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Revelstoke Herald Mar 2, 1905

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 ^AJISTID  V"' VV  ��������� HO:  y>  RAFIvWAY'   MBN'S   JOURNA'Co.7  gQR'ft-i;  Vol.   XVI: NO.9  REVELSTOKE B. C. THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 190S  $2 OO'a^Year in "Advance  Department Store.  tOViliCIAL'  ��������� A Table of Odd' Pieces cf China, selling at 20c.  Ram Lai's   Pure India and   Ceylon   Teas���������five   pkgs.  for $2.50.      .'_.'. .  A'SpeclarBlend India Tea���������-five packages for $2.25.  Cream    Dishes,  A new line of Cut  Glass  Sugar  ancl  Bowls, Bon Bon Dishes, Tumblers, etc.  " , New Groceries Just to Mane!���������Van Camp'  Beans, Bovril in 4-02. to 16-oz. Bottles, Van  Fry's.and Walter Baker's Cocoa.  Pork   ancl  Houten's,  i  Seasonable  Fruits  Pie Fruit in Gallon tins,  California'.- Prunes, Rhubarb, Grapes, un pkins,  Reg. rice. 65c. Special  Sale price.55c.  Men's ..'Fancy  Dress Shirts  Jilen's Fancy Dress  soft arid stiff bosoms:  ,price���������������,i.50_.���������..   .  .  .  Shirts,  Reg.,  Ca.j-foB-sila  Prtsracs  Specially imported by  ourselves, neatly packed in  25-lb. boxes, nice size for  family use. .Reg. value���������  .$2.75.    Sale Price $2.10.  Another line -of selected  Prunes from the same shipment.    Res:, value   $3.00.  ���������: -Saie~ Price 75c  23. Inch  Velveteen -  Black'only, nice, even Pile,"  ,'good'color. ��������� Reg. .Price 65c  Saie Price 40c  Boys' Moccasins  at a Sn a  Real Indian made Buckskin  Reg. Price $1.50 '  Sale Price 50c  Shetland Floss  Wool. Catered  Reg:  * This Staple .Wool in  and   Cardinal   only.  -Price-ioc���������=   Pink  Reg.'  Sale PrSce 5c  Gloves and Mitts  at Ground Floor Prices  Our winter stock of Gloves  and Mitts. Reg. Price $1  and $1.50 per pair.  Sale Price 50c  Ladies'  Ready-to-Wear Hats  Any Hat we have left. See  our window. Reg. Price  $4 and $1.  SaSe Price 50c  Ribbed Hose  for boys and girls  .Sale Price 2.50.   3*'  ���������Boys'; -' "-     :' -  Usidehs/ear -.  Nice,,   soft,    Union .Goods,  unshrinkable,   will   fit boys  ifrom   5 to  16 years,  '7,5c. "goods.   .  . .SAI.E  PRsOE���������40c  Dress ..Goods  Dress .Goods'  New goods, right   in color,  54-inch Tweeds.    You cannot buy anywhere  else  for  "less than $1.50.  SALE PRICE���������75c  'Wo?rse6'iS,        ���������  -  Urac2erwear  Heavy   Union  Goods,   unshrinkable;    Our $1 goods.  GALE  PRICE���������50c  Skirts  Swisses  .Wool  -Fit-Girls-i2-to-i6���������all-wool'  homespun.    Reg. Price $3.  SALE  PRICE���������SI.75  Stockings  40c and   50c  fit   big   boys  ancl   girls  women.  to  or  Sale Price 25c  Worsens*  Oxford Shoes  Nice  sewn.  high   lace,      McKay  Regular  $2  Shoe.  GALE  PRSCE-S1.25  Lacgies'  Dressy Coats  Only Six Coats left.  36 and 33.    Reg. $1:  Sizes  ��������� 50  SALE PRICE���������S6.25  China and  Glassware  A small assortment of odds  '     of    China    and  -;c.    and   40c.  nni' ��������� civets-  Glassware,  pieces.  SALE  oO1*  PRICE���������15c  Eijjht-Hour Smelter Bill Defeated ��������� School Act Amendment���������Grand Trunk Pacific���������  : Better Terms.  ��������� Mr. J. H. Haw thorn waite's eight I  lioiu* smelter hill wtis defeated on I  Wcilncsduj* in llio House tit its second  rending, after a prolonged discussion  in wliich a number or members of both  Government tind opposition took pint.  Twelve members supported tho proposed measure, the zest voting against  it.  'Considerable   discussion"   lias   beeu  evoked by Ihe bill to amend,and consolidate lhe School Act, brought down  on Wednesday by Hon. F.-J.  Fulton,  Provincial Secretary.   The bill is too  lengthy for discussion in all its points  heie, but its main object is to reduce  tho   enormous and ever-growing expense to which the country  is   being  put as the cost of education,  particularly  the   rural   districts,   where  the  attendance is very small and scattered  over a wide area.     While'the reductions contemplated by some sections  of tho bill may be considered  a hardship,  it    is    generally   felt    that a  measure of economical administration  in  this   department   has   become   an  imperative necessity.   To adjust this  reform   in   a   manner  'calculated   to  achieve the object   in  unduly burdening any  thc community more than another, is  the intent of the present measure.    It  is well to remember in this connection  that tho province,of British Columbia  is Uie only one in the Dominion where  the cost of education is* paid   out of  general   revenue;  and   the proposed  bill merely contemplates following the,  lines -loDg   since   adopted    in .'other  provinces. '" Here again,  the sparsely  settled condition of the"rural  districts  of British Columbitvas compared witli  those of tlie eastern provinces; "coiiics"  as 11 factor,to be considered; but it is  none'the less fair that _at least some  adequate   portion   of this increasing  burden should bo borne by the district  incurring it.  For reasons best known to themselves���������as they have taken neither  the House nor the country into their  confidence���������the opposition is in a  teViific hurry to find out what the  Government's railway policy is.  Acting apparently on the old principle  that "the bird that can sing and won't  sing, must bo made to sing," Mr. J. A.  Macdonald, loader-o������ the opposition,  proposes a somewhat amusing form of  coercion. When the question of supply comes up, upon the" motion that  the Speaker do rise and leave the  chair for tho purpose of going inlo  committee on the supply bill, the  member from Rossland proposes to  introduce a inbtion which, afrer  repealing the exploded story that the  Premier last session promised to call  the House together in the. summeu  for" a rail way session, will politely  "regret_llftri"tKlecision"bf_the"~govprii^"  ment and its reported failures to 'deal  with an urgent public question:"  With refeieuce to this often alleged  promise of the Premier's, it may be as  well at this puint to refresh your  readers' memories as to whnt Mr.  McBi ide really did say on the occasion.  He stilted very distinctly that if any  practical, workable and bona (ide  r.iil-.wiy proposition���������no paper scheme  or charter-limiting piomoters, but a  bu.-incss proposition of business men  to business men���������were submitted to  his government, he would call the  House together during the coming  year to consider it. No such businesslike railway proposition was submitted  ���������und some of the colleagues  of the leader of the opposition  could give him more than one reason  why. if he doesn't already know it  himself. Therefore the session was  not called, and the unnecessary expense to the public of a good many  thousand dollars was avoided. That  is the whole stcry, tind. as Mr. Macdonald is perfectly acquainted with  the above facts, bis course iu this  matter can hardly be regarded as  either public-spirited or straightforward.  As to the opposition's mysterious  impatience in this matter, it is all the  more inexplicable in view of the very  satisfactory statement made on the  subject by the Premier during the  debate on the address. That the policy  then promised will, when its details  aie submitted to the public, give  general satisfaction, there is no manner of doubt. But there is also no  I mftnuer of doubt that a reckless era of  railroad support, and encouragement,  with its consequent heavy additional  financial burdens, is about the last  thing the Government contemplates  no matter what steps tho opposition  may take to try and force their hand.  In the speech above referred to, the  Premier made this point very clear���������  unpleasantly so for his opponents.  c WithSiogard to the Grand Trunk  Pacific, no proposition has up to the  present been matte to the Government  by. the company.  This is considered not a  little   sur- j  prising, especially in view of the fact I  that     the   Victotiit    Times���������Senator J  Toniploman's organ���������was good enough  recently to outline all the terms of the  bargain which tho  Government was  supposed���������always   on   the Times' authority���������to have already entered  into  with   the   Company;   n    bargain   in  which, it is unnecessary to   say,   the  interests  of  British   Columbia   were  represented to have suffered seriously.  In fa<jt,���������still accoiding to the Times���������  a trap had been laid' for  British   Columbia by the Grand Trunk Pacific and  the   Government   had   walked  right  into it.   Now, it would appear, though  ^the trap might be set, the Government  has   declined   to  enter.  ' True,     Mr.  Morse,   rcpiesenting    the    company,  still lingers in the * city,   but  he   litis  made no offer to the Government.  Ib may be taken, therefore, as a ftict  that tho Government ��������� contemplates  engaging in no negbtial ions in which  British Columbia does not figure as  the principal of the high contracting  parties, and in which her interests do  not receive paramount consideration.  things.  Grand  come  %  38  BEATBI  view   without  It is   quito on   the  cards,   as  one section of stand   at   piesent', -that    no  Trunk  Pacific legislation   may  before tho liouse this session.  There is, nevertheless, a strong and  growing feeling on tho Coast that some  sort of a bargain  should  be   entered  into.-tvi.lh   (.his   cpmpnny.    Tt   is felt  that  "because    tlie    Government at  Ottawa in making ;tlie oontract with  the Company, committed the grievous  error   of altogether iguoiing British  Columbia's' interests  iri the direction  of enforcing simuli^iuequ's- commence-  menfc'OL construe-icfh* aC~botlr* ends of  the railway, that' is   no-reason  why  this province should accept tho situation as final.   And   ib   is   also  felt���������  and J pretty strongly expressed  too���������  that, although the representatives of  this   province     at    Ottawa,  showed  themselves ignominiously incompetent  to defend, or grossly negligent of, ihe  rights and well-being' of  British Columbia, no reason exists why the home  legislature should bo  bound   by such  discreditable   action.     The     opinion,  therefore, is rapidly  gaining ground  thnt, if a'satisfactory* basis   of   negotiation can bc arrived at,  some   bargain should be entered into  between  tbe Government and the Grand Trunk  Pacific   which  would-  secure- to the  province tho benefits of an early commencement   of   construction   at   this  end of tbe  line.   This bargain  would  be   couched  in   very   definite  terms,  with \x hard-and-fast agreement as to  what British Columbia was to receive,  iu return for such concessions as  her  people 111ight.be disposed to view witli  favour  -=oTho-dpha(e-on-lhe-resolutions���������for  better terms,' which have bcon standing on the orders of the day in the  name of the Premier, ended on Friday  with a graceful display of courtesy on  the part of tho Premier in withdrawing his own original resolution and  seconding that which���������to tho same  elfect, but in slightly modified terms ���������  was introduced in amendment by the  loader of tho opposition Mr. McBride,  in a temperate and statesmanlike  address, pointed out to ilia House the  great desirability of..the ..Legislative  Assembly, as representing the peoplo  oftho province, acting in "perfect harmony and 'unanimously on this important problem. To further such an  object, said tho Premier, he would  gladly withdraw his Government's  motion in favor of the alternative one  proposed by the leader of the opposition, and he took pleasure in personally seconding the adoption of that  amendment. .(Loud applause).  The resolution was then passed  unanimously. It will be forwarded to  Ottawa, in the hope of some * good*  resulting. ��������� ?  Tiie Max in* this Gallery.  Four Tons of High Grade Gray  Copper being: taken out per  day for Shipment���������Extensive  Development Proposed.  I    Mr.'H.-Y. Andeiwon,  secretary of  I the Beatrice Mine?, Limited,  camo  up  [from   the   company's'propei ty   near  I Camborne   on  Monday  evening,  and  was in the city on Tuesday  in consultation with  the manager,  Jlr.  F.   F.  Kulincr.     In   an   interview  v.'illi  the  I Ii-i-ALi) reporter, Mr. Anderson said  that the prospects of the property at  the present time and for  the future  were excellent.  The company tu'e now  taking out four tons  of   high   grade  gray copper oro per day and rawhiding  it down the   hill   for   shipment,   and  will continue till the  trail  breaks up,  wliich will be in about six weeks.  The  company have laid  out plans for extensive development work this spring.  Work   will   be   commenced   tit   once  sinking on   the   now   strike  of   high  grade oro, and will coniiiuio for GOf..,  which will   add   considerable   to   the I  stoping ore reserve.    Tho new strike |  was made in tho So foot drift,   where  the shaft will be sunk and an  intermediate tunnel  will   then   be   driven  below and will havo an upi iso to connect  with   the  shaft,   which,    when  completed, will give an enormous ore  .Stream nf the Big Bend, which wn.s  known only to tho pioneer miner who  worked his gold in the early days from  tho surfaco, leaving the deeper workings till the tlay when transportation  and supplies would make it convenient lo mine under mure favorable  circumstances.  HON. SiPTON  RESIGNED  Hospital Ball Statement.  nECKIPTS  By Sale of Ticket s... $210 00  '* Cash tit Door .... (it) 00  " " Refresh. Com. 39 00  " Donation In. Band    'AO 00  SMI 00  i:xpi*:N-i)iTiJj:ns  To Insurance on hall S 10 00  " Telegiam   2 00  " Druying   7 00  " Printing   8 70  " Hired help   9 50  " Erecting platform  ���������   o 00  " Incidentals   1 so  " Hev. In. Band ...  30 00  S 74 00  . Balance on hand $310 00  M. Es'n.LLE Scott,  Secy.-Troas. Hos. Ball Com.  The Cave.  showing reserve of high grade grey  copper. Besides the high grade ore.  the company have thousands of tons  low grade which will not be handled  al present until easier means of transportation are assured. Tlie Beatrice is  undoubtedly the binner property of  the camp and the lucky owners are to  be congratulated upon' the ' success'  which hns crowned their efforts in  placing this property in the front rank.  New Game for Lenten  Season  The popular winter pastimes,  skating and curling, aro over for  another year. Lenten season commences next week, when cards, dancing  and othor such amusements are  barred. The Herald has, however,  discovered a new game to which no  exception can be taken���������even during  Lent���������and wherever it has been  played, has become immensely popular. It is called. "Tickle the Publisher," and is played as follows : Take  a sheet of ordinary writing paper, fold  ib nicely, enclose a Iwuk' note sufficiently large enough to pay.-ill arrears  and one year -in advance, and give it  to the editor; keep an eyo on him nnd  if a smile adorns his face, the trick  works line. Now is the time to play  the joke, lt boats " Flinch and "Pit"  all hollow.  Columbian Ladies Trio.  These three cultured artists will  give a high class entertainment next  Monday evening in the Methodist  church. Admission C0c, reserved  seats 75c, plan at tho Canada Drug  & Book Store, childrens tickets 35c.  ���������TO BENT���������Office and Dental Parlors over Bews' Drug Store, next  Hume Block. Apply.to H, Loughead,  Revelstoke, B, 0,  Favor Duty on Lumber   .  Ottawa, Feb.* 27.���������An important  meeting of the Ottawa Valley lumbermen was held in . the ollice of the  Ottawa Improvement Company, Mr.  ,J,_P,_Bnotb_presitling. _Ainojig_those  present wore: .Messrs. E. C. Whitney, president St. Anthony Lumber  Co.; U.K. Egan, Hawkesbury Lumber  Co.; Alex. Barnet, Kenl'iow; XV. C.  Ilughson, of Gilmour and llughson;  J. C. Brown, Lumsdon Estate; Alex.  MacLa.cn, of MacLaren fc Co.;  Davidson and Thackeray, together  with representatives of lhe firms of  Frti'/er fc Co., Sheppard fc Morse Co.,  Booth fc Gordon, Georgo Gordon fc  Co., and others. Messrs. Jones, Du-  penoior and Jardine, representing the  British Columbia lumbermen, were  also present by invitation. Tlie lumber situation was discussed in nil its  phases, arid it wns unnniii.ously  resolved to support the memorial of  the Western lumbermen, asking for  the imposition of a duty of $2 a  thousand on rough lumber. Messrs.  ���������Jones and Dupcncier were requested  to. arrange for an interview with the  Minister of Finance on bis return  from Europe. It is expected that the  Maritime Province lumbermen will be  represented on that occasion;  Gold From French Creek.  Mr. E. A. Bradby, manager for the  Marshall Shelling Co., who are oper-  ating on French Creek, returned to  the city on Sunday from a visit to the  company's propei I y with somo .$1(500  worth of coarse gold, lhe result of  about 20 days woi ic in developing the  ground on bed ro k. The placers of  the Big Bend will this year bring to  the knowledge of tlie public the great  richness of tho channels and benches  of the tributaries of the famous Gold  In the issue of the ISth inst. of the  Kootenay Mail, ihete wus assurance  given tho waiting public that there  was no such a thing as a cave. Last  issue there is something of a cave  somewhere and that Mr. Deutschman  wtis now in Chicago ai ranging for  capital to build a hotel. The IIiii.ald  begs leave to place the Mail right  again, and to inform our esteemed of  tho fact that Mr. Deiitschnian is not  in Chicago for the purposo of arranging for capital to build a hole!.  On Account of School Question  ���������Hon. Fielding up in Arms-  Breakers Ahead for Laurier  and His Majority.  Ottawa, March 2���������Yesterday afternoon lion. ClilTovtl Sifton, Minister of  the   Inu'rior in  the Laurier cabinet,  resigned   his   poitfolio, as   a   protest  1 against thu Government's Altitude on  I the school cpicslion as regards the now  provinces of Alberta .ind Saskatchewan.    Hon. XV. S. Fielding, Minister of  Finance, i.s also up in arms against the i  govei nment.    objecting     to     certain  clauses in   the   Autonomy Bill.    Itis'  not unlikely   that   the   situation  wil  effect other ministers  of   the cabinet  and Sir Wilfrid  may find himself and  his big majority in sciious trouble.  F1CHT 051  Ai'.c  RIVEI  Best  Entertainment Given.  Two men wero seen examining the  lithographs of the Columbian Ladies  Trio, in IJ time & Go's, window, when  one of them was hoard to say; "The  best entertainment that I have seen in  Revelstoke was given in,;*.tlic Methodist church, and it was tbe Jubilee  Singers." lt wtis good but not better  than the Columbian Ladies Trio,  which-is under the same Lyceum  Bureau. The treat of the season in  the Methodist cluiich next Monday  evening at S:lo iriitirp.  Notice^ to the Public.  Tinsmilhing being an important  item just now, wo are prepared fo do  all kinds of work in tbis line to which  end wc liave secured the able services  of Mi*. Edgar Burridge, who will  "nilend to your need.-, promptly and  efficiently. Telephone 9.  MOSCROP BROS.  Nows wns received Tuesday of Lhe  death of A. J. Hipperson. at" Vernon,  whither he went some weeks ago after  leaving the Lawrence Hardware Co's.  employ. Deceased, it is understood,  leaves a wife and family at Nelson.  Japanese   Capture   Da   Pass.���������  An   Engagement   Extending  Along    the   Whole   Front.���������  Another Japanese Victory.  Man'Churia, March 1.���������(Russian  llcadtimtrtsrs).���������The Japanese attack  was renewed at dawn yesterday along  the whole eastern front, and Da Pass  was taken after fighting of the most  Stubborn character.  An engagement was in progress oif  the f:ont. extending almost twenty  iniles from the extreme left eastward  of ICaudoles.'in. where thn Japanese  opened ti heavy artillery fire, to tho  disti ict of Laolinznn. wheie they  nd va need in great force, meeting with  stubborn resistance. ' '  -  Tht: cnptuio of D.i Pass opens the  rn.id to Fushau, east of Mukden, and  Tien Pas.*-', but the-Russians are gath---  ering a strong force to meet tlio  thieatened attack on their line of  communications.  The Japanese army now hold "a line  from Syaobeh. opposite Dzhantan,  through Shahopno, along Ihe Shakhe  river to Vanupiulzi. thence to Da Pass  and Toumadzi, southetistwaid.  The Japanese have effected a crossing of the Shakhe at Kaoupudzi, and  attacked tiie Russian cenlie under  cover of darkness, driving back the  Russian ad*, ance post*: but supports  came up and stopped the Japanese advance. An officer in command oftho  kilter heard the Russians ci y out thab  tlieir cartridges were exhausted, and  tliey thereupon advanced incautiously  and received a volley at point blank  range, losing heavily. o  (HI; DISCOUNT  THIS IS A SNAP ! Persons wanting a Bargain in Dress  Goods can secure them here. XVe must clear them out to make  room on our shelves for Spring importations, and in order to do so  we are offering a tremendous Cash reduction.  Costume Lengths which were $9 00���������Reduced to $6 75  Costumo Lengths which were 7 00���������Reduced to 5 25  Costume Lengths which were 5 60��������� Reducod to 3 75  Costume Lengths which were   3 50���������Roduood to   2 65  Lddies Ready to Wear Costumes  IN A'RANGE OF SIZES  Regular Prlco S18 CO How $12 75  Regular Pricc   20 00 .Now   14 25  Regular Prico   22 oo   Now   18 76  These cannot last long at these absurdly low prices. Come early  Just taken into stock a fine assortment of Negligee Shirts in  beautiful patterns, and latest style.  The latest in "Men's and Boys' Spring Hats and Caps.  OUR SPRING (iOODS ARE ARRIVING DAILY  Our Dressmaking Department is under the management of  MISS GOUGH, where Ladies can leave their Spring orders and be  sure of perfect satisfaction.  Call on us���������it will cost you nothing and will do you worlds of  good.  W. -J. GEORGE, Mackenzie Ave.  MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.  I ft  I About the  |      ....House  ^___n____________!k������i_r  from tbo hands, rub an outsido piece I ���������������.;.���������������.;.���������������.>���������%.���������:���������������������������������:������������������������������������������������������������>���������%<;,���������������.;���������<  DOMESTIC  IIECIDES.  Baked Applo Dmnjilfligs.���������Cut u  short pic crust into live or six inch  squares. In tho centre ot each place  a pared and neatly cored apple, Idling thu space with sugar antl cinnamon, if liked, also u clow. After  wetting tho edges of thc pastry with  white of cgy, fold it over the apple,  pinch antl flnta them to look woll,  ������nd encase tho applo completely.  Bake from thirty to forty minutes,  toward the Inst brushing the top  with white of egg and dusting with  a littlo sugur. Serve with hart)  sauce.  Inexpensive Km it Cake.���������Cream together half a cup of buttcr aad ono  cup of brown sugar, moistening in  the process with half a pint of strong  codec: add onu cup of Now Orleans  molasses, a teaspoon of allspice, ono  grated nutmeg and a teaspoon of  powdered cinnamon, one well beaten  egg  and  threo cups  of  pastry     flour  sifted  with   a  heaping  teaspoon     of I -        .   .     .       ,      . ���������, ���������,,.,���������,,  baking powder,  and  one cup of   In- |!!!!^_���������d_ A*01���������.??^8 3!���������'*?.  tififcui   meal.  Heat   stcaid'ily   far     flion  of celery on them,  Breadcrumbs for frying.���������Let thoso  always bo baked.fn tho oven without boing allowed to tako color. Uy  this method tho flsh or meat, etc.,  will bo much crlspcr.  To avoid tlust marks behind pictures, placo two small pieces of cork  nt tho bottom of the picture frame.  This prevent!) tho accumulation of  dust and tho consequent dirty unsightly marks.  Thu disagreeable tasto of now wood  fn bucket.*) nml vessels may bo oradl-  catotl thus: Kill with a solution of  hot soda water ami lot it remain till  cold, thon rlnst) in clear water.  To Blanch Almonds.'���������I'luco in a  cup, pour boiling wator over them;  this will swell the skins and allow  them to bo tpilckly drawn oil. Throw  thu almonds into cold water ami  wipe dry with a cloth.  To Clean Spectacle Glasses.���������Give  them an occasional rub with u clean  cloth moistened with methylated  spirit. Then polish with a chamois  leather, tlio spirit having removed  all grease.  To Hak-n Kried Bacon more Digestible.*���������Take a good sized applo and  cut it in slices with tho peel on aad  fry till brown in tho bacon fat, Servo  highly Reasoned with popper and  salt niwl you will havo a <lelicious  dish.  Linseed Tea.���������Pour two quarts of  boiling water on o'no ounco of wliolo  I Jilted-After All I:  ���������> V  ������������������^j������'������������j������*������.$.*������������$.*������.������;������*������������j������*^j������****.������>*������������j������*������������t������*������������>  i.  .When the    Hon.     Fitzgornld  Chal  minutes and then stir in a quarter of  of a pound of shretldod citron, half  a pound of largo seeded raisins, cut  in two, and one pound of currants.  Turn into a round cake pan lined  with greased paper and bako three-  quarters of an hour in a slow oven:  Ico while still warm.  New England Bannocke.���������Scald  eight heaping tablespoons of meal by  stirring in two cups of boiling water, add four tablespoons of flour, a  saltspoon of snlt, one-fourth of a  teaspoon of baking soda, two well  beaten eggs and 'sufficient cold milk  to form a thick batter. Beat for five  minutes after tho last ingredient is  added and drop by the spoonful into  hot fat, frying tho bannocks to a  golden brown. Serve accompanied  by maple sugar.  "Lentil Roast (From the Vegetarian).���������Soak two cups of lentils over  night. ln tho morning adtl two or  threo slices of onion antl several  sticks of celery. When tendef pass-  through a colander. Adtl one cup  of tomato, cooked and strained, one  cup of wholo wheat flour, two well  beaten eggs, and placo in a buttered tin. Baste well with molted butter and bake from twentv to, thirty  minutes.  Celeste's Fritters.���������S'talo. .spongo  cake, cut. into rounds with ti'. cako  cutter. Slice the cake carefully and  fry to a nice brown. Dip each slice  for a second in a bowl of boiling  milk, draining this off on the sido  of the vessel; lay on a hot dish and  spread thickly with strawberry jam,  peach jelly, or other delicate conserve. J?ilo them neatly and send  aroui^fhot. with crealm to pour ovcr  them.  Seed Cakes.���������One cup of butter.  Three cups of sugar. One cup of  "loppered" milk or cream. Four  oggs. Six cups of flour, or just  enough to stiffen into a thin paste.  Two taldespoonfuls fennel or caraway seed. One ta"blespoonfuV~soda,  dissolved in boiling water. Boll out  thin and cut into shapes.  Raspberry Bavarian Cream.���������Soften a quarter of a package of gelatine iu half a cup of raspberry juico:  dissolve over hot water; add the  (nice of half a lemon, a cupful of  raspberry juice, and half a cup of  sugar, stir over ice water, and when  il begins to "set" fold in a cupful  and a half of double cream beaten  solid. - Pour into a mold. When  cold serve surrounded with the froth  from whipped cream.  Batter for Pineapple Fritters. ���������  Beat one egg without separating tho  white and yolk. Add half a cup of  flour and one-fourth of a teaspoon of  salt, and bent with a spoon until  perfectly smooth. Then b������at in one-  Md'mrth=df=n=cup-Oi-milk.--==^-==^=^==^  Cream of Pumpkin Soup.���������This is  a novelty even to many old cooks,  but is quite worth adding to tho  list  of  fell soups.    Cut.  a  nice     ripe  small pumpkin in pieces enough .to  fill a quart measure. Put in a  saucepan with a pi"* oi cold water  and season  with  liquoiicc root. Add a few slices of  lemon. Lot this stand in a covered  Jar for six hours, then strain for  uso and sweoten to tasto.  To Prevent Black Stockings Turning Green -When Washed..���������Turn tho  stockings inside out and wash in  lather; do not rub tho soap on tho  stockings. Rinse in tepid water to  which a little vinegar is added. Dry  in the shado, anxl pull gently into  shapo.  Do not wash a Frying-pan often,  for as a rule the following method  of cleaning it is very effectual: Placo  the pan on tho fire for a few minutes  to melt any fat loft in it, and whilst  this is hot, rub the inside of tho  pan with clean, soft pupcr until it  is quite clean. Tho paper should bo  screwed up and . used vigorously.  Treated liko this, frying-pans will  never burn till thoy are worn very  thin.  FIVE PIES.  Chocolate Pie.���������Ono coiloocup milk,  two tablespoons grated chocolate,  three-fourths cup sugar, yolks of  three eggs. Heat chocolate and milk  togother, add tho sugar and yolks togother, beaten to cream. Flavor  with essence vanilla. Bako with  under crust. Spread meringue of th".  whites over the top. .  Custard Pie.���������One pint of 'milk,  three oggs,?,a little snlt, three tablespoons of' sugar. Flavor with essence vanilla or nutmeg and essence  of lemon. If the milk is scalded "it  will require hut two eggs  to a pint.  Cream Pic���������One pint of milk  scalded, two tablespoons of corn  starch, three tablespoons of sugar,  yolks of two eggs. Wot thc starch  with a littlo cold milk, beat tho  eggs and sugar until light, ami stir  tho whole into the scalding milk.  Flavor with essence of lemon or  vanilla, and set aside to cool. Lino  a plate with pie crust and bake, till  it with cream, ami cover it with  frosting made of the whites of egg,  beaten dry, with two tablespoons of  sugar.  Bake a delicate brown.  Currant Pie.���������Stow and mash ono  pint green currants until all are  burst, using as little water as will  keep thorn from burning. Add sugar  to make it vory sweet, nnd one soda  cracker rolled fine. Bake between  two crusts. Ripe currants may be! to his  used without stewing. (patrol.  Cocoanut    Pie.���������One    quart     milk, j    "I  cannot  toll   him  the  truth,    fa-  fivo eggs,   and   one  grated   cocoanut;; ther,"  said  the young woman,  bent   the     sugar   and   eggs   together,)    "Truth���������of  course  not!"   exclaimed  and  stir     into   the   miik   when   hot. j the general,   suddenly    rowrd.     "Of  mors camo tlown tho long flight of  stops from Oovcrnment Houso,. ho  icit tho happiest man alivo. Ho had  put, his fato to tho test, and tho result had boon encouraging. Maisio  woultl probably bo his alllancod wifo  in a fow hours.  Iio hailed a passing hansom, and  was driven io tho "United," whistling gaily ns ho wont. In tho club  smokci'oom he found his friend, Lieutenant Uallnm, alono, for which ho  was effusively thankful.  "What's put you in such good humor?" askud Ilallaun. "If you wero  accustomed to being hard-up, I  should imagine you had coma into  some cash,"  Tho Hon. Fitzgerald drew a chair  to his friend's side nearer tho lire,  and lit a cigar,  "But," continued Hallam, "you'ro  ono of thoso lucky beggars, with all  the' tin, nnd most of tho girls!"  "Well, I've got tho best of thorn at  last!" exclaimed Ohnlmers. -'Truth  is, old man���������only keep it dark I toll  you���������I'vo proposed to Maslo Mesh-  more������������������'  "Antl bcon accepted oh?" interrupted Hallam.  . "N-no, not exactly; but X am confident I shall be. She nearly promised. Said she would liko a few  hours in which to think it oven���������-woman-like, you know. But I haven't  an atom of doubt. As a fact, tho  general  is  in  my  favor!"  Tho confidence" ho felt was plainly  expressed in his features', and, as ho  finished speaking, ho took tho cigar  from his mouth, and laughed merrily. Hallam shook him heartily by  tho hand,  "Uy Jove!" hc exclaimed. "Seems  a sure thing. My heartiest congratulations. You've tried hard enough  goodness knows, for a. long timo!  Eighteen months,  I believe?"  Tho Hon. Fitzgerald nodded assent,  and Hallam  added:  "She's a bonnie woman, and you  ought to  be proud!"  "I am," agreed tho. other. "For  I feel suro she will consent. Sho just  wanted to have a talk with thc general, antl, since ho has shown mc  his approval, I do not fear."  Could the Hon. Fitzgerald Chalmers have known what was passing  at that moment in tho interval between father aifd daughter, he would  havo been disagreeably surprised at  tho 'nature of the conversation. His  proposal was being discussed, but  from quite another, antl more dramatic, .standpoint to that whicli ho  imagined. Soon after ho had left  the house, Maisio wont to her father  in the library, and acquainted him  with" tbo offer of marriage whicTi she  had just  received.  For sonic moments thc pair stood  facing each other without uttering a  word, until Maisie, impatient at her  father's silence,   spoke again.  "Toll me, what can I do, father?  Fitz-has proposed to me, as I expected he would, seeing that 1 have  accepted all his attentions. I  thought at first it was to be just".a  lirtation; but be wants me to marry*  him���������antl  marry him  now!"  Dfaisie's eyes wore red and wot  with tears. General Lord Meshmore  paced thc room, torn between conflicting emotions. Tho cold, stern  soldier��������� "Muderous Meshmoro," as he  had been called in a'famous* war history���������was now a weak man of nerves  and fears. IDs only daughter clung  nis   as   he   went   his     short  then adtl the cocoanut and spice to  taste. Bake witli a bottom crust  twenty minutes.   *2   SNAIL'S INTELLIGENCE.  Give~Pro'6t=of'-itr-by=Goming-Hegu-  larly  to  Meals.  course not!     You must accept him!"  "Father'."  "Yes. accept hira!" he said sharply. "You have told me that you  lovo him. I blundered, Maisio, when  I made you marry Reginald. But  now.that he is  dead,  you  must  not  spoil  your TTie~liy^lehyjKg~Si^down^  right   honest  awl   good   follow.* Ac-  generally ;cept,  him  ami   be  happy,   dearie,   aw  T  Maisio kissed hcr father on the Upland gavo hia arm a gentle pressure  "You do efhoer my spirits, father,"  sho said, with a protty smile. "I  feel now as though I must accept  him!"  "That's right, deario," responded  hor father. "I want to help you.  Tho blunder which has brought all  this troublo upon you is mine, and  I am going to do what I can to repair tho injury. So wo will forgot  your scoundrel husband in your now  happiness.   Shall wo?"  And thus it camo about that  Maisio consented to become the Hon.  Fltvigcrnld Chalmor's wifu.  n.  Tho marriage of Lord Meslui-oro'a  only daughter to tho Hon. Fitagor*  aid Chalmers woultl bo tho most  brilliant event of nn exceptionally  brilliant season, Tho young Under-  Secretary wus exceedingly popular  inside tho House and in society;  whilo General Moslunoro and his  daughter, during his command of tho  Eastern Division, had surpassed all  records for entertaining at Government House. -  For weeks tho papers had boon noticing, at considerable length, tho  numerous features of tho coming  ovent. Not alono in society circles,  but inotho street thc affair was a  favorite topic of conversation. KVcry  day brought fresh surprises iir lovely  presents, and tho crowning honor  was whon thoro came a kindly personal letter from tho King, intimating that his Majesty would bo reprc-  cntod at tho wedding.  And now, on tho doy before the  wedding, tho young couple had inspected with delight the long rows  of costly gifts; and now, parting  from each other for tho Inst time,  Fitzgerald hold his prospective bride  in his arms, and kissed hcr upturned  faco. Sho was somewhat palo, and  trembled oven as ho spoko to her.  "To-m,orrow," ho whispered, "and  then, little woman, wo shall have  each other!"  "Yes, to-morrow, Fitz>���������only tomorrow; yet it seems such a long  time!" sho whispered. "Oh, I wish  I had you mine nowl"  AVJint made her say that sho could  not tell; but thc words brought a  look of -intense pain into hcr lover's  face. Ho drew hcr more closely to  his  breast.  ".Why, you have mc already," ho  answered, with an effort of gaiety.  "I am yours���������all yours���������now! What  over makes you so sad, sweetheart?  I shall never leave you. No, no;  I lovo you too dearly. And tomorrow my very own Maisio will bo  the queen of thc smartest event of  tho year���������and my wifo!"  Maisio never revealed what had  lieen in her heart when she ���������.���������.uttered  her fear, and Fitzgerald went to his  chambers  wondering greatly.  A shoal of telegrams of congratulations awaited . hiini, a number of  visiting-cards, and an unexpected  visitor. He attended to thc latter  first. '"'. *' .  " The gentleman was seated comfortably in the reception-room whon  Fitzgerald entered. He gave the  name of Lieutenant Reginald Max-  ton,  and was smartly dressed.  "I have not the honor of your.acquaintance," said the Hon. Fitzgerald genially, tendering'his hnnd to  the other.  "Nor    I yours,"    pui     in  Mnxton  promptly.      "To   tell   the   truth,      I  have only been back in  England     a  few  days."  "And  your   business  with   mo   now  is "  "Your wedding," Lieutenant Max-  Ion interrupted; and the Hon. Fitz-  gvrald gave a sharp look of surprise.  'Die visitor continued: "T. have seen  it announced in the ovening papers,  and believe ths event takes place  to-morrow."  "I cannot see that this can concern a stranger," observed tho Hon.  Fitzgerald irritably. "I am pressed  for time, so perhaps you will como  to  the  point!"  Lieutenant Maxton stood bofore  the fireplace, nnd puffed vigorously  at a cigarette.  "I,will," ho replied cynically. "The  fact is. you will bc marrying my  "wif*!"  -������otip=-TCifet'i--alm.Qst shriekctl.Fitz-  A WHALE HUNTER'S STORY  ADVENTURES AND PROFITS OF  THE BUSINESS.  Facility   With* Which    the  "Uses His-Monstrous  Flukes.  Whale  Tho    harmless     slug is  credited   with  no  greater  intelligence j know you  will  bo with  him  than   tho  power     to  crawl   aimlessly)    "Suppose   Fitz   should     discover?"  nbout,   leaving  a slimy  track behind j nsked Maisie,  her voice almost chnk-  jit.       In  a    letter    to     thc     London j ing.      "Or   suppose   Reginald   is   not.  half  a  teaspoonful (Times,   however,   Dr.   Horace   Dobcll, [dead?  Oh,   it   is   impossible���������Impossi-   came  goraltl.    "You   lying  scoundrel,   what  do  you mean'"1"  "The Hun.  .Vaisio  Meshmoiv.  is my  wife,"     continued       iftixton    coldly.  "Serimingly.   our    marriage  hns  been  kept ti     sc.-ri't  from     you.    Hi"     be-  Mrs.   Maxlon     during    C-mcrnl  each of salt and pepper, a teaspoon-1 writing from Parkstone Heights, Jhle! micro is nolhing for mo but M.shmore's tenure of tlje lurtlnm  fui   of   sugar,   nad   a   few   sprigs      of IDorset, gives remarkable proof of its ito   livo   in   wretchedness!" jcorrcmandcrship.    For certain  reasons  parsley or sweet marjoram. Cover possession of nn exc/llentc memory j "My denr Maisie, you really must, 'hat marriage wns kept tv .secret;  the saucepan and simmer gently for|nnd a considerable amount of rea- ijook 'at thing.*, more reasonably. No- 'but."���������and here ho bunded a thin roll  an   hour     and   a   hnlf.   stirring      fro- j soiling  power. [body knows  but vou nnd  I and your:*"1'  Papers   to   FiUgern Id���������"there    are  j    One  morning  I  observed   the  silver !dear,   dend   mother   of   tho   rnnn ' you iproofs!"  I trail  of a slug or snnil  round  about ; married      during     our      residence   in -j    Tho. young ohlcor,  half dazed,   took  ; the spot  where   the  crumbs had been. . India.     