hours  crowd fast,  And  things  to be  done go  hurrying  past,  In an urgent, beckoning line?  We must keep our hearts and our soula  awake  To beautiful things for duty's sake;  With   vision  keen  and  with  couragi?  strong.  Take beauty in as we go along.  What If ln the hours of earnest doing  Our tired spirits need renewing;  Sigh oft for thc streamssand the pas*'  tures green.  Which He in the realm of things unseen.  The beautiful Promised Land;  Yet ever before U3 stretches still  The rugged path of our Father's will.  With Its common rocks and sand?  We need not wait' for the longed for  peace  Till our journey Is done and our labors  cease;  We shall rest in the midst of the' busiest day  If the Master meets  us on the  way.  ���������Mary E. Allbrlght, In The Christian  Endeavor World.  ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  I AT TBE CHARITY BALL. I  ������������������^ ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������>������������������������������������������������������>  "Why, Mr. Browning, you at anything so gay as a charity ball?"  "And you, my .dear Miss Erickson,  at anything bo dismal?"  The girl laughed and shook out tho  folds of her misty pink dancing skirt,  with its ruffles and lace.   *  "I have Just one dance left, a schot-  tischo.   Shall it be for you?" she said.  "If you will' so horor me. Hut as 1  ran'tdance anything but the waltz, I  im going to that little alcove retreat  aver there, where we can talk and  watch  the  figures."  For answer. Mildred Erickson laid  Iier gloved fingers on' his arm ond  raised her brown eyes to his face, as  they walked away from the group o������  fiancerB now forming -for the schot-  .ische. '    ,-  The "little alcove retreat" was at  one end of the long ball room, and was  massed with cut flowers and terns.  Mildred threw her huge bouquet of  bridesmaid roses, her fan, and ��������� lacs  nanrikerchlef down beside her and tool:  up two-thirds of the divan with her  full sitirts. Browning sank back luxuriously in the silken cushion at her  sido.  "Hvcryone seems to be hero tonight," she said.  "Yes.    Even I."  "���������There is Maude .Tones, now, in that  pale blue chiffon. Did you know,-sho  is to be'mairied next week to Jack  Marshall?"   " '   " "  "She? This is only her second season, Isn't it?" ���������  "Second! No, only her first." Mildred said with a laugh and shrug of  *ier plump white shoulders.  "Ker first? You are more sensible,  Miss Erickson. Why, this Is youi  tenth season. Don't you remember, 3  was at your coming-out tea?" ���������  "Yes, and you were old then��������� 2?;  just my age now." She picked up hei  oouquet and buried her face in the  fresh, pink blossoms.  "And you were In white, and carried pink roses. Just like those, Mildred."  "Eut not so large a bunch." and she  began pulling the flowers out and tearing off the petals, while Browning  watched her color come and go.  "And I sent them."  "And you sent them."  Browning shifted his position slight*  VT.  "I, wonder what Marshall wants to  marry that llttlo Miss Jones for?" he  wid.  "As she Is not an heiress, he probably thinks he loves her. I hope lt  loes not worry you, Mr. Browning."  "Me? Not at all. I suppose you  have often .wondered why I've never  "Harried."  ���������Mildred's cheeks assumed the hue of  her roses.  "I? Not at all. Rather, I should wonkier if you did get married. 1 am so  used to you single, you know."  ."And I should wonder at it, too. I  like women. They are beautiful creatures, to be admired, adored and idealized, but kept a distance if a man-  wants to retain his peine of mind.  Don't you think so. Miss Erickson?"  "Can Mr. Browning be  wrong?"  "Thank you. Now,-suppose. I had  married when I was, say 28.. Ten  years ago, I'd have a wife who never  thought of me or my home, but always'  >f her own personality and her social  engagements. My home would be no  home at all, because I should expect  things of her which she would never  lo."  Miss Erickson was unconsciously  pulling the flowers to pieces and watching Mr. Browning with studied courtesy.  Browning continued: "As it is, I  havo my bachelor flat, in which I am  king. My servants, whom no one ev-  27 interferes with. I go and come  when I please, to tbOjdub, to the opera.  :o dinners, or to Europe. My horses  ind carriages .are .mine,, and no one  jver complains of them. My house is  lolitude itself unless I wish to make  ,t noisy. Don't you think I am a sen*  liblc iian?"  "It really had never occurred to me,  Mr. Browning," Mildred said, laugh-  ng slightly.  , "Of course you do, for you have fol-  owed my example and remained sin-  jle."  "But not alone. There is mamma  ind papa andvJoe and the girls, Mr.  Browning. Oh, I should not care for  solitude nor enjoyment alone.  "You are not so selfish."  "No."  "What?"  selfish'. And you would be happier if  you were not.  Browning looked at her in silent  tunazeruent.   Then he said:  "I suppose I have given up a lot for  my selfishness. It might bo nice to  have a wife always waiting for me and  planning little surprises for my comfort and enjoyment, if she were 6Weet  and nice and charming, like she would  be before I married her. And to always have 6omcone to take out with  mo whenever I���������or rather she���������cared  to go. And to entertain my friends as  some women can do. And to see great  tall boys and gentle girls���������my children���������growing up about me. But a  man must have a lot of nerve to. ask  a woman to give herself io him alone."  "Not necessarily." Mildred's lips  were parted in a smile.  "Her freedom, her childhood home,  her name, all girlish pastimes, every  bit of " Browning went on, answering his own question.  "She regards it all as a pleasant sac-  rlflcei If she loves the man, Mr. Browning."  "And if she loves the man will sho  want to do all this If he asks her to?"  "Men are positive and women negative."  "So you advise me to marry?"  "I  advise  all  men to marry."  "Then why are you single, Mildred?"  "I? Oh, I am a woman." And sho  laughed softly.  Browning watched the gay scene of  the ballroom in silence a' moment.  Then he said:  "Mildred, shall I tell you why I never married?"  The girl buried her face again In tho  roses.  "Yes," she said.  "Because I never thought you would  have me. You were so bright and gay,  and ten years younger than I."  Mildred leaned toward him until ho  felt her breath on his cheek. She  spoke rapidly, for she saw -Mr. Bixby  coining to claim a waltz.  "Shall I tell you why I never mar������  rled, Paul?"  "Yes."  "Because you never asked me."  "Mildred." '  Browning sprang forward from tho  silken cushions and caught her hand.  But she withdrew it hurriedly, and  with her face all 'wreathed in smiles  caught up her flowers and fan and lace  handkerchief, and said, as she walked  away:  "Come to me to-morrow afternoon  at three, Mr. Browning."  And a moment later Browning saw  her floating through the steps of the  waltz on the arm of George Bixby.���������������  Chicago Tribune. .'������������������       ,  Slim nonilou'i Secret.  "A mystery In';Which the American  people were once deeply concerned  was that which-shadowed the life of  one of the most remarkable characters  of the country," writes William Per-  rine, in the Ladles' Home Journal. "In  1820 Samuel Houston, or, as he called  and signed himself. 'Sam' Houston,  was Governor of Tennessee. It was in  the midst of a campaign for re-election to' the Gubernatorial chair that  Tennessee was startled by a report that  he had resigned his office. ' He had  been married to the daughter of an  influential family; three months afterward she returned to her father's  house, and -her >husband resolved ta  pass the rest of his life in the wilderness.  "Houston betook himself to the tribe  of Cherokees in the Indian Territory;  he adopted their costume, appearing  In all the trappings of an Indian brave  letting his hair grow down his back,"  and visiting Washington with a buckskin hunting-shirt, yellow leggins, a  huge blanket, and turkey feathers  around his head. No one could induce  him to reveal the secret of his metamorphosis and his abandonment of  the ways and habits of civilization. He  married again after he emerged from  his Indian life, and he lived to be an  old man, dying in the midst of the  .Civil. War, but no one was-ever able  to persuade him to unlock the mystery of his life. Nor would his flrst  wife, who also married again, throw  any light on the mystery."  Solomon Sloan's Advlce m< to Edtlralloo.  Mr. Editor:���������     _ .      _    .  If"I"were boss  We would have less clay modelling  and more arithmetic in the public  school.  Grammar and typewriting would  take the places of music and . color  study.  If a boy or a girl Is well up in arithmetic and grammar he stands less  Bhow of starving to death than if hia  specialty is color schemes or clay fig-  ares.  That's what the most of us'here on  this earth are trying to do���������keep from  starving.  Multiplication tables and good English can be taught successfully to every pupil, If time and pains are taken.  Color study and clay modelling can't.  In the first place, the teachers are  ordinarily just about as unfit to teacb  art'as the pupils are to learn lt.  In the second place, the vast majority of pupils ln the public schools will  soon have to earn their own living.  and even if they do become expert  clay modellers and colorlsts, they never can make any use of their knowl������  edge.  Give the children bread and butter,  and those who have a taste for cake  that's worth cultivating will get it.  And that's the way it would be If I  ���������were boss.���������Solomon Sloan.  England lioy Cltoirft.  Julian Ralph, writing of "The Choir  Boys of England," in the Ladies' Home  Journal, says "Small hoys are much  preferred for the reason that they develop into manhood later than big,  stalwart children, for ft is at tbe coming of manhood that their voices break  and they are obliged to stop singing  until their adult tones are reached���������a  matter of years. A boyish treble is  as delicate as the bloom on a peach,  and its possessor must lead an orderly  and innocent life, which Is why so  many choirs are made up of boys taken from their homes and boarded and  taught in church institutions. These,  sometimes, are able to sing until they  ���������re seventeen or eighteen years of age,  though between fourteen and fifteen  is the usual period when their voices  Rhodes as a Phrase-Maker.  lihodes rather fancied himself as a  phrase-maker, says a correspondent of  The New York Sun. A writer who  saw a good deal of him, describes .dm as  repeating over and over again some saying of liis own with which lie seemed to  have been pleased a.*, soon .ib he had  uttered it.  Perhaps one of the bi>st-known phrase?  is the "unctuous rectitude'' with whieh  he reproved a certain class of his opponents in this country. No one in  future who wishes to discuss the traits  of the British character will be ablo to  do without those two words. Some  olher sayings of lihodes which havo  been left on record are as follows:���������  AIj' life is a temporary one, but the  country will remain after me.  If I "forfeit my flag, what have I left?  If you take away my flag you take  awuy  everything.  Remember that sentiment rules half  the world.  "It is no use for us to have big ideas  if we have not got the money to carry  them out," Rhodes once remarked to  Gen. Gordon.  It took me fifteen years to get a mine,  but I got it. Though my boat may bo  slow in the race.l know exactly what  I am starting for.  I bave found out one thing, and that  is, if you have an idea, nnd it is a good  idea, if you will only slick to it you  will come out all rigfit.  The only awkward thing is the progress of Time. Wc do get older, and  become a little hurried in our ideas because of that  tei rible Time.  After the raid: "Kruger and I have  met twice. The first trick I won (referring to Bechuanaland), he won tho  second. There is no doubt who will  win  the odd!"  When timorous friends were begging  him to be discreet, and foes were saying he dare not "face the music," lie  answered both, once and for all: "I  am not going to lie about it!"  When Dr. Jameson was convicted arid  sentenced for' the part ho took in the  raid, Mr. Rhodes exclaimed: "What a  tribute to the moral worth of the nation that has jumped the world!"  I will challenge any man or woman,  however broad their ideas may bo, who  objects to go to church or ehappl to  say they would not sometimes be better for an -hour or an hour and a half  in a church.  In the Oriel Hall, Oxford, in 1899, ho  said: "I have been interested in Aristotle's definition of virtue in 'the 'Ethics'  as the 'highest activity of the soul living for the hiohest object in a perfect  life.' That h. . always seemed to mo  the noblest rule for a man to follow,  nnd I have made it mv rule from the  first."  "Life is too shorf. after all,'' he used  lo say. "to worry about previous lives.  From the cradle to the grave���������what is  it? Three days"at the seaside.- Just  that and nothing more. But although  it is only three days, we must bo doing  something. 1 cannot spend my time  throwing stones into the water." But  what is worth while doing?"  A WaKKim Journey.  After so much about Rhodes one may  have a bit of South' African life. It is  ������ description of a waggon -journey a  score of years ago, and occurs in a new  novel, entitled "Reversed on Appeal," by  John Ross :-r-  "Pale pink over the trees,, nnd bar  gold glittering th rough thc branches  saw the large waggon equipped and  drawn wilh open front, facing the kraal  gate, towards which extended a double  line of shininjr brown oxen, eacli with a  white streak down its back like fourteen  brethren bearing up the flashing chain,  crossed at each pair by a, heavy pole  with wooden yokes for two. At the  head of the uneven line'. of glancing  horns and switching tails stood the  powerful bronze figure, thong in hand, of  a Zulu in a sleeveless blouse and short  blue pants, the leader of the horned  cavalcade. ��������� A Kaffir boy held a grey  horse "ready saddled, tossing his head  and rattling his bit with impatience, a  contrast-to the drowsy cuttle. . . .  There was a din of shrill Kaffir shouts,  weeping women, yelping dogs, stamping  feet-and rattling chains as Mouji flour--  tshed his long whip, and the Zulu dragged at thc leading'strap like a son of  Analc,.as_he_ guided ,the_string_of-cattIa-  out of the kraal into the open field.  "Her uncle rodehis grey horse within  ipeaking distance behind., the -waggon,  and when they passed the large green  orchard, with its brown pears, purple  plums, and yellow'oranges, ripening in  the branches, he rode in among the trees  mid returned with a small basket of  peaches, which he handed to Belle at  the end of the waggon, as they moved  slowly on throi prickly cactus.hedges,  ������nd bushes of red and vellow mimosa  blossom.   ...  "She hnd travelled In the waggon be-.,  fore, with tin- mid-curtain that was low-  sred at night, to shut" her off into a  little nunnery of her own." She knew  the boil, so innocently tied on one side,  in whicli she waft advised to shun her,  and supposed to sleep, during the ceaseless jolts of a moonlight journey. And  she remembered how she pitied all men,'  and women, too, who went down to the  ica in ships, if their berths were like her  berth, nnd their to->sings like her toss-  ings. She knew the boxes lied with  thongs thnt served for seats and lockers, unci that she must fasten up everything, if she did not wi-.li n bruised foot  ?r a wounded head, when the quick  mounts and sudden dips came under the  irresistible strain of fourteen oxen."  lt  is  estimated   that   the   Kaffirs   in  the diamond mines at Ki.-uurley, South"  Africa,   steal    ������250,000  worth     of  diamonds in a year.  The Lion Bridge, near Sangang, in  China, is the longest in the world, being  6Vi miles from end to end. The rond-  ������ray  is  70   feet  above  water.  A large house in a Berlin suburb has  boen rented by several acquaintances,'  married nnd single, who are going to  try to run thp place on tlie principles  of" communal life.  "Take tlie men of prominence in the  United States to-day, and pick out the  :rue gentlemen. I'll wager that nine  out of ten of them never had a high  ir-hool education, let alone a college one."  So Bays Mark Twain.  Gold has been mined in Georgia for  icarly three-quarters of a century. Previous to the discovery of fjold in California the mines of Georgia furnished  the greater part of thc gold produced  in the United StateB.  Cecil Rhodes.  Great a figure as Cecil Rhodes was in  the public eye, it may be doubted  whether many people have a clear idea  as to the steps by wliich his career was  built up. That he went to Soutli Africa  for his health nnd returned to England  to take his Oxford degree; that ho  made a great fortune���������though smaller  than that of some American multi-millionaires���������out of diamonds, in part by  means of an amalgamation of interests;  tlmt he "acquired" Rhodesia, beenmo  Premier of Cape Colony, came to his  political downfall .through the Jameson  Raid, and wns shut up in Kimberley;  these are the main fuels of his career  which are well known. But main facts  do not invariably supply tbo key to  the motives und purposes of a man's  life, and the ideas which filled Cecil  Rhodes' mind and governed his actions  have had a profound inlluence upon the  development of a country in which we  iu Cn iinda have within the past three  years been forced to take a deep interest.  The question of motive mny be glanced at first. The extended biography  which The Times published notes tho  remarkably successful start wliich Mr.'  Rhodes made in South Africa, when,  strafing us a lad of eighteen lie in a.  year or two became a rich man. The  Times says :���������  "His interest in the country in whieh  he had enjoyed two years or such  strangely fortunate experience was by  this time keenly stirred, and before returning to Oxford he made it journey  into the north, which is of interest, as  having first suggested to him the great  capabilities for British development of  the eountry lying to the north of tho  Orange and Vaal Rivers. His trip took  him as fur north as Mafeking; thence  to Pretoria, Murchison, Middleburg and  back through the Transvaal to Kimberley. lt was made in an ox waggon, at  a timo .when the country was little  known, and there were no means of  communication. It occupied eight  months. The rate of progression of nn  ox waggon is not more than from fifteen to twenty miles a day. The trip  represented a* walking tour of eight  months tlirough the wide-spreading solitudes of rolling veldt wliich filled those  regions of central Africa.  "In 1872 the Boers had only been  established some twenty years in the  Transvaal. They were a purely pastoral,  hunting, nnd fighting people, with a  strong religious strain, deserving of respect for the sturdy independence nnd  devotion to their own ideals which characterized them, but rude in their customs  and "primitive almost to the point of,  barbarism in their habits of life, and  thought. They were very frugal, very  poor, without the conception of a possible development for their country  than that represented by the increase of  flocks 'and herds upon the land. Living  generally in isolation upon the vast extents of grazing ground best suited to  the multiplication of this form of wealth,  they were wholly, lacking in the intellectual stimulus which results from the  interchange of opinion in the urban  centres of population. Their political  organization was nf the simplest,  amounting to.little more than a patriarchal form of despotism, tempered by  the individual liberty almost necessarily  enjoyed during the greater part  of his existence by the hunter ancl the  herdsman on the plains. Each father of  iti family made for himself the laws of  daily life. The rifle and the stock-whip  hung side by side above every hearth.  The one serious danger by wliich the  State was .threatened camo from unnumbered hordes of hostile natives, who  hung upon the uncertain limits of whilo'  occupation, with perpetual menace of  massacre and desolation. The only bonds  which drew the scattered homesteads  into community were bonds of common  faith and self-defence. Political unity  could hardly be said to exist among a  people who "were unwilling to submit to  taxation for common purposes* There  is no reason for surprise if to a young  Englishman already conversant with the  methods of a developed civilization the  Transvaal of. that . day presented the  aspect rather of a rough new settlement  in flux than of any fixed political organization having claim to the dignity  of a nation.  "3 . Rhodes' acquaintance with the  agricultural possibilities of the South  African soil .in Nata^l._j_n^,t^p_ractical_  demonstration that he had received of  its mineral wealth at Kimberley, combined with his personal' experience of  the hygienic properties of. the .climate  to render him more appreciative than  the ordinary lad of nineteen of the value  of the apparently limitless area suitable  to white settlement, of which his solitary  trip took him over a small portion. Two  years spent far from home produced on  .hiin an effect not, unknown to travellers of a riper age. The latent patriotism which we nil believe ourselves to.  share with our, fellow-taxpayers bad  grown into a conscious sentiment. England had become a thing to love. During, Unit eight months' silent trump  across the veldt the foundation appears  to hnve been laid .of the policy to wliich  Mr. Rhodes' career was afterwards devoted. He hns described in intimate  conversation the persistence with which  the t -.ought accompanied him day by  day, that the fine country through  wliich lie moved should in the future be  thronged with a British population, and  that no power but Great Britain should  be allowed to dominate in South Africa.  He saw enough to-convince him of the  grent value of the unclaimed northern,  territory, and made up his mind that  it must be British. Asked once in Inter  life whether.he had nt that time conceived nny definite scheme for bringing  the country under British influence, lie  answered honestly in the negative.  'No.' he said, 'I only just felt each day  us I looked down at the earth and up  at the skv that it ought to belong to  Englnnd.' '*' ,  The Poultry Yard.  An Knglish poultry expert says:���������  Hoth in the States nncl in France the  system of tecding poultry generally followed Is the exact opposite to our own,  the fowis getting soil food at night and  corn in tlie morning. The poultry-keeper may well nsk which is right, and the  answer apparently is that theie is very  little diU'croncc in the result. An experiment recently tried in America, two  lots of fowls getting just thc same  treatment, but one having solt food in  the morning und corn at night, and tho  other the opposite. resulted in the  fowls getting soft food in the morning  laying slightly better than the others  in winter. This is what'one might expect. To set against this, however,  wus the fact that the fowls getting soft  food at niglit voided double the amount  of manure. -The reason of this, of  course, is tlint soltfood is more quickly digested, but in those poultry house*  where the droppings Irom the fowl-  houses are systematically collected and  utilized, there is a distinct vul.ie in  feeding soft lood at night, in preference to the morning. There is far less  trouble to the feeder when corn is given  in the morning, and it really seems as  though the value of soft food for  breakfast has been over-estimated.  