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Revelstoke Herald 1903-03-26

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 LSTOKE  ���������AJ25TJD  'v   .-< ..?  *������������������'*>,  i/:  <k  A  i^ALD  RAILWAY    MEN'S    TOURNA  Vol    V.   No    IS I  REVELSTOKE B. C.    THURSDAY,   MARCH 26, 1903  $2 OO a Year in Advance  L.EV..TED.  We are ready for your Business now.    All   Our  Stocks  arc complete.     Everything clean,-new and fresh.  GROCERIES  Send us word and our  driver will call for your  orders.  Friday, and Saturday  Wc will sell Malta  Vila  Recttlar  20c for 15c.  BOOTS  and SHOES  Wc sell J. D. KING'S  UNION made Footwear for  Men, Women and Children  and can show a nice Ladies'  Shoe at. .<*. *?i*--5  LADIES'  KID GLOVES  ���������Special��������� Guaranteed  Ladies' Kid Gloves in black  and colors..  DRY GOODS  I'"or this week wc are  ready with  WALL  PAPERS  LACE CURTAINS  CARPETS  MATS AND  RUGS  PILLOWS  .MATTRESSES, etc.  Have a look at the Union  Wool Squares in our Carpet  Room at $4.50 and $5.  EVSEEM'S  FURNISHINGS  New Spring Shirts, Ties,  Collars, Mats. See the  Regatta. Shirt in New Colors at '��������� * .$1.25,  Visit Our  DRESSMAKING and  1 MILLINERS PARLORS  Itinerary of American Institute  of Mining* Engineers' Tour of  the Canadian Northwest and  the Yukon,     o  One liunclri'il aiul .sixty strung, the  member**; ol* tIio American Institute of.  JMiiiiiiir Eiifrini'ors will reach Vancouver on .Inly 1 Sth next, on their lour of ]  the mining districts of thc Canadian  Nortliwi'St mul tho. Yukon. One train  will Iciiw Montreal cm J11I3- !>cl������: an-  olhcr liv.in will leave St. Paul on July  10th, antl linth will nicot, at Moose  Jaw 011 July Uth. The Montreal  train will come west on lhe main line,  ami the ono from St. Paul on the  Canadian Soo. From Moose Jaw tlie  main line of the 0. P. 1?. will he taken  to Meilicino Mat, and the excursionists  will there branch oil' on the Crow's  Kc������t branch, finally reaching Kootenay Landing on July 13th. Special  steamei.-i will convey the party from  (here to Nelson, where one day will be  spent.     July  J.jlh  will   be devoted to  lto.sslni.rl: July Kith to CJreenwood and  the Phoenix camps. The party will  then return to Robson and take special  steamers for Arrowhead, arriving  there on July ITt.li. The trains of the  party will be brought around from  KootenHy Landing to Arrowhead, and  tlie mining men will entrain there for  Vancouver, arriving on July 18th. An  effort will be made ,(o induce the  party to spend a day in Revelstoke on  their way to the coast..  A special steamer will transport  them to Skngway, whero the White  Pass will have special trains ready to  carry them to Whitehorse, and special  .steamers to take the party down river  to Dawson .will .be in waiting at the  head of navigation. Three weeks will  he spent by the mining niei: in touring  the northern gold fields.   < ".*  organization:   to   be  named   by such  organization.  Placer Mining Committee���������J. 1.1.  Ilobson. F. Dockerill, \V. M. fltown,  Itobt. lijiliuid.  Committee 011 Legislation���������A. 0.  Call, V. Phillipps-Wolley, A. L  Jfelyea, K.C, S.S. Taylor, K.C  Printing and Literary Committee���������  Hon. D. \V. Higgins (chairman), A.B.  Fraser, sr., A.L'. Belyca, K.C, Henry  Croft, C Phillipps-Wolley, 11. C  Ucllinger, C. Foley.  BIG STRIKE ON  HORSESHOE  Wage* Increase   for  Trainmen.  S,m Francif-'co March 23.���������After a  long conference between the trainmen  of the Western Division of the South-  urn Pacific and lhe official.-*; of the  company, a sett lemonl has been  reached on a basis of Iii por cent  in the wages of the passenger trainmen. These increases will alfect  between IttOO and 1000 employes in  this division. Some minor details are  lo be adjusted, including the question!"  of abolishing "double header" trains  and extra hours of labor.  ���������The famous singer, Miss Jessie  Maclachlan, is coming an Thursday  Lhe 2nd April. Don't miss this great  treat.  UP-RIVER  IMPROVEMENTS  Made Recently.���������22 Inches Fine  Ore.���������Looks as if it Were a  Bonanza for Lucky Owners���������  Creates Excitement.  The Horseshoe property on Trout*  cicck, adjoining the Lucky Hoy.whicli  wa.s bonded recently by M.L. Moyer.of  Philadelphia,is developing very nicely.  A few days ago a strike ol 2*2 fucht's of  shipping ore was made. The ore is of  the sanieynuality as thnt being taken  out in tlie Lucky Boy. A force of 12  men arc being empliiyed.'at the prop-  erl y. Mr. Moyer is very'jnbil������nt over  the new strike whicli,when announced  in Trout Lake, created quite an excitement. The Horseshoe ami adjoining Lucky Boy properties are located  only about six miles from Trout Lake,  ft is lhe intention of the property  owners on Trout creek to approach  the government, for the purposv of  inducing I hem to hear half the expense  of putting iu n trail on a wagon road  grade from the mouth of Trout creek  lo lhe Horseshoe. This would shoi ten  the trail very greatly, in fact it would  allow ore to be landed in Trout Lake  an hour at. least, sooner than it does  now by the old route. There are now  in tins neighborhood of IS men working on the Lucky Hoy"and Horseshoe  claims.���������Topic.  only as shall be instructive. ' The  addresses will bear more especially on  subjects in which modern methods in  teaching have been introduced. It is  tii us hoped that this meeting of the  association will prove of great benefit  to all the teachei-s attending.  Exhibits of work done iu the Normal  school, the Manual Training schools,  and in several of the public schools  will be arranged.  Permission has been granted by the  Eiiuo.atUm department to all teachers  in attendance, to be Absent from their  respective schools during the week in  whicli the convention is held.  lt is earnestly desired that as many  teachers as possible will be present.  Tbe following programme has been  arranged for the different da vs:  TUESDAY, Al'lill. 1*1."  10 a.m.  President's Opening Address.  Enrolment of Members.  General Business.  Election of Officers.  FIGHTING MAC  ENDS HIS LIFE  ��������� p.m.  LIABLE TO  Would be Dunsmuir and C.P.R.  Officials for Similiar Actions in  New Zealand, so Says Dr. G.  B. Clark.  At a public meeting held in Vancouver on Friday evening in the interests  of the striken*:, several interesting  addresses   were   beard,   chief   among  ���������which" was-oiie-f com-DrrO-rBrClark,"  Ihe well known British Parliamentarian, who arrived .there last week  from Australia on. his way to the  Old Country. dome friends in  Vancouver rami liar with Dr. Clark's  reputation a.s a speaker and democratic thinker, asked hiin to attend their  meeting", which liu gladly consented to  do, as one whose sympathies have  aUv.ty** extended to the cause of the  people.  Il may lie noted Ihat Dr. Clark was  for twenty years a member of the  Imperial House, and for ji number of  years occupied the position of Consul  General of tbe Transvaal in England.  In" addressing the meeting Dr.  Clark said he was astonished to find,  as gathered from the papers since his  arrival, that in this Colony, where  there was no House of Lords, no old  conservatism, venerable by age,  conditions could exist as they had here  at the present time. He was scarcely  able to realize that it was true, when  he read tlie other day of a man named  1 DiinBinuii*, who locked out 1,500 men  because tliey wanted to unite. They  had had their Lord Penhyn, in Wales,  who tried tricks of the same character.  But they had legislation that could  stop that in the Old Country, notwithstanding Penrhyn.  "And   now   I  hear." said Dr. Clark,  ."that the Canadian Pacific Railway,  the great monopoly, has been   turning  .away its employes, because they have  dared to unite. I have just come from  New Zealand, ami before that was in  some of the colonies ot Australia.  where similar laws exist. By the New  Zealand law, the directois of the 0. P.  li. and Mr. Dunsmuir ivould be liable  to imprisonment, under very similar  conditions, and I think it is about  time that you had some legislation of  that character here. Why should  your community suffer because either  the employer or employed are unreasonable or stubborn?"  In New Zealand, where he had  recently been, the public had rights  that even  the big corporations could  not   trample   on.     Tn that colony the  legislation passed in recent years made  it possible   to   punish   capitalists who,  deliberately took such  action as Mr.  JJunsmiiir-'iu   lookingoufc  practically  some   1,500   men   and destroying the  trade of a town like Laciysinilli.   The  state held such  actions a misdemeanour sis much as strikes.  Another point  he made was that in New Zealand the  workingmen   were   compelled   to organise, aud   thus   be in  a position to  meet  the employers in  fair arrangements.    Any differences were subject  to  thai pronouncement of   a tribunal,  whose arbitrament was binding either  on one side or   the   other.     The Government  of   New Zealand was a Government   of   thc   people.    The Prime  Minister- of-New���������Zealand, Dr.-Clark  said, was  formerly a  working miner,  and for tbe past 11 years that country  hud   niadfr   moro   progress .under his  leadership'than in nny other period of  its history.     The opportunities of  the  workers   in   this   Province, largely of  mining,   fishing   and  lumbering, and  necessarily   chiefly   populated   by the  working class, were great, if tliey used  their franchise with, judgment and in  the interests of their class.   The remedy for their condition lay in the ballot  box, through  which alone the worker  could secure those legislative reforms  required to   meet his case.   As it had  been done in Australia, so it should be  done here.   "What they had to do here  was   to   organise,   to   mould     public  opinion, and   to   make   laws more in  conformity with equity aud justice.  . Mining Association.   *.  A neat little booklet giving the  constitution and bylaws of the B. C.  Mining Association, together wilh  list of officers _ and committees, has  just been issued by. Secretary A. L.  Belyea. K.C. The executive committee  has named the following sub committees:  Auditing Committee���������H. B. Thompson, C. Foley, Henry Croft.  Finance Committee���������To be composed  of  one   member  from   each   district  Six Thousand Dollars to Be  Spent on the Columbia River  This Spring.���������A Tram Round  Death Rapids.,  Messi-s. McCartcr and Jvincatd  had  an interview last week with tho lion.  Messrs.   Blair    aiid     Sutherland    in  reference to the building of an electric  tram round Death' Kapids.   The Kevelstoke Navigation  Co.    proposed to  .the", governine'ut^that' they. ; would  build the 'iraiiiway- aiid'*place -it in  operation for $"f,000 per mile  subsidy.  The Hor.   Mr.   Blair considered the  proposition a   fair  one  and   said he  would recommend to the government  the Navigation Company's offer.    The  local member, Mr. Galliher, asked for  $10,000   for-   the,   up-river   improvements and .<p������,000 of the amount has  been placed in  the estimates bv the  government.     It    is  Mr.    Gallihers  intention, as he explained it to Messrs.  McCarter  and  Kincaid to have the  money available at once so that a good  deal of work could he done before the  water became too high this spring.  TEACHERS'  ASSOCIATION  Annual Convention Will be held  in This City Next Month  Lasting Three Days���������An Interesting Programme.  The annual meeting of the Provincial Teachers' Association will be held  in thc Selkirk hall, Kevelstoke, on  April 14,15 and 10, 1003.  Arrangements have been made with  the "Canadian -Pacific  . Railway.--by  which a return ticket  will he   issued  for a single fare to teachers attending  this convention.     It will-be requisite  for each" teacher to pay the single fare  to Kevelstoke, taking a receipt therefor  on   Canadian    Pacific.    Railway  standard form which  will be provided  by   the   ticket  agent  on .application,  and  on "surrender  of   these receipts  within   three  days  after the close of  the convention,   free   tickets will  be  issued to   return   to  the  point   from  which full fare has been paid.  The executive committee has arranged a programme including such papers  Authorized  \. Sullivan.  "Drawiu��������� Use   of    the  Books,*' D  Blair, Esq.  "Geography of  B. C."  Esq.  7:.'5U p.m.  Keception to Visiting Teachers bv  KevelsLiike City Teaching Staff. Addresses of Welcome will be given bv  the Board of School Trustees and bv  His "Worship the Mayor. During the  evening an addre.is on "Pacific Coast  History,"' illustrated by 200 stereop-  ticon views will be given bv R. E.  Gosnell, Esq.  W1311XESUAY, Al*HI 1.13.  10 a.m.  Arithmetic - "On --**������gtio,*'    X   D.  H. Dun*  Black-  Buchanan, Esq.  "Hand and  Eye Training  nel, Esq.  2 p.m.  Drawing ���������"Illustrations   of  board Work." D. Blair, Esq.  "On Knglish," Miss M. K. Grenfel.  B.A.  "Some  Practical  Points on leaching," 11. Landells, B.A.  8 p.m.  ���������'Literature in Senior Grades,"  William Burns, B. A.  "The Education of Teachers," It. J.  Clark, M. A.  "School Libraries," D. Wilson, B.A.  During the course of the evening the  Hon. W.' W. B. Mclnnes. Minister of  Education, will deliver- an address to  the teaehei'S attending.  THUnSDAY. APKIL 1(1.  10 a.m.  "Oral Teaching in'History aud Geography,'* J. D. Buchanan.  "The Teaching of Morality," G.  Hindle, B. A.  "Primary Language AVork,*' Miss  AI. A. Winter.  2 p.m.  Nature Study���������"Mineralogv," Win.  Burii3, B. A.  "High School Entrance,*'J. S. Gordon, B. A.  Question Drawer.  Resolutions.  Major General Sir Hector Mao  Donald Dies By His Own  Hand���������Charged With Immoral  Conduct.  Lfi.vDo.v, March *������>.���������Mnjor-General  ���������Sir Hector MacDonald, against whom  charges of alleged immoral acts were  tiled some time ago, committed suicide)  in his hotel at Paris today by shooting  himself.  London, March 24.��������� The announcement from Colombo that Maj.-General  MacDonald is to he tried by court  mattialon a most serious charge of  immoral conduct, seems likely to.  prove to be the greatest sensation in  British military circles since the cas#  of Colonel Valentine Baker, who wa*  sentenced in August 1875 to pay a fine  of $2,500 and to undergo 12 months*  impiisonuicnt foi assaulting a lady ia  a l ail way carriage.  General MacDonald is regarded as  ona of Great Britain's greatest soldier*  He rose from the ranks in the Gonlon  Highlanders to his present position,  and the service list shows no more  honorable war record than that of  Sir Hector, while few officers posses.**  more hard won decorations. He is -  popular in the Army and with the  public generally. ���������  While the Army officials and many  of his brother officers were aware that  charges were pending against General  MacDonald,   no   intimation   of   their "  nature leaked out. until the'dinner of  Lhe officers of a Highland regiment on.   *  March 21st,  at which  General   Mac-" -  Donald was/iot present. Lor* Roberts  the commander-riii-chief. paid a tribute  In a speech "on that 'occasion,   to  the  Highland officers who had served with  distinction, but did not mention Gen.  MacDonald's   name.     Thi*   attracted"  notice, and the sensation was increased  when another speaker,  who was- not  aware of the facts in the case, lauded  General .MacDonald as a typical Highland     soldier,   and- found    that- his   -  remarks were received in cold silenc*  by the majority of tha officers present.  In the North and West-  Prof Hepburn's Dancing School  Prof. Hepburn's dancing class meets  both tonight (Thursday) and tomorrow night (Friday). The remaining  last half of the term five dollars. The  school will close on Easter Monday  evening April 13th wilh a ball. This  class of 30 members *all waltz, polka  and two step very creditably now. The  Ping Pong two step is the favorite  dance among his pupils. Join the  class this week and become proficient  in the most enjoyable of arts���������dancing. Last half term $5.00. payable in  advance. Next Tuesday evening.  March 3lst, tlio. public will be  admitted by request of his pupils. Nn  lYii'iual invitations will be sent out.  You are invited. No charge will be  made. Prof. Hepburn feels proud  over the progress his scholars have  made. Pupils and teacher have  worked very 'much in unison with  each other, If you are contemplating  attending the Easter balln, now is the  time to prepare for such events. At-  Ivnd Prof. Hepburn's dancing class.  ���������I  YOUR SPRING AND SUMMER WANTS  CAN  BE SUPPLIED  OUR   STOCK  Attractive Bargains.  was  never  so   large and varied as at prcsenL and full of Very  0PEKED AND PUT IN ST0CKF0RTY LARGE CASES OF NEW GOODS THIS WEEK  Dress Goods  Selections  Jutt nrriveil by Kxpicun XI Urcn. I.uii|!tlw  iianprhiiie nil tliat. in liswei-t in Fn'ncli  Cam-iiH Cloth. JSiioH-flnke,' Xapiitr, Home-  ."|.un, lireiiniUni**,uiul I.uKtn.**,, See tli������*K>  unit nuike jmir nelevtlun for :i Spring  C'nitiuiii".  Wash Goods  Rnirlifli Prints in Nov l)(!������ii;iis, light, ilnrk  mul medium uliailt-.s. .Spcui.il 7c. pur vd.  Wnnanteil Fust Color*!.  Mucks.' Drill-),  Deiiiuix   in  lmllgo   nine,���������  .Inn the goods for Imnl wear.  Flannelette  in \VIiit<*, Blue, Pink Stripes, nml i*hecli������.  from 5 cents per yard up.  White Quilts  Twelve ilozen White Honeycomb, .Marsell's  Satin Finish Jleil Spreads from *?1.(X1 up.  A good range of licdspreads for single and  double beds.  Staple Department  This Department is BRIM FULL OF  BARGAINS.     Hotels    anil   Hoarding  Ifouses  Special Prices for quantities.  Sheetings Bleached and Unbleached���������  81-4 Sheeting' at 2ze.  I'lllou- Cottons���������all -tvitlths���������  46 In. at 12 1-2c  lllcachcil Cottons���������SO inches wide���������at 7c.  l.an*u*n]c Cambric���������all prices.  Victoria lawn**. Cross Bar Muslin, Piques,  Nainsooks, etc.   A large variety.  Spring and  Summer Hosiery  Ju this line of goods we call your attention, pur Hosiery will rlvnl anything in  stock this season.     We guumnU'o to sell  vou goods tlllll   glvi'Slltlsfllctiou.  Blouses  Sevonlocii dozen in all the new ami must  correct stylos. Muslin in Tucked nnd  r'inhrolilci'i'il and New Stripes, colored  eirecls. Itlaek Suleeii unil I,nwii from  ���������".li" each up.  Men's Furnishings  Thirty dozen Men's Shirts, hi white and  coloreil, starched or soft fronts, with or  without Collars.  It is a fact that many more North  ern and Western people arc going  South than have baen going during  Ilie settlement of the United States.  We take for instance the section  known as the Pine hills of North  Carolina. A few years since there  was hardly a house for every 10 miles  square. .Last winter there was more  than ten thousand people who went  to that section from the Xew England  States, ninny from the Middle and  North Western. Investigation shows  that a great many are attracted  there  Mr. Chatnoerlain, replying to* *  correspondent, intimates that . the  British govornment can give do assistance tn emigration to the self-gorern-  ment colonies. They must jet alona '  ia any emigration scheme.  These are TOOKH BROS.* make,  the Best make of Shirts on the  today.  One of  market  Clothing:  .Men's and Boys' Iti-mly-tn-Wciir Suits  ���������Spring Overcoats, Wild Punts. Wo ennv  a good range both in pattern and sizes.  Men's All-Wool Suits at. S8.00.  Boys' All-Wool Suits at..$2.00  Footwear  Solo Agcnis for tlie Celebrated American  milkers, Lilly Brackett and the Jlnrlou*  Shoo Co., anil several or thu noted Canadian makers. Our variety Is large and  varied.    Don't fail to inspect these goods.  MILLINERY!  MILLINERY!  Our Grand Millinery Opening will be announced in next issue.  Season's display of Millinery the finest and best of our efforts.  MILLINERY!  We certainly will make this  REID & YOUNG,  DRYG00DS MERCHANTS, REVELSTOKE, B.C.  MAIL   ORDERS   PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO-  on tlie account of the fact  that  tho?e  who .suffer from  asthma  find  immediate relief from  that disease.   They  are so much pleased that they become  permanent settlers.   Some who hare  to work  to  earn   a living-engage in  growing fruits and vegetables for the  home  and   Northern  markets.   Last  .summer,   commencing   the    first   of  June and extending till the 20th  of  August,     there   were    thousands   of  dollars worth   of   fruit shipped from  that section to New York and  Boston  alone; and Mr. John T.   Patrick, of  Pinehluff, NY C, who is the gentleman  employed by the Seaboard Air Line to  look after those who want information  about   that   section  and   to   see the  wants of the settlers after they arrive  tells us that there is a large number of  Northerners  going   down.   Some   to  spend the winter others to investigate  in  regard  to starting vegetable aud  fruit   farms,  others  raising   poultry,  bee keeping and many to start manufacturing in' a small   way.   He says  they get but   of the  way  of  the big  corporations and that a skilled man  with limited  means can   build  up a  good business.  Hepburn's Dancing: School.  POLITE ART DANCING.  Juveniles are instructed in Society  Oancing and Deportment, how to sit,  stand, walk, to present hands, bow,  curtsey and conduct themselves prop,  erly. Parents will confer a favor by  being present as often as possible.  Lessons���������Juveniles every Tuesday and  Friday from 4:15 to 0 p, m. Twelve  lessons���������$5. For further information  call at tho hall.  fty ty ifr i|i f|i i|i i|i i^i ty ip ty il  BREAKFAST j  fOODS       3  (REAKFAST is the  most important meal  of the day. Each day  commences with it, and if  things go wrong at that  time, they are apt to go  wrong all day. Buy  > your     Breakfast     Foods  ��������� here,    and    you   will   be  ��������� sure of a good   meal and.  ��������� a good temper.  .  Brackman and  Kcrs  .      Rolled   Oats  in   8   lb.  bags.  Brackman & Ker's  Granulated Oatmeal in  r.o lb. bags.  Quaker Oats  in 2 lb. packages.  Rolled Wheat,  Cream  Wheat, Wheatine.  Wheat G ran u les,  Sib. bags.  Germea, 4 lb. packages.  Ralston's Breakfast Food  Malt Breakfast Food.  Robinson's Groats.  Malta Vita.  Grape Nuts.  Cornmeal, Graham Flour  Whole Wheat Flour.  Shreaded Wheat Biscuits  of i *  it  it  ty  ty  **  it  it  Hot Cake* made of Breoknuut ft  KWo or DO Monte Milling- Co.*������  Self Raising Buckwheat Hour are  Delicious.  BOURNE  BROS. 4*  l Headquarters for Groceries i t"  of Guaranteed Quality. j u  tyty ty ty ty ty ty ty ty ty tytyty  ty  + + y  Mainly About r-eopie.  if:'  I.  Ir'<  If:-'  )EED AND  H ARVEST.  D*CNCAT*rJ.    MoMlI.l.AX,   Pastor  New York Presbyterian Church.  "Be not deceived; God is not mocked;  Kot whatsoever n man soivcth that shall  fcjs also reap."���������Oalatians, vi., 7.  "Be not deceived." This ia the pro-i  position, lt conveys the lesson which  ("the apostle desires to teach. The rest  ���������4 the passage only illustrates an en-  Aorces the injunction.  Our text strikes at a common, every*:  Bay eta. The weakness l-liat lies at tlici  bottom of every sin is self-deception. A;  ���������san could never get his own. consent to  e*ta if fae did not first deceive himself'  ������r allow himself to be deceived. And  a*o Paul is striking at the tap root of  ���������he whole business of sin. The principle that underlies it i3 Uie indissoluble connection between present conduct and future experience; 'between tlio  thought which we indulge and the state  and habit of mind which result;between  ���������ihe principle we oherish and the peri |  enanent character which will be evolved.  "As eurely as the nature of the seed in-  ba-res in the plant that grows out of it,  ���������o surely will the nature of the though!)  and action which we indulge determine  the character which they produce. Nature U pitiless and inexorable. This  law which we are considering is as rigid  oa the law of gravitation.  God has eternally lixed those laws by  ���������which righteousness brings its own re*  ���������ward and -ii its appr.>p.'i.it." pun's ment.  Paul   says  do  not deceive  yourself  by*  supposing for one moment that this law  ���������will somehow not operate in your case,  ���������or that God will cut the connection between cause and cll'eet for your special  benefit.    Against such a delusion   Paul  ftmrls      the     startling     words,    "God  Is     not     mocked."     It     is     a     law  of      nature        that        Ihe        reaping  tag snail correspond to tlie sowing,    it  ts impossible for men  to break the divine order established  in the very na-  fture  of  thing3.    lie  that  sows cocklo  ���������ball reap cookie,   lie that sows thistles  ���������must not expeot to reap wheat.  We understand all that, as it applies  ko vegetable life. We may also see it  ���������plainly working in human affairs. Commercial industry tend3 to commercial  ���������wealth. "Scest thou a man diligent ire  Business T lie shall stand before Kings."  The law applies also to the intellect-;  ���������Ml life. It is only to tho diligent stu-  ���������ijent that culture comes. And it is only.  ���������(to him who exercises the virtue of truo  ���������affection that loyal friendship is return*.  ���������jd. It would be vain to expeot thab  money would buy learning or refine-  tOBent. And it would too equally vain to  suppose that learning and refinement  ���������would lead to wealth, for there is no  tsecessary connection between them as  cause and effect. Kach pursuit has its  consequences according to its own nature. Thus we see in the boy tho pro* !  phecy of the man: in .the ��������� spendthrift i  ���������the "prophecy of coming penury nnd j  -want; in the budding genius the promise of future glory, and in a career  ���������of careless living and disregard oE God's  laws the inevitable consequence of disaster. One who habitually breaks the j  S-i bbath cannot expect the fruits of Saib- j  baths well spent. i |  So the law applies to spiritual sowing j  and reaping. God rules the tv.-o worlds, j  ���������ol matter and spirit upon the same.  ���������principles. Like produces like. Na-, j  ���������biral laws rule in the spiritual world, j  The future depends upon the past and j  the present. Our conduct is shaping our  ttestiny. i  If these things affected only the body,  ���������flien \the pampered body might perish  ���������srith transitory things and so come to  ���������a *md. But they affect the soul also,  for soul and body are intimately con-  ���������a****"*t**d. What affects one affects the  ether. How disappointment in business  prostrates a man I flow the failure of  ������*-ur plans in social and domestic affair.*!.  ^������s-'*vell-^s.v-*ir.=*bus'>.e.**-s,^depr(*oseei;JJi<v  ���������plrit ������ So the soul is affected, de-i  pressed or elated, by success or failure.  And. mor-vover. it becomes refined and  purified by holy exercises or corrupted  by evil habits or thoughts, according to  ���������the Eame laws of causation. Its faculties may become dissipated and decayed.  So that sowing to th<* llosli affects not  ���������anly the flc-h, but the mind and tht  aotil also, and produces moral rotten-  ���������oess and spiritual death  EHzabeth Cady SlMilon was once giving a piece of ndvica to a. roomful of  young men in a little village on the subject of matrimony. '���������When you marry,"  alio saiil,:r-ij:!iiiosi> a wcunaii with a spine  nnd a sound set of teeth." "Good gracious! .Mrs. Stanton," remarked ono of  ber listeners, in iilarm, "do tliey ever  come without spine**.*-"  Professor rowers of Cornell's political  Economy depart .ment was discussing the  changed attitude that people have assumed (and in his opinion rightly assumed) inward the conveniences and the  luxuries of life. "At a. "Methodist church  soiiveiilicin," be said, "the delegates wero  talking on that subject, when an old  jfraybcnrd arose and exclaimed angrily  to the presiding bishop: 'I suppose you  came here in a private ear?' 'Yen' "the  bishop answered j 'do you know any way  more comfortable V"  When Labouchcre wns an attache of  lhe British Ambassador to the United  States a Briton of tho consequential species descended on the ministry a.b Washington demanding to see his country's  representative, "lie's not in," said Lobby. "Then I'll wait," said the Briton  pompously, seating himself. At thc end  of half an hour mime the query, "When  ���������er���������do you���������er���������expect Lord Lyons  back I" "Ch, in six months or so," said  tihe ever-obliging attache. "He left for  Europe this morning. But you said you'd  wait, you know."  A manufacturer not one hundred miles  from the city tells a good joke on himself.   Ho is credited with being extremely disagreeable to his employees.   A man  just arrived in this country called on him  one day to ask for work. "Have you a recommendation  of  character?" he  asked  the stranger.    "No," he replied, "but 1  hava friends in the village who will give  me   one,"    Putting   his   bundle  on  tho  floor, he left.   In the course of half an  hour he. returned, took   up  his  bundle  and was  leaving  the  office  without  a  word.    "-Did  you  get your  character?"  asked   thc   manufacturer.       The     man,  without halting a moment or raising his  eyes, said: "No, mister, but I got yours."  Kitchener's scathing  sarcasm is well  illustrated by  the  reply  he  is  3aid to  have sent to the leader of a not over-  successful column.    This officer had several slight engagements; with the enemy,  mainly consisting of flinging a few shells  at them at long range.    After each engagement he wired  to tho commander-  in-chief   substantially:    "During  action  several Boers seen  to drop from  their  saddles."   The thing was becoming tiresome, for Lord Kitchener's rule was that  only those.actually "gathered" should bo  counted. ������Hc; soon thought of a remedy,  and sent back to tlie officer this polite  telegram:   "I hope wlic'n  they fell they  did not hurt themselves."  Foi������ the Farmer.  Improving the Live Stock.  Breeding is a science when it is dona  for the purpose  of arriving at results  which  are  sought as a  possibility, although the breeder may begin in a manner that does not apparently warrant  hiin   in   proceeding   with   his   venture.  Some  breeders,  among  them  Bakcwcll  and Western, were 30 years In perfecting  one breed of sheep and  swine.    Kvery  animal sold by theni put the purchaser  30 years ahead in the line of improvement.    They  simply  selected  the  best  for breeding purposes every year, and  were compelled to in-breeil the animals  in order to lix tlieir characteristics.   Tlio  farmer   must   pursue   the  same  course  with his herds and crop-**; and he must  make his selections every year by discarding every animal    Unit    does    not  come up to a certain standard of excellence.   