There  b>  not another soul   in'the   prolT������*rM   roll,   hut   ditl   not  open  Even   lho  smallest  crumbs   had   been IjCnglonil  who   knows,   or  cares.      He  cleared   np. ' (won  you   by  fraud.       I was  deceived  "But what especially fill-tick mo hy all his pretensions to wealth and  wns thnt. tho trail came straight up ibirth. nnrl ho proved to he nothiVg  to  tho  crumbs.     There  was   no  sign;hut  n   !ow-horit  rogue.     Ho  deserted  Within tho entire range of natural  history thore is nothing, in my opinion! which can givo to tho general  student a more profound intorost  than tha wlialo, and nothing in all  tho various pursuits of mankind possesses a moro e.vclting uml thrilling  Hold of adventure than that of hunting tho whale, says tt writer in  Forest and Stream.  My experiences as a wh'alor liavo  been chiefly as nn ofllcor, and I havo  both muxle and lost a good tloal of  monoy sailing from Now London ai.id  Now Bedford.  If wo can bellovo anything that is  assorted by tho wiso average man  of science, tho whalo would novor  mako a flsh stow, as it in in reality  a quadruped. It is a warm blooded  animal, and those appendages called  fins or flippers are in roality its  legs, its heart is liko that of man  and other mammals, having two  cavities an'd doing double duty in tho  lino of circulating blood. It is not  the offepring of an egg, but is born  alive. What aro generally called tho  blowholes of the whale are really  nothing but its nostrils. The whalebone of commerce comes from the  jaw of the animal and is found only  in tho variety'known ns tho Greenland or right whalo.  While tho whalebone whale has no  teeth, thtosc of the sperm whale oro  carried in thn lower jaw; and as to  tho size which, those creatures attain  it may bo stated that thoy have boon  known to measure 100 feet in length  orfd to have'weighed nearly 250 tons.  We often hear tho remark that something we seo "is vory like a whale,"  and yot thero are several animals to  which we may truthfully apply that  remark,* viz, tlio dolphin, purpoiso,  grampus, bottle noso manatee, sea  elephant arid narwhal, or sea uni  corn. Nor will I stop to give all tho  particulars bearing upon the equipment of a^lwhaling ship, but proceed  at onco^Aviithr?;  v SOME OF. MY "ADVENTURES.  And first in "fancy, lot us tako a  littlo run in tho South Atlantic. Wo  are in the vicinity of a groat plain  of seaweed, which is tho favorilo  food of the right whale, and they  arc numerous in that vicinity, One  of the crew has ascended to the  "crow's nost," for you must understand that it is dcsirablo to discover  a whale or a school of thorn bofore  -wc..come near enough to sec them  from the 'deefc. .     '       -,,.   ���������  Tlie boats aro .'ready, .equipped .'with  liarpoons arid lances and rope, the  crows duly assigned, when lo! from  the crow's nost comes tho cry, there  she "blows!" "Where away?"  "Abeam, to the leeward, sir.'*' "How  far ofT?" 'Two miles, sir/' "Let  us know. when tho ship hetuls for  he'r." "Ay ay, sir!"* "Keep her  ofT���������hard up tho helm!" Hard up  it is, sir." "Steady! S-t-o-a-<tl-5'!"  "There she blows! A' large right  whale with her calf, sir, heading  right at us. -Very", large.' Thero sho  blows! Sow half a milo off and  feeding, sir, and coming right toward us!" .Wc lower away and are  off. Now it is that you see the advantage of the drill we have practised for many days.  Every movement must be quick  and sure with no guessing or questioning what is best. There goes  the great mother whale followed by  her ofBspring, both of them moving  slowly and not heeding the coming  danger. The boat has reachotl her  side a fearful flurry of excitement  follows among the crew. One, two,  and perhaps three lances aro thrown,  amd away shu goes coloring the  ocean with her blood, dragging tho  ropo with fearful rapidity, then  stops, goes into what wc call a flurry, or death agony, when she swims  with her head out of the water, making a circuit of njiles and lashing  tho soa into foam'with her tail, aind  as sho grows -"' weaker and weaker  slackens her pace, straightens herself out upon the water on her side  nr.Kl with lior hen.il invariably to-  '.waud^theu.oag^tllcs. Jf.Jlli.e.-_!A,j*������_L_ is  queully. Strain through a colander  to gel cit tlie ckin. then through n  liner sieve. Put the puree back in  the pan. sprinkle over it n heaping  toaspoonful of Hour, mix thoroughly;  then po:ir over it. stirring nil the  time, one quart of hot milk. Add a  tablespoonful of butter, antl nimmer  fifteen minutes. Then add half a  pint of rich crenm and a tfaspoonful  of fine cut parsley: heat, but do not  boil, and xerve with toasted crackers.  3IIXTS  !**OP. THE HOME.  Damp spots on rnorocco leather  should be rubbed with methylated  -spirit. Two or threo applications  may  bc necessary.  To clean n Wall-paper.���������Take a  very dry crust of bread with about  an inch of crumb on it, and rub the  soiled patch lightly till the ytain  disappears.  To Cure Sore Throats.���������Put a  teaspoonful of powdered borax into  one tablespoonful of honey. Dissolve  over heat. When cool, apply it repeatedly with a camel's hnir brush to  the throat ond roof of thc moulh.  This will soon effect a cure antl allow the patient to swallow comfor-  tablv.  Dripping, if carefully clarified witli  boiling water, and .melted into n firm  cake, makes as good pastry for pies  and  tarts  as  butter.  To remove tho smsl] of onions froini  tho  breath  eat  pamley  and  vinegar;  hnd  got all  he could  out  o?  you.    I   tell  yon   he   wns     killed  Africa. I   saw     his   name     in  list!"  '  "Are you  sun:  tressed   Maisio.  "Absolutely!  interrupted  of .wandering   about,     in     search      of 'you   within   three,   months,   after  them,   but  an  evidence  of  knowledge,  of  the exact  place at which   to  find  them.  "I watched tho window after this,  and found that just before dark a  large brown slug camo straight up  to the spot and ate the remaining  crumbs.  "For two moro nights it came  again and ate thc crumbs as before,  being accompanied on tho second  night by a small brown slug about  half its  size.  "I then washtid out. the trail that  it should not be guided by it, hut  the sing continued to como on fine  nights. Except on wot nights, when  it did not appear at all, it came  straight over lhe edge of tho. sill opposite tho crumbs, nnd continued to  come every few nights throughout  duly and  August.  "Due night I put out some, grains  of rice, but the slug left thcm untouched.  "Thc in teres ting question for scientists," adds Dr. 'Dobell, "is. How  did tho slug find tho crumbs in the  first instance, and how did il know  tho exact time ut which to climh  up for thcm?"-  llC   ;  and ���������  in  the j  it. Instead. h.s gazed long nml silently into Iho firo. u Ills face was ashen  pale.  "I let'., her," continued Maxton.  "Why, is no matter of yours: but  there -.Tore sufficient reasons. I am  not going to troublo her, but I  thought   f  woulti   warn  you."  'i'he   Ifon.   Fitzgerald   had      become  .quite   oblivioi.s   of   his .sjurrouiullngH.  began  the  dis-'Ho  toyed   with  the tape  around    tho  jroll.  antl.   aft.er some soenmls,   buried  Lord'i his  face  in     his  hands.   The     whole  Meshmore..     "There     tire   not   a   hun-'fabric   of  hi.s   love's   dream   had   lop-  tlrcd,   or   a   dozen.   Lieutenant  Regin-jplod'    down     nbout     his   ears.      To-  ald  Maxtons   in   tho  Army.      And   if jmnrrow���������nh. what hopes lie had built  he   wns   not,   he   couldn't   como.    bnck   on   that!     To-morrow   to  you   again;   he  knows  better.     .So  your marringe cannot be discoverer!. "  'Tt is n dreadful deceit to practice!" urged Maisio. "Yet. oh, I  tlo love,  him!"  "There art* while nnd black lies,  child: so there are horinloss nnd  sinful deceits," answered tho general. "This secret i.s yours and mine  nlone. We will keep it so; and you  will accept Fitzgerald. That deceit  can do no harm, antl will innke you  both hnpp.v. I want you lo do It,  dear. 11 is n greater sin to waste  your botiuly untl mar your life by  moping over the gloomy pnsl. Why,  tliere is a brilliant future before you,  if you will only seize the opportunity!"  When be roused himself, with nn  effort., to regain control of his shattered nerves, his visitor hnd gone,  ffe  wns  nlone  with  his   misery.  ******  On the following morning fnshion-  nblo sorioly were startled to readin  the daily popers. set In lho largest  type, wilh hold headitigs, the Imld  announcement Hint, "The marriage of  (he Ifon. Miiisln Meshmore, only  daughter (>f Cenernl Lord Meslim.oi'e,  t.o tbe lion, l'it/gorald Chalmers, arranged lo be ceb-brntetl lo-dny nt  St. fleorge'M, lb)novor ,Squnro, will  nol Inlte pla>'". Cfront sympathy will  he roll, for lhe young fatly, who is  prostrated with crief. No renson is  forllKoiiiin..'.* f'.it- t lit* nbtviidonint'iit. of  the  mari'ingij."���������London   Answers.  blowing the son makes a clear breach  over hor tis if sho wore a rock and  this litis sometimes -deceived thc mariner. I rememlier one instance where  a cuplain reported the discovery of  a rock in t.he track to fiuropo nnd  suggested that this had perhaps boon  tho cause of many shipwrecks, , whon  he hnd only btxm deceived b.v a dead  whalo.  it has ff/*f|iiciil ly happened in my  experience thut a whale afler being  harpooned has turned in anger upon  his pursuers nml with his great  flukes shattered their boat to pieces  and  KTLLF.n .MANY M13N;  arjd I have also Known a wlitilo when  *>ngt'.V to raise himseli' so fur out of  waler as to look like a mnn on his  feet, ttmi then to let hitnscir down  with a crash upon the ill fa led boat.  Ami then the tinei-d with which the  whale can move is ft t'otitiiiunl wonder with all tho.-.c who have hunted  them. The quickness and facility.  Willi which tbey can use tlieir monstrous flukes Is only r-tpialled by the  coachman's whip, ft was never my  fate to be seriously injured bv tm  niigr.v whfiln, but Ihey. havt- frequently suggested very tliK.-it.lfd  thoughts  of f.'U'rnil.y.  Once a fellow dragged me downward Into tlio sea "full forty rtilli-  orns," judging by my feelings; nnd  fm n not her occasion f happened to  bo on tho back of a big sperm whnlo  when ho made n start, nnd, holding  on to the harpoon, 1 travelled for a  short liinc in n circle at tlie rnle of  thirty miles an hour, when I thought  it. expedient to nlitle into the sen,  nn'd trust to being picked up by one  of lho boats forming the hunting  party. Antl what will strike you as  a lish story, but it i.s true, hefore I  was rescued I actually wont within  nn ace of swimming directly into tho  mouth of another whale which was  strolling along lho spot as if anxious  to inquire about the general commotion  going  or.i. '  Tho largest right whalo I ever saw  was captured off tho coust of Kamchatka by ono of my. crows, and it  was during tho samo year that I  procured ���������a full ship of 3,200 bar-  rols of oil ami 40,000 pounds of  Whalobono within tho spaco of sixty  days. When tho monster just mentioned was killed tho sea wns vory  rough'.* Aftor the boats had bcon  lowered, It was necessary to move  them with groat caro, lest an urn-  lucky wnvo should carry us on top  of th'o whale, ami this actually hap-  poned, for when 1 called upon tho  harpoonur to fastiw ho dltl so, when  our boat wns instantly thrown upward, ami ono man killed. Fiyrtuni-  a'toly, before tho boat filled, 1 hatl  timo to put a fatal lanco into tho  whale, and wo woro rescued by another boat.  As I was gottlng in I saw near by  thc body of tho killed man, in u  standing position, a fow foot below  tho surface of tho water, when 1>y  diving I caught him by tho car, but  a Wg wavo fame, causing me to  lose my hold, nnd tho body of oiir  brave comrade went down out of  sight in tho bluo waters. Into this  whalo wo wero obliged to send a succession of lances, ami hc spoutotl  blood and ''disgorged food for six  hours, having ii.i tlhat time lost what  we estimated at a hundred barrels  of blood alone. -Hut I must toll you  something more about this horo of  Kamchatka. Ho was as long as our  ship and she measured 120 foot;  his greatest girth 75 foot, head 30  foot long, and  FLUKES 30 FEET BROAD.  His lips albrio made thirty barrels  of oil; throut and tongue the samo  amount, and tho total yield of his  blubber 240 barrels. 'I'he ;boiie taken from the insido of liis mouth  weigihod 2,800 pounds, and his market value, according to the prices of  oil  and bone thou ruling,  $18,000.  "And'now, without going into all  the particulars as to how wo hunters of the sea do our work when  preparing onr game for preservation,  I will givo you a few facts which  have como to my psrsoi.nl knowledge bearing upoti tho natural history of tlie whale. Hero, for example, is a fact which I liavo not scon  mentioned' in ar.ty 'authentic books.  On taking off tho skin of a whale,  you come to the blubber, which  rests lipon the flesh or muscle, and  thio I havo found to bo covered with  a fino hair or fur, about an inch  long; to this fur is attached a "black  pigment which answers tho purposo  and is used by thc sailors ns you  would a common soap; but the significance of this fact is that in reality it makes the whalo a fur-boaring  animal.  And now about their numbers. I  have sailed a thousand miles without seeing oven, the sign of a whalo;  and yet in the? North Pacific T have  on-? several?��������� occasions looked upon a  thousand or, moro individuals of the  sperm variety in ono great school/  covering the sea, apparently, to the  horizon, arid when tumbling and  rolling and pitching and spouting  they have presented a scene of gran-  dour and confusion which no pen  could 'desoribe. In 'these schools  there is always one fellow swimming  in thc centro who soems to be the  leader of the host, and he is called  by the sailors tho Old Soldier.' And  I maj' also here mention tlie curious fact that when you strike a  whale with the lanco and he makes a  demonstration with his tail the entire herd go through precisely tho  samo motion, as if influenced hy a  kind  of  magnetism.  "Nor should I omit an allusion  to the almost human intelligence of  the whale. I have known them to  Ho perfectly still lor.g enough to let  mc get within reach of thoir flukes  and then suddenly . turn upon the  boat and crush it with their capacious jaws; and thus have I seen tliem  watch for and destroy a numbor of  boats arid kill a number of men. All  this is vcry unkind on the part of  tho kingly creatures of the ocean,  but I havo novor boon disposed to  blame them for any of their savage  occcntricitios. Not only aro they  huntod and killed but they havo tu  moro terrible enemy that goes -by.  th'o namo of the "killer." This ^creature is sorpont-liko in .appearance,  armed with sharp teeth, and as the  right whale often swims with his.  mouth^opcn^tlui^ki Her ^fastens him-  ~StAi  107 YEARS OLD AND WELL  AGED   WOMAN     IKT     ENGLAND  STILL ENJOYS LIFE.  Born in Baltimore in  1707,    Now  Hakes Hor Home Near  London.  Healthy, activo, ami in tho poscs-  sion of all hor faculties, there is living less than a do/en mik*H from  Loudon a woman claiming to bo 107  years old. Her namo ls Miss Henrietta Johnson, tuul slio resides in  the lowly neighborhood of Kingston,  ou tho Tluimo.s, whui-n sho has boon-  enjoying a pension sinco the middlo  of tho last century.  Miss Johnson's history is ol moro  thnn ordinary intorost. She says*  sho wns born in llnltimora in 1707,  but is not quito sure ot the month  uml dato. As a baby girl she was-  adopted antl "brought up by a wealthy Baltimore family named Caton,  ami during her life has been brought  in contact with mtiny-cclebrltios. In.  tho first decade of tho nineteenth  century she met frequently llclsy  Patterson, a relativo of tho Oatons,.  a beautiful woman who married a.  brother of the great Napoleon.  PLAYMATE OF NAPOLEON'S SON  She rcmombors playing in the garden with Jerome Patterson, also tho*  day whon ho went to France, but  was refused pormiasion to land because NnjMilcon wouldn't roctrgnizo  his  brother's  marriage  with  Betsy.  The throe daughters- of tho family  with whom she lived had tho distinction, of ..marrying. Knglish poors.  Ono w-as wedded to the duke ol  Leeds, another to the marquis of  Wollcsley, antl the thiitl to Lord  Stafford. All of those have boon-  dead for many years.  About sixty years ago Miss Johnson wont to England and became-  housekeeper for Lndy Wollosley, with  whom she lived until tlio hitter's-  death at Hampton court palace,  about fifty years ago. Sho then ro-  tirotl from service and took up hor,  residence at Kingston on a comfortable annuity granted hcr by the  three sisters.  The old woman rclatss with satisfaction tho fact that sho has not  tasted medicino for a quarter of a  century. Twenty years ago slio was  recommended whisky, and water as a  nightcap, and thinks it is tliat  which has kept hor alive.  ALWAYS AN. EARLY IUSEJt.'  Throughout hcr' long life she has  been an early riser, and oven now  gets tip at S o'clock in the morning,  an'd until two years n.go was able  to do a littlo gardening. Hoi' appetite for food is mucli hotter than  that of'thousands of persons half a  century younger, hor hearing is  perfect, and her eyesight scarcely yet'  affected by advancing- years. She is  always cheerful,  and:ding's' to lifo.  "If I live as happily as I do now,",  she said,"I want to live a long  time yot. T. sliould love to visit tho  land of? my birth. T-havo not a single relative living, and, as far an I  know, no one is now alive who Knew  me before I left Baltimore."  DISRAELI'S  BEADY WIT.  Some Stories of the Famous British Premier.  self  on   his -tongue   When   thus  tacked tho  whalo is greatly alarmed  and utters  A MELLOWING SOUND  which may bo heard a distance of  ter.i miles, meanwhile lashing tho sea  into foam with his flukes. After  the killer has oaten away the tongue, then, ns a matter of courso,-tho  whalo dies from starvation.  Hut again, to look upon a pair of  whales when fighting with each other  is a sig*ht thut can never bo forgotten. 1 have seen nn old fellow, nftor  coming out of such a conliict, with  his 'jawbones bent till out of place  iiiitl with fearful gashes on his head  and all along his body. When thus  fighting���������ar.i'1 tht: lenders of the  various schools often come together  ���������they roar, which resembles distant  thunder, and the spray which often  scatter into the air reminds ore of  the surf on a rocky short;.  Antl here conies in an incident  which happened lo me at New Zealand a great many years-ago. I  had killed a whole, antl having stripped olT the blubber cast o!T the car-  cuss. Tiio wind antl tide landed it  high nutl dry on the shore. A few-  weeks afterward,. ��������� on visiting this  spot, I found that n whole family of  natives hod eaten thoir way into the  carcass and turned''ft'."hito-a* J4'jbito^-  tion. This was anything but a  "sweet home," and its influence���������  such as il was���������pervaded tho whole  couniry for miles around.  Who shall deny the wit of Disraeli,  whether in tho House of Communis  or in private life? Some of his remarks have bocomo historic, as when  in a debate on the corn-laws when  Pool had made his volte face: "Tho  right honorable gcntloman has  caught the "Whigs bathing and has  walked away with their clothes"; or  when he called Lord Derby "the  Prince Hupert of parliamentary discussion";. "His charge is resistless,*  but when he returns from tho pursuit ho always finds his camp in tho  possession  of the enemy."  Thc Disraeli of early days was no  loss witty. He had quarrelled with  his father���������Isaac Disraeli of "Curiosities of Literature" fame���������whom the  ltite Lord Dufl'crih's mother was anxious to meet. One fine day Disraeli  arrived with his father in his right  hand, so to speak. Setting him  down in a chair and looking at him  as if ho wore some object of voi'tu of  -whit*li___zho____wan_^d_tp:^_clisposo, thc  younger  man saitl in a somewhat  schtcnioiis manner: "Mrs. Blackwood  I hnvo brought my father. I. have  become reconciled to my father on  two conditions; the first wus tliat  he should como and seo you; tho second thnt ho should pay my debts."  This is an admirable example of tho  impudence and nonchalance of tho  man who announced that ho stood  for Parliament '.'on his head," and  and is a worthy companion of the  story told of* the day when, as a  young man, ho was driving with .Sir  Philip Doso to Shrewsbury, whore,,  at the general election, ho hnd boon  nominated as the Conservative candidate. As they neared the borough, Sir Philip noticed a largo poster, stopped the carriage, nnd calling- his friend's attention to it, remarked: "It is something about  you." 'Disraeli read the words  printed in largo letters: "Judgment  Debts of Benjamin Disraeli. Tory  Cnn-ditlale for Shrewsbury." '.."Underneath was a list of debts upon which  judgment had boen signed. This ho  perused carefully. :, Then he turned  to Sir Philip ��������� and said placidly:  "How accurate it is! Now let us  go on or we shall bo late." He won  the election!  TtATSlSD BY ACETYLENE..  it,  'but  fer  vou  tho I cs  "Mobliy youse won't believe  ma'am," suid the hungry hobo,  I've boon a-lookin' fer work  more'n ten years." "Well,  needn't look no farther," said  stem-faced kind lady; "I have plenty  of      it  right  here,   ai.d "   '"Sense  mo. ma'am," interrupted the patient  looker. 'As I sod, I've lieen lookin'  fer work, but now that. I've found  it me curiosity is satisfied. Orry  voor,   ma'am."  Acetylene gas is generally utilized  for motor niwl cycle Jumps, but in  Germany it is being employed for  salving vessels. Large hollow receptacles, called pontoons, containing  calcium carbide, arc sunk., and fastened to the submerged ship by div-  When the water, entering tlio  pontoon, comes into contact with  the calcium carbide, acetylene gas  immediately generates As the gas  cannot, escape from tne pontoons, it  rentiers the latter buoyant, so lhat  they rise to tho ourfac>. raising the  ���������'sunken vessel  with  thcj.i.  Id**- f'J  i;.'j.';.^..j.Tk.;.^,j.-Q..;.-������..j.-������.;.������..;.*..>*������.*;*-*  ���������  t  J  ���������>  *  THE AFFAIR AT  THE PARK HOTEL  you  tho  ������;.������������;������������*������;������-*������;������*%.������jv^.j������^������j������**������;������*������J������*������-������J������'������**J������^>*  I.  There was a commotion at lho  Park Hotol. Tho manager, surrounded by a number of employe**  Has speaking rapidly untl gcst'i'iilui*  ing wildly at. ono of lho bt'uk-keep-  01 s. who stootl boforo him will wl  lips antl a faco us white as dein.li.  Every word fell on the girl liko a  blow in tho fuco.  "Ono moro chanco I give you'" In*  vociferated    at  length.     "Will     you  givo up  tho    ring or not?     It  mnldo your   sentence lighter if  do."  There wns    no response from  quivering lips of tho shrinking girl.  ''There's' no doubt whatever you  stolo it,:' pursued tho manager; "but  I am allowing you tho opportunity  of giving it up, and so, in somo degree, palliating your crime. Now,  aro you going to speak, before I call  in  tho pollco?"  Tho girl cowered before him and  hcr features writhed in agony, but  she mndo no answer to her accuser.  Tho manager was almost livid with  H passion. Decently tho Park had acquired an unovitably reputation for  thefts from tho guests, and business  had consequently' suffered. That  i, morning a valuable diamond ring belonging to James P. Bronton, tho  American millionaire, had boen stolen, nnd tho manager congratulated  himself on having discovered the'culprit almost in tho net. His rage at  the knowledge that the thief was ono  of hi.s trusted book-keepers knew no  "bounds.  "Vcry well!" he snapped. "It's no  use, I see.    Call a policeman!" j  At this juncture the door opened,  and tho. figure of tho tall, broad-  shouldered American appeared in tho  doorway.  "Halloa! What's tho matter?" ho  asked, pausing to survey the group.  "I nra sorry to say wo have a case  of theft, here, sir," said tho manager,  deferentially, "and, .unfortunately,  you nre the victim. This morning,  -when you went out, you left a diamond ring on your dressing-table.  The servant who entered the room  immediately afterwards observed  ^that it was a vory valuable ring,,antl  drew the attention of my..wifo to  it. Unfortunately, tho door was  eft open for about half an hour,  tand- in the meantime the ring was  stolen. Wo hnvo -'discovered the culprit in tho person of Lucy Jowctt",  one of rny book-koepors. who was  seen to enter tho room before it was  ocked:? Tier conduct on being qucs-  .ionod place* the "matter beyond all  loubt. I was just sending for a  lonsthble. nnd can only express my  ���������egret  nt  tho  oerurrencn."  The American*'pulled at his cigar  .ml looked hard at tho shrinking  firl. Slio^wnSb so young���������she looked  arely-twenty���������and so pretty; her  *i-'eat' eyes seemed to appeal to him  or compassion; and an ovormaster-  ng Pity and desire to save her sciz-  d'hiin.  "You are quite certain about it.  ,;tako* it?" ho drawled. "Wait just  -second," ho said, ascending' tho  tairs three at a time.  Next moment '--he-stepped' lightly  own and confronted tho manager  nee more.  "See here, you'vo mado a mis-  ikc," ho said, holding out his loft  and, on which a massive diamond  ng scintillated.  Tho manager looked mystitiod.  "Whero did you find it,  sir?"   ������ho  ammorod.  'Why,  it's been on  my finger     all  ,e time!"     tbo    American laughed,  'vo got so many of 'em that   it's  metimes difficult to locate 'cm.     I  ���������collect' now that I returned for this  it  under  half  an  hour  after  leav-  ; my room this morning.    So that  ars up tho mystery, I guess."  F,'I am vory glad to hear it," said  '��������� manager,  flushing uncomfortably  Ier tho other's cool  gaze.      Thon,  ning to  the bo.ok-koeper,  ho said,  owe you  au  apology,   Miss    Jo-  :t.     I adviso you not to enter tho  !_LtsLj:ooiiis.���������^a!id-^=tIicn^stispicioi!=  1  not  rest   on you in case    any-  \\g liko this  occurs again."  Oh, sir,  I want to Ioavo at onco.  r    nmy,"  said    the girl, bursting  ���������> a Hood of tears.  lb.   very   woll.   Please  yourself,"  1 the mannger, curtly.    "You can |  o your    money  to  dato.      I will  -.ense with  the usual  notico."  th a murmur of thanks tho girl  jt-ied up to her room lo pack hor  . while the others dispersed to  r respective, posts. Half-way up  stairs tho girl was overtaken by  American.  '���������uy,  miss, come right In horo for  ojiient," ho called to hor.  ion they wore in his room     and  door wns  locked,  a grave     look  "No���������don't thank mo! Keep  straight���������that'll bo hotter. I reckon  you'll havo to got onothor job  Hero's any card. Refer anybody to  mo for a character. I trust you ���������  seo?"  "Oh, sir, I can't, thank you. Heaven will bless you!" faltered tho girl,  seized by a fresh outburst of violent  sobs.  "There, there���������don't cryl I shall  he opening a factory in this country  soon, antl perhaps I may bo ablo to  give you a start in Ihu ortllco,"  The next instant sho hatl gono, and  her benefactor atootl for a moment  in deep  thought.  H.  Tho great steel mtignnto Juntos P  Brent oil's factory hail raised Its tall  will cblmncys nmong its follows, in (hu  Midlands for upwards of fivo yours.  Burin; that timo a revolution hatl  been brought about In the hardware tratlo of (.ireul Britain. This,  the newest pliu.se of tho American invasion, had como at a particularly  crucial moment. For sonic years  British trade hud suO'oretl from t.lit*  importation of American-matlo goods  cheapened by tho vust resources of  that expansive country, and, as a  consoquonco, thousands of workers  had lost their employment. Finally,  os if to prove how far ahead American imethods of production woro to  their rivals', Bronton hud built,, a  huge factory check by jowl with  British  works.  Money was poured out liko wator  in tho equipment of the factory with  tho most up-to-date tools; but horo  prodigality, stopped short.* It is  .truo that by working ;on piece-work  linos high wages woro 'paid to somo  employes, but the sub-division of  labor had aroused all tho latent antagonism of trade unionists, who  strongly resented such methods. Tho  rules of service, too, wore so rigid,  and tho supervision so keen, that  mon who failed to turn out a stated  quantum of work wero "fired out"  in tho most approved Yankoo fashion.  At the outset Bronton frankly declared war ng'ain.'it all attempts 16  restrict tho output. Constituent'.-,  th>! men were in a perpetual state'of  ferment; for, while a fow rapid workers earned largo sums, the majority  suffered by comparison. The fortunate few 'wore subjected to such persecution by their fellows that thoy  throw up tho job in despair, and the  old-fashioned slow brigade, reinforced by others of tho same kidney,  commenced an active campaign  against their employer in the hope  of destroying altogether the now  methods. O  But they little knew tho man Ihey  had to. deal with in tho forceful  James F. Bronton. Ho retaliated by  announcing his determination to  stick to his system, though the business went to the dogs.  Thereupon lho men for aulalod  thoir demands in writing. Those wore  promptly rejected, and then the men  openly .threatened a general strike.  Their consternation may be imagined when Bronton suddenly foresti.-J.'ud  them by shutting down tho works.  Tho resentment of tho men knew  no bounds. Faced, however. by  such vast resources, they nnlizetl  their helplessness, and tho destitution of their homes impelled thcm. to  endeavor to mako terms with tln'ir  powerful antagonist. A hasty consultation' was held, and it was decided to offer to resume work on a  modification of the terms tln-y had  put  forward.  Wliile theso proceedings wore taking place and tho air was olive with  momentous issues Bronton sat in  his private room at his hotel. From  hero ho dirccled operations, seldom  going near tho works, but carrying  in his strong, clear master-brain  every detail of tho organization. He  alono controlled matters of policy;  his was tho hand that had signed tho  notico of a stoppaco.  As ho lay back in his comfortablo  arm-chair ho looked not five, but  ten years older than ho wns when ho  came to England. His hair was  touched with grey, and thero wero  lines on his faco which told bf ceaseless toil and strenuous thought.  Though barely thirty-five, ho possessed great wealth and wielded great  power. Of laJ^iyg^_JieiJuxd_jm_*_____,  dihnted~all~iht"e"rests to success; keeping an eyo on tho' object to be  achieved, and riding roughshod ovor  all opposition. Thoso who knew  him well said that ho had grown  ! ord and remorseless sinco ho had  como to England, and -thev told him  so.  And now, ns he sat there, his iijiurl  inverted to that incident at the Park  Hotel, and a shadow crossed his  fact*.  Ho remembered the fnco of tho girl  in all its placid beauty, with purity  antl uprightness of soul stamped on  every lino, and his faco flushed as ho  reflected on tho opisodo. Bah! Tho  one face in all the world that had  attracted him���������tho faco of a thief!  Ho was fast becoming a cynic. His  inlo the man's oyes and ho j friends were right in saying that ho  tl round sharply on her and (had grown hard and remorseless during the last fow years, but they  never dreamed tho cause. None  know better than ho that a chango  had taken place in his nature; and  now, as ho sat alono with his  thoughts, ho realized tho imminent  danger of his going from bad to  worse, and departing still" further  from the path of fairness and generosity.  An  hour  later  a  deputation  callod  and   olaccd  their  now   terms     befotyv  **d  ont:���������  *ay,  why did you  do  it?"  lie'only response was a fresh oul-  of weeping,  [ion  don't look liko a thief,"  the  went on.  in tenso tones.     "Ts  |;i  account  of poverty?    Oot    au  mother who is poor and wants  |>shm'cnt,   or anything  liko  that.  but    did  ��������� iri  bowed her head  lipeak.  I guessed  so.   Have .you got  |>.ing  now?"  sir."  lilt,  rid  of  it  quick,   too.  Well,     there's  nono  of  liciilnlc a.s to bo able to  Dear,  us     so  throw  Now, seo here. Promise mo  t-li.iicc.orlh you will bo honest:  \ig ns you  livo,  mind!"  roinlse,"   came   from   the  girl,  i'duod  accents.  'it's  right!   Now,   here's     some  lo  buy  tilings  for your     nm*  Producing     his   pocket-bonk,  'nl-cil    out    ten      twenty-pound  E.'-nd thrust IJiom Into her hnnd.  him.   Tho s,  in't'Iu-if-tern  sufferi..  sue   l<������,non  the lod was  ���������"!!t the  roso   !l tue  eyes,   i  "Sl'Vntfor  mt.'iiiiO.*  hnvo 'j some  ployiicfe-'-rig  aln'tlt.,*'  wori.sterms.  I >I"'.V ���������  \v;i,  j op.  mon withdrew, and thero were many  sad homes in Plumpton that night.  m.  Events quickly reached a climax  at Plumpton. Tho lock-out had  continued for six months, aud want  and misery stalked through tho  orstwhilo prosperous town liko a  spoctro. Appeals and protestations  aliko had been made in vain; Uren-  ton's heart wns adamantine, and at  lust tho peoplo had turned liko tho  proverbial worm. Appeals gave way  to demands, protestations to threats  and a largo forco of polico hod been  drafted into tho town In expectation  of a riot. Angry crowds paratl-*tl tho  si roots with banners flying, thc windows of tho factory wero smashed  with stones, and loud execrations  wore uttered against Brentnn  Amidst it all lho millionaire sat  secure in his room at Urn huti'.l.  Night aftor night tho men assembled  outside tho factory untl dcliivri'd in-  flpminatory Rpooches, and at length  tin nod thoir attention to tho hotel  Around ils walls thoy assembled in  thousands, nntl fists wore shaken nnd  ominous threats uttered. Tho lm  toi proprietors, alarmed nt tho .serious nspoct of .affairs, barricaded  thoir windows and implored Brenton  not to show himself to tho men. or  grave  consequences  might  follow  "Curse him! He skulks in thoro;  Ho dure- not go to the works, the  coward!"  criod tho crowd.  Bronton heard that cry, and tho  taunt stung him  to  tho quick.  Next morning tho hotel proprietors gave a sigh of relief, for their  guest liad gone to tho factory.  High up on tho fifth storey he sat.  gazing' out through the Window, a  look of 'determination on his features, and in his heart a grim resolution to sco the matter through���������  no mattci* what it cost.  As tho day woro on thc mon assembled in great force, and when a  whisper went round that tho "cursed  tyrant" was actually at the factory  mocking at tlieir misery and openly  defying thenie a great wave of .anger  passed  through the ranks.  Towards ovening the crowds still  further increased,.and a scene of tho  wildest, .excitement,. followed.- Stones  woro hurled at tho windows, and the  lifo of tho solitary inmate was  threatened.  Infuriated men and women brought  thoir pule and pinched children, and  held them up in thoir arms ns witnesses of their great sufferings. The  sight of tho wan-chocked iittlo ones  lashed the mon inlo a fury, and  fresh imprecations were hurled at  the head  of tho tyrant.  At length a sinslor suggestion  passed with lightning-like rapidity  through tho ranks.  "Firo the building! Destroy tlio  tyrant!" yelled a score of voices,  and instantly the cry was taken up.  Quickly the leaders clashed olT for  inflammable materials wherewith to  carry' out this dire threat, and soon  a great quantity of oil wns poured  on tho doors nntl through tho windows,  and matches were applied.  Amid thn shouts of tho people tho  flames burst forth, and with a roar  and a crackle the firo ascended skywards, casting its lurid glare, against  tho murky heavens.  Brenton, standing at the window,  saw the red serpent crawling upwards foot by foot; he heard 'the  fierce roar of tho flames and saw tho  smoko surging up liko a pall, anil ho  knew that in a short timo thoy  would reach him. A thousand  thoughts flashed through his brain  in that momont. Ho had beaten the  mon, but they were exacting a terrible price. For a brief instant ho  thought of tho face that had attracted him���������aye, which ho loved, in  spito of all!���������and  his  heart sank.  At length the instinct of self-preservation roso uppermost, and in a-  despairing effort ho started up and  scanned tho sea of* faces bolow. Not  a friend appeared amongst them;  not a voico raised itself on his behalf.  Just then ho heard the clatter of  hoofs and tho rattle of wheels, and  ho know that tho military had arrived on the scene. Three times thoy  charged up that densely-thronged  street, and after a severe struggle  succeeded in rolling tho rioters back,  Thon tho firo brigade came into ac-  jtigrLjind__tho^cnguie-ibegan=to���������play-  upon tho flames.  But the lire-escape was useless in  such an extremity. The lower part  of the building was.a mass of flames  nntl no man could live in such an  inferno  "Too ialol" hi: criod. in his-heart.  He rushed about tho building and  lookoti out from overy sitlo. All  around was tho same mass of flames  up to the second floor. Nothing  short of a miraclo could save him.  And then Bronton saw a miraclo  happen. From the highest storey a  ropo hung suspended to the- third  storey window, from whicli, on u  sudden, a figure sprang and, seizing  the rope, comimenced to ascend hand  ovor hand.  Fascinated by tho sTght, he watched, while the roar of the fire filled  his cars. Nearer and nearer came  tho climber by painful efforts, stopping short some-times, then struggling ahead again.  At length tho watcher saw something that made his heart beat'faster, and his hands clenched and a  thrill went through his whole being.  Tho climber was a woman!  Up,   up  sho climbed,   scorched     by  the    flames     and    blackened   by  tho  smoke,  until at  length  sho     reached  t!������j- window     wliero  Brenton   stood  i)ng,  and  then, with a great ef-  Y'hc     swung  herself   in   nt"   his  "Heavens!" he cried, starting back,  "It's Lucy���������tho thiefl"  "No���������not tho thiefl" criod the girl  exultantly, in ringing tones, and  snGwing him her bleeding hands.  "Oh, how I have waited for this moment lo toll you that I was innocent! It was my brother who was  tho thiefr To savo him I kept siiont.  Ho died six months ago, ami from  that momont I determined to sock  you out and toll you tho truth. I  obtained a situation in your ofllco,  and at last Heaven has given mo  tho opportunity to repay you for  sparing mo fivo yours ago. This  morning I got into tho factory and  fixed up this ropo. I wanted to  savo you; I know thoy would kill  you if thoy could."  A shudder convulsed the strong  man as ho listened to tho story of  her heroism. A dull, heavy load  seemed to pass from his soul.  You woro innocent! Oh, thank  ,Heaven! Whilo L���������selfish wretch that  I ma���������-havo bcon absorbed in amassing a fow moro miserable dollnrs you  sacrificed yourself. Lucy, you havo  saved my lifo and you havo humbled  mn to tho dust. Tho one redeeming  feature of my conduct is that I havo  lovod you for fivo long weary years  ���������lovod you oven while I doubted  you."  Iio paused and glanced at her face.  Something thnt ho saw there sent a  mighty thrill through his veins, and  his heart gavo a great bound.  "Lucy," ho whispered, in a voico  shaking with emotion, "is it possible? Can you lovo mo over such  a littlo?"  For answer tho girl's hands went  out to him, and he seized tham and  covered  thcm  with kisses.  "Give them the terms they ask,  for my sake!" sho whispered.  Ho knelt down and placed his arms  about her, holding hcr closo.  An hour later Brenton stootl on a  hastily-improvised platform and addressed tlio rioters.  "Men!" he cried, in vibrant tones,  "tho lockout is over. As soon as  f.liis factory can bo rebuilt you can  start afresh on your own terms. Tomorrow I will distribute."a hundred  thousand pounds to relievo the distress. You shall bo paid wages for  every, hour you have been put. If  you ask me why I give up the struggle, I answer that an English girl,  soon to bocomo my wifo, has taught  me my duty by performing a noble  act of self-sacrifice', while I fought  for imy own sellish ends."  When he hnd finished thoro was  ���������such a roar of cheering as had never  boforo been heard in Plumpton.���������  London Tit-Bits.  t %  Fashion  ...Talk  SAFE RULE TO  GO BY.  SO FUUNY.  . It was late in tho evening ns tho  young student was.,wending hi.s waj'  homeward from a concert and passing thc houso of a well-known physician.  .n������tihh0ni,,������ ������f V,C d01������llrwn1Jr. .as aIllio pelt is made the most of  speaking-tube,  underneath which  wasi,,. ,   ���������.,._   _ ���������t   ,��������� ,   ,,.���������  'Whistle   for     Dr. I  It's a iuistakq to buy ovorything  with an eyo lo its enduring qualities, oven if you'vo an oxtromoly  limited pocketbook. lt depends entirely for what purposo you chooso  your gown, whether or not it should  lust.  A fairly safo rule to go by is  that tho staple sort of clothes, made  in conservative ways, should bo  bought with a vory distinct idea of  "long life," and tliat ovening gowns,  especially If you're a good deal of  a butterfly, should be got with almost tho solo idea of effect.  We've all known tho unpleasant  sensation of putting too much money  in a gown nn-o then fooling that wo  must "get tho wear out of it," oven  though it bo a conspicuous stylo or  soils at its first wearing. Ami tho  woman with little money is the ono  who sudors most of all in such an  experience.  Evening gowns oughtn't to last  too long; business antl street clothes  can't���������always supposing it's tho woman with tho small purse who is  considering- the purchase. And  street clothes should bo of quiet, rather neutral, colors-���������the kind "you  don't got known by." as one woman  put it.  Afternoon gowns got hard wear���������  as hard as street clothes, in reality���������  so they should naturally bo mado  of materials that can hold their own  and yot not stretch nor shrink not-  got out of shape. They must bo got  to last, for the "set" and the  "hang" must last as long as the  gown.  And furs! The woman who can't,  afford to havo changes mado in tlio  stylo of hor fur coat or her neckpiece  and mull doesn't want to put all her  money in an extreme, unusual fur-  piece, that by its vory. individuality  is likely to "go out" in a short  time; bin. should stick to tlio most,  conservative furs, made up in tlio  most conservative ways.  Afler all, conservatism, not cost,  is the greatest help in eking out a  small clothes allowance: and conservatism consists ns much in having  an inexpensive litllo gown that is  put on and worn out soon nntl replaced ns in getting thintrs thai; lash  ovorlong.  Slink is now in high favor, and  this makes vory nearly as pretty a  hat as docs tho more expensive sable.  Only the choicest and deepest colorings  are Used,     nnd  tho  beauty     of-  Tho  who   cannot  afford   the   best .of  Tho Napoleon rosette is a favorito  with tho inillinors for the fur hat,  for the plainness and a certain degree of stiffness that inevitably accompanies tho uso of fur in imillinery  favors the military designs. A  smart ermine turban shows a military rosette, just threo rows of stiff  quillings with a button contro, and  throe stiff loops about a finger" dopth  each dangling at tho sido.  HEEE AND THERE.  Interesting Facts     About  And Things.  Places  lmink will wclcomo tho new Japanese  'mink���������which is really a dyed fur, bjut  tho      inscription  Potts."  Not     wishing    to     bo      disobliging , .  about so small ,i matter, tl.e slurlont ���������l:op">"cuf, <������".1>; r������' a, .short time, it  walked up tho slops and blow into ,"s t,uc> lb- rich markings of the  the pipe with all the strength of hisi"loro expensivo fur from which it  lungs. I lakes  ils     name,   and  will   doubtless  Tho physician,   who   was  awakened 'last  as  long ns   Iho fad   for  thn fur  by  tlio  resultant shrill  whistle near hat  endures  arose,  groped his  way  and  shouted:���������  to  his head,  tho  tube,  "Woll?"  "(���������lad to know you're woll," was  tho reply; "but, being a doctor, I  s'pose you can keep well at cost  price,   can't you?"  "What do you want?" said tho  man, of modicine, not caring to joke  at that tn'mo of night.  "Well "  said   the student,  after  a moment's meditation. "Oh, by  tiie way, aro you young Potts or old  Potts?--  "I am Dr. Totls. Thore is . no  j-oung Potts."  "Not  dead,  I hope?"  "There never  was any.   I have no  son." *  "Thon you are young Potts and  old Potts -too!. Dear, dear, how,  singular!"* . ���������!  . "What do you -want?" "snapped  the doctor.    ,  "You know old Mrs. Povine, who  lives iu the next street?"  "Yes. Is slio ill? What's the mat-  tor?"  "Do you know her nephew too���������  Bill  Briggs?" *.*',.  ^Aiyies.^AWeWilA^^^^^^   ho  And to tlioir credit bo it said the  milliners aro this season content to  let "beauty unadorned bo adorned  the most.!' The quotation is trito  nnd hackneyed, but in this connection���������and 'tis a ram one���������it has ot  least the merit  of truth.  A rook clan fly sixty miles,an hour,  a hawk ISO miles.  Boos suck 3,000,000 flowers to  gather ono pound of honey.  Dainty Indian muslins nro mado  from lho fibres of tho banana treo.  In Yucatan thero aro no fewer  than sixty-two ruined and abandoned cities.  Thoro is ono lighthouso to every  fourteen miles of coast in Groat  Britain.  Nineteen out of every hundred persons convicted of murder aro e-vocut*  ed.  A good railway ongino will travel  about 1,000,000 miles bofore it  wears out,  Tho cost of feeding the horses in  tho British Army is about $125 each  por year  Tho annual incomo from the Monte  CaiTo gaming tables exceeds $7,500,-  000.  Ovor 3,000,000,000,000 envelopes  are. manufactured in Groat Britain  annually.  Two hundred and fifty thousand  persons emigrate from Great Britain every year.  In the United States a ton is not  2,240 pounds, as in Britain, but 2,-  000 pounds only.  Tho French tobacco monopoly  brings in a profit of 580,000,000  sterling overy  year.  Two hundrod and eighty million  pounds' weight of tea aro annually  imported  into  London.  Fully 10,000 domestic servants in  London ard always out of situations  or changing their places.  Every inhabitant'of tho United  Kingdom may be said figuratively to  hold sway over 130 acres abroad.  ���������France   has   four classes of roads.  They  aro   respectively   fifty,     forty  thirty-throe,   arid     twenty-five     foet  wide. '  Bricks made of coal dust are used  for paving in Russia. Tho coal dust  is combined with molasses and  rosin.  Groat Britain requires 12,000,000  pounds' worth of leather every year  for tho boots and shoes of its inhabitants.  Tho largest proportion of single  persons is found in Ireland and  Scotland, and tho smallest in the  United   States.  In Spain street performers on thc  guitar aro licensed, whilo organ  grinders are rigorously suppressed;  Within tho past ninety years tho  Spanish-speaking population of thc  world has; increased from 2G.190,-  000   to  43,000,000.  Figs havo boon usod ns food in the  Orient from tho earliest times, and  wero also believed to bc an antidote to poispn.  w������:<<'<-:������x-x������x������:������w:������:������:������<������x->'X.  I   HEALTH  f  BRIGHT'S  DISEASE.  From tho Health Bulletin, of Chicago, wo copy the follouing .significant item:  . "It is not reassuring to learn thai  nearly G per cent, of Chicago's maf������  population in early manhood is af*  flictod wilh Bright's disiyise; and yet  such is the inference warranted by  tho results of thc exumination inadt  during the week by Department physicians of -18tt applicants f.ir nl������*  pointment to tlie City Fire Department. 'Of this number 2'J (ur ft,8.  per cont.) were rejected for kidney,  troublo. When it is reflected thul  tho principal cause of such troubl*  is oxposuro to cold and wot 'aflor ei  drinking bout,' tho figures do not  speak well for tho habits of Chicago's young men."  But we feel compelled to add that'  thoro aro many othor causes of  Bright's disease and other affections  of the kidneys than "oxposuro to  cold nr.id wet after a drinking  bout." Tlio everlasting habit ol  guzaling of beor, "orange phosphate"  mineral waters of every grada  of        sloppy      fizziness, is        no  doubt chargeable wilh much' of  tho universal crop of renal com-  plaints. If everybody would get  back to simple drinks os well as to  a "simple life," wo should hear less  about Bright's disease.  HOW IX) STAND.  You can make or mar your figura  yourself. Do not lay all the blame  at Nature's door, for it is mora  your own fault than hors that you  aro not a good figure, be it of tha  stout or slim order.  Tho minute a woman stands lightly on her feet, with knees straight,  chest well out, stomach flat, shoulders bade, and tho body from waist  up tilting over so lightly forward,  she has acquired at once a certain  smartness of effect, that no amount  of beauty or fine clothes could givo.  Tho smart girl is never round-  shouldered or hollow-chested, and by  standing properly she breathes properly. Every full, deep breath sho  draws straightens the muscles of hor  sides and abdomen. She is bound  not to grow into a fat, ungainly  woman, who can never catch her  breath or a train, for a proper poiso  of the body means' good digestion  and  good  health.  How many women sink into a little heap tho minuto they sit down���������  shoulders drooping, chest sunken,  the whole weight of tho body thrown  on the ond of tho spine. The smart  girl sits in tho samo erect, alert  way that she stands, and if sho  wishes to rest she leans back against  her shoulders, and not thc middle of  hor back.  In bonding, whether at a desk or a  dishpan, or a dinner-table, sho  bends from her waist, not from hcr  shoulders, ai.id she not only looks  well, but avoids fatigue and tho actual injuries that como from any  strain  on misplaced  muscles.  went*    shooting    this  I J. B. CRESSM  tytytytytyty ty ty ty ty %  'i-re is one way of escape���������quick  >jv me!" she cried, and with  j-ating .heart and bewildered  Jilrenton darted after her right  / iho building, through a long  t\r, then ascending a flight of  .iyiid thonce through a trap-,  vich opened on to the roof of  ning building. Then, with a  so sob, his rescuer fell in a  heap on the floor,  u     stooped   ant!   I if led      hcr  "Well,  morning, and*  "And ho hnd. an accident! Hold on  a minute.   I'll bo down "  "Ko, he's all right; but ho got  five brace of birds. I thought you  might liko to hoar of it."  "I say," rep I lod tho exasperated  Sf. D., "that's a jolly good joko,  my friend. Won't you take something?"  "What?" saitl the surprised humorist,  pausing for  breath.  "Why, take something. Tako  this."  Anrl before tho funny man could  withdraw his mouth, a hastily compounded mixture of ink, ipecacuanha, and about fourteen other drugs  squirted from the pipe and deluged  him from head to foot, about, a  pint  monopolizing  his  shirtfront.  And whilo he daixed frantically  round, sponging himself off with his  handkerchief and talking like a pirate in tho last act, ho could hoar a  soft voice from abovo sweetly murmur:���������  "Havo some moro? No? Woll,  good-night. Como again soon, you  funny dog, you!"   rt ���������  BEDS OF SOLDIERS.  In Germany and Austria the soldier has a simple straw bed with one  or two covers, neither sheet noo  mattress. I'n Itussia until recently  he slept''with his clothes on, on a  camp bed, but now ordinary beds  begin to be used���������the result of association with more civilized countries. After this it cannot bo doubted that the French soldier's bed is  tho best of all, with its wooden or  iron bedstead, a straw bed, nwool  mattress, sheets, a brown woollen  coverlet, and an extra quilt for cold  weather. Thus tho bed of tlio French  soldier is tho softest of all soldiers'  beds, as that of thc French peasant  i.s acknowledged also to be the bost  of all  European  countries.  CO LOUS  TO  WRATl.  Afternoon gowns aro among the  most characteristic clothes in a  woman's wardrobe. Almost anyone  can manage to plan a good-looking  tailor suit, and tho vory lightness  antl grace of evening gowns make  evory womnir look hor best. But afternoon gowns roqiiiro a dilTornnt  sort  of consideration.  Host of them nre made with long  skirts��������� and full skirts, too. This  is, full lo a great extent about tho  feet, and treated so as to suggest  tho idea of fullness, without being  actually very, full, about tho hips.  Broadcloth is the favorite material  for them, being a stufT,* that carries  a protty littlo air of /orinality and  dignity in its-. smooth ' surface, but  ^>nly tlip^sofler,^_maro_jmi_pj_ojico.ddi  cloth&^the kinds ���������that drape into  statucstjuo folds���������arc  used.  Velvet is 'good���������especially in gray  ���������but tho richest of colors in cloth is  a clear, bcuutiful red, with a strong  hint ��������� of coral, in its color-quality,  and that rod comes in a dozen varying tints.  For tho rest, Iicht colors nro worn  oven more than whito, with a strong  tendency to tho palo, exquisite bluo  thnt tho texture of broadcloth seems  especially lovely in. But a certain  soft rose-color is extremely popular,  ton.  Everything is trimmed a good  ileal, but. not, by any moans, with  the amount of trimming that tin  evening gown soems to require. For  the littlo touch of severity that belongs to broadcloth, no matter how  light weight ft may be, is bost set  by a simpler, less profuse amount of  trimming.  Irish crochet has carried styles "by  storm this season, especially thti  new Irish crochet, whicli is tho old  dominated by French ideas, and rich  with new design". A touch of if.  seems to  be on  almost everything.  In strong contrast are tho fino,  light Inces���������as airy and delicate almost as veils���������which como in evory  color of a .very  delicate rainbow.  Furs are used, by way of trinniming  too, in Iittlo rows that givo a rich,  wintry touch to tho costume.  Five out of overy ton gowns (perhaps moro) aro - mado with elbow  sleeves, with a deep frill of lace, or  of tho. material���������tucked and tricked  out prettily���������to end tl*������m off. But  all sorts of cuffs aro evolved, too.  for tho woman who isn't content  with that long stretch of glove to  her  olbow.  And tuckers havo cdmo in, too^���������  modest little affairs of lace that  como only half-way between throat  and shoulder,     and aro too  shallow  Vcsuvius'and Etna are novor both  ctivo at tlie same timo;  whon    one j  is "'violent,   the  other  is most  quiescent.    '     ...   Thero stands at the foot of Mount  Etna a chestnut treo which is said  to bo 2,000 years old. It is 213  feet   in  circumference.  Tho best choose mado in Switzerland is usually exported, and is seldom to be had oven in the famous  hotels of that country.  The French Governmont makes S3,-  250,000 a year out of tho very bad  matches of the manufacture of which  it holds a  monopoly.  Tho longest continuous stairway  in the world is that which leans to  the tower of tho Philadelphia City  Hall.   It  comprises   598   steps.  A boo, unladen, will fly forty miles  an hour; but ono Coming homo laden  with honey does not travel faster  than twelve miles an hour.  Tho orango is ono of tho most generally usod articles of food in Paraguay,   especially among the  poor  in  USEFUL ODDS  AN'D ENDS.  If you do not try to make yourself look as pretty as you can you  neglect one of j-our duties. It is  worth while to make tho most of all  thc good looks you possess; but  that does not mean that you should  revel in powder or purchased bloom,  or spend hours in frivolous decoration.  To havo a clear skin, remember  that you must liavo good health,  and to havo good health and a rosy  complexion you must wear thick-  soled shoos, and spend a part of  every day out of doors.  'To keep your skin from roughening, find by trial what kind of soap  suits j-ou bost, and use no othor.  Frequent changes of soap are bad  for the complexion. Beware of those  which are highly scented; as a general thing thej' are of poor quality,  tho scent boing used to destroy  odour of tho other ingredients usod.  If j-ou   would  keep  J'our  faco  and  tho country districts.   P.fgs  are; fat-1 hands   unwrinkled  use  tepid     water  toned  on  thcm  Tho dogs of Portugal arc passionately fond of gi-ap������s=and_iisticks^aro.  rpurpdselj'~fastoned to tha animals'  necks, to impotlo or prevent their  entrance to tho vinej-ards, in search  of tho luscious fruit.  TO   KEEP  YOUTHFUL.  Expect a good,  long, useful lifo.  Hold your thoughts persistently.  Simply refuse     to     grow old     bj-  counting your years and anticipating  your old  ago.  Kefrain from nil kinds of stimulants nnd sedatives. They will  shorten your  life.  One of tho best preventives of ago  is enthusiasm and interest in affairs  of  the day.  Keep in tho sunlight. Nothing  beautiful or sweet grows or ripens In  tho darkness. ���������*'  ���������Avoid fear in all its varied forms  of expression; it is-the greatest en-  ciny of  the human race.  Naturo is tho great rejuvonator;  her spirit is over j-oung. Live with  hcr, studj-,  lior,  lovo hcr.  Contemplate beauty in all its  forms, and you will drive everything  that is ugly out of J'our  life.  Don't allow j-oursclf to think on  your birthday that j-ou aro a j-ear  older,- and so much nearer the cwd.  Cultivate thc spirit of contentment; all discontent and dissatisfaction bring ago.furrows prematurely  to the face.  Keep j-our mir.id j-oung bj^ frosh,  vigorous thinking and your heart  sound by cultivating a cheerful, optimistic .disposition.  vcry hot or cold  water is injurious.'  Also avoid    burying tho  face in.^'a  i=soft=ldlio5viiLat=night,=which=always   produces wrinkles round thc cj-cs.  Keep j'our combs nnd brushes  sweet and clean Wash them in topid  water continuing a few drops of ammonia. The grease and oil will disappear, ns if by magic. Placo tho  brushes down, to dry. and tho handlo  will  not  bo injured.  'to  poso as yokes.  Superintendent���������"I have proof that  you saw a man in tho streets after  one o'clock, and neglected to question him." Policeman���������"No; but I  followed him, and saw him enter a  house, and five minutes after heard  a shrill female voice giving him  'Rule, Britannia!'��������� for being out so  lato, and so I know ho was a respectable citizen.'-'-  IIUN'OKn  FOR  HEALTH.  A  prolific cause of chronic indigestion   is eating  from  habit,  and  sim-  plj-      because    it   is   meal-time and  others are eating.   To cnt  whan  not  hungry is to cat without relish,  and  footl  taken  without relish    is   worse  than   wasted.'      Without  relish,     the  salivary  glands   do not act, the  gastric  fluids     aro   not   freelj' secreted,  and   the  best  of  foods  will  not     bo  fiigested.      Manj- perfectly    harmless  dishes   arc  severely  condemned,     for  no     other    reason   than   thej-     wero  eaten  perfunctorily,  and  without relish   and   due  insalivation.      Hunger  makes tho plainest foods    enjoyable.  It causes      vigorious   secretion   and  outpouring of all the digestion fluids,  the sources of ptyalin, pepsin,  trypsin,  etc.,   without a  plentiful supply  of  which  no  foods  can  be  perfectlj'  digested.  RAYS  FROM THE  BODY.  Tiie scientific world has been greatly excited bj- tho recent discovery of  a now  emanation���������the X-rays.   What  are they? Tlie X-rays aro amana-  tions, similar to those emitted from  radium, but of a distinctive naturo,  emitted from tho human body. This  highlj- interesting discovery was  made by two French scientists���������  Messrs. Charpentier and Blondlot���������  and thej- were designated N-raj-s in  honor of the University of Nancj-.  Thero are two tj-pes of theso raj's���������  those emittod from the body, and  those radiated from tho nerves. Tho  latter are tho more intense, and  with the aid of a fluorescent screen  tho scientist can follow thc courso  of  a   nerve  beneath   tho  skin.  <. CN ������������������������������������������������<*������������������������������-*t������������������(j^.,  It  I About the  I      ....House  &������������������*������������������������������������������������������������>���������������������������������������*������ ^  DOMESTIC  RECIPES.  Baked Applo Dunijilhigs.���������Cut u  short pic crust into livo or six inch  squares. In tho centre of each place  a pared and neatly cored apple, filling tho space with sugar and cinnamon, if liked, also a clove. After  wetting thc edges of thc pastry with  white of egsf, fold it ovcr the apple,  pinch and flista thcm to look well,  and encase the applo completely.  Bako from thirty to forty minutes,  toward the last brushing tho top  with white of egg and dusting with  a little sugur. Serve with hard  sauce. i.  Inexpensive Fruit Cake.���������Cream, together half a cup of butter and ono  cup oi brown sugar, moistening in  the process with half a pint of strong  coffee: add one cup of Now Orleans  mtolosses, a teaspoon of allspice, one  grated nutmeg and a teaspoon of  powdered cinnamon, one well beaten  egg and threo cups of pastry flour  siftod with a heaping teasipoon of  baking powder, and one cup of In-  clfiaJU meal. Beat st'eaid'ily ftw (ten  minutes and then stir in a quarter of  of a pound of shredded citron, half  a pound of large seeded raisins, cut  in two, and ono pound of currants.  Turn into a round cake pan lined  with greased paper and bako three-  quarters of an hour in a slow oven.  Ico while still warm.  New England Bannocks.*���������Scald  eight heaping tablespoons of meal hy  stirring in two cups of boiling water, add four tablespoons of flour, a  saltspoon of salt, one-fourth of a  teaspoon of baking soda, two well  beaten eggs and sufficient cold milk  to form a thick batter. Boat for five  minutes after the last ingredient is  added and drop by tho spoonful into  hot fat, frying tho bannocks to a  golden brown. Servo accompanied  by  maple  sugar.  Lentil Roast (From, the Vegetarian).���������Soak two cups of lentils ovor  night. In the morning adtl two or  three slices of onion and several  sticks of celery. When tender pass  through a colander. Add one cup  of tomato, cooked and strained, one  cup of whole wheat flour, two well  beaten eggs, and placo in a buttered tin. Baste well with melted butter and bake from? twenl.v to thirtv  minutes.  Celeste's Fritters.���������Stale .-". spongo  cake, cut- into rounds with a cako  cutter. Slice: tho cake carefully and  fry to a nice brown. Dip each slice  for a second in a bowl of boiling  milk, draining this off on the sido  of the vessel; lay on a hot dish and  spread thickly with strawberry jam,  peach jolly, or other delicate conserve. _J?ile them neatly and send  m*oui������ hot, with crealm to pour over  theni.  Seod Cakes.���������One cup of buttor.  Three cups of sugar. Ono cup of  "loppered" milk or cream. Four  eggs. Six cups of flour, or just  enough to stiffen into a thin paste.  Two ta"blespoonfuls fennel or caraway seed. One tablespoonful "Soda,  dissolved in boiling water. Roll out  thin and cut into shapes.  Raspberry Bavarian Cream.���������Soften a quarter of a package of gelatine in half a cup of raspberry juice:  dissolve over hot water; add the  juice of half a lemon, a cupful of  raspberry juice, and half a cup of  sugar, stir over ice water, and when  It begins to "set" fold in a cupful  nr.d a half of double cream beaten  solid. Pour into a mold. When  cold serve surrounded with the froth  from whipped croRm.  Battor for Pineapple Fritters. ���������  Boat one egg without separating the  white and yolk. Add half a cup of  flour and one-fourth of a teaspoon of  salt, and beat with a spoon until  perfectly smooth. Then beat in ono-  "tourth-of^a'"Cup-of^trulk-^^-----,^..^^^^,  Cream of Pumpkin Soup.:���������This is  a novelty even to many old cooks.  but is quite worth adding to "tho  list of fa'.', soups. Cut a nice ripe  small pumpkin in pieces enough .to  fill a quart measure. Put in a  saucepan with a pint of cold water  and season with half a teaspoonful  each of salt and pepper, a teaspoonful of sugar, nnd a few sprigs of  parsley or sweet marjorrtm. Cover  the saucepan and simmer gently for  an hour and a half, stirring frequently. Strain 'through a colander  to get out the skin, then throuijh n  finer sieve. Put the puree back in  the pan. sprinkle over  teaspoonful of flmir  thon  pour   over  it.  from tho hands, rub an outsido piece  of celery on them.  Breadcrumbs for frying.:���������Let these  always be baked.in the oven without boing allowed to take color. By  this method tho flsh or meat, etc.,  will bo much crisper.  To avoid dust marks behin*d pictures, place two small pieces of cork  at tho bottom of the picture frame.  This prevents tho accumulation of  dust nnd tho consequent dirty unsightly marks.  Tho disagreeable taste or now wood  ln buckets nntl vessels may bo eradicated thus: Fill with a solution of  hot soda water ami lot it remain till  cold, then rinse in clear water.  To Blanch Almonds.'���������1'laco in a  cup, pour boiling wator over thorn;  this will swell tho skins and allow  them to bc quickly drawn oil". Throw  tho almonds into cold water ami  wipe dry with a cloth.  To Clean Spectacle Glasses.-���������Give  them an occasional rub with a clean  cloth moistened with methylated  spirit. Thon polish with a chamois  leather, tlie spirit having removed  all grease.  To Malfio Fried Bacon moro Digestible.*���������Tako a good sized applo and  cut it in slices with tho peel on and  fry till brown in the bacon fat. Servo  highly seasoned with pepper and  salt ami you will havo a delicious  dish.  Linseed Tea.���������Pour two quarts of  boiling water on o"no gunco of wholo  linseed and twelve draohms of sliced  liquorice root. Add a few slices of  lemon. Let this stand in a covered  jar for six hours, then strain for  uso ahd sweeten to taste.  To Prevent Black Stockings Turning Green -When Washed.-���������Turn the  stockings inside out nnd wash in  lather; do not rub the soap on tho  stockings. Rinse in tepid water to  which a little vinegar is added. Dry  in the shade, and pull gently into  shapo.  Do not wash a Frying-pan often,  for as a rule tho following method  of cleaning it is very effectual: Placo  tho pan on the firo for a few minutes  to melt any fat left in it, and whilsit  this is hot, rub thc insido of the  pan with clean, soft paper until it  is quite clean. The paper should bc  scrowed up and usod vigorously.  Treated liko this, frying-pans will  never burn till thoy are worn very  thin.  } Jilted-After Wl I  ���������%*;.���������.;���������������������������..;������������������%.;������������������%.���������>'���������������>������<���������������������������*���������>���������*���������������������������;������������������������������;������������������������������������������>  I.  When  the    Eton.     Fitzgerald  Chal  FIVE PIES.  Chocolate Pie.���������Ono cofToocup milk,  two tablespoons grated chocolate,  three-fourths cup sugar, yolks of  three oggs. Heat chocolate and milk  togother, add the sugar and yolks together, beaten to croam. Flavor  with ��������� essence vanilla. Bake with  under crust. Spread meringue of tin1,  whites over the top.  Custard Pie.���������One pint of milk,  three' cggs,-.,a little snlt, three tablespoons of sugar. Flavor with..-.'essence .vanilla-or nutmeg and essence  of lcmoii. If the milk is scalded "it  will require but  two eggs  to a pint.  Cream Pie.���������Ono pint of milk  scalded, two tablespoons of corn  starch, three tablespoons of sugar,  yolks of two eggs. Wot the starch  with a littlo cold milk, boat the  eggs and sugar until light, and stir  tho whole into the scalding milk.  Flavor with essence of lemon or  vanilla, and set aside to cool. Line  a plate with pie crust and bake, fill  it with cream, ami cover it with  frosting made of the whites of egg.  beaten dry, with two tablespoons of  sugar. Bake a delicate brown.  Currant Pie.���������Stew and mash one  pint green currants until all are  burst, using as little water as will  keep thorn from burning. Add sugar  to make it very sweet, and one soda  cracker rolled fine. Bako between  two crusts. Ripe currants may be  used without stewing.  Cocoanut Pio.���������One quart milk,  five eggs, and one grated cocoanut;  beat tho sugar and eggs together,  antl stir into tho milk when hot.  then add the cocoanut and spice to  taste. Bake with a bottom crust  twenty minutes.   ^   SNAIL'S INTELLIGENCE.  Gave^Proof"of-it"by^Coming^B.egu-'  larly  to  Meals.  The harmless slug is generally  cretlited with no greater intelligence  than the power to crawl aimlessly  about, leaving a slimy track behind  it. In a letter to the London  Times, howevor, Dr. Horace Dobell,  writing    from     Parkstone    Heights,  mors came tlown tho long flight of  stops from Government House,, ho  felt tlio happiest man alivo. Ho had  put his fato to tho tost, and tho result had boon encouraging. Maisio  would probably bo his alllancod wife  in a fow hours.  He hailed a passing hansom, and  was driven to tho "United," whistling gaily as ho wont. In tho club  smokcroom ho found his friend, Lieutenant Hallam, alone, for which hc  was effusively thankful.  What's put you in such good humor?" asked Hallaim. "If you were  accustomed to being hard-up, I  should imagine you had conw into  some cash,"  Tho Hon. Fitzgerald drew a chair  to his friend's side nearer the lire,  and lit a cigar.  "But," continued Hallam, "you're  ono of those lucky beggars, with all  the' tin, and most of tho girls!"  "Well, I'vo got the best of them at  last!" exclaimed Chalmers. "Truth  is, old man���������only keep it dark I toll  you���������I'vo proposed to Masle Mesh-  more������������������'  "And boon accepted eh?" interrupted Hallam. ���������  . "N-no, not exactly; but I am confident I shall bo. She nearly promised. Said she would liko a few  hours in which to think it oven���������woman-like, you know. But I haven't  an atom of doubt. As a fact, tho  general  is in my favor!"  Tho confidence he felt was plainly  expressed in his features, and, as ho  finished speaking, ho took tho cigar  from his mouth, and laughed merrily. Hallam shook him heartily by  the hand.  "By Jove!" he exclaimed. "Seems  a suro thing. My heartiest congratulations. You've tried hard enough  goodness knows, for a long timo!  Eighteen months,  I believe?"  Tho Hon. Fitzgerald nodded assent,  and Hallam added:  "Sho's a bonnie woman, and you  ought to be proud!"  "I am," agreed the. other. "For  I feel sure she will consent. She just  wanted to have ,a'talk with the general, antl, since he has shown me  his approval, I do not fear."  Could the Hon. Fitzgerald Chalmers havo known what was passing  at that moment in tho interval between father antl daughter, he would  have been disagreeably surprised at  tho nature oh the conversation. His  proposal was being discussed, but  from quite another, and more dramatic, standpoint to that which he  imagined. Soon after he had loft  tho house, Maisio wont to her father  in-, the- library, and acquainted him  with the offer of marriage: whicli she  had just received.  For somo .moments .-the pair stood  facing each olher without uttering a  word, until llaisie, impatient at her  father's silence,  spoke  again.  "Tell me, what can I do, father?  Fit;*, has proposed" to mo, as I expected ho would, seeing that I have  accepted all his attentions. I  thought at first it wns to be just a  firtation; but he wants nic to marry*  him���������and  marry  him  now!"  fllaisie's eyes were red and wet  with tears. Genernl Lord Meshmore  paced the room, torn between conflicting emotions. Tho cold, stern  soldier��������� "Muderous Meshmore." as he  had been called iu a famous war history���������was now a weak man of nerves  and fears. His only daughter clung  to his arms as ho "went his short  patrol.  "I cannot tell him the truth, father," said the young woman.  "Truth���������of  course  not!"   exclaimed  the general,   suddenly,   ror.srrd.     "Of  courso not!     You must accept him!"  "Father!"  "Yes. accept him!" he said sharply. "You have told me that you  love him- I blundered. Maisie, when  T made you  marry Reginald.        But  now  that he is  dead,  you  must not  spo!i"iyo"flr='"l ife^b^dcnying=a^down--4^���������our^mfo  ���������  right 'honest  and   good   fellow.' Ac-|Kcra!d.    "You lying  scoundrel  cept him and be happy,  dearie,  as I  Maisie kissed her father on the lips  and gave his arm a gentle pressure.  "You do cheer my spirits, father,"  she said, with a protty simile. "I  feel now as though I must accept  him!"  "That's rigiit, dearie," responded  her father. "I want to help you.  Tho blunder which has brought all  this troublo upon you ls mine, and  I am going to do what I can to repair tho injury. So wo will forget  your scoundrel husband in your now  happiness.   Shall we?"  And thus it camo about that  Maisio consented to become tho Hon.  Fitngorald Chalnier's wife.  IL  Tho marriage of Lord Mcshiwore's  only daughter to the Hon. Fitzgerald Chalmers would bo tho most  brilliant event of an exceptionally  brilliant season. The young Under-  Secretary wus exceedingly popular  insido thc House and in society;  whilo General Moslunorc and his  daughter, during his command of tho  Eastern Division, had surpassed all  records for entertaining at Government House.  For weeks the papers had been noticing, at considerable length, the  numerous features of the coming  event. Not alono in society circles,  but in thc street tho affair was a  favorite topic of conversation. Every  day brought fresh surprises in' lovely  presents, and tho crowning honor  was when thero came a kindly personal letter from tho King, intimating that, his Majesty would bo reprc-  ented at the wedding.  And now, on the day before the  wedding, the young couple had inspected with delight the long rows  of costly gifts; and now, parting  from each other for tho last time,  Fitzgerald held his prospective bride  in his arms, and kissed her uptuiiiod  face. Sho was somewhat palo,; and  trembled even as he spoke to hcr.  "To-morrow," he whispered, "and  then, little woman, wo shall have  each other!"  Yes, to-morrow, Fitz���������only tomorrow; yet it seems such a long  time!" she whispered. "Oh, I wish  I had you mine nowl"  "\\1iat made her say that she could  not toll; but tho words brought a  look of intense pain into hcr lover's  faco. He drew her more closely to  his breast.  "Whj', you have mo already," .'lie  answered, with an effort of gaiety.  "I am yours���������allyours���������now! What  ever makes you so sad, sweetheart?  I shall never leave you. No, no;  I lovo you too dearly. And tomorrow my very own Maisio will be  the queen of the smartest event of  the year���������and my wifo!"  Maisio never revealed what had  been: in hcr heart when she uttered  her fear, and Fitzgerald went to his  chambers wondering greatly.  A shoal of telegrams of congratulations awaited .hiim, a, number of  visiting-cards, and ah unexpected  visitor. He attended to the latter  first.;. _.*���������.*'  "The gentleman was seated comfortably in the reception-room when  Fitzgerald entered. Hc gave /- the  name of Lieutenant Reginald Max-  ton,  and was smartly dressed.  "I have not the honor of your ac-  cfuntntance," said the Hon. Fitzgerald genially, tendering ' his hand to  the other.  "Nor    I. yours,"    put    in Maxton  promptly.      "To  tell  the   truth,     I  have only been back in England     a  few  days."  "And  your  business  with   mo  now  ia " ���������  "Your wedding," Lieutenant Max-  ton interrupted; and the Hon. Fitzgerald gave a sharp look of surprise.  The visitor continued: "I have seen  it announced in the evening papers,  and believe tha event takes place  to-morrow."  "I cannot see that this can concern a stranger," observed the Hon.  Fitzgerald irritably. "X am pressed  for time, so perhaps you will como  to the point!"  Lieutenant Maxton stood before  the firelflace, and puffed vigorously  at a cigarette.  "1,-will," ho replied cynically. "Thc  fact is, you will bo marrying my  "wife I"  almost__B.hr.iekcd Fitz-  wliaT  A WHALE HUNTER'S STORY  ADVENTURES AND PROFITS OF  THE STTSINESS.  Facility   With Which    the  "Uses His .Monstrous  Flukes.  Whale  do you   mean?"  know vou  will   bo  with  him"' "The  Ifon. Maisie Meshmoiv. is my  "Suppose Fitz should discover?" wife." continued Maxton coldly,  asked Maisie, her voice almost chok- "Seemingly, our marriage hns been  ing. "Or suppose Reginald is not;kept a secret from you. .She bo-  doad? Oh. it is impossible--impossi-'camo Mrs. Maxton during l.enerul  ble!     Thore  is   nothing  for  me     but, iMeshmore's     tenure     of     tl}e  Indian  Dorset, gives remarkable proof of its j to  live in  wretchedness!" jcommander.ship.   For certain reasons  possession of an excellent memory "jry dear Maisie, you really must j that marriage was kept a secret;  and a considerable amount of ren-llook'nt things more reasonably. No-j'1 ���������'"���������"���������and hero he handed a Ihin roll  soning  power. jbody knows  but you nnd  I anil your! of  papers   to   Fitzgerald���������"there    are  One  morning  I  observed   the silver j dear,   dend   mother  of  tho  man    you'proofs!"  trail  of a slug or snail  round  about i married     during     our     residence  our  the  spot  whero  the  crumbs had been. -India.    Then;  in  not  nnolht-r youi   iri  tt  heaping j Even   tho  smallest  crumbs   had  been i England  who   knows,   or  cares.      He  mix thoroughly;   cleared   np. ] won you   b.v   fraud.      I  wa.s  deceived  stirring   nil      thej    "But    what     especially   struck   mo'hy  all   his  pretensions   to  wealth antl  time,  one quart  of hot  milk.    Add e. jwas  that  tho  trail  camo  straight  up 1 birth,   and   he  proved   to   be   nothing  tablespoonful   of  butter,   antl   nimmorjto   the  crumbs.     'flicre   wn.s   no  sign:but,   a   low-born  rogue.     Ife  deserted  fifteen    minutes.   Then add     half   aof wnntlering  about    in    search     of jyou   within   three  months,   after  pint  of rich cream and a teaspoonful   tliem,   hut  an   evidence   of   knowledge jhn-rl  got  nil   ho could  out  of  rne  of fine cut parsley: heat,  but do not   of t.he exact place at which    to  Iind J7.-011.    I   toll you he  was     killed  them. ] Africa. I  saw     his   name     in  "I watched   tho window after this, 1 list!" "  and  found  that  just  beforo  dark     a 1    "Are you  sure������������������"   began  the  large  brown  slug  came  straight    up j trussed   Maisio.  