Farm Notes.  Care should be exercised in the use  of poisoned, solutions ior spraying, as  manv insects that are lrionds of the  farmer may be de-troyed. Bees havo  been exterminated in somo sections by  spraying, though something depends  upon the kinds of pl.ints sprayed.  We clip trom an exchange the following directions for killing lice on cattle��������� Dust the animals thoroughly with  fresh insect powder; rub in well, or  else part the hair so the powder will  reach the pests. In about "a week,  dust again to kill any mites that  might have hatched. The other is:'  Make a strong tea of cedar twigs; wash  the lousy animal with this tea; this  last is effectual in cleansing buildings,  coops, roosts, poles, etc., of lice.  No greater mistake is ever made than  to suppose that by ..electing we largest  eggs from the basket fur hatching improvement of the poultry is sure to  lollow. There is no mako-Iiift in this  .industry. Careful selection of tho  breeding stock, males and females, alone  will insure that grading up so desired  by every breeder. There is no room today for slipshod methods in poultry culture, and the breeder who does not  select a breeding pen from his best birds  and keep them hy themselves does not  deserve and cannot hope to maintain  the quality of his stock.  Once upon a time Mayor Low was  travelling through Germany with a  parly of friends. Being an (.excellent  German linguist, he. was the spokesman  for the company. Upon one occasion he  and his lrionds visited a beer garden,  and after sealing themselves, preparatory to having some refreshments, the  pleasant duty of ordering the same fell  upon Mr. Low, as usual. For once, however, he hesitated, his memory seeming  to desert him. Finally after vain attempts to recall the missing word, . he  turned to his waiting friends, appeal-  ingly, anying :  "You will have to help me out, for I  cannot for the life of me remember the  German word 'for beer."���������New York  Times.  Sulphur for KutvIm antl Svrine.  When fowls are attacked with cholera  I find that a little sulphur given in the  food will check it. One tablespoonful  mixed with the morning's food for  thirty fowls and given once a month is  sufficient when they are in health. When  much sulphur is fed, with exposure to  a. cold and damp atmosphere, it will  cause stiffness in the joints. Sulphur  put in the dust hath with ashes is a  preventive against lice. A little sprinkled in the nests and under setting hens  routs these pests.  It is also good to give swine . in case  of cholera or sickness followed with  vomiting caused from overfeeding. It  regulates .the stomach and liver without further trouble. I have given two  teaBpooi,tills twice a day in severe cases  in sweet milk or sprinkled on some  sliced vegetables.'���������Emma L. Hill.Damas-  cus, N.Y.  To Make Hen* iMy.  Many people complain that' they cannot get their hens to lay in winter.  One very strong complaint comes to  us from one of our subscribers. To aid  ���������uch we give the experience of one who  resides in the cold .climate of South  (Dakota.  Many farmers fail to get any eggs  during the winter months, and, from  the experience of others more successful, it must be concluded that they  either do not care about winter eggs,  or that they neglect to so manage iind  feeds the fowls as to induce them to  lay. An interesting experiment was  made with two-lots of pullets, showing  influence of feed and care on the production ' of eggs in winter, by Rose  Seelye-Miller, in the cold climate of  South Dakota. The trial was reported in a western journal as follows:���������  Two pens of pullets were placed in  conditions as nearly equal as possible.  One pen wns designed for bre_eding, and  it was desired that they should not lay  until toward spring. The other pen,  containing IS hens, was designed to produce-eggs during the winter, and the  eggs were not intended at all ror hatching.  The experiment began in December.  Lot it be r< membered that the care,  temperature and all other things were  equal, save, the food, and that the pen  dchigned for late laying contained two  less fowls.  During December the early layers produced live and a'quarter "dozen eggsi  and the other pen not an egg. In January, the early layers produced ten  dozen and three eggs; the late layers  -soven-eggsr=^-ln -Pebi'iiary-theearly-Iay"���������  <*rs produced .nine dozen" eggs, and the  other pen one dozen. In -March the  early layers produced fifteen dozen eggs,  nnd the late layers three and a half  dozen, in April eniiie the change; the  early layers laid ten dozen and "nine  i ggs, nnd the lute i ivers fifteen dozen  and lour eggs. F un this time the  breeder** were kept laying, and produced in May 28 eggs, the early layers 142  ���������*'ggi. This shows cr clusivcly that egg-  producing may he governed in a great  iiicnsiiie. Thc feeding was very simple,  and the early-laying fowls were fed as  lollows:���������In thc morning, boiled lean  moat, chopped, with scraps from the  tnble, and during the day all the wheat  -eieenings they would eat, with corn  twice a week. They were, of course,  watered twice daily, and had some milk  to drink.  The pen not intended for laying  were fed on poor wheat screenings,  with corn. These fowls grew and waxed  fat, until.they seemed too fat, and no  doubt were, for laying. As spring came  on the tood was changed, and as it waa  the natural time for layr.lg, too, they  produced eggs in abundance.  The ordinary poultry raiser feeds too  much corn and wheat. Hens are fed  liberally twice a day and arc fed on a  steady diet of one or two things, cither  corn or wheat, and both fattening.  Hence our hens do not pay, and poultry raising is a snare and a delusion to  the one wbo is not wideawake and up  to date in caring for the fowls.  Meat is known to be a great egg-producer, and there is now upon the market a feed prepared from refuse which  makes an ideal food for fowl?. Bones  ground and plenty of milk are also very  good in  egg production.  Cleanliness and warmth are absolute-  ly essential. A hen wilh a frozen comb  might about as well be killed, unless  she is n valuable one, whose eggs will  make good  hatching in the spring.  We feed our cattle for beef, and our  hogs for lean or fat; we feed cows for  milk or butter. Then why not discriminate in feeding our poultry too?  If thought were used more we should  find our purses growing fat. Lean hens  and hogs may be desirable, but a fat  pockctbook never fails of appreciation,  and the need of strenuous labor.i3 de-  creating.���������The Country Gentleman.  More pigs are lost in the summer season from improper feeding than- from,  any other cause. They are compelled  .to consume foods that are not conducive to thrift, and which .lead to.disease  in the herds. Some feeders "keep- slop  in barrels, which ferments until-. sour,  having a very di'ngreeable odor, the  pigs being fed largely upon the slop.  This kind of food is more injurious in  summer-than in winter, .as it induces  bowel disease. The be-it slop is milk  and bran, freshly made, with grass, vegetables and plenty of pure water, which '  will induce growth and .keep the ��������� pigs  in good condition.  .  Une a Good Sire.  If there is one thing more .than an- .  other which pedigree., breeding "has  taught it .3 the value of using a good  sire. It takes a long time liefore this  lesson can be universally appreciated.  There are some breeders whom nothing  but adversity will teach ;^ others are  willing to profit by'the experience of  the many, and are"ready to adopt the  lessons' which can be" obviously deduced. It is a. pity that in these times  of enlightenment and ��������� advanced -ideau  the simplest lessons cannot be-absorbed by small breeders. . It is with the  small breeder that the future lies, and  the sooner be adiipts himself to a more  successful policy the bettor will it be .  for himself and-for the breed whieh ho  favors. It is not enough to have a.  well-bred sire. That, certainly is a  primary consideration, for, as -every  breeder knows, there is nothing moro  perplexing in breeding than the frequency with which - atavism occurs. It  is satisfactory to note., however, that  when characteristics have become more  fixed by years .of registered breeding,  breeders, are more and mure coming-to  regard it as essential tlmt the trumpeted merits of good back breeding should  be displayed iu the animal itself. 'The  old principle that like produces like is  truer now than it was fifty years ago!  because of the increased prepotency, of  line bred stock. Nothing condemns the ���������  policy of a breeder more effectively  than the use of an indifferent horse on  good mares, or, for that matter, moderate bull on better cows. As'aTuIe,  the farmer is not deficient in useful  breeding marcs or roomy cows, but it  would form painful reading to learn  how often he had misused 'his, trust by  the use of an indifferent sire. _' It is a  very safe rule "to patronize a sire better than the females. There is everything to gain and nothing to lose.' The  initial cost is a mere bagatelle, compared with the difference in price of.the.  progeny.- It is a misfortune that many  farmers expect too much o"f their mares  or their cows. This, at alii events,  seems a reasonable deduction.from their  policy when they use very'indifferent' ,  sires. The point we wish to accentuate is that it pays to use a good sire.  It is short-sighted policy -to expect too*  much of the dams.���������Farmer, and: Stock-' -_  'breeder:"      '" T   :       ' .    . ;  'T_  Sore Hontbi In Horttefl.  A aore mouth in a horse is frequently '-.  the cause of-his  not feeding properly.'  In cases where a hor6e has lost his appetite or does not redily cat  his food  It is well to examine Iob mouth, if ths.  fact   of   liis   being  off   his   fecdi cannot,' ���������  be  traced  to  any  apparent  cause.    -JA*  Bore   mouth ' may " be   due   to   several  causes. In young horses it is generally,,  due. to  teething  troubles,   which   make"  the mouth more or less tender and in- .  terfcrc with the feeding.   In   such cases .  the only thing to be done is to provide  the food in a state which will permit ol  its being easily chewed and masticated.  The oats should be crushed, bran mashes  and roots should be given, and the hay  should not be hard, and free from woody ������������������  stems. "     ,.!..,'  In older horses tin* permanent molars  are sometimes tbe cause of a horse riot-  being  able   to   chew   his   food,   and   of.  his having a sore mouth.    Thc molars  sometimes havesharp edges'and points  whicli hurt the iuside of the cheeks, and  cause considerable pain when the horse "  is eating.    In this case they require' Si- >  ing wilh a rasp, but this operation can -  only  be   performed  by   a  skilful   hand.  At other times a horr. may be prevented _  from  masticating his food   properly by.'  one of the molar teeth being longer'than  the rest, which prevents the' molars in *  thc upper jaw from coming into ccntact'  with  tho=c  in  the lower jaw.'  In   this  case   again   professional     advice   is- required.  Lampas not infrequently is the cause  of a horse having a sore mouth. Lampas  consists of an inflamed condition of the  roof of the mouth or of the palate, and  is caused by various means. In young  hoi*scs it is due often to the growth of  the teeth, wliile ir. older ones it is caused through indigestion or by irregularities of the" molar teeth. The treatment  accordingly varies and depends on the  cause of lampas. Ignorant grooms and  stablemen sometimes suggest burning as  a remedy. This is of course a cruel and  perfectly inadmissible remedy, and one  which should not be adopted on any  account. _  Another form of inflammation of the  mouth is known under, the name of  ���������"stomatitis."���������Fanner and Stockbreeder.  * *  -���������"   . I  I  ?-'  ss  H������D4i5tohc Titrali! ami ^nilwag  ^cn's jrdlU'Hill.  1!  DID NOT KILL  A  LEGAL  I'tibli-dii'd 11 v  The Revelstoke Herald Publishing Co.  Limn.-d Liability.  A.  JOHNSON,.  Editor and Mming*.'!'.  AI.VXHIISIXG   RATES.  Displav ads., ?1.W per inch; single eoltimn,  J2 per inch when inserted on title pnee  Lugttl ads., 10 pen'..** wer inch (noiipiirleb line  /or flrst insertion: i com*1 for eaeh nd.Iiiloiinl  Insertion. Local notices 10 cents per line ench'  l-sue. Birth,Marriage and Demh Notices  free.  SrtH'll'lITIOS  KATES.   *  Bv taall or en-r.ei* 52 per annum- 'jl.25 for  eI.*\'months, sirii-tly in iidvance.  Ot'K JOB I)E!'AKT.MF.NT.  I loneol the best equipped printing offices In  'be West ami i.r<.-|..iruil to execute all kinds of  f.'iullni* fn iir-iH-lit*--; style at honest prices,  nne price to all. No job too large���������none too  truall��������� for us. Mall orders proinptlv nttended  lo.   (jive us a trial on your next order.  TO COl'.KESl'ONDKNTS. .1  We invite eorrospondenco on any subject  o' interest to tlie eencral public. In all eases  the bonA fide n������:ne .if lhe writer must neeoin-  .pany manuscript, but not. necessarily for  publication.  Address all communications to the Manager  NOTICE 10 COKKESrONDESTS.    -.-  1.���������All corre***pr.iHlence must bo legiblv  written on ous side oi the paper only.  2.���������Correspondence containing personal  matter must be signed, with"the proper name  o������ the writer.  LB  E MA STKE & SCOTT.  Kurrlstcrs, Holli'ittir**, Kt������.  Kuvi'lutolfc, B. O.  \V.d������ \McMiilntre, M.A.  ,!.M.Scott.il.A.,l.L.I!  I^^iav, Jur.YllI). 1902.  OUR MINING COUNTRX.  Fewer Accidents   are Reported j^  On    British   Railroads���������Blue  Book Shows that Death Rate  is Decreasing.  A very satisfactory 'feature uf the  board of trade blue bunk just iissiieil in  London, Knglniul, is that ilui'mn 1<*);"  train accidents did not cause the dentil  of a single pnsai'iiger. this being the  lirst time that such a gratifying record  bus been bbown by tlie annual returns.  AeciilenlB to trains, rolling stork,  periiiaiiunt way, etc., caused the ileal b  of 11 persons nml injury to 037,  including 470 passengers injured, S  servants of companies killed, and 150  injured, and of other persons :i kilUd  unil 5 injured. During 11)00 as ninny  as 42 persons were killed tind 10-10  injured, including passengers, 10 killed  and SOS injured, and othei* persons-  killed and 0 injured. Of the 8 deaths  which occurred among railway servants 3 were due to collisions between  trains, 3 resulted from buffer stop  collisions caused by trains running  into   stations   nt   too   high   a   speed,  ARVF.Y, .M'CAUTE'-t ic PINKHAM  liarrlsters.. Solicitor.*!. Eto. ���������  Solicitors fur Imperial Bunk of Canada.  Coinpanv funds to lniin atB percent,  l'lltsT Si'RKBT, Kevelsioke B. li.  LOTS NOW FOR SALE IN THE  CAMP OF FISH RIVKR  BANNER  Red Rose Decree meets second and fourth  Tuesdays of cadi month; White Hose Dcjzree  meets third Tues'liiy ofoiich quarter, in Oddfellows llall.   Visitina brethren welcome  (i.E. (iKOriAN. 11 Y. K "WARDS,  President. H m. Secretary.  LOYAL ORANGE LODGE   No. 1658.  Regular /meetings are held in the  .Oddfellow's Hall on the Third Friday of each mouth, at 8 11.111. sharp.  Visiting hrelhren cordially invited  A.J HNSON, W.M  W. O. BIRNEY, Rec.-See.'  CHURCHES  The Centre for all the Big Free Milling.Gold  Groups of Fish River, Pool Creek, Etc.  There seem* every probnbility   that  the adaptation of the oil process to the  British  .Columbia   ores    will    prove  entirely   successful, and  if   this be so,  the outlook for the  Kootenay district  as   a   S'-eat  mining  country  will   be  almost    indefinitely    enlarged.     The  more   far   beeing   of     investors     are  already   preparing   to   secure the nd  vantage which will be oll'ered by being  the first in the field, and once it has  been placed beyond  all doubt thnt the  Kootenay ores can be treated for from  S3 to $1.50,  there will undoubtedly be  a big rush of capital into that country.  Even  now,  according to the interior  -papers, money  is coming in in anticipation of the success of the process.  It will  not   only   menu     immense  activity in  mining circles, but it will  meana revival in all the interim-cities  and towns.     As nn example of   what  may he  looked   for   in  this direction,  Kossland,   where   business depression  has   existed   for   tlie   past year and a  half    and     where     the     commercial  interests have suffered so severely at  tbe   hands   of    stock     manipulators,  should double   its   population   in   tbe  course   of two or three   years.     The  tremendous bodies of low grade ore in  the hills surrounding that town assure  its   permanence  and   prosnerUy once  ores   containing   values ot:   $8  can be  treated with   a   margin of   profit.    If  such a result  were obtained Rossland  would very  quickly rival, if  it did not  surpass, Butte City in   size   and prosperity.     There   is   every    reason    to  imagine, too, that-the values contained  hy these ores will  increase as depth in  the   miues    is     obtained.      In    most  instances in Itossland, as in the other  ~~~cauips���������of���������the-���������Kootcnays,r_the_i_ore  becomes   higher   grade    the    farther  down development is pursued.  At the worst, the outlook for Biitish  Columbia's mineral country,.-'is not  dark; it is  rather bright and cheerful,  MKTHODI3T CHURCH. liF.VEI.STOKK.  Freaching services at n a. in. and 7:30 p. in  Class ineeiiui* ut' the  close  of   the morning;  While 2   occurred through the bursting   service.   Sabbath School anil Bible Class at 3:30  "   Weekly    I'rayer   Meeting  every   Wednesday  of boilers or tubes ot   engines.     There   evening  at 7:30.   The   public  arc   cordially  Invited.   Seats free.  Rev. C. Ladner, Pastor.  were altogether 150 cases of collision  during the year between trains or  pails of trains or light engines, 7  collisions between trains and vehicles  standing foul of tlie line (whicli caused  altogether injuries lo -t passengers), 2  cases of trains coining in contact with  projections from other trains running:  ST. PETEIl S.CIIUKCII,-ANGLICAN.  Eight a.ml, Holy Eucharist; 11 a.m., ma' *.as,  Litany and sermon (Holy Eucharist first Sunday In the month); 2:3o Sunday school, or  children's service; 7:30 Evensong (choral) and  sermon. Holy Days���������The Holy Luelmrist is  celebrated at 7 a.m. or 8 a.m , n** announced.  Holy Baptism after Sunday trcliooi at 3:1.').  ~   .   ni,rt,-iivr���������   it....tor.  Business Lots, $100.     Corner Lots, $150  EASY   TERMS   OF   PAYMENT.  tw-,1        i   n;*,���������.i.wl   drills   Pte     are   now on   the   way   to  Goldfields for  the North-  w^lSX^t-SSTd&^tt.a..   Go.df.eld, 'win b. ib. Big Town in  that District.  c. A.riiol.u.NiBK. Hector.  LEWIS BROS.,  KO.MAK CATHOLIC CIIUKCII  Mass.at 10:30 a. m.,  on   first,  .Mass.  a,   aw...u      fourth Sundays in the month.  KEV.: 'KATHEK THAYER  SALVATION   ARMY  Meeting every night in their Hall on Front  Street.  H  l-BESBYTEMAN  CHURCH.  projections irom umer uan������>' ��������������� |    service every Sunday at 11 a.m. and 7:50 p.m.  on parallel line, S2derailments and 21!   ftS^W?^ 0f^^W  cases of trains running through Rates <  at    level     crossings   or   into    olher  obstructions. ,      , '    ��������� ���������  Accidents   lo   persons   from causes  other tbim-accidents to trains, rolling  stock and   permanent way, including  accidants   from   their   own   want  of  caution, accidents  to   persons passing  over   level   crossings, tresspassers and  others,   resulted   in   the death of  057  persons   and   injury   to   2010.   Of the*  killed 135 and of  Lhe injured 1009 were  passengers.     Of "these 33 were killed  and   153  injured   by   railing between  carriages and platforms, viz., 22 killed'  and 70  injured when getting into, and  13 killed and 70 injured when alighting  rrom trains;  H killed and S3" injured  by falling onto platforms, ballast, etc..  viz.,   102   inj.ired   when   getting into,  and   U   killi-d   and   735 injured when  alighting from   trains; IS   weie   killed  and 9   injured by falling off platforms  and being struck or run over by trains:  21 were   killed  and   11 injured whilst  passing over the line at stations, viz.,  9 killed and 7 injured at stations where  there is a subway or footbridge and 12  killed and 4 injured at stations where  there   is   neither   a   subway  nor foot  bridge; 365 were injured by the closing  or   carriage   doors: 23 were killed and  ���������������37 injured from other causes connected  with thetnoveinentof trains or railway  -vehicles  Agents, lievelstoke.  R. F. PERRY,  Resident Manager  'econd'and   **************************  j. n*  EDWARD  TAXIDERMIST  DEER HEADS, BIRDS, Ktc. MOUNTED,  J^^^foFPKK^VT^lAN  CHURCH  Third Street.  A. H. HOLDICH  ANALYTICAL CHEMIST   *  AND ASSAYER.  Royal School of Mines, London.    Seven, years  at   Morfa   Works/Swansea:",    1". years  Chief  Chemist  to Wlgan Coal^and Iron Co.,   Eng.  Late <:hemlst and Assit*������������r, Hall Mines, Ltd.  Claim!i examined and reported upon.  Ferguson. B.C  t   A. KIKK.    Domini  a and Provincial Land Surveyor:  P.EVELSTOKE, B.C.  *  %  X  *  *  *  *  *���������>  ���������*_���������-  *  *  *  *  *  *���������  ���������_���������>  *  +  x*  *  *  ���������_���������  ���������K  X  *  ���������_���������  *  *  *  *  *  ���������*>  Baker and .  Confectioner  A full and complete  line of  GROCERIES  Canadian Pacific  Railway  TRAINS  LEAVE REVELSTOKE  DAILY.  ���������      EASTBOUND     8:10  WESTBOUND  17:1?  SOUTHBOUND     8:40  IMPERIAL LIMITED      *  EASTBOUND.  Sundays���������Wednesdays���������Fridays���������  4:20 o'clock.  FIlKEUKSalRBTS  ALL TKAINS.  FIUST CLASS'-ACCOMMODATION;  ELECTRIC BELLS AND LIGHT IN EVERY ROOM.  | nOUKLY S'l'HEKT OAIt",                                    BAR WELL SUPPLIED BY THE CHOICEST,  I MEETS ALL TRAINS.       ' WINES,   LIQUORS AND CIGARS   The .total number of persons killed  wus 1171, us compared with 1250 in the  previous year, or a dacrease of 79. The  total number injured was 0740.' as  against T3b'3. or a decrease of 013. In  addition lo the above, accidents which  E. MOSCROP . . .  Sanitary Plumbing, Hot  Water  And Steam Heating. Gas  Fittin  ,J���������&S,nd"StrREVECSTOKErB:C:  Cor. Mackenzie Ave.  and Railway Street. %  WESTBOUND.  Mondays���������Wednesdays-  21 o'clock.  Saturd'ys  ^.T,,T,.t..T..T..l..|.T.*t������^^4.������^t*I**f*t'-i''*f*l***H'  Jas. I. Woodrow  Fastest time & Superior Equipment  82-HOURS TO MONTREAL-82  STEAMSHIPS.  FROM VANCOUVER  TO-  TO-  -CHINA,  -AUSTRALIA  JAPAN,  ALASKA  uiii'K; iu is   i.'.ui*.*.   .....���������..���������  _.._.    ..*.,..v.~   and every year is giving mure absolute   occurred  on   railway premises, hut in  -i-:..i. ,u������ ,..n,.ompnt f,f trains was nnt  certainty to the claini which has been  made by miniiit; tnen of. Inrgetixperi-  ence arid knowledge, that a decade  will find this piovince .the'largest  producer of any country in Lhe world.  ��������� Province.  C. P. R. Spohs Busy .On Orders  The Montreal shops of the Canadian  Pacific  have   already  turned   out    a  considerable portion of the large order  placed six months ago for new  eouip-  ment.   