He" must never become discouraged, as even the most skillful breeders  succeed     in     securing     but     a     few  very    valunblo    specimens    in a year,  though an improvement will be noticed  overy  season.    Tho  gain  is .but little,  and skill is essential, but in  tinio the  stock differs greatly from the original.  Should extraordinary excellence be observed in certain individuals the breeder  may abandon his plans'and methods and  start on new  lines  of breeding, as ho  learns by experience during his progress  and takes advantage cf accident or discoveries, but he always adheres to his  original object of making a breed that  is to be adapted to a special purpose.  Even among the best breeds    of    live  stock some individuals will be more valuable for certain uses than others, and  those with the highest record may not  display  their best points  of  excellence  until "selected    for    breeding.���������Philadelphia Record.  Preserving' the Dead.  The Scotch of Glengarry arc largely,  probably .mainly, of "the old faith," and  this story told by Senator McMillan,  touches upon that fact, and also introduces one of the old-time giants of that  county. This particular giant was Big  Alex.,McDonnell, uncle of the bishop of  the same name. "Big Alex," the senator began, "was probably the only man  who went over the Chaudierc Falls and  lived. Shortly after his escape ho visited his uncle, then a simple priest, and  his marvelous escape, with the incident  of hanging desperately to-a floating crib  while being tossed about in the turbulent waters, formed tho subject of conversation. *. 'It must have been a great  comfort to you to know that the saints  were with you in your peril,' remarked  the priest. 'Oh, yes,' responded Alex,  but it was also a comfort to know I was  a tamn good swimmer.'"  The following incident occurred at an  entertainment in a large provincial town  in Kngland. On the programme a certain vocalist was down ~to sing "The"'  Miner's Dream of Home," and to add  special .effect to the song he, having a  friend a fireman at the fire station, about  three minutes'.-walk from the hall, ran  out and borrowed his topboots. His  turn on the programme came, around. He  appeared on the? stage in all thc glory of  n blouse, slouch hat, white breeches and  (the fireman's) topboots. His rendering  of the song was a great success  Foods "For Egg Production.  The subject of egg production is one  upon which the farmer is always ready  for infonma.tion, and, although there is  not very nnich to bo said on the matter  that is original, still it may perhaps be of  use to some of the readers of this journal if I give a few details as to the composition of the different    foods   which  farmers give to their poultry, with the  idea of pointing out which of them are  most likely to result in making the hens  lay well.   It needs no very high degree  of intelligence to understand  that if a  ���������hen is to lay .well, she must be fed well-  arid not only fed well, but fed with particular kinds of food which are required  for the composition of egg substance; and  eo the-best way to enter upon our present subject is to inquire first of all what  an egg is composed of, and then.ive can  soon determine what kinds of food contain most of the principal   -ingredients  which are to be found in an egg.   There  are three parts to an egg���������the shell, the  albumen or white, and the yolk'. Without   entering   into    analytical    details  (which would confuse many readers), it  may be  pointed  out .that as  so large  a proportion of the egg is made up of  albumen, the food: given must be largely of nn albuminoid nature.   The value  of an  egg as an article of. diet,,is due  principally to the nitrogenous matter it  contains, and unless a hen is   provided  with food which; is rich in nitrogenous  matter���������-that is to  say, food in which  nitrogenous constituents are not    overdone by the carbonaceous    or    6tarehy  constituents���������that  hen  will  not    make  a good layer. ; The point for us to consider, then, is what are the foods which  are  richest  in  itrogenous matter?���������or,  rather, what arc the foods in which nitrogenous matter   is in the   ascendant?  first of all, with regard to the different  kinds of grain, analysis show3 that   the  legumiuous seeds are, on    the   whole,  richest   in   albumen.' and   therefore,   in  mixing a meal for laying poultry, it will  be well  to use a percentage  either  of  bean meal or of pea meal.    A mixture  of equal narts c-f pea meal, barley'meal,  oatmeal, and pollards will make as good  a diet  for laying poultry as anything.  It will contain nlentv of aiburocn and a.  top   of   his   voice:   "Bill,  you've  got  come out of them 'ere boots if you value  your life.   I'm called to a fire!''  up to  the middle of the second verse, when a. 6Unjciencv of faVforming matter, which  commotion was heard at tbe entrance of j -J3 aIso n"ecc*s*.arv in moderation for egg  the hall.   Then a hot nnd eager fireman   production.   This can be varied   in win-  forced his way through the audience up i [er tin]e bv tbe addition of a little Indian  to the footlights and bawled out at tho j B,eal- -which,  being of a more   .stareby  "Bill, you've  got  to | nature> -p-iii assist in keeping    up    the  temperature of the fowls' bodies���������a very  aecessary thing in cold weather.  ' Now,  m regard to grain, oats   are    without  doubt  the best corn  for  poultry,     because they ore rich in nitrogenous ami  also in fatty   matter;    compared   with  maize, they are richer in both respects,  whilst at the same time thev have nothing like the amount    of starch    which  maize possosses.    Next to oats, English  wheat is to be recommended; but that  Ts^fiiUver^denCTerrt-in= f ais,==A fier^thafc.  come barley and buckwheat,    both    of  Her First Night at the Theater.  A lady who resides at Streatham Hill,  according to an English exchange, has a  girl in her service fresh from some re-  cion far removed from the theater.  Thinking to give thc girl a treat, and  -knowing^that-^shc^had^ncver^been^to^a,  theater, the lady purchased a ticket for  a play at Balham Theater. The* girl  went/and returned before nine o'clock.  "What is thc matter? Did you not  like it?" asked the mistress.  "Oh, I liked it, mum, it was fine."  "But," enquired her mistress, "why  have you returned so soon? Surely you  didn't see it all."  "Yes, mum, I did. T went in, sat down  and  looked  at the large pieter hanging  In  spiritual  alfuirs.  a* in    material, i ������P  in  front.    People  kept  a-eomin'  in.  bo one need expect or hope to sow ono  ���������thine and reap another. Those who reck-  Jfssly sow ti thc fle=h must reap t.heir.  ���������harvest of blighted fortune, shattered  Stealth, disappointrd hopes, soured tem-  ���������aer, Infamy and shame.  God leaves us free to sow whatever.  . sort of seed we will, and no one can  fclame thc Almir'nty if, having chosen  the kind we prefer lo sow, we reap  ���������onr own harvest. It would not be liko  ���������God to thwart us by giving any other  kind of hr.rvest than that for which we  fcave  chosen   to  sow  seed. i  Do not expect consequences which the  Saw   of   sowing  and   reaping does    not  Justify.   Do not h.  surprised if bad men  who  are  industrious are  prospered    in  business.    That is just what they have  ���������been sowing =eed for.    if they are diligent  and   faithful   about  thoir  sowing,  of course they will reap the appropriate*,  "harvest.    That, is all right and according  to  t'i������  law.    And  do -not  be disappointed  or  think  it  strange  if good  men  who do not  sow wisely nor work!  ���������diligently   are    unfortunate    in     their*  business  affairs.    That  is  also    in  accordance wit-h the same law. Kach roans  ���������as   he   sows.    "Be   not   deceived,"   you  ���������need not expect a material harvest from  ���������spiritual  seed-sowing.    "Be  not deceived," you will never reap a spiritual hnr-  Test  from  sellfch   and    material    eced-  ���������scaing.    Nov,"  determine   the  kind    of,  Janrvest you want, then sow that kind I  of seed and you will reap in due season |  tt you faint not. !  and pretty soon there was quite a crowd  ill looking at the pieter. Then they took  it away and some men and women begun a-talkin' up there about somethin'  that didn't concern mc, so t got up and  come away.   But I enjoyed the pieter."  Up to Date.  Great Publisher���������Mr. Quill, your novel  i3 o very good one.  Mr. Quill���������Then you arc going to publish it?  Great Publisher���������Yes, if you will only  make a few slight changes. Just change  the marriage of your heroine to her  death on the eve of the bridal; kill your  hero in a railroad accident; and close  the book with the funny man standing  between two graves in the twilight, and  it's a go.  The Use of Logic.  A great deal is said in these days  about the value or valucles-mcss of logic.  In thc main, indeed, logic is not a productive tool so much ns n weapon of defence. A man building up un iiil.ellccluiil  system has lo build like Xr-herninli, with  the sword in one hand and the trowel in  the other. The iiii.iginntiori, the constructive quality, is tin* trowel, and argument is the sword, A '.vide experience  of actual intellectual affairs will lead  most people to the conclusion that logle  is mainly valuable as a weapon wherewith to exterminate.logicians.  which make excellent variety in food.  Passing from grain to other* substances,  it will be well to point out tliat one of  thc best foods for poultry is milk; and  wherever "skim" milk  is available,    it  should always be used in*tend of water  for mixing up with  the poultry    meal.  Many (nri.ier-i' wives 6we their success  in  poultry-keeping to the line of   meal  both   for" thc laying hens  and  oho  for.  rearing  the  chickens,    fn'ccts  such  as  beetles are largelv conipn-cii of nitrogen,  and that is one of the reasons why chickens which are reared in woods and coppices generally thrive so well���������they get  plenty  of insects.    The same thing applies to laying poultry���������no hens lay better  than  those which are    allowed.': to  ramble  through   a  small  wood  or coppice.   Next to insect life, lean meat is,  of course, rinh in nitrogen.   Lean meat  can neither be given in the fresh state  nor in the dried state���������in the dry state,  of course, a smaller quantity  needs  to  be given, because of the absence of moisture- which in fresh meat has not been  taken away.    On  an average, one portion   of  dry   lean   meat   should   go   as  far a3 five portions of fresh lean meat,  because lean meat contains from 60 to  70 per cent, of water.   Granulated bono  is another food rich in egg-forming constituents,  and  the addition of about 5  per  cent,  of  crushed bone    or  of  tlio  dried fibrine mea.t just referred to will  very much improve    the    egg-producing  qua.lit3"   of   any   food.     If   people   who  arc  so   fond   of  using Indian   meal   for  tlir!*  poultry would   increase  the  proportion >*f nitrogen it contains by adding  crushed bone or else meat,  they would  attain batter  results.      A  mixtuie    of  equal parts of oatmeal and Indian meal,  with  tho addition  of nbout 5  per cent,  of each, meat and  bone, is as likely a  food ba any to bring poultry on to lay  at  this  time  of  the year,    when    the  weather is cold    nnd    unsettled.���������Mid-  lander, in "Warmer and    Stockbreeder,"  London,  England.  There has just arrived irt. London from  Queensland a scientist who, in the mysterious interior of Australia, "has made  certain discoveries which, says The Express,  if   accepted  by   the   medical   faculty in England, will prove of  extraordinary   value   to   the   whole   human  race.       One    of    his    discoveries���������tho  weirdest,  if not the  most important���������  arrests all change in the appearance of  tho   human,   form   after   death.       Tho  maker of  this  astounding discovery  is  Mr. A. R. Taylor.      Particular interest  has been aroused in the ease of an old  man of eighty-one, who died last year,  and   whose  body   was   handed   over   to  Mr. Taylor by the authorities of Sydney  for  the   purpose  of   experiment.      Mr.  Taylor shows this subject, which is in  a perfect state of preservation, as a triumphant proof of the value of his discovery.     "He will remain as ho is," said  Mr. Taylor, "to the   end  of all  time."  Mr. Taylor went on to explain how he  made his discovery.     "For many years,"  lie said, "my fntlier carried on an elaborate system of research with this ono  object in view.     After his death I carried on his work.     By a stroke of good  fortune I came across some manuscripts  of  the  early  Egyptians.      From   thorn  I found wha't my father and .f had boon-  searching for during many long years.  I found how a solution, part vegetable  and part mineral, could be. made which,  so    far   as  outward   appearance   went,  would  stay   forever  the   handiwork   of  death.      There was no need to use the  swathings  employed by  the Egyptians.  By injecting the solution under the skin  the body would .lie petrified."  Chinese Bankers.  Tn an interesting article dealing witli  the Chinese residents of Seattle, Tho  Post-Intelligencer of that city says :���������  And speaking of banks recalls another curious phase of the Chinese character that soon becomes apparent to one  Who has a passing knowledge of lifo  in "Chinatown." A Chinaman has no  ���������maimer of usa for banks, legitimate  banks, bhe custodians of the wealth of  the nation. He never visits one except  on those occasions when he wishes to  send the money he has earned in America to his relatives in China. In all  other things he acts as his own banker..  Now a Chinese bank is about as peculiar an institution as one can lind in  a five-minute walk from the City Hall.  Thc 'mqtiiods of the small merchant who  has money to put nway for safe keeping arc as peculiar a.s were those of  3>rct Harto's "Heathen Chinee." The  'banking system is brielly this:  Five or six small merchants or tradesmen will join in the purchase of a safe  -������������������-Ameriean built and of the latest pattern. : It may be ilint as many nt** fen  men will thus Income the joint owners  of a fire arid burglar proof strong-box.  Having acquired lhe safe the services  of an expert locksmith are called for.  ���������Ry him the safe door is fitted with ten  complicated Jocks, each one different  from tbo other. When his work is  complete the safe door cannot bo opened unless each of the ten locks has first  been unlocked. Each of the .ten owners  is given a key to a lock and the banking arrangement is complete. The'safe  then becomes *,hc joint repository of  the-funds of the several partners, each  having a separate compartment inside  the much-locked outer door. Behold  now  the working of the scheme:  Ah Fat, being one of tho owners,  wishes to make n deposit or to withdraw all or a portion of his funds. He  first finds and notifies each of the other  nine key holders that he wishes to open  the safe, ff all of the bankers can be  rounded up they repair to tho safe nnd  each one opens the lock that is tho  badge of his ownership and bhe safeguard of his wealth. This being dono,  the safe doer is opened and nine interested bankers remain in close attendance while Ah Fat fingers the coin  that is his and his alone. Tho safe  is then closed and caoa of the ten  bankers solemnly turns the key in his  individual lock and returns to the pursuit of his own occupation.  Unvarnished Truth.  Under the caption of "The Unvarnished Truth," Tito Now York Evening Post  Bays:���������Ex-Gov.   Boutwell's     speech    at  Fancuil hall on New Year's Day was a  notable appeal to  the  beclouded  spirit  of liberty in the United    States.      Although addressed primarily to the color*  ed population, it is equally well adapted  to all Americans.    Mr. Boutwell spoko  to the negroes in .behalf of the Filipinos,  because thc negroes have been emancipated, while the Filipinos have been lately subjugated���������both by the United States Government. Ho tells the unvarnished truth when ho says that "tho Republican party  has become  tho enemy of  universal liberty."   The inciuisition had  nothing worse to show than the torture  and death of Father Augustine at tho  hands of   American   officers���������a    crimo  which is now said to be under investigation after useless attempts at concealment.   And this is only one of a scries of similar acts perpetrated in order  fo suppress the liberty of a distant people who never did us any  harm until  we  carried  fire  and swofd  into  their  country and their homes.    We gave to  this invasion of a free and friendly people the names of civilization, Christianity, law and order. . We  said  that it  was all for their good.    Wo have proclaimed that our officers in the Philippine Islands were performing their duties satisfactorily and successfully, whereas the islands are in a condition of famine, pestilence and general misery more  pitiable than under any period of Spanish rule that can now be recalled.    01  course, we lose  sight  of theso    things  easily, because  they  are so far  away  and so little news that is unfavorable  leaks out.    So it is all the more ncees-  Bary  that  the voico  of some  Prophet  Elijah should ery aloud and spare not.  Such a voice is "that of Gov. Boutwell,  and never wa3 it pitched upon a nobler  key than on Now Year's Day in Faneuil  Hall.  "Humor of the Hour.  Pat���������You say if I use one of those  patent dampers I save half me coal ?  Agent.���������Exactly, sir; exactly.  Pat���������Be gobs, I'll take two.���������Harvard Lampoon.   ���������  Jaggles���������Which country has the largest standing army in the world ?  Waggles���������This one, if you count tho  people who ride in the New York street  care.���������New York Sun.  "Are you fond of birds?" she asked  innocently, as she stood at the piano  fumbling the music.  "I dearly iove them," ho replied, wilh  never a shadow of suspicion.  Then sho ran her slender fingers over  the keys and began to sing, "Oh, Would  1 Were a Bird."���������Chicago News.  Neiveome���������They tell me hens never  lay eggs at night. iDid you know that f  JSjibbubs���������Oh I   yes.  Newcome���������Strange, isn't it T  SuWbubs���������Not at all. All the hens  are roosters at night, you know.  Sohool���������The boy was going away to  school, full of high hope.  "I shall make the football team and  color two pipes the first year I" he said  bravely.  His mother kissed him and wept. His  father wrung his hand in silence.  They were too full to speak then.  But when he was gone, and they were  calmer, they talked together of him,  and prayed that his ambition might not  earry him beyond his strength.���������Life.  Shipping- Casualties.  The official record of shipping casualties, compiled by tha Board of Trade,  was recently issued, says The London  Daily Telegraph. From the tables givin  during the last 25 years there occurred  6,770 wrecks and casualties to ships bs-  Jongjngjo^the United Kingdom, attended with fatari^surt^~f.o~ii]T80.T"pcfsons,  of whom 30,0*18 were members of crcwi  and 6,770 passengers, pilots, or otlnr  persons. The average annual losi during the 25 yearn was 1,072 persons, consisting of 1.4-11 crew and 231 passengers. The lo=s in 11)00-1001 w.ii l.O'll  pen-ons. of whom D.j" were erew i*id  54 were passengers. The loss of seamen  in 1000*1301 was lower than in a*iv previous year except 1SC7-08. 1'ho losi of  life in 1835-06-was -swollen by the loss  of 247 lives through the wreck oc ll.o  ���������Ortimmond Castle, and the loss of 277  lives through the sinking of the On Wo,  of London, by collision. The number of  passengers lost in 1894-95 was swollen  by 1,150 Chinese soldiers droivn.id by  the sinking of the Kow Shing of London. The average number of a"airion  lost during, the 25 years in sailing -.easels was 938, and of passengers i"0,  against 574 seamen and 12 passengers  lo3t in 1900-1901. The average number  of seamen lost in steamships was 503,  and of passer-gem 181, against 383 seamen and 42 passengers lost in 1900-1901.  The loss of life in steamships in 'HiK-:ia'  was swollen by the loss of 100 iives (0i  men nnd 42 passengers) through the  wreck of the Mohcgnn, and of 105 lives  (II) erew .and 8fi passengers) through '..he  wreck of tht* Stella. The total number  of sea. casualties to vessels of all kinds  belonging to British poase-isiom .ilcond,'  which occurred in 1900-1 IK)I, was CM.  Tlie total loss of life in I9O0-190I was  209, against (542 in the previous year.  The record ceases with June 20. i90l.  La Montt���������This paper contradicts itself. At one time it remarks that the  esteemed citizen lived to "a green old  age" nnd at another "a ripe old ngo."  La  Moync���������What's  the  difference ?  La Mofitt���������Why, if anything is green  how can it be ripe .'���������Chicago IJaily  News.  What the Patient Did.  Many stories are being told of thc late  Rev. Dr. Temple, Primate of England,  among them tho following:���������He had a  habit of emphasizing his words by gestures. When he received his first episcopal promotion from Exeter to London  he left behind him, to his sorrow, a  faithful dependent in Devon County Asylum. Visiting Exeter soon afterwards,  out of the kindness of his heart he  called to see this patient. Returning  to town, Dr. Temple was met at Pad-  dington by nn old- friend, and drove oil  with hiin to Fulliani in an open victoria.  Presently the Bishop began to tell his  friend of bis visit  to the asylum.  "I was hoping," he said, "poor Y ���������  might soon be discharged, whon. just  as I was leaving, he put his thumb to  his nose, and "went���������just so���������at me."  Ai Dr. Temple said this he graphically  illustrated the contemptuous gesture.  The same moment the carriage turned  info Fulham High street, and tho horror  cf Ihe spectators can lie imagined at  seeing the Bight. Rev. tho Lord Bishop  of London, whom they wero ju3t beginning to knowby sight, guilty of such a  vulgar   act   in "broad   daylight.   ������������������ '  They had looked soulfully into each  other's eyes for some time, but somehow he didn't seem to come to the  point. Then suddenly he made a discovery.  "You have your mother's beautiful  eyes, dear," he said.  She felt that the time had come to  play her trump card. "1 havo also,"  she said, "my father's lovely check  book."  Within 30 minutes the engagement)  was announced.���������Tit-Bits.  A farmer who had arrived in town on  business dropped in at the cat show to  see puss at her best.  "It's rather ridiculous for a farmer  to buy a cat, because I know there's a  dozen round the farm, but that's a  beauty, and 1 believe I'll get it for my  little girl. Do you suppose it's for sale,  porter, and what is tlio price ?"  "A hundred and twenty pounds."  "Great turnips," he gasped, "that's  moro than 1 give for a whole waggon-  load of pigs I"  Precedence at State "Functions.  The question of precedence at State  ceremonies has been agitating British as  well as Canadian church circles, and  Thc Dundee Advertiser thus facetiously  comments upon a recent decision of the  King. Tbe Moderator of the General  Assembly of the Church of Scotland is j hard "coal"'  At a twenty-first birthday party tho  other day, says "London Answers," a  mother was praising the,talents of her  son, and, being anxious to make liim  appear at his best before tho company  present, asked him to show the company the prizes he 'had won.  One of tho guests, picking up thc best  article, said: "And what did he win tliia  prize with ?"  "Oh, that was for running," said the  proud mother.  "And who presented it to him ?" asked the guest.  "We did," said the mother.  "How vwaa that ?"��������� asked the guest.  "Why, you see," said the proud mother, "he'd have won, but he didn't hear  the pistol go off."  ��������� .  "Ah," said the Count, "zis ees not ne  lady I would have for my wife. She ees  what you call plain."  "But her father owns a coal mine," replied the General Manager of thc International Tide and Trust Syndicate.  "I care not for zis gold mine.   I "  "Not gold mine.    I said coal mine���������  a proud man to-day. For some unexplained reason his Majesty tlie King  has been pondering the problem of tho  Moderator's precedence, aud the result  is now announced. During his term of  oflice the Moderator is to take precedence in Scotland next after the Lord  Chancellor of Grcait Britain. Thus is  the horn of Prcsbytorianism exalted. To  estimate  the dizzy  attitude  to  "Ah, my dear friend ! How beautiful  zis lady ees I My heart he what you  call leap wis love I"���������Chicago Record-  Herald.  the Moderator is raised, we must suppose the King to hold his court at Iloly-  rood, aad picture the long procession o������  personages who will rank below tho very  reverend   figure  in  the  Geneva    gown.  The entire peerago will take their places  after him, together with all the Bishops i  of the Anglican church.      As   for tho  numerous Bishops who    have    assumed  Scottish titles, they arc, of course, mere  dissenters, with no place on the precedence table at all, and if the matter were  probed we are not sure but that Jacob  Primmer would come before tlio Bishop  of Edinburgh.    We hope that the efrcct '.  upon that humble Christian, thc minister i  of Moiiswrild, may"nofbvrthc"production j  of  anything  of   the   nature    of    "teto ,  nionte."    liis Majesty has also,  it up- :  pears, settled  the question    of prceed- I  ence, which for some years past has been  disturbing thc peace of Belfast,   lie has i  pronoun������6d the Moderator of the I'rev ,  byterian Church (*o -Hand on an equiil- ,  iiy with tlie Archhlsnopf of the Catholi  Thc keeper in attendance on a guest  at a Norfolk shooting    party    rocenlly  looked  on with  disgust at  the gsntlo-  wliich    nian's  erratic  marksmanship.    He  was  banging away here, there and everywhere, but no birds fell.  "Aim 'igher, sir," advised the keeper.  Still thc birds Hew untouched.  "It ain't the gun, sir, and it ain't tho  cartridges," remarked tho Norfolk man.  "Try shuttin' your right eye instead of  the left, sir."  But not a pheasant fell.  Thc keeper scratched his head.  "The birds is very strong on the wing  this year," he remarked, "but there's una  more chance. If I was you, sir. I sh.mlil  'ave a pop with both eyes shut."���������Answers.  ������������������You know-therc's a_bclief_that_whcn.  a man is delirious from fever he tells  his niost cherished secrets."  "Yen, but it isn't so. X could show  you "  "Well, it certainly isn't true in the  ense of old Polliiggnmus. U hen he was  raving in bis delirium the other night  the watchers bupposed lie would let out  ops of the Catliolio        ,      ,   ,      ,  --   ,.    and Episcopal churches, nnd an there is , 9 fow (j-cls about Ins wculth and what  no State church in Ireland", Lhe (Tr-cision . lle * fi01 lt invested in. He not on./  is unohnllepgablc upon any grounds save <licl*n*t do that, but I'm blest if ho didn't  those of ."prektie pride/' faint traces ; ���������-<������������������������������������ more lies about it than if he had  of which may Mjmetimes be detected.! be?>������ talking to the assessor,"���������Wucago  Many will ncclnim the judiciousness 6f i I'whune, ���������        , ,      ;       i, ;���������  these  decisions of  the    King,    running J ���������������'    ������ *���������>  Btrongly, as they do, in the face of At the annunlmceting of the Emanu-  nretensions loudly enough expressed ! El Sisterhood the Rev. Dr. Leon Harri-  jiist now in England-and not unheard   Bon told this atory :  How Lillian Russell Keeps  Young.  Lillian Russell is described by  Geraldino Bonner, who recently  saw her at Weber & Field's Theater in New York, as "just tho same  old Lillian, exactly as good-looking,  in the same perfectly regular way, aB  she ever was. Theatergoers have always wondered how this popular actress  contrived to retain her beauty, despite  the flight of time, nnd so thoy' will read  with interest her article on "Tho Secret  of How to Keep Young," which appears  in a recent number of ���������'Collier's Weekly."  Miss Russell declares that it is a comparatively simple thing for nny person  to keep fresh and youthful-looking without the aid of cosmetics, e.nnniel, dyes  and other mineral or vegetable Bub-  stances which may servo the purpose for  n time, but in tho end leave filio user all  tho worso for the application. She adds:  "Thoro is nothing like oxcrciso and diet  to promote tho good health which is a  necessary accompaniment of���������in fact, the  vital principle that serves to preserve���������  youth and beauty. The average woman  of to-day is apt to sacrifice all thing* to  her comfort. Exercise is a bore; dieting  is troublesome nnd almost painful; be-  causo effects are not at once apparent,  she dispenses with any little reform in  the mode of living which, in a contrite  spirit, sho may have taken up. I have  known women who made firm resolves to  undergo a systematic course of cxeTeiso  and followed it up religiously for a faw  days, meanwhile scanning their glass  eagerly to note results. None developing  at once, they have voted the whole thipg  a fraud, and gono back to the old routine of pleasure and indolence. The woman who is really in earnest about preserving her beauty and youth will find,  in a short time, that the few simple  rules to follow soon become a source of  genuine pleasure. I say rules, but tlwt  is not to bo taken literally. There aro  no set rules to bo followed; one aiust  bo guided by common sense, and enter  thoroughly into the spirit of the thing,  for mind has as much to do with accomplishing results as thc actual training.  Tho woman who assigns to herself flic  task and then goes about it in a desultory fashion, with half-hearted hopes of  achieving ends, would better* not make  the' attempt at all."  The system of exercise which Miss  Russell follows may, to some, seem almost heroic; to her it has now become a  sort of second nature. "In the first  place," sho says, "when I awaken in tSio  morning I drink at least two cupfuls of  hot water. Then a plunge into a warm  bath is followed by a thorough massage,  and I take a few minutes of rest before  eating breakfast. This meal consists ot*  a, piece of dry toast and, perhaps, a cup  of weak tea. If it is summer*time, a  game of tennis or practice with the -medicine-ball is next. All the muscles are  brought into piny, and at the expiration  of fifteen minutes I am in a profuse perspiration. But tho game is enjoyable,  and I continue until thoroughly wea*}'.  