to  the spot and     ato  the remaining I    "Absolutely  boil,  ers.  and    nerve with  toasted crack-  IITN'TS  FOR  THR HOME.  Lamp spots on morocco leather j crumbs,  should bc rubbed with methylated 1 "For two more nights it came  spirit. Two or three applications 1 again ant! ato l.ho crumbs as before,  may  be  necessary. being     accompanied     on   the    second  To   clean     a   Wall-paper.���������Tako     a 1 night  by  a small   brown  slug  about  ���������MoKhmore,  !"     interrupted  'Thero    are  not tx  Thn young officer, half tUr/.od, took  tho proffered roll.- but did not open  it. Instead, hu gazed long nrrd silently into the firo. His face was usheii  pale.  "I   left     hor,"     continued   Maxton.  "Why,   is  110  matter  of yours;     but  there  were  sufficient   r"asons.      I   am  not     going   t.o     troublo     her,   but   I.  thought   I  would  warn you."  The  "Hon.   Fitzgerald   had      become  !quite   oblivions   of  his   surroundings.  dis-!H'o  toyed   wilh   the  tape  around    the  1 roll,  and,  nftor some seconds,  buried  Lord I his  face  in     hi.s hands.   The     wholo  hurt-! fabric  of  his  love's   dream   had   lop-  he ;  and :  in  thc  very dry crust of bread with about  an inch of crumb on it, ami rub the  soiled patch lightly till the tJtain  disappears.  To Cure Sore Throats.���������Put a  ioaspoonful of powdered borax into  ene tablespoonful of honey. Dissolve  over heat. When cool, apply it repeatedly with a cornel's hnir brush lo  the throat ond roof of tho inouth.  This will soon effect a cure nntl allow the patient to swallow comfortably.  Dripping, if carefully clarified with  hoiling water, and .incited into a firm  cake, makes as good pastry for pies  and tarts  as  butter.  To remove tho smwll of onions froini  tho breath  eat parsley  and vinegar;  half its size.  "I then washi.-d out tho trail that  it should not ho guided by it, but  tho slug continued to come on fino  nights. Kxcept on wet nights, when  it did not appear at all, it camo  straight ovcr the edge of the sill opposite the crumbs, nntl continued to  come every few nights throughout  duly nntl August.  "One night I put out somo grains  of rico, but the slug left them irn-  touched.  "Tlie interesting question for scientists," adds Dr. Dobell, "is, f.I.'ow  did the slug find tho crumbs In thn  first instance, anil how did it know  the exact time ut which to climb  up for them?"-  tlred. or a do/on. Lieutenant liegin-  'ald Maxlons in tlio Army. And if  ho wns not, he couldn't como, bank  to you ngnin; he knows bettor. So  your marriage cannot be discovered."  "It is a dreadful deceit to practice!" urged Maisio. "Yet, oh, I  tlo love him!"  "There are whito nnd black lies.  child: so there are harmless nntl  sinful deceits," answered the general. "This secret is yours antl mine  nlone. Wc will keep it so; nnd yon  will accept Fitzgerald. That deceit  can tlo no harm, nntl will make you  both hnppy. I wan I, you to do It,  dear. It is a greater sin l.o wattle  .vour beauty nnd tunr your life by  moiling over thn gloomy pnsl. Why,  there is 11 brilliant, future before you,  if you will only seize lhe opportunity!"  plod      down      nbout     his   ears.     Tomorrow���������'tth, what hopes he hud built.  on  that!     To-morrow   Whon he roused himself, with nn  effort, to regain control of his shattered nerves, his visitor had gone.  He  was  nlone.  with  hi.s  misery.  On tho following morning fashionable society were startled to rend in  the daily papers, set In tho largest,  typo, with bold headitigs, the bald  announcement Hint "The. marriage of  the Hon. 'Wnisie Meshmore, only  daughter of (iouonil Lord Meshmore,  to tho Hon. Fitzgerald Chalmers, arranged It) In- celebrated t.twtlny nt  Hi, GfKi'ge'ii, Hanover Square, will  not Ink- plat'.-, (Trent sympathy will  be roll- for lho young lh.tly, who is  proslnitoil wilh i.ri'if'f* No reason is  forl.hi-.oming for lho abandonment of  the ninrriiigu,"���������London   Answers.  Within thc entire range of natural  history there is nothing, in my opinion, which can givo to the general  student a moro profound interest  than tho whalo, and nothing in all  tho various pursuits of mankind possesses a morc exciting and thrilling  field of adventure than that of hunting tho whalo, says a writer in  Forest and Stream.  My experiences as a whaler have  been chiefly as an ofllcor, and I havo  both made and lost a good deal of  money sailing from New London amid  New Bedford.  If wo can believe anything that is  asserted by tho wiso average man  of science, the whalo would nover  make a flsh stew, as it in in reality  a quaidruped. It is a warm blooded  animal, and those appendages callod  11ns or flippers arc in reality its  legs, its heart is liko that of man  and other mammals, having two  cavities ami doing double duty in tho  line of circulating blood. It is not  the offspring of an egg, but is born  alive. What are generally called tho  blowholes of the whale arc really  nothing but its nostrils. The whalebone of commerce comes from the  jaw of the animal and is found only  in the variety' known as the Greenland or right whalo.  While the whalebone whale has no  teeth, those of the sperm whale aro  carried in the lower jaw; and as to  tho size which these creatures attain  it maty be stated that they havo heen  known to measure 100 feet in length  a/rtd to have'weighed nearly 250 tons.  We often hear the remark that something we soo "is very like a whale,"  and yet thero are several animals to  which we may truthfully apply that  remark,* viz, tlie dolphin, purpoiso,  grampus, bottle nose manatee, sea.  elephant nn'd narwhal, or sea unicorn. Nor will I stop to give all tho  particulars bearing upon the equipment of a whaling ship, but proceed  at*, once with  '^SOME OF MY "ADVENTURES.  And first in fancj-, lot us tako a  little run ir.i the Soutii Atlantic. Wo  are in the vicinity of a great plain  of seaweed,' which is the favorite  food of the right whale, and thoy  aro numerous in that vicinity. Ono  of t'he crew has ascended to the  "crow's nost," for you must understand that it is desirable to discover  a whale or a school of them boforo  we coiiio near enough to see them  from the  deck:.... .  The boats aro ready, equipped with  harpoons an'd lances and rope, the  crews duly assigned, when lo! from  the crow's nost comes Hie cry,,.there  she blows!" "Whoi'0 away?"  "Abeam, to the leeward,:sir.'*',"How  far ofP?" 'Two miles, sir." -"Let  us know when, the ship hoails for  her." "Ay ay;'���������'���������.sir!'���������'-���������'���������;', "Keep-.'.-her  off���������hard up thc helm!" Hard up  it is, sir." "Steady! ,S-t-c-a-ti-y!"  "There she blows! A large right  whale with hor calf, sir, heading  right at us. Very large. There slio  blows! Now half a milo off and  feeding, sir, and coming right toward us!" .Wo lower away and are  off. Now it is that you see the advantage of the drill we have practised for many daj's.  Kvery movement must be quick  and sure with uo guessing or questioning what is best. There goes  the great mother whale followed by  her offspring, both of them moving  slowly'..aiid.--not hooding the coming  danger. The boat has reachod her  side a fearful flurry of excitement  follows among the crew. One, two,  and perhaps tliree lances are thrown,  and -away, sho goes coloring tho  ocean with her blood, dragging the  rope with fearful rapiditj-, then  stops, goes into what wc"call a-flurry, or death agonj-, when she swims  with her head out of the water, making a circuit of njites and lashing  tho sea into foam'with her tail, aind  as she grows "' weaker and weaker  slackens her pace, straightens herself out upon the water on hor side  ar.Kl with hor' head invariably to*  wai__Lthc_cag_tjtlit;������. Jf_ lho win*t������ is  blowing tlie sea mn"kes_a~cleSi*T>i'<jiS'clV  ovor hor as if sho -were a rock and  thi.s litis sometimes -deceived the mariner. I rememlier one ir.sluncc where  a captain reported tho discovery of  a rock in the track to Fjiirope nnd  suggested that this hatl ncrhapft been  Uie cause of manj' shipwrecks, whon  ho hail ouly boon -deceived by a dead  whalo.  It has frequently happened in my  experience Unit n whalo after being  harpooned has turned in anger upon  his pursuers nntl with his great-  nukes shattered their boat to pieces  and  KILLED MANY MEN**;  ar.Kl I hnve also known a whole when  angry to raise himself so far out of  water us to look like n limn on his  feel, ami thm to lot himself down  with a crush upon the ill frtted bout.  And then tho unettd with which the  whale can' move is n continual wonder with ull tho:;o who huve hunted  them. Tho quickness antl facility,  with which they etui use their monstrous flukes is only equalled by "the  coachman's whip. It wns never my  fate to bo seriously injured by un  angry whale, but. they, huvi* fro-j  qin.ml.ly       suggested      very       decided i  The largest right whalo I ever saw  was captured off the coast of Kamchatka by one of my. crews, and it  was during the samo year that I  procured a full ship of 8,200 barrels of oil and dO.OOO pounds of  Whalebone within the space of sixty  days. Whon tho monster just mentioned was killed tho sea was very  rough',* After tho boats had boon  lowered, it was necessary to movo  them with groat care, lest an utn-  lucky wave should carry us on top  of tho whale, and this actually happened, for when I called upon tho  harpooner to fasten he did so, when  our boat was instantly thrown upward, and ono man killed. Fortum-  at-oly, before tho boat iillctl, I had  time to put a fatal lanco into the  whale, and wo woro rescued by another boat.  As I was getting in I saw near by  the body of tho killed man, in a  standing position, a few foot below  tho surface of the water, when -by  diving I caught hdm by the car, but  a "big wave came, causing mo to  lose my hold, and tho boilj- of our  brave comrade went down out of  sight in tho blue waters. Into this  whale wo wero obliged to send a succession of lances, and hc spouted  blood and tiisgorgod food for six  hours, having iu that time lost what  we estimated at a hundred barrels  of blood alone. But I must tell you  something more about this horo of  Kamchatka. Hc was as long as our  ship and sho measured 180 feet;  his greatest girth 75 feet, head 30  feet long, and  FLUKES 30 FEET BROAD.  His lips alone mado thirty barrels  of oil; throat and tongue the samo  amount, and the total yield of his  blubber 240 barrels. The bone taken from tho inside of his mouth  weighed. 2,800 pounds, and his mar-  kot value, according to thc prices of  oil anO bone then ruling,  $18,000.  "And now, without going into all  the particulars as to how wo hunters of the sea tip our work when  preparing our game for preservation,  I will give you a few facts which  havo come to my. psrsoi'.ral knowledge bearing upon tho natural history of the whale. Here, for example, is a iact which I havo not seen  mentioned in ar.y authentic books.  On taking oft tho skin of a whale,  j'ou como to the bluhbor, whicli  rests upon the flesh' or muscle, and  this I have-found to be covered with  a fino hair or fur, about an inch  long; to this fur is attached a black  pigment which answers thc purposo  and is usod by thc sailors as":'ayou  would a common soap; but the significance of this fact is that in reality it makes the whale a fur-bearing  animal. -'���������"���������  And now about their numbors. , T  have sailed a thousand miles without seeing even the sign of a whale;  and yet in tho North I^acificcI have  on several occasions looked ?- upon a  thousand or more individuals of tho  sperm variety in ono groat school,  covering the sea, apparently, to-tho  horizon, ahxl whon tumliling and  rolling and pitching an'd spouting  they have presented a seen a of gran-  dour and 'confusion which no pen  could desdribe. I'n 'these schools  there is always ono fellow swimming  in the centre who >soems to bo the  leader of the host,?, and he is called  by the sailors tho Old Soldier. And  I may also horo mention the curious fact that when j-oii strike a  whale with the lanco and he makes a  domoiist/ration with his tail the entire herd go through precisely the  samo motion, as if ir.tfluencc'd by a  kind "of magnetism.  "Nor should I omit an allusion  to the almost human intelligence of  the whale. I have known them to  lie .perfectly still lor.g enough to let  me get within reach of tlieir flukes  and then 'suddenly-: turn* upon*' the  boat and crush it with their capacious jaws; and thus have I scon them  Watch for and destroy a number of  boats and kill a number of men. All  this is verj- unkind on tho part of  tho kingly creatures of tho ocean,  hut I havo novor boon disposed to  blame thorn for anj- of their savage  eccentricities. Not only are they  hunted anid killed but they have /a  moro terrible enemj' that goes -by  tho name of the "killer." This,creature is sorpont-like in .appearance,  armed-.with sharp teeth, antl as tho  right whale often swims-with.i ' his.  anouJ;h^p<m,_aHio_J\ider_7as tons^himself on his tonguo. When-thus-���������"at*-'  tacked tho whalo is greatly alarmed  and utters  A BELLOWING SOUND  which may bo hoard a distance of  teu miles, meanwhile lashing tho soa  into foam with his flukes. After  tho killer has ealon awaj- the tongue, thon, us a matter of courso, tho  whalo dies from starvation.  But nguiii, to look upon a pair of  whales when lighting with each other  Is a sight that, cun novor be forgotten. 1 havo seen nn old follow, after  coming out of such a conliict, with  his jawbones bent till nut of place  nnd wilh fearful gushes on his head  niul all along his bo'dy. When thus  fighting���������ai.i;l the leaders of the  various schools often come together  ���������tliey roar, which resembles distant  thunder, and the spra.y which often  scalier inlo the air reminds oi.'o of  the surf on a rocky shore.  And hnru comes in an incident  which happened to me at New Zealand a great ninii.y ybars ago. I  .had killed u-whale, and having stripped ofT the blubber cast o!T the carcass. Tlu> wind and tide landed it  high nntl dry on tlie shore. A few  weeks   afterward, ' on    visiting    this  107 YEARS OLD AND WELL  AGED   WOMAN     IH     ENGLAND  STILL ENJOYS LIFE.  Born in  Baltimore in  1797,    Now  Makes Her Home Near  London.  Hoal't'hy, active, and in thc poscs-  tjion of all hor faculties, there is living less than a dozen milua from  London a.woman claiming to bo 107  years old. Hor namo is Miss Henrietta Johnson, and sho resides in  the lowly neighborhood of Kingston,  on the Thames, where sho hns beeu  enjoj-ing a pension sinco tho middlo  of tho last century.  Miss Johnson's history is of moro  than ordinary intorost. She says-  she was born in Baltimore in 17D7,  but is not quito sure of lho month  and tlatc. As a baby girl she was  adopted antl brought up by a woal-  thy Baltimore family named Cuton,  and during hcr life has been brought-  in contact with many-colobiitios. Ia  thc first decade of thc nineteenth  century sho met frequently Betsy  Patterson, a relative of tho Oatons,.  a beautiful woman who married a.  brother of thc great N������,p������lcon.  PLAYMATE OF NAPOLEON'S SON  Sho rcmembors playing in the garden with Jerome Patterson, also tho*  day when he wont to France, but  was refused permission to land bo-  cause Napoleon wouldn't recognize*  his brother's' marriage with Betsy.  Tho throe daughters of thc family  with whom she lived had the distinction, of marrj'ing English- peers.  One : w-as wedded to the duke of  Leeds, another to tho marquis of  Wollcslej', and the thiitl to Lord  Stafford. All of those have been*  dead for many years.  About sixty years ago Miss Johnson went to England and became*  housekeeper for Lady Wellcsley, with  whom sho lived until tho lattor'a-  death at Hampton court palace,  about fifty years ago. She then ro-  lirotl from service and took up hor,  residence nt Kingston on a comfortable annuity granted hcr by the*  three sisters.  Thc old woman rclatss-with satisfaction tho fact that she has not  tasted medicine for a quarter of a  century. Twenty years ago she was  recommended whisky and water as a  nightcap, and thiiiks it is tliat  which has kept her alive.  ALWAYS AN EARLY IHSISK.  Throughout hcr long lifo sho Has  ���������boon an early riser, and oven now  gets up at 5 o'clock in the morning,  and until two years it.go was able  to tlo a little gardening. Her appetite for food is much hotter than  that of thousands of persons half a  century j'oungor, hor hearing is  perfect, and her cj-csight scarcely yot"  alTected by advancing years. She is  always .cheerful, and clings to life.  ��������� "If I live ns happily as I do now,",  she said, "I want to live a long  time j'et. I should love to visit the  land of my birth. 1 have not a single relative livii.ig, and, as far aa I  know, 110 ono is now alive who Know  mc before I left Baltimore."  DISRAELI'S  READY WIT.  Some Stories of the Famous British Premier.  thoughts of eternity.                                  ,        , ,.    , ,,.-.,       .  Once   fi.   follow   dragged   ,���������,.     ,l���������w���������- j *J'" ��������� J f1������,������"1  l,,uU * w]lolu r.umly of  ward   into   the  sea   "full   fortv   rath-   "ollvt's hal] ���������t*������.'!.'-.1il'������: ������'������}'  orns,"   judging*  b.v   my   feelings;    and j carcass and   turned. if-rutty-i  fin  nnotht*r  occasion   f   happened     to ' ,',".'",', ,j  be 011  thn back of a big sperm whale!    H"'-'ul   -  ������������������  ������������������������������������������������������"      holding iSI,ch  ns  when ho mn.de a start, and,  ori to the harpoon, I. travel led for ti  short time in a circle al the rate of  thirty miles tm hour, when I thought  il expedient to tslitlc into tho sea,  ami trust to being picked up by one  of the bonis forming the hunting  party. And what will strike .vou as  ti lish story, but il is true, before I  was resound 1 actually went within  nn nee of swimming directly into the  inouth of another whale wliich was  strolling lilting the spot as if anxious  to inquire about the general commotion going on.  country  into the  Ik* bit or  This    was   anything  but      a  borne,"   nnd    ils   influence���������  it   wns���������pervaded   the   whole  for miles around.  it,  ���������but  fer  vou  'the  "Xlriitfiy joust; won't believe  ma'am," saitl the hungry hobo,  I've been a-lookin' fer work  more'n ten years." "Well,  needn't look no farther," said  stern-faced kind lnti\'; "I havo plentj"  of      it  right here,   and "   '"Scuse  me. ma'am," iiitorruptud the patient  looker. 'As I set), I've been lookin'  fer work, but now that 1'vt* found  it me curiosity is satisfied. Orrj-  voor,   ma'am."  Who shall deny the wit of Disraeli,  whether in tho Houso of Commons  or in private lifo? Some of his remarks have bocomo historic, as when  in a debate on thc corn laws when  Peel had made his volte face: "The  right honorable gentleman has  caught tho Whigs bathing and has  walked away with their clothes"; or  whon he callod Lord Derby "the  Prince Ituport of parliamentary discussion"; "His charge is resistless,  but when he returns from tho pursuit he always finds his camp in tho  possession  of tho enemy."  The Disraeli of early days was no  loss witty. He. had quarrelled with  his father���������Isaac Disraeli of "Curiosities of Literature" fame���������whom tho  lato Lortl Dull'orin's mother was anxious to moot. One fino day Disraeli  arrived with his father in his right  hnnd, so to speak. Setting him  down in a chair and looking at him  as if ho wore some object of vcrtu of  wh ich __ he_ want cd . t_o dispose,  the  younger man said in a somewhat"  sontcniotis mnnner: "Mrs. Blackwood  I have brought my father. I havo  become reconciled to my father on  two conditions; tho first was that  ho should como antl sec you; the second thnt he should pay my debts."  This is an admirable example of the  impudence and nonchalance of tho  mnn who announced that ho stood  for Parlinmont "on his head," and  and is a worthy companion of tho  story told of-the day when, as a  young man, he was driving with Sir  Philip Dose to .Shrewsbury, whore,,  at the general election, ho hatl been  nominated as the Conservative candidate. As they neared thc borough, Sir Philip noticed a large poster, stopped tho carriage, and calling his friend's attention to it, remarked: "It is something about  .you." Disraeli read the words  printed in lurgo, letters: "Judgment  Debts of Benjamin Disraeli. Tory  Candidate for Shrewsbury.". ..Underneath was a list of dohts upon which  judgment had been signed. This ho  perused carefully. Then ho turned  to Sir '/Philip and said placidly:  "Mow accurate it is! Now lot us  go on or wo shall bo late." He won  the election!  RAISF.D BY ACETYLENE.  Acetylene gas is generally utilized  for motor and cycle lamps, but in  licrmany it is being employed for  salving vessels. Large hollow receptacles, called pontoons, containing  calcium carbide, arc sunk., and fastened to thc submerged ship by divers. When the water, entering the  pontoon, comes int:> contact, with  the calcium carbide, acetylene gas  immediately generates As the gas  cannot, escape from tne pontoons, it  renders thc latter buoyant, so that  they rise to the surfao. raising the  sunken vessel with them, cciaaesiwl  f - !/  C������*a .j. ������-<.-������k.;.*������k.>^*.������;**������.;������**<.-tt<' ���������%������������������}������������������������������������������>������  f THE AFFAIR AT *  f THE PARK HOTEL  w  ���������  .*.*������..;.*o..^.;.������..;^������.,;.-������..;.*������������;.**.;.'%-<.*������v*-������*.  I.  There was a commotion ac tho  Park Hotol. Tho manager, surrounded by a number of employes  ivas speaking rapidly mid giist'i'tilui*  ing wildly at ono of tho book-kcep-  cis. who stootl boforo him will t-'-l  lips nntl a faco as white as death.  Every word foil on the girl like a  blow in the face.  "Ono moro chance I give you1"' he  vociferated at length. "Will you  givo up tho ring or not? It will  make your sentence lighter if you  do."  Thoro wns no response from the  quivering lips of tho shrinking girl.  "There's' no doubt 'whatever you  stole it,:' pursued tho manager; "but  I am allowing you tho opportunity  of giving it up, and so, in some degree, palliating your crime. Now,  are .you going to speak, beforo I call  in the polico?"  The girl cowered before him and  her features writhed in agonj', but  sho mndo no answer to her accuser.  Tho manager was almost livid with  passion. Recently tho Park had acquired an unovitably reputation for  thefts from tho guests, and business  had consequently suffered. That  r; morning a valuable dfnmond ring belonging to James P. Bronton, tho  American millionaire, had been stolen, and tho manager congratulated  himsolf on having discovered the culprit almost in tho act. His rage at  thc knowledge that the thief was one  of his trusted book-keepers knew no  bounds.  "Vcry well!" he snapped. "It's no  use, I see.    Call a policeman!"  At  tin's juncture  tho  door  opened*  and the    figure of    the tall,  broad-  shouldered American appeared in the  doorway.  "Halloa!      What's tho matter?" ho  masked,  pausing to survey tho group.  "I am sorry to say wo have a caso  of theft- hero, sir," said the manaigor,  .���������deferentially,     "and,     unfortunately,  you  nro the    victim.   This morning,  when  you  wont  out.   you  left a  diamond    ring on    your drossing-tablo.  The servant    who  entered  tho room  immediately      afterwards       observed  that it was a vorv valuable ring, nntl  drew the    attention  of  my wifn     to  it.   Unfortunately,     tho     door     was  '.eft  open   for     nbout   half  an   hour,  land^ in   the  meantime  tho  ring    was  itolen.   Wc hnvo discovered  the  culprit  in  the  person  of Lucy  Jowctt,  one  of   my  book-koepors.   who     was  isoen to enter the room bofore it was  ocked.   Hor conduct  on   being questioned  places  this' matter  beyond all  ���������doubt. "I  was    iust  sending  for     a  mnstnblc,  and  enn  only express my  r,cgrct  nt   tho  occurrence."'  Tho    American   pulled  at his  cigar  nd   looked  hard  at     thn  shrinking  iri.   She  was  so  young���������sho  looked  larely   twenty���������and   so   pretty;       hor  veal eyes seemed  to nppeal  to him  nr  compassion:   and  an  ovormastor-  g pity and desire to save hor sciz-  d him.  "You arc quite certain about it.  , take it?" ho drawled. "Wait just  second," ho said, ascending the  tairs three at a time.  Next moment ho stopped lightly  own and confronted the manager  nee moro.  "See here, j'ou'vo made a mis-  ikc," he said, holding out his loft  |and, on which a massive diamond  ng scintillated.  The manager looked mystiliod.  "Whero did you  find it,   sir?"   *>ho  immerod.  Why,  it's been on my finger     all  |e time!"     tho    American  laughed,  vo got so many of 'em that   it's  metimes difficult to locate 'em.     I  Collect now that*. I-returned, for-this  it.-.under half  an  hour  after  leav-  r my room this morning.    So that  ,ars  up the mystery, I guess."  I am vory glad to hear it," said  , manager,  flushing uncomfortably  frier tho other's cool  gaze.      Then,  ning to the book-lceoper,  ho said,  owe j-ou   au  apology,   Miss    Jo-  :t.     I adviso j-ou not to enter tho  *.^sLJ___CHns,__aiid=^then^suspicion  I  not rest    on you  in case,,  any-  [jig  liko this  occurs again."  Oh, sir, I want to leave at onco.  '.    mny,"  said    tho girl, bursting  ���������> a Hood of tears.  'lh,   vory   well.   Pleaso- yourself,"  fl the manager, curtly.    "You can  o j-our    money to  date.      I will  ense with  tho usual  notice."  ith a murmur of thanks the girl  K-ietl up to hcr room to pack hor  .  while tho others dispersed     to  r  respective;  posts.   .Half-way- up  stairs  tho girl  was overtaken by  American.  iii.V,-miss, como right in hero Ior  oinent," ho called to hor.  ion  tliey were in his room     and  ;door wns locked,  a grave     look  !  into  tho    man's  oyes  and     ho  ed  round     sharply  on   her     and  tl  out:���������  lay,  why did you do it?"  o'only response was a fresh out-  i, of weeping.  ou don't look liko a thief," the  ��������� went on, in tenso tones. "Is  i account .-of .poverty'" Oot au  ���������g mother who is poor and wants  ;fshmcnt,   or  anything  liko   that,  "No���������don't thank mo! Keep  straight���������that'll bo better. I reckon  you'll havo to get onothpr Job  Hero's nny card. Refer anybody to  mc for a character. I trust you ���������  see?*'  "Oh, sir, I can't thank you. Heaven will bless you!" faltered tho girl.  spizi.il hy a fresh outburst of violent  sobs.  "There, thorp���������don't cry! I shall  lie opening a factory in this country  soon, antl perhaps I may bo abla to  give you a start in the otfllco."  The next instant sho had gone, and  hor benefactor stood for a moment  in deep thought.  II.  Tlio great steel magnate James P  P.renlon's factory had raised  its tall  'chimneys  nmong  ils  follows  in     tho  .Midlands    for upwards of fivo years.  Darin-   thut  timo a revolution     had  boon  brought     aliout   in   tho     hard-  waro trntlo of Oreat Britain. This,  tho newest phase of tho American invasion, had como at a particularly  crucial momont. For some years  British trade had suffered from thp  importation of American-made goods  cheapened by tlio vast resources of  that expansive country, nnd, as a  consequence, thousands of workers  had lost their employment. Finally,  as if to prove how far ahead American methods of production wore to  thoir rivals', Brenton had built a  huge factory cheek by jowl with  British works. ������  Money was poured out liko water  in the equipment of the factory with  the most up-to-date tools; but hero  prodigality stopped short. It is  truo that by working on piece-work  lines high wages woro paid to somo  employes, but tho sub-division of  labor had aroused all the latent antagonism of trade unionists, who  strongly resented* such methods. Tho  rules of service, too, woro so rigid,  and the supervision so keen, that  mon who failed to turn out a stated  quantum of work were "lirod out"  in the most approved Yankeo fashion.  At the outset Brenton frankly declared war against all attempts to  restrict tho output. Oon'sji|"utinti/,'  tha men wero in a perpetual state of  ferment; for, wliile a few rapid workers earned largo sums, tho majority  suffered by comparison. -The fortunate few were subjected to such persecution by their follows that they  threw up tho job in despair, and the  old-fashioned slow brigade, reinforced bj- others of the same kidney,  commenced an active campaign  against thoir employer in the hopo  of destroying altogether the new  methods.  Cut they littlo knew tho man thoy  had to deal with in tho forceful  James P. Bronton. He retaliated by  announcing- his determination to  stick to his system, though the business wont to tho dogs.  Thereupon tho men for inflated  thoir demands in writing. These were  promptly rejected, and then tho men  openly threatened a general strike.  Tlieir consternation may be imagined when Brenton suddenly forest.viled  thcm by shutting down the works.  The resentment of tho men know  no bounds. Faced, however. by  such vast resources, thoy realized  their helplessness, and the destitution of their homes impelled them, to  endeavor to mako terms with thoir  powerful antagonist. A hasty consultation was hold, and it wns decided to offer to resume work on a  modification of the terms thvy had  put  forward.  Wliile theso proceedings were taking placo and the air was alivo with  momentous issues Bronton sat in  his private room at his hotel. From  hero ho directed operations, seldom  going-'��������� near tho works, but carrying  in his strong, clear master-brain  every detail of tho organization. He  nlone controlled matters of policy;  his was tho hand that had sigtned tho  notico of a stoppage.    .  As he lay back in his comfortable  arm-chair ho looked not five, but  ten years older than ho was when ho  came to England. His hair was  touched with grey, and-there , wero  lines on his face-which told of ceaseless toil and strenuous., thought.'  Though' barely thirty-five, ho possess-  men withdrew, and thoro were many  sad homes in Plumpton that night.  m.  Events quickly reached a climax  at Plumpton. Tho lock-out had  continued for six months, and want  and misery stalked through tho  erstwhile prosperous town like a  spoctro. Appeals and protestations  alike had been mado in vain; Brcn-  ton's heart was adamantine, and at  last tho peoplo had turned liko the  proverbial worm. Appeals gave way  to demands, profest'ations to throats  and a largo forco of polico had been  drafted into tho town in expectation  of a riot. Angry crowds parad-tl the  streets with banners flying, the windows of tho factory wero smashed  wilh stones, nnd loud execrations  wore uttered against Bronton  Amidst it all the millionaire sat  secure in his room at th*- lintel.  Night after night tho mon assembled  outsido tho factory and dcliivr.-d in-  f]p minatory speeches, and at length  turned thoir attention to the hotel  Around its walls thoy assembled in  thousands, and fists wero shaken and  ominous threats uttered. Tho ho  toi proprietors, alarmed at tho serious aspect of .affairs, barricaded  thoir windows and implored Brenton  not to show himself to the men, or  grave consequences  might follow  "Curse him! He skulks in thore;  Ho daro not go to the works. lht>  coward!" cried tho crowd.  Brenton heard that cry, and tho  taunt slung him to the quick.  Next morning the hotel proprietors gavo a sigh of relief, for their  guest had gono to tho factory.  High up on tho fifth storey he sat  gazing out tlirough the window, a  look of determination on his features, and in his heart a grim resolution to seo tiio matter through���������  no matter what it cost.  As tho day woro ��������� on the men assembled'In great force, and whon a  whisper went round that the "cursed  tyrant" was actually at the factory  mocking at their misery and openly  defj'ing thorn n great wave of anger  passed  through  tho ranks.  Towards evening tho crowds still  further increased, and a scene bf the  wildest, excitement, followed. Stones  woro hurled at tho windows, and the  lifo of tho solitary inmate was  threatened.  .'-Infuriated:men and women brought  thoir pale and pinched children,  and  held them up  in their arms as   witnesses  of their great sufferings,  sight  of  tho  wan-chocked  littlo  lashed    lhc    men    into   a fury,  fresh   imprecations   were   hurled  tho head of tho tyrant.  At length a sinster suggestion  passed with lightning-like rapidity  through lho ranks.  "Fire tho building! Destroy thc  tyrant!" yelled n score of voices,  and instantly the cry was taken up.  Quickly the leaders dnched off for  inflammable materials wherewith to  carry out this dire threat, and soon  a great quantitj- of oil wns poured  on the doors ant! through the windows,   and matches  were applied.-  Amid the shouts of tho people the  flames burst forth, and with a roar  and a cruckle the firo ascended skywards, casting its lurid glare.against  tho murky heavens.  Jlrenlon, standing at the window,  saw the red serpent crawling upwards foot by foot; ho heard 'tho  fierce roar of the flames antl saw thc  smoko surging up liko a pall, antl ho  know that in a short time thoy  would reach him. A thousand  thoughts flashed through his brain  in that momont. Ho had beaten the  mon, but they wero exacting a terrible price. For a brief instant ho  thought of tho faco thdt.had attracted him���������aye, which ho loved, in  spite of all!���������and his heart sank.  At length the instinct of self-preservation rose uppermost, and in a  despairing effort ho started tip'- and  scanned tho sea of- faces below. Not  a friend appeared amongst them;  not a voice raised itself on his behalf.  * Just then ho heard the clatter of  hoofs and tho rattle of wheels, and  ho knew that the military had arrived on the scene. Throe times they  charged up lhat densely-thronged  street, and after a severe struggle  succeeded in rolling tho.rioters back.  "Heavens!" he criod, starting back,    ^������������������^���������������������������������������������****#*.>*'*^>#������'>g     Tho Napoleon rosette is a favorito  "Ifr'o     T  I) f.\r       f Vip     ihlpft** ^ tlTi + li      4-Y\H.      millinnpa      fn**      4V\*.      fiiw Vi a ���������  The  ones  antl  at  "No���������not the thiefl" criod tho girl  exultantly, in ringing tones,__ and  showing him her bleeding hands.  "Oh, how I have waited for this moment to tell you that I was innocent! It was iny brother who was  tho Ihieff To save him I kopt silent.  Ho died six months ago, and from  that moment I determined to seek  you out and tell you the truth. I  obtainod a situation in youi* ofllco,  and at last Heaven has given mo  tho opportunity to repay you "for  sparing mo fivo yours ago. This  morning I got into tho factory and  fixed up this ropo. I wanted to  savo you; I know they would kill  you if thoy could."  A shudder convulsed the strong  man as ho listened to tho story of  her heroism. A dull, heavy load  seemed to pass from his soul.  "You woro innocent! Oh, thank  Heaven! Whilo I���������selfish wretch that  I nm���������have boon absorbed in amassing a few more miserable dollars you  sacrificed yourself. Lucy, you havo  saved my life and you have humbled  mo to the dust. Tho ono redeeming  feature of my conduct is that I havo  lovod j-ou for fivo long weary years  ���������lovod you even whilo I doubted  you."  Ho paused and glanced at hcr faco.  Something that he saw thoro sont a  mighty thrill through his veins, and  bis heart gavo a great bound.  "Lucy," he whispered, in a voice  shaking with emotion, "is it possible? Can you love mo ovor such  a littlo?"  For answer the girl's hands wont  out to him, and he seized thorn and  covered them with kisses.  "Givo tbem tho terms they ask,  for my sake!" she whispered.  Ho knelt down and placed his arms  about her, holding her closo.  An hour later Brenton stood on a  hastily-improvised platform and addressed tho rioters.  ' "Men!" ho cried, in vibrant tones,  "tho lockout is ovor. As soon as  this factory: can. bo rebuilt you can  start afresh on .your own terms. Tomorrow I will distribute a hundred  thousand pounds to relieve the distress. Yoii shall be paid wages for  every hour you have boon out. If  jrou ask ma why I* give up .the 'struggle, I answer that an English girl,  soon to become my wifo, lias taught  me my duty by performing a noble  act of self-sacrifice,. while I fought  for imy own selfish ends."  Wlien he had finished thoro was  ���������such a roar of cheering ns hatl never  beforo boon heard in Plumpton.���������  London Tit-Bits.  Fashion  ...Talk  SAFE RULE TO  GO  BY.  SO FUUNY.  It was lato in the evening ns tho  j-oung student was .wending his waj-  homeward from a concert and passing tho houso or a well-known physician.  At the side of tho doorway was a  speaking-tube, underneath wliich was  the inscription���������"Whistle for Dr.  Polls."  Not wishing to bo disobliging  nbout so small a matter, thc student  It's a mistake to buy everything  with an eyo to its enduring qualities, ovon if you'vo an extremely  limited pocketbook. It depends entirely for what purposo you chooso  your gown, whether or not it should  lust.  A fairly safo rule to go by is  that tho staplo sort of clothes, mado  in consorvativo ways, should bo  bought with a very distinct idea of  "long life," and that evening gowns,  especially if you're a good deal of  a butterfly, should be got with almost the solo idea of effect.  We've all known tho unpleasant  sensation of putting Uio much money  in a gown and then feeling that wo  must "got tho wear out of it," ovon  though it be a conspicuous stylo or  soils at its first wearing. And tho  woman with little money is the ono  who suffers most of all in such an  exporionro.  Evening gowns oughtn't to last  too long; business and street clothes  can't���������always supposing it's tho woman with the small purso who is  considering the purchase. And  street clothes should bo or quiet, rather neutral, colors'���������the kind "you  don't get known bv." as one woman  put it.  Afternoon gowns got hard wear���������  as hard as street clothes, in reality���������  so thej' should naturally bo made  of materials that can hold thoir own  and yet not stretch nor' shrink not-  got out of shape. They must be got  to last, for the "set" and the  "hang" in us t last as long as the  gown.  And furs! Tha woman who can't  afford to havo changes mado in tlio  style of hor fur coat or her neckpiece  antl mull doesn't want to put.all'hcr  money in an extreme, unusual fur-  piece, that by its vory individuality  is likely to "go out" in a short  timo; but should stick to tho most,  conservative furs, made up in tlm  most conservative ways.  After all, conservatism, not cost,  is lho greatest help in eking out a  small clothes allowance: and conservatism consists ns much in having  an inexpensive little gown that is  put on and worn out soon and replaced ns in getting thimrs thnt. last,  overlong. '  Mink is now in high favor, antl  this makes very nearly ns pretty a  hat as tloes tho more expensive sablo.  