The shops at Perth continue to  turn out ten cars a day  and  have  to  manufacture SCO ofthe total  number  of 2.300 box caw.      When this order is  completed the C.P.R- will  ha.-o over  25,000 fi eight cars in commission.     At  the l'-arnham shops, thirtv- of the fifty  vans have been  completed  and  work  has been commenced on the seventeen  express c������.i*s ordered.  .      Of the 40 first-class coaches ordeied  sixteen have  been  nearly  completed.  They   are   the    standard     Canadian  Pacific coaches'finished in  mahogany.  The only new feature in them  is that  in twentv of these  cars the smoking  room is about double the size of those  ordinarily in use.    The two diners, the  "Westminster and   Warwick,   will   be  added to   the  Imperial  Limited' ths  week* They are seventy five feet long.  Ofthe twelve sleeping cars ordered,  tbePuidnor and Satsuma. have left the  shops. Of theGStidditioniillcicoinotives  ordered    HI    are    freight    and     15  passenger.  whicli the movement of trains Was nnt  concerned, was responsible for 100  deaths and injury to 11 ,(SJo persons.  Of these 51 of the killed and 10,407 of  the injured were either servants of  the companies or of contractors  engaged in executing woik for the  companies, while 23 of the killed and  ITiS of tbe injured were passengers.  There were 20 other persons killed and  ���������'438 injured.-' Thus the total number of  personal accidents reported during the  12 months amounted to 1277 persons  killed und 18.375 injured. The dan-  gerons practice of tnrowtng bottles,  etc.. out of carriage windows evidently  prevails still among thu lravellin~  public, for 12 railway servants were  injured in "1001 from being struck by  articles thrown from passing trains as  compared with 0 months  during 1000  WING CHUNG  \   Fine Stock of Chinese and Japanese  Goods   .lust Arrived  11A.MBOO   CIIAIHB,  VANCV.  TABLE"!,  TEA TIIA.YS,  CHINA WARK,  KASCV GOODS,  NAPKINS.  HANDKKRCiriEPS,  F.VNH,  IN GREAT VARIETY  IN THE  NEW STORE OPPOSITE  THE JOSS HOUSE.  GRAND  10r<M$e Celebration  ���������ptTTdHER  Retail Dealer tn���������  Beet, Pork,     .  Mutton, Etc.  Fish and Game in Season....  AllordcrB promptly Ailed-  CoT,r������^trt". RBYBBWOKB, B.S  Lowest Bates and Best Service to  "and1ffoririiU"points.~''^=_ii  For    full   information,   printed  matter, etc., call on or address,  T. W. Bradshaw,  Agent        -  Kevelstoke.  E, J. Coyle.  Attaint, lit*n.  PmnenKer Ag������nt  , VBUcouver.  Oriental Hotel  Ably furnished with the  Choicest the Market  affords.  REVELSTOKE, JULY 12, 1902,  in which Golden, Salmon Arm,  Kamloo])*; and Rcwlstokr, and  the Loyal Trite' Blues will take  part.  THE CITY EXPRESS  E. W. B. Paget, Prop.  Prompt deliver)- of parcels, baggage, ete.  to any part of the city  Any Kind of Transferring  Undertaken  All order" left at R. M. Smythe*������ Tobacco  tore, or in Telephone So.7 will receive prompt  tlen tion.  WOOD  For Sale.  I The iiiHlcrslgneil having contracted for thc  whole of Mc-Malion IlroB. wood, lu prepared to  supply Mill wood at  $2 Per Load  Cedar Cordwood���������1:������,00 delivered.~M3  Hardwood at equally low rateii.  H.Thos. Lewis..  Ordem left at C* B. Hume. .v. Co.,  Morrfi <Sr  Stecd'H, or at mill will have prompt attention.  HEATED BYHOTAIB.-  REASONABLE KATES.  Brown & Guerin, Props.  S & GO'Y.  Wholesale and Retail Dealers  PRIME BEEF.     PORK.     Ml) i TON.     SAUSAGE.  FISH AND GAME IN SEASON.  HJHolflsoiu  General Blacksmith,  Wagon Maker,  Etc.  DEALER IN-  M*  m  1  Chatham Wagons, Wm. Gray & Sons Plows,  Popp Bros.' Plows, Cultivators, Harrows, Seeders, &o.  DOUGLAS STREET. ReVClStOkC,   B. C.  EXlGXJ-H.SIODbT    "Ea^rrBS  BEST WINES. LIQUORS, CIGARS  Large, Light bedrooms.  Rates $1 a day.  Monthly Rate.  J. Albert Stone ���������   Prop.  BELG I A N~ H AR ES  !The quickest breeders and frreatest  money makers   in   the  small   stock  line of the present day.      Full   bred  stock of KAS HO DAS.  Price���������S6 and $io per pair,  according to ai;e. ������  THOS. SKINNER,-npvi-lstoke, B. C.  Tn connection with the celebration  liv the OninKeinen in this city on the  12th July next, the. C.I'. R. hnvo  jjra.ntcl cheap excursion rates from  the following points to Kevelstoke and  return ;      $10;  Ashcroft   Kuniloopn   Hulmnn Arm..  Vernon   Cxolden   Arrciwhead ������������������'������������������  :i 75  1 or.  3 05  2 a*".  1 ()5  For Further Particulars Write  "W. C3-.    BIR/2<rE*y,  Itecordlng Sec.. I-. O. I... 1CM.  KEVELSTOKE. B.C. *  Ilive, AHDinuvEni  F'lefwe don't try nnd run us ���������  out of town hy Hcndinjf your  oidcri fast. We must have  .your work i.i order to live.  Wi* depend on you for our  work! Knstern Iioiisoh do  not 1 Do not allow yourself  t.o he roped in by their peddlers We also guarantee  to give.."you lietter satisfaction for your money,   n  ���������&.   S.   WILS03ST,  Next the McCarty Block.  Laces and Braids  A lftr^ti rniiRe of Point I.ace,  ]>nche*i*i nnd tlattenburK  Tlr-tld", Htninpeil De-ilKii**.  FtKinpvdLlnenti, Embroidery  Nccillen, HooVa. Ac.  T.ftrlin and Zephyr Wool^, all  fihailcs, Slipper Sole. Valcn-  ctcnccuLacc, Insertion.  Call at llie ,,__^������  AlADISON PARLORS.      ^  Misses Sheppard & Bell ^  McKensle Avenue      oc'J3      htt  t������s3  ���������������������������  t,    ,aL.                                       M. J. O'BMEK. Managlnit Director  H. O. PAR30K, Prealdent. ,    ���������SL**1* J!   ^ Revelstoke Wine and Spirit Co.  Limited Liability.  Carry a full and complete line of  Scotch and Rye Whiskies, Boandles, Bums,  Holland, Old Tom, London Dry and Plymouth Gins,  Ports, Sheries, Clarets, Champagne, Liquors |  1 Imported and Domestic Olatars.  THE   SUPPLY    HOUSE    FOR    NORTH    KOOTENAY.  FURNITURE  Just unloading Two Large Cars of Furniture.  We   now  carry  a larger and   better stork   than   any  between Winnipeg and Vancouver.     Come and look roun d w  vim want to buy or not.   We are stacked full from Floo r to  REVELSTOKE   FURNITURE   CO' Y.  *     *- -**" -*^ -*^������- *������<**��������� **ov*<T\/0%^Oi_iS������u5_l_XjC  8 /^  /  FIGHT WITH  vi  t?  ^ ft  ������4  Tracy the Oregon Convict Adds  to His Series of Murders.���������  Kills Two Men and Wounds  Two More.  Seattle, Wash. July 3.���������Tracy, the  escaped Oregon convict and desperado,  lias   added   another   murder    to    his  already   long   list,    and    has     again  escaped.  As a result of this afternoon's haHle,  two miles south of Bothell, Deputy  Sheriff Raymond, of Snohomish County  lies dead at nn under taker's room in  this city; Djputy Sheriff Williams,  ���������King County, lies seriously, if not  fatally wounded at the hotel in Bothell  and Carl Anderson, a newspaper  reporter from Seattle, has a sear caused  by a bullet grazing his arm.  A party of deputies and newspaper  men from tbis city, upon hearing that  Tracy was seen going North over the  Seattle and International tracks, near  the Statu University this morning,  proceeded to Madison park, embarked  thence to Kitkland, and from there  went to Bothell. They left Bothell  about 1 o'clock, proceeding down the  railroad track in the direction of Seattle  watching in every direction for signs  ' of the desperado.  About two miles from Bothell they  . came upon a small cabin,   which they  ' proceeded to search.    While the members of the posse were trying the doors  and climbing on the roof of the cabin  to see what it contuinoil, Tracy opened  fire from within.     One   shot ripped a  hole in Aderson's coat.    Another one  pierced Raymond's body   on   the   Ic-ft  side, killing him instantly.     Another  shot from Tracy's fatal rifle took effect  on Deputy Williams,  making only  a'  ���������wound ou his right hand. *. A   second  shot took'eft'ect in the left side, - under  ���������the heart, making an ugly,  possibly a  fatal wound.  The men of the party who were not  wounded returned the fire of the convict, and succeede din silencing that  coming from under his cover.  As soon as the.fire ceased Anderson  secured a buggy, iu  which   the   posse  . had come to"." the', scene   and  loading  r" Williams in it, drove rapidly to Bothell.  Immediately upon the receipt,of the  news at the sheriff's office,  arrange-  nients were undertaken tosendasecond  * posse of officers to   the  scene   of   the  man hunt.  At 11 p. ill. Tracy appeared at Fremont, a suburb of Seattle, where he  killed a policeman and wounded  another man.  - -When Tracy appeared at Fremont,  he was recognized by Neil Itouley, a,  member of the posse of Fremonters,  preparing to take up a watch for the  night.  . ��������� Without giving Neil achance to draw  a gun on him, Tracy instantly fired on  hiu'i, sending a bullet into his abdomen  and killing him.  The fight occurred cn Fremont Ave.,  ..^just-eouthwest���������of^Woodland���������Park;  Rouley, who was taken (o the Fremont  drug store in a buggy, expired shortly  after reaching there.  It is reported another man. who hag  not yet been identified, was shot.  Here is /Tracy's record steeped in  blood:  '   In ISO" murdered Valentine I-loge, a  -    -Colorado cattleui.in. ���������  ' In 1897 murdered William Strong, a  hoy in the same'state. ".'''  . June 0, 1002, at Salem, with David  * Merrill, his partner in crime, - he  murdered four men (three gtiurdg and  ti convict). They were : Frank W,  Ferrell, G. R T. Jones, B. P. Tiffany,  guards, and Frank Ingraham, Convict.  July '3, near Seattle murdered  Deputy ' Sheriff Charles Raymond,  Policeman 13.- B. Breese, - mortally  wounded Neil Rawleyand dangerously  wounded Deputy Sheriff ' Jack Williams,  Think it is the Ark.  \V. A. Reid, secretary of the Skag?  way Y. M. C. A., intends to return to  the interior of Alaskn, where he talked  with the Indians, whose earnest statements, be believes, fully confirm the  previous reports that the Indians of  the Lower Yukon have discovered an  immense petrified, ship on Porcupine  river, near the Arctic circle und norlh  ot Rampart. Alaska.  When asked regarding its size thc  Indians traced its dimensions on the  ground, indicating a length of 1,200 ft.  Such Indians as are familiar with the  Bible nre convinced Unit the ship is  none other than Noah's Ark. Mr. Roid  Intends tn return to the interior nf  /Uffska thi* (summer when he will take  aotpe Indiana ppd <. request the War  Oflice to detail soldier* to De-company  him. The ship lies on a bill thousands  pt feet above sea level.  A  Lost Lead.  This is the true stnry_.oi* a lost lead.  Rice and McKenzie, two prospectors,  struck a rich vein of quartz in the  Whitewater district, a mile and a half  from the Whitewater mine, in lhe  early nineties. Rico assayed tho  quartz with his rough appliances and  got results from $500 up Lo $1,200 a  ton. lie sent McKenzie back to find  the lead thai, had been carefully  concealed, but McKenzie found the  whole topography of' the country  changed by ,-i  landslide   and a  fall of  Notice.  snow. The lead was lost and fur ten  years constant but fruitless search  was mado for it. Rice got into trouble  at Rossland over the violent, death of  a woman and disappeared. McKenzie  died last year. In the meantime the  laud, including the lost lead known as  the Honeycomb mine", owing to the  float quartz leading to its discovery  being honeycombed, fell into the  hands'of J. T. Wilkinson. Owing lo  the story of tho lose lead Jlr. Wilkinson valued his property at $10,000, but  as years rolled-on and the lost lead  could not bo found, he sold the live  claims to J. Macquillan, consul general  for Ecuador, for $1,000 cash. A slum  time ago Macquillan's - prospectors  were working in the vicinity of the  lost lead, they discovered Lhat a recent  snowslide had takon place* and carried  with it hundreds of tons of loose rock,  and that a dirty white *vein of quartz,  hardly distinguishable from Lhe" surrounding soil was laid bare. The vein  was flve feet wide, and on consulting  the plan of the Macquillan, mine Lhey  were "overjoyed to find that nature  hart done what man failed to do���������  disclosed the rich lost lead of Llu*  Honeycomb mine*. The prospectors  had just made a very valuable discovery near the lost lend of piccioti.s  metal and the oxciLetuoiiL was somewhat divided between the two finds.  Moreover a big chunk exposed by the  slide was struck oil', wiLh a, pick.-ixe.-  It showed tree gold. It was a ragged  projection from the bluff." This has  been assay ec. by .T. O'Sttllivan, a  Vancouver assayer, who reports that  the ore is So per cent i'reo.niilling. and  the piece submitted, showing no free  gold, assays $12.00.. to- the ton. The  name of the mine is now-changed to  the Humming Bird. Mr. Macquillan,  needless .to say, .is..to thoroughly  explore,the, .lost lead, and if thought  continuous, will establish a mill on the  property.     ,. ���������_   .,  Winter I'plands.  Hie  like, fire  upoji^my  frost that stings  " ."   . :cheel������,  '  The loneliness of this forsaken ground,  I*he- long  white   drift  upon   whose pow-  -*   . dered neak.. i .-.'i *  I "sit ln the great Bllcnce aa'.orie bound;  nie. rippled   sheet   of   snow   where   tho  '    '   - wind  blew v -  Across the .open fields for" miles ahead;  I"he  far-off ..city   towered, and  roofed  in  .   blue, -  A tender line upon the western red;  The stars that singly, then In flocks appear.  Like jets of silver from a violet dome.  So wonderful, so  many, and so near, t~  And then the golden moon-to light mo  home; ���������- "  The'crunching snowshoes and the stinging air,  And   silence,   frost,   and  beauty   every-r  _    where.  ���������Lampman,.  Epitaph.  Here lies Luke Longpenne, the distinguished historical novelist, who died  at the ace of eleven, years in the full  height of .his fame, three, weeks after  the publication of h'm first book.���������  "Life."  TIME TABLE  S. S. Revelstoke  .' During High Water. "  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that  thirty days afier date I intend to apply to  the Honorable the Chief Commissioner ol  Lands ancl Works for permission to cut  and carry away timber from the following  described land's :  Commencing at a post planted on the  south side of the Columbia River, about  one mile below the mouth of C.inoe River,  and marked " Maude Skene's North-East  Corner Post;" thence south So chains;  (hence west So chain**:; llienco north So  chains; thence oast lo the point of commencement.  MAUDE SKENE.  Dated this 29th day of April, 1902.  Notice.  NOTICK IS HEREBY GIVEN that  Lliii-ty days after date J intend, to apply  to the Honorable the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for a special  license to cut and carry away tim.ber  from the following described lands;  Commencing at a post planted on  the east bank of the Columbia River  about two miles above the mouth of  Wood River, aiul marked "Olivia  Robinson's North-West Corner l'ost;''  thence south 10 chains; thence enst 100  chains; thence north 40 chains; Mieucc  west 100 chains to the point of  commencement.  OLIVIA ROBINSON,  Dated this 29th day of April, 1902.  IsTOTIGB.  I, the undersigned, intend 30 days  after date to apply to the Chief Commissioner of,Lands and Work?, for a  special licence to cut and carry away  timber from the following described  lands: Commencing at a, posL  planted on the west side of the  Columbia River one mile- below  Boyd s Ranch, and marked A. Edgar's  south east corner post, thence running  in a westerly direction -JO  chains thence north 160 chains thence  cast *J0 chains toColumbiaRi ver thence  along Columbia River 160 chains to  place of commencement.  Dated Lhis 1-lth day of May, 1902.  A. Edgar.  Notice.  v XOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that  thirty clays after dale I intend to apply to  the Honorable the Chief Commissioner, of  Lands and Works for a special license to  cut and carry away timber from the folj  lowing-.described lands : - ��������� -  ' 'Commencing'at a" post planted on the  east bank of the Canoe River, about four  mi!i*s up from ils ��������� mouth, -and marked  "Olivia Robinson's North-East Corner  Post";* thonce west So chains; thence  south So chains; thence east So chains;  thence 1101 til So chains to the poinl, ol  coiniiienconient. * 't'-;* ���������"������������������'���������  "    " ��������� ���������   '   '     OLIVIA ROBINSON.   *  Daled this 1st day of May, 1902.  Notice.  Cg^-l.eitve Klghl-Milo Landing*!-'" ���������"*'  Every Tuesday and l'rldny at (I a. m  ���������Leave La Porte���������  Every Tuesday and Fridav at 2p.m  ���������Special Trips between regulitr nillncs.  will be made fit any ense where busi-  offerod warrants same. >'  Tlie Company reserve the right'-to  chanpre time of sailings* without  notice.  FORSLUND,  Master.  W. TROUP,  Mate and Purser.  TIWBE TABLE  S. S. ARCHER OR S. S. LARDEAU  Running between Arroivhoad, Thomson's  LaudiiiK and (Joiniipllx, commencing October  Mtli, 1901, will sail as lollows, weather permitting:  Leaving Arrowhead for Thomson's Landing  an.l Comaplix twit*':dally���������10k. and lot.  Leaving Comaplix and lioni**nii'*i Landing  for Arrowhead twice daily���������7:15k and 12:l.".k  Making clo*-c connections with all 0. I*, lt.  Steamers nnd Trains.1  The owners reserve the right to change time"!  of sailings without notice.* ���������  Tho Fred Robinson Lumber Co,, Limited  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 30  days after datu I "intend to apply to the  Honorable the Chief Commissioner of Lands  and Works'for permission to'cufand carry  away "limber fiom the following described  lands in West Kootenay:   '  Commencing*ar a* post marked ."E. L.  MeMahon's North-West Corner" planted  on the cast bank ofthe Columbia River at  the south-west corner of* the timber limit  held by Henrietta McMahon under special  license; tlicnce east 40 chains; thence south  160 cliains; thence westio chains, to the  cast bank of the Columbia River; theni_e  north along-the east bank of the said river  160 chains 10 the point ol" commencement.  "   "'    " ll. I.. McMAHON.  Dated .May 5th, 1902,  Notice.  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN lliat  30 day.s after date I intend lo apply to the  Honorable the Chief t'oinniissionorol'Lanils  and Works for penn ,,sion to cul and carry'  away limber I'roni llu following described  tract of land in West Kootenay:  Commencing at a posi marked "John A.  MeMahon's South-W est Corner," planted  at!> point 160 chains southerly from the  south limit of tlu* land*, of lhe* Pittsburg  Syndicate situated north of Death Rapids;  tlicnce cast 40 chains; ihcnce nortli 1G0  chains, to the south limit of llie lands oi'the  I'ittsbuig Syndicate; llience west 40 chains,  to the east bank of tin* Columbia River;  Ihcnce soulh along the cast bank of said  river 160 chainsto the point ol" commencement.  JOHN A. McMAHON.  Dated May 5th, 190J.  Notice.  NOTICE IS HEREHY GIVEN. Lhat  thirty days after date I intend to apply  to Lhe Honorable tlie Chief,.Commissioner of Jytiids and AVorks for a special  license to cut and carry away timber  from the following described lands:.  Commencing at a postvplanted on  the east lunk of the panne Rivei.  about four miles up from its mouth  Vi'iM-"ni";i"iikeir"i'0:���������H~a!reric's_"Mortli*  West Corner Post;'' thence east 80  chains; thence south SO chains; thence  west SO cliains; thence north 80 chains  to Lhe pointof commencement.  * C. R. SKENE,  Dated this 1st day of .May, 1003.  Notice.  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that  thirty days nfu-r date I intend 10 apply lo  the J lonorable the Chief Commissioner ol  Lands and Works for permission to cut  and carry away tiinber from the following  described lands :  Commencing1 at a posi planted on lhe  .south bank ofthe Columbia River, about  one mile below the mouth of Canoe River,  and marked " Henry Lovewell's North-  West Corner Post;" thoncc south So  chains; thenco easl So chains; thence  north So chains; thence west So chains to  the point of commencement.  HENRY LOVEWELL:  Dated this 29th day of April, 1903.  Notice.  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai  thirty days after date 1 intend to make  application to the Honorable the Chief  Commissioner of Lands and Works for a  special license to cut and carry away  timber from the following described  lands :  ( ommencing al a post marked " G. B  Nagle's Souih-East Corner Post, planted  on the north bank of the Columbia River,  one mile west ofthe mouth ol* Canoe River;  thence north 80 chains; thence west So  chains; thence south 80 chains; thence  east So chains to the point of commencement.  G. B. NAGLE.  Dated this 29th day of April,  1902.  Notice.  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that  thirty days afterdate I intend to apply to  the Honorable the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for a special license lo  cut-ind carry away timber from the following described lands :  ��������� Commencing at a post planted on the  north bank of the Columbia River jusl  above the mouth of Canoe River, and  marked "Fred Robinson's South-East  Corner Tost;" thence nortli So chains;  thenee west So chains; thence south So  chains; thence east So chains to the point  of commencement..   *  :7.\'   ;1J   .FRED ROBINSON.  Dated this 29II1 day of April, 1902.    -  -"���������-���������IT  Notice.  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that  thirty clays after date I intend to apply to  the Honorable the Chief Commissioner ' ot  Lands and Works for a special license to  cul ancl carry away timber from the following described lands :  Commencing at a post planted on thc  east side of the Columbia River, about two  miles above the mouth of Wood Rivor, ancl  marked. " Fred. Robinson's South-West  Corner Post"; theuce oast 160 .chains;  thence north 4o"chains; thence west 160  chains] thenco soulh 40 chains to the point  of commencement. 0  FRED ROBINSON.  Daled this 29th day of April, 1902. '  Notice.  NOTICE IS HEREBY" GIVEN t|iat  thirty days aftei-cl_ttc 1,intend to apply,to  lhe Honorable .he, Qjiief Commissioner ot  Lands a.nd *\Vov|_s for a, special license to  cm and p:irrya.way tiinber from the following despnbed lands i  ft * - -*"!  Certificate of Improvements.  ZEsTOTTQIE  Shamrock. Mammoth. r<iirvi**u-, Maple  Lent, Arabian. JlpU-licr. "a:id V'ictorj* IV  mineral elainiH. siiuaic in the Keiclsioki..  Mining Division of -''est Kootenav.  Where located:���������The Plmnrock ami Mammoth mineral claim**, nt the head of Csmp  Creek, Iu round Huir HiiMn. Hig Bend. The  Fnirvicw ami Maple Leaf ininccnl claim**, at  head of the West Fork of MeCullnil*-h I'reek.  kiin\vn as Barrett Creek; tlie ArabiAn, Belcher  and Viclorijv JV iiiiiu'ral' clr.im.s on GrahAm  Creek, at tlio huid miters of luu We-st fork 01  Frencli Crec-k.  TAKK NOTICE that I. Florence MeCartj,  Free Mineri' Certificate No. II. G7.'^lt. intend  Hlxty dais from the dale hereof to apply to the  Mining liecordcr for ccriiilcntes m improvement!* for the purpose of obtaining Croun  tirnntsof tliciihove clnlms.  AND FUKTHEK TA .K NOTICK thataction  under Section :t" must be commenced before  the Issuance of .such Certitlente-i of '.nipruve-  meats.  Dated th s Ural day of Jjly, A. I), vxrl  FLOKKXCE M..CAKTY.  H0T1GS TO CREDITORS.  