Then into tho bath-tub again and another rub-down, and I am ready for breakfast No. 2, which consists of a lean chop  mil' toast���������but nothing of a liquid nature. If the day is fino, .a spin on my  bicycle is next in order, lor this 1  rear a medium-weight sweater over my  .cular costume, and the-ride is never  less than ten miles and at a pretty good  ���������lace. Reaching home, and after another  vub-down, I don'some loose costume and  .cad or otherwise pass the time until  lunch. This meal is also very simple, all  starchy' or' fattening foods being religiously excluded. Allowing a little_ time  tor digestion, some .other game is indulged in���������such as tether-ball, or perhaps  golf. A short carriage drive lollo-vs,  with a bath and massage" at the finish.  That takes me up to dinner-time, when  usunllv 1 cat what my fancy dictates.  That iV the ono meal of the day in which  [ do not stint myself, although I avoid,  so far as possible, any foods which have  n. fattening tendency. The evenings, too,  are spent in quiet relaxation, ns I consider I have dono enough for the day.  "The following morning," concludes  Miss Russell, "the .same plan is followed,  and I take genuine pleasure in carrying  out the schedule laid out. There is nothing hard or disagreeable in what I do.  Tn the winter, when bicycle-riding is out  of the question, I play ping-pong, or row  a few miles in an indoor boat. . Tho  punching-bag, I find, is a grand form of  exercise, and I am becoming an expert  at that. Tlie care of the 9kin is, of  course, nn important factor. The simplest forms of emollients, used in connection with facial massage, I find are thc  best. But they are of Tittle use without  the exercise which brings tho natural  glow of health to the cheeks. Tho hair  should be carefully looked after, as nothing so much tends to make a woman look  youthful or pretty as her 'crowning  glory.' Frequent shampoos, combined  with persistent'brushing, will do all that  is necessary in that line."  in Scotland itself.  Autocars Por Railways.  The Northeastern Railway of England  Is at the  present  moment building at  I "1 invited my teacher and venerable  j friend Dr. Gottheil to be present at a  I synagogue one day when 1 was to dcliv-  j cr a sermon. He came and heard me,  | and I was naturally anxious to know  how my effort had pleased him.   So at  its York".works-two autocars to"nm on I the  first  opportunity  I  asked  how he  its  railway,  each  of  which will    carry  a. complete  apparatus    for    generating  its own motive power,    it is calculated  that a speed  of 30 miles an   Itnur (*������n  bn  got  up  in  as  many  secWjrKl.s.  which  is very much quicker flcceleriition than,  is possible with an ordinary train.      It  is  not proposed   to  use   those  autocars  at-first-for  the  longer  distance  trnllie  of tlio Northeastern Railway, but to em-*  ploy, them   rather  for  accelerating   the!  service on  tho*e sections of the system ���������  whero an ordinary train can only make!"  a slow rate of speed owing to the mini- j  ber  of  stopping  places.    The  two  cars  liked the sermon.  "'The text was good and admirably  chosen,' ho responded quietly."���������-New  York Times.  now under construction arc destined to    for us?"  With a face of the utmost gravity,  amounting almost to sternness, but  with a twinkle in his eye, the grea t  merchant called the office boy to his  desk.  "Henry," he said, "have I ever given  you anything ?"  'No, sir," replied the boy, wondering  wha t was to come next.  "How  long  have  you   been  working  run between Hartlepool and West j  Hartlepool stations, where there is keen;  competition with a tramway service. If ;  the experiment be successful, other sec- I  (inns of the company's system aro to be  similarly equipped with automobile  trains. . ��������� ���������  "Six months, sir."  "Then you'have been here long enough  to know belter than to leave that door  open. if you do it again I shall have  to give you a permanent vacation. That  is all,  Henry."���������Chicago  Tribune.  KO NEED TO  SUFFER.  Yorture of Rheumatism  Relieved In Six Hours  Cured  ������������������ ��������� ���������' .--->*���������*,. i  ���������****������i*������.^.'."- J  In One to "j  Three Days.  . The acid poison that invades the joints  In Rheumatism can be reached only  through the blood. South American  Rheumatic Cure neutralizes the acids,  dissolves and washes -out all. foreign  substances and sends a current of rich,  fed blood to the affected parts, bestowing  instant relief from the torturing.pains.  Read what C., M. Mayheer, - of Thomas-  ville, Ont, has to say: "My joints were  so badly swollen with Rheumatism that  1 could hardly walk, or even feed my-  (ielf. I have tried various other remedies, but thev did me no good, and I  almost despaired of getting cured. A  friend advised me to try The South  American Rheumatic Cure, and after  tisin*' only three bottles I was entirely  fcuri ..and have never had a return of  ihe agonizing symptoms."  Pain ha Your Kidneys?  South American Kidney Cure purges  the kidneys of every impurity, and restores  them   to   health���������: speedily  and  perfectly. No. 31  ������^*?.*af'*^*&*".-'..'.^..'^^  jgjajHj****jg������g tf  ���������'Thank you, Coulson, I think not,*"  Bald Mr. Hyde; "or stay! you might  send a telegram for me."  He pulled out his note-book, scrtb-  (bled a few words In lt, tore out the  teat and handed it to the servant, with  ihotructlons to despatch the telegram  Bt once.  i "Just a word to my daughter," ho  "explained, as the man departed, "to  ���������tepare her Xor the pleasure ot your  .Arrival."  A few more' minutes and the trala  Cras on its way again.  It Is hardly necessary to say that  ffltarjorie St. Clair was no other than  tBie child whoso father had met with,  (80 tragic a death on that fatal St. Val-  ���������Hitine's morning nine years ago: j  / The change in her name had been  (Brought about by her "going to live*  With her mother's cousin. Miss St.  fjilalr.  / This lady had cieslred the child to  (tie called by her name; and now Mar-  Krle rarely remembered that it was,  it her own.  Her father's murderer   had   never  [been discovered, ir   ipite of the most  ^gllant search on .-e part of the po-  ' It seemed pretty certain.however,  Ihat plunder had been the object; for  BV roll of bank notes was missing from  (the drawer of the writing table���������also  the' pretty gold locket which had been  Intended for poor Ethel Bruce's Valentine.  She, poor soul, followed her: husband  to the grave within six months of the  tragedy that had wrecked her life.    >  ��������� ���������       ' ��������� '        ��������� ���������  ���������' It was late in the afternoon when  Air. Hyde and Marjorie alighted at a  little country station, they having left  ���������he express at Euston, and finished  IBieir journey in one of the slow local  trains.'  A well-appointed carriage was In  ���������raiting.  Mr. Hyde tv-d Marjorie entered ft;  the servant who had traveled with'  his master mounted beside the cfach-  man, and away they drove towards  Denelands, which Mr.- Hyde had told  sVfar.'orle was the name, of his home.   ,  A drive of half an   hour   brought  them''to: It"  It was a handsome white building,  ample and substantial, though plain.   *  It was surrronnded by a large gar-  Ben and shrubberies; and there was a  iseatiwhite:lodge at the entrance-gate.  There appeared to be no other house  ���������Within a distance of halt a mile.  Just behind it,'on a slight eminence,  itvas a wood; at the side of it a wido  lake."  The carriage howled swiftly and  smoothly:up the drive and stopped at  the hall door.  Mr. Hyde, with great courtesy, assisted Marjorio to alight and led her  ���������Into one of .the parlors opening out of  ithe hall.  It was ;a remarkably pretty, refined  apartment. A cheerful fire ivas: burn-  tug in the grate.  A lady's work-basket and somo needle  (Work were lying on the ' table; an  ���������empty chair stood near.  "Ah, my daughter is 'not here, I  see," remarked Mr.: Hyde, : glancing  swiftly round the'room. "Sit down,  Miss St. Clair, and I will fetch her."  Marjorie seated herself near the fire,  ���������and awaited the coming;of Miss Hyde,  (with no small degree of trepidation.  When Mr. Hyde made; his generous  offer, she accepted it almost at once,  ���������Imply because she was so distressed  end overwrought that she.knew not  ���������What else to do.  But-now-Bh"e could-not~but~.re0ect"  that the daughter might not approve  Utter father's choice.  She might bo a haughty, mistrustful young lady, who would object to  ���������his intrusion on the part ot an uttei  stranger.  Mr. Hyde had remarked, in tht  course of conversation, that he wai  ��������� widower, so Marjorie knew hit*  daughter was mistress at Denelands.  In a minute or two the door opened  and a young lady entered���������tall and  graceful, *nd wearing.an elegant, tea  ���������own of black and gold, which trailed  ���������on the carpet behind her.  She looked a little haughty, but held  ���������put her hand with frank cordiality.  "How do you do, Miss St. Clair?*''  (Waa her greeting.; "My father has told  see about you. I hope we may be abli  (to make you comfortable. I am Mlsi  itByde." ' - ��������� ���������  . Marjorie, as she murmured a grate*  ���������fill word or two, looked up at the fact  '���������abeve her own, and saw In a moment  (bow very beautiful lt was.  < A somewhat southern-looking face,  (iirlth a clear, creamy skin, large blui  'eyes, fringed by almost black lashes, t  '���������arm. beautiful mouth and slightlj  Sravy, very dark brown hair.  t Her age might be four* or five and  twenty; her bearing was one of slngu*  iter dignity and grace.  She sat down, begged Marjorie to dg  ���������the same, and: began to talk with per*  ; feet ease, and in a clear, high-bred  -tone.  "My father says you have told hlnj  ���������that the lady to whom you wero going,  and who has loft England so suddenly,  may return in tlio course ot si]  (,weeks," she said, "if she does, and  lyou prefer to go to her, we shall, ol  icourse, wish you to please yoursolf. 11  not, we shall be happy to havo you  .continue to stay with,UB." ��������� . ...       ,  These were kind words, and Mlsi  Hyde's manner did not seem insincere.  And yet, In some subtle, rayatorioui  'fashion, Marjorie received the Imprest-ion that she was not really a welcomt  cuest, so far as this young lady wai  concerned.  Presently Miss Hyde rang tho bell  and desired a servant to bring In tea  "Wo will have it here togethor," 9b������  -itremarked. "My father ia tired with  his journey, and will take his in hli  own room. And there is no ono els*  in the house at present. After tea 1  care, say you will like to,go upstairs  cna have the evening to yourself. You  must be tired, too. Allow me to Ueljj  you to take off your hat and jacket."  And very graciously and gracoftillj  she persisted iu helping her, in split  uf Marjorle's remonstrances.  During tea the,two glrlB sat opposite each other, and more than ones  Marjorie caught Miss Hyde's eyct  fixed upon her with a look: she could  Dot fathom���������a scrutinizing gaze, as  though she would penetrate into the  Innermost secrets of her soul.  : That look puzzled Marjorie.  There came a day when she under*  stood it well.  CHAPTER III.  Visitors.  Marjorie thankfully availed herself  of Miss Hyde's coimIderate' offer, aud  ' retired to her room very early ic tha  evening.  When she wont downstairs next  morning she found Mr. Hyde in tha  breakfast room, his fine, fresh complexion all glowing from his matutinal bath.  He greeted-her with the utmost cot-  dtallty and kindness.  To hereelf she said that if only th*.  laughter had tan frank, pleasant man-.  Her. of the father, ber home might be  a very happy one indeed.  In a moment or two Miss Hyde appeared, dressed in an elegant morning  (own, and looking even more beautl-  ful "than she had iooked the night before.  Her manner, however, was restrained, though perfectly well-bred and polite.  Evidently Bhe had no-intention ot  getting on terms of freedom with her.  young companion until* she knew her  better.  Mr. Hyde seemed to notice and be  vexed by his di-  -jhter's coldness.  Indeed, once Marjorie saw him cast  a' glance of unmistakable reproof at  her.  After breakfast; the members of the  family were free to follow the day'a  occupations or diversions.  Mr. Hyde rode out on horse-back,  first commending Marjorie very;: kindly to the care of his daughter.  1 "Ydui must remember she is amona  Strangers, Madeline, and try to keep  herfromfeellng lonely," he said, as he-  left' them.... "And you, my dear, mu3t  make up your mind to regard us as  your friends,"  - A mist of grateful.. tears dimmed  Marjorle's eyes as, standing by the  ���������window, she watched him ride away.  How kind' he was, how generous,  how true a gentleman.  Already Bhe loved him as she might  have loved a dear and honorable relative.  Oh, If only his daughter were more  flke him! She turned to find Madeline's eyes fixed on her with that same  scrutinizing gaze she had seen In them  ^ast night  ThlOlme~a~sllght~ebade_0f"melan*<"  iholy crossed Miss Hyde's- brow, as  though she saw something which gave  her "pain.  She suggested they should sit by the  fire and do some needlework together.  Marjorie readily acquiesced,' and a  servant brought in a great roll of flannel from which Madeline commenced,  with great, dexterity, to cut a number  of garments, which, she said, were-for  the poor.  "I'm always so pleased to do anything of this kind���������for the poor, I  mean," said Marjorie, watching her  with Interest. "I'm glad you like lt,  too."  But Madeline disclaimed all merit  tn the transaction.  "If I wero left to myself I should  never moke a single garment," "ha  eald, with frank carelessness. "I do  it simply because my father wishes  lit. He likes me to bo kind to the indigent."  "He 1b kind to everyone, I think,"  . Bald Marjorie, softly.  Miss Hyde made no answer.  A curious look flitted over her face���������  'almost a mocking look���������aa though she  had her own opinion about her father's  kindness.  All that day Miss Hyde and MarJorl������  twoi-0 alono together, for the master of  la  the house did not return till early  the evening.  Little by little the elder girl's manner unbent.  The air of cold restraint dropped  from her; her face lighted up into new  beauty.  Marjorie said to herself���������  "Oh, how I could love her if only sha  ���������Would always be like this."  Tho truth was it was Marjorle's own  sweetness that had softened Madeline.  There was a charm about her which  .Won its way to most hearts.  Hard Indeed would have been tht  heart that could resist ber.  The two girls were still sitting together by tho morning room fire when  Mr. Hyde returned.  "I hope we have something good for  dinner, Madeline," he said, cheerfully,  "Your cousins will be here to-nlgnt."  Madeline looked up, startled, a red  spot on her cheek, excitement in her  eye.  "I got a wire from them at the station," went on her father, easily.  "They will be here for dinner. Isn't  It time you went upstairs to dress?"  'T think it is," said Madeline, speaking in an abstracted, preoccupied taaa*.  Ion. "Come, Marjorie."  . And they left the room.  ' Ten minutes later Marjorie, as she  (dressed in her own chamber, missed a  little gold sleeve llnkofrom her cuff,  and feeling sure she had dropped it  ���������either in the hall or on the staircase.  She slipped out to look for-It.  At the bottom of the stairs she  found it; and as she stooped, to pick it  up she heard Mr. Hyde's voice in a  room close at hand.  It was slightly raised, undoubtedly  In anger or displeasure���������  "Do aa I tell you," he said, imperatively. "You know my plans. Silence!  I will not hear a word. Enough for  you that I mean to be obeyed."  It was not intentionally, that Marjorie had overheard even this much,  and she went upstairs again as soon  as she had got her sleeve link, without  pausing!for a single unnecessary moment.  She concluded It must be one of the  servants Mr. Hyde was speaking to,  and wondered what had been done to  arouse Buch severe displeasure in so  {mild-tempered a man.  A couple of minutes later there cams  la. "tap at her door, followed by-tne entrance of Madeline.  "You've begun to dress, I see," Bhe  remarked, carelessly. "I thought -I  would come in and tell you to put on  one of your prettiest dresses. My father will like it, I think, and take it  as a compliment to the arrival ol his  nephews."  Marjorie was only too pleased to do  anything to gratify Mr. Hyde.  She acquieced at once.  "Will you choose for me?" Bhe said  io Madeline.   "Ah, do, please."  Madeline walked to the wardrobe  without speaking, * and looked at the  two or three* evening dresses which  hung there.  . "You might wear this, I think," she  eaid, pointing to a very pretty frock,  eau-de-Nll in color, and most charmingly made. "X will send you a few  (lowers to wear with it."-  "Oh, thank you; how very, very kind  Jjrou are."  Again a slightly mocking ��������� smile  'curled Madeline's perfect lips.  Marjorie did not see it. however, for  her face was averted, and a moment  later Madeline quitted the room.  When the dinner bell rang and,Marjorie went downstairs, she made as  fair a picture as the mind could franio  orthe eye could rest upon.  The delicate shade of her dress har������  tnonized exquisitely with the fairness  of her skin.  Her eyes were sweetly lustrous be������  bind their long silken lashes; her  beautiful golden brown hair shaded  her white brow, and .was gathered in a  simple Greek knot at the back of her  dainty head.  She looked sweeter than words can  say.  Mr. Hyde, who was alone In the dining room, glanced at her with a well  ���������pleased.smile.  'Did Madeline send you the flowers,  toy dear?" he asked, looking at a lovely cluster of pink roses which were  pinned across her bodice,  "Yes, sir. It was very kind of her,  (was lt not?"  "I trust you will never meet with  anything but kindness from Madeline,"  ���������aid the old gentleman, earnestly.  The next moment Miss Hyde enter  ed, gowned in old rose silk, with trimmings of rich Spanish laee.-  " Her cheeks were flushed���������her eyes  sparkling. She looked indescribably  beautiful.  "Where are Edgar and Charles?" sho  asked, glancing round.  "Here!" said a man's voice���������very  soft and musical���������just outside tho  door.  It: opened and two young men in  evening dress came forward, the foremost, who hud been the speaker, stepping up to Madeline' and kissing her  frankly on the cheek.  ��������� He was very Handsome, la a dark,  Spanish style, with an olive skin, very  brilliant eyes, a heavy moustache and  glossy hair of raven blackness.  His figure, too, was remarkably fine  ������������������tall, and of splendid proportions.  Hs looked haughty, Marjorie  thought, hut clever, and not Ill-natured.  His companion waa younger, and bj,  no means so striking-looking, but Marjorie liked his face better.  He was perfectly clean-shaven, and  had a clear, healthy skin, such as ono  often sees In young Englishmen who  spend a deal of their time in the country in the open air.  His gray eye was very bright ana  tceen,   his   mouth was pleasant, hia  teeth were white and even.       ,  -   Hls_ whole appearance was unnila  fakably that of a gentleman.  Not quite so tall as his brother, he  was yet of a good height, and possessed, moreover, that air of alertness  and agility which is a sign of perfect  health.  Marjorie was Introduced in dun  form.  She then learned that the dark gen**  tleman was Mr. Edgar Hyde, and that  the fairer one's name was Charles.  Both looked at the dainty face ot  Marjorie with as much interest as was  consistent with good breeding.  They greeted her with great courtesy, and Charles took her in to dinner. Madeline laughingly taking an  arm ot her father and her cousin Edgar.  During the evening Marjorie, whost  perceptions were very keen, made <  discovery.  Madeline loved her cousin Edgar-  loved him with that all-absorbing, passionate devotion which one would naturally expect in a girl of her type.  Whether he returned her love. Mar  Jorie could not be quite so sure.  There was evidently some kind of an  ODderstahding between them.  A.s, on their entrance he kissed her,  (While his brother was content with a  simple hand-shake, so, during the  whole evening, his manner to her was  lover-like; his place, of right, seemed  by her side.  Nevertheless, Marjorie could not ba  quite sure he loved her, and once or  twice she detected a jealous, dissatisfied look in Madeline's eye, as It  rested on him.  Mr. Charles Hyde took his place beside Marjorie, and seemed well content to stay there; nor was she ill-  pleased to have him, for he was a  pleasant, entertaining companion, and  had read most of her favorite poets  end authors.  She found it quite delightful to con-  Terse with him. Among other things  he told her some capital.stories of his  adventures at Oxford.  His brother, who chanced to bt  ���������standing, near, caught a word or twq  end said���������  "What's that you're telling Miss St  Clair, Charlie?"  "Oh, only a little tale about a scrap*  I got into at Christ church."  This answer seemed to amuse th������  elder brother exceedingly.  It was with difficulty he kept from  laughing ontrlght; and when hs re-  loined Madeline he repeated lt to her.  is though it were ah excellent Jest.'  She, however, did not smile.  On the contrary, a rather uneasy and  tnxious look crossed her face as she  glanced at Marjorie.  Late In the evening Mr. Hyde asked  for some music. -        ������,  VYou play, Marjorie?" said Madeline..  and tho suggestion was bo warmly seo-  jnded by all three gentlemen that liar-  |orle could not but'comply.  "I wonder If you can play m*f favor*  its," said Mr. Hyde. .  "What la it," sir?"  He rose, and placed a piece of muslo  fn front of her. It was Mendelssohn's  "Hear My Prayer."  "You wish me to' sing aa well as  play?"  "If you will."  Marjorle's skill as a musician waa  far beyond the average, and her voice  was exquisite���������so sweet, so rich, -so  pure. -  As the beautiful strains ran through  tbe room, everyone present Waa ea**-  iranced. ' -r  Mr.Hyde seemed deeply moved.    *-���������  Me.*Jorle, turniug round, saw hint  rai.������; his handkerchief to his cyea.  "Miss St. Clair, your.voice la divine!" . claimed Edgar' Hyde, witli  enthusiasm.  And bcth Charles and Madeline  echoed the sentiment.  Mr. Hyde laid his hand in fatherly  fashion on the head of the young pley-������  er as she still sat at the pianoforte.  "You.have given me,a great p'oas*  nre," he said, in a slighty fnlterlns  voice, but very earnestly. "God olciis  you, my dear."  CHAPTER IV.  -The-Locket.  The next day passed pleasantly In  company with tbo young men, who  would spend, Madeline ������ald, at least  i week or i*vo at Deuclands.  There had been a hard frost for two  or three days and the Ice on the lake  was quite strong enough to bear.  Madeline and Marjorie, attendod by  (he two young men, went to make  trial of It.  Mr. Hyde, though declining to put on  tkates, stood on the bank and watched  them for" some time.  "You might invite a few of your  young friends,' and mnke a a'-atlng-  party of it," he suggest*.*- to his daughter. "Sir Edward Mortimer and hla  listers would be glad 10 came, I think;,  ind perhaps the OU rera*. What do you  gay?"  At the mention of Sir Edward Mor������  timer, the two young men exchanged  glances, and seemed exceedingly  amused.  Marjorie saw thoir amusement and  wondered what caused lt.  That, too, she: was soon to under*  stand.  "Skating by torchlight would he fins  tun," said Charles Hyde. "How  arould St. Valentine's Day do for It,  sir?"  His brother muttered a word of dissent under hla breath.  He looked angry and disturbed.  His uncle gazed at him Intently for  ��������� moment of two then said In a slow,  thoughtful tone���������  "You don't like St. Valentine's Day,  my boy?'  "No. sir���������do you?' demanded Edgar,  turning suddenly upon him, and speaking with almost fierce abruptness, then  as suddenly turning away, nnd skating aulte to the other end of the pool.  (To be Continued.)  A Gloomy View.  'A special despatch from London to  The New York Sun says Mr. Ifrodeiic  Harrison, in an address to the Positivi.st  Committee, of which* he is President,  said that the Monroe doctrine would  eventually descend to tlio simple formula of "No European monarchy shall  hold ground on transatlantic continents."  Mr. Harrison affirmed that Englmd was  hastening such a development by Ver  foolish combination with Germany. Ilr.  Harrison takes a gloomy view of poli-  cal institutions as thoy were affsetod by  the events of the year 1902. He says:  "Tlie cardinal fact of our lime is tho  exhaustion of the Parliamentary system  of government. i'mliuincnU ev<*ry������livi'.-  are passing iuto a .stage uf decadence,  discredit und servility. In Germany a  Parliamentary coup d'etat hus reduced  thc Chamber to an ollice in wbioh decisions of State which are decreed by  tlio Sovereign nnd a Minister are registered with n iui'imilu which has licea  seen and approved. The-same iji-.h-.c ���������-*  ii being applied in Knglund to the mother of free Parliaments, somewhat lead  openly but quite as efficiently. Wars  which might indirectly have brought us  into collision or dispute with the two  great nations in tho world were begun; behind the back of Parliament almost without any explanation of their  cause or object,! Treaties were niade  with foreign powers such as might*indirectly have,'shaken pur whole commercial fiscal system to its foundation without any explanation to Parliament, and  even while Parliament waB offered:_ a  false explanation and wrong translation  of an important document the House of  Commons was called upon to waive its  most cherished privileges, including, tho  keystone of the British constitution���������  the absolute control of taxation. AH  this," Mr.: Harrison concluded;: "is a sure  eign the Parliamentary government in  England is felt to be superannuated and  is being superseded by irregular plebiscites, when these were ratilied or approved by a House of Lords'and House  of Bishops. A huge, unreal majority  elected under ���������'������������������ popular effervescence,  ���������which was equivalent to a revolutionary  storm, demoralized the Government and  Its opponents alike. The Ministers grew  as reckless of-justice, and even of public opinion, as any autocrat, and the Opposition, feeling themselves silenced by  a mechanical guillotine, lost all cohesion,  and withdrew in despair. What is certain is, that the khaki reaction of 1900  "has made inroads on tlie constitutional  rights of the House of Commons sueh  as was never attempted by Pitt, Wellington, Peel, Palmerston or Gladstone.  Thirty: Years'  Service.  Miss M. C. Smith, who is the flrst woman to receive his Majesty's Order of  the Imperial Service, says The Golden  Penny, has been in the Savings. JJank  Department of the Fostoffice for thirty  years. The experiment' of employing  women in that department proved so successful, that it opened tbe way, through  Mr. Fawcett's influence, to their employment in the Postoffice. Miss Smith,  who began as one of the twenty female  clerks, haB now over 900 women under  her control. As the pioneer of her "sex  in that branch of work, she well deserves  the honor she has just received.  The Golden Penny also has the following : Mrs. Elizabeth Alsop, of Godson  Common, Guildford, has recently celebrated, with great rejoicings, her 102nd  birthday. She was in her young'days a  children's nurse, and  when sho was 25  Sears old she went into service at Lady  .udrey Eisdale's. Lady Audrcv was the  wife of the Rev. I!. It'isdale, o'f Tilling-  ton, and daughter of the then Marquis  of Townshend. Mrs. Alsop remained  With the Risdales for the record period  of female service of 74 years. The late  Duchess of Teek offered a prize lor the  female servant who in the llritish  Isles could prove the longest  period of service . continuously in one  family, and after due competition this  was unanimously awarded to Mrs. Elizabeth Alsop by tihe Duchess and her ladies' committee, with many felicitations  upon her unique record.  Mrs. AIsop's eyosight.aiid hearing.are  not so good as tbey once wore, it is true,  but she is extremely active, docs a lot of  knitting, and takes a very deep and intelligent interest in tilings that go on  round her neighborhood, She can tell  many interesting stories of our Queen's  girlhood, of historical events that now  seem far back in the past, and she seems  likely?to=live-many=yearSi.yet,  DON'T HAWK  AND SPIT.  Do Your Friends Avoid  You by Reason of  These  Symptoms  of Catarrh?  Dr.   Agnew's Catarrhal  P o w d e t  quickly dispels every loathsome symptom of Catarrh and effects a permanent  cure. It stands alone as a remedy  (or Catarrh, both chronic and acute;  Hay Fever, Headache, Sore Throat, Influenza, Deafness, Tonsilitis and all  other diseases of the nose and throat.  i Cures the severest cases and cures them  speedily. Rev. J. Louer Grimm, a well-  known clergyman of Springer, York Co.,  IJa., writes: "Both myself and family  have used Dr. Agnew's Catarrhal  Powder for the past two years, and I  can conscientiously recommend it to any  one who suffers from Catarrh or otbet  aose or throat diseases. I would con*  tider it wrong not to recommend it every  chance I get."   -  Liver forking Properly?  If not, it's proof tnat your entire system is disorganized. Agnew a Lives  Pills���������entirely veget .ble���������regulate the  Liver, purify the wcule body, restoring  it to perfect health.  40 doses ioc. No. 85  Didn't Lose Much.  _At one of 'Uie annual fairs which are  held at a small town in Russia u gentleman observed a gypsy and a Pole haggling over the sale of a horse. Full of  curiosity when the two separated, and  anxious to know 'how two sueh shrewd  characters had bargained, the gentleman called the gyp3y to him and enquired how much he had got for his animal. The gypsy opened his hand and  showed ii. ten-rouble note (valued about  a guinea).  "But isn't that very cheap?"  "No," said the gypsy, "he is dead  lame."  The gentleman then sought out the  Polo and said:  "So you have given ten roubles for a  lame horse?"  The Pole, however, with a knowing  look,: said:  "Lame! lie's as sound as you are. I  saw he was badly shod, and only limped  in consequence"  The enquirer ������������������ctuniod to the gypsy  and reported what the other said. The  former gave a tremendous and most significant wink and whispered:  "He's as lame as a two-legged stool. I  had him badly shod on purpose to make  people believe that that was the cause  of his limping."  When tilis waa communicated to the  Pole he seemed for the moment taken  aback, and hung his head; then, with a  little sigh and a shrug of hi3 shoulders,  he said, quietly:  -   "Ah, well, it's all rigiit; it was a bad  ten-rouble note!"  