Onlj- tho choicest and deepest colorings arc used, nnd lho beauty oftho pelt is mado tho most of. Tho  girl who cannot afford tho best .of  mink will wclcomo the iicw Japanese  mink���������wliich is really a dyed fur, Wut  reproduced (only for a short tiunc, it  is  true)   the  rich  markings    of     tho  with tho milliners for tho fur hat,  for the plainness and a certain do-  grco of stiffness that inevitably accompanies tho uso of fur in imilliuery  favors the military designs. A.  smart crmino turban shows a military rosotto, just threo rows of stiff  quillings with a button centre, and  three stiff loops about a finger"dopth  each dangling at tho sido.  HERE AND THERE.  Places  walkod  up  tho  steps  and   blow  into,  the pipe with all the strength of liisiJnor*-   expensive   fur   from   which      it  lun^s. Hakes  its    name,  and will   doubtless  Tho physician,   who  was  awakened'List  ns  long  ns   tho fad  for  the fur  by  tho  resultant  shrill  whistle  near bat  endures  arose, groped his way  and shouted:���������  to  ed great wealth and wielded     great (Then tho firo brigade came into    ac-  power.   Of lato .years  ho had._subor  did  Dear,  us     so  throw  ���������iri  bowed hor head,   but  ijpcnk.  l'i,  T guessed so.   Havo you got  |!ing   now?"  sir."  fill,  rid  of  it  quick,   too.  Woll,     there's  none  of  I'jciilnlc as fo bo ablo to  Now,    sco  hero.   Promise me  tlu'iif.'oforlh you  will  bo    honest;  1'ig as you  livo,  mind!"  :*,ionii.se,"   camo   from   the  girl,  ���������{���������duet! accents.  Kit's right! Now, here's some  to buy things for your ino-  Proiliicing his pocket-honk,  Jilted out ten fwent.v-pound  etind thrust  lhem Inlo her hniul.  dinatod^ti 1 l~iiilerSSts"tcTsiiccess; keeping an ejro on tho' object to bo  achieved, and riding roughshod ovor  all opposition. Those who knew  him woll said that ho had grown  lard mid remorseless sinco ho had  como to England, and ���������i.hc.v told him  N".  Ancl now, as ho sat there, his /ulnd  inverted to that incident at the Park  Hotel, and a shadow crossed his  fact,  Hc remembered the faco of tho girl  in all its placid boauty, with purity  aiul uprightness of soul stamped on  overy lino, and his faco flushed as ho  reflected on the opisodo. Bah! Tho  one. faco in all thc world that had  attracted him���������the faco of a thief!  Ho was fast becoming a cynic. His  friends wore rigiit in saying that he  had grown hard and remorseless during tho last fow years, but thoy  nover dreamed tho cause. None  knew better than ho that a change  had taken place in his nature; and  now, as he sat alone with his  thoughts, ho realized tho imminent  danger of his going from bad to  worse, and departing still further  from tho path of fairness and generosity.  An hour later  and  placed   their  tion^jind^thc^gngme^iegan^to-^play  upon tho flames  But tho fire-escape was useless in  such an extremity. The lower part  of tho building was a mass of flames  and no man could live in such an  inferno  "Too late!" ho criod. in his-heart.  He rushed about the building and  lookotl out from overy sitle. All  around was the same mass of flames  up to the second floor. Nothing  short "of a''miraclo could savo liim.  And then Brenton saw a miraclo  happen. From tho highest storey a  ropo hung suspended to the ��������� third  storey window, from which, on a  sudden, a fit;uro sprang and, seizing  tho rope, comimenced to ascend hand  over hand.  Fascinated by tho sight, he watched, whilo the roar of the fire filled  his oars. Nearer and nearer came  tho climber by painful efforts, stopping short sometimes, then struggling ahead again.  At length the watcher saw something that mado his heart boat faster, and his hands clenched and a  thrill went through his whole being.  Thc climber was a woman!  Up,   up  sho  climbed,   scorched     by  the    flames     and    blackened   by  lho  deputation called I smoko,  until  at length  she     reached  his head  tho tube,  "Woll?"  "Glad to know you're well," was  tho reply; "but, being a doctor, I  s'pose j-ou can keep well at cost  price,  can't j'ou?"  "What do you want?" said the  man. of modicine, not caring to joke  at that tiine of night.  "Well "  said    thc student,  aftor  a moment's meditation. "Oh, by  the way, are j-ou j'bung Potts or old  Potts?--.:  "I  am     Dr.  Potts.   Thore  is  -.- no  j-oung Potts."        ���������  "Not?dead,  I hope?"  ���������"There' never was any.- I have no  son."  "Then you -are young Potts and  old Potts -toot Dear, dear, how  singular!"' ,  ;. "What do you want?" snapped  the doctor.   ,  "You know old Mrs; Povine, who  lives in-.the next street?"  "Yes. Is sho ill? What's the matter?"    ..-������������������;.-������������������.  "Do  you    know her nephew too���������  Bill  Briggs?"  - JlY^^^Well?iL==i======i=-=---===-  iio  And to thoir credit bo it said the  milliners oro this season content to  let "beauty unadorned bo adorned  tho most." Tho quotation is trite  nntl hackneyed, but in this connection���������and 'tis a rare ont*���������it has ot  least  the merit of truth.  went!   shooting    this  new   terms  in Ih^j-fe-'"?,,?;?-!--!;*.-*$-:Aiy:AA:-Ai::A  suffer i 3  sue It  the lo.  Wher  rose  eyes.  "Si  ���������(window whero Brenton stood  ing, and then, with a great ef-  ,she     swung herself   in  at"    his  re is one wny of escape���������quick  ,v  me!"   she  cried,   and     with  iting   .heart    and    bewildered  liientoii darted after her right  ihe building,   through  a long  r,  then ascending a flight     of  nil     thence  through   a  trap-  ifh  opened  on  to  the roof of  :n:ng building.    Then, with a  've sol),   his  rescuer  fell   in    a  heap on the floor.  n     stooped   and   lifled      hcr  "Well,  morning, and*  "And ho had an accident! .Hold .on  n minute.   I'll bo down "  "No, he's all right; but ho got  five brace of birds. I thought j^ou  might like to hear of it."  "I saj'," replied tho exasperated  If. D., "that's a jolly good joko,  my friend; Won't j'ou tako something?"  "What?" said tho surprised humorist,  pausing for breath.  "Why, take something. Tako  this."   ...  And before tho funny man could  withdraw his mouth, a hastily compounded mixture of ink, ipecacuanha, and about fourteen otlior drugs  squirted from the pipe antl doltigod  him from head to foot, about, a  pint  monopolizing  his  shirtfront.  And whilo he darcod frantically  round, sponging himself off wilh his  handkerchief and talking liko a pirate in the last act, hc could hoar a  soft voice from above sweetly murmur:���������  "Have sonic moi-e? No? Woll,  good-night. Come again soon, j'ou  funny dog, you!"  BEDS OF SOLDIERS.  In Germany and Austria the soldier has a simple straw bed with ono  or two covers, neither sheet noo  mattress. In Russia until recently  he slept with his clothes on, on a  camp bed, but now ordinary boils  begin to bo used���������the result of association wilh more civilized -countries. After this it cannot bc doubted that the French soldier's bed is  the best of all, with ils wooden or  iron bedstead, a straw bed, awool  mattress, sheets, a brown woollen  coverlet, antl an extra quilt for cold  weather. Thus the bod of tlie French  soldier is the softest of all soldiers'  beds, as thnt of the French peasant  is acknowledged also to be the bost  of  all  Europeuu  countries.  COL'OItH  TO  WEAR.  Afternoon gowns aro among the  most characteristic clothes in a  woman's wardrobe. Almost anyone  can. manage to plan a good-looking  tailor suit, and the very lightness  and grace of evening gowns .mako  every woimiir look her. best. But afternoon gowns require-a' different  sort  of? consideration. -  Most of them nre made with long,  skirts��������� and full skirts, too. This  is, full to a great extent about the  feet, and treated so as to suggest  theiden of fullness, without boing  actually very, full,  about tlio hips.  Broadcloth, is-tho favorite material  for thorn, being a stuff/that carries  a pretty littlo air of .formality,". and  dignity in its smooth surfaco, but  only tho softer, jnoro_gupploi_brp_ad-  cldths���������thb~klnds~ that drape into  statuesquo folds���������arc used.  Velvet is good���������especially in gray  ���������T>ut tho richest of colors in cloth i.s  a clear, beautiful red, with a strong  hint of coral, in its color-quality,  ami that red comes in a dozen varying tints.  For tho rest, light colors are worn  even more than whito, with a strong  tendency to lho palo, cxrpnsito bluo  Hint, tho texture of broadcloth seems  especially lovely in. But a certain  soft rose-color is extremely popular,  ton.  Everything is Iri mined a good  ileal, but not, by any menus, with  tho amount of trimming that nn  evening gown scorns to require. Fnr  the littlo touch of severity that belongs to broadcloth, no matter how  light weight it may bo, is best sot  by. a simpler, loss profuse amount of  trimming. 0  Irish crochet has carried styles hy  storm this season, especially thn  now Irish crochet, whicli is tho old  dominated by French ideas, and rich  with now do,sign������. A touch of if,  seems to be on almost everything.  In strong contrast aro tho fino,  light Inccs���������as airy and delicate almost as veils���������which como in every  color of a very delicate rainbow.  Furs arc usod, by way of Iriimiming  too, in little rows that givo a rich,  wintry touch to tho costume.  Fivo out of ovory ton gowns (perhaps moro) aro - mado with elbow  sleeves, with a deep frill of laco, or  of tho. material���������tucked and trickod  out prettily���������to end tfcom off. But  all sorts of cuffs arc evolved, too.  for tho woman who isn't content  with that long stretch of glove to  her  elbow.  And tuckers have como in, too���������  modest littlo affairs of laco that  como only half-way between throat  antl shoulder, and . aro too shallow  to  poso as yokes.  Interesting Tacts     About  And Things.  A rook clan fly sixtj' miles,an hour,  a hawk 150 miles.  Boos suck 3,000,000 flowers to  gather ono pound of honej".  Dainty Indian muslins arc mado  from tho fibres of the banana treo.  In Yucatan thero aro no fewer  than sixty-two ruined and abandoned cities.  Thoro is ono lighthouse to every  fourteen miles of coast in Groat  Britain.  Nineteen out of every hundred persons convicted of murder are executed.  A good railway engine will travel  about 1,000,000 milos beforo it  wears out,  Tho cost of feeding the horses in  tho British Army is about $125 each  per year.  Tho annual income from tho Jlonto  Carlo gaming tables exceeds $7,500,-  000.  Over 3,000,000,000,000 envelopes  are. manufactured in Groat Britain  annuallj'.  Two hundred and fifty thousand  persons emigrate from Great Britain every year.  In tho United States a ton is not  2,240 pounds, as in Britain, but 2,-  000 pounds only.  The French tobacco monopoly  brings in a profit of 880,000,000  sterling  overy  year.  Two hundred and cightj- million  pounds' weight of tea aro annually  imported  into  London.  Fully 10,000 domestic servants in  London are always out of situations  or changing their places.  Every inhabitant: of tho United  Kingdom may bc said figurativolji* to  hold sway over 130 acres abroad. -..  ���������France has four classes of roads  Thoy aro respectively fifty, forty,  thirty-throe, arid - - - twenty-fivo feet  wide. '  .- Bricks, mado of coal dust arc used  for paving in "Russia. Tho coal dust  is combined with molasses and  resin.  Groat Britain requires 12,000,000  pounds' worth of leather ovorj- j-car  for tho boots and shoos of its inhabitants.  The largest proportion of single  persons is found in Ireland and  Scotland, and tho smallest in the  United   Stales.  In Spain street performers on tho  guitar aro licensed, while organ  grinders are rigorously suppressed.  Within tho past ninety years tho  Spanish-speaking population of tho  world has increased from 20,190,-  000  to  43,000,000.  Figs have boen usod as food in the  Orient from tho earliest times, antl  woro also believed to be an antidote to poison.  Vesuvius "and Etna aro nover both  active at tho snmo timo; when ono  is "violent, lho other is most quiescent.    ' ......          There stands at the foot of Mount  Etna a chestnut treo which is said  to bo 2,000 years old. It is 213  foot   in  circumference.  Tho best choose mado in Switzerland is usually exported, and is seldom to bo had oven in tho famous  hotels of that countrj-.  T'he French Government makes S3,-  '250,000-a-year out of tho very bad  matches of tho manufacture of which  it holds a'monopoly,  Tho longest continuous stairway  in tho world is that which loans to  the tower of tho Philadelphia Cit}-  Hall.   It   comprises   598   stops.  A bee, unladen, will fly forty miles  an hour; but ono Coming home.laden  , with honey does not travel faster  than twelve milos an hour.  Tho orango is "ono of the? most generally usod articles of food in Paraguay, especially "among the poor in  the countrj- districts. . Pigs aro,fattened  on "them. ;     ��������������������������� y'j'-.   ���������':.  The dogs of Portugal are passionately fond of grapes _antr^ticks^aro  purposciy^fiisteried^to-lho animals'  necks, to impodo or prevent their  entrance to lho vinoj'ards, in search  of tho luscious fruit.  ?   HEALTH  I  BRIGHT'S  DISEASE.  From the Health Bulletin, of Chi*  cago, we copj- tho following signifi*.  cant  itom:  . "It is not reassuring to learn thai  nearly G per cent, of Chicago's mal������  population in early manhood is afflicted wilh Bright's disoase; and yet  such is the inference warranted by  tho results of iho examination- mad*  during the week b\- Department physicians of -189 applicants for appointment to the City Fire Department. 'Of this number 29 lor 5.S.  per cont.) were rejected for kidney,  trouble. Whon it is reflected thai  tho principal cause of such troubll  i.s exposure to cold and wot 'aftor ei  drinking bout,' tho figures do not  speak well for tho habits of Chicago's young mon."  But we feel compelled to add that'  thoro aro many othor causes of  Bright's disease and other affection!  of the kidnej-s than "exposure to  cold aud wot after a drinking  bout." Tlie everlasting habit ol  gusszling of beor, "orange phosphate"*  mineral waters of ovcrj- grada  of       sloppy     fizziness, is       no  doubt chargeable with much" of  tho universal crop of renal complaints. If -. everybody would get  back to simple drinks os well as to  a "simple lifo," wo should hear loss  about Bright's disease.  HOW TO STAND.  You can make or mar your figure  j-ourself. Do not lay all the blama  at Nature's door, for it is mora  j-our own fault than hors that j-ou  aro not a good figure, be it of tho  stout or slim order.  The minute a woman stands lightly on her feet, with knees straight,  chest well out, stomach flat, shoulders back, and tho body from waist  up tilting over so lightly forward,  she has acquired at once "a certain  smartness of effect, that no amount  of beauty or fine clothes could give.  The smart girl is never round-  shouldered or hollow-chested, and by  standing properly she breathes pro-  porlj-. Everj- full, deep breath sho  draws straightens the muscles of hor  sides and abdomen. Sho is bound  not to grow into a fat, ungainly  woman, who can never catch her  breath or a train, for a proper poiso  of the body moans good digestion  and good  health.  How many women sink into a little hoop tho minute thej- sit down���������  shoulders drooping, chest sunken,  tho whole weight of the bodj- thrown  on the end of tho spine. The smart  girl sits in thc same erect, alert  way that she stands, and if'sho  wishes to rest she leans back against  hor shoulders, and not the middlo of  hor back.  fn bonding, whether at a desk or a  dishpan, or a dinner-table, sho  bends from her waist, not from hor  shoulders, aud she not onlj- looks  well, but avoids fatigue and the actual injuries that come from any  strain  on  misplaced  muscles.  TO   KEEP  YOUTHFUL.  . Expect a good, long, useful life.  Hold your thoughts porsistcntlj'.  Simply refuse to grow old bj-  counting .your j-ears and anticipating  j-our old  ago.  Refrain from all kinds of stimulants' and sedatives. They will  shorten your life.  One of tlio best preventives of age  is enthusiasm "and interest in affairs  of the day.  Keep in the sunlight. Nothing  beautiful or sweet grows or ripens in  tho darkness.  Avoid fear in all its varied forms  of expression; il is the greatest' enemy of  the human  race.  Naturo is tho great ��������� rejuvonator;  her spirit is ever young. Live with  hcr, study, hor,  lovo her.  Contemplate beauty in all its  forms, and you .will-drive'everything  that is ugly out of your life.  Don't allow yourself to think on  your birthday that j-ou aro a j-oar  older, and so much nearer the orjd.  Cultivate the spirit of contentment; all'discontent and dissatisfaction bring ago.furrows prematurelj-  to tho face.  Keep your mir.id young by frosh,  vigorous thinking and your heart  sound by cultivating a cheerful, optimistic disposition.  USEFUL ODDS AND ENDS.  If j-ou do not tr\- to mako J'our-  self look as pretty as j'ou can j'ou  neglect one of j-our duties. It is  worth whilo to make the most of all  tho good looks j-ou possess; but  that does not mean that j-ou should  revel in powtler or purchased bloom,  or spend hours io frivolous decoration.  To havo a clear skin, remember  that j-ou must havo good health,  and to have good health and a rosy-  complexion j'ou must wear thick-  soled shoes, and spend a part of  ever j- daj- out of doors.  To keep your skin from roughening, find by trial what kind of soap  suits j-ou best, and use no other.  Frequent changes of soap are bad  for the complexion. Beware of thoso  which are highly scented; as a gen-  oral thing thej- are of poor qualitj-,  the scent being used to destroy  oilour of tho othor ingredients usod.  If j-ou would keep j-our face antl  hands un wrinkled uso tepid water; ..  verj- hot or cold water is injurious.'"  Also avoid    burying tho fnco in^'a  sqft jdngw^at^night.__which_- alwaj's   "produces wrinkles round the ej'es.  Keop j-our combs and brushes  sweet and clean Wash thorn in topid  water containing a few drops of ammonia. Tho grease and oil will disappear, as if by magic. Place tho  brushes down, to drj-, and the handle  will  not  be injured.  Superintendent���������"I havo proof that  you saw a man in the streets aftor  ono o'clock, and neglected to question liim." Policeman���������"No; but I  followed him, and saw him enter a  houso, and five minutes after heard  a shrill female voice giving him  'Itule, Britannia!' for being out so  lato, and so I know ho was a respectable citizen."  HUNGER  FOR   HEALTH.  A  prolific cause of chronic  indigestion  is eating  from  habit,  nnd  simply     because     it   is   meal-time and  others are eating.   To eat  whom  not  hungry is to oat without relish,  and.  footl  taken  without relish    is   worse  than   wasted.       Without  relish,     tho  salivary  glands   do not act, tho   gastric fluids    are   not   frc*c-lj-  secreted,  and   the  best  of  foods  will   not     bo  digested.      Manj- perfectly     harmless  dishes  arc  severely  condemned,     for  no     other    reason   than   thej'     wero  eaten  perfunctorily,  and  without relish   and   due   insalivation.       Hunger  makes  thc plainest  foods    enjoj-ablo.  It  causes    -vigorious   secretion   and  outpouring of all the digestion fluids,  the sources  of ptyalin,  pepsin,   tr.vp-  sin, etc..   without a plentiful supplj-  of  which  no   foods  can  be  perfectly  digested.  HAYS  FROM THE  BODY.  The scientific world has been greatly excited b.v the recent discovery of  a  now  emanation���������the X-rays,  What  are they? Tlie X-rays are amana-  tions, similar to thoso emitted from  radium, but of a distinctive naturo,  emitted from thc human bodj\ This  highlj- interesting discovery was  made by two French scientists���������  Messrs. Charpentier and Blondlot���������  and thej' were designated N-raj's in  honor of tho Universitj- of Nancy.  There are two types of those raj's���������  thoso emittod from the body, and  those radiated from the nerves. Tho  latter are the more intense, and  with tho aid of a fluoresrent screen  thc scientist can follow the courso  of  a  nerve  beneath   the  skin.  A r������Tm Ti ^,-it.^mi*tmr  ~ -xw-wiivw;  r .^ii*ii'0^a>'ieTii+*.7i*bV&*i  ^*y<������iccs>o*c;tr^^tf>������'rt--^^j^^  "TntfB-tn-TW-tciirr'nri-fr'-r'Tr''' rr*   ���������'���������^������--������>*-^*1������<������*-������--^-*'*-a*..������r^������li  "*- -1 **i������rii*i���������-vi - !r* ���������"���������    *-���������      "'"���������"��������� -*"-���������- ������������������        ���������     'f--   ���������      ~���������  WjO*ftg*OW<������Wtf*W*  MASON & RISC  They ave the product of monoy, brains and experience-substantial Pianos for people who buy, but one instrument in a  life time. Thev look, well, sound well and wear well. 1 et  with all their goodness they are sold at a reasonable price on  easv terms. A card with your name and address will bring  you our illustrated catalogue and an explanation of our easy  time system of pavnients, of which you may avail yourself, no  system ot f  matter where you live.  &    RSSCH    PIANO   CO.,  KING STREET WEST, TORONTO, ON   .  MASON  J. Mac Seod,  LTD.  Agent, Second Street.  Revelstoke Herald and  Railway"eMen's Journal.  Published''everv Thursday. Subscription ?2  per year.   Advertising rates on appl^'jon.  Changes of advertisements must {An in lieforo  noon on Wednesday to insure insertion,  Job Printing ;in all its branches promptly and  neatly executed.  Thursday, March 2, 1005.  TREACHERY TOWARDS  BRITISH COLUMBIA.  Forbearance is certainly a virtue  possessed by the average British Columbian. From the hour of Union it  has been a struggle to conserve even a  marginal portion of Provincial Eights.  Members have acted as abject slaves  of the Dominion authority; the Feder  al wish was the individual thought eif  many who should have publicly rebelled against the trickery and treachery of those in, power at Ottawa.  Since the change of Government  affairs have gone from bad to worse,  for now the people themselves  appear to have lost that  manly patriotic interest in  British Columbia, that characterised  the days of Decosinos, Dewdney, Nathan, Thompson, Nelson and men of  the earlier regime.  TVhy is this? Has the poison of  fcelf-interest, favours to come, trust  combination, the devilish greed for  pelf, sapped every fibre of the organism once so ready to assert itself, so  powerful to demand justice and so  determined to insist upon reasonable  compromise? What would have happened had the public men of the  Province been as weak, as vacillating,  113 time serving between 1S7I and 1ST"  as they are today? We leave that  for those who have studied the history  that  of   that  historic   ep61H*iT"tb~rahswerf  Since 1S06, those who were elected to  support   Sir  Wilfrid    Laurier    have  looked  but one way���������the road to personal aggrandizement, the lane leading   to   political   preferment.     What  have they got? A few men in Victoria  liave made money out of Government  supplies, a few have become prominent, without deserving it and one lias  secured the marvellous   trophy   of a  non-portfolio cabinet position, carrying with it  the glorious and inherent  privilege  of being present when the  Premier of the Dominion  receives a  deputation   crawling   hefore   hiin   to  speak upon behalf of the lumber and  other neglected and undone industries  in this great Province.    It affords us  no satisfaction to   use this language,  true as   it may be and is;   but   what  other   course   is   open?    Newspapers  ���������supporting the Ottawa   combination  are dumber than last season's oysters;  they   cannot  defend,  they dare  not  attack; they cannot eulogise they dare  not anathematise.   They deceived the  people  in November last, they misled  the   electors, the   blindly followed interested leaders, even threatening the  electors  with   foreshadowed disaster,  should they be guilty of the mad error  of   voting   against   so   called Liberal  candidates.     Hundreds   were misled,  hundreds deceived,   hundreds cajoled  into   assuming  responsibility    for  a  Provincial blunder.    Today, the Otta  wa contention is���������that the people of  British Columbia approved of the general policy of the administration, and  to make any extreme departure now,  would be an insult to those who had  already given their adhesion to that  now existing and existing at the time  of the general election.    There is certainly a modicum ofj reasonableness in  this, despite the fact that the conditions were not universally understood.  The people voted  confidence; in those  entrusted   with   the   management of  Federal  affairs.     They  may not get  what they wanted,  still,  it does not  lie in their mouths to indulge iu grumbling  and recrimination.     Of   course  they were solemnly informed in language usually direct, at all times by  inference,   that  construction'  of   the  Grand   Trunk  Pacific   was   to begin  simultaneously, east  and  west;  next  that there was., to be re-arrangement  of   Terms -between   the   Federal and  Provincial Government;  then a duty  was to be put upon  lead; next that a  compromise had been arrived at between representatives from Manitoba  and the North West, aud  the tariff so  arrauged that rough lumber from the  United States (entering Canada at the  rate  of ������3,000,000 per annum) was to  be practically excluded.   These were  the   ante   election   statements.     The  people blindly supported  Sir Wilfrid  Laurier   and  what  benefit have they  derived?     There   is  not one member  who opens his lips and demands that  the  rights of  a free, industrious and  patriotic   people   should be respected.  Each is working for personal favors.  One  promotes  private    bills   before  committees���������we refer to Mv. TS7, A.  Galliher���������while  a   deputation    from  British   Columbia is urging the Premier to protect national interests by  putting a duty   upon   rough lumber,  "thus=^ehcotiragtQg'-one^ofla-the=3tapla'  industries of the Kootenay country.  Another is  pulling wires in the interest of what is popularly known as the  "Bob"  Kelly  ring, in "Vancouver; another just knows enough to vote when  the hell rings, always of course, "with  the  Government.''     Altogether, British Columbia appears to disadvantage,  and   today,   if   Senator    Templeman  (without   portfolio) could   control Sir  Wilfrid   Laurier;   he  would  sacrifice  Province,   people,    industries,   everything, to defeat the McBride Government.     Of course Mr. Templeman is  not a statesman;  even  that could he  overlooked,   wore   he   only a British  Columbian   hefore   everything.    The  Province needs men; not men working  for   place  and   sacrificing  important  interests in an effort to secure personal advancement; but brave, determined and patriotic representatives whoso  one aim, ono object is���������tho progress of  this western portion or the Dominion.  AVe cannot believe that the Premier is  antagonistic   to   a  readjustment    of  Provincial   terms; but  we nan believe  that   Senator  Tenipleinan   is    doing  what he can  to delay any conference  with the design of injuring tho McBride  Government; in short, preventing   the   construction  of  such public  works   as   the   deyelt>prnent   of    thc  Province requires.    If tliis bo not true,  let   Senator  Templeman   by    public  When grievous wrongs were complained of by the electors of Yukon,  tho Government delayed the election  until general results were known.  Then it was announced that if Mr.  Congdon, the Liberal candidate, was  elected, everything would be made  lovely. Thoso Yukon people were  wise in their day ami generation; they  refused to bo duped and returned an  uncompromising opponent of tho  Ottawa programme. What followed?  Already sweeping reforms have heen  introduced and othor drastic measures  decided upon, looking to the amelioration of popular conditions. That  was business tind only such methods  force a Government to recognize tho  inherent right of the taxpayer to  demand a fair, just and reasonable  policy.  Take another view���������and what do we  find? East and West Kootenay are  largely interested in lumber; after the  general election, it was poiuted out  by Government "touters," that in case  XV. A. Galliher was returned, the  Government had decided to put  a duty upon American rough  lumber; tlie same applied to  Mr. Eoss of Greenwood, Both candidates were elected. ��������� We ask what  either has done to carry out solemn  pledges made to those who trusted  them? Recently, a deputation met  the Government at Ottawa; with  what result? "The Government would  take up the matter of tariff revision  as soon as Mr. Fielding returned." It  now transpires that all the issues appertaining to tariff revision, will be  "considered, by. a commission"; two-  thirds of those appointed will beyond  doubt he the deadly opponents of protecting British Columbia lumber!  Already the: fine work of sacrificing  this Province has begun. For instance,  the Montreal Board of Trade deliberately refusing to assist the Western  people stating as follows:  "The question of the advisability  of-the Dominion government im  posing a duty on lumber, was a very  complicated one, owing to the varying  conditions prevailing in different parts  of the Dominion and being moreover,  aware that the people of Manitoba  and the Northwest Territories had  complained of the high prices , of  British Columbia luinher,'"������������������.;*"it - was  decided that i t would be inexpedient  to advocate tis requested by the Rossland Board of Trade, the placing of  such duties on lumber."  Added to this the "machine" is  bringing pressure to bear in Manitoba.  At a meeting of the Grain Grower's  Association, held at Brandon on the  Sth, 200 delegates being present, reports in the Winnipeg newspapers  state:  "After much criticism of the lumbermen a resolution was passed to  grant no duty ou rough lumber and|to  take the present duty off dressed  lumber a copy of which will be for.  warded to Ottawa."  We fear the influences brought to  bear against a duty on rough lumher  will prove ������00 potent, too far-reaching  for we have no confidence in the  members for British Columbia. United  tbey could certainly force the hands  of the Government. When they  unite, however, it will be to further  their own i n teres ts o r-eM VSnTse^Somer  scheme for their aggrandizement of  the all powerful rings and corporations.  loops, and there is every indication  that easy grades, of not more than |j  ono per cent at the most; could he  obtained all the way. The country,  being in the interior tableland, is clear  and rolling, ahd not nearly so mountainous and difficult as it is nearer the  coast.  Westbound Grand Trunk Pacific  and Canadian Northern business  would, it is stated, naturally come  south by this route. McLean Brothers are now applying lo the federal  Government for a charter for this  line.  LEGAL  TOHN MANNING SCOTT,  Barrister, Solicitor, Etc. .  First Street  Revelstoke, B. C.  JJA.RVEY, M'CARTEU & PINKHAM  Barristers, Solicitors, Etc.  Solicitors for Imperial Bank of Canada.  Company* funds to loau ins per cent.  First Street, Kevelstoke B.o.  H  UC1HS. CAYLEY  Barrister and Solicitor.  OFFICE���������Corner First Street tuul Boyle  Avenue, Revelstoke, B. C.  SOCIETIES.  LOYAL ORANGE LODGE No. 1058.  Pcgular meetings are held inthe  Oddfellows Hall on tho Third Friday of each month, at s p. ni. sharp.  Visiting brethren cordially invited  J. A. ACHESON, Vi: M  R. J. TAGGERT, Rec.-See.  KOOTENAY STAR, R. B. P.   ���������  Meets on First Tuesday of every month, in  I. O. O. F. Hall.  j. ACHESON. Vi. V.  K. J. TAGGERT, KEO.  Gold Range Lodge, K. of  P.,  No. 26, Revelstoke, B. C.  MEETS EVERY   WEDNESDAY  in   Oddfellows'   Hall   at  8  TENDERS  WANTED.  Tenders will he received until Ma; 1st, 1905.  for one house and lot situated in tlie town of  Kevelstoke, 11. c, known as the residence of  Frank linrnnrd on First Street, or more fully  described in deed from C. I'. R.  TERMS���������One-third cash, balance to be paid  iu monthly instalments. Twenty llollnrs per  month, on thc lirst, titty of every moulh with  seven per cent interest until paid. The pres-  cnt owner will plnee deed in a Revolslofcu  bank with .instrui-tltins to hand deed over to  purchaser when all payments have beeu niit'le.  A marked check on either of 1 lie Kevelstoke  hanks forTwcntv-iive Dollars must aceompanv  each tender, checks returned il tender not  accepted.  The highest or any tender not necessarily  accepted.  Address all tenders lo  F. BARNARD,  Otlorvilh.-, Ont.  feb-10 tin  o'clock      Visiliug  cordially invited.  Knighls  are  SCOTT,   0. C.  stewart Mcdonald, k. of r. <t.s.  H. A. BROWN, M. of F.  action prove otherwise  Railway to Tap Northern Lines  Another plan for connecting both  the Grand Trunk Pacific and the western extension of the Canadian Northern Railway with Vancouver is proposed by Messrs. McLean Brothers of  this city, says the Vancouver Province,  owners of thc present charter of the  proposed Vancouver and Coast-Koote-  nay line.  The plan is to have the lino connect  with their proposed line, between here  and Midway, ata point south of Karn-  Joops and Nicola in the northern part  of tlie- Similkameen.  The line would th.ep run north ������long  the high tableland of the upper poiin-  try, through Kamloops, across tho  Thompson river antl thence north to  connect with the transcontinental  lines opposite both tlie Yellowhend  and the Pino river passes, ft is stated  that as soon as the Grand Trunk Pacific makes a selection of one of these  passes through the mountains, the  Canadian Northern will make the  selection of another route antl may  build through to the coast at tho same  time as the Grand Trunk Paciiic. Preliminary surveys wero mado some  years ago of a route uorth from JCiun  Camp Mountain View, C. IV. 0. W.  Meets in Selkirk Hall every Second and  Fourth Fridavol each month at S p. in. Visiting Choppers cordially invited to attend.  NOTICE.  Notice ia liereby given that, thirty days afler  dato 1 intuuil lo apply to the Chief CuuimiKsioncr  of Lauds mid Works fur a special licence to cut  ami carry away timber frum the fnlliivnngdi*.  scribed lauds, siiuated on Dudgeon Creek, a tributary of Adams river, Lillooet jlistrict, li.C.:���������  I. Commencing at a post marked " I'. O. Doug-  'las's  north   easl comer  post,"  planted at  the  north end of Dudgeon Lake mid on west side of  creed; theuce south Sl������ chains, tlience west Wl  chains, thence north 80 eliains, theneo east Sll  chains to point of commencement.  ���������2. Commencing at a post marked "T. C. Douglas's north west cornut* post," planted at the  norlh end of Dudgeon lake and on east bauk of  creek; tlience south 60 chains, thcuco east fl)  eliains, tlience nortli 81) eliains; thence west SO  chains to point of ouinuieiicenient.  :i. Commencing at a post marked '."f. O. Douglas's south west corncv pnst," planted on tho east  hank of Dudgeon creek at foot of Dudgeon lake?  tlience north 81) eliains, thenee east tit) chains!  theneo soulli SI) chains, theuce west SO chains to  point of commencement.  ��������� 4. Commencing at a post marked "T. C. Doug  las's south east cornei* post," planted on the east  bank of Dudgeon creek at foot of Dudgeon lake;  thence north SO chains, tlieuco west SO chains,  theuce south 80 chains; theuce east SO eliains tu  point of commencement.  5. Commencing at a post marked "T. C. Doug*  las's nortii west corner post," planted ou the west  liank nf Budgeon creek, nbout two iniles north  Dudgeon lake; tlience south 80 chains, tlieuco east  80 chains, theuce north so chains, thenee west 60  chains to point of cunimcnceinent.  0. Commencing at a post marked "T. C. Douglas's nortii east corner post." planted on the west  hank of Dudgeon creek, about two iniles north  Dudgeon lake; theneo south SO chains, theuce west  SO eliains, thencu north SO chains, thence east 80  chains to point of commencement.  7. Commencing at a post marked "T. C. Douglas's soutii west comer post," planted on the west  hank of Dudgeon creek, about two miles north  from Dudgeon lake; thence norlh 1C0 chains,  thence east 40 chains; theuce south 100 chains,  thenee west 40 chains to point of commencement.  8. Cominencing at a post marked *'T. C. Doug-  las's soutii east corner post," planted tin the west  hank of Dudgeon creek, about two miles north  from Dudgeon lnkc: thnnce north SO chains, tlience  west 80 chains, thcuco south 80 chains, thenee east  SO chains to point of commencement.  9. .Commencing at a postmarked "T. C. Douglas's north east corner post," planted on tho east  bank of Dudgeon creek, ahout four miles north  from Dudgeon lake; theuce south so chains, theneo  west 80 chains, tlience north SO chains, tlieueu east  80 chains to point of commencement.  10. Commencing at a post marked "T. C. Douglas's soutli east corner post," planted on' the east  sido 'of Dudgeon creek, about four iniles north;  from Dudgeon lake; thenee north 80 cliains,'thenee  west- 80 chains, thence smith SO chains, thence east  SO chains to po'int of commencement,-;.: *  II. Commencing nt apost marked !'T. C. Douglas's soutii west corner post." planted on the east  bank of Dudgeon creek, about four miles north  from Dudgeon lake, thence nortli 100 chains,  thence east .40 eliains, tbence south 1C0 chains,  theneo west 41) chaius to point of commencement.  ' Dated this 21st January, 1005.  feb 10 T. C. DOUGLAS.  The   Prince   ftlfotag   and  Development  empany,  Limited Liability.  NOTICE Is herebv givon thnt the Annual  Meeting of the Shareholders of the Prince  Mining uml Devvlopim-nt Com puny, Limited  Liahiiitv, win Iw held at ihoConipniiy's unices,  rirsi street. Hcvelsloke, II. C , on Wednesday,  tin*. Eiuliili Dav i'f Manh, A. I), 1WI8, at lhc*  Hour of Timi o'clock in lhe nflcnionii, (or I 0  pui pose of elect Ing Ollieers lor the ensuing  year, nn'd for all oilier i*ur|'o*e!j relating to the  miiuiiKi'iucut of the t onii-nny.  Iii" proposed to inneii'l lhe By-Laws by in-  crbitslugtliv iiiiiiilier of Dlreeiius lo seven  The Transfer lloek oi the fniiiininy will he  closed during lhe fourteen days immediately  preceding such inueilng.  Ilnled at  HevohK-ko.  1  February. A. P., ���������,%&  W. M. llrtOWK,  1'i'oliieiH.  feii-iii ;:i  C tills loth dayol  .1, JI. SCOTT,  Secretary.  H. BOURNE, Con. Com.  Vi. EDWARDS, Clerk.  Dr. Morrison  **'-' DENTIST  OHice Ovcr*Bc**vs'-*Drug SforaT Mackenzie Avo.  H. W. Edwards,  Taxidermist.  DEER  HEADS,    BIRDS,     ANIMALS  MOUNTED.  REVELSTOKE,  B. C  Take Notice  Until further notice the Empire  Lumber Company's steamship Pipei?  will make only one round trip per day  between Arrowhead, Beaton and  Comaplix.  EMPIRE LUMBER CO., UNITED  U. S. Navy Yard,  Washington, t>. O.,  Nov, 23rd, 1001.  Sm.-^ffi'conTpliSnce^witli^Bureiurof  Equipment letter No. 100,1:33, of the  15th ultimo. 1 have the 'honor to report for the information of the Bureau  results of analysis-general of the sample of coal forwarded there witli, also  its liability to spontaneous ignition, as  follows:  Commercial name of coal���������Smokeless semi-anthracite.  Sample furnished by���������Canadian Pacific Railway Company.  location of mines���������BnnlT, Alta.  Per cont. fixed cbn.���������S0.20.  Per cent, coinb. vol. matter--8.20,  Per cent, non-conib. vol.  matter���������0.  Per cent, of moisture���������b.H'-l,  Per cent, ash���������1.71.  Per cent, sulphur���������0.42.  Respectfully.  (Signed)   E. C. Pendleton,  Captain V. H. SJ  Supt. Naval Gun Factory.  