In the mailer.of thc Estate of Thomas  Edwin Home, late of the City "of Revelstoke, deceased. <������������������  , NOTICE is hereby given that all creditor:, ancl other.s having claims against the  estate ot the said Thomas Edwin Home,  who died on or about the 21st Alay, 1902,  arc'required, on or before jjje [3th dil3* of  Aue;iii,f, (ijco, lo send by post prepaid, or  deliver to Messrs. Harvey, MeCarter &  Pinkham, of the Cily of Revelstoke,  solicitors for the administrator., of the  estate ofthe said deceased, their addresses and descriptions, the full particulars of  their claims, cthe statement of their  accounts and the nature of the seciri-  ties if any held by tlieni.  And further lake notice that after such  last mentioned date the.said administrator  will proceed to distribute the assets of the  deceased ,-*,nion_j the parties entitled  thereto, having regard only to the claims  of which they shall then have notice, and  that the said administrators will not be  liable for the said assets or any part  thereof to any person or persons of whose  claims notice shall not have been received  by them at the time of such distribution.  D^ted the aotli day of Ju^c, .-\.p., 1902.  HARVEY,   .McCARTER & PINKHAM,  Solicitors for the Administrators of the  Estate,of Thomas Edwin Home, deceased, td  ���������'ComiTieneiniJara-jwst~planti?d on the  east side of tlio Canoe River nod alongside  of the Canoe River trail, fthoul one'mile  above the mpntlt of Hiirvcy, Creek, and  marked " C, " R." Skene's" South-West  Corner rastf'' thenco north 80 chains;'  thence west 80 chains';'thence' .south 80  chains; thence east So chains lo the poinl  of commencement. -      ' '   -"-' "  C. K. SKENE.   '  Dated this isl day of .May, 1902.  Notice.  THE TOWNSITE OF  IS NOW ON THE MARKET.  msmn  s on Sale��������� 2oo  BUY BEFORE YOU SLEEP.  CIRCLE CITY is thc Terminus   of   thc   proposed    Railway   already   surveyed  via the Lardeau Creek with fork to that point.  CIRCLE CITY is beautifully situated at the base of the Lardeau Pass,  Galena  and Surprise Creeks.  CiRCLE CITY is   absolutely   surrounded    by    Mining   Properties    now    under  Development. .........  Splendid  Water  Power  " Which will be utilized next Season by Concentrating Plants.  SEND FOR-PART1CULARS AT ONCE  TO THE GENERAL AGENT,  G. B. BATHO,  Ferguson, B. O.  -        *" '   The Smelting Centre of the Similkameen Valley.     Backed by the payrolls of two'  gigantic coal companies and the Copper and Kennedy Mountain Mines. '     - -  Surrounded by the following resources:    Coal, gold, copper, silver and a fine agri-"-  cultural country. _   Large herds of cattle, fruit in abundance, with  a" climate almost southern  and all that could be asked.  ASHNOLA is owned anil backed by the payroll of the Similkameen Valley Coal  Company,   Ltd.,  whicli is a guarantee in itself of its success.    Tho equipment, and development of their coal mines, installing  of water, electric light and power plants are already  arranged for.   The  development of the Aslmola- Coal  Company's mine by tbe Eastern Capitalists who have established their payroll at ASIIXOLA,  makes it   the,  coming city of the interior of British Columbia.  City of Wonder, Progress and Great Prosperity  Lots in Ashnola are safe investments. In Blocks 1 to 4'and 13 to 20 the price will he advanced 25c.  per month until May 1st, 1902, and to ten per cent, in tho ramainimc blocks. . The present price is from ������50 to  .$225     Twenty-five percent, cash, three, six and nine months without interest.  Arrangements are" already"completed for Eight buildings, including cottages for the Employees of  theamnpany nt Ashnola.   This work-will be under full headway by May 1st.  , ' Four years ago the Crow's Nest Shares could be bought and were sold at II cents. Today they.are  quotel at $80.00. With the advent of transportation, Similkameen Valley Coal can be delivered at "any  point in West Kootenay or Sale as cheaply as by any other Company in Canada. ' -c  FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS APPLY TO  SIMILKAMEEN    VALLEY   COAL   CO.,    LIMITED.  .    i. NELSON, B. C.  '  ftft������!ftf*J>J������.������j>^*#iff*������*Jh>i������iJ!������^^ *Hf44C������<f4r+<[*4F������  Certificate of Improvements. .,.   ,Not,ce *������ 0Bl,ntluent co-owner,  '*"' ���������      t .-%     Tj-.1i ll    '1"        \Tnn������n    nw    t ������.      -a ������ ..j^.,r,     * ���������    ...1_ .  3sroTia*B.  HOTiCe  The  Crest Western Mines, Limited,  Liability.  NOTICE Is hcrebv given Hint tlie Annual  <icn-������riil Meetin'u of the Shareholders ln  litisGomptinv will be held at their ollice in  Fer(r*j-!on. B.'J., on Wednesday, July 9th, 19ft>*  afi p. in., for the transaction of all business  connected with thc Compnny. ani* the transfer  book-, ofthe Companr uill be closed from June  ���������JSth, iS-iM. *     '  A. H. HOLDICH,  Secretary.  NOTICE IS. IrlliREHV GIVEN Unit  til'l'l}' <liy������ nfter dale 1 intend 'to apply lo  llie I lonorable the Chief Commissioner,of  Lands and Works for a special license -to  cut and carry away timber from tlu*. fol-  lowinjj described lands:  Commencing at a posi planted on the  west bank of the Columbia, River, jusl  below the mouth of a larjjo creek :\L';*,u",'  one half mill* above l'l'ter.sim'**, HttlH'lie,  and marked "Henry UoyoivoII1"*. South-  East Corner V"o**>(',".(li'iK'u \ve.sl"'8o 'chains;  thence m'l'nh ito chains; tlicnce east 80  ijliaiiii., iiioru or less, to the bank of the  Columbia River; tlicnce following tho  bank of the Columbia River to the point 01  commencement.  HENRY LOVEWELL.  Dated this 5H1 day of "U.vy, 190-.,  ~"GoldeiTHill Mineral Claini. 'Situate in  the Revelstoke Mining1 Division of West  Kootenay District. Where located:���������In  Ground Hoe; Basin, on IMcCulloiii^h Creek.  TAKE NOTICE that I, C. il. Humo,  Free Minor's Cerlilicale No. B67188, intend, sixty daj's from the date hereof, to  apply to the Mining- Recorder ftvr a Certificate of Improvements, for* tho purpose of  obtaining' a Cro\\'*,i Ofaut of tbe above  claini.  And fin'^.i*!'- take notice that action,  ui.dor* icclioP 37, must be commenced  bolero (ho Issuance of such Certificate of  Impiovements. '   -  Patcd this iCtliilay of June, A.D,, lyos.  C B.'HUME.      '  To John T. Moore or to anyone to iv'.ioia he  - may have transferred  his  interosts in the  Giliniiii Fractional mineral claini, situate  in the i.nrcleau .Mining DivIsion._  -=-You are hercl_.y notllledthat-'Iie*cj)eirdc<i"tlie  .sum or ono hundred and   .seven  dollars  and-  /ifty cents .$107.50) in lalior und monev on the  bcforiy-neiitloucd mineral claim, In order to  hold said mineral claim iir.dcrSection 'Hoi the  Mineral Act; and if within uinetv days  (90)  trom tho dato of this notice, -iou fail to contribute your proportion of such expenditure,  together  with all costs o{ advertisinp, yfur  inurest in said mineral cUliu will become tUe  uipcrty of the undcrsiguvd, under Section 4  ���������1 ..11  Act  entitled ���������_���������   ,\n  Act  to   amend the  ineral Act, 1900."  Bated  at comaplix, B.C.,   this loth day bi  Miril.A. D., VXiZ.  JOSEPH BEST,  ' Co-OWnor.  Notice.  NOTICE IS JIRRKIIY GIVE^ VbOT  thirty days after date I intend to apply  to the IJonoralilo tin* Oh't'f Commissioner of I/andsiind Works foraspecial  license to cot and carry away timhev  fVfini tl^e following des-cribed lands;  tJomitieuciiig fit a nost planted on  th.e west l>ut_.t of tht' Columbia liiver,  about one quarter of a mile below thc  mouth of Seven Mile Creek, about six  miles above Death Rapids ami marked  "Maude Skene's Smith-East Corner  Post;"' thence west SO chains; thence  north 80 chains; thencu east 80 chains,  more or less to the west bank of the  Columbia'River; thence followiptj th,a  bank of the Columbia Rivei* to,* the  point of commencement:.  MAUDE SKENE.  Dated this 5th day of May, 1002.  Corporation   of  the City  of Revelstoke,  3sroT,"ro2G i  N.OTICE is hereby give that the fn-.st  sitting of the annual Court of Revision ol  the Municipality of the Gitv of Uevelstoki;  will be la-Id in thu Cilv 'Clerk's Ollice,  Revelstoke, on Friday, "the Kir-,1 day of  August, if)OS, ������t io .-ijjn,', for the purpose  of hi*avirt*_r complaints against the Assessment ������s made by the Assessor, and for  revising and correcting- tlie Assessment  Roll for the year tgo?,  CHARLES ERSKIXE SHAW,  Clerk Municipal Council.  Revelstoke, B. C,      June zisl, 1902.  NOTICE.  The Double Eagle Mining and Development Co., Limited Liability.  NOTICE Is hcrcVw given that the niiual  CienerRi Mealing of the Shareholder, of  this. i^ynpAuy wilt he held at their oflice. ia  y*ri;u*,on, B. C, on Tliurx.lay. July lUth. 1902,  at 2 ).. 111.. for tbe transaction of all business  'connected with the Company, and the transfer  books of the company villi lie closed Irom  June 20th, 1902.  ' A. U. HOLDICH,  Secretary.  fltS-* UNION -S#  Cigar   Factory  Uj REVELSTOKE,   B.C.  jj* H. A. BROWN,   Prop.  gig) (j|p  & Brands: ^  OUR  SPECIAL  and THE   UNION  4.***********i  PELLEW-HARVEY,  BRYANT & CiLMAN  Mining Engineers  and Assayers,  VANCOUVER, B.C.      Established 1S50  Write for our interesting books.*��������� Inventor'* Help" and '* How you are iwlndled.".  Send us a rough sketch or model of >our in-?  vention or improve ment and *-ve*a-i]liellyoa������  free our opinion as to whether it is probably^  patentable. Rejected application! have often/  been successfully p: osecuted by us. We\  conduct fully cq*u:pp*rd offices In Montreal)  and "Washington ; irus qualifies u*������ to prompt-!  ly dispatch work and quickly secure Patents/,  as broad as tbe invention. Hfghesl references!  furnished. /  Patents procured through Marion & Ma*)  rion receive *pec:ol notice without charge in)  over 100 newspapers distributed throughout)  the Dominion. - )  Specialty :���������rate nt business of Manufac-)  turers aud HiiKineers.  MARION & MARION  .    Patent Exports and Solicitors.   <  /���������okicm-   /   New Vork Life B'ld'g, flontre������l<.  ^J^^^^tlantJcBWg.Washlngton DX^j  Neat, Clean and Attractive  Work Guaranteed.  Job  Printing  All the latest faces in type7  At the Herald Office '.  ASSAY WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS  UNDERTAKEN.  Tc**t������ made up to 2,C001b*i.  A specialty made of checking Smelter  I'nlp*.  Samples from the Interior by mail or  express promptly attended to.  Correspondence solicited..  VANCOUVER, B. C.  i     ������������������������������������r ' s  *y**yi***i*Jll*lf*l H-I >������f������  alex. Mclean & cc  Agents for tbe  i MasoB&Risch Piano  OFFICE AT  I J. MeLeod's Residence  SECOND STREET,   EAST.  I REVELSTOKE, b.C. The Friend <-f M'dame.  Er.r ia  ���������y.ti ���������  ;;].j story which was  - the twilight, when  1 -ished our tea and  i'ii.i'���������..!". clips in hand, loth to  say -.no'-l yt. We were talk-  in ir of a town tar down east,  re !'��������� a queer old gray  l;i*'i has not heen in-  .;*.* years.  ��������� v;* itor, lt was one of  ���������s In Canada. A  .nistress ruled over  those old-fashioned  ���������*<s who are now out  ..tar was a traveler,  -ninth at a stretch,  i line and "M'dame"  near which  stone hou=e v.-!*.'*  ihp.blted in iw -r.;v  Once, said i't* v  the pretti������.-t p* ���������  ���������*harsd=ome yo-n.s:  'ii and over ;'***.' ���������'���������'  loyal family .--v**"'  ���������of vogue. Tn- n>  often away :"ur n  "but Jean and Jam  -were as happv At. contented as three  people could he*. 'M'dame" had her  ���������dogs, her horses*, her pigeons, her  ���������books, her piano ,-ul her needlework.  She was convent-hi'.-d. and had married from school��������� -:i orphan, who had  never been to a n.i.iee or a, play or a  race meet, nor c*v>*ii a big dinner. The  -Cure dined ���������-���������oni*-;lines at the Stone  House, the doct*.n came tc smoke a  pipe with the ni.' u*r and play cards;  the master Invited n.i one else, and the  mistress wlthdre,. herself from the  few gentlefolks wi u would have entertained her in the neighborhood. She  ���������was gently born .i.ul convent-bred ���������  you know how tlui type can be happy  ln a seclusion that .vould maddan you  and me.  One day Jean and Jacqueline were  made anxious by the delay in the return of m'dam*.* fr.im her drive. Long  after the simple* lime dinner of flsh  and fruit was .spoiled by waiting  jn'dame came home���������was brought  home, rather���������by a strange gentleman  ���������who had startled he:-' ponies in an unfrequented road, and after a time  stopped their runaway career and taken them in hand. The gentleman came  up to the verandah with m'dame, and  fcecause lt was so warm, and he a bit  tousled and dusty, Jean took him Into  the dresslng-rooi-, of monsieur and  brushed him, and Jacqueline made him  a famous drink or fruit-syrup and Ice,  with a dash of something Firench and  llqueurish.  "I phall look in ti-morrow. If I may.  to see that you nre none the worse,"  they heard him ray, as he lifted his  hat ln farewell to m'dame, and Jean  said to Jacqin*l'.**n- "He 1s not Canadian, nor of the Ki public, but English,"  and Jacqueline nodded, "So it appears  to me, my friend."  To-morrow '."'ii on many other morrows the str-* -'-'or sat on the rose-  wreathed verni-'h'-h, Jean and Jacqueline always watchfully chaperoning  their mistress, M'dame read and played  and sang to the stranger, who was  courtesy ancl compliment personified,  and Jean and Jacvueline agreed that  never had they .-.-i-ved a finer fellow  ���������than this one whom they always mentioned as "the iriuud of m'dame."  Monsieur was nwny on a long trip,  somewhere in thnt region vaguely  ���������known as the North-West, but just before he might he ������������������������������������cpected home the  servants he::id the Knglishman regretting- that how nwj had arrived calling him back '.*-��������� Kncrland.  So he went .n*fliy, and monsieur duly  returned. M'-i' tit* drove to meet him,  antlon tha vi-'-"Hiiili. in the hearing of  Jean and Jai"*. .-lii.e. detailed the story  of the lunav. v. mentioned that the  .stranger liar. ...p. .I. and had gone to  England. It wus strange how her  istory gave :!:e in presslon lhat he had  ���������only calied or.i?: Jean and Jacciueline  ���������thought it str? n *.->*. though neither one  made any rcin-.-.K each being secretly  a bit ashainucl of having noticed it at  ait  lt was about tii..- time that Jacqueline b-:*gan to be anxious about tha  Jiealth o: m'd:u*..������. ..������������������'���������d ventured to give  monsieur o. few tin.id words in that  -connection.  "M"da:;ie not siring?" cried monsieur  .fceartiiy. "Nor.sc.iss!" Monsieur-.was  ���������a very big, very i.bitst and very slow-  ���������wllted person, it ii:ms, Jean was also  auoved to rc-iiu..-. ;.'.at m'dame needed  ���������change of air. did not sleep well, ate  less than fo: n..-i :y. and rarely sang  those brilliant :.:-.d somewhat "risque"  .French songs whi^h monsieur preferred. Mom-leu: protested. "You and  Jacqueline hav*. ���������b*;urd fancies," he  said, testily.  And then lie to'.J m'dame, and she,  ���������wonderful to relate. ;;rew suddenly furious at her iwo .-i.vitors, and rated  them for off.ciuiis meddlers. You could  ���������aiot picture the hi'rror and chagrin of  two! Sl'dame7rthelr���������cherlshedj-  adorc-d ono. abusing them in  "Certainly she Is ill  those  petted  wrathful tones!  . s-ald Jean, v.lih sorrowful pigheaded-  r.ess. "We must V- very, veny good to  1:*;r. until she i< "'jite recovered."  When monsieur went away again,  t i!s time on :. si.u. ter trip, he asked  i.i'daine to come v. Is i him. She promptly refused. "In :V ��������� heat I should die  of the railway train, smother ln the  country Inn? Jiid ft*'.! ill of the viands,"  .-he .--aid with a wve of her pretty  hands, consuming the whole scheme to  limbo.  "On the w--iy to the train, monsieur  met ihe phy*-i'-ian. "I wish you'd take  a look in oti r-'(*-.-'!':������������������ at my wife," he  *.ild; "she's not 111. but silly old Joan  and Jacqucl.!.'.* p ���������--ist she is, and I  think she ',.*: -ixitl���������:'..-:: from the heat."  "She has b*.**--. .'r'.vlng about so much  and walking in*, f .-. The Knglish are  *?uch walkers, t-f, ;hat young man has  made her walk too far every day in the  **un," said the !*--*tnr testily, for he  Jiad not one*** \,-"rx asked to .-moke a  ���������pipe while rnon*M<-ir was this time at  home.  Monsieur was* hoarding Ills train at  the Instant and -".T-cely comprehendi-d  the remark. It wt.nl In at his .jars and  did not at or.c������ -������"ich his brain. But  v-h*-n he had scr-l.-d himself, some'moments later, yinl *.;iily it arrived. He  start������d. "Vo'in^ l*:*.*;lishnian���������walking  la the sun **v._.iy .lay!" the physician's  words Jo-tl'-ri wen other to the tai'k-a-  tack of Hi*, trim over the rail*.'  Mon.-l**ur t^^---.���������r,, a very cV-ep red.  "Good thing he'n i--ft the country:" he  -���������������������������.lid in a v-;y ii-_-l** tone, nnd ther. .jot  r> ddir y-.-t. _\,r ;.,*- i,.;xt neighbor "pir-  duned"  r*nd a.-k  remarked.  "Oh.   nothir.-'  rt-p'.-ed. : ������:*. i,ii-'.i  tactful i;:.ri-o. ��������� -  M'-anv. !-."������������������ .,* .  Jacqu'.-ii:-,** ���������... :-  eto.ie ho'j*'*. ���������,'������������������..  befoie. only .,,������  mor... and in.-.i*.  fjuellr.e'.s last*. -���������  i--|ttin-r ir.ur*'** ,:.  the'aibor fion,  long way d j-.\,-, t  The old I",--,.  eober and <..!'-:it.  line went dr.".:. i  Jersey co-.v. >h*'  and  call  Bijou,  <l   what  monsieur  had  nothing!"   he   nhortly  .' niable to thinlc ol a  -i-e nnd Joan ,md  iv.i-.g ln  the old zr.iy  " e e'luable 11 vr--* as  ��������� '-. m'dame growing  ���������1 '".cile. passing Jnc-  -��������� ups and entree." and  '. i* hammock under  - . h one could see a  ��������� ������������������ .lusty country road.  ,i   people   grew   very  liven when Jacf.:*..--  -e orchard to mlik .*-*:���������  ��������� iiiitc   forgot   to   sinjf  '...:  poodle,   to  trot  al  her side. She prayed often to her good  Saint Anne, and opened her fat little  savings bank and took out her coin and  bought four big candles, which burned  gaily the next Sunday before the altar  of Bonne Ste. Anne in the church of the  village.  One day m'dame came in from her  drive a bit late, and as she pulled up  liter ponies at the gate she cried: "Jacqueline, ma bonne, hast thou a good  dinner? I am hungry again!" And  Jacqueline, hastily crossing herself and  sending a sort of telegraphic "thank  you" to Bonne Ste. Anne, told of the  little chicken roasting and the late  ealad and the early Crawford peaches  on the ice, with Devonshire cream, and  then, in )_rratlfled tones, mentioned that  m'dame's favorite potage' was just  ready to serve.  It was the old merry dinner-hour,  when Jean and Jacqueline almost  quarrelled about who should . serva  m'dame, though lt was well known that  it was to Jean to serve, to pour the  wine, to enquire If the dinner was aa  m'dame liked, while Jacqueline stood  hunrbly by the door until lt was time  to remove the different services.  Jacqueline was a bit bumptious when  she remembered her four candles and  the evident complaisance ot Bonne Ste.  Anne, and so far forgot herself as to  march in with the roast chicken and  actually place lt herself before m'dame.  Only the exceeding content of Jean  with m'dame's appetite and spirits  made him overlook this breach of privilege!  After dinner m'dame and Bijou  strolled down the orchard as usual, and  Jean gently reprimanded Jacqueline,  who Immediately demolished him with  the revelation of the four candles and  the complaisance of Bonne -Ste. Anne.  Then Jacqueline trotted busily down  the orchard with a little shawl, for  m'dame had gone out with her beautiful shoulders -bare. She, good Jacqueline, paused at the prettiest of pictures,  m'dame reading a letter. Bijou sitting  up before her, begging; tlhen m'dame  kissing the senseless sheets of paper  and crushing them to her bosom and  crying: "He comes, Bijou, my little  one! Only you must know ft! He  comes!    He cannot leave us. Bijou!"  Jacqueline came forward all smiles.  "A little shawl, m'dame," she said,  archly.- '.'Monsieur will not be pleased  to find m'dame with a cold," then  shrank back from her flushed and  frowning mistress. In one instant the  letter was ln m'dame's pocket and she  had recovered herself.  "Some day, Jacqueline, you will  frighten ine to death. Don't follow me  about, my good soul!" she said quickly.  "I am going in. I shall not needathe  little shawl, and you know I never take  cold," and, like a Hash, m'dame swept  by, calling to Bijou to come in for his  forgotten lump of sugar at once.  There was an envelope on the grass,  which Jacciueline picked up. It was  not addressed, and lt waB crushed and  a little rubbed and dirty. The old woman dropped it as if It were hot.  "I have wasted my Tour candles," she  sighed, as she went hurriedly back to  her kitchen.  That night m'dame slept like an. infant, as the anxious old woman assured herself by many visits ��������� to her  bedside, but Jacqueline slept not at all.  Instead she prayed, but not once to  Bonne Ste. Anne.  For several days m'dame came home  from drives or walks ln famous appetite and spirits. Jean chortled, and  teased his glum companion, enquiring  if she begrudged the four candles now,  and being overcome by her tierce rejoinder that she did.  At last one evening Jacqueline's forebodings were realized; the rustic gate  swung on its hinges with a bang, and  the tall form of the friend ot m'dame  came to the verandah. Jacqueline  stood behind the shutters ancl remarked the meeting. M'dame waa  neither flurried nor surprised. Indeed,  she barely held out her hand, but Jacqueline could see how her whole frame  trembled.  The old woman hurried out to tho  kitchen garden, where Jean was picking some herbs tor drying.  "See here!" said she, explosively.  ���������This will not do. Here is that cursed  Englishman back again!"  Jean dropped his tray of herbs.  ."'"Where?" he gasped.  "But there on the verandah. "What  must be done?"  "Calm thyself, good Jacqueline. I  have not been kind with thee lately. Is  It no new thing, this Idea of thine?"  "Jean's - voice"- was���������trembling-���������with-eon--  fusion and distress.  "New! New! And I vowing candles  to Ste. Anne and spending one whole  night on my knees, while thou In bed  snored and snored! It is this cursed  Englishman, only him! She was so  content and happy here. He has ruined  us all!"  Jean put his hand over her mouth.  "Shut up! you are dreaming!" he said,  fiercely.  ���������"Oh, am I, Indeed? "Well, otia  awakes! Let me tell you���������" and In a  torrent of whispers she told of the letter, the changed spirits and the words  to Bijou. "Now, Isn't this too much  for us?" she cried between sobs.  "If only monsieur were 'here!" said  Jean distractedly. A heavy hand fell  on his shoulder.  "Well, my good Jean, he Is here," and  so was he, In traveling chist-eoat and  valise, having come up between the  rank.t of vegetables and herbs from  the back gate. "Don't be frightened,  you two. You, at least, need not fear,"  said monsieur, kindly. "I gather from  you, good woman, that the serpent has  entered vmy Eden. Well, I shall put thn  serpent out. It will not be a mighty  task, never fear. Jacciueline, will you  very quietly Klve me .���������*. biscuit and a  glass of wine, out here?���������as quickly and  as quietly n.i you can���������not to disturb  m'dame. Jean, take my valise Into  your own room and return here to me  directly."  ��������� .Monsieur sat clown on a rustic bench  amid the vegetables and herbs, while  Jean and Jacqueline stole Into the  house.  "I shall tell m'dame," said Jean, "if  monsieur shoots me for It."  "You will do as you like," said Jacqueline, rooting ln her blscult-box. "I  know enough to obey." Jean hung his  head and softly mounted to his own  chamber with tho valise and coat.  Monsieur drank two glasses ot wine  and ate a biscuit.  "I am going out as T came, nnd shall  meet the seip.nt outside pnrad.se," said  monsieur. - "Unless m'd.'imc rings for  you, you will remain hure. you two."  Then he went back down thi narrow  path between the v'csetablcs.  "Hold my hand, Jem!" said Jacqueline in a shrill child's voice.  "I am sore afraid, too!" sighed Jean.  Outside on  the dusty road  monsieur  paced to and fro.   Presently, an hour  or so later, the rustic gate swung back  and two figures camo out.  "You will come with me to-morrow!"  said the strong English voice. "Promise me!" Then monsieur listened as  one listens to tho nails driven in his  scaffold.  "Not to-morrow," said m'dame, pleadingly,    "lt is not possible!"  "Hut the ship sails next day, beloved,  and if he returns." M'dame slipped  inside the gate, trembling, warned by-  some psychic current, who knows? and  faltered:  "I cannot go to-morrow! I must  think. I will tell you in the morning,  at the old place, when I can go," and  then her white dress and pale face  flitted under the trees, up the verandah  steps and into the shadows.  In a moment her bell tinkled and  Jacqueline's voice was heard crying,  "A Hnstant, m'dame!"  The Englishman laughed.  "Cursed French tricks," he said,  loudly. "I've a good mind to sail without her."  Monsieur strolled down the road; tho  Englishman stared at him curiously.  "Bonsolr, monsieur! Could you  oblige me with a light?" said monsieur.  The Englishman handed him a match-  case.  "Monsieur resides here?" politely enquired he, striking a match and lighting a cigar.  "No," said the Englishman, shortly.  "Just making a call."  "Ah, you know the afflicted one?"  (politely to a degree).  ���������  "Afflicted one? What do you mean?"  stammered the stranger.  "I mean," explained monsieur, "but  I detain you. Let us go together, if  agreeable; I am walking to the village."  "But, you mean?" insisted the Englishman, anxiously.  "Only this, that the beautiful lady Is  mad. Surely you know her sad history?" queried monsieur in surprised  tones.  "Good God!" cried the Englishman.  "Mad! Why, she goes .about everywhere!"  "But always watched, my dear sir.  You would not remark lt, but It is true.  When she receives friends there is always a keeper concealed close at hand,  within earshot. When she drives she is  perhaps in peril, but she has never  oome to much harm. Once she was  rescued in a runaway by some tourist,  whom she has since spoken of in her  times of delirium. Her physician* sent  for me to-day to decide whether she  should be put under restraint. I am,  monsieur, the superintendent of the insane asylum. We await the return of  that much-to-be-pitled man, her husband. Monsieur will pardon me, but,  seeing you emerge from the gate, I fancied you might be he. However, no  such tragedy darkens, your life, - for  which you may be thankful."  The Englishman walked mechanically  along beside monsieur. He stepped  high as if his feet were numbed. Presently he shook himself together. *  "Good God!" he said again. "What  an escape!"'  Monsieur "pardoned."  "Oh, nothing! nothing!" said tha  ���������Englishman hastily. "If you don't  mind, I'll .just hurry along. I believe  my train leaves at midnight, and I  have some things to pack."  Monsieur stood watching him as he  strode through the dust. "A fine, handsome fool!" said he, bitterly. "I am  glad she took time to "think it over!"  Then a sudden.fury shook him. "How  I'd like to feel his neck between my  hands! How I'd enjoy running him  through. What pleasure to' pitch him  over the cliff!" he gasped, and laughed  as devils might.  Presently monsieur re-entered the  vegetable garden, where old Jean stood  waiting.  "Well, my good Jean," said monsieur  cheerfully. "The serpent has'left Paradise. But, to be quite sure that he has  ���������to satisfy yourself, good Jean���������would  you very much mind walking to the  station about the time the midnight  train passes here? It is late, I know,  but, to satisfy yourself���������" and monsieur  paused. Jean looked curiously at him.  "And monsieur?"  "Oh, I shall smoke here until you  return," said monsieur, sitting tranquilly down. "I always enjoy this  kitchen garden, a.nd I want to enjoy it  greatly this autumn because, good  Jean. I think of mov'.r.g into town a  little later.  When Jean got home at one of the  morning, monsieur still sat smoking in  the moonlight. He nodded when Jean  said "I am satisfied, monsieur," and re-  "niarkedT^-'You-rnighc-ask���������JacutiellaK-tj-  tell m'dame when she takes her the  morning coffee that I arrived home by  the midnight train, Jean, and am sleeping in the guest-chamber rather than  disturb her."  M'dame slipped from her lace-draped  bed and ran act oss the hail to the  guest-chamber v.'hen Jacqueline had  duly delivered herself of this message.  There she found monsieur soundly  sleeping. He was awakened by the  clasp of her amis about his n***ck and  her glad cry: "I have wanted you so  badly!    I am srlad you are here!"  Jacqueline, shamelessly eavesdropping, said undor her breath: "Forgive  me, m'dame! Forgive me. Bonne Ste.  Anne! And thou shalt have four more  candles for Christmas'."  Warning Off the English.  An Ingenious method of obtaining a  reputation for patriotism cheaply has  been Invented by certain Berlin publl-  .cans. On their shop fronts they hnxig  legends tothls effect: "So long as tho  war In South Africa lasts I forbid any  Englishman to enter my premises.".  The use of this placard Is, It is said,  entirely confined to houses of a class  that never entertained an Englishman  in the course of their existence.  Intellect vs. Morals.  It is the tendency ot a sophisticated  age like the present to overestimate Intellectual as compared with moral ancl  emotional gifts. The material civilization upon which wc pride ourselves Is  almost "ntlrcly the achievement ot the  in-tfllect. Fame and wealth, luxury,  cultivation and leisure���������all the big  prizes ot the world. In fact���������are obtained by the successful exercise* of the  Intellect. The moral qualities, of Ihf-m-  selves, can procure a man nothing t/ul  a clear conscience, and the npprov.i),  perhaps mixed with contempt, hi* h!s  neighbors. And yet, when the Intellectual qualities are brought to the tost of  reality; wh'*n one's view of them is not  clouded hy pride, avarice, or pns<.*inn,  how amazingly does their value ������!ninlc  ancl slirlvt*!!���������Henry Chllds Mcrwln in  "A thin Ho Monthly."  Revolutionary Proposals.  T must <have .struck many of the  admirers ot the melodramatic  stage that the various outrages  to which the hero is subjected  during the course of the four ��������� acts,  when he is "up against it" good and  hard, are as like each other as a row  of Japanese dolls. The locomotive, the  fire-reel, the buzz-saw, the mine explosion, and the shipwreck, have been  ���������worked over and over again. What we  need is novelty. And if T might make  a suggestion, some new and startling  climaxes could be worked up from the  modest incidents of our daily life. For  Ihere are climaxes in the domestic circle Just as distressing as any depicted  on the stage. Even when the canvas  buzz-saw Is advancing on him with all  *he energy a perspiring stage carpenter can Impart to It, the hero does not  suffer the agony of apprehension that  convulses the soul of the average man  when he arrives home at three o'clock  in the morning and hears the contemptuous sniff which apprises him that the  wife of his bosom is awaiting him at  the top of the stairs. Nor does the  heroine, when starving to death ln the  latest black cashmere "Dally Hint from  Paris," evince more trepidation than  does the average matron, when the  leader ln her particular brand of "sas-  slety" drops In and finds her in a cotton wrapper with -her store teeth in a  tumbler of water and her magnificent  chevelure 'lying on top of the bureau.  There are calamities just as soul-harrowing in the domestic circle as In the  drama. The trouble is that the play-  wrlgihts have never taken hold of them  in the true spirit of discovery.  We will take as an example one heroic Incident that lately happened in this  city when a prominent citizen induced  a small gli-1 to save her life by jumping  from the windowsill of a burning house  on to the tails of his ulster, which she  ���������accomplished without even breaking his  flask.    We can easily picture  to  ourselves how this could be worked up for  the stage.   The Angel cheelld is backed  up on  the windowsill will a pound of  red fire 'burning on a tin shovel behind  her.    The hero comes tearing on from  the side scenes. He sees her, and-clasps  his hand to his forehead.    (Heroes always do that.   It is a kind of a send-  off.)   He seizes a handful of clustering  locks from his wig and tosses it Into  the air.    It comes down "Tails!"    The  cheelld  must be  saved.    With  a  wild  wrench he whips off his liver-pad and  holds   it   outstretched   in   his    strong  arms.   The cheeild jumps and rebounds  from lt like a half a brick from a book-  agent's cheek.   Once more she springs;  and again 'he is foiled.   With a cry of  anguish ,he hurls the liver-pad at the  sneering villain and catches her on his  breath.   And as she is lowered in safety  to   the   ground   we   see   the   quivering  body of the villain nailed fast to the  blazing ruins by the faithful liver-pad.  There   is   another  point   to   which   I  would   like   to   draw   attention.     And  that is the way in which Inanimate objects  are  neglected.      We  have  dogs,  geese,  chickens   and  poultry  ln   melodrama.   But that Is all.   I was once acquainted with a gentleman who -played  a cake of ice in the river scene In "Uncle Tom's  Cabin."    And   the barrel   in  "Panjandrum" was a most lovable personage off the stage.   Many friends of  mine   have   also   formed   part   of   the  "hoarse gathering murmur" which always arises in the wings when the hero  is getting into, a remarkably tight place.  But theso were not strictly inanimate  objects.   They drew salaries, and wore  red   neckties   on   Sundays.     What   we  need Is a further extension of the drama from the farmyard /to the grocery  counter, and the hardware store.   And  we. shall  get  it.    We  shall  yet  see  a  drama   in   which   the   leading  comedy  part  is played   by   a   tin   ot   canned  salmon    and    the    heroine    is    saved  from the villain's clutches by a barrel  of  patent glue.     And  why should we  not?   There are many comedians now  on the stage who would compare unfavorably from an intellectual standpoint  with  a   tin   of   canned   salmon.     And  there are heroes beside whose personal  charms a barrel of glue would shine as  a   paragon   of. pulchritude.     A   tin   ot  canned salmon would prove far more  useful to the heroine when she is lost  on  the sandy desert,  or afloat on the  lonely raft In mid-ocean, than a comic  Irishman with a Coney Island brogue.  If she did not care tn tackle It herself  she could feed lt to the villain and tie  him up in so many knots that it would  take   a   traction   engine   to   straighten  hirn out.    And  the dramatic posslblli-  "Ue3~of~-t~barrel-of-glue-are-sIn.ply-il--  llmitable.   She could use lt for sticking  to  everything  from  the angel  cheelld  to the papers proving her to be rightful  heiress to the old baronial home. When  the   villain   sprang  upon   her,   hissing  out  "At, last I  have  you  in  my  pow-  er-r-r!"   she   could   paste   him   to   the  kitchen  stove and go out for a walk.  How would  the band of Moorish  brl-  irands look if she stuck them all to the  adjacent^ rocks by  the  slack of   their  loose   trousers,   while", the  manly  hero  went through their pockets?   A dab of  glue on her windowsill when the murderer was i;rr*eplnir, knife In hand, Into  her lonely tied-chamber,  would compel  him   to  stay   there  all   night  or  complete his crime In a costume which thi>  ���������management would not stand for even  for a moment.    And then how useful lt  would be to help her to adhere to her  salary.    It Is ini<: that they inlifht havo  to soak  the h'f-ro  In  hot  water  to  get  him away from her.   But then he often  richly deserves to be soaked.    In every  other   Instance   the   faithful   glue   pot  could give card'" and spades and Uttlt*  casino to the most useful comedian who  ever trailed the villain to his lair.  These arc only two of the Instances  In which the use ot Inanimate objects  In the cast would Increasf-' the novi-lty  of the drama. But their number could  be lndefinl'ely increased. We have lonjj  had the woodr-n actor. Why should w������  stick at th<* lnanlrn.it*. tragedian?  Herein we have a bright idea for the  budding pl-iyf/ri-fhts who have dramatized f-v.-ry hook that has a circulation of ov-r t������n copies, until the principal valij..* we place on the dictionary  Is the fact that even the mo-ct ambitious of th'-fii have never used It an tho  basis cf ,x rci'n.intlc play. And we  charge no'hln:; tor this hint to ilrnm.-  tists. It Is an absolutely free ;;raft.--  Montrr*-il   "Sunday Mun."  Anecdotal.  After one of his trips to the Emerald  Isle Foote was praising the hospitality  of the Irish, when a gentleman asked  him whether he had been nt Cork. "No,  eir," answered Foote, "but I have seen  many drawings of it."  Disraeli once said of Sir William  Harcourt in his affectedly cynical way:  "He has the three essential qualifications of success in politics���������a line person, a loud voice, and no principles."  To this, when It was repeated lo hiin,  Harcourt rejoined: "Leaving out the  first two qualifications, it might almost  be applied to 'Dizzy' himself."  Tradition ascribes to the second Pitt  the dying words: "O, my country���������my  country! How I leave my country!"  What, in fact, Pitt said was: "I think  I could eat one of Bellamy's pork-pies."  Which he did���������and straightway ' expired, to the Intense grief of the nation.  This version Is attested by the head-  waiter of "Bellamy's" (likewise deceased), who told it to Mr. Disraeli.  Louis XIV. was told tlint Lord Stall-  was one of the best-bred men In Europe. "I shall soon put him to the  test," said the king; and asking Lord  Stair to take an airing with him, as  soon as the door of the coach was  opened, he bade him pass and get In.  The other bowed and obeyed. The  king said: "The world Is in the right in  the character it gives���������another person  would have ' troubled me with ceremony."  When, a few years ago, the King of  Portugal was a guest at Lord Salisbury's country seat, the Prince of  Wales���������now King Edward���������asked King  Carlos what had impressed him most  during his stay ln England. "English  roast beef is very delightful," was the  reply. :'Oh," said the Prince, "surely  something else has impressed you as  well." "Ah, yes," returned Carlos; "of  course, there is English boiled beef,  which Is also delightful."  A commercial traveler well known In  the cycle trade adds this to the collection of jokes on newly made happy  fathers: The hero Is the manufacturer  of the wheel which the narrator sells.  Being compelled to go away on a business trip about the time an interesting  domestic event was expected, he left  orders for the nurse to wire him results  according to' the following formula: If  a boy, "Gentleman's safety arrived." It  a girl, "Lady's safety arrived." The  father's state ot mind may be imagined  Nwhen, a few days later, he received a  telegram containing' the one word:  "Tandem."  A certain Scotch caddie named 'Math-  io Gorum was noted for his invariable  remark after a poor shot by the person  he was serving: "It micht hae been  waur," which was meant to be consolatory and encouraging. His master, a  clergyman, was wearied with this well-  meaning flattery. Accordingly, to make  sure that he would squash the remark  for once, he told the caddie he had a  terrible dream the night before.  "Mathie, my man, I dreamt that I was  in the place where the wicked are punished. I saw the wretched ones tortured; they were swimming in a lake  of boiling pitch,, and could not get  landed for red-hot .pitchforks thrust in  ihelr faces hy demons." He halted a  minute, with his tongue in his cheek,  when, with perfect coolness, the caddie answered: "Aye, sir, that was a  bad dream, jist awfu'; but it micht hae  been  waur."     "Waur,  you fool?    How  could  that  be? It  micht  hae been  true."  It is a current story in Tevibtdale  that in the ihouse of an ancient family  of distinction, much addicted to the  Presbyterian cause, a Bible wa.s always  put in the sleeping apartment of the  guests, along with a 'bottle of strong  ale. On some occasion there was a  meeting of clergymen in tlie vicinity of  the castle, all of whom were Invited to  dinner by the worthy baronet, and  abode all . night. According to . the  fashion of the times, seven of the reverend guests were allotted to one large  barrack-room, which was used on such  occasions of extensive hospitality. Thn  buller took care that the divines were  presented each with a Bible and a bottle ot ale. But, after a little consultation among themselves, they are said  to have recalled the domestic as ho was  leaving the apartment. "My friend,"  said one of the venerable guests, "you  must know when we meet together as  brethren the youngest man reads aloud  a portion of Scripture to the rest; only  one Bible, therefore. Is necessary. Take  away the other six, and, In their place,  "brl'ng-slE-more-bottles-of-ale."-^^���������'    ~-  rir, ii, my persons are opcratr.d upon  "V-ry .lay that It Is becoming quite n  distinction to go to the gr.ive nil In on*  pi"ce.���������Atflilson  "Globe."  "Doesn't it make you thc li-nst bltcn-  vioiM to see what elegant furniture  Mrs. Rye-fly In pulling Into her hnu-n  n"xt door?" "Nnt n 'bit. My husband  s.-iy.s It will be sold by the sheriff within  six mini ths���������and I'll be there to buy."���������  Chicago "Tribune."  Huxley and the Reporters.  N his arrival in Baltimore, Professor Huxley was driven to the  country seat of Mr. Garrett, who  had offered him hospitality and  had invited a large company to meet  him in an afternoon party. There was  Unit one intervening day between his  arrival, tired out by a long journey In  the interior, and his delivery ot the address. He had hardly reached the residence of his host before the reporters  discovered him and asked for the  manuscript of his speech. "Manuscript?" ihe said. "I have none. I shall  speak freely on a theme with which I  am quite familiar." "Well, professor,"  said the inte'rlocutor, "that Is all rlglit,  but our Instructions are to send the  speech to the papers ln New. York, and  if you cannot give us the copy we must  take It down as well as we can and  telegraph it, for the Associated Press  is bound to print it the morning after  it is spoken." This was appalling, for  ln view of the possible inaccuracy of  the shorthand, and the possible condensation of the wlrehand, the lecturer  was afraid that technical and scientific  terms might not be rightly reproduced.  "You can have your choice, professor,"  said the urbane reporter, "to give us  the copy or to let us do the best we  can, for report the speech we shall."  The professor yielded, and the next  day he walked up and down his room  at Mr. Garrett's dictating to'a stenographer, in cold and irresponsive seclusion, the speech which he expected to  ���������make before a receptive ancl hospitable  assembly.  I sat very near the orator as he delivered the address la the Academy of  Music, and noticed that, although he  kept looking at the pile of manuscript  on tihe desk -before him, he did ��������� not  turn the pages over. The speech was  appropriate and well received, but lt  had no glow, and the orator did not  equal lhis reputation for' charm and  persuasiveness. When the applause  ���������was over I said to Mr. Huxley: "I noticed' that you did not read your address; I am afraid the light was insufficient." "Oh," said he, "that was not  the matter. I ihave been in distress.  The reporters brought me, according to  their promise, the copy of their notes.  It was on thin translucent paper, and  to make it legible they put -clean white  sheets ibetween the leaves. That made  such bulk that I removed the intermediate leaves, and -when I sto'od up at  the desk I found I could not read a  sentence. So I have been ln a dilemma���������not daring to speak freely, and  trying to recall what 1 dictated yesterday and allowed the reporters to send  to New York." If he used an epithet  before the word "reporters" I am sure  he was justified, but I forget what it  was.���������Dr. D. C. Oilman ln "Scribner's  Magazine." ,  Must be Deadly.  'Attention lias been called, says a re*-  cent issue of The Speaker, to the mysterious plan of warfare l'nvented by Admiral Cochrane,-lentil Kurl of Dundonald (grandfather of tno present Lord.  Dundonald, our uew'G.O.C), early in  the last century, which, it was claimed,  would result in the'absolute'annihilation of an enemy. -Dundonald himself  believed that if his plan was once put  into effect it would innke war impossible for tho future, and there seem' t������*  have been some grounds for this belief,,  although the secret lias never yet been  divulged. George IV., when Regent,,  appointed a secret committee to consider it. The committee reported that,  the method would be irresistible nnd  infiillible, but. slirpnk from recommending its adoption. Forty years later a  commission was again appointed ta*  crnsider it. They reported against it  on the grounds that if any experiments,  were.made the secret would be at the**  command of every nation, and iiIbo that  it would not accord with tin.* Jeclings-  and principles of. _ civilized warfare..  Twice during the Crimean war Dundonald urged his plan upon* the .Government. Tlii*.second time lie offered  to reduce Scbantopol by liis invention,  but tho War Office lai'd down stipulations which he .would not accept, and  the secret remains a secret still. Tho  present Karl of Dundonald, besides being a successful cavalry lender and tho  possessor of one of the reputations niacin-  in the present war,, is aUo an "inventor.  It would he interesting to know whether  he is in possession of his grandfather's,  secret or whether that, secret died with.,  its discoverer. '.   .,-..-,. . .  I "'  D  " Now, James, please remember: Loft  hand���������EgRS, poultry, three yards of silk  to match my skirt, lining for Mamie's  dress, and a new reefer for George. Right  hand���������Nellie's ribbons, Harry's algebra,  telephone mosHHKe to Henry, a box of  starch, and my new bonnet. Say them  over a������ you" ko to town." ��������� "llarpor'i  Wcokly."  Sue ISrette���������How do you know tho  gallery kocIs threw eggs at you? Ham  I.,ettc*���������tlow do I know? Yi* gods, didn't  r catch thern ln the act?���������Chicago  "News."  A visitor to a farm was especially  struck .by the great rugged ness and  strength or one'of the stalwart harvest  hands, and said to the fanner: "That  fellow ought to be chiic-lc-flill of work."  "He Is." replied the farmer, "or he  tmi.lit lo be, because I hain't never  been able to get none out of him."���������  From "Success."  "I see that Mrs. Uptardeight Is addressing the Mot'neis' Scientific Club  this afternoon on Tho Care of Children." "Speaking of children, who was  that youngster that broke Into Snoop'*  candy store last night and robV������4 th*  till?" "That���������why, that wai Iir.. XJv-  t.trdelght's youngest." ��������� Baltimore  "News."  A Feat of Memory.  URING a debate in the House, between Gladstone and Disraeli,  when the latter in the course of  his remarks had occaslonsto quote from  a recent speech made by his rival upon  some platform in the country, a dramatic scene was enacted, and Is described by Harry Furniss ln his recent  book, "Confessions of a Caricaturist."  Suddenly Mr. Gladstone started up  and exclaimed: "I never said that in  my life!"  Disraeli was silent, and putting his  hands behind his back, gazed apparently in hlank astonishment at the box in  front of-him. Several seconds went by,  but he never moved. The members ln  the crowded House' looked from one to  the other, and .many imagined that  Disraeli was merely waiting for his opponent to apologize. But Mr. Gladstone, who had a habit, which he deT  veloped in later years, of chatting volubly to his neighbor durinp. any interruption of this kind'in which he was  concerned, made no sign. A minute  passed! but tho sphinx did not .move.  A minute and a quarter, 'but he was  still motionless.  A minute and a half of this silence  seemed as If it was an hour.  When  the  second  minute  was  completed the excitement in the House began to grow intense.    Disraeli seemed  to be transfixed.   Was he ill?   Was the  ���������great man sulking?    What  could  this  strange silence portend?  Two minutes .and a half!  Some members rose and approached  him, but Disraeli raised his hands as If  to   deprecate   their   interference,   and  they  stole  back  to  their places,   con-  _sclpus__that Jliey^were jtorbidden to__ln7_  terruiSt.   Then at last, when the mlrt"  ute-hand of the clock had passed three  times  round  its  course,. the most  remarkable silence which the House had  ever experienced within living memory  ���������was broken as the Tory leader slowly"  ���������began once more to speak.  "Mr. Chairman," he said, "and gentlemen," and then word for word he repeated the whole speech of Mr. Gladstone from which he had made his quotation, duly introducing the particular  passage which the Liberal' leader had  denied. . Then he paused and looked  across al his rival. The challenge was  not.to be avoided, and (Mr. Gladstone  bowed���������he would have raised his hat  did he wear one ln the House, which, In  tho phraseology of the ring, was  equivalent to throwing up the sponge.  Mr. Disraeli afterward informed a  friend that, working backward, he had  recalled the whole of Mr. Gladstone's  speech to his mind. Beginning at the  disputed quotation, he recovered the  context which led up to lt, and so, step  by step, the entire oration. Then he  was enabled to repeat It from tlie outset exactly as he had read lt. ������  Humor of  the  Hour.  "Why,'.' asked' thc. raceliouse, sneer-  ingly, "do you have ��������� that great bunch;  of useless hair on your'fetlocks J"  "One reason," said the imported  Clydesdale, "is that 1 want to look as  much unlike a useless sporting animail*  as 1 possibly can."���������Chicago Tribune.  ��������� ������������������  Mrs. Growells���������"The idea of you palling me a goose 1 When you were eourt-  lng me you said 1 was an angel."  Growells ��������� Well, suppose 1 did ?'  What's fhe use of twitting a man about  the lies lie lold three years ago ?���������Chicago News.  ���������f-f-f-  " "l'ain't de fellow wid de longes' line-  dat catclf, de mos' lish," said Charcoal  Eph, .in another of his ruminating,  moods ; "hit's de ' man wid de loiiges*  "magination. Ain' .dat so, Mlstah Jackson I"���������Atlanta Constitution.  ��������� Dr. P. M. Ulxey recalls that when  President McKinley's mother sat down,  for the lirst time to a White House-  dinner, "what seemed to impress her most."  ���������was the prodigal supply of cream, and  she commented on its abundance,, and,  then added :���������  "Well, Willinm, at last 1 know what  they mean .when they speak of the cream,  of society."  The President liiughcd. "1 admit,"  said he, "that there seems to be an extravagant array of .cream on the table,,  but you know, mother, we can all'ord  to keep a,cow now."���������New York Tribune.    ' A good"stor3* is, lold in a musical"  paper of tho Principal of a well-known  colonial academy of music. Ue was*  much pestered with letters from young  composers', asking his advice. On ono  occasion he received a. letter from a  country organist asking In wliich of two-  ways he should .write a certain miislcat  passage. The professor, being a blunt  man,   wrote   back   on   a   postcard,   "lt  ���������doesn't   matter  a   .".   His  oll'ended  correspondent sent (he postcard to tha  Academy Board,' who sal in solemn conclave on it, and wrote lo the Principal  for an explanation. He answered thus r  "Dear Sirs,���������I beg to acknowledge the  receipt of your letter. 1 have considered the matter in all Its bearings, and it  really   doesn't   matter   a ' .     Yours,.  etc."���������London Globe.  Little Willie���������Say, pa, what is the difference between an- optimist and a pessimist?  Pa���������An  optimist, my son, is s man:  who is happy when he is miserable, and  a pessimist is a * man who is miserable.  .when he.is happj*.���������Chicago News.  Conservation of Energy.  "You say you never gossip?" "Never," unswercd Miss Cayenne; "when 1  feel disposed to hear my neighbors discussed, I merely mention a name and  proceed to listen."���������Washington "Star."  -+++-  An Expensive Luxury.  Mr. O'Toole (entering doctor's oflice)  ���������Shure, doctor, Ol think Ot have np-  plndicltis.' Dr. Smith���������Nonsense, ma.il  You haven't money enough for that.���������  "Judge."  The Veal Age.  This is assuredly the Veal Age In literature. People no longer ask about  an author. How old Is he? but How  young is he���������or she, as is.usually the  case. Of the writers on the staff of  Josh. Gosh & Co. 85 per cent, are under  the age of twenty-one, and 25 per cent,  are under sixteen years. Sixty-eight  per cent, of these write historical romances and 23 per cent, write in the  colonial style.���������'*_3ook Booster.**  "I never went back on a friend," said:  one  politician.  "I never found it necessary to do so,*"  said the other.- "As soon as I was not  in a position to'favor hiin, my-friend,  always went back on me."���������Washington'  Star.  -������������������������������������������  As   cause   for   the   habit   'tis   surely;  ,  enough���������    .    , ..  King   Edward   himself   has   taken1  to-  Bnough.  If applied to -your nose '   ������  Twill be felt in your tose ;  Provided you snough up enough ol the  stough. i.  "Yes,"._said tho head of the firm., "Miss  Addie is a good bookkeeper, but "6he-  niakes some queer mistakes."  "What, for instance ?" asked the silent  partner.  "Well, she enterB our messenger boy's,  wages under tho head of 'running   expenses.' "���������Philadelphia PreBS. ������  ��������� ���������*������ ������������������  Greene���������1 suppose a man who had no*  knowledge of i'rench would have a good,  deal of trouble to make himself understood  In Paris t  Gray���������On the contrary, most people ia  l'nris understand Knglish    much better  than  they do  their own  language.  ,, Ii  tried   them  in both;     so  1  ought   'ta'  know.���������Boston'���������1'ranscript.  ���������   ���������������++-    '  *'   "I am sorry, doctor, you were not able*  to attend,the chruch suppcr'last night;.  It  would  have  done  you  good   to   bo-  there."  "it haa already done me good,madam;,  I have just prescribed for three of tha*  participants."���������Richmond Dispatch.  We long for rest���������for rest and play.  ,  Our  heart  gives    forth    but     weary-  throbs  We long,to rest, but never may,  - .best othcrs'come>-and get our job*.  ��������� ������������������������-  London Fun���������Mistress  (arranging for  the dinner)���������Didn't the grocer send the-  macaroni ?  Cook���������Yes, mum, but I Bent it back-  Every one of them stems wan empty.���������*  Xonkers Statesman.  ���������   't>  f  I  11  1. Is  i  k  /I?  .ii  ���������7'S  ' 'J'  I''  til  '"A i  JW  ' I //^  '( li--  V'r  fr,-.  x   fr  Weeds and  Flowers.  SERMON BY  $       GEORGE H. HEPWORTH.  Stand last in the faith, quit you like  wen, be strong.���������1 Corinthians, xvi., 13.  I have a neighbor in the country who  .has a garden which he treats in a very  peculiar way. His theory is that all  forces of nature are good-natured, and  that all products of nature should be  encouraged. Whatever is natural, he  tells me, is admirable. A weed is just  as natural as a rose and tins just a3  clear a right to flourish. It is, therefore, unfair to il -criminate ag.iinst the  weed by pulling it up and destroying its  life.  Wishing to see how his theory worked in practice, 1 wandered ubout his  enclosure and found a curious state of  alf&irs. The weeds were in a more  flourishing condition than the roses; in  fact, they had taken possession of the  ground and dominated it to such an extent that the flowers had well-nigh given  up the struggle for existence, and were  on the verge of despair. 1 vainly tried  to convince' my neighbor that if he  wanted flowers he must pull up the  ���������weeds, for the two do not' get on well  together. They can't be made to harmonize, because weeds are greedy and  refuse to give flowers a chance.  *  My neighbor has another peculiarity.  He carries his theory into the education  of his .boy. All natural, impulses are  good impulses, he tells me, and it is not  right to give a child a. bias toward this  or that standard. Let him show himself just as he is, giving perfectly free  vent to his good and bid qualities of  character, and by and bye he will  achieve a well-rounded' and well-balanced soul. It is the weed theory  transferred to human nature, and so far  aa my observation of the boy goes it  works very badly. 1 rather fear that  later on that father's . heart will be  filled with regrets. * *   -       ���������   ���������  You cannot build a house without a  plan." If you attempt to,do so you will  have a. curious combination, whose inconvenience is only*equalled by ils ugli-  .  ness.    A  house  without  a  plan  is not  ' worth having. It is not true that all  natural impulses are good, for some impulses, when gratified, produce unmixed  evil. Mot everything that is is right,  for; some things are wholly wrong and  must be- held in check at any cost. If  you give the weeds as fair a chance as  the flower's the time will come when the  _ flowers  will  die  and  nothing  but    the  .weeds will be,left.    It is just as neces-  ' sary to  pull  up certain  natural  qualities as to pull up weeds, and'unlcss you  do  so  you  will  iind  yourself    without  any character "at all.  There is a stern and awful -truth in  the injunction to pluck your eye out if  it offends you. It is a bold 'figure, and  startling, but it has a profound meaning. If, for instance, you give free rein  to your scllishne.*^ it will grow apace  to rule and ruin. It will creep over  your soul like a smouldering lire on the  prairie, and burn the life out of everything as it goes. You must treat it as  you would a weed, and without any  compunction tear it up and hurl" it as  tax from you as possible.' And if you  liavc a quick , or an ill temper,' it is  necessary to subdue it if you would  bave peace or happiness. " Your very  Mature*must be conquered, no'matter  fcow hard the light may be. .It must b'e  ���������eaught.iharnes*-** d,���������i bitted,--'tamed-and-  ta'ught that.yo'u arc its master, and will  be obeyed.  You ore simply a bundle of possibilities in the beginning, and if you allow them full swing you "will become  ������ moss of contradictions. Your business m an immortal soul is to' look,at  all your tendencies, good and bad,  ���������quarely in the-face, arid'then'set''to  work to annihilate some of them, to encourage others, and, with a definite purpose in view, to give yourself the shape  of honest and ^virile manhood.. This is  not an easy, but it is a glorious, task,  and it ends in the victory over self, the  sublime mastery .which brings self-respect and that dignity which comes with  poise and conscience. x '  The object of religion is to teaeh you.  that this is thc best and noblest thing  to do, and that it is the only thing  which it will pay you to do. That  struggle is worth your wliile, for when  ' you find yourself well in hand you will  possess that quiet kind of power which  "blesses you and the whole world- alike.  This life gives you that sort of discipline, and when the lesson is learned you  ���������will be ready for any other life that  may come to you. ISarth will become  * Btcpping-stone to heaven, for a whole  man ia fitted for any world in God's  universe. Plant your garden wilh flowers and then see that weeds do not interfere with their growth.  AS WE GO ALOIS! U  What shall  we do  when thc autumn  weather  And the autumn duties come together:  Whon  the  golden   duys  are  fair  ancl  sweet.  When the bright leaves  rustle under  our feet,  And the air is a sparkling wine;  Yet cares pile    thick and tho    hours  crowd fast,  And  things  to be  done  go  hurrying  past,  Ia an urgent, beckoning line?  We must keep our heart3 'and our soula  awake  To beautiful things for duty's sake;  With  vision  ke3n   and   with   courage/  'strong.  Take beauty in as we go along.  What if in the hours of earnest "doing  Our tired spirits need renewing;  Sigh oft for the streams and the pastures green,  Which lie in the realm ot things unseen, .  The beautiful Promised Land;  Yet ever before us stretches still  The rugged path of our Father's will.  With Its common rocks and sand?  We need not wait'for the longed for  .peace  Till our journey is done and our labors  cease;  We shall rest In the midst of the busiest day  If the Master meets  us on  thc way.  ���������Mary E. Allbright, in The Christiap  Endeavor World.  The following appears on a sign over  m, little country store in Georgia :���������'  ��������� JONATHAN WILK1NS,  ice Cream in Season  '        and Emba lining on Rcusonublo  ; Cash Terms.  Also   Millinery  nnd  Tooth   Pulling.  Boots,     Shoes,     Hooks     nnd     Itucon.  Cilljliii on the Instalment Plan.  t AT TEE CHARITY BALL, i  ��������� * ���������  *������^4>*^.������ ******.* ������***fr-f|*'"ft>'������.f><>-  "Why, Mr. Browning, you at anything so gay.as a charity ball?"  "And you, my dear Miss Erickson,  r.t anything so dismal?"  The girl laughed and shook out the  folds of her'misty pink dancing skirt,  with its ruffles and lace.  "I have Just one dance left, a schot-  tische.   Shall it be for you?" she said.  "If you will so hor or me. But as 1  **an't dance anything but the waltz, I  ���������im going to that little alcove retreat  Dvcr there, where we can talk and  watch the  figures."  For answer Mildred Erickson laid  her gloved fingers on his arm and  raised her brown eyes to his face, as  they walked away from the group of  Cancer* now forming for the schot-  '.ische.  The, "little alcove retreat" was at  one end of the long ball room, and was  massed with cut flowers and ferns.  Mildred threw her huge bouquet of  bridesmaid roses, her fan, and lace  nandkerchief down beside her and tool:  up two-thirds of thn divan" with her  full skirts. Browning sank back lux-  urir.-i.sly in the silken cushion al her  side.  "Everyone seems'to be here to-  ���������tiipht," she said.  "Y'es.    Even I."  "There is Maude .Tones, now, in that  pale blue chiffon. Did you know, sho  is to bo married next week to Jack  Marshall?"  .   "She?-  This is only her second season, isn't it?"- -'"  "Second! No, only her first," Mil;  dred-saicl with a laugh and shrug oi  her plump white shoulders.  "Her first?   You are' more sensible,-  Miss Erickson.      Why,  this Is    youi  tenth season.   Don't you remember, 1  was at your coming-out tea?"  "Yes, and you were old then ���������?.$;  lust my age now." She picked up h*-.r  iioitquet and buried her face in the  fresh, pink blossoms.  "And you were in white, and carried pink roses, just like those, Mildred."  "But not so large a bunch." and sho  "o'egan pulling the flowers out and tearing oft the petals, while Browning  watched her color come "and go.  "And I sent tlieni." -  "And you sent them."   "-    -  Browning shifted his position-slight*  ly. '.������������������'-���������  "I wonder what Marshall wants to  marry that* little Miss Jones for?" he  iaid. .: (  "As she, Is not an* heiress, he prob-  ably-thlnks-he-loves-her.���������I���������hope-it-  ioes not worry you, Mr. Browning."  . "Me? Not at all. I suppose you  have often wondered why I've never  married."  Mildred's cheeks assumed the hue of  her roses. .     ���������    .-���������  "I? Not at all. Rather, I,should won-  3er if you did get married. I am so  used to you single,' you know."  "And I should wonder at it, too. I  like women. ..They are beautiful creatures, to be-admired, adored and idealized, but kept a distance if a man  wants to retain his peace.of mind  Don't you think so, Miss Erickson?"  "Can Mr.^Browning-be-wrong?"  "Thank you. Now, suppose I had  married when I was, say 28. Ten  /ears ago, I'd have a wife who never  thought of me or my home, but always  3f her own personality and her social  angagements. My home would be no  home at all, because I should expect  things of her which she would never  Jo."  Miss Erickson was unconsciously  pulling the flowers to pieces and watching Mr. Browning With studied cour-  tesy.  Browning continued: "As it Is, T  have my bachelor flat. In which I am  king. My servants, whom no one ev-  ".r interferes with. I go and come  .vhen I please, to the club, to the opera.  :o dihners,, or to Europe. My horses  ind carriages are mine, and no' one  jver complains of them. My house Is  iqlttude itself unless I wish to make  ,t noisy. Don't you think I am a sen*  lible tha.nl"  "It really had never occurred to me.  Mr. Browning," Mildred said,- laugh-  ng slightly.  "Of course,you do, for you have fol-  owed my example and remained sin-  jle."  "But not alone. There Is mamma  md papa antl Joe and the girls, Mr.  Browning. Oh, I should not care for  loliludc nor enjoyment alone.  "You are not so selfish."  "No."  "What?"  Selfish'. And yoa would be happier If  you were not.  Browning looked at her in silent  amazement.   Then he said: '  "I suppose I havo given up a lot for  my selfishness. It might be nice to  have a wife always waiting for me and  planning little surprises for my comfort and enjoyment, if she were sweet  and nice and charming, like she would  be before I married her. And to always have someone to take out with  me whenever I���������or rather she���������cared  to go. And to entertain my friends as  some women can do. And to see great  tall boys and gentle girls���������my children���������growing up about me. But a  man must have a lot of nerve to ask  a woman to give herself to him alone."  "Not necessarily." Mildred's lips  were parted in a smile.  "Her freedom, her childhood homo,  her name,  all  girlish pastimes, every  bit of "  Browning went on,    ans*-  werlng his own question.  "She regards lt all as a pleasant sacrifice. If she loves the man, Mr. Browning."  "And If Bhe loves the man will sho  want to do all this if he asks her to?"  "Men aro positive and women negative."  "So you advise me to marry?"  "I  advise all  men to marry."  "Then why are you single, Mildred?"  "I? Oh, I am a woman." And sho  laughed softly.  Browning watched the gay scene of  the ballroom In Silence a moment.  Then he said:  "Mildred, shall I tell you why I never married?"  The girl buried her face again in tho  roses.  "Yes," she said.  "Because I never thought you would  have me. You were so bright and gay,  and ten years younger than I."  Mildred leaned toward him until ho  felt her breath on his cheek. She  spoke rapidly, for she saw Mr. Bixby  coming to claim a waltz.  "Shall I tell you why I never mar*  tied, Paul?"  "Yes."  "Because you never asked me."  "Mildred."  Browning sprang forward from tho  silken cushions and caught her hand.  But she withdrew it hurriedly, and  with her face all wreathed in smiles  caught up her flowers and fan and lace  handkerchief, and said, as she walked  away:  "Come to me to-morrow afternoon  at three, Mr. Browning."  And a moment later Browning saw  her floating through the steps of the  waltz on the arm of George Bixby.���������*  Chicago Tribune.  Sam Houston*-! Secret. ' ,  "A mystery in which the American.  people were once deeply concerned  was that which shadowed the life-of  one of the most remarkable characters  of the country," writes William P.er-  rine, in the Ladies' Home Journal.* "In  182!) Samuel Houston,' or, as he called  ancl signed himself, 'Sam' Houston,  was Governor of Tennessee." It was in  the midst of a campaign for re-election to the Gubernatorial chair that  Tc-nnessee was startled by a report that  he had _ resigned his office. He had  been married to the daughter of an  influential family; three months afterward she returned to her - father's  house, ancl her husband resolved to  pass the rest of his life in the wilder*  ness.  "Houston betook himself to the tribe  of Cherokees in the Indian Territory;  he adopted their costume, appearing  in all the trappings of an Indian brave  letting his hair grow down his back,  and visiting Washington with a buckskin hunting-shirt, yellow leggins, a  huge blanket, and turkey feathers  around his head. No one could induce  him to reveal the secret of his "metamorphosis and his abandonment of  the ways and habits of civilization. He  married again after he emerged from  his Indian life, and he lived to be an  old man, dying in the midst of the  ,Civil War, but no one was ever able  to persuade him to unlock the mystery of his life. Nor would his first  wife, who also married again, throw  any light on the mystery."  Solomon Sloan's Advice a* to Education.  Mr. Editor:���������  If I were boss  We .would-have less clay, modelling,  and more arithmetic in the public  school.  Grammar and typewriting would  take the places of music and color  Bttidy.      ������  ,. If a boy or a girl Is well up in arithmetic and grammar he stands less  show of starving to death than If his  specialty Is coi*sr schemes or clay fig-,  ures. i   ���������  '  That's what the most of us here on  this earth are trying to do���������keep from  starving.*  Multiplication tables and good English can be taught successfully to every pupil, if time and pains are taken.  Color study and clay modelling can't.  ���������In the first place, the teachers are  ordinarily just about as unfit to teacb  art as the pupils are to learn it.  In the second place, the vast majority of pupils In the public schools will  soon .have- to earn their own living,  and even if they do become expert  clay modellers and colorists. they never can make any use of their knowl*  adge.  Give the children bread and butter,  and those who have a taste for cake  that's worth cultivating will get It  And that's the way it would be if I  were boss.���������Solomon Sloan.  Rhodes as a Phrase-Maker.  