The idea of a domestic remaining in  one family for 74 years is almost, more  than the mind of the average householder can grasp. Fancy anyone���������but what's  tho use t  Out the Leaves of Books.  Why in tho name of all that Is modern and swift, asks The London Globe,  do not publishers cut tlio leaves of the  books they publish? It is assumed thnt  in these days a man has not time to  walk upstairs; it is perfectly "under-'  stood that telegrams must be accelerated,  and that boy messengers must be cher-'  Ished; and yet publishers will persist in  attaching a sentence of slow servitude  to nearly every book they issue. Take  the ."Dictionary of National Biography."  It is a serious thing to buy it, but it  is a more serious thing to get it cut. Who  is to do it? Not every- man has relays  of daughters or an under-gardener whom  he can arm with a paper-knife. Mdnarclis  and millionaires must have ways of dealing with this problem. It is not to be  supposed that at Windsor Castle the  reader cuts the leaves. Whitaker may  be silent on the point, but it seems certain that a Groom of the Paper Knife  or a Book Barber In Ordinary exists and  draws an enviable Balary. The "Dictionary" .is a fat and flagrant case.  It Is morally and actuarially  certain that 'many eager purchasers of this great work have not  lived to cut its leaves. Which is sad.  But the evilis at least proportionally  great in even n tiny volume. The present writer had occasion this week to  cut (with a paper knife two feet-long)  a copy of Matthew Arnold's "Note  Books." The booklet was tightly bound,  the leaves were stiff and slippery; and  though his one desire was to get at the  innermost mind of Arnold, he had all  the sensation of vivisecting a guinea pig.  Which is absurd.  A Savage Pun.  William Penn was obviously i nervous  while signing his treaty with the'Indians.  "I am afraid that redskin over there  may make a snap shot of tha occasion,"  he "explained. ���������  "No fear," rejoined a friend; "he has  already done his' worst, fie just remarked the Penn was mightier than the  sword."  Moved <o wrath, the great Quaker  went' forth and founded Philadelphia,  thus making main innocent people suf.  fer for the ���������*.������������������ ������������������' ���������lwitting savage.���������  New York "Tribune." ^      _^    _il  Mamlv About People.  Here's" * .kite 6tory anent Christian  Sel'l'r.c*:'. A Boston mother said to her  little daughter: "If you had my faith,  darling, you would have no toothache.  Tho child replied:. "Well, mother, if you  had my toothache, you wouldn't have  any faith."  When Major-General Samuel B. M,  Young, e. United States army officer, was  presented to ilie Kaiser during a recent  visit to Germany, Emperor William  asked lihn if he had ever visited that  country before. "Not this part," General  Young is_8aid ito^have:replied.^The^Ehi  pcror then enquired what parts he had  visited, whereupon General Young said:  "I have visited St. Louis, Cincinnati and  Milwaukee," Thc Emperor roared with  laughter, and took General Young to the  Empress, to whom lie repeated the witticism. _ ____  ONE 8POONFUk  'Will build for you good health,1  through good nerves, by using  South American Nervine  Almost all disease is the result of .  poor nerve action.   Without good j  nerves neither brain, nor stomach,'/  nor liver, nor heart, nor kidneys, I  can work well.   Nerve food musfl  be such that it will be absorbed by  'the nerve ends.    Such a food is  South  American  Nervine,   the  greatest tonic known, a euro for  dyspepsia and  all  stomach   ailments.  Aoolph LE Bodie, B. C L., Montrs-  . al's well known barrister, writes i WI  wns suffering from insomnia nnd nervous debility, prostration and exhaustion. I took five bottles of South Asieav  icon Nervine, and am wholly recovered,  Thc Great South Amerlcen Rheamstat  Care is the only one ihnt lias not a singja  case of failure in Its record. Cur* sura  within three days; relief inUanUT.      S ,  Interesting: Items.  According to an Omaha correspondent  of the Chicago "Tribune," D. H. Hoffman, a Union Pacific machinist getting  S3 a day, has received the palm as the  most expensively dressed man in that  city. The extent of his wardrobe was  brought to light in a trial in Omaha,  where a man was charged with stealing  a suit-case full of clothing from him.  While under oath he stated that the grip  contained $6 worth of neckties. "How  many neckties have you altogetherf*  tisked the attorney, lie* replied: "I hava  $400 worth of neckties." The court  gasped and the attorney turned pale. "Is  the rest of your wiiniiobe in proportion!" asked "the altonu-y. "Tt is," responded the witness. Hoffman was  dressed faultlessly.  ''When lfenrv Hiemenr.. jr.. of St. T.oji*  died the other day. lie left $1,000,000 and  a will which provided that his widow,  who inherited the entire fortuife, was to  strew the grave of liis first wife with  (towers every Sunday and on the anniversaries of her birth and death. Thi*  probably is tin* acme oi iciined cruelty.  If the 'testator had provided that the  widow, in order to ki*ep the money, must  elinili a greased pole every Sunday morning, i>r "ive up cor**ts. or do her own  washing, other women ini^lit have gone  (o her and encouraged h������*r with the assurance that the money was worth tlv*  sacrifice;' but to be compelled to strew  flowers on the grave oi thc woman win-  is now, let us hope, happy-with the', man  in paradise will undoubtedly In* regarded  by all-'-sober-ininiled women as too iiiucii.  'Hie Knglish papers tell of a young  Parisian in L*ondon, visiting the "C'ikiii-  ber of Horror-'* at .Mine. Tuss-iud'**. Idling alone, he was seized with an impuLso  to put his neck in. the lunette'wherein  had rested that of Marie Antoinette. H..-  lay down, touched a spring; and closed,  the collar. But how was he to rele.i.'-*'-  himsclf? If he touched the wrong "���������pr'ni;  tho fatal axe might de*c<*nd. Be fori- Ion.-'  a crowd of visitors, led by an attendniU,  came on the scene. Tne guide was a b*i  of a linguist, and saw an opportunity,  with himself as master of thc situation.  He at once began a practical lecture -oil  the guillotine, interrupting his remarks  with little asides in French to the indignant victim, asking him to scream loude>  < or < writhe more agonizingly. "How *������c"*i  he acts!" exclaimed the gratified onlookers. Finally the Parisian wn-> ri*lc.T*eu_^  and, answering the applause with male-"  dictions, fled.  Plea For the Plain Husband. \  As the result of examining a* very extensive collection of portraits oi  the newly married obtained friwu.  the illustrated papers, the preseab  writer has come to the conclusion thaij  the'plain man is just now iu the heyday'  of his popularity, matrimonially speak*1  ing! " J  It would seem that while the handsome man is charming to dally witli.  someone who*������e features are homely, indeed even ugly, is regarded a������ the wiser  matrimonial venture. " '.  The wife of the modern Adonis ap-*  pears to have discovered, in fact, that  by her own act she has created a "problem that may bring her many hours of  uneasiness, If hot of actual pain. i  Her husband lives upon tlie approba-j  tion of others. Her own worship off  him may for a while suffice lo satisfy;  liim; but later on he will assuredly need'  that of the outside world. And the outside world i������ only too pleased to grant  him all the admiration he requires. Balls,  dinner-parties, picnics, skating meetings  demand his presence constantly, but  make no point of his wife being there at  nil, a fact she quickly discern*, and proportionately resents. Should she nb*>eiit  herself from such g'iietie������. .she imnpine-i.'  her husband making himself too agreeable to this pretty "woman or that, and;  should she become a hanger-on of his-  popularity, she is all the wniie seething:  with hatred foi her equivocal position.  (  Slueh of the vanity of the handsome  man arises from the indiscreet adoration'  showered upon him in childhood. As ho  grows up he is made much oi outside ther  family circle, because it is pleasant to,  have in a room full of iruests as many,  handsome men as possible. And the sequel? Is it not obvious? When he fell'  in love, it was not altogether because  his choice was fair and sweet, but because she, too, paid h|m the tribute of"  sdmiration.  Now, it is all very well to put a m&n^  on a pedestal and wreathe him with  bays before marriage; but what a wo-,  man wants after marriage is, a good and  serviceable article in thc way. of a husband.  * It is excessively annoying to a woinaa,  alwavs to have to play" second fiddle pi-  anis5hno-whcn-the_bea.uty_iiiicstion_i������^_  uppermost. Breathes there the wife ia'  any household who dislikes some little'  passing mention made from time to time  nbout her good looks and charming individuality? But the wife .of an AdonU  obtains little of this sweet incense.  Sweep away this picture and contemplate the companion one. of the plain  husband. His object is to make life a  bed of roses for his wife and family, Un~  selfiihly the plain man toil*,.  Thc 'plain husband "puts up" with,  things. Did ever a hund-joine one brook*  the domestic trials li<* cheerfully en-*  durest : Somet'ow' the handsome man is  expected to regard calamities from quit*  a different standpoint. Nay,- more, the.  ugly, good-humored head of a household  is expected to be the handy man of the,  family. If a chimney smokes, his plain  features must be begrimed in an attempt!  to get at the root of the mischief; if a'  pipe leaks, his red and uncultured paws,  are quite good enough to probe the do-'  feet to its very depth-. What -handsome*  curled darling"could possibly be expected;  to  risk   his  good   looks   by   performing)  such nasty tasks as these?  *, (���������   >-               ���������  f  ���������'Judge���������Why- didn't you go to the *���������-,  distance of the defendant in the fighttj  Policeman���������Shurc, un' Oi didn't know  which av thim wus goin' to be th' defe**"*;  dant, yer honor.���������Chicago "News."  .       ,  A woman in pursuit of a late mim-aan*  gown stood in front of a counter heaaesV  with foulards in a big store. A bloe}  {round with a white polka dat seemeef  to please her best, but she paused irreso-'  lutcly. "It looks ju.������t like the eld iodimj  blue calicoes tliey used to wear when 1)  was a little girl in the country," shesaidd  discontentedly. "Madame," said th2  portly salesman, "lonij after you and *fl  are dead and yone women will be we*j5  ing blue and white polka dots. Th*"****"!  have worn them suuc the r.ice cmerge-a,  from barbarism. Tliey -.itll wear tftesal  until it sinks into it r'gain." After tha^  firotestous gravity and liea-,y philooophTi  the woman bought the dr*****? in a dazefe,  ���������.Hence.���������Tacoma "Ledger." V  **h  It -  tt.���������  I Seed and  | H ARVEST.  5    Dcxcax J.   McMiu-ax, Pastor  '"* Ken- York Presbyterian Church.  "Be not deceived; God is not mocked;  Sor whatsoever a man soweth that shall  fee also reap."���������Ualatians, vi., 7.  "Be not deceived," This is the proi  position, lt conveys the lesson which  the apostle desires to teach. The rest  ad the passage only illustrates an en*  dorces the injunction.  Our text strikes nt a common, cveryi  ���������ay ete. The weakness Mint lies nt tin**  fcottom of every sin is self-deception. A,  ���������"���������an could never get his own, consent to  alai if he did not first deceive himself,  ���������r allow himself to be deceived. And  ���������o Paul is striking at the tap root of  the whole business of sin. The principle that underlies it is Uie indissoluble connection betweon present conduct and future experience; 'between tho  thought which we indulge and the state  ���������nd habit of mind which result jbetween  tbe principle wo oherish and the per-:  enanent character which will be evolved.  IAs surely as the nature of the seed in-  beTes in the plant that grows out of it,  eo surely will the nature of the thought)  ���������Ind action which we indulge determine  the character which they produce. Ka-  tere U pitiless and inexorable. This  law which we are considering is as rigid  tu* the law of gravitation.  God ha3 eternally lixcd those laws by  which righteousness brings its own re*  ���������ward and .-.i 1 it- apprjpri.-.t.: pun's ment.  Paul says do not deceive yourself by*  ���������supposing for one moment that this law  ���������will somehow not operate in your ease,  vr that Cod will cut the connection between cause and cll'eet for your special  ���������benefit. Against Mich a delusion Paul  fcurls the startling words, "God  is not mocked." lt is a law  ef nature that the reaping  fag shall correspond to thc sowing, lb  ts impossible for men to break the di*  ���������line order cshibli.-licd in the very nature of things, lie that sows cocklo  aboil reap cockle. He that sows thistles  tmust not expeot to reap wheat.  We understand all that ns it applies  Ho vegetable life. We may also see it  ���������plainly working in human all'airs. Commercial industry tends to commercial  ���������wealth. "Seest thou a man diligent in  kusiness ? He shall stand before Kings."  The law applies also to the intellect-;  snl life. It is only to the diligent sfcu-  elent that culture comes. And it is only;  to him who exercises the virtue of true  affection that loyal friendship is return**  ���������xL It would be vain to expect thab  money would buy learning or refinement. And it would ibe equally vain to  enippose that learning and refinement  ���������would lead to wealth, for there is no  "necessary connection between them ns  cause and effect. Kach pursuit has its  ���������consequences according to its own nature. Thus we see in the boy the prophecy of the man: in the spendthrift  ���������the "prophecy of coming penury nnd  ���������want; in the budding ccnius the promise of future glory, and in a career  of careless living and disregard of God's  laws the inevitable consequence of dis- ���������  ���������-ter. One who habitually breaks the |  Sabbath cannot expect the fruits of Sab- I  baths well spent. - I !  So the iaw applies to spiritual sowing  and reaping. God rules the two worlds  ���������M matter and spirit upon the same  principles. I/ike produces like. Na-,  ���������Liral laws rule in the spiritual world.  The future depends upon the past and  ���������the present. Our conduct is shaping our  tlestiny. !  If these things aiTected only the body,  ���������Ato tbe pampered body might perish  ���������with transitory thineis and so come to  ������������������ end.    Bub they affect the soul also.  j Mainly About jreopie.  j     Elizabeth Cady S Union was once glv-  i Ing a piece of advic*.  to a roomful of  j  young men in a little village on the sub*  i  ject of matrimony.   '���������'When you marry,"  ��������� she said, "choose a woman with a spine  ! and a sound set of teeth."   "Good gni-  cious!  Jhs.  Stanton," remarked ono of  hor listeners,  in  alarm,  "do  thoy  ever  come without spines';"  Professor Powers of Cornell's political  economy depart ment was discussing tho  changed attitude that people have assumed (and in his opinion rightly as-  sniued) toward the conveniences and the  luxuries of life. "At a Methodist church  convent ion," he said, "the delegates were  talking on thnt subject, when an old  {Triiybenrd arose and exclaimed angrily  to thu presiding bishop: 'I suppose you  came here in a private car?' 'Yes,' "the  bishop answered; 'do you know any way  more comfortable?'"  When I-nbouchcre ivas nn attache of  the llritish Ambassador to the. United  States a Uriton of the consequential species descended on the ministry ab Washington demanding to see his country's  representative. "He's not in," said Lab*  by. "Then I'll wait," said the Briton  pompously, seating himself. At tho end  of half an hour came the query, "When  ���������er���������do you���������er���������expect Lord Lyons  back?" "Ch, in six months or so," said  bhe ever-obliging attache. "lie left for  Europe this morning. But you said you'd  wait, you know."  A manufacturer not one hundred miles  from the city tells a good joke on hun-  self. He is credited with being extremely disagreeable to his employees. A man  just arrived in this country called on him  one day to ask for work. "Have you a recommendation of character?" he asked  the stranger. "No," he replied, "but 1  havo friends in the village who. will give  me one." Putting his bundle on tho  floor, he left. In the course of half an  hour he returned, took up his bundle  and was leaving the office without a  word. "Did you get your character ?"  asked the manufacturer. The man,  without halting a moment ot raising his  eyes, said: "No, mister, but I got yours."  Kitchener's scathing sarcasm is well  illustrated by the reply he is said to  have sent to the leader of a not over-  successful column. This officer had.several slight cngngenientsi with-the enemy,  mainly consisting of flinging a few shells  Pox> the Farmer,  nt them at Ion**; range. After each engagement he wired to the commander-  in-chief substantially: "During action  several Boers seen to drop from their  saddles." The thing was becoming tiresome, for Lord Kitchener's rule was that  only those, actually "gathered" should be  counted. *>'He'soon thought of a remedy,  and sent back to the officer - this polite  telegram: "I hope when they fell they  did not hurt themselves."      "  The Scotch of Glengarry arc largely,  probably mainly, of "the old faith," and  this story told by Senator McMillan,  touches upon that fact,"and also introduces one of the old-time giants of that  county. This particular giant was Big  Alex McDonnell, uncle of the bishop of  the same name. "Big: Alex," the senator began, "was probably the only man  who wont over the ChaudiercFalls: and  lived. Shortly after his escape he visited his uncle, then a simple priest, and  hi3 marvelous escape, with the incident  of hanging desperately to a floating crib  while being tossed about in the turbulent waters, formed the;subject of conversation. ��������� 'It must have been a great'  comfort to you to know .that the saints  were with you in your peril,' remarked;  the priest. 'Oh, yes,' responded Alex;  but it was also a comfort to know I was  a tanin good swimmer.'"  The following; incident occurred at an  entertainment in a large provincial town  in England. On the programme a certain vocalist was down to sing "The  Miner's Dream of Home," and to add  ���������-pecial .effect lo the song he, having a  friend n fireman at the fire station,- about  three minutes* walk from the hall, ran  out and borrowed his topboots. His  turn on the programme came around. He  appeared ou the" stage in all the glory of  a blouse, slouch hat, white breeches and  (the fireman's) topboots. His rendering  of thc song was a great success up to  the middle of the second verse, when a  commotion was heard'at tlie entrance of  the hall. Then a hot and eager fireman  forced his way through the audience up  to the footlights and bawled out at the  top of his voice: "Bill, you've got to  come out of them 'ere boots if you value  your life.   I'm called to a fire!"  Improving the Live Stock.  Breeding ia a science when it is dono  for the purpose of arriving at results  which are sought as a possibility, although the breeder may begin in a manner that docs not apparently warrant  him   in   proceeding   with   his   venture.  Some  breeders,  among  lhem  Bnkewell  nnd Western, were 30 years in perreeting  one breed of sheep and swine,    livery  animal sold by them put the purchaser  30 years aliea'd in the line of improvement.    They  simply  selected  the  best  for  breeding purposes every year, and  were compelled to in-brend the animals  in order to Hx their chiiract eristics.   Tho  farmer  must  pursue  the  same  course  with his herds und crops, and he mirst  make his selections every year by discarding every animal    that    docs    not  come up to a certain standard of excellence.   He must never become discouraged, as even the most skillful breeders  succeed     in     securing     but     a     few  very    valuable    specimens    in a year,  though an improvement will be noticed  every  season.    The gain  is .but  little,  and skill is essential, but in time the  slock differs greatly from thc original.  Should ��������� extraordinary excellence be observed in certain individuals the breeder  may abandon liis plnns'and methods and  start on new lines of breeding, as ho  learns by experience during his progress  and takes advantage c? accident or discoveries, but he always adheres to his  original object of making ii' breed that  is to be adapted to a special purpose.  Even among the best breeds    of    live  stock some individuals will be more valuable for certain uses than others, and  those with the highest record may not  display their best points ot  excellence  until selected    for    breeding.���������Philadelphia Record.  Preserving the Dead.  Her First Night at the Theater.  for soul and bodv are intimately con- _,      ,.       _...  _l-������.j     nn,,,   -Jr_.i.,   ���������������������������   .ir.*,.*,"..,   tv,,*.        A ladv who resides at Streatham Hill,  sorted.    What  ah-cc*.  one  affects  the di-   t   an E ��������� Ugn cschangei has a  ���������ther.    How diup-pointment ini business      . ,       ^     ^    -J     h from |0'me re.  ���������prostrates a man I   How the failure of    b*on   far  rcmovcd  from     the     theater.   ���������oi'.P***-*-* in_social and domestic affair*. ' -n,inking to give the girl a treat, and  ���������s well at in busine-**-.���������depres**..*"-.--th<v^know-ng.(*iat_gha_*,a.i^nevU!^h&m^=*i  spirit * So the soul Is affected, de-t  pressed or elated, by success.or failure.  And, mortover, it becomes refined and  ���������purified by holy exercise* or corrupted  fey evil habits or thoughts, according to  the Esmc laws of causation. Its facilities may become dissipated and decayed.  So that sowing to the llc������h affect? not  *������nly the flcih, but the mind nnd thu  ���������soul also, and produces moral rotten-  mess and spiritual death  theater, the lady purchased a ticket for  a play at Balham Theater. The'* girl  went, and returned before nine o'clock.  "What is the matter? Did you not  like it!" asked the mistrcsB.  "Oil, I liked it, mum, it was fine."  "Hut," enquired her mistress, "why  have you returned so soon? Surely you  didn't see it all."  "Yes, mum, I did. I went in, sat down  | and looked at tho large pieter hanging  In  spiritual  affairs,  as  in    material, i "P   ���������*>   front.    People  kept  a-comin' in,   , ....       . .    i' nrwl   rn*rt4li, annn   llinrrt   Willi milt*** n. ***ri"IWrl  sjo one need expect or hope to sow ono  thing and rea-p another. Those who reck-  . J>s������iy sow tn the flesh must reap their  tbsrvest of blighted fortune, shattered  taealth. disappointed hopes, soured tem-  ���������jser, Infamy and shame.  God leaves us free to sow whatever.  , t������ort of seed wc will, and no one can  fclame the Almighty if, having chosen  the kind we prefer to sow, we reap  our own harvest. It would not be like  ���������God to thwart us by giving any other  kind of hc.rvest than that for which we  "have   chosen   to  sow   seed. i  Do not expect consequences which tho  Saw   of  sowing  and   reaping docs    not  justify.   Do not h. surprised if bad men  ���������srho  are  industrious arc  prospered    in  business.    That i3 just what they have  been sowing *=ccd for.    If they arc diligent and  faithful  about  their  sowing,  ef course they will reap the appropriate  ���������harvest.    That is all right and accord-  9ng  to  t!ie  law.    And  do  not  be disappointed or  think it  strange  if good j  men who do not sow visely nor work  ���������diligently   are    unfortunate    in     their, i  "business  affairs.    Thnt  is  also    in  ac- j  eordnnce with the same iaw. Kach reaps j  ���������as  he  sows,    "lie   not  deceived,"  you j  ���������need not expect a material harvest from j  ���������spiritual seed-sowing.    "He  not deceiv- i  *d," you will never reap a spiritual har* '  Test  from  sellifeh   and    material    seed- '���������  ae-oving.    Nor,-  determine   the  kind    of, ���������  ftarveat you want, then sow that kind \  ���������*������f seed and you will reap in due seaaon 1  tt you faint not. \  and pretty soon there was quite a crowd  ill looking at tho pieter. Then they took  it away and some men and women be-  j������un a-talkin' up there about somethin'  that didn't concern me, so I got up and  come away.   But I enjoyed the pieter."  Up to Date.  Great Publisher���������Mr. Quill, your novel  is a very good one.  Mr. Quill���������Then vou are going to publish it?  Client Publisher���������Yes, if yon will only  make a few slight changes. Just change  the marriage of your heroine to her  death on the eve of the bridal; kill your  hero in a railroad accident; and close  lhe book with the funny man standing  between two graves in the twilight, and  it's a go.  The Use of Logic.  A great ileal is said in these days  about thc value or valuclessness of logic.  In the main, indeed, logic is nol, a productive tool so milch as a weapon of defence. A man building up an intellectual  system has to build like Xeheminh, with  the sword in one hand and the trowel in  tlio other. The illumination, the constructive quality, is tin* trowel, and argument is the sword. A wide experience  of actual intellectual iiM'nirs will lead  most people to the conclusion that logle  is mainly valuable ns a wenpnn wherewith to exterminate logicians.  Foods For Egg Production.  The subject of egg production is one  upon which the fanner is always ready  for information, and, although there is  not very much to be said on the matter  that is original, still it may perhaps be of  use to some of the readers of this journal if I give a few details as to the composition of the different    foods   which  farmers give to their poultry, with the  idea of pointing out which of them are  anost likely to result in making the hens  lay well.   It needs no.very high degree  of intelligence to understand  that if a  hen is to lay well, she must be fed well���������  arid not only fed well, but fed with particular kinds of food which are required  for the composition of egg substance; and  so.the best way to enter upon our present subject is to inquire first of all what  an egg is composed of, and then we can  soon determine what kinds of food contain most of the principal    ingredients  which are to be foundin an egg.   Thero  are three parts to an egg���������the shell, the  albumen or white, and the yolk. Without   entering   into    analytical    details  (which would confuse many readers), it  may be pointed  out .that as  so large  a proportion.of the egg is made up of  albumen, the food given must be largely of an albuminoid, nature.   The value  of an egg: as an article of diet is due  principally: to:the nitrogenous matter it  contains, and unless a lien is    provided  with food which* is rich in nitrogenous  matter���������that is to  say, food in which  nitrogenous constituents are not    overdone by'-'the carbonaceous'   or    starchy  constituents���������that hen will not    make  a good layer.   The point for us to consider, then, is what are the foods which  aro  richest  in  itrogenous  matter?���������or,  rather, what are the foods in which nitrogenous matter    is in the   ascendant?  First of all, with regard to the different  kinds of grain, analysis shows that   the  legumiuous seeds are, on    the    whole,  richest  in  albumen,  and   therefore,   in  mixing a meal for laying poultry, it will  be Well-,.to  use  a percentage either  of  bean meal or of pea meal.    A mixture  of equal .narts of pea meal, barley meal,  oatmeal, and pollards will make as good  a diet for laying .poultry as anything.  Tt -will-contain plenty of'albumen and a.  sufficiency of fat-forming matter, which  is also necessary in moderation for egg  production.   Tbils can be varied    in winter time by the addition of a little Indian  meal, which, being of a raore    starchy  nature, will assist' in keeping    up    the  temperature of the fowls* bodies���������a very  leeassary thing in cold weather.    "Sow,  In regard to grain, oats    are    without  doubt the best corn  for  poultry,    because thev arc rich in nitrogenou** anil  also in fa'tty   matter;    compared    with  maize, they are richer in both respects,  whilst at the -same time they have nothing like the amount    of starch    which  ���������maize possesses.    Next to oats. Knglish  wheat is to be recommended; but that  Ts=r'ath er= d eficien-t^in^f lis, __After _that  come barley and buckwheat,    both    of  which make excellent variety in food.  Passing from grain to other *u!>*>tnnce������,  it will be well to point out that one. of  the best food?,for poultry is milk; and  wherever "skim"  milk  is available,    it  should always be used instead of water  for mixing up with thc poultry   meal.  Many fnrueri' wives owe their sileee*>*s  in poultry-keeping to the use of   meal  both  for the laying hens and  also  for  rearing  the  chicken."..    ln*>i:cl*������  such  as  beetle", are largely composed of nitrogen,  and that is one of the reason* why chickens which are reared in wood* and coppices generally thrive -o well���������they get  plenty  of insects.    The. same  thing applies to laying poultry���������no hens lay better than those which aro    allowed    to  ramble  through  a small  wood  or coppice.   Next to insect life, lean meat is,  of course, rich in nitrogen.   Lean meat  can neither be given in the fresh slate  nor in the dried state���������in the dry state,  of course, a smaller quantity  needs to  be given, because of the absence of moisture, which in fresh meat has not been  taken away.    On an average,  one portion   of   dry   lean   meat   should   go   as  far as five portions of fresh lean meat,  because lenn meat contains from (10 to  70 per cent, of water.   Granulated bone  is another food rich in egg-forming constituents,  and  the addition  of about 5  per  cent,  of  crushed  bone    or  of   tlin  dried fibrine mea.t just referred to will  very much improve    the    egg-producing  quality   of  any   food.     If-"people   who  are  so  fond  of  using Indian  meal  for  tin*if  poultry would   Increase  the  proportion of nitrogen it contains by adding  crushed bone or else meat,  t'ney would  attain batter results.      A  mixtuie    of  equal parts of oatmeal nnd Indian meal,  with tho addition  of about 5 per cent,  of each, meat and bone, is us likely a  food fus any to bring poultry on to lay  at  this  time  of  the  year,    when    the  weather is cold    and    uiiselt.lnfi.���������.Mid-  lander, in "Farmer and   Stockbreeder,"  London, England.  