The Commandant,  Washington Navy Yard,  NOTICE.  Notice is hereby givon that thirty days after  date I intend toapply to the Chief Commissioner  of Lands and Works for a special license to cut  and carry away timber from the following tie-  scribed lands in Lillooot District. B. C:  -1. Commencing at a post marked "George A.  Xammers' south east; cornor post," and planted on  the-west bank. of the Upper Adams Kiver about  thirty-nine miles above Adams lake, theneo n������irth  80 chains, thence west SO-chains, thence south 80  chains, tlience east 80 chains to place of commencement."  2. Commencing at al post marked "Georgo A.  Laminers' south west corner post,*' planted on the  west bank of Adams river about'tlurty-nine miles  above Adams lake, thence north SO chains, thence  east 80 chains, theuce soutli 80 cluiiiis, thence  west 80 chains to place of commencement. ? ...  S. Commencing at a post marked "George A.  Laminers' nortii east corner post," planted on the  west bank of Adams river, about thirty-nine miles  ahove Adams lake, thence soutii 80 ciiains, thence  west SO chains, thence north 80 ciiains, thenee east  SO chains to placo of commencement. -���������'  4. Commencing at a post marked "George A.  Lammers* north west corner post," planted on tlie  west bank of the Upper Adains river abont thirty-  nine miles above Adams. lake, theneo south 80  chains, thence east SO chains, thence north 80  chains, thence.west 80 chains to the place of  commencement: , V   ���������  Dated 16th day of January, 1905.  NOTICE.  Notice Is hereby givon Hint thirty dnys after  date 1 Intend to npplv lo llu- t'liieit'oninils-  slnncrtif Lnnds aiul Works forspeelnl lleonces  to cut and i*������rry inwy timber from lhc follow-  iny described lands iu West Kuolcmiy distriet:  1 Couiiiifitii-lng at a pnst marked "(!. K.  Lindnuuk's cornor post," and plained half n  milo Irom south bnnl: of llig Kddy crcr-lc about,  two miles,nr.d a quarter from Columbia river,  thenee south 80 chains, ihence woM Sll chnins,  thence north .so cluiiiis, thenee easl so ciiains  io poinl of commencement.  2. Commencing al a post marked "C.. F.  Lindmark's corner post," planted on the south  bankof llig Eddy ereek, nbouitwo miles and a  half from Columbia river, theuce soutli 40  chain?*, theneo west ICO ehnlns. thenee north  40 ehnlns, thcuco east 160 chains io point ol  commencement..  3 Commencing at a post marked "C. F.  Lindmark's corner post," planted about ten  chains from soulli bank of Hit: IMdy creek  nboul half a mile from Ibe Columbia river,  thence 40 chnins south, thenee . 1UU chains  west, thenee *I0 chnins nortli, tbence 1C0 chains  east to pointof commencement.  ���������I. Commencing at a post planted about  three-quarters of a mile from Hock ereek nnd  one mile'and a half from, the wet bnnk ofthe  Columbia river and marked "11 K. Lindmark's  corner post," liienee west 1C0 chnins, thence  nortli 40 chains, theneo enst 11.0 chains, thonce  south 40 chains to point of commencement.  Dated this 17th day ol January, 1005.  CHAS. P. LINDMARK.  1. Commencing at n post marked "Pevcl-  stoke Lumber Co's north east comer post," on  west bunk of Co lum t.ia river, opposite six  mile bur, liienee running south 80 chains,  thonce west 80 ehnlns, tlience north 80 chains,  theneo cast 80 chains to the point of com-  .meneement.  2. Commencing' at a post marked "Revel*  stoke Lumber Co's north west, comer post," on  west bunk of Columbia river opposite six mile  bur, running soutli 80 chains, liienee east 80  chains, liienee nnrtii 80 chains, thence west 80  chains to pointof commencement.  Dated this 17th day of January, 1905.  REVELSTOKE LUMBER CO. LlD.  NOTICE.  Notice  is hereby given   that CO days after  date I iniend to anplv to thc Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for ferniission lo  fiurehase the following described lands in the  listrict of West Kooteuay:  Commanding at a post planted on the east  sido  of  the   Arrowhead   Brunch, about   two  miles west of station at Arrowhead, nnd marked "W. F. Ogllvlc's south west comer post,"  thence cast 40 chains, thenee nortii 40 chains,  thenee west 40 chains, thenee soutii 40 chains  to pointof commencement.  Dated 23rd day of January, 1905.  Vi. F. OGILVIE.  feb-16  GEORGE.A. LAMMERS.  NOTICIi!,  Notice is liereby given that the undersigned  have submitted to the Lieutenant-Governor-in-  Council a proposal undor tho provisions of the  Rivers and Streams- Act for the clearing and  removing of obstructions from Mosquito Creek  between Arrow Lake and , Mosquito Lake, West  Kootenay, and for making the same lit for rafting and driving.thereon logs, timber, lumber, rafts  and crafts, and for- erecting aiid maintaining  booms for holding, sorting and delivering logs' iind  timber brought down said river and for attaching  booms t*> thc shores 6f said creek and said Arrow  Lake for said purposes.  The lands to he affected by said work are Lots  .173 and 840 in Group One on tho ollicial-plan of  Kootenay. Distriet and Crown lands.  Tho rate of tolls proposed tn. lie- charged are  such asiuay.be.. fixod -byjhe^ Judge of_the County  Court of Kootenay.  Dated February 8th, 1905.  1'lIVi YAT,E pOJjlJMBIA {.UMBER COMPANY,  feb-iil'oOd '     ' '   'LIMITED.  NOTICIi;.  In tho matter of the Act respecting certain works  iu or ou navigable waters, being Chapter 02,  R. S. C. 1880.  Notice is hereby given that ono month after  date the ltevelstoke Lumber Company, Limited,  will apply to 'tlie Governor-in-Council under the  provisions of the ahovo mentioned Act for approval of plans for the construction of certain, piers  and booms for gathering, booming and holding  logs and timher'intlieColiiuibia river at and near,  the point known as the , "Big Eddy" near the Citv  of Revelstoke, llritish Columbia; and that said  Company liavo deposited plans of. tho works proposed to be constructed and a description of tho  site thereof as lequired by the. said Act with the  Minister of Public Works at Ottawa, Ontario, and  with the Registrar, of'Land Titles at Nelson,  British Columbia. '   '  Dated at ltevelstoke, B. C. this Sth day of  February, 10115. r?    .  ���������-. '    HARVEY, McCARTF,R& PINKHAM,  .;  felj-10 lm Solicitors for the Applicants.  * NOTICE. ���������'���������'���������  Notice is hereby: given that 00 days after  datel intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of.Lands ana Works for permission to  purchase the following described landBin the  district of Wtst Kooteuay:  Commencing at a post planted on theeast  side of tho Arrowhead Branch, about 2*^miles  west of Arrowhead . station and marked "A.  Johnson's south west corner post," thep.ee east  40 chains, thence north 40 chpins, thence west  40 chains, theuce soutli 49 chains to place of  commencement.   ���������  Dated 3rd day of February, 1905.  .'-...-.       ARTHUR JOHNSON.  ..-��������� V 'V ":���������   -.No. 241  CERTIFICATE OF THE REGISTRATION OF  AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.  "Companies Acri 1897."  F. McCarty, Agt. Revelstoke  NOTICE,  Notice is hereby given that 00 days arter  dato I Intend to apply to the Chief Commls  si.'.ner of Lauds and Works for nerriilssiovrio  purchase the following doscrlbcd lauds ln the  District of SVcst Kootenay:  Commencing nt a post marked "Robert  Armstrong's south westcorner post," situated  half a mfleeastofO S. McCarter's south west  post, situaled on the east side of the Arrow-  liead Branch about JVi iniles west o( tho station of Arrowhend, ihence 40 chains cast  tlience 40chains north, thence40 chains west,  theneo 40 chains south to placo of commencement.   ���������   ���������  ���������  Dated Fob. 23rd  ,1901!.  inch 2 GfltJ  Cancellation of Reserve  Corporation of tho City of  Revelstoke.  ���������I  TEMPERS FOR WOOD.  Tho City Council is prepared to re-  coiw t,(>n(loi8 foi' tlio supply of .Fifty  (00) Cords of Wood, delivered nt the  Power Mouse, the wood l.o be eut. on  ground belonging to tlie City and  piled where directed hy the Mannger.  Tenders to reach the undersigned hy  noon on Friday, March 8rd, 1iK)5.  II. FLOYD,  feh23-2t City Clerk.  NOTICK IS HKUBI1Y OIVKN that tlie rcscr-  vaLlori OHtn.MlKli(.'<l in uiirtitmncu of Mhj provini.nin  of tlm " Cohitnlti.L Hint WuKtern Jtailwuy Sulmiily  Act, 1800," nntifien of which woro puhliHliori in the  Brltlxli Coluruhm Oa/-ett������ nml (luted 7th Muy,  18W, and f-t.}|.limn, IBM, n.*8j������ucUvtiIyt nro herohy  canccllifil.  Crown IutuIh rtitiiulwl within tho area ombraocil  hy tjie  H'ii'1   renervatmn   will   ho   open   to  Halo,  ?f!Stt{mnRt)t. Jo:i!io and othor clixpoMition, undor tho  provisions u\ W<3 "IiAhiJ Act," thrne montliK aftor  tJiethito of thn HrRt'-prtlilicatiorj ���������������/ ihip notice in  tho llrltinh ColumMa Gazette;"prbvhletl, fii}v,'ii\cit  that in all canes wfiere hinds aro gold, pru-o'mpted.  loused or otherwise alienated  by the Ciovermnt tit  ami are mihneriuflntly found upon tho survey of tl  enlumbia    and    Wostern     Railway   Coinputij'ti1  blocks, to lie wholly or in part within such blocks,  then   the persons so  acquiring stich  lands shall f  acquire  their  title   thereto   from   tho   KaiJwav j  Company, who havo agreed to deal  with sucli  pnrcnaners, prc-etnptors, leases, etc., pn the sam?'  terms and conditions as the Government *otil  under tho provisions of the "Land Act,'*  excel'  in respect to timber  lands  on   the   Company  blocks, whioh shall he hiiIn'ocJ. to tho regulation  issued hy the Company relative to tho cutting ('  timber nn the Columbia  and Western  Uailv.a;  Land Grant.  \V. S. CORK,  Depnty'Commisaioncr of Lands and Worka  LandR and Works Department,  Victoria, B. C-, 23rd February, 1005.  I HEREBY CERTIFY that tbe "Munday Lumber Company" lum this day be on registered as an  Extra-Provincial Company under the-'Companies  Act, 1SU7i" to carry out or effect all or any_ of thu  objects of the Company to which the legislative        "      ifature of |U'ithili polpml'i[i  .   of the Legisi  extends'.'      ..������������������*���������.������������������������  The head oflice of the Company is situate at the  City of Bradford, in the County of McKean and  State of Pennsylvania.  The amount of the capital of thc Company Ib  fifty thousand dollar^, divided into live hundred  ffharos of pnu hundred dollars oaph.  Thu head oiltco of tho Company In thla Proyinop  is situate nt Imperial Bank Illock, in the City of  ltevelstoke, and George Smith McCarter, Barrister  at.law, whoso address is Kevelstoke, is the attorney for tho Company (nut empowered to issue and  transfer stuck).  The time of the existence of the Company la  fifty (fiU) years.  Given under my hand ami seal of office at Vic-  torin, Province of British Columbia, this 1st day  of Fobruury, one thousand nine hundred and tlve.  [L.S.] S. Y. WQOTTpN,  |*pgistrfi.r of Joint Stock Companies.  Thejpbeeta for which the Company haB been  established ami registered are for the purpose of  NOTICE.  iNotico is hereby given tlint SO days nfter dato I  intend to apply "to tlie Chief Commissioner of  Triinda und Works for a special license to eut nnd  cum* away timber from tho following deseribed  land's in Lilluoet district, B. C.:  I. Commencing at a post maikud "T. c\ Douglas's smith west..coiner peat," planted at abont a  mile north eust i.f Turn Turn lake, thoi.ee north 41)  chnins, tlieuco east. UIO clm.ns, thenee south 40  elm ins, thonco west 100 chains to the point of  uoumiuiiceutent.  *J. Cotiimencing'at a post marked *'T. C. Doug-  In **.'i* noilh i������������Ht conur pu.-u," phmted at about a  mile we.-t from Turn Tum lake, theuce souih JtiU  cliuins, llienco wwest -Ut eliains, thencu north 100  ehains, tlieuco easl 40 chains to thuiioint of commencement.       .   ,*'  :i.' Commencing at n pest mnrked U'J\ C. Doug- -  luVs suiith enst f'.nirrp-md," planted ntabout-onu  mde we.it I'nun Tom Tum hike, llienco north 1(H)  cluiiuu, theuce west 40 clialiw, thenre smith WO  olvihts, theuce east40 chains to the point of com-  moiii'ciuuul.  ���������I. . t'liUitiHMunng at a post uuuked *'T. C. Doug-  hi������'s north efist comer poM," planted r.n the west  hunk ������.f Turn Tutu lake uhout two milos up fnun  l lo* tool ������>f I lie lako, t hcitro mi th tHJ chfi ins, theneo  west* hO elm ins, thence south so chains, theuce east  fOchnms to the point of commencement.  ,r������. Cournetii'iug ot- a post marked *'T. C. Douglas's south west, comer post," phmted at about  one milo north of Sugar, cveck ou theeast boundary of T. A. KaMilier's limit, thonco norlh 100  chains, thenee e;tj-t> 40 chaiiis, tlieuco souih 100  ehains, tbence wost -10 chains to tho point of commencement.  0. Commencing at a post marked *'T. C. Douglass north cost corner post," planted about half a  mile nuilh from the betid of Turn Tum lake, tlieuco  south bu-cluiius,.thencu west -SO chains, thunee  north 80 ciiains, theuce oust bO chains to tho point  of commencement.  7. Commmmijig at a post marked *'T. 0. Douglas's soutli east coruer post/' planted about halt' a  mile nor* h of tho head of Turn Turn hvko. theneo  north SO chaius, theneo West SO chains, thence  south 80 chains, theuce east SO chains to the point  of commencement.  S. Commencingat a post marked "T. C. Douglas's south west corner post," planted on the east  side of Tum Turn lake about one mile north from  tlio foot of the lake, thenee east 40 eliains, tlience  nortii 100 ehains, thence went -10 chains, Ihence  south 100 ehainsto the point of commencement.  9. Commencing at a post marked "T. C. Douglas's southwest corner post," planted-on the- -  south bank of Cedar ereek. about one-half mile .  east from Kinbuaket crock, thenee north 40 ciiains,  thenee east 100 chains. thenco-Houth 40 chains,  tliunce-west 100 chains to the point uf commencement. ,  10. Commencing at a post marked "T. C. Douglas's north west corner post," planted tm the east  side of Kinbasket ereek .about threo in ties above  Turn Turn lako, thence south 100 chains, thence  eait40 chains, theneo not tit 100 chains, thenca  west 40 chaius to tbe poiut of commencement.  II. Commencingat a postmarked **T. C. Douglas's south west corner post," planted on the oust  hank of Kinbasket creek, ahoullhrec miles abovo  Turn Turn lake, theuce north SO chaius, thence  east SOchaius, thence south SOchaius, thence  wost SO chains to poiut of commencement.  12. Commencing at a postmarked "T. C.Doug,  las's north east corner post," planted ou the west  bunk of Kinbasket creek aliout threo miles above  Turn Turn lako, thenee south 80 chains, thence  west SO chains, tbence north SO chains, theuce east  SOchaius to the point of commencement.  III. Commencing at a post marked '*T. C. Douglas's south east corner post," plauled on the east  hank of Kinbasket crock, about three miles above  Turn Turn lake, thence nortli 80 chains, thuico  west SO chains, tlieuco south SO chains, theneo east  80 chains to the point of commencement.  14. Commencing at a post nuiTked "'J'. C. Doug- *  las's north east corner post," planted on the west  hauk of Kinbasket ereek, about five miles above  Tum Turn lake, theneo south SO chaius, thencu  west SO chains, theneo north SO cbains, tlience oast  SO chains to the point of commencement.  15.'��������� Commencing at a post marked "T. C. Douglas's soutli east comer post," planted on the wost  liank uf Kinbasket creek, about live miles above  Tum Turn lake, tlieuco north I'O chains, theuce  west So chains, thence soutli bo chains, tlience oust ^  SO chains to the pointof commencement.  10. Commencing ut apohtimirked "T. C. Douglas's south-wost cornor pot,t," planted ou tho west  -bauk of Kinbasket creek, about live miles abovo  Tuut Turn lake, tbence north SO chains, theneo  east SO chains, thence south SOchaius, Ihence  west So chains to the point of comnienceinent.  17. Commencing at a post marked "T. C. Douglas's aouth east corner post," planted one mile  west from Two Mile Point on Tum Turn lako,  thonce north 100 chains, thence west 40 chains,  thence south 100 chains, thence east ,40 chains to  the point of commencement.  18. ; Commencing at a post maTked *'T. C. Douglas's north.west eorner>post," plantod on the oast  sido of Adams river, "about one mile "below Tuin  Turn lake, thence soutii 100 chains, thence east 40  chains, thence north 100 chains, theuce west 40  ehains to the point of commencement. ���������  19. Cominencing at a postmarked "T. C. Douglas's north west cornor post," planted on the  north side of Mammoth crook, thence south 40  chains, tlieiiee east 1G0 chains, tbence north 40  chains, thence west 100 chains to the poiut of  commencement.  20. Commencing at a post mnvkod UT. C. Douglas's soutii west corner post," planted on tho nortli  'side of Mammoth creeK, thonce north 40 eh ain h,  thence east 160 ciiains, theneo south 40 chains,  theneo west 100 chains to the point of commencement.        .  Dated 1st February, 1005.  feb-23      ;. T.C.DOUGLAS.  NOTICE. v  Notice is hereby given that GO days after dato I  intend to apply to tbe Honorable The Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to  ������urcbase the following described lands ip tjie  listrict of West Kootenay.  . Commencing at a post' planted on the south  shore of the North-East Arm of Upper Arrow Lako  in Blind Bay and marked *'G. S. McCarter's northeast corner post," tlieuco south 20" chains, theneo  west 40 chains, thence north 20 chains more or less  to the south shore of the Korth-Kast Arm of Upper  Arrow Lake, thence east '40 chains to the point of  commencement,, containing SO acres more or lean.  Dated thia SOtU December, 1904. v  ..';.; G. S. MCCARTER.  Iniying, selling and dealing in timber, timber  lands, tracts, berths, licences, trees both down and  standing, wood, bark, logs and lumber, and pro-  ducing aud manufacturing therefrom all kinds of  |umb(i)*, shingles uud boards, and all other merchantable products'of tbe'forest; apd to those ejfds  to'purchase, lease n-pd acqulfe, and in it's porpo^t  jiW namo \o take, lioljl, 'conyey and dispose of  pnch lands, timher, trees, wood, logs, bark, lumber,  timber berths, timber limits, timber licences!  rights or grants, and such other real estate of personal property as mav bo necessary for tho pur  poses of its organisation, ajid to construct, erect,  maintain any and all such waterways, roads,  bridges, boats, rafts, dams, booms, buildings,  machinery uud othor appliadces as may be necessary or convenient in the conduct and management of said business aud the transportation of  '    yoduUs mentioned. feb-10 30U  NOTIOE.  Notice is hereby given that 60 days alter  datel Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands ana Works for permission to  Burehiue.t_lie_follo.wlnf; describes lands iu the  Istrietof WeBlKooteuay: -���������'������������������ *  ComincneiiiK at a post planted on the east  Rifle of the Afrowllc|ia Branch about Uimllpj  west bf Arrowlicnd station, ana marked "0,  b. McCarter's southwest corner post," thenee  east '10 ebnlnsi'thcnco nnrth 40 chains, thence  west <I0 cbains. thence soutb 40 chains to point  of commencement.  Dated 23rd day ol January, 1005,  b. S. McOAKTKR.  No.- 240  CERTIFICATE OF  THE REGISTKATION OF  AN EXTUA-PKOVINCIAL COMPANY.  "Companies Act, 1807."  ���������^^JW-tS'jp'  I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "Eaglo River  Lumber Company" hus this day been registered as  an ExtratProvincial Company under the ''Conl*  panles Act, 1897," to ciirry out or"effect all or any  of the objects of thc Company to which the legis*  lativo authority of the legislature of British Columbia extends.  The head oflice of the Company is situate at the  City of Bradford, in thc County of McKean, and  State of Pennsylvania.  The innoimt of the capital of tho Company Is  Ave hundred thousand dollars, divided into nve  thousand shares of one hundred dollars each.  The head office of the Company in this Province  is aituate at Imperial Bank Block, in the City of  Kevelstoke, and Georgo Smith McCarter, barrister  at-law, whoso address is Revelstoke, is the attorney for the Company (not empowed to issue and  transfer stock).  Tho timo of the existence of tho Company is  fifty (50) years.  Given under my hand and seal of office at Victoria, Province of British Columbia, this ilrst day  i>f February, ono thousand nine hundred and five.  [L.S.]  S. Y. WOOTTON,  Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.  , ������\    The objects for which tho Company has been  fe-itablished juid registered are ;  For tile purpose of bpylng, selling and dealing  ������ m timber, timber lands, tracts,'berths-, licepcii!*;  eg (both down and standing), wood, bark, logs and  JS* lumber, and producing aud manufacturing there*  *{ from all kinds of lumber, shingles and boards, and  ?K all other merchantable products of tho forest, and  ^* to those ends to purchase, lease and acquire, and  -Am its corporate name to take, hold, convey and  Klu-pose of such  lands, timber, trees, wood, logs,  $ bark, lumber, timber lierths, timber limits, timber .  .^licences, rights or grants, and such  other real I  "hestate or personal property as may be necessary j  Sfor the purposes of its organization, nnl to con-  g ,truct, erect, maintain any and all sucli wuter-  Lnays, roads,  bridges, boats, rafts, dams, Imiouis,  gbiiiidings,   machinery and other  appliances,   as  '[ may be necessary or convenient in the conduct aim  ������ management of said business and the transportation ol the products mentioned, feb-lBSOd  Lr'*^  ��������� ���������?^t-?.ft***WgOt*lr-wgft;rtJTW^������'**"~' ���������SS  ,r  ESS  "ssssa  SB  ������_������������_*______  ii.il ��������� i  ������������������mm I ������  5BP**Wf"Wi"w?W*m*ww.a-  .whj mjijiii.ii.uu 'jjj.jm-.w'  i   i   mi\fyrY&vYit&Kij;s*&&&i*?tt^^  THE PLOT  At Trial of Liberal Deputy in  Manitoba���������Voters Lists used  in recent Dominion Elections  were " fixed."  Winnipeo, Fob. 25.���������In his evidence  yesterday in lhe election trial of  Deputy Jickling Mnudomil, Liberal  Organizer Leech laid hnvo a plot  whereby the lists were "fixed."* His  evidenco went to show thnt- none of  the lists, as sent up from the king's  printer in Ottawa, wero usod, but lhat  thoy were all arranged on an elaborate plan previously worked out in tho  offices of thc Liberal organizers in this  city. He said that he had chosen to  regard Manitoba as having no polling  sub-divisions, and tbat, therefore, he  had proceeded to map out the province  in the manner in wliich appeared best  to him, or rather, no.doubt, to the  interests of the Liberal party, disregarding altogether the provincial subdivisions for which lists had been  .prepared, and which properly constituted units for the federal elections.  These lists were .prepared months  before the election, and were sent out  to all Liberal canvassers, who were  told to make them the basis of their  work. When the writs had been  issued and the proper lists had been  forwarded from Ottawa to the returning officers by the king's printer, the  former were instructed by Liberal  Organizer Leech to bring them into  him for revision. These lists were  then made to correspond with the  canvass books already in the hands of  the Liberal workers by a free use of a  "thin red line," and were then given  back lo the returning officers, who  certified them as correct, and sent  them out to their respective deputies.  Every Liberal knew where he had  to vote, because he had been previously instructed by his canvasser^ and it  would appear as if the re-arrangement  lists were made directly under the  advice of t.he particular Liberal candidate.  The Conservative workers, on Ihe  other hand, naturally worked on the  provincial lists, theauthentic lists sent  up from Ottawa, and consequently  they had misdirected a large number  of Conservative voters as to the place  where the' latter should vote. It is  not hard to imagine what happened  on election day.  The Liberals found that they had  recorded their votes at the most convenient sub-division, but tbe Conservatives presented themselves at their  - accustomed booths, only to find in  many instances that their names had  bsen struck out, and that they were  refused a ballot.  .A few of these were lucky enough  to succeed in putting in their votes a t  subdivisions at considerable distances  from their homes, but many failed  altogether in recording their votes,  some because thej' could not locate  the booth to which they had been  switched, aud others because their  nunes had beea struck out, and left  off aM the lists.  23mwmwmmmmtmwwwwmm&2  ITS A REST =1  E FOR YOUR EYES  To wear good glasses. To those who have to work  and feel that, their eyes^'are 'continually aching  from that cause should wear a pair. The trouble is  that the majority of peoplo do not know that the  right glasses will give tbat needed rest.  WE WILL EXAMINE YOUR -EYES FREE OF  CHARGE, nnd if you feel that you are justified in  wearing glasses wo can fit you. A large quantity  always in stock.  <F F   ft-fl!    Al I  BJflMI    WATCHMAKER  ^ tZ.* l������fl. ML-J-UWI, AND 0P1  OPTICIAN  ^ii^WiiidiWiiUiii^^Wii^WUi^  THE CROW'S NEST PASS COAL CO  Semi-Anthracite, Soft and  Smithing Coals and Coke  SOFT COAL from these collieries according  to thc Government tests, ls superior to tbe boat  Pennsylvania bituminous coal, having moro  thermal units and ������renter evaporating power.  It is an excellent domestic fuel.  A SEMLANTHfU'-ITE coal from one of the  collieries is slronuly recommended for furnaces and base burners.  A flrst class smithing coal Is also mined.  These coals are all high in carbon and low  in ash and will bc found vcry .economical at  the prices charged.  Domestic Coal  per ton  delivered.  $10  Swan Carlson, Agent  Orders left nt W. if. Lawrence's hardware  store will receive prompt attention.  IHE ION HOTEL  W. J. LICHTEURNE, Manager.  NEWLY BUILT AND FORNISNED  STRICLY FIRST-CLASS  THE BAR IS*. SUPPLIED  WITH BEST BRANDS  WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS  ARROWHEAD, - B. C.  Oriental Hotel  Ably furnished with the  Choicest the Market  affords,  Cablnot Making:  Upholstering  Picture Framing  BEST WINES, LIQUORS, CIGARS  Large, Light bedrooms.  Rates $i a day.  Monthly Rate.  THE PEOPLE'S  9     FURNITURE STORE  J. Albert Stone,  .^ ��������� f Fire and   Life   Insurance   Companies���������  ) only Reliable Ones.  AGENTS FOR���������Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation  COAL MERCHANT���������Comox  Coal.  First Street,  Op. Macdonald & Monteith's  HORACE  First-lass    Livery and Feed Stables, Saddle Horses.  Single and Double Rigs   for   Hire  on   Reasonable  Terms.    Turned  out  lean and Neat.  Jas. I. Woodrow  -RUTOHER  WM.   FLEMING,  Wholesale & Retail Meat Merchant.  Fish and Game in Season.  First Street,   -   Revelstoke, B. C.  REOPENED  REMODELED  Palace Restaurant  Two Doors South of the New Imperial  Bank  Premises formerly occupied by Union Restaurant,  Mrs. McKitrick, Manageress.  Open at .all hours.  Meal Tickets IssiTfed.  Short Orders tastefully served^  Rates Moderate.  Retail Dealer in���������  Beef, Pork,  Mutton, Ete,  Fish aad Game in Season....'  All orders promptly filled.  LICENSED AUCTIONEER  Orders   left   here   for    Firewood    promptly  Dry Fir, Hemlock and Cedar.  HOBSON & BELL  BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS  Fresh aud Complete Line of Groceries.  NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS.  AU subscriptions to The  Revelstoke Herald are now  due and the management will  consider it a favor if subscribers govern themselves  accordingly and remit without  further delay.  Port Simpson the Place  The Victoria Colonist thinks that  Port Simpson will be chosen as the  terminus of the Grand Trunk Pacific.  That newspaper says that a citizen of  the capital who lias certain property  interests thero was on Saturday approached by an emissary of an eastern  syndicate aiul asked for tho option on  his holdings. The pricp involved was  $45,000, and it ia understood that the  deal was made.  A. E. Bonk, of this city, is agent for  lots in Port Simpson and has some  centrally located whicli he is offering  afclow figures ^and   on    eney   terms.  $25 down.  A. E. BOAK.  Op. Woodrow's Butcher Shop.  P. BURNS ft COY.  Wholesale and Retail Dealers  PRIME   BEEF.     PORK.   MITTON     SAUSAGE.  FISH AND GAME IN SEASON.  * ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** **/L** ***** .Ti tT< ***** iTi ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** Jl*\  wij^i *Xr**\p**v *Xr **\r ****** *A* *X *X* vfj "X* \L ***** ������X* *X* *I*"A* *aV "X *X   X   X'  IB. CRESSMAN    Art Tailor  Watch  this  Space next  Issue  ������ J. B. CRESSMAN    Art Tailor |  ***** *****  ***** *****  ***** a**** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ������T������ ������T������ ������Ti .Ti ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** *****  ***** ****m *****  l*y **\y **y **V **\} **%>* **y l*\y lJ* *y **%** l+* %* l*v l*\y **y l4** l*v l*\y l*v l*y l*y **V **V V +'  FANCY CAKES        5  AND CONFECTIONERY       2  It you want tlie  above we  can   ���������  supply you witli anything iu tbis   ���������  ��������� line. | ���������  TRY OUR ���������  WHOLESOME *  ���������  White and Brown Bread ���������  Scones and Buns      ���������  Is prepared to handle Auction  Sales of every description.  For terms apply to  H. MANNING, Mackenzie Ave.  Revelstoke, B. C.  FOR   SALE  ���������At a Bargain if Sold This  Month���������  ONE RESIDENCE  In Central Part of the City, and One  Lot so x ioo.  A GOOD RANCHE  8o Acres, close to town, 35 acres of  which can be easily cleared. Suitable for  Hay and Mixed Farming*. Apply for  particulars at HERALD Office.  filled.  Turnross, Prop  Dances anil Private Parties Catered. To.  Full Stock of Excellent Candies.  A. E.  BENNISON,    :  M ickenziu Avenue. a  a  ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������a**  WHEN YOU WANT  A RACK  NIGHT OR DAY  RING  UP  Telephone No. 27  STAND AT UNION HOTEL  Jno. M. McCallum  Gait Coal!  Is unsurpassed for all domestic purposes. It is clean,  burns to a fine ash, no waste.  You can use it in your wood  burner cook "stove with satisfaction. It is znuch cheaper  thau wood. Try a ton and be  convinced. PRICES ON APPLICATION.  J. C. Hutchison,   -   Agent  UNION HOTEL  FIRST CLASS S2 PER.DAY HOUSE  Choice Brands of Winee, Liquors  and Cigars.  W. M. Brown,   Prop.  One of the best and  commodious hotels in the  City   Free Bus meets all trains  Hourly Street Car.  Fare 10 Cents.  Front Street  ueen  COMAPLIX  Best brands of Wines, Liquors and Cigars. Travellers to  Fish Creek will find excellent accommodation at this  Hotel..  CHIEF   YOUNG,  Proprietor  THE REVELSTOKE WINE & SPIRIT CO.  LIMITED.  IMPORTRES   AND WHOLESALE DEALERS.  _  Manufacturers  of Aerated Waters  REVELSTOKE,    IB. O.  ���������$&$:$������:&$&&������������<&-������3$$s&������s:.%������:X-^  J. LAUCHTON, Prop.  First  Street.  20th   Century  Business College  r VICTORIA,  B. C.  SHORTHAND  TYPE WRITING  TELEGRAPHING  BOOKKEEPING  PENMANSHIP  A thorough business training.   Arrangements for Boarding Canadian PupiU.  NORTON   PRINTZ, Principal  Bevelstoke Corresponding Secretary  C   8. DENT  Wood  FOR SALE!!  CALL AT THE  Empire   Lumber  Co.'s Office  It Pays to Advertise in  The Herald  Because   It    Brings  Results.  GIVE US YOUR NEXT AD   5ee Our Scotcfi Tweeds  Before you place your Order for a Fall Suit.  We also carrv tlic Best Lines of Worsteds and Serges  in the market.    PRICE   RIGHT !  Latest Stvles and Fit Guaranteed.  WE USE THE UNION LABEL.  G. A. SCOTT,  Mackenzie Avenue  ff  -fr-  ter  ������  &  Hie  ������������#������**������**������*#������*������-������sb*������***������**������^***x^***^  ^^������������������*^^l������������������������^^V-^^^���������^>/*^^���������^*A^���������^*^^V������^^^^A^^^^V>A^^^^^^>^^^^^^^������������������>^^������������������*^^Vt^^���������^^^l  HOMES FURNISHED ON MONTHIY PAYMENTS  Another  Carload   of  Furniture just arrived.  Carpets,  Linoleums,  Oilcloths, etc.  Sewing Machines.  Heintzman Pianos  R. HOWSON & CO., FURNITURE DEALERS, EMBALMERS  vvvv**vvw^������**^>***vvyw*vi***^^*^>^^'w^^**^>**^>v***/^AA******A*^*  Wood for Sale.  Having established a permanent  wood yard, the citizens can depend on  getting first class dry wood at all  times.  ROBERT SAMSON.  For Sale  A HOUSE���������Price 82,750. In heart  of city. Can be bought on easy terms.  Apply Herald Office.  For Sale  A House and Two Ix>ts. Close to  Central Hotel. Price $750, $500 down,  balance on easy terms. Apply Her*.  ald Office. ������  J A   SECRET   REVEALED f  * *M**l*-^!-*MH-I-M**Hrt*'M-+'M^  CHAPTER  VIII.���������(Continued.)  Royco enjoyed his moal Unit morning with keon rolish, Mtiidgo seated  busido him, and each silently admiring tho oUiur. At tho close, tho  man with u limp strode away, Buying that the ramp was soon to  move on, but that lirst ho iutendod  to break a colt. Royco beggod and  obtained permission to try hi.s hand  at this performance, and amazod tho  lame gypsy by his skill over tlio rc-  factory animal. In about half an  hour the colt wns mastered, and tho  old man said, upjtrovingly:  "You oughter been a gypsy."  Tho words deeply impressed Royco,  and, a fow minutes later, as hc sat  smoking a pipe, tho remark was  thoughtfully rovolved in his mind,  aud ho said to himself:  "And why should I not ho a  gypsy? I am an outcast from homo  and kindred, and lifo with thoso  wanderers would be as congenial for  me as any I could choose."  They soon set forth, stopping only  for a hasty midday meal, and toward nightfall they neared a town.  Royce saw ahead of thcm other  caravans, and it became evident  that they were joining tho main  body.  With compressed lips Royce looked  at his attiro. Hc was clad in a  Norfolk suit, dusty and travel-stained, yet it was of fine texture, aiid  denoted the wearer to be a gentleman.  Without a word to anyone, ho  strode off silently in the darknoss,  and   hurried   to   the   town.  When ho was missed, and the information was imparted to Madge,  she was sorely distressed, thinking  that he should ut least have announced his intention to leave them,  and said good-by to her.  Uncle Jake, who had been with the  mnin body, and nt n lale hour hiwl  visited the lesser dctachmont, heard  of Roycc's ungrateful action, and  taunted  Madge regarding it.  "He wont nwny without so much  as a : thankee, ' didn't ho?" he said.  "And after you're, nursing him, too!  But that's just like 'em! Never  mind' It'll be a lesson to you. Next  time you let 'cm lie where they  fall."  Tie turned away, and she was moving toward tho van when Lottie asked her to help hcr carry a basket.  "I's powerful heavy, Madge," sho  :;aid.  "Madge stoopod  down,  and  a voice  s-iid:  "I'll take that,  Madge."  ���������'You���������you   have   come  back!"   she  said  almost  innudibley.  "Yes," he said gravely, but ��������� with  lho smile, still on his lips. "I've  come back, Madge. Come back to  stay���������if you'll  let me!"  "What���������what do you mean?" sho  asked, her eyes fixod on him, hcr  breath coming and going painfully.  "I mean that I am going to bo  ono of you," ho said quietly and  firmly.  "You-*a gentleman!" she said.  "You one of us?"  "Yes," he said. "Don't look so  scared. It's not such.a singular proceeding if you knew all. Anyhow,  I've    thought    the matter out,    and  I've made up my mind "  "Xo, no!" she punted, and yet  with a  strange look  in" hcr eyes.  Two   or   three  oi   the  gypsies     had  gathered   around  and  stood   looking*  from her to Royce curiously.  "It's  the gentleman,"  cried  one.  Uncle  Jake  pushed   through    them  and stood looking with curious eyes.  "What's  this?"  he demanded.  "Just  this,"  he said in his direct  fashion.    "I want to join you, to be  one of you!"  "You're the gentleman our Madgo  found  and  nursed?"  'I am," said Roj-cc. "She saved  _ruy���������life."._He_ spoke  in  a   tone  that  "So you want to bo a gypsy, do  you. You liko our free, and easy-  ways, oh?   What is your name, sir?"  "Jack  Graham,"  snid RoyCe.  "Givo  us  your  hand."  "Good!" said Undo Jako looking  around as if ho darod contradiction,  or opposition, "that's a bargain!  You're free of thc camp from this  momunt. You're one of us. Hero���������"  ami ho looked around, "got ua a  drink!"  Ono of tho mon producod a bottle  of spirits and Undo Jake tilled somo  glasses.  "Drink," ho said, offering ono to  Royce.  "Drink, Madgo. Luck to our new  mato." -*-  "No,  no,"  sho faltered.  "Drink,   Madge,"  said  Koyce.  Sho raised the glass to her lips,  but as tho voices of the group���������now  swollen to a small crowd���������criod  "Luck to our now mate!" tho glass  fell from her hand and sho turnod  away.  th*-i!k*d them, rough as they were.  ".She saved my life. I want to stay  with you, t.o be one of you. I'm  strong and can work, and I'll do  my ^harc������������������ "  "No,  no!"  broke from Madge.  CHAPTER IX.  Royce had crossed tho Rubicon.  He uo longer was the Honorablo  Royco I.,an*don, but Jack Graham;  the gypsy. Ho had pledged himself  to share' their work and help boar  their burdens, aird with Royce a  pledge, though it was made over a  glass instead of with tho usual formality of a law-court, was a pledge,  and ho meant to abide by it. With  all his faults; he possessed one virtue at least���������thoroughness.  That samo night he sot nbout  learning what sort of fellows these  wero with whom ho cast his lot, and  what was exacted of him. And he  wont through the camp talking with  one and the othor, he learned a great  deal   that  surprised  him.  He was informed that this particular tribe wa.s in the main honest  and industrious; tlrnt their chief  business was colt raising and horso  trading; that thoy they did considerable business ir.i the making and  selling of baskets, and in running  various sideshows at the country  fairs. All this he gleaned from a  conversation with" thc lame gypsy���������  David by name���������whose tent he shared on the night following his admission as a member of the tribe.  David also informed him that  Madgo was recognized ns their  qucon, although she rarely had occasion  to  exercise hcr-authority.  Tho vans, Davy declared, wero giv-j  en up to  the married men and  their j  families, and  the women,  while    tho;  men     wore   best      pleased   with     the  tents.    'It wns this information' which  caused Royce to refuse to longer keep  Madgo out of her van, and seek shelter with tho lame g.VpKy*  In the course of the conversation  Davy further disclosed to his attentive companion, that Undo Jnko,  was not a real gypsy, bnt. was an  outsider, "a gentleman who had gjt |  into trouble," he believed. "lie has!  one great failing," the spca" cr add-  od���������"a love for drink; and if it  wasn't for that, Uncle Jake would  be a groat man."  After   a   night   of   refreshing     rest,  Royce arose,  and felt the vigor of a  new  man  in  his  muscles.      He  took  n  bath  in  an  adjacent   brook,     and!  then assisted in the systematic strik-j  ing of tents.    In about half an hour!  after breakfast tho tribe  was     once *  more on the march. |  All day long Madge seemad to keop  out   of    his     way,   but   at   nightfall, |  whon  they halted, hc made his  way j  to   her   van,   and  at   the   door  found I  her,    holding  by  tho  hand  a     three-  year-old boy.  who had a face as red  as  an Indian.  She told lloyee that she ' was not  glad to see him���������that he should not  have stayed with the tribe���������the.t ho  should have gone back to hi.s people  ���������that the gypsies were not fit as-  swa res^f Sr^"nr������ge fitieman  tory,"  he  rejoined,  you  would    not  woudor at my  decision."  