Rhodes rallicr fancied ' himself as a  phrase-milker, says a correspondent of  The Kew York .Sun. A writer who  saw a good deal of liim, describes l>im as  repeating over and over again some saying of his own with which he seemed'to  have been pleased n*> soon as he had  uttered it.'  Perhaps one of the best-known phrases  is the "uncluous reetiltidc" with wliich  he reproved a certain class of his opponents in this coiinliy. No one in  future who wishes to discuss the traits  of the British character will be able to  do without those two words. Some  other sayings of Hliortes which have  been left on record are as follows:���������  My life is a tempoinry one, but the  country will remain after mc.  If I forfeit my flag, what have I left?  If you take away my Hag you take  away  everything.  Remember that sentiment rules half  the world.  "It is no use for us to have big ideas  if we have not got the money to carry  them out," Rhodes once remarked to  Gen. Gordon.  lt took me fifteen years tn get a mine,  but I got it. Though my boat may bo  slow in the race, 1 know exactly what  I am starting for.  1 have found out one thing, and that  is, if vou have an idea, and it is n good  idea, if you will only stick to it you  will come out nil right.  The only awkward thing is the progress of Time. We do get older, and  become a little hurried in our ideas because of that  tci riblo Time.  After the raid: "Kruger and I have  met twice. The first trick I won (referring to BcehuanuUuid). lie won the  second. There is no doubt who will  win the odd!"  When timorous friends were begging  him to be discreet, and foes were say;  inp- he dare not "face the music," he  answered both, once and for "all: "I  am not going to lie about it!"  When Dr. Jameson was convicted and  sentenced for the part lie took in the  raid, Mr. lihodes exclaimed: "What a  tribute to the moral worth of the nation that has jumped the world!"  I will challenge any marl or woman,  however broad their ideas may be, who  objects to go to church or chapel to  say they would not sometimes be better for an hour or an hour and a half  in a church.  In the Oriel Hall, Oxford, in 1890, ho  said: "I have been interested in Aristotle's definition of virtue in the 'Ethics'  as, the 'highest activity of the, soul living for the hio-hest object in a perfect  life.' That h. . always seemed to me  the noblest rule for a"* man to follow)  and I have made it my rule from tho  first."  "Life is too short, afler all." he used  to say, "to worry about previous lives.  From* the cradle to the grave���������what, is  it? Three days at' the seaside. Just  that and nothing more. But although",  it is only three days, we*must ho doing'  something. 1 cannot spend my limo  flirowing stones into the water. But  what is worth while doing?"  A Wnprgou .Tourney.  Afler so much about lihodes one may  have a bit of South African life. - It is  a description , of a waggon journey a  score of years ago, and occurs in a new  novel, entilIed-"Reversed on "Appeal," by  John Ross :������������������  "Pale "pink over the trees, and bar  gold glittering through . the branches  saw the large waggon equipped and  cliawn with open front, facing the kraal  gate, towards which extended a double  line of shiniiij; brown oxen, each with a  white streak down ils back like fourteen  brethren bearing up the Hashing chain,  crossed at each, pair by xx heavy pole,  wilh wooden yokes for two. At the  head of the uneven line of glancing  horns and switching tails stoocl" the  powerful bronze figure, thong in hand, of  a Zulu in a sleeveless blouse and short.  blue pants, .the leader of the horned  cavalcade. A Kallir boy held a' grey  horse ready saddled, tossing his head  and rattling his bit with impatience, a-  contrast to the drowsy cattle. . . .  There was a din of shrill Kaffir shouts,'  weeping women,,yelping dogs) stamping  feet and rattling chains as Mouji flour-  Uhcd his long whip, and the Zulu dragged at.the leading strap like'a son of  Anak, as he" guided the string of cattle  out of tho kraal into the* open field.  _ "Her uncle_rode his' grey horse within'  'speaking distance behind the waggon,  aud when they passed the large green  orchard, wilh its brown, pears, purplo-  plums, and" yellow oranges ripening in  the 'branches,* he rode in among the trees  &nd returned with a small basket of  peaches, which lie handed to Belle at  the end of the waggon, as they moved  slowly on thro. prickly cactus hedges,  ind bushes of red and ��������� vellow "mimosa  blossom.' ...  "She had travelled In tho waggon before, with tlu> mid-curtain that.was low-  :rcd at night, to shut hor off into a  little nunnery of her own. Sho knew  the bed, so innocently" tied on one side,  in which she was advised. to slumber,  mul supposed to sleep, during the cease-  less jolts of a moonlight journey. And  she remembered how she pitied all men,  nnd women, too, who.went down to Ihe  lea in ships;' if their berths were like her  berth, and their tossings like her toss-  ings. She knew the boxes tied with  thongs tlmt served fur seats and lockers, nnd that --.he imisl fasten up everything, if she did not wi-h a bruised foot  )r a wounded head, when the quick  mounts and sudden clips came under the  irresistible -.(.ruin of fourteen  oxen."  I-n-lund ISoy Choirs.  Julian Ralph,'writing of."The Choir  Boys of England," in the Ladies' Home  Journal, says "Small boys are much  preferred for the* reason that they develop into manhood later than big,  stalwart children,, for it is at the coming of manhood that their voices break  and they are obliged to stop singing  until their adult tones are reached���������a  matter of years. A boyish treble ia  as delicate as the bloom on a peach,  and Its possessor must lead an orderly  and innocent life, which is why so  many choirs are-made up of boys taken from their hemes and boarded and  taught in church Institutions. These,  sometimes, are able to sing until tbey  ere seventeen or eighteen years of age,  though between fourteen and fifteen  is the usual period when their voices  It is esliiniitcil Unit the Kaffir" in  thc diamond mines nt Ki ...,������.-rley. Soutli  Africa, steal .������2">0,000 worth ' of diamonds in a year.  The Lion Bridge, ni'iir Sangnng. in  Ohina, is the longest in the world, being  51/, miles from end lo end. The road-  ttay  is  70  feet-above water.  A large house in a Berlin suburb lias  been rented by severnl ..acquaintances,  married and single, who are going lo  try to run the place, on the principles  of communal life.  "Take the men of prominence in the  'Jniicd States to-day, and pick out the  ;rue gentlemen. I'll wager that nine  out of ten of them never lind a high  ii'hocil education, let alone a college one."  so i-aj-s Mark Twain.  Gold has been mined in Georgia for  icnrly three-qiiartcis of n century. Previous" to the discovery of fjjold in California the mines of Georgia Airmailed  the greater part of the gold produced  in the United StnU'B.  Cecil Rhodes.  Great a figure as Cecil Rhodes was in  the public eye, it may be doubted  whether many people have, a clear idea  as to the steps by which his career'was  built up. That he went l.o South Africa  for his health and returned to England  to take his Oxford degree j' tlmt ho  made a great fortune���������though smaller  than that of some American multi-millionaires���������out, of diamonds, in part by  means of an amalgamation of interests;  that he "acquired'' Rhodesia, became  Premier of Cape Colony, came to his  political downfall through the Jameson  Raid, and was shut up in Kimberley;  these are the main facts of his career  which are well known.    But main facts  do not invariably supply the key to  the motives and purposes of a man's  life, and the ideas wliich filled Cecil  Rhodes' mind and governed his action.*!  have had a profound inlliieucc upon the  development of a country in which we  in 1,'iiiiiidn have within the past three  years been forced to take u deep interest.  The question of motive may he glanced at first. The extended ' biography  which The Times published notes the  remarkably successful start which Mr.'  Rhodes made in South Africa, when,  strafing as a lad of eighteen he in a  year or two became a rich man. The  Times snys :���������  "His interest in the country in which  he had enjoyed two years of such  strangely fortunate experience was' by  this time keenly stirred, und before re-'  turning to Oxford he made u journey  into the nortli, which Is of interest, as  having first suggested to him the great  capabilities for British development of  the country lying to the north of the  Orange and Vaal Rivers. His trip took  him as far north as Mafeking; thenco  to Pretoria, Murchison, Middleburg and  back through the Transvaal to Kimberley. It was made in un ox waggon, at  a time when -the country was little  known, and there .were no means of  communication. It occupied eight  months. The rate of progression of an  ox waggon is not more than from fifteen to twenty miles a day. " The trip  represented a walking tour of eight  months through the wide-spreading solitudes of rolling veldt which filled those  regions of central Africa.  "In 1872 the Boers had only been  established some twenty years in the  Transvaal. They were a purely pastoral,  hunting, and fighting , people, with a  strong religious strain, deserving of respect for the sturdy independence and  devotion to their own ideals which characterized lliem, but rude in their customs  and primitive almost to the point of  ' barbarism in their habits of life - and  thought. They were very frugal, very*  poor, without the concepfion of a possible development for their country  than that represented by the increase of  flocks and-herd*! upon the land. "Living  generally in isolation upon the vast extents of grazing ground best suited to  the multiplication of this form of wealth,  they were wholly lucking in the. intellectual stimulus which results from the  interchange of opinion in the urban  centres of population. Their political  organization was of the simplest,  amounting to little more than a pnlii-  arcliiil form of despotism, tempered by  the individual liberty almost necessarily  enjoyed during tlie greater pure  of liis existence by the hunter and the  herdsman on the plains. TCaeli father of  a> family made for himself the laws of  daily life. The rifle and the stock-whip  hung side by side above cv,cry honrfh.  The one serious danger by wliich the  Slate, was threatened- came from unnumbered hordes of hostile natives.-who  hung upon the uncertain limits of while  occupation, with perpetual menace of  massacre and desolation. The only bonds  which drew the scattered homesteads  into community were bonds of common  faith and self-defence. Political unity  could hardly be said to exist among a  people "who wero unwilling to submit to  taxation for common purposes. There  is no reason for surprise if to a young  Englishman already conversant with the  methods of a developed civilization the  Transvaal of- that day presented the  aspect rather of a rough new settlement  in flux than of any fixed political organization having claim to the dignity  of a nation.  "J . Rhodes' acquaintance with the  agricultural possibilities of the South  African soil in Natal, and the practical  demonstration that he had received of  its mineral wealth at Kimberley. com-  bined**-with���������liiG-personul-experieiiee_of_  the hygienic properties of the.climate  to render him more appreciative' than.  thc ordinary lad of nineteen of the value  of the apparently limitless area suitable  to white settlement, of wliich his solitary  trip took him over a small portion. Two  vears'spent far from home produced on  him au effect not unknown to travellers of a riper age. The latent patriotism which we nil believe ourselveS���������to  share with our fellow-taxpayers had  grown into a conscious sentiment. lOng-  lund had become a thing to love. During that eight months' silent tramp  across the veldt the foundation appears  In have been laid of the policy lo wliich  Mr. lihodes' career wns afterwards devoted. He has described in intimate  conversation the persistence willi which  the I -ought ncecimpniiicil him day by  day, that tin* fine country through  wliich lie moved .should in the future be'  thronged wilh a British population, nnd  that no power but Great Britain should  be allowed tn dominate in South Africa.  He saw enough to convince'him uf the  great value of llie unclaimed northern  territory, nnd made up his mind that  it must he British. Asked once in later  life whether he hud at. that time conceived any definite scheme for bringing  the country under British inlliieiice. he  answered honestly in the negal ive.  'No.' he said, 'I only just felt- each day  as I looked "ilnwn at the carlh and up  at the skv that it ought to belong to  England.' " .  The Poultry Yard.  An I-iigliih poultry expert says:���������  Both in tne .States and in Fiance the  system ot feeding poultry generally followed Is tlie exact opposite to our own,  the towls getting soil lood ul night and  corn in the morning. The poultry-keep-.  er may well ask whicli is right, and the  answer apparently is th.it there is very  lillle difference in the result. An ex-'  periment recently tried in America, two  lots of fowls getting just thc same  treatment, but one having soft food in  the inoriiing ancl corn at night, and tho  other the opposite, resulted in the  fowls getting Boft food in the morning  laying slightly better than the others  ln winter. This is what one might expect. To set against this, however,  was thc fact that the fowls getting soft  food at night voided double the amount  of manure. The reason of this, ef  course, is that solt lood is more quickly digested, but in those poultry houses  where the droppings from the fowl-  houscs are systematically collected and  utilized, there Is a di.itinct val.ie iu  feeding soft lood at night, in preference to the morning. There is far less  trouble to the feeder when corn is given  in thc morning, and it really seems as  though the value of solt" food for  breakfast has been over-estimated.  Farm Notes.  Care should be exercised in the use  of poisoned solutions for spraying, as  inniiy insects that are friends of the*  fainier may be destroyed. -I'ees have  been exterminated in some, sections by  spraying, though -omc-tliing depends  upon the kinds ol pl.wits sprayed.  Once upon a time Mayor Low was  travelling through Germany with a  party ot friends. ' Being nn' excellent  German linguist, he was the.spokesman  for the company. _ Upon one occasion he  nnd liis lriends visited u beer garden,  and after sealing themselves, preparatory to having some refreshment*1, the  pleasant duty of ordering the same fell  upon Mr. Low, as usual. For once, however, he hesitated, his memory seeming  to desert him. Finally after* vain attempts to recall the missing word, he  turned to -his waiting friends, nppcal-  ingly, saying :  "i'ou will have to help me out, for 1  .cannot for the life of mc remember the  Geiman word for beer."���������New York  Times.  We clip Irom an exchange lhe following directions for killing lice on cattle��������� Dust the animals thoroughly with  fresh insect powder; rub in well, or  else part thc hair so the powder will  reach the posts. In about a week,  dust again to kill any mites that  might have hatched. The other is:-  Make a strong tea of cedar twigs; wash  the lousy animal with this tea; this  last is c'llcctual in cleansing buildings,  coop9, roosts, pole.', etc., of lice.     .    ..  No greater mistake is ever made than,  to suppose that by .-.electing ..*e largest,  eggs trom thc banket for hatching improvement of the poultry i*s sure to  lollow. There is no .tmkf-fliift in this  industry, fan-nil selection of the  breeding stock, males nnd l'eiiuiles, alone  will insure tnat grading up so desired  by every breeder. There is no room today forslipsliod methods in poultry culture, and thc breeder who does not  select a breeding pen from his best birds  and keep them by themselves does not  deserve and cannot hope to maintain  the quality  of his stock.  Snliihnr fur I.*o*tvl������ and Swine.  When fowls are attacked with cholera  I find that a little sulphur given in the  food will check it. One tables-poonful  mixed wilh the morning's food for  thirty fowls and given once a inontli is  sufficient when they arc in health. When  much sulphur is fed, with exposure to  a cold and damp atmosphere, it will  cause stiffness in the joints. Sulphur  ;put in the dust bath with ashes is a  ^preventive against lice. A little sprinkled in the nests and under setting hens  '������������������outs these pests.  It is also good to give swine in case  of cholera or sickness followed with  vomiting caused from overfeeding. It  regulates the stomach and liver without further trouble. I have given two  teaspooi' fills twice a day in severe cases  in sweet milk or sprinkled on some  'sliced vegetables.���������Emma L. Hill.Damas-  cus, N.Y.  To Make Helm Lay.  Many people complain that they cannot get their hens to lay in winter.  One very strong complaint' comes to  us from one of our subscribers. To aid  such we give the experience of one who  resides in. the cold climate of South  (Uakota.  Many farmers fail to get any eggs  during the winter months, and, from  the experience of others more successful, it must be concluded that they'  either do not cure "about winter eggs,  or that they neglect to so manage mud  feeds the fowls as to induce them to  lay. An interesting experiment was  mado with two lots of pullets, showing  inllucnce ot feed and care on* the production of eggs in winter, by Rose.  Seelye-Miller, in the cold climate of  South Dakota. The trial was reported in a western journal as.follows:���������  Two pens of pullets were placed in  conditions as nearly equal ' as possible.  One pen was designed for breeding, and  it was desired that they should not lay  until toward spring. The other pen,  containing 18 hens, was designed to produce eggs during the winter, and the  eggs were not intended at all for hatching.  The experiment began in December.  Let it be n 'liembered that the care,  'temperature and all other thing-, wore  equal, save the food, and that the pen  designed for late laying contained two  less fowls.  During December the early layers produced five and a quarter dozen eggs,  and the other pen not an egg. In Jan-  nary, the early .layers produced ten  dozen and three eggs; the late layers  seven oggs. In February the early layers produced nine dozen eggs, and the  other pen one dozen, in .March the  :eiirIy-I.*iyer8~produced_lifteen-dozeii-egg5^  and the late layers .three and a half  dozen. lnJApril came the change: the  curly luyers laid ten dozen and nine  igg-. und the late 'ivers tifteen dozen  .���������ind four eggs. K .ni this time the  lirei'dcr*** were kept laying, nnd produced in May 28 eggs, 'lie early layers 112  eggs. This shows ci 'elusively that egg-  proiliii;ing..m:iy be governed in a great  measure. The iecding was very simple,  and tlie early-laying fowls were fed as  lollows:���������In thc morning, boiled lean  meat, chopped, with scraps from the  table, and during the day all the wheat  -creenings they would cat, with corn  twice a week. 'They were, of course,  watered twice daily, and had some milk  to drink.  The pen not intended for laying  were fed -on poor wheat screenings,  with corn. These fowls grew and waxed  fat, until they seemed too fat. and no  doubt were, for hiving. As spring came  on the tood was changed, and as it was  the natural time for laying, too, they  produced eggs in abundance.  The ordinary poultry raiser feeds too  much corn and wheat. Hens arc led  liberally twice a day and are fed on a  steady diet of one or two things, either  corn or wheat, and both fattening.  Hence our hens do not pay. and poultry raising is a snare and a delusion to  the one who is not wideawake and up  to date in caring for thc fowls.  Meat is known to be a great egg-producer, and there is now upon the market a feed prepared from refuse which  makes an ideal food for fowls. Bones  ground and plenty of milk are also very  good  in  egg production.  Cleanliness and warmth are absolutely essential. A hen with a frozen comb  might about as well be killed, unle33  she 13 a valuable one, whose eggs will  make good hatching in the spring.  We feed our cattle for beef, and our  liogs for lean or fat: we feed cows for  milk or butter. Then why not discriminate in feeding our poultry too?  If thought were used more we should  lind our purses growing fat. Lean hens  and hogs may be desirable, but a fat  pocketbook never fails of appreciation,  and,the need of strenuous labor is decreasing.���������The Country Gentleman.  More pigs are lost in the summer sen-  son from improper leeding than from  any other cause. Tliey are compelled  to consume foods that are not conducive to thrift, and which lend to disease  in thc herds. Some feeders keep slop  in barrels, which ferments until sour,  having a very disagreeable odor, the  pigs being fed largely upon the. slop.  This kind of food is more injurious in'  summer than in winter, as it induces  bowel disease. The best slop is milk  und bran, freshly made, with grass, vegetables and plenty of pure water, which  will induce growth and keep 'the pig3  in good condition.  Use n. Uond Slro.  If there is one thing more than another    which    pedigree    breeding    has  taught it is the value of using a good  sire.     lt takes a long time before'this  lesson  can  be  universally   appreciated.  There are some breeders whom nothing  but   adversity   will   teach;* others aro  willing lo profit  by  the  experience "of  the many, and .are ready to- adopt the  lessons    which   can  , be   obviously   deduced.     It is a pity that in these times  of   enlightenment   and   advanced   ideas  the simplest lessons cannot be absorbed bv small breeders..    It is with the  small breeder "that'the future lies,.and  the sooner he adapts .himself _to a more  successful  policy  the  belter  will  it'be  for himself and for "the breed which he  favors.     "It is not   enough   to   have-.u.  well-bred  sire. '    That    certainly    is -a  primary    consideration,   for.   as   every  breeder knows,  there  is  nothing  more  perplexing'in  breeding    than   the   frequency with which atavism  occurs.    It  is  satisfactory  to   note,   however." that  when characteristics have become more-  fixed by years of  registered    breeding,  breeders are more and more coming to *  regard it as essential thai, the trumpeted merits of good back breeding should  be displayed in  the.animal  iLscIf.    The  old principle that like produces like, is  truer now than it was fifty years, ago.-  because of the increased prepotency of  line bred stock.     Nothing condemns the  policy  of a  breeder    more" ' effectively  than'the, use of an indifferent horse on'  good mares, or.  for that matter,, moderate bull on better cows.      As a rule,  the  farmer is not  deficient ' in  useful  breeding mares or  roomy cows,-but-it*"  would   form  painful *-. reading' to- learn  how often he had misused his trust by..  the use of an indifferent sire. -  It is a  very safe rule to patronize, a sire, bettor than the females.    ' There is everything lo gain and nothing to"-lose.; .The  initial cost is a mere bagatelle, compared  with  the difference in  price of the .  progeny.     It is a misfortune that many'  farmers expect too much cif their-mares-  or their cows.       