There has just arrived io London from  Queensland a scientist who, in tho mysterious interior of Australia, "has mado  certain discoveries which, says The Express, if accepted by the medical faculty in England, will prove of extraordinary value to the whole human  race. One of his discoveries���������the  weirdest, if not tho most important���������  arrests all change in the appearance of  the human form after death. Tho  maker of this astounding discovery is  Mr. A. It- Taylor." particular interest  has been aroused in the case of an old  man of eighty-one, who died last year,  and whoso body was handed over to  Mr. Taylor by the authorities of Sydney  for the purpose of experiment. Mr.  Taylor shows this subject, which is in  a perfect state of preservation, ns a triumphant proof of the value of his discovery. "Ho will remain as he is," said  Mr. Taylor, "to the end of all time."  Mr. Taylor went on to explain how he  made his discovery. "For ninny years,"  he said, "my father carried on an elaborate system of research with this ono  object in view. After his death I carried on his work. By a stroke of good  fortune I came across some manuscripts  of the early Egyptians. From them  I found wha't my father and .1 had been*  searching for during many long years.  I found how a solution, part vegetable  and part mineral, could be made which,  so far as outward appearance went,  would stay forever the handiwork of  death. There wns no need to use the  swathings employed by the Egyptians.  By injecting the solution under the skin  the body would .lie petriflcd."  Chinese Bankers.  Tn an interesting article dealing witli  the Chinese residents of Seattle; The  Post-Intelligencer of that city says :���������  And speaking of banks recalls another curious phase of the Chinese character that soon becomes apparent to one  who has a passing knowledge of lifo  in "Chinatown." A China-man has no  manner of use for banks, legitimate  banks, the custodians of the wealth of  the nation. He never visits one except  on thoso occasions when ho wishes to  send the money he has earned in America to his relatives in China. In all  other things he acts as his own banker..  Kow a C'liincse bank is about as peculiar an institution as one can iind in  a five-minute walk from the City Hall.  The methods of the small merchant who  has money to put away for safe keeping are as peculiar as were those of  3>ret Harte's ''Heathen Chinee." The  banking system is briefly this:  Five or six small merchants or tradesmen will join in the purchase of a safo  ���������American built and of the latest pattern. It may l,n thai as many an ten  men will thus become the joint owners  of,a fire and burglar proof strong-box.  Having acquired the safe the services  of an expert locksmith are called for.  By him the safe door in fitted with ten  complicated locks, each one different,  from I bo other. When his work is  complete the safe door cannot be opened unless each of the.ten locks has first  been unlocked. Each of the .ten'owners  is given a key to a lock and the banking arrangement is complete. The safe  thpn becomes the joint repository of  the. funds of tho several partners, each  having a separate compartment inside,  the much-locked outer door. Behold  now the working of the scheme :  Ah Fat, being one of thc owners,  wishes to make a deposit or to withdraw all or a portion of his funds, lie  first finds and notifies each of the other  nine key holders that he wishes to open  the safe. Tf all of thc bankers can be  rounded up they repair to thc safe and  each one opens the lock that is the  badge of his ownership arid tihe safeguard of his wealth. This being done,  the safe door is opened and nine interested bankers remain in close attendance while Ah Fat fingers the coin  that is his and his alone. The safe  is then closed and each of the ten  bankers solemnly turns the key in his  individual lock and returns to the pursuit of his own occupation.  Unvarnished Truth.  Under the caption of "The Unvarnished Truth," The Now York Evening Post  Bays:���������Ex-Gov.   Boutwell's     speech    at  1'ancuil hall on New Year's Day was a  notable appeal to  the beclouded  spirit  of liberty in the United    States.      Although addressed primarily to the colored population, it is equally well adapted  to all Americans.    Mr. Boutwell spoke  to the negroes in behalf of the Filipinos,  because the negroes have been emancipated, while the Filipinos have been lately subjugated���������both by the United States Government. Ho tella the unvarnished truth when he says that "the Republican party  has  become the enemy of  univorsal, liberty."   The Inquisition had  nothing worse to show than the torture  and death of Father Augustine at tho  hands of    American    officers���������a    crime  which is now said to bo under investigation after useless attempts at concealment.   And this is only one of a series of similar acts perpetrated in order  to suppress the liberty of a distant people who never did us any harm until  we  carried  fire  and  sword  into   their  country and their homes.   Wo gave to  this invasion of a free and friendly people the names of civilization, Christianity, law  and  order. . We  said that it  was all for their good.    Wo have proclaimed that our officers in the Philippine Islands were performing their duties satisfactorily and successfully, whereas the islands are in a condition of famine, pestilence and general misery more  pitiable than under any period of Spanish rule thab can now be recalled.    Ol  course, we lose  sight  of these    things  easily,  because  they  are so  far  away  and so little news "that is unfavorable  leaks out.   So it is all the more necessary  that the  voice  of some  Prophet  Elijah should cry aloud and spare not.  Such a voice is that of Gov. Boutwell,  and never was it pitched upon a nobler  key than on New Year's Day in Faneuil  HnlL  Humor of the Hour.  Pat���������You say if I use one of these  patent dampers I save half me coal ?  Agent���������Exactly, sir; exactly.  Pat���������Be gobs, I'll take two.���������Harvard Lampoon.   ������ >  Jaggles���������Which country has the largest standing army in the world ?  Waggles���������This ono, if you count tho  people who ride in the New York street  care.���������New York Sun.  "Are you fond of birds?" she asked  innocently, as she stood at the piano  fumbling the music.  "I dearly iovo them," he replied, with  never a shadow of suspicion.  Then she ran her slender fingers over  the keys and began to sing, "Oh, Would  I Were a Bird."���������Chicago News.  Newcome���������They tell me hens never  lay cgg3 at night. HJid you know that t  Bubbubs���������Oh I  yes.  Wewcome���������Strange, isn't it t !  Sublbubs���������Not at oil. All the bens  are roosters at night, you know.  to  What the Patient Did.  . Many stories are being told of the late  Rev. Dr. Temple, Primate of England,  among them tho following:���������He had a  habit of emphasizing his words by gestures. When he received his first episcopal promotion from Exeter to London  he left behind him, to his sorrow, a  faithful dependent in Devon County Asylum. Visiting Exeter soon afterwards,  out of the kindness of his heart he  called to see this patient. Returning  to town, Dr. Temple was met at P.id-  dington by nn old' friend, and drove off  with hiin lo Fulham in an open victoria.  Presently the Bishop began to toil his  friend of his visit to the asylum.  "I was hoping." he said, "poor Y   might soon bo discharged, when, just  ris 1 was leaving, he put his thumb to  his.uose, and wont**���������just so���������at me."  As Dr. Temple said this he graphically  illustrated the contemptuous gesture.  The same moment the carriage turned  into Fulhain* High street, and the horror  of the spectators can lie imagined at  seeing the Bight Rev. the Lord Bishop  of London, whom they were just begin- |  ning to know by sight, guilty of such a '  vulgar   act'  iii 'broad   daylight. --'  Precedence at State "Functions.  The question of precedence at  State  ceremonies has been agitating British as  well  as  Canadian  church  circles,    and  The Dundee Advertiser thus facetiously  School���������Tho boy was going away  eohool, full of high hope.  "I shall make thc football team and  color two pipes the first year 1" he said  bravely.  .His mother kissed him and wept. His  father wrung his hand in silence.  They were too full to speak then.  But when he was gone, and they were  calmer,   they  talked  together  of  him,  and prayed that his ambition might not  oarry bim beyond his strength. ���������-���������Life.   ���������   They had looked soulfully into each  other's eyes for some time, but somehow he didn't seem to come to the  point. Then suddenly he made a discovery.  "You have your mother's beautiful  eyes, dear," he said.  Sho felt that thc time had come to  play her trump card. "1 havo also,"  she said, "my father's lovely check  book."  Within 30 minutes the engagement  was announced.���������Tit-Bits.  A farmer who had arrived in town on  business dropped in at tho cat show to  see puss at her best.  "It's rather ridiculous for a farmer  to buy a cat, because 1 know there's a  dozen round the farm, but that's a  beauty, and 1 believe I'll get it for my  littlo girl. Do you suppose it's for sale,  porter, and what is the price ?"  "A hundred and twenty pounds."  "Great turnips," he gasped, "that's  more than I give for a whole waggon-  load of pigs I"  At a twenty-first birthday party the  other day, says "London Answers," a  mother was praising the ^talents of her  son, and, being anxious to make him  appear at his best before the company-  present, asked him to ��������� show the company the prizes he 'had won.  Ono of the guests, picking up the best  article, said: "And what did he win this  prize with ?"  "Oh, that was for running," said the  proud mother.  "And* who presented it to him ?" asked the guest.  "We did," said the mother.  "How waa that ?" asked the guest.'  "Why, you see," said the proud mother, "he'd have won, but he didn't hear  the pistol go off."  ��������� ���������    ���������  "Ah," said the Count, "zis ees not ne  lady I would have for my wife. She ees  what you call plain."  "But her father owns a coal mine," replied tlie General Manager of the Inter-  comments upon a recent decision of the j M������0������re��������� t to Ss^ol^mine1^!       '  King. _ Tbe . Moderator  of .the  Genera! j     ^XgoTd^Lf^T.\ l\TZ  i hard coal."  Ah, my dear friend I  Shipping Casualties.  Tbe official record of shipping casualties, compiled by the Board of Trade,  was recently issued, says The London  Daily Telegraph. From the tables given  during the last 25 years there occurred  6,770 wrecks and casualties to ships belonging to the United Kingdom, attended- with���������fa tal-resu! ts -1 u-41,803 -person?,  of whom 3G.03S were members of crews  and 0,770 passengers, pilots, or oth-v  persons. Thc average annual los������ during thc 25 years was 1,072 persons, con-  Msting of l.-IU crew and 231 passenger.". Thc li-i-n iu ldOO-lOOl was l.Oil  persons, of whom !*.>" were crew V,d  fl4 were pasucngers. The Io������s of seamen  in 1900-1001 was lower than in anv nrc-  vious year except lg97-!,*3. The Ini*; of  life in 1805-98 wns swollen by tl'e loss  of 2*17 lives through the wreck ot ', l.o  Drummond Cnstlc, and the loan of ?77  lives through thc sinking of the On Wo.  of London, by collision. The number et  passengers lost in 1891-95 was fw.iilen  by 1,150 Chinese soldiers drowned by  the sinking of the Kow Shing of London. The average numbpr of a"awn  lost during the 25 years in sailing i<=s-  sels was 933, and of passen^er-i FO,  against 574 (seamen and 12 passenger*  lost in 1900-1901. The average number  of seamen lost in steamships was 50.'',  and of passengera 181, against 383 seamen and 42 passengers lost in 1900-1901.  The loss of life in steamships in "J iy-:l'.l  was swollen by the loss of 100 lives (Oi  men and 42 pn-v-icTigcrs) through tho  wreck of the Mohogan, and of 105 lives  (19 crew ami 8(5 passengers) throiigh '.lie  wreck of the Stella. The total number  of sea. casualties to vessels of all kinds  belonging to 15ritiah posse-wiorw ,:!iv<,ad,  which occurred in lflfW-1001, wns 033.  The total loss of life in 1900-1001 was  209, against fS42 in the previous year.  The record ceases with June 20   tSUl.  La Montt���������This paper contrndle.ts itself. At one time, it remarks that tho  esteemed citizen lived to "a gTcen old  age" and at another "a ripe old ago."  La Moyne���������Whill's  the  dill'crence ?  La Monti.���������Why, if anything Is green  how can it be ripo .'���������Chicago Daily  News.  Assembly of the Church of Scotland is  a proud man to-day. For some unexplained reason his Majesty - the King  ha3 been pondering the problem of Iho  Moderator's precedence, and the result  is now announced. During his term of  office the Moderator is to take precedence in Scotland next after the Lord  Chancellor  of   Great  Britain.    Thus  is  1  said coal mine���������  How beautiful  My heart he what you  love I"���������Chicago  Record-  j zis lady ees I  i call  leap  wis  Herald.  i  ���������   !     The keeper in attendance on a guest  at a Norfolk shooting   party . recently  the horn of Presbyterianism exalted. To ' looked on with disgust at the gantli-  cstimate the dizzy attitude to which 'Mans erratic marksmanship. He was  the Moderator is raised, we must sup-   banging away here,    there   and   every-  banging away here,    there  where, but no birds fell.  "Aim 'ighcr, sir," advised the keeper.  Still the birds,flew untouched.  "It ain't the gun, sir, and it ain't tho  cartridges," remarked tho Norfolk man.  "Try shuttin' your right eye instead of  the left, sir."  But not a pheasant fell.  The keeper scratched his head.  "The birds is very strong on the wing  this year," he remarked, "but there's una  more chance. If I was you, sir. I sh.mlit  'ave a pop with both eyes shut."���������Answers.  we must suppose the King' to hold his court at Holy-  rood, and picture the long procession of  personages who will rank below the very  reverend figure in the Geneva gown.  The entire peerage will take their places  after him, together with all thc Bishops  of the Anglican church. As for the  numerous Bishops who have assumed  Scottish titles, they are, of course, mere  dissenters, with no place on the precedence table at all, a'.id if the matter were  probed we ore not sure but that Jacob  Primmer would come before tho Bishop  of Edinburgh.    We hope that thc clTect _  upon that humble Christian, the minister j ' ���������������������������������������������  of-Mou&wald,-mayinot_bo_the production Yoxi know there's a belief that when  of anything  of  the  nature    of   "teto "a-man-is-delirious-from_fevcr-he-tells  nionte."    Tfis Majesty has also, it ap- : -**"-1 "'OS-- cherished secrets."  pears, settled the question    of preeed- !     "Ves^but it isn't so.    i could  bhow  ence, which for some years post has been    y������u   disturbing the peace of Belfast. Ho has \ "Well, it certainly isn't true in the  pronouncfid lhe Moderator of the l'rcv , ,cft8e ol .olu l'olhiggninus. U hen lie was  bytcrian Church to stand on an equal- . raving in Ins delirium the other night  itv with the Archbishops of" the Catholic tl,e watchers buppoxed he would let out  nnd Episcopal churches, and as there is , ������ ���������fft"*v (J,C).9 "bout l������s weulth and what  no State church in Ireland, the decision , ���������'e1** Hot it invested in. He not on.;,*  is unchallepgahlc upon nny grounds save di<1"'t d������ that, but I'm blest if he didn't  those of "prcliitic pride/' faint trace*; tell more lies about it than if he had  of which may nomelimcs be delected, i ������,c?n talking to the assessor,"���������Lhicago  Many will ncclaim  the judiciousness of i .tribune. . . ^  these  decisions of  tlio    King,    running ! ������ ��������� *���������>  strongly, as they do, in the face of At the annua ^meeting of tho Kmanu-  pretensions loudly enough expressed j El Sisterhood the Uev. Dr. Leon Harri-  just now in  England-and not unheard   son told this story :  How Lillian Russell Keeps  Young.  Lillian Russell is described by  Geraldino Bonner, who recently  saw her at Wcbor & Field's Theater in New York, as "just the same  old Lillian, exactly as good-looking,  in the sanlo perfectly regular way, as  she ever was. Theatergoers have always wondered how this popular actress  contrived to retain her bounty, despite  the flight of time, and so they will read  with interest her article on "The Secret  of How to Keep Young," which appears  in a recent number of "Collier's Weekly."  Miss Russell declares that it is a comparatively simple thing for any person  to keep fresh and youthful-looking without tho aid of cosmetics, enamel, dyes  and other mineral or vegetable substances which may servo the purpose for  a time, but in tho end leave the user all  tho worso for tho application. She adds:  "Thero is nothing liko exercise and diet  to promote the good health which is a  necessary accompaniment of���������in fact, the  vital principle tliat serves to preserve���������  youth and beauty. The average woman  of today is apt to sacrifice all thing.*, to  her comfort. Exercise is a bore; dieting  is troublesome and almost painful; because effects nre not at once apparent,  she dispenses with any little reform in  the mode of living which, in a contrite  spirit, Bho may have taken up. I have  known women who made firm resolves to  undergo a systematic courso of exercise  and followed it up religiously for a faw  days, meanwhile scanning, their glass  eagerly to note results. None developing  at once, they have voted the whole thing  a fraud, and gono back to the old routine of pleasure and indolence. The woman who is really in earnest about preserving her beauty and youth will find,  in a short time, that the few simple  rules to follow soon become a source of  genuino pleasure. I say rules, but that,  is not to be taken literally. There aro  no set rules to ��������� bo followed; one must  be guided by common sense, and enter  thoroughly into tho spirit of the thing,  for mind hns as much to do with accomplishing results as the actual training.  Tho woman who assigns to herself tSic  task and then goes about it in a desultory fashion, with half-hearted hopes of  achieving ends, would better-not make  the attempt at all."  The system of exercise which Miss  Russell follows may, to some, seem almost heroic; to her it has now become a  sort ��������� of second nature. "In the first  place," she says, "when I awaken in t3io  morning I drink at least two eupfuls of  hot water. Then a plunge into a warm  bath is followed by a thorough massstge.  and I take a few minutes of rest before  eating breakfast. This meal consists of*  a pieco of dry toast and, perhaps, a cup  of weak tea. If it is summer-time, a  game of tennis or practice with the medicine-ball is next. All the muscles arc  brought into play, and at the expiration  of fifteen minutes I ain in a profuse perspiration. But thc game is enjoyable,  and I continue until thoroughly wea������y.  Then into tho bath-tub again and anoth-  -r rub-down, and I am ready for breakfast No. 2, which consists of a lean chop  mil' toast���������but nothing of a liquid nature. If thc day is fino,.a spin on my .  oieyelo is next , in order. For this I  .vcar a medium-weight sweater over my ,  .e-mlar costume, and tho ride is never  *es3 than ten miles and at a pretty good  ���������lace. Reaching homeland after anotlMr  vub-down,*I don'somo'loose costume and  .ead or otherwise pass the time until' -  lunch.. This meal is'also very'simple, oil ���������  starchy" or' fattening foods being religiously excluded: Allowing a little_ time  for digestion, 'some .other game is indulged in���������such ns tether-ball, or perhaps  ...,'olf. A short carriage drive follows,  with a bath and massage.at the finish.  That takes ,mc up lo dinner-time, when  usually I cat what my fancy dictates.  That is "the one meal of the day in which.,  I do not stint myself, although I avoid,  so far as possible, any foods which have  n. fattening tendency. The evenings, too,  uro spent in quiet relaxation, as I consider I havo dono enough for the day.  "The following--morning," concludes .  Miss Russell, "the same plan is followed,  and I take genuine pleasure in carrying  out the schedule laid out. There i3 nothing hard or disagreeable in what I do.  In the winter, when bicycle-riding is out  of the question, I play ping-pong, or row  a few miles in an .indoor boat.. , Tho  punching-bag, I find, is a grand form of  exercise, and I am becoming an expert  at that. Tlie care of the skin is, *of  course, an important factor. The simplest forms of emollients, used in connection with facial massage, I find are the  best. But they are of little use without  the exercise which brings the natuiwl  glow of health to the chocks. The h������iT  should be carefully looked after, as nothing bo much tends to make a woman look  youthful or pretty as - her 'crowning  glory.' Frequent" shampoos, combined  with persistent-brushing, will do all tnat  is necessary in that line."  in Scotland itself.  "I invited my teacher and venerable  friend Dr. Gottheil to be present at a  synagogue one day when 1 was to deliver a sermon. He came and heard me,  and 1  was_ naturally anxious to know  So at  the first opportunity 1 asked how he  liked the sermon.  " 'The text was good and admirably  chosen,' he responded quietly."���������New  York Times.  Autocars "For Railways.  Tho Northeastern Railway of England  is  at the  present  moment building  at J hpw my effort had pleased liim  its York works two autocars to run on  its railway,  each of  which  will    carry  a complete apparatus    for    generating  its own motivo power.    It is calculated  that a speed of 30 miles an  hour  can  bo got up  in  as  many  second.*),   which  is very much quicker acceleration than  is possible wilh nn ordinary train.      It  h  not proposed   to  use   these  autocars  at  lirst  for   the  longer  distance:   trallio  of the Northeastern Railway, but to em-j  ploy, them   rather   for  accelerating   the I  service on  those sections of thc system j  whero an ordinary train can only mako ]  a ������low rate of speed owing to the num- j  her  of  stopping  place?.    Thc  two  cars I  now under construction nre destined to- [  run     between    Hartlepool    and    West i  Hartlepool stations, where there is keen;  competition with a tramway service.   If j  tho experiment be successful, other sec- !  tinns of the company's system are to be  similarly    equipped    with     automobile  trains.  KO NEED TO  SUFFER.  torture of Rheumatism  Relieved In Six Hours  Cured  With a face Of the * utmost gravity,  amounting almo-,1 to stcrnneSB, - but  with a twinkle in his eye, the great  merchant called the ollice boy to his  desk.  "Henry," he said, "have 1 ever given  you anything 1"  "No, sir," replied the boy, wondering  what was to come next.  "How long have you been working'  for us I**  "h'ix niunths, sir."  "Then you "have been here long enough  to know better than to leave that door  upeii. If you do it again 1 shall have  to give you a permanent vacation. That  is all,  Henry."���������Chicago Tribune.  In One to      ^ " j  Three Days.  . The acid poison that invades the joints  In Rheumatism can be reached only  through the blood. South American  Rheumatic Cure neutralizes the acids,  dissolves and washes out all foreign  Substances and sends a current of rich,  fed blood to the affected parts, bestowing  Instant relief from the torturing pains.  Read what C. M. Mayheer, of Thomas-  Ville, Ont., has to say: "My joints were  so badly swollen with Rheumatism that  I could hardly walk, or even feed myself." I have tried various other remedies, but thev did me no good, and I  almost despaired of getting cured. A  friend advised me to try The South  American Rheumatic Cure, and after  lisim* only three bottles I was entirely  curt ., and have never had a return of  (he agonizing symptoms."  Pain in Your Kidneys?  .South American Kidney Cure purges  the kidneys of every impurity, and re- '  stores  them   to   health���������speedily  and  cericctly. No, 81  '^^^^M^^riSsm^Si^S^^^^^,  ���������^i-u-aaaff-t-aw^^ //  /  ���������'Thank you, Couison, I think not,*'  eald Mr. Hyde; "or stay! you might  vend a telegram for me."  He pulled out his note-book, scrib-  fbled a few words in it, tore out the  ���������eat and handed it to the servant, with  .instructions to despatch the telegram  nt once.  i "Just a word to my daughter," he  ���������explained, as the man departed, "to  prepare her for the pleasure of your  Arlvai."  A few more' minutes and the train,  Bras on its way again.  It ia hardly necessary to say that  /(Marjorie St. Clair was no other than  'ate child whoso father had met with  ���������so'tragic a death on that fatal St. Val-  tmtlne's morning nine years ago;       .. I  kThe change in her name had been  rought about by her Tgoing to live  1th her mother's cousin. Miss St.  lair.  i This lady had aeslred the child to  ftbe called by her name; and now Mar-  Sorle rarely remembered that it was.  Slot her own.  Her father's murd erer   had!  never  (been discovered, ir   iplte of the most  Igilant search on --e'part of the po-  / Jt leemed pretty certain, however,  that plunder had been the object; for  ������ roll of bank notes was missing from  [the drawer of tho writing table���������also  the pretty gold locket which had been  Intended for poor Ethel Bruce's Valentine.  She, poor soul, followed her husband  to the grave within six months of the  tragedy that had wrecked her life,    i  ��������� ���������       ' ��������� '        ��������� ���������  .' It was. late In the afternoon when  fflSr. Hyde and Mnrjorie alighted at a  pttle country station, they having left  .fete express at Euston, and finished  Bheir journey in one of the slow local  ���������trains.   "  A well-appointed carriage waa in  ���������raiting.  Mr. Hyde tr-d Mafjorle. entered It;.  (he servant.who had traveled with  his master mounted beside the cfach-  man, and away .they drove towards.  Denelands, which Mr.- Hyde had told  sVfar.'orle was the name of his home.  A drive of half an hour' brought  them to It.  it was a handsome white building,  ample and substantial, though "plain.  It was surrronnded by a large gar-  Ben and shrubberies,- and there was a  <seat white lodge at the entrance-gate.  There appeared to be no other house  jrithln a distance of half a mile.  Just behind it, on a slight eminence,  ���������was a wood; at the side of it a wide  lake.  The carriage bowled swiftly and  smoothly up the drive and stopped at  the hall door.  Mr. Hyde, with great courtesy, assisted Marjorie "to alight and'led her,  flnto one, of the parlors opening out of  ithe ball. i  It was.a remarkably pretty, refined '  npartment. A cheerful fire was burn-, -  tag in the grata !  Alady's work-basket and some needle  iwork were lying "on the' table; 'an ���������  ���������empty chair stood near,.,    ; ,. "  "Ah, my daughter is not here, I  eee," remarked Mr.    Hyde,    glancing '  swiftly round the room.    "Sit'down,  IMIss St. Clair, and I will fetch her."  Marjorie seated herself near the fire,  ���������nd awaited the coming of Miss Hyde,  With no small degree of trepidation.  When Mr. Hyde made; his generous  offer, she accepted It almost at once,  ���������imply because she was so distressed  and overwrought that she knew not  ���������what else to do.   **  But now she could not but .reflect  that the daughter" might not approve  iter father's choice.  ' she might be a haughty, mistrustful young lady, who would object to  this Intrusion on the part of an uttei  Stranger.  Mr. Hyde had remarked, fn tha  ���������ourse of conversation, that he wai  a widower, so Marjorie knew hla  daughter was mistress at Denelands.  In a minute or two the door opened  and a young lady entered���������tall .and  graceful, ������nd wearing. an elegant, tea  ���������own of. black and gold, which trailed  ion the carpet behind her.  She looked a little haughty, but held  Unit her hand with frank cordiality.  "How do you do,' Miss St- ClairJ"'*  (was her greeting. "My father has told  -arte about you. I hope we may be abli  ]to make you comfortable. I am Mist  i|������yde."  , Marjorie, as she murmured. a grate-  ifnl word or two, looked up at the fact  labove her own, and saw In.a moment  jbow very beautiful it was.  j A somewhat southern-looking face,  (jsrlth a clear, creamy skin, large blui  'kyes, fringed by, almost black lashes, i  'arm, beautiful mouth and allghtl)  - aravy, very dark brown hair.  i Her age might he four or five ant  twenty; her bearing was one of slngu*  iter dignity.and grace.  She sat down, begged Marjorie to d������  ���������the same, and began to talk with periled case, and In a clear,, high-bred  'tone.  "My father says you have told htm  that the lady to whom you were going  and who has left England so suddenly,  may return in the courso of nl*  jWeeks," she, said. ','If she does, ant)  lyou prefer to go to her, wo ahall, ol  icourso, wish you to please yourself. 11  not, we shall be happy to have you  .continue to stay with us." ��������� t  - These were kind words, and - Mlsi  Hyde's manner did not seem insincere.  And yet. In some subtle, rayatortou*  'fashion, Marjorie received the impres*  tion that she was not really a welcomi  cuest, so far as this young lady was.  concerned.  Presently Miss Hyde rang the bell  and desired a servant to bring In tea  "We will have it here together," sb������  jtremarked.   "My father is tired with  his journey, and will tako his in bit  own room.   And there is no one els*  "in the house at present.   After tea 1  care say you will like to go upslalrj  cno nave the evening to yourself.   Yoo  must be tired,; too.   Allow me to help  ybu'to take off your hat and jacket."  ���������   And very graciously and gracefully  she persisted In helping her, in spits  of Marjorle's remonstrances.  During tea the,two girls sat opposite each other, and more than  once  , Marjorie caught  Miss    Hyde's    eyct  toed upon her with a look she could  hot fathom���������a scrutinizing   gaze,    as  though Bhe would penetrate Into the  Innermost secrets of her soul.  ; That look puzzled Marjorie.  There came a day when; she understood it well.  CHAPTER III. '''  Visitors.  Marjorie thankfully availed hersojl  of Miss Hyde's ' coii.il derate offer, and  retired to her room very early in the  evening.  When she wont    downstairs    next  morning she found Mr. Hyde in the  '.', breakfast room, his fine, fresh complexion all glowing from his matutinal bath.  He greoted. her with the utmost cordiality and kindness.  To herself she said that if only \h\  laughter had tha frank, pleasant man- <  ter. ot the father, her home might ha  a very happy one indeed.  In a moment or two Miss. Hyde appeared, dressed in an elegant morning  town, and looking even more beautiful than ahe had.looked the night before. .' ��������� - ,  Her manner, however, was restrained, though perfectly well-bred and polite.  