Tho presenco of tho littlo boy, and  a childish inquiry from his lips, proven tod further conversation on tho  thomo, ami Madgo said:  "It is timo Tony went to bed."  As she spoko two men approached  tho van. Royco's back was toward  them and ho did not seo them, but  ho saw by tho suddoii pallor which  ovorsproad Madgo's fatVj that sho  had soon something to upset hor,  and turning his head quickly ho ro-  cog'nized tho giant Long Rill, and  tho gypsy who had bcon too ready  with "his knife.  Ho half atartod up, his faco darkening, but Ma*dge's hand foil upon  hi.s shoulder.  "What will you do?" sho askod in  so low a voico that it was scarcely  aufdiblc.  Ho looked up into hor face, whito  with dread.  "Nothing now," ho said. "Don't  bo afraid, Mivtfgo! Why, you aro  trembling!      Thoro,  I'll go,"  He got off tho stops and, without  looking in the direction of thc mon,  walked away.  Hill and the young gypsy camo up  to tho van, and tho wrestler grcolod  hor with forced gentility, eyeing lior  rather fearfully but tho gypsy stalked close up and scowlod after Royco  as ho did so.  "Who is that, Madgo?" ho demanded. "I don't know him! Ho ain't a  Romcany. And what's he sitting horo  for as if the place belonged to him?"  Tho palor had completely left  Madgo's faco and her 'dark oyos, not  tender now, but flashing, glowing  with passion, mot his sullen ones  steadily.  * "Whero havo you been, Steve?"  she demandod in a voico which, while  it was low, rang with a tono of  powor and command Royco had not  yet heard.  "Whero     havo   I " . He  stopped  and looked down. "I'vo bcon about  some horses, me and Hill.* Wo'vo  only just got back. Who was that  fellow?"  "Ono of us, but a stranger,"  snid Madge. "Ono you had bettor  avoid. Keep out of his path, Stovo  or you  will bo sorry."  "WhatI" he exclaimed, his faco  roddoning. "What *do you mean,  Madge? What have I to be afraid  of .him for?"  "Ask yourself!" she said, pointing  to his face which changed color beneath hor accusing gaze. "You know  what j'ou have dono. Look, there's  blood  upon your  hands,   coward!"  .He started, and involuntarily looked at his hands as if ho expected  to soo rod stains there; then he recovered ��������� himself and laughed defiantly.  "You're talking gibberish, Madgo"  ho said. "If you can't give mo a  sensible answer, I'll Iind out who  the fellow is for myself," and he  strode off.  Royce had gono straight to the  camp-fire, ai.td was seated eating his  supper, when Stove, followed by.  Bill, came up. Royco scarcely -."���������raised his oyes and said not a word  until the rough greetings between  the two men and their comrades had  passed, then he rose" slowly ami  looked around.  There was something in the manner  of his  rising  which   drew    every  "Thoro     will   be no  troublo;     there  shall bo none, I promise you."  Sho slipped botween them amd  looked  from one to  tho  othor.  "Givo him tho knife." sho said in  a voico which, low as it was, reached overy ear.  Stove's face became white with' a  now passion; that of joalousy.  "You're on his side, are you!" he  ground out. "Oh, ho! And he wants  my knife, does ho! Lot him take it  then!"  Royce gontly drew Madge . aside.  They wero now tho con toi* of a  throng pressing closely around thorn  with supprossod oxcil'cmout, waiting  to see which would provo victor.  Itoyco would havo likod to lot tho  matter drop until Madge and tho  rest of tho women folks woro absent, but his mothor-wit told him  that tho best courso would bo to follow the business to the bitter ond.  "You hear?" he said. "Do you ro-  fuso to obey? You know why I  want tho knife; you know I havo tho  right to demand it; and that I ara  lotting you off much moro easily  than you deserve. Como!" an'd ho  hold out his har.'d.  Then, as Stove's lips twisted into  a defiant snoor, Royce sprang on  him and threw him, and tho next  instant hold up  tho knife.  A guttcral shout of pon't-up excitement suddenly lot loose rose from  tho crowd, and Stove, struggling to  his feet, seemed about to show fight.  But he stopped himsolf as if with  an effort, aud breathed hard, looked  from under his dark brows, first at  Royce ami them at Madgo, and to  Koyco's surprise said:  "Aro you satisfied?"  ���������"���������Quito," said Royce.. "You have  had the best of it, my friend; but  we'll cry q,ults And now we'll go on  with our suppor," and ho dropped  down into his place, and took up  his can as if nothing had. happened  purposely refraining from looking  toward the placo whore Madge had  stood.  Steve stood for a minuto biting  his lip and fidgeting*'at his coat with  his hands, then ho sat down too;  but thoso nearest him noticed that  his lips wore working a.s if thoy woro  palsied, and that his eyes followed  Madge with an evil glare as sho  went slowly away.  "Well done, sir," whispered Davy  in RoycV.'s ear. "I thought it was  him. rSteve's a bad lot; the worst  we've got. Havo a care of him, Mr.  Jack, have a care! I alius said ho  was a bad un. And he's sweet on  our Madge,  too���������moro's the pity!"  itoyco put down his can suddenly  and looked at Davy.  The old man shook his head.  "Yes, that's what makes it so  bitter bad for him," ho said. "But  it servod him right. Only keep- a  look out,  sir,  that's all."  "Oh, I'm not afraid," said Royco;  but he said it abson'tly, for Davy's  "he sweet on our Madge" rang in  his ears and gave him a curious and  unpleasant'shock.  (To bo Continued.)  We'll Write It Down Till Everybody Sees It���������Till  Everybody Knows It Without Seeing It. It's  Worthy of Wide Publicity,  Ceylon Tea is Rich, Doliciotis and is absolutely Puro. Sold only in  sealed lead packets. Black, Mixed or Natural GREEN. By all  grocers. Received the highest award and gold medal at St.  Louis.  "I  tell  medical  Boon . is  eye    upon him,  and the group stop- . .  ped rating and drinking,  ami stared   he  cnt  off tho  wrong  log.'     "But  I  nt him  expoctantly. | don't call that clevor.    "Wait a bit.  "Friends."  he said.   "I'm  a     now-jTho swgeon  said  it  would  bo  tcrri-  comer,     and      not    quite acquainted j ble  for  the  poor  follow  to  go about  with your  ways yet.  and  I want  to  ask   a.   question.    When  one of    you  you,"  exclaimed the young  'student,  , "our  houso  sur-  a  clover ������������������fellow."-..   "How's  that?"  asked his chum.       "Woll,    a  man was brought ir.i with a crushed  log.   The surgeons said it must coma | acid and form nitrate of lime, nitri*  off.   But,  by somo    means or other, I fleation will go on with the greatest   " '   ""   vigor,  and the plants will have    an  abundant  supply   of nitrogen   in tho  GOOD EFFECT OF LUTE.  Wo often hear tho question askod,  "Why has tho sowing of land plaster  bcon so largely givon up?" If wo  ask it of a farmer who usod it back  in the 70's ho will say that it was  givon up flrst, because of tho rise in  price, which made its uae almost  prohibitive, and, second, because tho  soil camo to respond to il loss and  less as it was applied from year to  year, the conclusion being that tho  soil contained all that was profitable to apply. Aa a result very littlo has been sown of lato, or we arc  getting "out of the habit," as it is  sometimes expressed. "Wo have had  many discussions of the effect of hind  plastor on tho crops and upon the  soil but the following explanation of  tho effect of plaster or lime on organic nitrogen by Dr. II. W. Wiley,  chief of thc Bureau of Chemistry, U.  S. Department of Agriculture, will  throw some light on tho action of  limo on our soils: nnd perhaps lead  us to return to the old practice of  sowing lime an*d "plaster." In his  address Dr. Wiley said in part:���������  "Limo is one of tho things most  lacking in farming to-day. Y"ou can  hardly detect a trace of limo in some  of our soils and yet in order for tho  soil to be properly fertile to produce tho proper results it sliould always havo an excess of limo in it,  not bocauso limo is such an essential  constituent of tho plant, but because  of its ciToct upon other constituents  of tho soil, and upon the nature of  tho soil itsolf. Organic nitrogen, like  driod blood, tankago and cottonseed  meal is a splendid nitrogenous fertilizer, but it must bo first converted  into .iviti-ic acid. , Then tho acid formed retards the development and  growth of bacteria. The moment  those organisms begin to convort  cottonseed meal into nitric.acid thoy  begin to make tho soil acid and tend  to hinder their own work and will  stop it altogether in a short timo  unless thero is something to take  charge  of that acid.  "There is nothing so good for that  as lime. Whenovcr there is plenty  of  lime  to  combine with  the  nitric  THE ARMIES COMPARED  AVAILABLE     RESERVES  RTISSIA AND JAP AW.  OS1.  ble, raising all the chicks hatched.  Wo aro making a new 200-chlcks  broador this season, but wo will not  place moro than 100 chicks in it, as  voung chicks will not stand crowding.  Ours aro indoor broodors, and havo  a shod for thc chicks to rum into,  and whon it gets cold thoy run into  tho brooder. During very cold woa-  thor wo do not lot thcm out of    tho  SSgST' *Z������ oTdoor &S& Toft ������������������?������ 7^ '"'^V'T^  Beaton for $12. Ho placed 60 dhicks' *"*' "������o 8iw of the army which sho  in it all of which nearly died, and c*n f^Jl' ^I,'.^^^!"!,1?1  thoso that lived arc 4ittlo runt������ hard*  On    Paper It Is a Case  of 4,500,-  000 Men Pitted Against  1,000,000.  A German statistician" who jotted  down daily tho roports from both  Russian and Japanese sources ot  the number of casualties in tho Mun-  churlan campaign found by adding;  up. tho figures a fow weeks ago that  tho Russians had lost in killed and  woundod 4,097,000 men,, or as  many us the entire quota of soldiers  available from tho Czar's Kinpiro,  and that the Japanese have suiTcrod  tho enormous loss of 0,778,800 mon,  fivo times tho total of all tho Island  Empire's soldiers of tho standing  army  and  tho resorves.  WbMc tho exaggerations made by  both sides are thus oxhibitod vividly, the losses have undoubtedly boon  tremendous and it becomes interesting ������o know how long cither country can continue to fill up the  broken ranks.  Russia    has    nn almost unlimited  ly worth to send lo market. Ho is  disgusted with tho machine and it  is ono that is advertised in nearly  overy poultry paper in tho laud,  poopio aro buying thorn by tho thousands, and then wondor why tho  chicks  die.  Our brooder has top heat which  wo can regulate just as wo please.  Tho chicks ncvor huddle in tho  broodor, for whon you find your  chicks huddling you may look for  dead ones in tho morning, as thoy  will  smother  when  crowded.  Our brooder cost us about S10 to  mako. Wc have an old one in use  for 25 years and it is yet good except the 'lieuter which has burned  out somo, but it is good yot for  several years. Whon wo put a brood  of chicks into it it raises thorn.  Ah. that's why you did not drink  to  my health  last night'?"  he said.  She answered with a hesitating  "Yes."  "If    you   knew   moro  of   roy     his-  is Your  Liver  Hero Are the Symptoms Which Tel! ofa Congested  Liver, and indicate the Need ot"  DR. CHASE'S KIDNEY-LIVER PILLS.  The tongue is coated, thc appetite  is impaired, digestion is derangad,  th.? bowels are constipated, and there  nre feelings of fullness and soreness  ebout the liver.  You may have headache and dizziness, pains iu tlie limbs, feverish-  uess. yellowness of the eye and skin,  dejmssion of spirits, and irritability oi temper.  So ."jTeat is the influence of the  liver on the other organs of the  body, that once it is deranged, thd  sho'.c system seems to bc upset.  There are no means by which you  ran r.o quickly and certainly obtain  relief from torpid, sluggish liver action as b.v the use of Dr. Chase's  Kidney-Liver  Pills.  One pill at bedtime, and t.he result  is a thorough cleansing of the filter-  ing and excretory systems, and new  vicror and regularity for liver, kidneys   and   bowels.  No family medicine has been more  extensively used In Canada than Dr.  Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills, and none  hns such a reputation for reliability  and  certainty of  action.  Knliven  thc a/7tion of the liver  by  .this well-known treatment., and you  iensure good digestion and regular  nctiosfo^thc bowels���������the foundation  of gftod   li������nlth.  Mr. Rogers Clancy, farmer. Chep-  stowc, Uruce County, Ont... states:���������  "I have used Ilr. Chase's Kidney-  Liver Pills, nnd would say that.  there is no medicine that equals  them as a cure for stomach troubles,  biliousness, torpid liver ar.*d headache, f wns troubled o great deal  with these ailments before using Dr.  Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills, and t.ho.y  have iirovcn wonderfully success-fill in  my  case.  "I would not think of being without a box of thene pills in the houso  and whenever T feel nny symptoms of  theso disorders I. take one of these  pills, and they set me. nil right  again. I can strongly rerommend  Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver I'ills for  the troubles mentioned above."  Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver I'ills, one  pill a dose, 2fj cents a box, al, all  dealers, or Bdmanson, notes ,t Co.,  Toronto. Thc portrait; and signature of Dr. A. W. Chase, tho famous receipt book author, aro on  every box.  has a .-grudge against another or  others. ��������� wliat- does lie do?" There  was silence for a moment then a  voice,  with  a  rough  laugh,  said:  "Have   it   out,   mate."  "I thought so," said Royce. calmly, almost cheerfully. "Well I've a  grudge against  two  of you."  Tho men  exchanged glances.  "Only two," said Royce. "For tho  ���������rest Tha've only sincere liking and  gratitude; and with your permission  I'll  have  it  out."  At this juncture Long Dill arose,  ar.d muttering about fetching something was shambling ofT, but Royce  stretched  out  his   hand.  "Stop where you are," he. said  quietly, "I've got a bono to pick  with you���������and with you!" and he  turned  swiftly to  Stove.  Steve sprang to his feet and advanced a step. then recognizing  Royce. shrank back.  ��������� ������������������lyiheiaet--.t,vin:���������ratal.-'- said ___ltoyce.  "have done me an injury; we won't  go into particulars, unless they think  it necessary. Sow we will settle  this little difference���������that is if they  choose to havo it settled in my  way. Now you Bill, turn out your  pockets."  There was a murmur of amazement and curiosity, then the. stwicta-  tor������ undorstocrd, and a growl of  sympathy and approval anise from  thcm.  Bill, finding tho majority against  him, and remembering? Roycc's  strength, without a word emptier!  hi.s  poi/kets  into  hi.s  hand.  "1 want thirteen shillings and sixpence, please," said lloyee cheerfully.  "Will some one take  it  for me."  Old Davy went and picked out the  required sum from .Bill's huge palm,  and Royce with a pleasant "thai)*',  you, Davy," put it in hi.s own pocket.  "Now," lie snid. turning t.o Stove.  "Your friend h������*e has a big knife  which he would be far better without, ft will get him into serious  trouble I. nm afraid; and so I will  tnko care of it for him. The knife  please!" and  ho held  out his hand.  Stove had .stood with cler-chid  hand, his eyes bloving, hi.s lips light-  ly set; but os lloyee mentioned the.  word "kniie," his' left hand went up  to  his  breast  pocket.  "Ves, there it. is," said Royee.  "Come give it over, antl let us got,  back to suppor.' What., you hesitate!  My friend, they 'don't let. you take  big  knives   into  jail,  you  know."  As ho spoke a murmur ran around,  and some, of  the  women exclaimed;  "Here's   Madge."  Itoyco half t.iirnnil and saw lior  standing hy his .side, her shawl  drnwn nrou-r.ld her head and rlnnped  tightly in hor hand. He could hear  hcr breath coming in (piick, labored  pants.  "Co back,   Madg"."  he ;,*,iid gently.  with no legs at all, so he doctored  up the crushod leg instead of cutting that off too; aud now it is as  good as ever. An ordinary surgeon  would have left the follow legless.  Wonderfully skilful,  wasn't it?"  "Gracious, my 'dear!" said the  first society belle, spitefully, - "I  trust you're not ill. You look so  muoh older : to-tnigih't."' "Do I,  dear?" the other roplied, sweetly.  "I feel quite well. An'd you���������how  wonderfully improved you are! You  look  positively  young*!"  Ziggsby���������"There goes a fellow who  whistles at danger." Pcrsby���������"Ah!  ho must bc a very brave follow. Who  is he'?" Zrtggsby���������"A locomotivo  driver."  If not, something must  bc wrong with its food. If  the mother's milk doesn't  nourish it, she needs Scott's  Emulsion. It supplies the  elements of fat required for  the baby. If baby is not  nourished by its artificial  food, then it requires  Half a teaspoonful three  or four times a day in its  bottle will bring thc desired  result, it seems to have a  magical effect upon babies  and children. ,  SCOTT & I'OWNK, Chemists, Toronto. Out.  t~.  foods; but -the very? moment that  limo is deficient tlien nitrification  goes on with diminished speed and  finally stops altogether. This Is ono  of tho essential reasons for thc usefulness of limo.  "You may wonder why the lands  in England tbat have been under  cultivation for so many hundreds of  years are still so fertile, and you  wonder why thoy do not grow acid,  and why the bacterial organisms do  not cease to work. The reason is  that a great part of England is  chalk. At the grounds of the groat  agricultural station in England you  can pick up lumps of chalks all  through the soil and if you pour a  little acid on tho soil it effervesces  like water from a soda fountain.  "Now thero is. a soil whiifli you  can manure with barnyard manure  for an indefinite time and* still you  will nover make it acid and have  nitrification go on with vigor."  Looking at it after the manner of  Dr. Wiley wc may assign thc lack of  lime as the cause of many of our  sour ^unfertile soils. __espccially��������� those^  which have been heavily ihailured.  | Speaking further of the use of limo  Dr. Wiley mentions the fact that  thousands of torn-,, of limo cako aro  thrown out every year from our sugar factories which might be ulili*/.-  od to the best advantage in neutralizing   the   acidity  of  our soils.  While Dr. Wiley has taken up thc  subjoct from a scientific standpoint,  many fanners have already begun to  realize the truth of tlie statements  in a practical way and have a few  years back been applying more and  more lime with good results orj just  such   soil  as  Dr.   Wiley  mentions.  guvo  tho  con-  dirt  and  PROTECTI.NC!   TR13ISS.  A''correspondent sends the    following:���������  As I have , boon askod timo and  again how to protect trees from mico  and rabbits, if you will spare mo  spaco in your columns I will  the  following  tried  romodios.  Ilomovo all litter from near  trees thus destroying the most  vonient nesting placo��������� If tho  was heaped* around the roots  firmly packed it would aid groatly  in removing shelter for these rodents. Take a piece of common  "tarred papor, window screen, or thin  wood such as is usod for berry boxes  is good. Theso coverings should  extend above the snow higih ono ugh  so that rabbits could not reacli tho  trunk of the trees. They sliould ho  removed before warm weather. Many  poisonous washes'.:.arc recommended,  with this objection that a portion of  the bark of the tree must be eaton  boforo the poison can take effect.  The following arc also suggested:  1. Portland cement of the consistency of paint,  as a wash.  2. Or a mixture of cement and  gas .tar.  3;  Cement and asphaltum.  4. Lime and carbolic acid.  5. Lime and sulphur.  0.  Sulphur, lime and soot.  Should a. young tree become gir'dl-  od it can be saved often by covering  the wound with soft clay or grafting wax, also by inserting cions  abovo and below tho wound. This  is aallod bridging, and will carry  the sap from the roots to the top  above the wound. If tho.trco is too  badly'* injured, or if discovered too  lato in the spring, cut tlie treo off  below the wound. Insert a graft  in the stump, and after tho summer's  growth remove all but one, and in  livo years, with good cultivating and  care, your treo will be as large or  nearly so as anyof the other trees  in tho orchard.  LOCOMOTIVE BUILDING.  Past Work Accomplished by British Firms.  KAISINC   KARLV  OrifCKS.  to  L.  to  do  We. were nsked thc lime host  start the incubator, writes Mr. 0.  Ilogue. We can give no answer  apply to all cases, because wo  not know how everybody is situated  ���������vi us to take proper care of the  chicks. However, if one has a good  warm shelter, free from exposure, wo  would advise that tho incubator bo  at ome started, for if hatched in  January chicks will fetch a good  price, in April. The raising of young  chic<k.'i in winter is something whicli  few people know anything about, nnd  il, is hard work to learn. 'I'he chicks  must bo kf.<pt warm, exercised, and  be givon plenty of the right sort of  food. Last March wo hatched some  early chicks rond as soon ns they  were old or.migh we ?old the roosters  and kept, tho pullets, and tho latter  began to lay in August and havo not  missed a day since oven when shut  up ir.i coops. "Now they arc laying  finely, and, with eggs at 30 cents  per down, it helps Pay tho expenses  and  buy feed.  One point in  early hatching  is the  brooder.   Thore are many  kinds     on  salo but   we   would    not give     our  rp-oodor  for  all   the   kinds   we     ever j  saw.   It is simple and always  rolia-  Rcmarkablc feats of swift. work  aro-*accomplishcd=by-thoso^who=havc  to do with unbving railroad bridges  and building railroads and locomotives in Kngland. The m������\v bridge for  the Croat Northern Railway at Kins-  bury Park wns substituted for the  old one in the short space of four  hours, livo work started at three  o'clock in tho afternoon, when powerful cranes were set to work to remove tho ten-ton girders ot the old  bridge. The new steel bridge, weighing more than 2,000 tons, which was  resting near at hand on six small  carriages, was hauled into position  by steel crabs; it was rapidly made  secure, the rails wore connected, and  within four hours trains were running over it. A feat still more surprising was that of substituting a  new bridge tor the old one near Hatfield. Within 52 minutes the old.  structure, with its four lines of rails  had disappeared;, and in its place  was a new iron girder bridge carrying six lines of rails, all ready for  trafllc.  A complete locomotive engine was  put. together for the Great Eastern  Railway nt thc Stratford works in  ten hours. The work began early in  the morning, the engine being photographed at the different stages of  its construction, and the samo evening it was actually at work pulling  a  train.  "An illiterate young man once got  a friend to write a letter for hdm to  his sweetheart. The letter was rather prosaic for a love-letter, and he  felt that on apology was due to his  sweetheart for its lack of tenderness. Tt was as follows: "Please excuse the mildness of this here letter,  as   the   chap  wot's   writin'     it is a  at     4,r>00,000,   including  about   75,-  .000 ..officers.  Every man in Russia is a soldier,  that is, every man botween tho ngos  of 21 and 43. With the oxcoption of  educated persons, tliose who havo  boen graduntod from universities,  colleges and grammar nchools, five  years with the colors or in active  service is required. A graduato oi a  university is required to servo actively for  A  YUAR  ONLY.  Thoso in tho active sorvico are, of  course,   receiving  training continual-  iy*  The reserves aro trained for a  fixed number of weeks periodically.  Regimental barracks aro scattered  from ono end of the empire to the  other, and tho mobilization of tho  troops, although a vast undertaking,  is systematically carried out. llo-  sides tho periodical drill to which  tho reserves are subjected, there aro  many companies and regiments  which aro callod out for active duty  in  quelling riots.  In .Japan tho total available re-  servos falls fat below that of Russia,  but to offset .tliis' is the fact that  Japan is nearer the sccno ol tho  fighting. Some exports also bolievo  tho Japanese arc better fighters.  Tho Japunese standing army consisted beforo the war **f only 107,-  029* oflicors and men, while Russia's  peace quota was 1,000,000. mon and  4-2,000 officers, according to figures  supplied by each Uovcrnmient. Tho  organization of the ;Japanese army  is rather complicated, but its ofllci-  enoy lias been fully tested in tho  mobilization and transportation of  the troops to the field.  Tn Japan all men from 17 to 4 0  are liable to military service. Tn  addition to the standing army are  lho reserves; tlien what is known by  the German term landwehr, and tho  first and second depots.  THK  RKSKUV13S.  consist of those who have quitted  the active service. They aro enlisted for four years and four months  and are considered part of the standing army.  The landwehr, which is brought into service after all the reserves havo  been called to thn colors, is composed of those who havo quitted tho  standing army, active and reserve,  and the enlistment period is livo  years. Tho first depot comprises all  those who have not enlisted in tho  active army for a term of seven.  years and four months. 'Those who  had not previously enlisted in tho  first depot comprise the second depot, tho term of service of which is  only a year and four months.  These divisions are called out     in   .  regulur  order. Training of  three    or  four weeks each year is given to all  those not. in the nctivo service.  In war times tho reserves are put  into active training, and a depicted  regiment can easily and quickly bo  filled with ��������� trained and experienced  men.���������Thoro is-also a fifth division _^  called tho landsturm.  which consists  of those who have gono through the  landwehr or first depot, but who  have not been in other service. In  this mnnner the ranks of the army  aro quickly filled.  Aside from all these there arc thousands in the empire* who can be called upon for active service and,  counting evory man eligible for tho  service/the total military strength  of Japan would be upward of 1,000,-  000  men.  On paper this number compares  poorly with the Russian figures, but  Japan, it must bo remembered, tan  more easily got her men to the field.  THE MAIN.   PROBLEM  which each nation must face is that  of feeding her soldiers. With Japan  tho present base of field supplies is  short when compared with Russia's  5.000 miles.  That the Russian army is suffering  from the lack of facilities for transporting foodstuffs to tho front is  partly shown by the request which  came from Gen. Kouropatkiin a few  days ago asking that eighteen or  twenty trains daily be added to  thoso already crossing Siberia and  entering Manchuria over tho Siberian Railway.  Japan also has the advantage of  having her troops better ecfuipped  than her opponent. The reserves of  Russia are not all supplied with  modern rifles, ironic of the regiimciit.s  wero fitted out years ago ami new  arms have not entirely replaced  those of the old  styles.  On the other hand, Japan's forces  go to thc front with guns and arms  of tKo latest type. The prepared ness  married man, an' he says he can't jof Japan for the war is show.-: em-  bide any soft-soaping; it gives hiin : phatically in the better equipment of  lhc* spazzums." ihor forces.  >J  |������jffis^w?������syw___  IB ���������i-T^^a-wr"-,. i ������������������ .li i. ���������  ,���������MTB1I  oooooo^ooooooooooooooc  YOUNQ  FOLKS  CK>-0-000<K><>0<X>0<>0<>00000-0  THE SORROWS OP BOBBY.  "I'll never speak  a piece again,  I  don't  caro  what  folks  say,  'Cause   once    I   'learned the    nicest  speech  To speak nt school last day;  My,  but I  studied  awful hard,  An'  practiced makin'  bows,  When I wns chorin'  'round tho barn  I'd say. it to tho cows.  Then, when tho foks all Come,  An' I was called to speak,  I clean forgot to mako a bow,  An' my knees was dreadful weak,  Stid o' the words I was to say.  Tlioro conic a great big lump  In  my  throat,   an'  stuck  thoro fast,  Au' I stood there like a gump.  Jes' like a gump, with open niouth  An' starin' eyes an' achin' heart;  Then  everybody  laughed,  but ma  (She alius takes my part.)  I spect I'd bo a stamlin' yot.  My mind was that confused.  But teacher,  spcakin'  jes'  as kind,  Said:   "Bobby,  you  aro  'scused."  THE JEWEL-BOX.  Polly's mother was away. Sho  often was. Polly had to father,  and Polly's mother did many things  to keep comfort in the little houso  which was their very own.  Polly wanted.to go to school, but  this day it was impossible, because  tho two littlo children were left in  her 'caro. Polly was not a very big  girl, but she was in the seventh  grade iu school, and she-knew "just  every thing," so Tommy, hcr five-  year-old brother, said,  ��������� Polly had washed the breakfast  dishes. Sho hnd swept tho little living-room, and made it just as neat  as her small hands could. She had  slipped out into the small garden  and gathered a bouquet of the late  flowers, and this brisk little chose  in the fresh .air gave Polly two blossoms of which sho was\pot aware-  roses in her checks. Aftei' all this  was done, she amused two-year-old  Baby Grace, and gave her hei* bowl  of bread ami milk, soon after this  tucking her in her little cot, where  she happily crooned herself to sleep.  Polly busied herself with her lessons, for she meant to get overy  ono just as well as if she were sure  to recite them. Tommy, had a little  book, too, but the words hc knew  and could read somewhat resembled  himsolf in size, for both wore little.  "The pictures lost their power to  please. He did wish Polly could  leave her lessons and play with him.  Theso children hnd to learn somo  things many do not. Tommy had  ��������� to learn to amuse himself when he  would much rather have played with  Polly. Polly had to .learn .that she  must think for all cf them and herself, too. It often happens that th������  very best and most helpful lessons  are not found in books. The "having to do things" is the best kind  of schooling.  Polly glanced at Tommy. She saw  that he was getting tired of himself.  To be tired of oneself is a pretty  bnd .thing. Polly could not play.  She must get her spelling- lesson.  Rhe looked at the rows of words.  They seemed long and hard. All at  or.ee something came into her mind.  "O Tommy, I've thought of the  very best thing!" said Polly, cheerfully.  Tommy responded at  once  with  a  bright   and     attentive   look.       "Oh,,  what is it. Polly?"  "I've found a jewel-box. Tommy!'.'.  Tommy looked mystified.  "See  here.     Tommy,"   said  Polly,  showing him the rows of words. "She  copied a few  on his slate for  him���������  anthem,  sonnet,  opera,   sonata,  cantata,   oratorio.  Those were only part of the lesson,  but enough to hold many "jewels,"  as Polly called* them.  "Kow. Tommy, look here. See  these words; we will call them boxes  ���������jewel-boxes,���������because each holds so  many smaller words or jewels. Now  we will play- we 'are hunting jewels,  and we will see how many we can  ^find^in_,_eachij*^_rd^^J^shalliiIearnjJtq=  ���������pell the words, too, for after finding the  jewels, how can I ever for-  J. BULL AND UNCLE SAM  BRITAIN SURPRISES AMERICA  IN MANY THINGS.  British Biscuits   and  Bicycles   tho  Best, Wliile  British Bee! Is  Best.  , The supremacy oi British eggs and  bacon is being threatened by. American breakfast foods. So the dealers  say. Yet thoro is a closely-alMad  product to tho cereal foods now  garnishing every grocer's window, iu  whicli wo arc beating tho Americans  hollow on thoir own ground says  Pearson's Weekly.  In biscuit-making Britain stands  unrivalled to-day. Tho American  sniffs his nose at his nativo "cracker," and tho British makers aro  pouritg their products into the United States despito the 45 per cent,  protective duty. This practically  means thnt tho British manufacturer  has to pay a halfpenny for* the privilege of introducing a penny biscuit  into tho United States. Yet the demand throughout the States for the  British article is rruch that one British house has been compcllod to establish a branch factory in Chicago.  The Americans, again, are circulating abroad descriptions of trials  botween tlieir makes of locomotive  engine and ours. In theso corjbests  naturally tho Americans aro well  to the front.  But what about the recent trials  on the Egyptian Government railways between ton American and.,ton  British locomotives? The conditions  wero slightly in favor of the American engines, but .the result was an  nbsoluto success for those of British  make. While the total weight of tho  train hauled by ono American engine, for example, was 4*48 tons,  the opposing British engine had to  pull a train weighing 555 tono.  Tho American engine consumed 4  tons of coal, tho British only 2|.  Tho British engine did its work with  case,  the American with difficulty.  BRITISH BEEF AND MUTTON  get just how they are placed in the  box?"   she  asked,' conclusively.  Tommy still looked mystified, but  he wn.s eager. He ktiew Polly was  right.  "Now, Tommy, sco this big word,  a-n-t-h-e-m, anthem. See. the first  two letters, n-n, spoil what?"  "Why, they spell an," said Tommy  gleefully, "and tho next letter mukes  ant. I learr.'ed about the ant one  day,  you  know,  Polly."  "So you did," said Polly, "and  I didn't see that. Now we have two  jewels."* Tommy tried, but he could  not find any more. "I see two  moro!"   exclaimed   Polly.  "Whore, Polly?" asked Tommy,  excitedly.  "T-h-e. the, and t-h-c-m, them.  Yes, and hero is another. XI-o-m,  hem. My, this box is just full of  jewels! Just see���������an, ant, thc, them  hem. Five jewels in that little word  of only six letters!" Polly had forgotten that sho had callod tho word  "big"  at  first.  Polly and Tommy kept at the row  of words, and the jewels they collected would havo been enough for a  queen's crown had they been of tho  right sort. I think they wero very  valuable jewels, although they nro  not used for crowns.  are the finest in the World. Who-  oyer tasted a succulent sirloin or a  juicy chop in Now York, '��������� unless it  chanced to bo of British importation? Strango as it may appear,  quantities of British dead stock are  as a matter of fact exported to  America. An "English chop" over  thero is a luxury, figuring only in  tho menus of first-rate clubs ami restaurants. Its price is three times  that  of  the native article.  'American bicycles in Great Britain  aro now pructically unsaleable. Yet  at one time the Americans threatened to Sweep the market. They came  in just nt the smash of tho Hooley  companies, when our cycle firms  could not defend themselves. Everything was in their favor for capturing the cream of the British trade.  But they started off with the idea  that the effete Britisher didn't know  what a real bicycle was, and so  tried to teoch him. Tlioy brought  him a brakclcss and mudguardlcss  machine, with single-tube tyres���������not  to speak of springless saddles and  other abominations. Their machines  wore utterly unfitted for tho English  climate and roads. When they found  their trade '"declining they merely  put worse stuff into their machines,  hoping that ' tho very low prices  would revive trade. But the British public sadly shook its head.  SHIPS BUILT CHEAPER.  When Mr. Pierpont Morgan bouglit  up the White Star line, he also  thought he would later buy up' the  whole British mercantile marine. He  is wiser now.* Tho real fact is that  American shipowners prefer to put  their vessels under jthe British flag,  because of the extra cost of an American crew. When they sail their  ships under the Stars, and Stripes,  the pay-roll alono is increased by  fifty per cent. To the; building.' of  ships the same reason applies. So  long as a 10,000 ton vessel costs  $2^000,000 to build in America, and  can be turned out iti Great Britain  for about '$1,250,000v it is scarcely  likely that American owners will bo  anxious to have their vessels built  on their  own side pt the Atlantic.  So struck were the Americans at  the phenomenal success which has  attended the Corporation management of the electric tramway sys-  tehi^itrLiyiorpoolfthat^an^invitation*  was recently sent Mr. C. R. Bellamy,  the manager, to attend a tramway  convention in New York, 'llio Corporation committee unanimously  granted Mr. Bellamy permission to  accept the American invitation, and  by now tho Americans probably  know moro about municipal management than thoy did.  Howevor, they are not above going  to Britain to learn, if wo are indisposed to go to them.  THE GENERAL MANAGER  for example, and general superintendent of tho Baltimore ond Ohio  Railroad woro recently in Lancashire, making investigations as to  the method of dealing with goods  traffic on the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway. Nor did they go  away without learning something.  The electrical working of capstans,  for instance, was quite new to them,  ahd they confessed it to be far ir.i  advance of anything of the kind in  America.  Speaking of goods traffic, a recent  instance may bo mentioned where tlie  Caledonian Railway Company placed  orders with an American company  for twenty bogie waggons, at the  same time ordering thirty waggons  of similar capacity from the Leeds  Forge Company. This firm had urgent Government orders on hand,  but, notwithstanding, completed the  Caledonian's work in two months,  "while tho Americans took five.  Everyone remembers the tobacco  war���������how confident Mr. Duko was at  the outset���������and how ultimately he  "drew in his horns," and confided  to an interviewer that "it was after  all a grand thirjg in every way for  the British and Americans to work  together." That, of course, was  when Mr. Duke had reached tho  point of feeling very glad the British Imperiaf Tobacco Company were  about to offer him terms.  THE BATTLE OF BOOTS.  Tho battle of boots, too, how it  raged. British boot aiid shoe manufacturers had braved many alarms  of foreign competition���������one day  French, next Austrain or Swiss.  Thon the man with tho drawl camo  along. However, to-day thero are  probably less than two per cent, of  real American boots on the market.  Half of those you see lu the shop  window are labelled "American" it  is true, but all the same for that  the greater proportion of them are,  as a matter of fact, made in Britain.  This also moans that our own  bootmakers at Northampton and  elsewhere consider themselves as  good as the Americans any day, and  that if Britons want boots labelled  "American,'*' and made in thc American : style, they can have them.  "Anything to give satisfaction;'*'? say  the manufacturers. ''They'll r.ever  never know the difference."  .They, do not know the 'difference,  and it is an extraordinary fact���������so  well are British manufacturers now  able to turn out "American" footwear���������that one cute Yankee dealer  lins recently found.it worth his while  to make more than one shipment of  their goods to America itself.  LIKES BRITISH GOODS.  