This,    at  all' events,  seems a reasonable deduction from'their  policy when  they use  very" indifferent  sires.   ��������� The point we wish to'accentuate is that it pays to use a goodi sire.  !lt is short-sighted policy to expect too  much of the dams.���������Farmer and .Stockbreeder. .,.-..     .,   .   .,  Sore Montlia In Horaies.  ~^A-8ore"mduthnn"a~b"ofseM8~frequenUyt?  the cause of his not feeding, properly.  In cases where a horse has lost.his ap*_-  petite or-does not redily eat. his food,  it is well to examine his mouth, if the ���������  fact   of  his  being  off  his  feed  cannot"  be traced  to  any  apparent  cause.' 'JA.  sore   mouth   may     be   due'" to   several--'  causes. In young horses it is*generally-  due  to  teething troubles,  which -make '  the mouth more or less tender, and in-*  tcrfcre with the feeding.   In   such cases-  the only thing to be done is to provide-  the food in a state which will permit,of  its being easily chewed and masticate'd."'  Thc oats should-he crushed," bran mashes "  and roots should be given, and the hay .  should not be bard, and free from woody  stems.  In older horses the permanent molar*  are sonn-times the cause of a horse not  bein������ able to chew his food, and of  his having a sore mouth. The'molars  sometimes have sharp edges and points  which hurt the inside of the cheeks, and  cause considerable pain when the horbe  Is eating. Tn this case they require filing with a rasp, but thistoperation can  only be performed by a skilful hand.  At other limes a horr, may be prevented  from masticating bib food properly by  one of the molar leeth.bcing lon^er'than"  the rest, which prevents the molars in  the upper jaw from coming into'contact  with tho'-e in the lower jaw. In-this  case again professional advice is required.*" ���������. '.    ���������  Lampas not infrequently is the cause  of a horse ha \ ing a sore, mouth. Lnmpas  consists of an inflamed condition of the  roof of the month or of the palate, and  is "caused by various means. - In voting  hoi*ses it is due often to, tho-growth of  the teeth, while ir. older ones it is caused through indigestion or bv irregularities of the molar teeth. Trie treatment  accordingly varies and depends on the  cause of lampas. Ignorant grooms and  stablemen sometimes suggest biirnin"- as  a remedy. This is of course a cruel "and  perfectly inadmissible remedy, and one.  which should not be adopted on any  account.  Another form of inflammation of the "  mouth   is   known   under , thc ' name   of  ^stomatitis."���������Farmer and Stockbreeder.  ��������� ''*"��������� I  Os        '       -)\  ���������M������������������J WAILPAPERS  We have them in all  the new designs for tlie  year. See our samples  if you are going- to  paper.  Cdnadd Drug & Book Co  ]  BORN.  A MAN���������At l! -vi-l-loUe. 1!. ('!., nn  Monday, .lulv Till, to .Mr. inul Mrs.  C. 3. Ainaii n sen.  NOTES OF  NEWS  No. 2 (ire liiii,.:uli' hail a prncliei! nm  Monday night.  ���������Fruit jars, fmit jars. 25U crates just  leceived.    C. H. Uiiiiil1 & Co.  R. li. McLean left Saturday inoriiinp:  on a vi.it to Spokane.  ���������Selling out bargains at Miidison  Parlors.  Tom Downing, of Fish Creek, was a  visitor in the city this week.  ���������Clearing out sale. All goods at. cost.  Madison Parlor**.  Miss J. .Siuvvpi-returned on Tuesday  from a two weeks visit lo   Vancouver.  ���������Umbrellas:, l.ulies ancl gents. C. SI.  Huuie k Co.  Jit. Joseph Martin. M. P. P., passed  through the cily on his way soutli  Saturday.  ���������A large assortment of men's -vain  coats at* C. SI. Hume & Co.  M. Grady of Si. Leon Springs, was  in the city Monday returning south  Tuesday.  -���������-Chiidrens' weather serge and velvet  tarn o' shnnters.     C. li. Hume & Co.  Dsual services will lie held in St.  Peter's church on Sunday next at 11 a.  m, and 7:30 p.m.  ���������Chiidrens" red cashmere hose. C. B.  Hume k Co.  "Wesley McKernan; of .Strathcona, is  in town on a visit Lo Mr. and Mrs. M.  Pettipiece.  ���������Another direct importation of  Huntley and Palmer's biscuits at C. B,  Hume k Co's.  J. Ennest, of the Oyster Group went  west to Vancouver today lo join his  family.  J. H. Young, M. E. of Comaplix.  spent a couple of days in the city t his  week.  The Hehai.t) regrets to announce  that H. J. Bourne- is still laid up  through illness.  The annual general meeting of the  Revelstoke Hospital Society will be  held on Monday August -1th.|  W. R. Reid, of Messrs Reid & Voung  returned Monday from a business trip  to the Lai-dean.  Mrs. A. Johnson and family are  visiting at B.illm d. Wash., at the home  of Mis. Johnson's parents, Mr. and  Mrs. Cle.iry.  _^-^I._A.__V_Mls_on. _ merchant, tailor   of  Ferguson, who has been spending a  few days in the city with his .family  returned south Monday.   *  The executive uf the Canadian  Manufacturers' Associationhasdecided  lo send a representative to the Yukon  lo look after Canadian trade interests.  There has been r.o train through from  the eau since last Thursday. Today  there will be thrue trains houi the  east with mail ancl passengers -.i-sin**.'  ferred over the washouts.  Mr. and Mrs. \V. J. George, returned  from their honeymoon trip in the  coast Tuesday morning and have taken  up their residence ou MacKenzie  (LTtnne.  AV. Morris, Mrs. Morris mid son and  Miss McLean, left on the Imperial  Limited on Saturday evening on a visit  to the C.'.iast citie*. for a couple of  months.  Mrs. Guerin and Muster Ted.  Guerin  returned   yeslerday     morning     from  v Portland and southern Oregon,   wlieie  Mrs. Guerin waa visiting  her  paients  ' and friends for the past two months  All members of L. O. L. 16.>Siind L.  T. B. Lodges No. 17*1, are hereby  notified to attend divine service aLthe  Presbyterian church nf- the morning  service July 13th. Visiting members  are fraternally invited.  Mrs. Crawford, of Wiarton, Outwent soutli to Ferguson on Saturday  accompanied by her brother Mr. Tf-  Ferguson. Mrs. Crawford will return  to her home in Ontario about the 20th  inst.  The ladies executive of the Hospital  Society have all the linen made up and  .laundried and in the hospital teiidr^  for., use. The term of the present  executive has just about expit-ed aod-  their work is practically finished.'  Tbey hava done a great deal for the  success of the hospital, and through  their untiring  efforts  during the first  year the fuiiiiiid.ilinn is well 'aid for  the emit immure in I lit7* future nf the  good wnrk. of the la lie   executive.  XV. 3. Mc'Iiityi'**, ii'Nn t.ht-rn Pacific*  braki'inan of Seattle.' i-niiu* in on No. 2  yesterday ��������� inoriiing In liiki* in the  Orange celebration here nn Saturday.  Mr. Mclntyre is u brother of Mrs.  Davis.   ���������*..-���������  'Thos. Taylor, M. P. P., ai.d family  arrived from the coast Monday morning en route fur Trout Like City. Tin*  reports as to Mr. Taylor's illiu:*s were  entirely wilhoiit-' foundation, thai  gentleman staling he never fell belter  in his life.  The Fred Robinson Lumber Co's.  steamer Archer will bring exi-uri.ioni-.ts  for tlu* 12lh of July celebration al  Ituvi'lstoke rrom Comaplix and  Thomson's Landing lo Arrowhead for  $1.(X) I'or lhe roiintt liip good from lhe  Uth lo Lhe 14th July.  Constable Upper went down to  Nelson on Friday last lo take Fred  Hancock, lo the. penitentiary nt New  Westminster. Hancock was sentenced  by Judge Forin to two years imprisonment for slashing an mint mod man  in thu lace with a knife.  Tomorrow evening a promenade  concert and dance will lake place in  the rink. Music will be furnished by  LhCflndupendent Bund and the arrangement promises a good time to those  who attend. The concert will  commence at 8*30 o'clock sharp and the  admission price is only 25 cents.  The Canadian . Socialist, formerly  Citizen and Country, of Toronto, was  received here for the Hrst time from ils  new home ��������� in Vancouver. The  publishers are R. P. Pettipiece and G-  XV. Wrigley, both practical printers.  Tin? Hkkald wishes *'Parm" and his.  partner every success .in their new  venture.  On July 12th next a grand Orange  celebration is to take place at Revelstoke, and -.'UTatigeiiicnts have been  made to carry adult passengers on Lhe  regular Friday night's train for lhe  sum of $3.75 ana return: children $1.90  Tickets aie good for two days. A large,  number of Kamloopians intend visiting  Revelstoke ou that day.���������Kamloops  Sentinel.  AV. W. Foster, secretary of the  Revelstoke Rifle Association, informs  the Hekald that the rifles and  amimition have arrived for the use of  the association. The District Ofiicer  Commanding, Lt. Col. Holmes, proposes  to stay over, a day in Revelstoke  shortly to inspect a site foi-Ja new range  but in the meantime the old one will  be, utilized for' practice' by the  association.  . The Canadian government agent at  Glasgow, Scotland, says: The importation of pig iron from the Dominion to  the Clyde has created quite a sensation.  Fifty three thousand tons were discharged during the year, and three or  ���������four cargoes are now nn the way. The  iron serves the same purpose as Scotch  or English foundry iron, and is principally used by foundries. Some of it,  however, it used by pipe and malleable  iron manufacturers.  The Ladies Aid of the Methodist  church held a most successful lawn  social at the parsonage grounds Tuesday afternoon and evening. In the  evening the grounds were prettily  illuminated and Llie Independent Band  furnished music which was much  appreciated by the large crowd nresent.  The ladies are to be congratulated on  the unbounded success which attended  their efforts, the proceeds of the sneila  .amoutiting_to.JJ.i^__handsqme^ sum ol  SOL The committee wish to thanlriill"  those who in any way contributed to  the success of the affair.  Annual General Meeting.  t'be annual general meeting of the Revelstoke Hospital Society will be held nt Fire  Hall No. i on Monday. Aimust 4tb. 1M>">, at 8  I>. ni., for the purpose of electing trustees for  the eimilnir ami Reuortil business*.  All persons who have subscribed $���������"> or upwards towards the funds of the Society are  entitled to be present and vote on all matter*  brought before the meeting, and all snen are  Invited to be present.  11. R. ATKIXS.  It Hon. Sen -Treas.  -THE-  -*--i3tu|S_pi",*>l"������-'  "'NAME ON  EVERV   PIECE."  Chocolates  @������) We have lv.telv imported {$")  @*| thc choicest varieties of ^g  $ft the ahove   in   hulk,   and  are selling at  i5(. per k  Highest Award  at the World's Fair..  Red Cross  -Drugstore  mammmmmmmmm<  THE KINC  ENTERTAINS  aimm?fm?roroTmmroromromromw������  SUMMER BEAUTY  AND COMFORT  Requires the right kind of Clothing  and Footwear.  We have them at the right prices.  Call at Our Store and prove it.  Hot Weather Hats.  We can fit you with a Hat lhat looks  well and feels comfortable.  Boots and Shoes  King's Union-Made Boots tor Men  and Women.  Tlie Empress Shoe for Women.  Dress Goods  A full line of Dress Goods, consisting of the latest patterns and  fashions.  Carpets and Linoleums  Sold at fair prices and cut and laid  free of charge.  TAYLOR & GEORGE  Mackenzie Avenue.  {J    Mail Orders Solicited and Promptly Attended To '  '  !)^)^p^p^)(^)(^)'Q)@)^a)(^)^al*^)*^)^_l)(^)^l(^)1  ICE CREAM  Days are Here.  Why not call at  Bew's Drug Store  And Qo Away Back-   \nd partake of the Kcfrei'hine Drinks  whieh eooie from onr So.la fountain in  almost continuous streams.  We Use.True Fruit Syrups  Of delicious flavors, also Crushed Fruits  and high class Ice Cream.  ������___T-In the rear of the Store In aniplf; accommodation for those who wish to set awhile nt  their drinks.   -  Only Tpn Cents for High Class Material  W. BEWS,     -      -     Phm.B.  Druggist and;Statloner.  Brown Block. Te(ephon*������.  Dinner to London's   Submerged  Tenth���������His   Majesty's   Charitable      Entertainment      was  Eminently Successful.  London, July 5.���������Thc King's dinner  to   London's   submerged   tenth   took  place tclay.      It was the only feature  of the original coronation  programme  not'ehanged or abandoned by   reaso.i  of the King's illness.      Ever   mindful  of the welfare   and   happiness  of his  subjects, even in the face of death, His  Majesty made it   special   request that  the dinner to  t.he   pour   be   given   as  "planned.  It is doubtful if history records Anything like a parallel to today's feast.  No single structure in all London could  be found'large enough to accommodate  the army ot London's poor.  Half a million of London's poor.were  King Edward's guests this afternoon.  They were scattered in aliout -100 halls,  schools and parks in varying numbers,  the greatest of the royal beneficiaries  being at Stepney, wliere no less than  -lo.OOO were entertained.  The dinners comprised roast beef,  potatoes boiled in their jackets, colfee  and several varieties of vegetables, the7  whole being topped off with heaping  dishes of plum pudding. Each male  diner received an ounce ot smoking  tobacco ancl free pipes were also presented. As a memento of the occasion  there was presented to each of the  King's loyal but hungry guests a.  handleless souvenir cup bearing under  its glaze photographs of the King and  Queen, and a memorial design selected  by the King himself.  In addition to the half-million men.  women and children who were fed at  "th"e~wbie5ritris-prubaljle-lhat-as-rnany-  morf*. including the aged, sick and  infirm, made a merry feast over the  edibles which the diners were permitted to carry home after their own  appetites had been satisfied. In the  task of feeding the great hungry horde  more than 700(1 stewards and an .army  of waiters were employed.  The King, much to his regret, was  unable to attend any of the dinners.  The principal dinner was at Fulham,  where Sir Thos. Lipton, who or|faniy.-  ed the whole feast,' did the'- honors of  the day to 11,000 cf the poor, aided by  a host of titled unil untitled volunteers,  who handed around plates of Iwef and  pudding, or filled beer mugs with an  eiithiisia.stn enihleinati  spirit of the occasion.  The Prince and Princess of Wales  paid their first visit to l*~ulhaii.. They  entered the parknf the JJishop's Palace  through a triumphant arch', ancl were  received by the .Mayor of Fiilliain, Sir  Thomas Lipton, and others. Their  Royal Highnesses were enthusiastically greeted by an immense band of  scholars who sang (.<>d S.iye thc King.  The Prince and I'riin.ess alighted and  walked among them, as guests were  assembled around two and a. half  miles of tables and evidencing the  utmost, interest in every tiling. At the  head of the table in the central  marquee the royal party stopped and  Ihe Prince of AV ales rc-ul thin morning's bulletins regarding the King's  health. This was the signal for a  tremendous outburst nf cheering.  Before leaving, the Prince.-of Wales  expressed to the Bishop of'-London,  the Rt. .Kev. Arthur Foley Ingram,  and Sir Thomas Lipton, his great  satisfaction at tlie completeness of tbe  arrangements, and emphasized his  regret at the fact that the King Wiis  unable to be present. r>  lhis was a sample of the other  dinners, wliich were followed in eve.*y  case by variety shows, upwards of 1500  operatic theatrical people, music hall  artists, ancl 418 pianists giving their  services for the* occasion.  S^UUiiUiUiUiUUiMU^iiUMiiUUMU^  *H*������P������^&j*]*j*J>������MKMm>J**������9& *J&*������JHMHMH>**������������*������r������9)M*������93**-*,  Edward J. Bourne  I  Dealer In  i,  i,  i  Groceries, Gent's. Furnishings, Boots and Shoes,   jj  Ready-Made Clothing. *  'I  Men's Union-made Boqts���������New Stock Just In.  Revelstoke Station'. Bourne Bros.' Old Stand.  .*������*������'������������'^������r*fr.ir*r-f-r-f*r*fr^  SIBBALD & FIELD,  -fS^GOEasTTS   JFOIK.  Real Estate  tar-  n. P. R. TOWNSITE.  .MARA TOWNSITE.  OKRKAKI. TOWNSITK.  CAMBORNE T0WN81T1-,  piw i TVIPT AT     i. Cunailii Pcrmiinent & Western  xVl W tWW .1 AL- ,       Canwlii Mortgage Corporation,  x iiuiiiuii*". ( Equitable Savings Eoiin and Building Association.  Imperial l'irc.      Caledonian Fire.   Atlas Fire.  Canadian Fire.   Meroantile Kire.    Northern Fire.  Guardian Fire.   Manchester Fire.   Great West Lite.  lOfican, Accident and Win ran tec.   Confederation Life  ^Canadian Accident Assurance Co.   Connecticut Flre  Insurance {������  COAL FOR SALE,  HOUSES POR SALE AND RENT.  CONVEYANCING.  J. D. SIBBALD, Notary Pubii".  REVELST0KT2." B. C.  CHAS. M. FIELD.  8)*^)(^)^)^l^)^)(^)������^)������)^)������)  (^(i^)^)^)^.!^)^)*^)^)'^)'^'^  ^Turner ..vs. Cowan et al.  of   the,  whole  This whs an action hronght hy  Junies ' Turner und lompany of  Hamilton, ngiiinst William Cowan.  Thomas Downs and Charlie Holten ns  individual shareholders ot the Cowan  Holten Downs Co. Limited under  section 51 of the Companies. Act.  seeking to hnlil the defendants  personally liable on the ground that  the shares heldhy them in the company  were not paid forin cash as provided  liy section 51.  'I'he case w.is tried at the Revelstoke  spi inn assizes last ilny In-fore thu Chief  jualire who reserved ..is judgment hut  has since delivered judgment holding  lhat although un caul] actually paused  yet within the inraning of llu* Ihw as  interpreted by enst** that lhe *>li:iri s  whip paid for in rush and therefore  di*.iiii**!������iiig the actum wilh costs. -  , K. P. Davis K. C. nnd .1. M. S;otl  appeared foi the defendant*.  ti. S. Tavlor K.C. and G. S. .Mc-Carler  appeared for the t'laintiifj.  The plaintiffs through their soliciting  have enteied an appeal ii^aiust the  decision of Chief Justice.Hunter.  iir. Bernier  revenue, eim hIvk  William iluloi-k,  ductifin of Ktaiiips.  of Inland Kevrtiui-  twii new hcrios   of  winks of art have nnt. been i-iiiialli-il in  Camilla for   ni.tny   yenrs.      They  minister of infant]  his colleague*. Sir  pointer in the pro-  The _ Depart ment  has jn-st leceived  htamps which as  i-iiiii  They arc  leagued especially fur u^e iu the  Yukon. All the Htaiiipsiiif cf tiriifnriii  size, li incli'M hy 1 inch, and ait* of six  denoini nation.*, 10c jSlr..' SOr.. ft I, $'2.  and SH The red color* iw in-arilied  DawHon Mining stHinp. and i-i In lie  tii<ed in payment (if. .nil', milling teen.  The stamp in the repis-tentalioii of ii  prospector in the act of picking up a  nugget. The law stamp for the Yukon  teiiitorial court is lilue. with a ligure  Justice holding scales in her hand. The  artist Iris made the departure from i lie  traditional engraving in that lie has  removed the hoodwink from the lady's  eye. implying proliahly ���������. that" she  intiiiids to exercise a* little more  vigilance in future in the administration of Yukon alV-tiis.  Certificate of Improvements.  NOTICE.  Edna, Alice and i**orland Mineral claim*--,  situate In llie Revelstoke Mining livinlonol  West Kootenay District.  Where located :���������I.aformeCreek. B1k Bend.  TAKE NOTICK that I, \V. h. McLauclilIn,  Free Miner's Certilicate No. H. nT'/itt, inlend,  ixty davs from the date hercor, t. apply to tlie  MiniiiB Recorder for a Cerlitlcati; of Improvements, for the purpose of olitainliiK a Orown  Urant of the above ula nis.  And furtLer take notice that action, under  section 'it, must be coininenced before the  issuance of such Ccrtlflraic of Impro\omenta.  liatcd tliis 10th day of July, A.D., l'M'i.  Vi. E. McLAUCIIUN'.  NOTIOE  Notice Is hereby civcti that sixty days from  date hereof 1 intend to apply (o the Chief  Coniiniswioner of hands and \\orkri at Vletorlu,  B. tl., in purchase :!VU acrea of land on Downie  crof-k In tin; I'.Iir Hend, commencing at a po-t  planted about nine miles Irom the Columbia  Kiver on the nortii earn aide of Boulder Creek  and murk.Ml A. Vi. Mclnlfvh's Initial post, No  I, and running north forty chains to northwest corner post. No. 'I, theuce "eighty chain*.  ea*.l to post No 11, tlicnce forty chafiiH soutli In  po>-t No. t, thence eighty chains west to point  of coiiiineiieeineiit.  Jlated the :<oih ilny of June, HK)'������.  A. Vi. McINTOSH.  WE HAVE JUST  REMOVED INTO OUR  NEW QUARTERS  ON MACKENZIE AVENUE  OURNE  a-'EiisriEiE-b.A.ij 3^:s:R,a:E������.A.j������"TTS.  & '  T HFT A VP1 TT1 T                            '  ' ' ,^���������  The'lurgest stock, of  the latest WATCHES,  _\������kT  CLOCKS,   RINGS,   SILVER WARE,    CUT  f^yfw^  GLASS,  FASHIONABLE JEWELRY, Etc.  nM'Slfflr/s  My many years' experience enahles me to buy  (^^pw\  goods . ut. the   right  prices,  enabling me. to*  /5gP^(Ny������  sell to the puhlic at reasonable prices.-   . ���������"��������� ; /  '  py     \ffi  CT. v O-TJ"ST  *BA.I?,BE-R>.  '         1  WATCH niHFAlKING 'A. SPECIALTY'.  JStO'XXCrJEi  -Notice K lirreby ������lvcn that Hixty dnys from  dale hereof I intend AMdyltiK t-������ tho Chief  C'uruifiifiMioner o htrndrt nml Workn at Victoria,  B. I*., to porchbs������ three hundred nnd tweuty  Acres of land un JJnuntc Creek Jn the Big  I'.end, comment'liif; fit a jiohi planted about  eight rnile������ from thu Columbi River and near  the north cant Hlda of Moulder "Creek aud  marked J. K. -Montgomery's Initial pom, No. 3.  ihcnce forty chain* nortli to north-west corner  pout No. 'l. thence eighty elm In* cum to north  tilt corner pOHt No. 'A, iherce fortv chains  iouth to Kouth cam corner ptmt No. 4. thence  eighty chaltiHKouth to (>olntof commencement.  Tutted nt Uevflitoke iho 30th day of June I9W.  3.0. MONTG JMEKY.  For Sale  TWO Kcsi-Icncei on McKenzie Annuo, with  modern  impruvenenti, ������i*"*00 ench  on easy  TWO Uesidunces on TLlr.l 3lri*ef. east. \<*ry  convenient for railway nun.lISJj i������c!i, casy  terins.  ON'B Kol-lcnce o������ Flr*=t Street, east, cusli  reqnlrcil F>M.   ubject to mortgage.  i Apply to,  "H A RYE V, McCATBEE & PI^IfH AM.  (Antral  WORKER  with the best  of appliances  ancl materials  at his disposal  must of necessity produce  more perfect  garments than  do the human machines who work at low wages  in crowded sweat shops.  (inents  Our Garments  show the im-  p-r ess-ofvth.e^  careful painstaking work of  well paid and ,  skilful   tailors.  J. B.   CRESSMAN, Mackenzie Aveuue.  Real Estate Bargains  Good "Residence k  Store Building.  Terms���������$200 cash;  Balance   on  Ensy  Terms.  $1250  8-Boomcd Residence, with all  modern imorove-  nients. A. very desirable prop -  erty. Terms can be arranger!  with suitable party. '���������  (t>nAA ^ Roomed House,  ShHIJIj with bathroom, etc..  ^ good  cellar.    Well  situated for a C. P. R. man.  Easy Terms,  $1200  PlustjM-ed     Hours:  with stone founda-  .  tion. Good garden'  50x100 feet���������well located.   This  is a special bargain.  rt������-f/\r*'/\   A fine Residencs  NJAVsJ-V and Bath Room,  Electric Lighting, garden 60x100  feet. A comfortable home,  selling ata great sacrifice.  *aaa 80 acre Farm, about  iDullll 5 milesfrom Salmon  yw,,v ArmSUtion. Best  .of soil, good timbei for domestic  uses and good roads. Teimsto  the right party.  ' A Number of Other Real Estate Bargain;.      Call aim Inspect Our list.  Revelstoke Smelter Townsite  Fine Residential and Business Lotsin.all parts of thc  City on easy terms of payment. A limited number of Five-  Acre Garden Plots within five minutes' walk from the  centre of City, are now ready for sale. Easy terms of payment.  ���������   BUflC     BD-fkG     R<Bal Estate Brokers.  bCVVIO]   DnVwa   Financial and Insurance Agents.  I  i  '1  I*  'vflfl  #  1  ll  -^

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