Evidently Bhe had - no intention ot  Betting on terms of freedom with her  young companion until-she knew hev  better.  Mr. Hyde seemed to notice and be  fi-exed by his d?  -jhter's coldness.  Indeed, once "Marjorie saw him cast  a' glance of unmistakable reproof at  her.  - After breakfast, the members of the  family were free to follow the day's  occupations "or. diversions.  . Mr. Hyde rode out on horse-back,  first commending Marjorie very kindly to the care of his daughter.  "Tou must remember she is amend  Btrangers, Madeline, and try to kee>  her from feeling lonely," he said, as he  left-them. "And you, my dear, must  make up your mind to regard us as  your friends."  A mist of.'grateful , tears dimmed  (Marjorle's eyes as, standing by the  .Window, .she watched him ride away.  How kind he was, how generous,  how true a gentleman.  Already, she loved him as she might  have loved, a dear and' honorable relative.  ; Oh, If only his daughter were more  ftke him! She turned: to find Madeline's eyes fixed on her with that same  scrutinizing gaze she had seen In.them  Sast night.  This time a slight shade of melan-  iboly crossed Miss Hyde's- brow, as.  though she saw something which gave  her pain.  She suggested they should sit by the  lire and do some needlework together.  Marjorie readily acquiesced, and a  -servant brought in a great, roll ot flannel from'which Madeline commenced,  with great-dexterity, to cut a number.  ef garments, which, she said, were for  the poor.  "I'm always so pleased to do anything of this kind���������for the poor, I  mean," said Marjorie, watching her  ���������with Interest. "I'm glad you like it,  too."  But Madeline disclaimed all merit  tn the transaction.  "If I ware left te myself I should  never make a single garment," ahe  said, with frank carelessness. VI do  It simply because my father wishes  dt He likes me to bo kind to the indigent."  "He 1b kind to everyone, I think,"  Bald Marjorie, softly.  Miss Hyde made no answer.  A curious look flitted over her face-  almost, u mocking look���������as though she  had her own opinion about her father's  kludueas.  All that day Miss Hyde and Marjorie ���������  tvn-'o alone together, for thc master of  the house did not return till early in  the evening.  Little by little the elder girl's manner unbent.  The air of cold restraint dropped  from her; her face lighted up into new  beauty.  Marjorie said to herself���������  "Oh. how I could love her if only sh������  (Would always be like this."  The truth was it was Marjorle's own  sweetness that had softened Madeline.  There was a charm about her which  .won its way to most hearts.  Hard Indeed would have been thi  heart that could resist her.  The two girls were still sitting together by tho morning room fire when  Mr. Hyde returned.  "I hope we have something good for  (dinner, Madeline," he said, cheerfully.  "Your cousins will be here to-nlgnt."  Madeline looked up, startled, a red  spot on her cheek, excitement in her  eye.  "I got a wire from them at the station," went on her father, easily.  "They will be here for dinner. Isn't  It uiae you went upstairs to dress?"  '���������I think lt is," said Madeline, speaking in an abstracted, preoccupied fas****-*  ton. "Come, Marjorie."  . And they left the room.  ' Ten minutes later Marjorie, as she  ���������dressed in her own chamber, missed a  little gold sleeve link from her cuff,  . nnd feeling; sure she had dropped lt  either in the hall or on the staircase,  ���������he slipped out to look for-it.  At the bottom ot the stairs she  found it; and as she stooped to pick it  up she heard Mr. Hyde's voice in a  room close at hand.  It was slightly raised, undoubted!;,  tn anger or displeasure���������  "Do asl tell you," he said, impera-  , tlvely.   "You know my plans. Silence!  I will not hear a word.    Enough for  you that I mean to be obeyed."  It was not Intentionally.that Marjorie Had overheard even this much,  and she went upstairs again as soon  os she had got her sleeve link, without  pausing for a single unnecessary: moment.  She concluded it must be one of the  ���������servants Mr. Hyde was speaking to,  ' and wondered .what had: been done to  arouse such severe displeasure in so  mild-tempered a man.  '  A couple of minutes later there came  clap at her door, followed by ore en*-  trance of Madeline.  ' "You've begun to dress, I see," she  remarked, carelessly. "I thought .1  would come in and tell you to put on  one of your prettiest dresses. My father will like lt, I think, and take lt  as a compliment to the arrival of his  nephews."  Marjorie was only too pleased to do  anything to gratify Mr. Hyde.  She acquieced at once.  "Will you choose for meT" she said  Co Madeline.   "Ah, do, please." .  Madeline walked tt) the wardrobe  without- speaking, -and looked at the  two or three evening "dresses which  hung there.  . "You might wear this, I think," she  said, pointing to a very* pretty frock,  eau-de-Nll In color, and,most charmingly made. "J. will send you a few  : flowers to wear with it."-  "Oh, thank you; how very, very kind  you are."  Again a slightly mocking smile  curled Madeline's perfect lips.  Marjorie did not see it, however, for  her face was averted, and a moment  later Madeline quitted the room.  When the dinner bell rang and Marjorie went downstairs, she made as  fair a picture as the mind could franio  or the! eye could rest upon.  The delicate sbade of her dress har*������  tnonized exquisitely with the fairness  of her Gkin.  Her eyes were sweetly lustrous be*  hind their long silken lashes; her  beautiful. golden brown hair shaded  her white brow, and was gathered in a  simple Greek knot at the back of her  dainty head.  She looked sweeter than words can  ���������ay.  Mr. Hyde, who was alone In the dining room, glanced at her with a well  ���������pleased smile.  ���������-"Dld-Madellne^send^you^the-flowers,  tny dear?" he asked, looking at a lovely cluster of pink roses which were  pinned across her bodice.  "Yes, sir. It waa very kind of hor.  (Was it not?"  "I trust you will never meet with  anything but kindness from Madeline,"  said the old gentleman, earnestly.  The next moment Miss Hyde enter  ed, gowned In old rose silk, with trimmings of rich Spanish laee.-  " Her-cheeks were flushed���������her eyes  sparkling.    She looked   Indescribably  beautiful.  "Where are Edgar and Charles?" sho  asked, glancing round.  "Here'." said a .>.man's voice���������very  soft and musical���������just outside the  door. ,  It opened and two young men: in  'evening dress came-forward,"the foremost, who had been the speaker, stepping up. to Madeline and kissing her  .frankly on the cheek.  He was very nandEome. in a dark,  Spanish style, with an olive skin, vary  brilliant eyes, a heavy moustache and  glossy: hair of raven blackness.  Hia figure, too, was remarkably fine  ������������������tall, and of splendid proportions.  He looked haughty, Marjorie  thought, but clever, and not ill-na-  tnred.  His cosapanlon was younger, and bj,  ���������no means so striking-looking, but Marjorie liked his face better.  He was perfectly cleaa-shaven, and  had a clear, healthy skis, such as ono  often sees In young Englishmen who  Epend a deal of their time in the coun-  itry In the open air.  His gray eye was very bright ana  keen, his mouth was pleasant, hla  ���������teeth were white and even.  Hls_. whole appearance was unmls  takably that of a gentleman.  Not quite so tall as his brother, he  was yet of a good height, and possessed, moreover, that air of alertness  and agility which Is a sign of perfect  health.  Marjorie was Introduced in dm  form.  She then learned that the dark gentleman was Mr. Edgar Hyde, and that  the fairer one's name was Charles.  Both looked at the dainty face ot  Marjorie with as much interest as waa  consistent with good breeding.  They greeted her with great courtesy, and Charles took her in to dinner. Madeline laughingly taking an  arm of her father and her cousin Ed-  Kar.  During the evening Marjorie, whost  perceptions were very keen, made ���������  discovery.  Madeline loved her cousin Edgar-  loved him with that all-absorbing, passionate devotion which one would naturally expect in a girl of her type.  Whether he returned her love. Slur  Jorle could not be quito so sure.  There was evidently some kind of an  Understanding between them.  A.s, on their, entrance he kissed her,  /While bis brother was content with a  simple hand-shake, so, during the  whole evening, his manner to her was  lover-like; his place, of right, seemed  by her side.  Nevertheless, Marjorie could not be  Quite sure he loved her, and once or  twice she detected a jealous, dissatisfied look in" Madeline's eye, as It  rested on him.  Mr. Charles Hyde took his place be-  'Side Marjorie, and seemed well content to stay there; nor was she ill-  pleased to have him, for he was a  .pleasant, entertaining companion, and  had read most of her favorite poets  and authors.  She found it quite delightful to con-  Verse with him.. Among other things  he told her some capital, stories of his  adventures at Oxford.  His brother, who chanced to bl  "standing: near, caught a: word, or two  and said���������  "What's that you're telling Miss St  Clair, Charlie?"  "Oh, only a little tale about a scrapi  t got into at Christ church."  This answer seemed to amuBe ths  elder brother exceedingly.  It,was .with difficulty he kept from  toughing outright: and when he re-  loined Madeline he repeated tt to her,  ts though it were an excellent Jest.  She, however, did not smile.  On the contrary,, a rather uneasy and  snxiouB look crossed her face as she  glanced at Marjorie.'  Late In the evening Mr. Hyde asked  Cor some music.  - VYou play, Marjorie?" said Madeline,  and the suggestion' was so warmly seconded by all three gentlemen that Marjorie could not but comply.  "I wonder If you can play my tavor-  (te.'r said Mr. Hyde. . -   '  "What is It, sir?"  He rose, and placed a piece of muslo  fn front of her. It was Mendelssohn**  "Hear My Prayer."  "You wish me to sing as well as  play?"  "If you will.".1' * .     .      ,  Marjorle's skill as a musician was  far beyond the average, and her voice  was exquisite���������so sweet, so rich, so  pure. -  As the beautiful strains ran through  the room, everyone present **J*M en**  ���������ranced. " -t  ' Mr.Hyde seemed deeply moved.  Ma.-jorie, turning round, " saw   him  rai.v his handkerchief to his eyes.  '   "Miss  St. Clair,  your voice Is  divine!"   , claimed   Edgar Hyde, with  enthusiasm.  And beta Charles and Madeline  echoed the sentiment. - -  *  Mr. Hyde laid his band in fatherly  fashion on the head of the young play-*  er as she sUll sat at the pianoforte.  "You. have given me a great p!oa&������  nre," he said, in a slighty' rnl'erlnjj  voice, but very earnestly. "God olcas  you, my dear."  CHAPTER IV.  The Locket.  A Gloomy View.  The next day passed. pleasantly in  company with the young men, who  would spend, Madeline ������ald, at least  i week or t-vo at Denelands.  . There had been a hard frost for two  Dr three days and tbe Ice on the lake  tvas quite strong enough to bear.  Madeline and Marjorie, attended by  (he two young men, went to make  trial of it.  Mr. Hyde, though declining to put on  ikates, stood on tbe bunk and watched  them for some time.  "You might Invite a few of your  roung friends, and make a s'.atlng-  party of* lt," he suggested to his daughter. "Sir Edward Mortimer and his  listers would be glad to eoine, I think;,  and perhaps the Oli rerav IVhat do you  lay?"  At the" mention' of Sir Edward Mor������  timer, the two young men exchanged  glances, and seemed exceedingly,  amused.  -Marjorie saw their amusement and  erondered what caused lt.  That,, too, she was: soon; to under*  I tend.  "Skating by torchlight would he fine  tun," said Charles Hyde. "How  prould St. Valentine's Day do for it,  ilr?"  His brother muttered a word of distent under his breath.  He looked angry and disturbed.  His uncle gazed at him intently for  ��������� moment of two then said in a slow,  thoughtful tone���������  "You don't like St. Valentine's Day,  flay boy?"  "No. sir���������do you?' demanded Edgar,  turning suddenly upon him, and speaking with almost fierce abruptness, then,  as suddenly turning away, and skating aulte to the other end of the pooh  (To be Continued.).  'A special despatch from London to  The New York Sun says Mr. l'redeii:  Harrison, in an address to tlie Positivist  Committee, of which" ho is President,  said that the Monroe doctrine would  eventually descend to tho simple formula of "No European monarchy shall  hold ground on transatlantic continents."  Mr. Harrison affirmed that England was  hastening such a development by 'or  foolish combination witli Germany. Mr.  Harrison takes a gloomy view of poli-  cal institutions as they were afflicted by  tho events of the year 190*2. He says:  "Tlie cardinal fact of our time is tho  exhaustion of the Parliamentary system  of government. i'.uli..im*iiu ewi'y>*li'.'i-���������  are passing into a sluge of. decidciut',  discredit and servility. In Germany a  Parliamentary coup d'etat bus reduced  thc Chamber to an oflice in which derisions of State which ore decreed by  tho Sovereign and a Minister are ron's-  tered with a iui'iimlu which tins been  seen and approved. The-sn'uie ur.ma-i  i.s being applied in England to the mother uf free Parliaments, somewhat lead  openly but qiiite us efticiently. Wars  which might indirectly have brought us  Into collision or dispute with the two  great nations in tho world were begun behind the back of Parliament almost without any explanation of their  cause or object." Treaties were made  with foreign powers such as might-indirectly have shuken our whole commercial fiscal system to its foundation without any explanation to Parliament, and  even while Parliament was offeredv a  false explanation and wrong translation  of an important document the House of  Commons was called upon to waive its  most cherished privileges, including, tho  keystone of the British constitution���������  the absolute control of taxation. All  this," Mr. Harrison concluded, "is a sure  sign the Parliamentary government, ia  England is felt to be superannuated and  Is being superseded by irregular plebiscites, when these were ratified or approved by a House of Lords and Hou3e  of Bishops. A huge, unreal majority  elected under popular effervescence,  which was equivalent to a revolutionary  storm, demoralized the Government aud  Its opponents alike. The Ministers grew  as reckless of justice, and even of public opinion, as any autocrat, and the Opposition, feeling themselves silencedby  a mechanical guillotine, lost all cohesion,  and withdrew in despair. What is certain is that the khaki reaction of 1900  has made inroads on the constitutional  rights of the House of Commons such  as was never attempted by Pitt, Wellington, Peel, Palmerston or Gladstone.  Thirty Years' Service.  Miss M. C. Smith, who is the first woman to receive his Majesty's Order of  the Imperial Service, says' The Golden  Penny, - has been in the Savings Bank  Department of the Postoffice for thirty  years. The experiment of; employing  women in that department proved so successful that it opened the way, through  Mr. Fawcett's influence, to their employment in the Postoffice. Miss Smith,  who began as one-of the twenty female  clerks, has now over 900 women under  her control. As the pioneer of her "sex  in that branch of work, she well deserves  the honor she has just received.  The Golden Penny also has" the following : Mr3. Elizabeth Alsop, of Godson  Common, Guildford, has recently celebrated, with great rejoicings, her 102nd  birthday. She was in her young" days a  children's nurse,'and when she was 25  Sears old she went into service at Lady  iudrey Bisdale's. Lady Audrev was the  wife of the Rey. B. llisdale, o'f Tilling-  ton, and daughter of the then Man-uis  of Townshend. Mrs. Alsop remained  with the Bisdales for the record period  of female service of 74 jears. The late  Duchess of Teck offered a prize lor the  female -Bervant who in the British  Isles could prove the longest  period of service continuously in one  family, and.after due competition this  was unanimously awarded to Mrs. Elizabeth Alsop by the Duchess and her ladies' committee, with many felicitations  upon her unique record.  Mrs. Alsop's eyesight and hearing are'  not so good as they once were, it is true,  but she is extremely active, docs a lot of  knitting, and takes a very deep and intelligent interest in things that go on  round her neighborhood. She can tell  many interesting stories of our Queen's  girlhood, of historical events that now  Beem far back in the past, and she seems  likely to live many years yet.  Tho-idea-"of" a-domestic "remaining" In"  one family for 74 years is almost more  than the mind of the average householder can grasp. Fancy anyone���������-but what's  tho use f ���������  DON'T HAWK  AND SPIT.  Do Your Friends Avoid  You by Reason of  These  Symptoms  of Catarrh?  Dr.   Agnew's Catarrhal Powdei  quickly dispels every loathsome symptom of'Catarrh and effects a permanent  cure. It stands alone as a remedy  for Catarrh, both chronic and acute;  Hay Fever, Headache, Sore Throat, Influenza. Deafness, Tonsilitis and all  other diseases of the nose and throat.  Cures the severest cases and cures them  speedily. Rev. J. Louer Grimm, a well-  known clergyman of Springer, York Co.,  Pa., writes: "Both myself and family  have used Dr. Agnew's Catarrhal  Powder for the past two years, and I  can conscientiously recommend it to any  one who suffers from Catarrh or otbei  oose or throat diseases. I would con*  ���������ider it wrong not to recommend it every  ���������chance I get."   -  Liver Vorking Properly?  If not, it's proof neat your entire system is disorganized. ' Agnew s Livet  Pills���������entirely veget ble���������regulate the  Liver, purify the wcole body, restoring  it to perfect health.  40 doses ioc. No. 35  Cut the Leaves of Books.  Why in tho name of all that is modern and swift, asks The London Globe,  do not publishers cut tbe leaves of the  books they publish? It is assumed that  in these days a man has not time to  walk upstairs; it is perfectly "under*1  stood that telegrams must be accelerated,  and thai boy messengers must be cherished' and yet publishers will persist in  attaching a sentence of slow servitude  to nearly every book tliey issue. Take  the "Dictionary of National Biography."  It is a serious thing to buy it, hut it  is a more ecrious thing to get it cut. Who  is to do it? Not every man has relays  of daughters or an under-gardener whom  he can arm with a paper knife. Monarchs  and millionaires must have wayB of dealing with this problem. It is not to be  supposed that at Windsor Castle the  reader cuts the leaves. Whitaker may  be silent on the point, but it seems certain that a Groom of the Paper Knife  or a Book Barber in Ordinary exists and  draws an enviable salary. The "Dictionary" .is a fat and flagrant case.  It is morally and actuarially  certain that many eager purchasers of this great work have not  lived.to cut its leaves. Which is sad.  But the evil is at least proportionally  great in even a tiny volume. The present writer had occasion this week to  cut (with a paper knife two feet-long)  a copy of Matthew Arnold's "Note  Books." The booklet was tightly bound,  the leaves were stiff and slippery; and  though his one desire was to get at the  innermost mind of Arnold, he had all  the sensation of vivisecting a guinea pig.  Which is absurd-  Didn't Lose Much.  is   dead  out the  At one. of'.-tlie. annual fairs which are  held at a small town in Kussiii a gentleman observed a gypsy and a Pole haggling over the sale of a horse. Full of  curiosity when the two separated, and  anxious to know how two such shrewd  characters had bargained, the gentleman culled the gypsy to him and enquired how much he had got for his animal. Tlie gypsy opened his hand and  showed a teii-roublc note (valued about  a guinea).  "But isn't that very cheap?"  "No,"   said   the   gypsy,   "lie  laime."  The gentleman   then  sought  Pole and said:  "So you have given ten roubles for a  lame  horse?"  The Pole, however, with a knowing  look, said:  "Lame! He's as sound as you are. I  saw he was badly shod, and only limped  in consequence."  Tlie enquirer ������������������cturaed to the gypsy  and reported what the other said. The  former gave a tremendous and most significant wink and whispered:  "He's as lame as a two-legged stool. I  lind him badly shod on purpose to make  people believe that that was the cause  of his limping."    ���������  When this was cammunicatcd to the  Pole lie seemed for the moment taken  aback, and hung his head; then, with a  little sigh and a shrug of his shoulders,  he said, quietly:  ���������   "Ah, well, it's all right; it was a bad  ten-rouble note!"  A Savage Pun..  William Penn was obviously nervous  while signing his treaty with the Indians.  "I am afraid that redskin over there  may make a snap shot of the occasion,"  he explained.  "No fear," rejoined a friend; "he has  already- done his worst, lie just remarked tlie Penn was mightier than the  sword."  Moved to wrath, the great Quaker  went forth and founded Philadelphia,  thus making mr.n\ innocent people suffer for tlie i-"*- '������������������" nvitting savage.���������  New York "Tribune.'*   . . ***-l  Mainiv About People.  Here's ���������*���������> late story anent Christian  Sal"'-.-****. A Boston mother said to her  little daughter: "If you had my faith,  darling, you would have no toothache."  The child replied: "Well, mother, if you  had my toothache, you wouldn't have  any faith."  When Major-Gcneral Samuel :B. M.  Young, a United States army officer, was  presented to tlie Kaiser during a recent  visit to Germany, Emperor William  asked Qihn if he had ever visited that  country before. "Not this part," General  Young is said to have replied. The Em-  pi-*ror-then-enf|tiii"i*d-w!iat-p.trts-hc-had  visited, whereupon General Young said:  "I have.visited St. Louis, Cincinnati and  Milwaukee." The Emperor roared with  laughter, and took General Young to the  Empress, to whom 'he repeated ihe witticism.  Interesting: Items.  According to an Omaha correspondent  of the Chicago ������������������Tribune,*' D. H. Hoffman, a Union Pacific machinist getting  S3 a day, has received the palm as the  most expensively dressed man in that  city. The extent of his wardrobe was  brought to light in a trial in Omaha,  where u man was charged with stealing  a suit-case full of clothing from him.  While under oath he ttated that the grip  contained $8 worth of neckties. "How  many neckties have you altogether!"  asked the attorney, lie* replied: "I have.  $400 worth of neck ties." The court  gasped and the attorney turned pale. "Is  the rest of your wauiiobe in proportion?" asked "the attorney. "It is," responded the witness. Hoffman was  dressed faultlessly.  "When lienrv Hiemem*. jr., of St.-T.oju  died the other day he left SI,000,000 and  a will which provided that his widow,  who inherited lhe entire fortuife, was to  slri-w thc grave- of his first wife with  flowers every Sunday and on the niini-  vei-s.irics of her birth and death. Thi*  probably is tl,������* ncini* of ii-lined cruelty.  If the. testator had provided that the  widow, in order to keep tin* money,must  climb a greased pole every "Sunday morning, or yive up corsets, or do her own  washing, other women might have gone  to her and encouraged her with the assurance that the money was worth i.h������  sacrifice; but to be compc-lled to strew  (lowers on the grave of thc woman' w!u>  is now, let us hope, happy with the.man  in paradise will undoubtedly be regarded  by all sober-minded women ns too niueh.  The English papers t<"ll of a yoiinsj  l"*arisian in London,' visiting the "CIikiii-  ber of Horrors." at Mme. Tiissuiid'.**.'-. Being alone, he was -eizeii with an impul.***.'  to put his neck in the lunette wherein  had rested that of Marie'Antoinette. Ho  lay,down, touched a spring, and closcl  the collar. But how was he to releas****.-.  himself? If he touched the wrong spring  the fatal axe might descend. Before lo:,/  a crowd of visitors, led by an attendaus.,  came on the scene. Tlie guide was a bit.  of a linguist, and saw an opportunity,  with himself as master of the situation.  He at once began a practical; lecture on  the guillotine, interrupting his roranr,.*i  with little asides in French to the indignant victim, asking him to scream loudei-  or writhe more agonizingly. "How wd  ho acts!" exclaimed the gratified onlookers. Finally the Parisian was r.*lea*>e.l,_  and, answering the applause with me.Ie-  dictions. fled.  ONE 8POONFUI*.  "Will build for you good health,1  through good nerves, by using  South American Nervine  Almost all disease is the result of j  poor nerve action.   Without good j  nerves neither brain, nor stomach,/  nor liver, nor heart, nor kidneys, I  can work well.   Nerve food must I  be such that it will be absorbed by  'the nerve ends.    Such a food ia  South  American  Nervine,  the  greatest tonic known, a cure for  dyspepsia and  all  stomach  ailments.  Aoolph Le Bodie, B. C. L, Montrt*-  . al's well known barrister, writes i   "I  was suffering from insomnia and nervous debility, prostration and exhatu-  * tion.   I took five bottles of South American Nervine, and am u-hollv recovered  The Orest South Americen Rheumatia  Cure is the only one that has not a single  ' case ot failure in its record. Cure sure  within three days; relief inttantljr.     fi  Plea For the Plain Husband. '  As the result of examining a very extensive collection of ''portraits oi  the newly married obtained from,  the illustrated papers, the pressnb  writer has come to the conclusion thatj  the'plain man is just now in the heyday"  of his popularity, matrimonially speak-1  ���������ng! ' \  It would seem that while the handsome man is charming to dally witli,  someone whose features are homely, indeed even ugly, is regarded as the wisen  matrimonial venture. '.  The wife of the modern Adonis appears to have discovered, in fact, that  by her own act she has created a problem that may bring her many hours oi  uneasiness, if hot Of aeiual pain. !  lier husband lives upon the approba-j  tion of others. Her own worship op  him may for a .while" suffice lo satisfyi  liim; but later on he will assuredly need  that of the out-ide world. And the outside world is only too pleased to grant  him all the admiration he requires. Sails,  dinner-parties, picnics, skaiing meetings  demand his presence constantly, but  make no point of his wife being thcie at  all, a fact she quickly discerns and proportionately resents. Should she absent*  herself from such gaieties, die imagines!  her husband making himself too agree-'  able to this pretty woman or that, andi  should she become a hanger-on of his  popularity, she is all thc wftiie seething:  with hatred for her equiioeal position.  Much of the vanity of the handsome  man arises from the indiscreet adoration*  showered upon him in childhood. As ho  grows up he is nude much of outside the  family circle, because it is pleasant to.  have in a room full of guests as many,  handsome men as possible. And the se-.,  quel? Is it not obviou=7 "When he fell'  in love, it was not altogether because  his choice was fair and sweet, but because she, too, paid him the tribute of*  admiration. ,  Now, itis all very well to put a.man  on a pedestal and wTc.ithe him with  bays before morriagc; but what a wo-,  man wants after marriage is a good and  serviceable article in the way. of'a husband.  'Itis excessively annoying to a woman,  always to have to play second fiddle pi-  anisshno_whje*rL^he_^iuty_ question^ i������'  uppermost. Breathes there the wife"iny���������  any household who dislikes some little'  passing mention made from time to time  about iter good looks and charming indl-'  vidualityt But the wife .of an Adonis  obtains little of this sweet incense.  Sweep away this picture and contemplate the companion one of the plain  husband. His object is to make life a  bed of roses for his wife and family. Unselfishly the plain man toils.  The plain husband "puts up" with.  things. Did ever a handsome one brooto  the domestic trials lie cheerfully -m-*  dures? Somehow the handsome man is  expected to regard calamities from quite  a different standpoint. Nay, more, the.  ugly, good-humored head of a household  is expected to be the bandy man of tha  family. If a chimney smokes, his plain  features must be begrimed in an attempt)  to get at the root of the misohief; if a!  pipe leaks, his red and uncultured paws  are quite good enouuh to probe the de-'  feet to its very depths. What ���������handsome,  curled dorling could possibly be expected;  to risk his good looks by performing)  such nastv tasks as these? -  Judge���������Why didn't you go to the aa-*  sistance of the defendant in tho fight?  Policeman���������Shurc, an' Oi didn't know  which av thim wus goin' to be th' defee*>  dairt, yer honor.���������Chicago "News." ,       \  A woman in pursuit of a late sub  gown stood in front of a counter hea  with foulards in a big store. A bh  ground with a, while polka det seeme  to please her best, but she paused irre-so-*  lutcly. "It looks just like the old iodigei  lilue calicoes they: used to wear when "fj  was a little girl in the country," she  discontentedly. "Madame," said  portly salesman, "long after you,and  are dead and gone women will be'-'w  ing blue and white polka dot*. Thi  have worn them since the. race emergea.  from barbarism. They "will wear tReeaj  until it sinks into it.'again.".. After.thaq  proteutous gravity and heavy philosophy*  lhe woman bought the dr<*ss in a dazec  pjlence.���������Tacoma "Ledger." j Revelstoke Herald and  Railway Men's Journal  Published Bv  The Revelstoke Herald Publishing Co  Limited,Liability.  A. JOHNSON,  Editor and MsiinRer.  AIlVEKTISIXn   liATKS.  ���������-ii  on  r>isi.layads.,Jl.;*) j.er Inch;   sIiikIp column  I'ffr inch   when Inserted *'*'   lmite  **-' |"^r inch when Inserteil on till  i-ej-nl ads., lOcents tier inch (noii|.iirlul| lim*  far litMlnnertlon; Seems for each additional  ln-frMon. Local notice" 10 cents per line em'li  line. hir������i. Marriage ami Death .Notice**  'roe.  sr.issomPTioN hates.  "���������vro&llor earrler, ti *.i*r uniiiiin; ?1.2'i fur  *il 'mouia.*., strii'lly In ailvnitee.  OUR JOn nEPAKTMENT.  l.'Oiiefltthb l>cst equipped l.rlullnpoflicps In  'he H������t and prepared too.tectite nil kinds nf  ' . ilit ms tn ilrstelass style Ht Inmost prlees.  ���������'".it* l'rii'"* toftll. No job too lHrite���������iintii* nm  ������uinl--ti''r>i������. Mall orders |>roni|.llv utleiiili-.t  to.   Hive ns. ft trial on your next order.  to conr.EsroNDr..NTs.  We invite correspondence on nny subject  .".' lutcrct-t to the general imhlic. In all cases  th" bona lido name nf the writer must iiccom-  i.iitiv manuscript, hut nol necessarily for  piihl'icaUon.  