What, however, on the Americans'  own admission, "riles" them is the  fact that, despite the much-talked-  of Monroe doctrine, the trade of all  South America is mainly in European hands. In fact,? the Americans  for once are modest. They do not  grumble so much at Great Britain  maintaining the first place, but they  admit it galls them that Germany  should be driving them even out of  the second.  A few years ago thoy intervened to  save Venczula from "British aggression." Yet to-day Venezuela buys  more from Great Britain than from  them. Chili, too, purchases from us  to the extent of $12,000,000 a year,  while from the. Americans she buys  only to the extent of the odd $2,-  000,000. And as to Argentina, the  New York lYibunc says it is "a disgraceful fact" that Britain sells to  that country nlor.e more than the  United States sells to the entire  South American continent.  A  MOTHER'S   PRECAUTION.  There is no telling when a modicine  may be needed in homes whore there  are young children, and tho failure  to have a reliable modicine at hand  may mean much suffering, and, perhaps, the loss of a priceless life.  Every mother should always keep a  box of Baby's Own Tablets in the  house. This medicine acts promptly  and speedily, cures such ills as  stomach and bowel troubles, teething troubles, simple fevers, colds,  worms and other little ills. And the  mother has a guarantee that the  Tablets contain no opiate or harmful drug. One wise mother, Mrs.  Geo. Hardy, Fourchu, N. S., says:  "I have used Baby's Own Tablets  and find them a blessing to children.  I am not satisfied without a box in  tho house at all times." If your  dealer does not keep these Tablets in  stock send 25 cents to The 'Dr. Williams' Medicine Co., Brockville, Ont.,  and you will get a box by mail post  paid.  -   ���������������������������;���������  DEADLY PNEUMONIA.       v  In All Its Varieties Disease is Duo   z_ tplnfection.  "Let me see somo of your black  kid gloves," said a lady to a shopman. "Theso nre not thc latest  style, are thoy?" she askod, when  the gloves were produced. "Yes,  mndiini," replied the shopman; "wo  have  had     l.hcin   in  stork   only     two  dnys. I   didn't   think   they   were,  because tlie fashion paper says black  kids have Inn nlichcs, ami. vice versa. I '.-eo the Ian stitches, bul. not  Mie vice veri.ui." The shopman explained Unit vice versa was French  for .seven bullous,, so she bought  three  pairs.  In all its varieties, pneumonia is  due to  infection.  Twenty years ago even that much  was unknown. Now it is on undisputed fact that the majority of cases of this most deadly diseases are  caused by a germ known as tho  pneumoccus���������or, as it goes about  in pairs, the dipplococcus pneumoniae. That thore arc other bacilli  which cause pneumonia is also admitted. How muny different varieties are in this~elass is a question,  but several of them have been discovered   beyond   cavil.  "Pneumonia," says a distinguished  authority, "is caused by weakening  of the lungs duo. to congestion, allowing the inroad of germs which  were in the body before."  Investigations have apparently established the fact that all the microorganisms whicli cause pneumonia  enter through the respiratory organs. The bacilli are found in largo  quantities in "the mouths and noses  and breathing passages of persons in  a normal condition of health. In  fact, according to a Chicago physician, who made many tests, pneumonia producing germs exist in . thi>  bodies of 45 out of every 100 persons, under average normal conditions.  When pneumonia develops in ono  lung or both, as thc result of a cold,  or because of somo other depressing  fact, it means that the patient is in  such a reduced state that the microorganism can take hold and multiply.  It is evident, therefore, that maintaining the general health is the first  lesson  of prevention.  Little Willie���������"Father, what is a  spendthrift?" Father���������"Ho is a  man who spends a great deal of  money foolishly." "Little Willie���������  "Then, is a man who lends lots of  money foolishly a lendthrift?"-  NO DOUBT ABOUT  ROBT. BOND'S CASE  HE    WAS CURED   OF BRIGHT'S  DISEASE BY DODD'S KIDNEY BILLS.  Doctors Said There Was no Hope  For Him, but He is a Well  Han Now.  Mount Brydges, Ont., Jan. 16.���������  XSpeciaf.)���������That Dodd'B Kidney Pills  cure Bright's Disease complotely and  permanently has been clearly shown  in the cose of Mr. Robt. Bond, a  well-known resident of this place.  Mr, Bond docs not hesitate to say  he owes his life ato Dodd's Kidney  Pills.  "My attending physician," Mr.  Bond states, "said I was in thc last  stages of Bright's Disease and that  there was no hope for me. I then  commenced to use Dodd's Kidney  Pills and no othor remedy. I used  in all about twenty boxes whon my  doctor pronounced me quite woll.  I have had no return of the troublo  since."  Bright's Disease is Kidney Disease  in its worst form. Dodd's Kidney  Pills always cure it.,_ They also easily curo milder forms of Kidney  Complaint.  -.        >         .���������..:.".���������  A minister and'a rather bUmjptibus  traveller occupied tho sanio stateroom . on a cvoyage across the Atlantic. At breakfast on������the first  niorning the traveller said:��������� "I hopo  sir, my snoring did not disturb you  during tho night?" "Oh, no, not a  bit, sir," roplied tho minister, "not  a bit. You see, I live on the coast  near" a lighthouse, and I'm used to  the sound of the foghorn on thick  nights.'*'-  Sunlight  OAF  REDUCES  EXPENSE  SS,000 Reward r^.beBprao^  Limited, Toronto, to any person who  San prove that this soap contains  iny form of adulteration whatsoever,  ������r contains any injurious chemicals,  AkH Tor the Ocfason lUr. av  Dyeing!   Cleaning!  Vor th* *w������ kaat atadfatu ink la tka  "MITUM AMIRIOAN DYIINO OO."  Laok *o* a������Mt la r���������t *������wb, ������ Ma* 41ml.  Montrttal.Torooto, Ottawa, Qutfetn  For the Winter  ���������GO  TO���������  CALIFORNIA, MEXICO OR  FLORIDA.  The "Land of Sunshine,  Fruit and Flowers."  Hound trip tourist tickets  on sale daily.  Mount; Clemens " Mineral Baths"  Situated--on'direct line of Grand  Trunk.  St* Catharines Mineral Springs  Those who need a rest should  spend a few days or weeks at this  delightful resort. Best of hotel accommodation.  For tickets and full infonmation  call at any Grand Trunk Ticket Office.  &ert4Aiyf2i^La, &nqv*iq^ c?4*%y{e>4/-'vUjZ0  POULTRY  THE  We can handU your poultry althta  alive or dri���������ud to best advantage*  Also your butter, *gf*. honey and  other produce.  DAWSON   COMMISSION   CO.,  Limited  Oar.   West   Market   and   Oolborno   8t������*   TORONTO.  OUTCOME OF THE WAR.  Sue  EARN A  Comfortable Living  WITH A  Poultry raising will], a Chatham  Incubator is a very profitable and  easily managed occupation. Unless  you want to go into it extensively it  need take but very little of your time.  Government reports .show that the  demand for chickens in Canada is  greatly in excess of the supply and  Great Britain is always clamoring  for more. That means a steady  market and good prices for chickens.  You cannot raise chickens successfully with a setting hen. She is wasting time setting* when she should be  laying. While she is hatching and  brooding a few chickens she could be  laying five or six dozen eggs. The  percentage of chickens she hatches is  much less than that produced'by the  Chatham Incubator.  It will pay you to own a Chatham  Incubator.  Chatham Incubators contain every  improvement of importance in Incubator construction that has been produced. They are made of thoroughly  seasoned wood, with two walls, case  within case. Between these walls  mineral wool is packed forming the  very best insulation. Each piece of  the case is mortised and grooved and  screwed, making the whole as solid  as a rock. Chatham Incubators are  equipped with scientifically perfect  regulators which are an infallible  means of regulating the temper.-iture.  HocasTtlfpapmtil  October, 1905.  We will start you raising poultry  for profit with a Chatham Incubator  without one cent of money from you  until next Fall. That means that you  can take off seven or eight' hatches  and make considerable money out of  the Incubator before thc first payment  becomes due. .  We couldn't make this offer if we  were not certain that if you accept it  you will get complete satisfaction, if  we were not positive that the Chatham  Incubator w'dl pay you a handsome  yearly income.  This is a straightforward offer. We  make it to show our supreme confidence in the Chatham Incubator. We  want you to accept this offer as we  are sure of the satisfaction our Incubator will give. Every machine we  have put out so far has made other  sales in the same neighborhood  Our offer fe to sent! you a Chatham  Incubator at once, freight prepaid by  us without one cent of cash from you.  You mah������ your first payment in  October, 1905. The balance to be paid  In October, '1906, or if a Cash Buyer  you get it cheaper. Could any offer  be fairer or more generous ?  smith Fallr, Ont., Novcmlwr loth, 1904.  Tho Incubator anil llrowlur that I houglit from vour  agent, od tlmo. I wish nowr to pay tho ivliolo amount  t'lla fall. If you will plvo mo a discount. I am -rnry  much plflMeri with both lnctiliiitor ami Rrooilrr. mid  would not uo without tlitftn. bocaunn I clonreil this  seaion, mora tbau tbo lucnliator anil llroodcr cost mc.  Youiu rcaiwlfiilly,  MRS. \V. IIYSMIP.  Write us to-day for full particulars  of our offer and mention this paper.  Don't put it aside for another time as  this special proposition may bo withdrawn at any time.  THE MANSON CAMPBELL CO., Limited  Dept. 3-i Clmtlinm, Ont.  MAXUPftCTiniEIll OF  Chatbam Tannins Mllh ami  Chatham Farm Scnlcs.  IMHTK1DUTIS0 WAlir.iroUBRS AT  Montreal, Que, I'-mnrton. Man., Calgary, Alta.,  New Wwlinlnnbir, li.C, Halifax, N.S.  KACTOI.ir.8 AT  Chatbam, Out., anil Uutrolt, Mich. 13  Kussia Must Be the First to  For Terms;  "This war will end when Russia  asks for terms of peace, or, in the  contrary event, when thc la.st Japanese creature of either sex, capable  of bearing arms, dies fighting hQS lvcn  against hor." Such-was tlio emphatic declaration of Mrf Arthur Diosy,  F.R.G.S., founder of the Japan Society of London, recently. Intervention he regarded as practically out  of the question; Japan would take  care not to be swindled a second  time.  The struggle was likely to affect  the commerce of the world to a  greater extent than any., other war in  history. It was a conflict between  a retrograde typo of civilization, represented by a ��������� so-called Christian  nation, nnd* a free and enlightened  type, .'represented by a so-called  heathen people. Tho real cause of  the war was ' 'the preser.it condition  and futuro of China. It was thc ambition of Japan to awoken the Chinese, and she would have every advantage in attempting their regeneration. Russian success would not,  in thc lecturer's opinion, be well for  British trade. Wherever a Chinaman  had come under the thumb of tlio  Russians, he.had found it to his advantage to buy other than British  goods, and if Kussia became all-  powerful in China, there would be a  great increase in the salo of German,  Belgian, and Swiss products, until  such time ns Russia herself could  supply the articles. There was undoubtedly* a danger ef a commercial  rivalry stronger and fiercer than the  world had ever soon, for China" was  likely to become one of the greatest  if not the greatest, of industrial nations. In the interval, at all events,  this country could keep its mills  going to theii* fullest extent for  China would need plant and tools,  and a great deal of those would be  supplied by Great Britnin. Those  who engaged in this business must  do so on scientific Hues; they must  take a leaf out of the Gorman book  in the Far East, and several leaves  out of the Japanese. It would be  worth   doing.  IRELAND  CAN  GEOW-*TOBACCO.  An Initial     Experiment   Produces  Surprising Results.  J A new era appears to have opened  for Ireland. Not only will she be a  manufacturer of tobacco, but she  appears likely to bc able to grow a  good leaf of her own.  From the lands of Col. Nugyjnt Bv-  erard, in Raudalstown, County  Heath, twenty acres of tobacco have  boen harvested, and Professor J. N.  Harper, of Kentucky University, the  American tobacco expert, describes  it as "a tobacco crop of the highest  quality, -quito equal to that in Virginia and Kentucky." Professor Harper also pronounces the Irish climate  to be almost perfectly suited for tobacco culture.  Col Bverard has been supported by  the Irish Department of Agriculture  and his is the lirst experiment in  producing, a tobacco crop in Ireland  on a commercial and practical scale.  The Department of Agriculture  agreed to assist anyone who would  experiment with tobacco culture to  tho extent of ten acres by bearing  the cost of the drying and curing  plant. Col. Everard ag-rcod to lay  down twenty acres. The best procurable seed was brought from Virginia,0 and planted early in thc  spring, and since Sektcmibcr the process ���������'��������� of curing, sorting and drying  employment to a number  of local hands.  The twenty acres have yielded  about 14,000 pounds weight of leaf.  This is a remarkable result for what  is practically un initial experiment;  it is estimated, however, that the average yield per acre will bo. about  1,000 pounds of tobacco. Dublin  manufacturers and experts have valued thc samples already grown as high  as 16 cents a pound for the best  leaves.  The Government has removed the  prohibition against- tobacco culture,  and undertakes to refund to tho  grower one-third of tho duty levied^.  The' concession, , however, is limited  to five farmers to undertake the  heavy initial years, and it is impossible to expect cost for this limited  period.   4   Minister��������� "Of    what   wero   you  afr-  puscd?'.^ Convicts JjStpal i ng __a  watch. I made a good fight about  it. I had two lawyers, and proved  nn alibi with sixteen witnesses. Then  both my lawyers made strong  speeches to the jury. No use. I wns  sentenced for four years." "I don't  sco why you were not acquitted."  "Well, I confess there was one weak  point in my defence. They found tho  watch  in  my pocket."  A NEW PLUG, OF TOBACCO.  The Tuckett Tobacco Company  has placed upon the market a  new plug of their celebrated T &  B tobacco, whicli sells at 10 cents.  The well-known quality of the tobacco assures the success of the  new   venttire.  PROPRIETARY  RIGHT.  Little Edith had spent an afternoon busily searching with nimble  fingers tlirough the soft fur of her  pet kitten. When Bhe was through  she came to report to her mother.  "O mamma," she cried, "I found  a little flea on kitty, nnd I caught  it!"  "What did you do with it?" asked  her mother.  "Why, I put * it back on kitty  again,  of course.   It was her flea." ,  SHIRT  Made big enough for a big  man to work in with comfort.  Has more material in it than  any other brand of shirt in  Canada. Made on the  H.B.K. scale it requires 393^  to 42 yards per dozen, whereas  common shirts have only 32  to 33 yards.  Minari's Liniment Cure3 Colds, &c.  Steel fishing-rods have been brought  to such a state of perfection that  they are nuw being sold extensively  in the place of those of bamboo. It  is saitl thut ��������� .they are handier to  carry,  and  are better  balanced.  That's the reason why the  H.B.K. "Big" Shirt never  chafes the armpits, is never  tight at the. neck or .wristbands, is always loose, full  and comfortable and wears  well.  Each shirt bears a tiny book.  that tells the whole history  of the "Big" Shirt, and  also contains a notarial  declaration that the H.B.K.  "Big" Shirt contains 39^  to 42 yards of material per  dozen.  Sold at all dealers but only  with this brand:���������*  HB.K  '*    BrtA'N*.*-.* A  HUDSON BAY KNITTING CO.  Montreal        Winnipeg       Dawson  *���������___      *  1  For Over Sixty Vears  Uitp.WiKKiow'i-SoaTnixaSriiurltM b*onii>l m  million! ot uothrn for thoir cAUdrea white t*������hlas.  JleootheB.ae child, aofteoH the guciii. allsjapklo, earaj  viadcollo.reffMUbeatkflviomkuaantlbdvcts, tQdi������ th.-  be������troi...jl<tr Olftrrbus*. Tw.aXT-^t. Mali . botU*  tSoldbrdruffgUuthroughou* Lbo world. Bt������ur*ao4  Wu*"Mh .Winaxitt-h.-iotiTuisa At.or.'   tl-ot  Tho celebrated soprano wns in the  middle of hor solo, when littlo Freddie said to his mother, referring to  the conductor ' of thc orchestra:���������  "Why does thnt man hit. at the woman with his stick?" "Ho is not  hitting at her," replied his mother.  "Keep quiet." "Well, then, what  is  she  hollerin'  for?"  A Gorman inventor has recently  producod n magazine camera, which  is contained within tho handle of a  cano.  Minard's Liniment Cures Distemper  "And what arc you in hero, for  my poor man?" nsked the lady visitor of the prisoner. "l*'or making  money, mum," was the reply. "But,  dear me, it's not a crime to make  money!" "Yes, it is, mum," replied tho prisoner, "when you makes  twenty-five cents an' dollars an" so  on."  DR.A.W. CHASE'S OK���������  CATAMHC&BE... -tUO.  ii uot direct te the *-tf~������  f"ti br th* Improred Blotree.  Heak Ibe alcera, clean the air  panafee, Hope droppinn In lie  throat and pcnnaauirtly corea  Catarrh and Har Perer. Blower  All dr ileru. or Dr. A. W. Chaae  Medicine Co.. Toronto aad Buffalo  In Germany, employers of labor.  are compelled -to grant ono hour's  rest nt midday, and women with  household cares mny claim nn extra  half-hour.  Minaad's Liniment Cures Diphtheria  The massed navies of the world  include 560 battleships, 471 cruisers,  1,25s gunboats, nnd 1,600 torpedo  craft..  Lifebuoy Soap ��������� disinfectant ��������� ia  strongly recommended by the medical  profession as a safeguard against infectious  diseases. 22  '���������The minister looked round with  tho Book in his hand. "Who t;Ivcs  this bride away?" he demandu.l "I  do," hastily replied hor father,  most  willingly."  TAKE  NOTICE.  Wo publish simple, straight testimonials, not press agents' interviews,   from well-known people.  From all ovor America they testify  to the merits of MINAHD'S LINIMENT, tho bost of Household Remedies.  O.   C.   RICHARDS  &   CO.  A piece of lancewood an inch  square will stand a strain of 2,000  pounds   bcfor������   >a"taking.  OPENING  FOR  A   YOUNG  MAN.  "Yes," said Mrs. Mnlonc, to the  old friend who was picking up the  threads of family history, "my Boh-  by, he's travelling with a circus  now,"  "Protty hard work, isn't it?" inquired  the interested  caller.  "Never a bit of it," returned tho  proud mother of Bobby. "He's jiving liko a gentleman, he is���������hands in  his pockets, as ye might say,���������for  it's a handsome salary he gets, antl  every blessed thing he has to do is  to lay his head in the lion's mouth  a matter o' some two or three times  a day or thereabouts!"  For locomotive purposes last year  England consumed 9,251,563 tons  of cocil, Scotland 1,790,753 tons,  and Ireland 357,092 tons.  Minard'sLinimeni Cures Garget inCows  Unrefreshing but sound sleep near-  ily always shows that the blood does  not leave the brain by the veins at  jthe normal rate. Soaking thc feet in  ihot water, and using a high pillow,  ] will  be  beneficial.  When  tho little folks take colds  and coughs, don't neglect them  and  let them  strain the  tender  membranes of their lungs,  Give them  I"  The Lung  Tonic  will core them quickly and  strengthen their lungs.  It is pieasant to lake,  Prices,  2Sc��������� S0c, and St.00.   300  1 -il  1   I  l"t\  <'  3-  ISSUE NO. S���������05. S6K00L GLAOSE  9  Eastern Fress Strongly in favor  of Pei milting Legislatures of*  New   Provinces to Settle tht:  .   Educational-System.  ToiioN"-'.), Out., -Fob. ������7.���������The press  nf cistern Canada, w aliia.-l ;i uiiil. in  denouncing the t-chool o',*u;-*o lei in o!  the autonomy men-.-mv. Be;.'-, id less  of parly linos the met rrpoli'.an joiie-  nabi t,l' Toronto, (KUava, .\!<>w real.  Hamilton and London .'it-serf v.*till decided \ i';or Ui.it the debate on I his  feature  cii'.  llu;   bill i-l  convinced that tlie Dominion legisla-  tiim of 1S75, securing* the establishment df separate schools in the  Territories, does not make it obli-  gillory mi Parliament, now that a,  provincial conslitut it'll is being grunted  , to enuet  that   the  establishment  of  .so;  Varate schools shall he a, permanent  the   new    provincial  obligation   on  ���������eiris!,! lures."  Ottawa, Feb. 27  aro Keenly, discussing  issue   in   r;l!ic     autonomy  ���������The   mcnilci'3  eparate schools  bill.    The  .ll.T  Libera!:! pit cold feet tii-t3.*iy when  tlit'y learned that the 'I'monto Globe  flatly opposes tiio government's proposals in lliis respect.  Tin* liis-l'scries uf petitions lo parliament which may run up inlo lhe  thousands was presented by ������proulc  to-day.    It cami! from the eleclois of  \yiji. feature  oi".  Iiu;   Iiiil !*h(M:!ti lie in.-iilo so I "'���������"���������'., ���������������������������   "���������������*"���������������"*'���������"������������������*���������-   ^....������...  ...  'W$   warm as  to   r.-i'iv  the em-crn nt. |.��������� f Centre York, On!:., and prayed; ���������'���������Unit  -Ji'- recede.      Tin;   pitJifi*.s  (..encraiiv. even | ���������������������������   tf'*l**t***������'   provincial   .���������uUoiioiiiy   (o  :^frJ some   of   thoso   who  havo proviou-dv j Ulc' Territories I,arliam"tit will not by  0k  ??vS  TfvS  ?rrT  ^1^  %\n������y New Si  In Tweed effects, Broad Cloth, Worsted, Serges, Venetian, Lustres, Brown, Navy and Black. Many stylish effects are produced  by the great variety of strapping and pleats.  By offering the .best goods at lowest prices. : Everything guaranteed as represented, and if you find anything you buy from, us not  up to the standard, return the goods,and you will'get your money  back. If you are wanting anything in the above list, call in- or  telephone.    No trouble, but a pleasure to show you our goods.  AGENTS  FOR  BUTTERICK  PATTERNS  AGEf'lTS FOR  "*������   PA77E3SS  BSJTTEEHCK  4&J  --it  ~//>,\<*  y-'Jc  S'Jij.  J*V'<-  ���������>,r.\f-  -etiy-  **.*********** 99*9 9*9 9****0  \ A great  \  Convenience  Around a house is lo have* a  place to keep books. You  can get those sectional book  cases at the Canada Drug* ;&  Book Co.'s Store. They keep  all the sizes. You buy the  lop and the base and as many  intermediate sections as you  wish���������they fit anywhere.  Call ancl see theni or write  CANADA DRUC & BOOK CO., Ltd  Coming Events  March 0.���������The Columbian Ladies Trio,  Methodist church.  March   34.���������Harold    Xelson,    at   the  Opera House.  March 15. 1G. IS.��������� XV. B. Sherman  and Company, at the Opera House.  March 17.���������Irish Concert, at the Opera  House.  April IS.���������Tlie  "Nation Fair"  by the  Ladies' Aid of Methodist church.  April 10.���������"One Hundred Thousand  Pounds," Amateur Dramatic Club.  May S-t.-Eutertaimnent by Amateur  Dramatic Club, under auspices of  .St. Peter's Church.'  Birth  Jackson���������On  Tuesday,   Fed. 2-Slh, to  Mi. and Mrs. J.   II.  Jackson, a son.  A special meeting of the Board of  Trade will he held in Uie City Hall  tonight.  Mr. Avery, of the Arrowhend Lumber Co., arrived in town on Tuesday,  on business.  Harold Nelson and his company will  appear nt the Opera House on Tuesday, March llth.,  Mr. H. S. Cayley, barrister, went  down to Arrowhead this morning on  a business visit.  Prof. Chase held his w-eekh- dancing  class at the ..Sell.hlc Hall last night.  It was well attended.  Mrs. Ed. Jackson left on Tuesday  morning on a, visit to friends at  Mooseiiiiii. N. Y.~. T.  Mrs. Mcivitiick. l.ho popular proprietress of tlie Palace Bescaraunr,  spent Sunday last at Arrowhead visit-  inj; friends and renewing old ae-  '���������miiiitunccs.  Mi*. Cameron, of the Lake View  hotel at Arrowhead and Mr. Keid.  the well known merchant of that  town, came up on the sonth train on  Monday nijylit.  An Irish concert will be. held in  Tapniug's Opera House, on the 17th of  March.'-St. Patrick's Day. under the  auspices of tlie Ladies Altar Society  of the Catholic church.  Hear Uie Columbian Ladies Trio* in  the Methodist church next Monday  (.���������veiling at .S:15 o'clock, church seated  ro accomodate over 8(X'people. Plan  nt the Canada Drug & Book Store.  D. Cameron, of the Lnkeview hotel.  Arrowhead, and������W. Boyd, of Beaton,  were in the city on Tuesday.  Mv. D'Arcy, C. P. Ti. claims agent,  came up froin Ilie south on Tuesday's  train on liis way westward.  We are son1}- to hear that Jlr, Win.  Lawrence, of tlio Lawrence Hardware  company, is confined to his home with  la grippe.  Mr. H. Y. Andeison. secietary of  the Beatrice Minos, who was in the  city on Tuesday, leaimcd smith yesterday 11101*11 ing.  Miss Jean Orr came in on Tuesday  morning fiom Victoria on a visit fo  Mr. and-Mis*. 15. -V. Liu-on and lier  many friends in Uie city.  ������������������South African heroes will do well to  remember thit ihe pit **.-nt.ition of  theii' script holds goad only until  June. Sutli of this year.  Major Burnet te. P. L.S., spent Sunday in the city \i-iting hi- -ori-in-l.uv.  Mr. J. P.-Foide nl the engineering  department of the C. P. R.  The many friends of Mr. and Jlrs  Harry Morri-, wi!! :vgie! to hear of  tbeiv's.'w! bercivcnipni-". Thi- inurninsr  their ouly ch'.'-c\ a little jriil passed  awa y.  etjjBCBt35SfSaS2SiaES5S-3E2ti23S  _aCffiSSQ_2������5������23ia3aCISa���������  Tlie  Amatoi  secured   r'.onw  Hardware    O:  having  then)  furnished.  GI  ���������52*1  PER CEHT.  ON.ALL CASK PURCHASES  Of Hats and Caps, Gloves, Milts, Shiits, Blankets, Underwear,  Mackinaws, Clothing, ancl all furnishings, Men's, Women's ancl  Children's Rpbbors and IjidoIs.  Il.-'ve removed from my old qu irlcrs, neat* Depot, to Kiel/.' building  Pit*st Streot, West.  !> Ja Bey-rue, First Street  ������sras-j  'jzzrasGsm&szzgi sss  is in the hands of 3lr. Samuel Aithiu*  an expert irom Vancouver.  A number of petitions are in circu-  Ktion asking the Dominion (iuvei n-  inont to refrain from interfevence in  regard In education in the new  pi evinces, in the west. They are being  largely signed and will be sent to  Ottawa this wet:!:.  Jlr. Frank Morgan, recently  in   lhe  employ of "Most-is. liom no Bio-.,  h.i-  Dr.-.mp.l'.c  Club havei sf-vered his connection  with tl.at firm  in the new Lawienee  tnpiiiiy block, and i>  suitabiy   fitted  up and  1     Tlirough an order of the Lientenant-  ; Governoi-in-Couricil a close s<*a>on for  . heaver has been   declared for i.he next  I*    I-tilitier,  manager of the   f^e   years, beginning  from'''Februarv  Jtuies.   returned   last   week.  ist. p..it)r}. . ,.  Death  MmtRl.T���������At Hi'V'*!-U.ke. Marcli 2nd.  Ainv Ixjuise. th" ini'aiit datiuliter of  .Mr.'and Mrs. II. A. Morris. ~   Mr. I  Beat tii.  Ii-oin    Butte.   Mont..  ye.-tetday. en route  j"T^rineTOfiri^vith���������the  I compauy.  nd went south  to   Spokane  iu 1     Nine  nil>:im*?^0f~ir1ST-ii "rbi*r:  nlliee  *\-p*������i  LOCALISMS  Kvery piano player in fie.velstnke  '���������h'niiil hear that muster of the piano  i:!i!i*i;he I leering, eoneert pianist ami  vii.linistnf. whiim Uie Otieonta Slur.  S. V., says. "At the piano, Blane'ne  Deering is simply a mnvve!." Miss  Deering will play next Monday evening in tin; Methodist church.  J. D. Sibbald went south this  morning on a Imsine.-s visit.  J. A. Iiarragh went .-outh on a  vi-it! a  to the Fish Hi ver camps this morning, i  Mrs. P.. il. Botilthee came into town  fiom Arrowhead on Monday evening's  train.  Mr. il. M. Scott last week was appointed solicitor for the Molson's  Bauk.  Mrs. Geo. S. McCarter left yesterday  morning cm a visit to friends in  Calgary.  Supt. Kilpatrick returned on Tuesday morning from a business visit to  the coast cities.  Dr. Morrison has moved into his  new dental parlors in thc Lawrence  Hardware company's block.  The new branch of the Imperial  Bank at Arrowhead, was opened for  business last week. Jlr. Boull.bee i.s  the manager and Jlr. Geo. S. McCarter  ���������was appointed solicitor.  One of the favorite entertainers at  the great cultured Chautauqua gathering, is Jleress Mildred 'Thompson,  dramatic reader and impersonator,  says tlie Herald Transcript: "Jliss  Tliompson took the audience by storm  and it was with difiiculty the applauding was stopped." Hear her next  Monday evening in the Methodist  pliurch.  TO   CHOOSE    FROM  25c.  Each.  Writings'   From   all  Best Known  Authors.  the  Join   Our Library,   Only  io^ cents a   Change.  Walter   Bews,   Phm. B.  ]il!t:<ir;iS'J' AND STATKINKIt.  iV3'Se.y.t lo llle I hum: Hloek  HT'IUW/I.'  ftAjfmuu>ji,n iwimgas  sacks   of     Timothy   Baton's  ra=^v(=rs^rect?i-vci3=^s*=tli&*=poHU  this week for distribution in  Revelstoke alone. The po-lage on  this mat!i'i' Mould he about $27.  K. Adair informs the IlEUAi.n that  the patents for his stionp burning  machine are expected this week antl  by next week he hopes to be in a  position to start matters on rt- business  footing.  That beautiful s.iered yong "Cast  Thy Burden on tlie Lord," will bo  sung as ji quartet, on Sunday evening  in tlle Methodist church, by Jlt-sdauies  Lawrence and Dent and Messrs.  ���������Barber and Lawrence.  Tiie man Sehoiey, who was enn-  vicfed of slcding a coat from a, guest  at (lie Queens hotel, went to Kamloops Wednesday, accompanied by  Chief Bain, on a, government visit,  which will extend' over a period of  thirty days.  There will bo a special service for  the Sunday school scholars in the  Methodist church on Sunday niorning,  when the Paslor will give an address  especially to the little folk. Subject  for evening, "A Shrewd Ileal Kst.iuo  Dealer vs. A Wise Business Jfan."  All lovers of good singing should  hear the famous contralto, Kmrna  Housh Dnwdy, as I.he Boston Herald  says; "Miss Oa.wdy has a. beautiful  contralto, rich, warm and sympathetic." Don't miss hearing her next  Monday evening in thc Methodist  church.  On Sunday last a. number of peoplo  took advantage of the beaiilil'ul  weather to walk out lo the power  house. li'egardiiig I iio burnt out  ii.riiinl.iiru which was tlie sea t ol the  recent trouble, a. Hkuai.I) representative was informed that Ihe authorities expect to have the plant running,  again early next week.   Thc repairing)  and will go back lo hi-  lormer -inia  tion with   Ch.i-*.   Wan en.   at  Ciolden. ' ������������������  taking with him s the  good  wishes  of  the inanv friends he has made during  hi.s stay in Kevelstoke.  Jlr. J. A. Darragh, mannger of tlie  Silver Dollar Jliiies, returned JUmday  i.-vening from :i four months' visit to  Uie iii'iddle States. Dm ing. his trip  through the south and west Jlr.  Darragh did good missionary work in  -i-b4������-iru-i*S'������?t t:<- thft^iuiung^mduHtiy^if.  L-irdeau and Big Bend:  AV. J. George has nbout completed  his new store arrangement nnd is  moving in today. 'I'he work of connecting the two large adjoining rooms.  creeling new olllces ete, was carried  out by D. McCarthy nnd tiie result is  a line large store, with convenient  millinery and work rooms at Uie  buck.  Business Locals.  Smoko Brown's Union  Cljjar.  10c, per dozen at  Oranges  '���������. P.. I'.uuit  ".<*.   ami  ind Co.  -Mat of  Furnished  Booms  to  rent,  apply to John E. Wood.  Heinz's Sweet Pickles*", by thr; quart,  at C. B. Hume and Go's.  Smoke Brown's  WueSta "Cigar.  " flfiaroa  tytytytytytytytytytytytyty  '% For Ladies  I  ty of Taste  ty  TIhi������h f(ai!!tiH who w.'tnl Hh; l������:*.it.  Hiin;.'* fnr Un! T'..l������t S.,i|..-.,  t'owikTH, PillfH. Tnilet. V.'jitor.  Kl.f.. you want to rttln tlio Sl'.'.'l:  we en rry,  from     flnllciita     T'nrfumcry   In  wlioliMoma MlllIX*  M'llMl   tnin.i   till!  tyntein, ������*o liiivn nil tlio i,i.'i|iii������ll.t,a  at Mm  RecS Cross  .1. i'IUNAN", Milliliter.  f  ty  ty  It  ������������������Eva-vMili: Glean-Up.  Tlie first monthly clean-up at the  33va stampmill, since (lie mill le-  smiied its profitable occupation, took  place in the first week of February.  Alter deducting time lost on account  of the cold weather, which caused ice  to form in the Ihmie and incidental  delays that always attend the start-  ing-up of a mill that has been dormant  for several months, the returns yielded  ire quite s iti-l'aetory.  The Miner, was unable to procure  the weight and value of the goldbrick,  hut an issue of the "Nelson News just  received states the weight of the  brick to bp'lOuJ ounces. Placing the  value of the gold contained in the  brick at $Io per ounce, which is ahout  the usual run of the gold that has  1WrcrnfnTO~lwoh~6bM  Kva. the approximate value of the  goldbrick will be $2,032.50.  This is considerably lower than the  monthly returns yielded by the Kva  mill prior to its suspension last  August. But taking into consideration the fact Unit the mill was not  put into commission until .Tan. 4th.,  and the many delays that have occurred which will bring the working  time down to just a little better than  I.i days, the present clean-up is entirely satisfactory. It is anticipated/provided operations are not hampered bj'  the severely cold weather now prevailing, that the next clean-up will bo  oo a, par wi,(.li former monthly records.  ���������Cauihoi'iie Jliner.  Smoke Brown's "Special"  Cigar.  .-.-A fine range of Knglish  Linoleums,  at John Ii. Wood's furniture.Store.  Try it box of our Pewaiikee Apples,  they arc the best, G. 11. Hume anil Co.  A fi'CHh lot of JlcCormick's Biscuit."  jii.'it on packed at C. II. Hume antl (Jo's  !  favored   the  separate  school  sy.-tem,  say the whole subject should be left to  tin; legislatures of the new provinces.  This* is  the substance  of their objec-  i tions, that no  matter wliat  was done'  | iu tliis direction, it should be done by  tlie legislatures of the new provinces if  | the spirit of  British   popular government was to be maintained.  ,:  The Telegram last evening came out  with a. violent article. Tiie opening-  sentences are: "Canada has fallen  upon evils days when the premier of a  free government proclaims, the banns  of unholy,'iunrriage between . church  and state and the leader of the opposition utters no brave word of protest  against, the. course expedients dictating a union tii.it must, prove a curse,  to church and state alike.  One of tlie niosfcpei-sislent advocates  of letting I lie legM.i! me.*, of Ihe West  determine llu st hool qnes'ion i.-lhe  Toronto tilolu* Uie ieco.;iii/.ed Liberal  organ of tlie whole Dominion. The  G!ob'j is in revolt against Sir Wiiiritl  on thai; portion of the bill.  The press of Toronto is up in arms  against tiie proposal. Thu "Win Id says  "tliere never was such a far reaching  ell'oi't mnde to put the whole Dominion under tho domination of the province of Quebec." The Telegiam bavs  "Limioi's speech was sliii'f and rubbish.'' Laurier and Iloi den are tea lly  looking ,it lhe school issue as a question of polities, nol of principles. The  introduction of tho Laurier bill is  looked at'as a crime from the standpoint ot Uio country's future. But  Borden's advocacy of the Laurier lull  will lie worse than a crime; it will be  a bl under.  The Globe says : "The question at  issue is tliis, is ib right or wise for tho  Dominion parliament; to make the  maintenance of separate schools a permanent constitution obligation on (he  new western provinces?  " The Globe's answer to that question is not the answer given in the  measure now before parliament;.  "We are convinced that the spirit  and intention of the Briti-h North  America Act was to concede to the  provincial legislatures full control of  theii educational systems, .subject to  the right of the Dominion parliament,  in a specified case, to enact remedial  legislation.  ' " An exception made with regard lo  tliB'separate schools- in Ontario and  Quebec does not impair' that fundamental, constitutional -. principle of  provincial autonomy in education,  and the'- history of criticalioniil  controversies in New Brunswick,  Prince Edward Island anil .Manitoba  confirms the *< viowr  and   are  furtiiei  any enactment or otherwise withhold  from the. neiviy created provinces full  and unreslricted freedom of action, in  all matters affecting lhe .establishment  and mainteiianco and administration  of the schools."  A Professional Testimonial  (Fro.ira Prominent Musician).  Nelson*, B. d Feb.  20, l!i(������.  Mason fc Bisch Piano Company, Ltd.,  ;Nelson Office :  Gentlemen,���������Before leaving*..*Nelson ':.  for tlie Bast, I feel that it is- my duty  l r :-  to express to you my opinion ot your  pianos. :*.      ? , .  I was pa; ticulaily taken with tho  excellent quality of your medium  sized instruments and more especially  Willi the one 1 used for tho training  and performance of tlie opera Erminie  ���������it .N'ci-on.  In my visits to many of the Nelson  honii- 1 oh-erved a maiked preference  for your pianos and I consider this  speaks well for the musical culture of  many of the inhabitants of Nelson,  showing, a.s it plainly doe-, tint the  geneial public  judge of I hi  various makes of instruments  I will not go inlo details about (he  merits of youi" pianos as they have  been praised and accurately described'  by most ol the leading inu-icians both  in Biu'iipc anil in Gatiatla. but I should  like to sav, that I PttliFMRUKD TO  PAYl'Xm THFt USB OB ON 13 OF  YOlMi PIANOS, ALTHOUGH I  WAS Ol^liKBD lhe use ot several  OTUIill MAK I3S FIIBE.  This will show you moie plainly  than any winds of mine, how highly,I  estimate t hem.  ' Yours faithfully,  (Sgd.j"  MILTON C. SMITH.  s   very   WW I   able   to  musical   qualities  of  the  To   Kent,  after   March   1st, double,  room in Taylor Blnck, Mackenzie ave.  Apply at JIehalu office.       l'el>23 tf  WANTED���������A situation by a D. E.  Book Kcep-'i*, ins, had ten years  expei ience in general store aud six  years in saw mill. Address, J. C. T.  Box 01, ICainloops.  60 YEARS^  EXPERIENCE  Marks  Designs  Copyrights &c.  Anyone sontllnpc ft plcotcb nnd description may  quickly uncertain our opinion froa whether an  invention lit prolmbly Pntcnlftblo. Conununlca.  UoiiHRtrlPtlycoiilluoiitla]. HANDBOOK on Patents  eent fi co. Oldest tiuoney for securing patontii.  1'iitciits litkcn turoUKli Munn &, Co. recolve  sjieclal notice, without ofanrge, lu tlio  Scientific fttnericam  Alinnrinnmoly Mnfltrntofl weekly. J.nrKOBt clr-  cnlntton of nny HctcntMo journal. Terms, $3 a  your; four niontbn, $1. Sold byull TiowndenlorB.  MUNN & Go.88-1*"*1* New York  Branch omco. 026 F SU Waahlngton, D. C. _  '��������� Don't Buy'  A Piano  UntirYou"  See and  Try It!!  'TA  tytytytytytytytytytytytyty  - Bend  John E.  --fiiiy  Wood's,  tliiarters   for   Iron   Beds   at  AV'ood's Big Kiirniture Store.  your   ftirniliiro   nt   .lohn  bit; discount for cash.  ���������Tour  credit    is   [(not)   at  Wood's l'"iirniUii*r* Hlote.  E.  John   K.  I!(JI>J!.������   to    l!t*:.VT-  .Mail      Biiiltlint;.  T:i[>pill{r..  ���������In   the  Kootenay  Applj*     to    II.  WANTKD���������A  he   lirst class.  Bevelstoke*, B. 0.  Book-keeper,   must  Apply   to  Box   'JoS,  If, in tlie near future, you antici^  pate purchasing a PIANO, or if  you are musically inclined and  appreciate hearing and seeing  an instrument that will appeal to  you, call at our. Warerooms and  try thc new, artistic PIANOS  just arrived from the Best Factories in Canada. '  REVELSTOKE  INSURANCE AGENCY  LIMITED.  Wc Handle  Nordheimer  Williams'  Newcombe  Ste in way

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