Address aH.commiinicfttions to Ihe Manager  Aiiigiviitnps, Ralph Smith, ��������� M. P.,  would be retired for good. In Koss-  l.inil, straight, party rnim would micas tin* (j.ilts and the Sinclniis Iiavi* no  iiillii.'iicc. In the districts, like* (.'owi*  than on the Island, and East Yule unci  Vinir on tlie .Mainland, the Mugwumps  anil soichcnds me so few that they  do not count. In ncnily every instiiiue  i.lii'V nil" I ho fjidl'tei's and plncc hmiters  who lloiiiislii'd iliirinir the Tuiiier  icf-iiiH", und now hnve no political  fillui'p uinoiiir the men who want l.i  si*i* a stnble und progressive jrovcTii-  incut, in ririlisli (,'oluiiiliiii.���������Nelson  Tribune.  LEGAL  F.   MAISTRK i SCOTT.  Darri.stt'r.**, "-'oticitors, Hie.  Kuvclstiike", 11. C.  .1..M.Scott, ii.A���������LL.li.   W.ite i'.leM'aistre.M.A  H  AKVEY, .M'OAKTKU A; I'lNKUAM  Unrristers. t-ulii'itnrs. Kle.  Solicitors for linnurliil Hunk of t'liniiilii.  Company funds to loun iitS percent.  Kiiiht Stiiget, Kevelstoke 11. C.  SOCIETIES.  NOTICE TO COURESl'ON.IBNTS.  1 ���������All correspondence must he legibly  iri*4iH.ron one side of the paper only.  '-'.���������Correspondence containing personal  mat'" nnus-t be signed with the proper name  o'th nvriter,  ���������*> ���������' ��������� ���������     "^rr.  TucnsDAY. M.vncu 20. 100H.  Parliament Has Opened.  The Ninth Parliament ot Canada,  has entered upon its sessional duties  ���������"���������Jtmilift-tliird time. The speech -from  the throne was brief. -Mention was  made of thc; Col on in I Conference; the  influx of population to the Northwest:  the need of increased transportation  facilities: the approaching 'meeting of  the Alaskan Boundary Commission:  tlie redistribution bill; Ihe* introduction of legislation concerning the Hnil-  ivay Commission; amendment of the  patent-laws: the Militia Act: Chinese  immigration; settlement of railway  disputes; and the reorganization of  the Department of Marine nnd Fisheries.  The-session will lie one of the most  important since confederation, and  will" cover "an. immense 'amount. of  business.     It will last for six months.  Provincial Politics.  The action of the Nelson Liberal  Association, in turning down the  Vancouver Liberal Association's efforts  to "do up** ��������� Joseph Martin, shows  clearly that the rank and file of the  Liberal party in Nelson have no use  for Mugwump.-*., just as the rank antl  file of the Conservative party have no  use for disgruntled soreheads. . The  people in Nelson are in favor of con!  ducting the next provincialelection on  party lines, and have so declared  themselves. Tliey accept Charles  Wilson as leader of the Conservative  party and Joseph Martin as leader of  the Liberal party, both of whom were  chosen as leaders in regular conventions of their respective parties. The  people like fair play, and they do not  like soreheads. More: the people of  British Columbia will  not brook out  side interference in affairs that solely  concern the province. ��������� "While the  Liberal** have "great faith in Laurier as  the leader of their parly in Dominion  politics, they do not want Mr. Lauriei  or tuny of his minister* to iiit"*ifere  with them in provincial politics. So  with the Conservative**-. if the disgruntled and sorehead ("onf-ervntives  and the Mugwump Liberal"- ennnot  pull in party traces, then let them  m-ganize a party of their own; let them  flock all hy themselves. No great  nlTort would be made to keep them  from doing so, and by doing so tbe  political atmosphere would be cleared.  The candidate of such a party would  jxill probably 100 votes in Nelson, as  against 1,000 polled for the candidates  of the Conservative and Liberal  parties. It is true the 100 would bo  the "best people" in Nelson; but the  1.000 would be "common'' people. The  conditions that prevail in Nelson prevail in all of the larger towns and  cities. The candidates of the Mugwumps in Vancouver would poll the  300 Liberals who follow Harry Henklcr  and E. P. Davis and Bob Kelly, and  the 100 Conservatives who follow  Police Magistrate Russell and the C.  P. R. officials. Tn Victoria a Mug-  wntnp ticket would be snowed under.  Jn New Westminster, the disgruntled  element have no strength. In Nu-  naimo,   the  leader  pf    the    Liberal  Hon. Frank Latchford. "Cap7rSulli~  van, and his son, Frank Sullivan, a  government employee, D. A. Jones, a  brother of Senator Melvin Jones, and  E.(.'.Meyer.'. Mr. Stratton's secretary.  In addition, Mr. Gamey has verbatim  repot ta of a conversation between himself and Frank Sullivan, taken by  three qualified stenographers, in which  the whole of the sickening plot was  revealed. Tn fact nothing that sonld  forge the strong chub, ol* evidence was  omitted.  The revelations must brng home  with an unquestionable force from  which there is no escape, thc malicious current which underlies the  whole Liberal system of retaining  power. There is no attempt, made  to confine tlie crimes to any one  province or csection of a province.  They have been committed from British Columbia to Prince Edward  Island and in every case the Liberal  party has sought to benefit at the expense of the citizen. Mr. Gil nicy hna  suffered excessive degradation while  engaged in bis fight ngniiisl. the  "machine" but now that bis fine  motives are known, he stands out  conspicuously as one who has conferred an inestimable service on Unpeople of this country. As for Mr.  Gamey's would-be seducers, we may  leave them to wallow in tho mire of  thoir own creatioiij  Most   Revolting   Liberal    Plot.  The political history of Ontario for  the past, few years has been a story of  moral degradation from which the best  elements in the province have shrunk  with disgust. Tlie sanctity of the  ballot lias been systematically violated  under the auspices of men sworn to  guard it. -Judges have been dragged  into political disputes involving allegations of grovious wrong-doing. The  doors of prisons have been opened to  secure perjurers willing to swear away  the honor of men in exchange for  money wrongfully seemed by prostitution of office. Ministers of the  crown have recruited and maintained  a standing army among professional  election thugs, whose duty it... is to  defeat the will of the people as registered at the polls. All these and  many other heinous, offences against  public morality have been proved in  open court, ar-d it was this appalling  spectacle that provoked Hon. Sam  Blake to denounce in most uncompromising language the Ross government, and its vicious systems.  But it remained for Mr. I!. '.'.It,  Gamey, the Conservative'member for  Manitoulin, to disclose the worst  crime of all. Profiting by the exeri-  encc of Mr. Donald Sutherland, South  Oxford, who was. approached by an  emissary .''"of* the Ross government,  offered a good thing financially, and  denounced as a. liar by Hon. G. AV.  Ross, when he exposed lln? game, Mr.  Gamey made sure tliat ampin evidence  to prove a similar plot against his  integrity would be secured. Accordingly, when lie was offered $-1,001) on  behalf of Hon. J. R. Stratton to trans-  fee his allegiance to the Liberal party,  he proceeded- in a systematic manner  to round up tbe criminals.  On tbe floor of the bouse at Toronto.  Mr. Gamey laid bare tbe hard, cold  facts i)f an outrage on responsible government, which has sent a thrill of  indignation throughout Canada. He.  recited the incidents iis to how Hon.  J. M. Gibson and Hon. J. li. Stratton  sought to buy bim body and soul. Mr  Gamey was received tit first with  Liberal approbation but be closed his  speech amidst a dull and guilty silence  on the government benches.  The evidence offered is most damag-  ing. The very money paid for his  supposed treachery by the government  agents was displayed in the house.  Letters of a compromising diameter  were read  from  Hon. J. R. Stratton,  Keil Rose Pcprroe meets second unit fourth  Tuesdays of eneh month; White llose Decree  meeis third 'i'uesilny of each I'linrter, fn Oddfellow" Hull.  VIsltinc brethren welcome  lilt. C.AHRUTHEU.S, T. 11. ll.VKER,  President. Act. Secretary.  LOYAL ORANGE LODGE   No. 1658.  Regular meetings lire held In the  Oddfellow's Hull on the Third J'ri-  clny of each month, at S p.m. sharp.  Visiting brethren cordially invited  A. JOHNSON, W. .\I  W. JOHNSTON, llee.-Sec.  Cold Range Lodge, K. of P.,  No. 26, Revelstoke, B. C,  K&SSmttHI    1UIKET3   EVERY   WKDNKSDA Y  $���������������������������$/    "I-   in   Oddfellows'     llnil    at *s  ���������,mc'      o'flloek."    Vi**iling   Knights   are  cordially invited.  B, VAX JIOKNE, C.C.  ti. II. BIIOCK, K.of K. .l****.  CHURCHES  METHODIST CHURCH, HKV..I.STOKB.  Preaching-services at 11 a. 111. nnd.TifiO p. ni  Class meeting nt Lhe close ot the mui'iiiiig  service. Sahbnth School and UibleOlftss nt.-l::'.u  Weekly ��������� l'rayer Meeting every Wednesday  evening nt 7:80. The public nre cori-lially  invited.   Keats free.  I!cv C. I.adnrr, Pastor.  ST. PBTEItS UIIL'IICll, ANGLICAN.  Eight n. 111., Holy Eucharist; 11 a.m., ma'---a.**,  Ldtiiuy and sermon (Holy Euchnri.st lirst Sun-  dev in the month); -::*o : Sunday school, or  children's service; 7:S0 Evensong (choral) and  .sermon. IIolv Days���������The Holy Eucharist is  colebratednt / a.m. 01-811.111., ns announced.*  Holy Baptism after Sunday School mU:15.  c*. a. 1'KOcuNii.it.   color.  rnKSnYTBKIAN   CHURCH.  Service every Sunday at 11 a.m. antl 7:30 p.m.  to which all are welcome. ;.Prayer.meeting at  S p. m. everv Wednesday.  '    HkVi.W..C. Cai.iiku, Paslor.  KOMAN CATHOLIC CHril'IH.  Mais   at 10:**u a: in.,   on: (li-st,  second .and  fourth Sundavs in the mouth.  HEV.   FATHErt   THAVEIt.  SALVATION   AltMY.  -Meeting every night in their  Hall on Front  ���������Ireet.,  A. H. HOLDICH  ANALYTICAL CHEMIST  AND ASSAYER.  RoyalSchool of Mines, London.    Seven year."  at  Morfa  Works,  Swansea.     17   years   Chief  Chemist  to Wigan Coal and  Iron Co.,   Eng.  I.Hte Chemist and Assayer, Hall Mines, Ltd.  Claims examined mid reported upon.  Ferguson. B.C.  T   a. KJRK.  Domini  n'and Provincial Land Surveyor.  RKVELSTOKE. H.C.  E. MOSCROP . *- .  Sanitary Plumbing, Hot   Water  And Steam Heating. Gas  Fitting  Second St., REVELSTOKE, B.C.  H. PERRY-LEAKE,  Mining Engineer  '^"^arid^Metallurgist.-  SPEriALTIKS:  Kxamiiiatinn and rrp/trt^ mi .Mining  I'roperli*?*..  Spt-citlratifili   and   lV*.n������.triictM'ii   '���������  .Mining Mii,*liin,*r\  .Mill   TeHt.i   'if   Or'-  mid   C'i.iiivii  trnte**.  Il-dfnvil MrNuiU C������������li*:  fOWAN  ISI.CK'K, Ttevl-ti.!.'".   II. C  WHAT  IS A   IfOMI*. IVITIfOrT A  SINGER  Singer Sewing Machines  are sold or. easy monthly  payments.  A. full supply of machines  needles and attachments are  kept, for any make of machine on earth;  MANNINC,  :  MACKENZIE AVE.  Jtevelstoki", B. V.  WOOD  Wood for sale including  Dry Cedar, Fir and Hemlock.  AU  order.*!  left (it W   M. Lawrence's   will  receive prompt nticntlon.  W. FLEMING.  If you are looking* for possibilities in Estate  Speculation that will double your capital,  it will be to your interest to invest RIGHT  NOW, before the best of the properties have  been taken up.  Are you looking1 for Business Lots, Residential  Lots, or other Real Estate? Goldfields is the  Payroll Centre and Resident Town of the  Famous Fish River Free Milling- Gold Camp,  and has a Future unequalled by any other  Town in the West.  For Terms and Particulars Write  ROGER   F.    PERRY,    Manager,  Goldfields,   B. C.  ure  GO TO THE  REVELSTOKE DAIRY  FOR  Pure Milk  J. G. McCallum  PROPRIETOR.  Jas. I. Woodrow  gUTCHER  Retail Dealer in���������  Beet, Pork,  MuttonrEte.   Fish and Game in Season....  All order., promptly filled  CoTi������strzee" * 'RBYBItiS-SOKB, B.G  THE CITY EXPRESS  E. W. B. Paget, Prop.  Prompt delivery of pn-rcels, bn������(g*igc, etc.  to any pert of the city  Any Kind of Transferring  Undertaken  All orders left at K. M. Smylhe'a Tobaeen  storeor byTelophoiie.W.7willrcieivc prompt  attention.  1   HOW ABOUT  I  THAT SUIT  ?! Of CloUies* you promisor!  yourself this FALL.  Our Full Htoi-k is now the  most coinplctP in B. (J.  Our Fnney-Goods 11 ro nil  new with mow coloi'H niul  the Inti'Hl ptripes.  Sun llietn Imfoi'i! leavinij  your order elsewliun*.  n  R. S. WILSON,  j������ FiiKliioini We Tailor.  sj       Niixl, thi! IMel'iuty Block.  psxt*<������ixs������ex^^  *-*"i"*4"'i'*"l*+"i"ti'******t*"*l"*'M'*'l* **  5 PELLEW-HARVEY, I  BRYAftT & C.LfMK |  Mining* Engineers  ,and Assayers,  VANCOUVER,-H.C.    :.'Established 1S!W  ASSAY WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS  UNDERTAKEN.  Test-i made up to 2,000 lb?.  A specialty made of eheckiMc- Smelter  Pulps.  Samples from the Interior by mail or  S e\nress promptly attended to.  ������j     ijorriispondence solicited.  W VANCOUVER, B. C.  **f"Y"T* *T* 'T"T"T* 'T' 'T"T' *T* ***t' **f* 'T* 'T* *T* *T* ���������T* "Tt* *T* ***t* *T* *T* *T' *T* 'l*  Now is yoiit* t.iniG to como and make vonr soleoMons in.what-Furniture  you require. We can make arrange in en t*j with you to let you have  what you want. We aro going to make alterations lo our store, in  order "to Kive us a good deal more show room. Yoii must recognize,  the fact that wo were the means of enabling you to get FURNITURE  at one third the cost you previously paid before we started. We have  another large cur ordered and wc'ivant to get* our store ready for it.  A good discount on .anything you require.  Revelstoke Furniture Compp-ny.  **-S&4-*2������. .iff? tffo Vfo *iY f'ftV t*frj! -ifo rfV iTi llVl rfl rfl fifo f*frl 1*1*1 rfV il*! B^l t*frl rfl ft*l*1 [l'i Al l*i*T  ty ' '"     "  ty  t  ���������+������������������     ~k Bfflwz a wa ty  f  ty  ty  ty  ty  ty  ty  ty  If you are contemplating* going. South during  tlie winter of 1902 or 1903 you can get valuable information free of charge.  Write to  Patrick  Abljr furnished with the  Choicest the Market  affords.  BESTJ/INES, LIQUORS, CICARS  Large, Light bedrooms.  Rates $1 a day.  Monthly Rate.  J. Albert Stone ���������   Prop.  Land Registry Act.  Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, in Block 48, In  Town of Revelstoke, B. C,  Map 636 B.  A CKriTIFICtTK of Indefensible Title lo tlie  nl*ovo property will be issued to Kriinlc Bernard Lewis nii'ihc IBItli day of February. A.D.,  loo.', unl������*i������ in tbe inciiiitline n villi.1 objection  llierelo be miide lo me in writing by n person  ..���������liiimliiK nn uniiiU" or IntercHl tliorein or'ln  any pnri tbereof.  II. F. MACMCOD,  lllslriei Heirlslrnr.  Land   Kiiiel.ilry   Ofllce,   Nelnon,   I).   C, 17tli  .N'ovciii ber, 1002.  ty Pinebluff, N. C.  ty Me can save you mpney in hotel rates.  ty He can direct you which is the best railroad  ty route to travel. ~  ty He can direct you where to rent neatly fur-  ty nished cottages or single rooms.  ���������*Vm *>*Tt t*r*  t*J**  JTm afV* tTi ������*}?��������� a*T*  m'Ta ���������i'Ta   A ���������"T-i ������*!*��������������� ���������"T-a  ���������������  *lL* rA" ^A* T-Ji* 'ilr 'X* *X* *X    'A* 'Ji* *Xr  *������V \B* *al* *3E* *  ***��������� ��������� ���������!���������  ��������� ������������������      ���������     ���������  P. BURNS & COY  Wholesale and Retail Dealers  PRIME BEEF.     PORK.     Ml)iTON.     SAUSAGE.  FISH AND GAME IN SEASON.  FHKE I1U8 ME15TS ALL TRAIN8.  FIK6T CLASS   AtiCOMMOnATION.  HEATED BY HOT A  REASONABLE KATE  Hotel Victoria  PROMPTLY SECURED!  Write for onr Interest!!.*: book* " Invent**,  or'n Help" mid ���������' How yon ore ���������v/lndled.'*  Scud in n rough nketch c*r model of joiirfn*.  ventionoriniprovcnieiit nnd wc will toll;you*  free our opinion ns to whether It is prolKtbly.  oatciitnble. Pejected appllcatlong have often  been succcssfiilly prosecuted by hi. Wc  conduct fully criuiopcd office.** in Moiilrcnl  and Wn-dihiKton ; thUtpialifics us to prompt*!  ly dispatch woik nnd quicklv accurc I'nleiits,  as bro id as the invention. J!i$*liest references,  furnished. J  Patents procured through Marion & Me .  rion receive special notice without charge ii'r  over ioo newspapers distributed througbouti-  the Dnniinion. .  Specialty:���������Patent husiiiess ol Manufae* (  turersniirf Engineers. ^  Brown & Querln, Props.  ET-ECTBIO BELLS AND LIGHT IN EVERY BOOM.  ITOUHLY STREF.T CAB                                         BAB WELL SUPPLIED BY THE CHOIC1WT  StEETS ALL TRAINS. WINES,  LIQUORS AND CIGARS   By Royal  1848  Warrants  1901  JOHN   BEGG'S  Royal   Lochnagar  BALMORAL  WHISKEY  SCOTLAND  MARION & MARION  .    Patent Experts and Solicitors,   s  )cmir...   S   New Vork Life B'ld'jr, flontreaSt  By appointment to His Majesty the King-, 1901. 1,-  By appointment to Her Late Majesty Quean Victoria, 1848-1900.  Revelstoke Wine & Spirit Camp any, Limited, Agent  jffiffjjjstasafaa^^ The   Government   to     Amend  Vexatious   Act, which.   They  Say Strengthens the   Unfair  Monopoly of Existing; Limits  There  is  an  agitation   among   the  lumbermen of this province to remedy  certain   grievances   undet' which they  ,claim lo belaboring at present.  The Lumbermen's association hun  tiken the matter up nni'l prepared a  petition for presentation tolliegov-  vrnmeiit. Mr. W. Shannon was seen  by the Vancouver World and gave the  lumbermen'.*' story us follows :  The   lumbermen  ion I end   that  thu  lease   act   passed   two   yenvs   ago   is  unworkable.     No   limits   have   been  taken up under it, and no revenue has  been derived from  it by the  province.  At Ihe   time the  act was passed, the  idea   was   to   put  timber   up   to   the  highest bidder, as is done in Ontario.  both   thc   Dominion    and   provincial  j-foveriiinents send out survey parties  to locate and appraise the value of the  timber limits or   that  province, here  the work is  left.In piivnte enteiprise.  There are 1.000 miles of coast line and  neither thc governmsnt nor anybody  el;.e knows wheiethe timber is.andthe  Uniting of it is left to cruisers, sent out  at great  expense  by   the lumbermen  themselves*.      Under    the    old    law,  timber   limits   weie   taken   up on .'10  year leases, with provision for renewal,  and .in   many   cases were afterwards  ciown  granted;   two   third*-,   of    the  timber of the  province is so held now  by specnlatois. who are attempting to  build  A   wall   around   the   timber   of  Biitisb  Columbia, in order to inciease  the valneof their holdings.  A few yeat*��������� ago the government  ott'eied the holders of these limits 50  percent off if they would pay up their  arrears ol taxation, and in tpite of  that they still owe the treasury  $40,000. '      .  Under the present law, one license  entitles the licensee to only 010 acres  of timber and is good for only n, year.  The peculiar haidship to the men who_  want to gel. lumber for tlieir mills  ciunes in right here. All the easily  accessible timber is either being held  for exorbitant pi ices or has been cut,  and'lhe stage Has been" reached iii  Biitis-h Columbia lumbering when  railways must be built into thc limits,  but after a man or a company has, at  great expense, sent out cruiser* and  a v.illey   full of  good timber  NOTICrv  A Bank on Wheels.  located  back from the coast, he cannot- build  and equip a railway to take out. that  timber if. out of eight or ten thousand  acre.*-, ho can locate only W0 acres, and  be assured of only a year's time to  operate. The petition calls for more  timber to the license and a longer  .period, wilh all proper protection  against speculation. *  Mr. Shannon claims that tho**e  opposed t<i this, and who are raising  the cry of speculation against the  advocates of a change, are simply the  men who hold immense tracts of timber- land for speculative purposes,  secured under the old conditions, and  who were instrumental in getting the  present vexatious legislation passed in  order that the value of their timber  might be increased through the restriction of output that necessarily  results from such handicapping of  other operators.  The present condition is practically  ONE of -tlie most brilliant Ideas of  modern times has just, occurred  to the local authorities ivhlcli  administer the public moneys of ths  town of Mezleres, in the Ardennes. The  new scheme consists In au "automobile  saving's bank." The term requires  soma explanation.  The inventors apply it to a new. sort  of motor car which tliny are having;  built. The vehicle Is propelled by electricity and contains four seats, one Iu  front and apart from the others, for  the driver. The three places behind are  arranged round a revolving table In  the middle of the car, one at each side  and one at the rear of the vehicle.  "Writing desks are fitted over each ot  the three seats and devised In such a  way that they can be either folded flat  against the sides of the carriage inwardly or opened outwardly. The central table also contains desks, besides  bookshelves and a small metallic!  Btrong-box.0 Such Is the new automobile. The use to which the authorities  of Mezleres Intend to put their lnv*i*~  tlon Is as follows:     i  The ear will travel rounfi the country, making stoppages ot* an hour oi*  so on.prearranged days In the different'  localities of the department. The passengers will be two clerks, of the local"  treasury administration and -a cashier.'  They will can j- with them a cunipltd?  collection of savings bank book*?, repi������-  ters and forms, and the thiid of th������  above-mentioned officials will be empowered to receive moneys. Your readers will have now divined the purpose of  the financial authorities of Mezleies. It  seems ihut these gentlemen, aisi-mbleu  in council lately, came to the conclusion that something should be clone to  encourage thrilt among the peasantry  of the Ardennes. On the other hand,  It was recognized that the saving propensity was already very marked  among the country folk. What vm  needed was that the administration  should meet their wants halfway. The  peasants put by their earnings thriftily enough, but frequently fail to Invest  them In savings banks because, especially in the busy summer months,  they have little time for journeying to  the few principal towns where the of>  fices are situated. So the authorities  determined upon sending the savings  bank to the country folic Instead of  waiting any longer for the latter to  find time to come to the office.  The desciiption of the vehicle which  the authorities have had built, according to 'their own designs, requires no  further explanation except to say that  the movable desks are intended for use  by the public, hence the arrangement  by which they! can be opened out wai d  over the road. It is reported 'that the  scheme meets with the unqualified approval of the savings bank clerks,  whose days hitherto throughout the  fine season have been spent In musty  offices. But, contrary to what might  have been expected, the public does not  look upon the .Innovation with unalloyed delight. Some suspicious persons  have spread a rumor that the administrative motor car will not always convey savings bank clerks, but will occasionally bring���������more often, perhaps,  than would be desirable���������that unwelcome .visitor, the-tax collectoiv-  Tuko nniii'c* tliat thirty days after date I intend  to apply to tho chief l.'inuiiiia*>ioiii*r of Lands and  Works fur a special liceit.se to eut and carrv awav  timber from the following described lands iii West  Kootenay district.:  Coninieiii-itiR at a post planted IJ miles from  Gold Stream, on the trail, and marked "(ieo.  Lafnrine'H north west eornet* post." thenee east 40  ehaius, thence smith loo chaiiis, thence west* 40  cluiiiis, tlieiiee nortli 10.) cluiiiis to the pointof  commencement.  Dated the tith day of March, HUB.  GEO. LAFOItMK.  NOTICK.  Talco notice that thirty davs after dato I intend  to aiiply to the Chief Coinniisslonei* of Lamia and  World* tor a special liccuAe to cut and carrv awav  timber from the following descrihed lands iii West  Kootenay :  Commencing at a post planted at the nnrlli wist  corner of lien. Kafurme's hniiH**.Ii'ail. and marked  "Cleo, Loforiiie'ri noitli east coiner post," thenee  Honth lim chains, thence west 40 chains, thence  north 100 chains, thence east 40 chains to the  place of commencement.  Dated this Slnl day of February, 100.1.  flEO. LAFORME.  NOTICE.  Tata* notice that thirty davs after date I intend  (o apply to tho chief f.'onim isslonei* of Lamia ami  Works for a-special license to cut and cany e.wav  liinlier from the following described lands in West.  Kootenay district'  Coiiiiiieiiiiugat Ceo. Ln.fi.rine'*, south uo-t post  on I...1.1 Stream, at a pi**,t ul.uked'"(le.tie La-  tonne'*, ninth m.| coinei post," thence south SO  eliains, Uicinc east, so iIi.uih, ihence north so  chains, theme wet fiiihaiii*. to the pointof commencement.  Dated the 4th d.i\ of March. lOO'l.  (ll.li'i'iK LAFOr'Ml".  NOTICE.  Notice is hereby- given that. :!0 days after date 1  iniend to apply to the Chief Coiniiiissiiuiei' of  Lands and Works for special licenses l" cut and  carrv away timber from the following described  lands in West Kooteuay district:���������  1. Commencing at a post planted on the south  bank of (luldstreaui, about ill. miles upstream  from tlie mouth of French C'rcelc and marked "*.A.  I.. landmark's south west corner post," thence  north 8U chains, thenee east fin chains, thence  sontli SO eliains, thence west 80 chains lo the {mint  of commencement.  2. Commencing at a. post planted on thu South  bank of OohlHtream, about six and a half miles  upstream from thc mouth .If French Creek and  ma i ked "A. L. landmark's north-west corner post,"  thence east 1GU chains, tlience south 4(1 chains,  thence west 100 eliains, thenee liorlii 111 chains to  point, of commencement.  Dated tills 24th day of February, 10i������.  A. L. MNDMAlilC.  NOTICE.  NOTIOE.  Take notice th it thirl\ d.u -, "iftci d ite T iniend  tonpplj to the chief ('i"iiiiiii<i->.o!ici of Lauds and  Winks foi a special license to cut and can\ aiuo  tlnibei fiom the lolii.wiug dc*,ciilicd lands in ]}ig  llcnd, \\i-l Konluiu", di-tiict  Ciiiiiiueni ing [at a po-t pi luted I mile south of  Con Laftiimes couth we**t post of Ins i.null oil  Hold ht ream, and m.iikcd "'fieri leLnfnrine's ninth  west lorni i post." thluce smith SiIlIi.iIii-*, llienic  cast SO ih.ilns. theme uoith SO chains, thencu  nest SO ill.litis to the point uf c eminent fincnt.  Hated the 4th d n of Maiih. 11XKI.  lil.R'lTl". I.VFORMi:.  NOTIC  Xotice Is hereby given that ,'tOdays afterdate  I Intend to apply to tlie Chief Commissioner of  Lauds and Works for special licenses to cut and  parry nway timber from tho following described  lands in went Kootenay :���������  1. Commencing at* a post planted on the south  bank of Cloldstreiim ;ii*bout four and a half mites  up.sireaiu from the nioiilh of French Creek and  marked "Tl. if.' Brock's south-west comer post,"  thence .north SO chains, thence east SO eliains,  tlience south SO elm ins, theneo west *S(I chains to  the point, of,commencement.  2. Commencing at a post) planted on tlie south  bank of Goldstrfta.ni, about four and a half miles  upstream from the mouth' of French Creek aiid  uiaiked "II. If. lliock's uoith-west coinei po-t,  thence e.ist'so chains,rthence **out*h hi) (.hams,  Iheuce wet So chains, thence iiorth.80 chain-* to  the point of i oniiuenccmcnt.  bated this *!liliil,i> of Veinn.tii.nous.  li. II   lnilX'K.  Take nol ice that .'10 days after date I intend  toapiilvto the Chief Commissioner of Lands  and works for a special license lo cut and  carrv nway timber from the following describ.  cd lands in West Kooteimy:  Commencing at a post, planted one-half mile  westerly from the Columbia River about one  mile above Itoclcy Polni, tbence south 10  chains, tlience west H.0 chains, thence north  ���������10 chains, tlience east 1<*0 chains to ike point  of commencement.  tinted tin's Urd day of February, litO'l.  A. KllQAR.  NOTICE.  Nptlec is horcbv given Ihat :!0 days from  ilnie I will applv to tlie Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for n special license to rut  and carry away timber from tho following  described land iu West Kootonny :  ('onuncut'iiig at Mary I*!. Sanderson's north  west corvnr post on west bank of I'ingston  Cieek about l\:j miles from mouth of snid  creek nnd about.A elialus south nf tree Ul ./.ed  on four sides on II. O, .Mounce's trail, thence  south 1(10 chains, thence west IU chains, thenee  north 10(1 chains, theneo oast 10 chains to  point of commencement, containing CIO acres.  Halcyon, Feb. Tlh, ]f)0S.  JlAftY E. KANDKRSON.  Notice.  USTOTICE  If Ihe party or parties who'removed the  cap from a Held glass at Watchman William  Maekie's Cabin at the Columbia bridge last  summer, will return tlie same to A. McRec,  Postmaster, thev will receive *5 reward,  NOTICE.  -Notice i** licieb*, g*vcn tliat *!0 day -*  aftoi date 1  will ,ippl\ tn the chief Coiiiinis-.ir.nei-of Land*, and  Woik*,ioi a special license to cut aiidc.ui-*. au.i*,  timber fiomilie following ilcsciibed hinds in West  Kootenai-  Commencing.it li. "-.luini-iir*-, noitli east coinei  post on the south nidi' of Pool eieek, about hall a  mile fiom the iiioutii of Mohiuk cieek. tlieuie  we-t I(W chain**, theiue -outh 10 chains, theme  east U.0 chain*, tlieuie noitit 41) chain*, tu the  point of commencement  Hated the J111I i',i\>i" M.ueli, 1001.  ti   SHANNON  NOTTCR.  Xotice i** hi'iebv given lli.it ilOdaj- after date I  intend to apply to the Chief Coninii-*sioiiei* of  l.uid*. ami Winks fur special licenses to oic.iml  iaii> away timber fiom Hie.followingjlesuiliuil  l.inds^ui *n est Knoten.i", *���������  1. Commencing at a pn-t' pl.inted7ou the south  bank of (loliUtiu.ini, about .two and 11 half miles  iipstieain fiom the nioiith or Ficnch Cieek mid  maiked "A. V, "Jos-sop's sinith-westcoiner nosl.'  thence 1101th N) limit]*,, tlience e.i*d t.0 chains,  lhciioe"s,uu!li SO (haiiis, theme west Si) eliains to  tlie point of iiiinnienceniciiL  2 Commencing at a post planted* on the soul h  bank of Cold stie.im, abimt tun and.1 half miles  upstie-un 'fiom thu mouth of ii eneh Cieek and  m.ulred 'A. H. .lessop'**. south-east cornel post,"  thence ninth SO chains theme, west *S0 chums,  thence south SO chain**, thence east PIHli.inis to  the point of comment onient  Dated thisiiid'diu i.fil'ehiii.ii"., 110!  A. 1;  .ll>isOP.  NOTICE.  Notico is herebv given tliat :.0 days from date  I'Wlll apply to the Chief Commissioner, .of  Lands and Works for a speeinl license lo out  nnd cnirv awa\ timber irom the following  deienbi'd'lands In \\ est* Kootenay .  Commencing at Andrew M. Symons north  east coiner post about 20 chains noitli of tlio  south west corner of Lot S7I, Croup 1, Koole-  niiv, Ihence south SO chains, tlience west SO  chains, tlience nortli SO chains, thence east 80  chains to point oi commencement, containing  Mrt licit**;, and  "Commencing nl Aiidrew"**M. Rjmons north  oast coiner post plained on the west slope 01  Pingsion Creek Vnllev about *lj; milrs 110111  mount of slid creek and about "111 chains  uesteily irom tree bla/cd 011 four sides on it.  t>. Mounce's trail, Ihence won-IOohains, thenee  south KM chains, ihence east 10eliains, llienoe  1101II1 lull iliniiis lo point ni comnii'iiceiiienl,  containing (.10 iicios.  llalc'on, Fob. 7th, l')0l.  A.N'n.-fEW M. SYMONS.  NOTIOE,  Thirty days after date I intend to apply to  the Honorable the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Wirks for special licenses to cut  and carry nway timber from the following  described lands in the Big Bend Distriet of  West Kootenay:  1. Commencing at a post planted two miles  above thc head of Heath Rapids on the west  -bank of the Columbia Klver. thence south I'M  chains, thenee west 40 chains, thenee north  liiu eliains, thence east 40 nhalns to the place  of beginning.  ���������_'. Commencing nt a post planted two miles  above the head of Death Kapidx on thc ivtst  bank of the Columbia river, thence north l.X)  chains, theneo wost *I0 chains, thence south  11:0 elialus, tlience east 10 chains to the place  oi beginning.  Dined this loth day of .January, 1M.1.  n, MORf-AX.  J.*������..lll��������� 'U.I���������IIJ '  -UJ.J-.  The Phraseology of Sport.  T  ~~one" of monopoly and .the small capital  isl", who wants to make a living nnd  develop the trade of the country at  the same time finds himself in a very  difficult position. For instance, a, man  lias $10,000 capital, and secures some  timber and is anxious to get his mill  going; but he requires $20,000 lo do it.  Woll, he cannot go to a bank and  borrow another $10,000 on tlio security  of his limits because his title expires in  a year, und no bank would accept  such security.  Considering all these things, the  association has prepared a petition  containing five clauses which, if  acted upon by the legislature, is  expected to lie of great henefit to the  lumbering industry. The petition is  as follows:  " Your petitioners pray that your  honorable body may be. pleased to  causa an act to be passed by your  present legislature to provide:  " 1.���������That timber licenses shall be  made transferable.  "2.���������That timber licenses may be  issued for a fixed term up to 15 years.  '* 3.���������That permission may be  granted to take all such jags of one-  half mile and that three detached  fragmmnls may he included in oue  license.  " 4���������That no cliangu may be made in  thc license fee of $100.  "5.���������That a recent ruling of the  department, that piles he prohibited  from exyort be rescinded."  At a meeting of the 13. O. Lumbermen's Association, held recently, tho  question as to what form the proposed  improved Umber legislation should  tyke was postponed for another w������������k  HE London "Outlook," In a recent number, while conceding  that every sport and pastime  should, naturally, have an  especial phraseology, deplored  the fact that this phraseology  Is becoming mere Jargon. In its "palmy  days" the P.R. could boast a language  of Its own; and one regrets to notice  that the picturesque reporter is now  doing the same ��������� disservice to cricket.  When an eleven makes a bad start lt  Is suffering from "rot and rout." On������  batsman Is "breezy," another plays  with "graceful assurance," a third Is  "cheaply dismissed." A score that  progresses unevenly Is "streaky," and  a very favorite formula runs that So-  and-So "played excellent cricket." This  might reasonably be expected on a  cricket field, where Bridge or Ping-  pong would be somewhat! out of place.  After all, however, lt is the billiard reporter who most savagely dislocates  the vertebrae of the King's English.  Not long ago one of the brotherhood  varied the monotony of life by describing the red ball as a "pinky round."  After all, the most glaring examples  of Idiotic phraseology In the English  papers are exceedingly tame beside  those of our own, says the "Bookman."  -For_ingtance,_let_U3_lake_the American-  equivalent for the English game of  cricket. The knowing reporter writing  a description of a game of baseball  never makes the mistake of calling the  ball "the ball." .To him; of course, It  Is the "sphere." the "pellet," the "pea"  or tho "leather." A batsman never  makes his base on lulls; "he strolls" or  he gets "a free pass to the first corner." Ite does not make a base hit.  but "he singles" or he "slams the pea  to the center garden." He does not  strike out, but "he fans" or "he  pounds tho air." The pitcher does not  pitch; he does "slab duty" or he "bends  lhem" or he "passes them up." We  might continue In this strain indefinitely.  To refer to a baseball team representing a certain city by Us proper  name would be to betray a woeful lack  of knowledge and experience. A few-  years ago, after the veteran ballplayer  Anson relinquished his leadership of  the Chicago team, that team was, for  a short time at the beginning of the  season, without any nickname what-.  ever. Sporting writers all over the  country were In a state of chaos. The  Chicago newspapers opened (heir columns to suggestions for ai suitable sobriquet, and matters generally were  unsettled and unsatisfactory until ths  significance of the desertion of Anson  dawned upon one ingenious scribe, and  the Chlcagos immediately became "the  Orphans." During the first two years  of Its career In the National League  the New York team was known as the  "Maroons." In 1S85 this title was  dropped for that, of "the Giants," a  term which at a period when the team  was unpopular was modified to "the  Joints." The Bostons are, of course,  "tho Beaneaters;". the Washlngtoni",  "the Senators;" the Baltlmores, "the  Orioles," or "the Birds;" the Brooklyns  are 'Ithe Trolley Dodgers."  NOTICE.  Xotice is herebygiien that "!0 da>s afterdate I  will apply to the" Chief Cuiniiiis*>iniiei- of Lands  and Woiks for a special license to cut and iniry  away timbei fiom the folloiunic de**eiibed lauds 11*1  West Kootcn.i\ :  Commencing at C. H.ir*e>*s south east roi nor  post on titc south sidu of Pool cieek about halt a  mile from the mouth of Mohawk cieek, theuce  west 100 chain-", thcnie uoitii 40 chains, thence  cast 1G0 chains, thence south -lOVhaiu** to point of  commencement.  Dated the and da> of March, i-in-l.  - C. HARVEY.  NOTICE.  Thirty days afier date I intend t" apply to  the Honorable the Oluef Commissioner of  Lands nnd Works for ft special license to cut  and carry avrny timber from tlie following  described landB in the Big Bend Distriet of  l\ est Kootcnn> :  Commencing at a post planted four miles  above lhe head of Death Kapids on thc nest  bank of tbe Columbia Kiver and marked W. J.  Cummings' south cast corner post, thence  north 1C0 chains, thence west *io chains, thence  south 1C0 chains, thence east 40 cbains to thc  place of beginning.  Dated this ISth day of January, 1903,  \V. J. CUMillNCi?.  NOTICR.  Notice is heicb\ giien that 30 d.*.*.*** nftti dato T  intend to apply to the Chief Coiniiiis-uoiiei of  Lands and Winks for a special license tin ut, .mil  cany a,w.i\ timber fiom the following dcsiiibed  lands in West Kooteimy:���������  Cotnniencing'at a post planted on tlie west bank  of the Columbia lti\ er about "MO feet south of Old  Ci'oldstieani Slough .mil maiked "A IMwaids  umtli-eait cornel post," thence west SO chains,  tlience south SO chain-*, thence east SO chains,  tlience noith SO chains to peine of commencement  Dated this SOtli d.i> of I'ebiuaiy, VM3.  A. EDWARD"-  NOTICE.  Notico is herein- given that SO diivs from  date I w ill applv to the Chief Comiul-tioiioi* of  L nils nnd Hoiks foi a special lieencu tocnt  aud nury awav timber Irom lhe follonnig  do**cribcd hind In \*i est lvootenaj  Commencing "t '-. Sanderson's noilh west  corner postal the soul li west eornoi of Lot WI,  Gioup 1, Konlciuir tlience east SO chains.  Ihence south fiOi'liniiis, thence west .SO chains,  thence north SO ehaIn-5 lo pointof coininciiic-  nicnl, containing 010 acres.  Halcyon, 7th Feb., 100).  noi5i:rtT sakdkksox  NOTIOE.  Take notice that thirty days after date I  intend to'apply to the Chief commissioner of  Lands and Works for a special license to cm  and carry away timber from the following  described lands:  Commencing at a post planted on the west  side of Don nic Creek, about 100 yards south of  Thomas Meredith's south west corner post, and  marked Alex. Taylor's south east corner post,  thence west lOO eliains, thence nortli 10 chains,  iheuce cast ICO chains, thence south 10chains  to the plaec"of commencement.  Dated this .list ilayjif .Innuary, 190.1.  ALEX. TAYLOR.  XOTICE is. hereby given that ,"jO days  afterdate I will apply to the Chief Commissioner of: Lands and Works for a.  special license to cut and carry away  timber from the following described land.**,  in West Kootenay :���������  Commencing al a post planted on tlfjc  south bank of Goldsiream, about three*  and a half miles up stream from the mouth  of French Creek and marked F. C. Mati-  iiiiiff's south-west corner post; thence  north So chains, tlience cast So chains:  thence south 8o chains; tlicnci* west ���������������  chains to the point of commencement.  Dated this 241 li dav of Febman-, i<Joi.  F. C. MANNING."  JsTOTTOE  NOTICE.  Take notice Hint thirty dais after date I  intend to apply to tlie Chief i*'ouiiiii**sioner of  Lands and Works for a special license to cut  and carrv away timbei irom the following  described lands :  Commencing at a post planted on the south  bank of Halfwiiv Creek St. Leon Springs,  t'pper Arrow Lake, and about 10 miles from  Us mouth and marked itewurt Taylor's south  w est corner post, ihencccust iu) chains, thence  north 10 chains, iheuce westli-O chain**', tlieiiee  soiuli Ul chains to thc'plai'cof commencement.  Dated the (.th day or February, lCOS.  STEWART TAYLOR.  NOTICK is hereby given'that 30 days  after date I will apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for a  special license to cut nnd carry away  limber from thc following: dos-crihfd landt  in West Kootenav :  Commencing- ai a post planted on-the  west side of thc Columbia river, about  half a mile from tlie river and about two  uiiies above Dealh Rapids, marked A. M.  Xel-son's north-east corner post; thenct*  west 40 chains; thence south 160 chains;  thence cast 40 chains;* thence north itx>  chains to the point of commencement.    Dated this 27th dav of Februarv, 1903.  A. M. NELSON.  nsroTxciE]  NOTICE.  Notice i.s hereby g-iven that thirty days  after date I intend tn apply to the Chief  Commissioner of Lands, and Works for a  special license to cut and carry away  timber from the following described lands  in West Kootenay district:  Commencing at a post planted on the  west side of the Columbia river above  Carnes creek and marked "R. Edgar's  southeast corner post," thence north 40  chains, thence west 160 chains, thence  south 40 chains, thence east 160 chains to  the point of commencement.  Dated the 26th day of February, 1903.  R. EDGAR.  -NOTieE.  Xotice is heicby given that sn days after date T  intend to apply to thu Chief ConimNsiouei of  Lands and Woiks foi a special license to cut and  eauy nu.i} timbei fiom the .following dtsciihed  land'-, in West Kootenay ;���������  Commencing nt .1 post planted on thc west side  of the Columbia Rnei, .itiuiit half a mile fiom the  river and about two miles aho\o Death l'apids,  maiked *"A. M. Nelson's south-west coinei post,"  thence nmlli 40 chains, tlience west 100 chains,  thence south 40 chains, tlience east ICO chains to  the point of commencement.  Dated this 27th day of relniiary, 100.1.  A. M. NELSON.  NOTICE.  Notice is herebv git on thnt .10 days from  date I will apply to the Chief Commissiouci 01  Lands and "oiks foi a special license to cut  and cairy eway timbei from the following  described lands in West Kootenay:  Commencing at C. M Sjnions north west  eoi ner post situated about 10 chains wosterl>  from a tice blu7Cd on four sides on il. G  Mounce's tiall on the wcstsido, and anout AV.  miles from the mouth oi Piiigston Creek,  thence cast 40 chains, thence south 100 chains,  thence west 10 chains, thence north li.O chains  to point of commencement, containing 010  acre,.  nalc>on,Feb. 7th,100). '  C. M. SYMONS.  NOTICE.  Tako notice that thirtv days after date I  uitdnd to apply to the Cli'ief Commissioner of  Lands and works for 11 special license to cut  and carry away timber from'the following  described lands:  Commencing at"'a' posfplanted on the nerth  bank oijilfalfwai Creek, St. Leon Spring,  L'pper Arrow Lake, about 11 miles from Its  mouth and marked A. Butler's south irest  corner post, !heneoS*east ICO chains, thence  south lOchnin", IhoiiccwcstlCO^ehaint, thence  north 40j chains to the plnee of commencement. '  Dated the 7th day of February, 19CU.  A. BUTLER.  NOTIOE.  Take notico tliat. thirty days after date I intend  to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and  WorKsfora special license to cut and cany nway  timber from tlie following described lands in West.  Kootenay:���������  Commencing nt a po-t planted 011 the west side  of the Columbia liver, about 1 mile above One  .Mile creek, marked "Chas. F. Liiidmaik'a northeast corner post," tlience south SO chains, thence  west SO chains, thence north 80 chains, thenee  east SO chains.to tlie point of commencement.  Dated this 4th day of February, 1003.  CHAR.  F. LINDMAHK.  NOTICE.  Thirtv davs after date I intend to apply to  the Ilo'nornblu The Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for special licenses to eut  and cairy awav timber from the following  described lauds "ill tlie ISig Iloud Pistrii t of  West ivooccua}:  1.-Commencing at a post plan tod about three-  quarters of a mile east of the Columbia Ulvcr  nt a point about a quarter of a mile south of  the Forks or the Smith Creek nnd Gold Stream  trails and marked J. Smiih'ssouth west corner  post, thence north 100 chains, tlience east 40  chains, thence south 100 chains, thence west  40 eliains to the place of beginning.  2. Commencing nt a post planted abont  thrcc-qiiartcr-i of n mile cast of thc Columbia  Kiver ut a point about a quarter of a mile  south of the forks of the Smith Creek and  Gold Stream trails nnd marked J. Smith's  north west corner post, tlience south jr>0  chains, thence enst <lo chains, tlience north  ICO cluiiiis, Ihence west 10 chains to the place  of beginning.  Dated this 1,1th dny of January, 100.J.  J. SMITH.  NOTICE.  Take "notice that thirtv days after date* I  intend tornpply to the Chief Commissioner of  Lauds and \\ orks for a special license to cut  nnd carry away timber from thc .following  described lands :  Commencing nt a post planted about one  mile cast of Deep Cieek and about one nnd a  quarter miles .-outh of; Galena Bav, Upper  Arrow Lakes, and about 50 feet south" of what  is known as J. J. Foley's farm, and marked  James White's northwest comer post, thence  south ICO chains, thence east 40 chains, thenee  north 1C0 chains, thence west 40 chains to the  placj of commencement, ~  Dated the 9th day of February, 1903  JAMES WHITE,  NOTICE i*; hereby given that 30 day*:  after date I will apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for a.  special licence to cut and carry away  timber from the following desi-ribed land*,  in West Kooicn.iy :  Commencing at a post planted on tin*  West bank of lhe Columbia river at lhe  south-east corner of John Nelson's ranche.  and marked A. Edward's north-cast  corner post: tlience west So chains;  Ihence south So chains; thence cast 80-  chains; thence north So chains to the  point of commencement.  Dated this 2*"th dav of F������*bruarv, 190}.  A. EDWARDS.'  XOTICE.  NOTICE is in-reby given (hat thirly-  days after date I intend to apply to tht* -  Chief Commis-ioner of Lands-'and Work**  for [a special licence 10 cut and carry  away timber from thc following .described  lands in West Kootenay :  Commencing at a posi planted on the  south bank of Goldstream, about two and  a half miles upstream from the moulh of  French Creek, and marked B. A. Law-  son's north-west corner post; ihence east  So chains; thence *-outh 80 chains; ihence  west So chains; whence north So chains- to  point of commencement.  Dated this 23rd dav of February, 1903.  15. A. LAWSON.  NOTICE.  TnVc notice that thirty days after date I  Intend to apply lothe Chief Commissioner of  Lands and works for a special license to cut  and carry away timber from the following  described lands:  Commencing at a post planted 40 cnains  north of the north bank of Halfway creek, St.  Leon Springs, Upper Arrow Lake, and about 15  miles from its mouth, and marked James  White's south east corner post, thence north  SO chains, thence west SO chains, thence south  80 chains, tbence cast 80 chains to the place of  commencement.  Dated the Oth day of February, 1903.  JAMES WHITE.  -NOT-ICE.-  Nolice is hereby given that thirty days  after date I intend to apply to the Chief  Commissioner of Lands and Works for a  special license to cut and carry away  timber from the following described lands  in West Kootenay district:���������  Commencing nl .1 post planlrd on thc  west side of the Columbia River, about  one-half mile above Carnes creek, and  marked "A. Edgar's north west corner  post," thence south 80 chains, thence east  80 chains, thence north 80 chains, thence  west 80 chains to the point of commencement.  Dated thc 26th day of February, 1903.  A. EDGAR.  She (scornfully)���������I despise you from  the bottom of my heart!   He (cheerily)  ���������Oh, well, tb.tr* i������ alway* room at tha  I (���������op- ^Aj^*������**g.|***������'K*Tti **��������� ml, mi ��������� 1 *.**ii*i  XOTIOE.  NOTICE is hereby given that thirty  days after date I intend to apply to the  Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works  for a special licence to cut and carry  away t'mber from the following described  lands in West Kootenay :  Commencing at a post planted on the  south bank of Goldstream, about eight  and a half miles upstream from lhe mouth  of French creek and marked N. T. Edwards' south-west corner post; thence  east 160 chains; thence north 40 chains;  thence west 160 chains; thence south 40  chains to point of commencement.  DateJ this 24th day of February. 1903.  N. T. EDWARDS.  NOTIOE.  Notice is lieiebv (.'iien that-ftO-days nfter date 1  Tnteiiil to applv to the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and W01 ks for a special license to cut and  carry awav IInilier from the following deseiilied  lands hi M'est Ivootenay :������������������  Commencing at a post planted on the west side  of the Columbia Ilivor iilxint I mile above One  Mile creek, marked "H. M. AIIiiiu'h noith-west  eorner post," thence east 80 chains, thence south  80 chains, thence west 80 chains, thence north 80  chains to the point or commencement.  Hated this Ith day t.f IVhi-uni-y, 1D11.1.  K. XL ALLi;.U.*������  NOTICE.  Take notico that thirtv days after date I  Intend to apply tn the Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for a special license 10 cut  and carry away timber from the following  described lands :  Commencing at a post planted nbout 12 miles  from the month of Halfway Creek, St. J/*ou  Springs, UppT Arrow Lake, and marked Stew*  art Taylors north west corner post, thenee  ea-t 80 chains, thenee south 60 chains, thence  west 80 chains, thenee north SO chains to tbe  place of commencement.  Dated the 7th day of February, 1WW.  STEWART TAYLOR,  NOTICE.  NOTICE is hereby given th.-it thiny  days al'ler date I intend to apply lo the  Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works  for a special licence to cut and carry  away timber from the following described  lands in Wesi Kootenay :  Commencing al a post planted on (lie  south bank of Goldsiream, about eight and  a half miles upstream from the mouth 01  French creek, and marked John Nelson's  north-west corner post; (hence east 160  chains; Ihence south 40 chains; tlience  west 160 chains; thence north 40 chains to  the point of commencement.  Dated this 241I1 day of February, 1903.  *    JOHN NELSON.  TSTOTIOIE  NOTICE is hereby given Ihat 30 days  after date I will apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and. Works for a  special license to cut and carry away  timber from the following described lands  in West Kootenay :  Commencing at a posi planted 011 the  South Bank of Goldstream, about three  and a half miles upstream from the mouth  of French Creek and marked E. L.  Hume's north-west corner post; thence  east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;  tlience west 80 chains; thence north 80  chains to the point of commencement.  Dated this 24th day of February, 1903.  E. L. HUME.  NOTIOE.  NOTICE is hcr-ehy given that thirty  clays after dale I intend to apply lo the  Cliii'f Commissioner of Lands and Works  for"a~speci;il licence lo"cTit".itid"i".iiTy"away  timber Irom the following described lands  in West Koolenay :  Commencing at a' posi planted on lhe  south bank of Goldsiream, abot'il six .'ind ,1  half miles upstream- from lhe moulh' of  French creek, and marked K. L. Hume's  south-west corner post; thence east 160  chains; thence norlh 40 chains; tlicncr  west 160 chains; Iheuce south 40 cli.-iins  lo point ofcoimnciici'mi'iil.  Dated (liis 241I1 dav ol   February,   1903  lv.  I..   HUME.  NOTICE.  NOTICE.  NOTICE is hereby given that thirty  days alter date I intend to apply to thc  Chief Commissioner of tands and Works  for a special licence to cut and carry  away timber from the following^describei  land'sjn West Kootenay :  Commencing at a post planted on the*  south bank of Goldstream, about two and  a half miles upstream from the mouth of*  French creek, and marked.F. C Manning's north-east corner post; Ihence  south 80 chains:! thence west 80 chains;,  thence north 80 chains; thence east 6>  chains to pointof commencement.  Dated this 23rd dav of February,  1903.  *F. C. MANNING.  NO-TICK.  NOTICE is hereby given llnil lliirly  days after dull'I iniend to, apply lo the  Chief Commissioner nf Lauds and Works  for a special license lo cut and carry  away timber from lln: following described  lauds in West Koolenay:  Commencing al a po.sl planted on Hie  noilh side ot Goldsiream, about live miles  above Ilie moulh of Goldstream, nnd  marked John Nelson's south-cast corner  post; ihence norlh So chains; thence west  80 chains; ihviicc south So chains; tlience  cast So eliains, to point oi'comiiieiici'incnl.  J-hiled this 25th dav of '���������"ubrunrv, 1903.  'JOHN NELSON.  NOTICE.  NOTICE is hereby given thai thirty  clays alter dale I intend 10 apply lo the  Cli'ief Commissioner of Lands and Works  for a special licence to. cut and carry  away limber from the following described  lands in West Kootenay:  Commencing at a post planted on thc  north side, of Goldstream, about five  miles above the mouth of Goldstream and  marked N. T. Edwards'southwcst corner  post; (hence nortli 40 chains; "(hence  cast 160 chains; thence south 40 chains;  thence west 160 clriins; to thc point of  commencement.  Dated this 25th dav ol February, 1603.  N. T. EDWARDS.  Thirtv davs after dat������ I Intend to apnly to  (lie Honorable thc Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works for special licenses to cut  and carry awav timber (from the following  described lands" In the Big llcnd District 01  Wo������t Koo'enay:  ���������1.~Commencing-nt-a-po*.rpla*ite~d lOCfvara's  east of the Nine Mile Shed on Big llcnd trail  nnd on the Kasl limit of E. L. McMahon's  timber limit, nnd marked Ccorge Johnson's  north west corner post, thence south 100  chains, thenee cast 40 chains, thence north 160  chains, thence west 40 chains to the place of  beginning.  ii. Commencing nt a post planted 100 yard*  east of the Nine Mile shed on Big Bend trail,  and on the east limit of K. L. McMahon's  tlinlier limit, and marked George Johnaon's  south west corner post, thence north ICO  chains, thence cast 10 chains, thence south 160  chains, thence west 40 ehainsto the place ol  beginning.  Dated this l.'.th day nf January, 190*1.  OKOIlOE JOHNSON.  NOTICE.  S  OTICI! IS HfcP.KBY OIVRN that The Fred  Robinson   Lumber    Company.     Limited,  tend to applv to cliangu thc name of the  company to " IIAKBOIt LUMBER COMPANY,  Limited."  Dated February 12th, 1903.  HARVEY McCAUTEIl A 1'ISKHAM,  Fol)-12-:iiii. Solicitors for thc Company.  MeMahon Bros. & Company,  Limited.  Notice Is hereby given that MeMahon Bro=.  and Company, Limited, Intend to change the  name of the Company to Thc Big Bend Timber  and TradlnglCompany,Limited.  Dated this 10th day of February, 1003.  HAKVEY, McCARTER <fc PINKHAM,  3m solicitors for the Companr   .  For Sale  TWO Kesidenccs on McKenzle Avenue, with  modern Improvcmenti, liiCO each on easy  terms.  TWO Residences on Third Street, cast, very  convenient for railway men, f 1800 each, easy  terms.  ONE  Residence 011  First Street, east, oash  required fjOO. Subject to mortgage.  Apply to,  HARVEY, UcCATRER A PINKHAK.  NOTICE.  NOTICE is hereby given thai thirty  davs Irom date I intend to apply to the  Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works  lor permission to cut and carry away  timber from*,the*.following described lands:  Commencing at W. le'Maistre's south-  cast corner posti^about half a mile cast or  the cast bank of the Columbia river, and  onihe-eabt-boundary- of���������John-Nelson's���������  ranche; thence north* 160 chains; thence  west 40 chains; thence south 160 chains;  thence east 40 chains; to the point ,-et  commencement; containing 640 acres.  Revelstoke, B. C, Feb. 21.il. 1903.   -  W. le'MAISTRE.  XOTICE.  NOTICE 'it hereby given (hat thirty  days alter date l^intcnd^to "apply ,to the  Chief Commissioner of Land*, and Worki  for a special licence to cut and carry  away limberffrom the following described  lands in West Kootenay :  Commencing at J. A. Kirk's south-west  corner posi, on the Keystone trail, near  Bovd's ranche. about three-quarters of ������  mile from thc Columbia River; tlience  nortli 160 chains; thence east 40 chains;  thence south 160 chains; tlience west 40  chains to point ol commencement, containing 640 acre*;. ;  Revelstoke, B.C., 21st February, 1903. u  J. A.  KIRK.  TIME TABLE  S. S.'ARCHER OR S. S. LARDEAU  Banning between Arrowhead, Thomson's  Landing and Comapllx, commencing October  14th, 1901, will ������ail as lollows, weather permitting:  Leaving Arrowhead for ..Thomson's Landf������B  and Comapllx  twicedaily���������10k. and 14k. .  Leaving Comapllx and Thomson's Landing  lor Arrowhead....twice dally���������7:15k and ia:45k  Making close connections with all C. V. K.  Steamers and Trains.  The owners reserve tho right to change ffmea,  ol sailings without notice.  TH^rrad RqMpmh lumber -P0., ltd, ' *o>--iVtf**=v���������.-r:fa*:^  ������1CK  HQ6A3:0M'S  SCOOP.  T wns the **  chr.Mi:i'b ���������'���������  Tolclie.-t"'  partmen: .-  know;   t!i ���������  Jarged on ihe d--  |n   criminal   deferred to with I.-  the same degree  vlnclal  artists  *.���������  .   some   niasicr    v  iiici above the i  -"a*he social lmp"i  -���������"Millionaires     ���������  "���������was  the  head In-'  completely over-  lerest,   and  In  ������dltors,  s marred  ��������� -st piece of business  i the police annals of  The  detective  de-  ':���������-. so, and lt ought to  police reporters  en-  .'.sa ot the thief, and  -  the "Job" waa  re-  ��������� ,1 breath, and with  .' admiration as pro-  ord to the work of  "sc* skill has raised  lousy of mediocrity,  nice of the wedding  Hymen's   lionds,"'  in   one paper���������was  ���������lowed In public In-  ��������� estimation  of  city  by  the <1  ring robbery whicli  the   rei "plion    and   sent   the  ���������' .'.*������������������*���������' -bride away In a Mate ot semi-hysterics.  ���������- '-.* The    presents    >.-d     been    Jealously  ���������guarded by two p ivate detectives, with  ���������silk hats, and IV" ��������� !; coats badly llttluB  '-'���������'    and  hired  for  t..c  occasion,  while   a  third,   garbed  n"  ������������������   footman,  had  ofll-  clated at the front door, to keep a sharp  -* ._-,eye on the stre..,:i of guests lest any  ���������*-.-". jevll-dlsposed. per.sun  should obtain an  ->.'-]entrance.   And >f-t, in spite of nil pre-  "-���������������"     cautions, four valuable pieces of Jew-  ���������elry had mysteriously disappeared un-  - -iner the very noses of the custodians.  The list, as supplied to the city force,  "���������si-ras Itemized as follows:  i Diamond pin, valued at... t   ?**">0  1 Diamond sunburst  1,000  1 Emerald hoop ring-      2.r)0  -sj Rope of pearls  2,500  It was a long time since Tolchester  "had enjoyed such a sensation. The social prominence of the parties lent additional piquancy to the occurrence,  ���������Hnd people who, as a rule, never looked  at the society columns, eagerly scanned  tbe list of ���������v.-eddinsr gueste, and won-  tf3.' .flored who. . i lint provlnclally august  ..luitalogue.' -������������������u'.d hnve been the author  ������f one of the-neatest "touches" on rc-  cuid.  Nick  Ho~i''boom.   police  reporter  of  the "Courier," felt a double interest in  the  affair,  both, from a personal and  -professional  point  of view.    Much  to  -"his  disgust,  he  bad been  assigned   lo  nvrlte up the ceremony, the reportoiial  ."���������staff being below its normal strength,  ��������� -and had with his own hand catalogued  -for his paper the inrge array of wedding gifts.   He had been greatly taken  -.���������with  the beauty of the diamond pin,  ��������� Jocularly remarking to the society , edit-  ��������� '���������'.'tress of the "Weekly Hearth and Home"  Ihat he "had'a good mind to pinch It  '���������-lor his Sunday tie," and had wished,  with  a  sigh,  that  he could  afford  to  -.".haiid such a string of pearls on a cer-  " .tain white neck.  *-*i~As police reporter ot the "Courier,"  "���������with a reputation; for "scoops," for so  exclusive news stories are called in the  'Jargon of the press, it behooved him to  - get the earliest information on the sub-  ���������'���������s'-Ject of the robbery, and so. he strolled  Into the offico of the chief of the city  :-detectlve staff, to pick up anyi crumbs  -.'which that august official might vouch-  "-Vale :��������� to let fall.   The chief liked Nick  3-iosalioora   as   -Well   as   he   permitted  ���������ti.'.inself  to  like  any of the reporters,  "-.���������vliose premature disclosures sometimes  i -Interfered seriously with his plans, and  tr.e ."graciously  suffered two  pieces  of  l'i formation, to be extracted���������first, that .  ���������-���������J.*.-. Wotherspoon had offered a reward  nf a thousand dollars for the recovery  of  the  stolen  Jewelry;   and,  secondly,  that Detective Wright, who had been  assigned on the case, was Ul, and that  ���������Jiis place had been taken by: Detective  -SfKundlesroth.  "Bundles, eh?" queried Nick, .with a  -".-slight uplifting; of the eyebrows and  -**n indrawing of the lips, which did hot  -escape the keen eyes of the chief. :  "Have you got any objection to my  ".putting liim on" he asked, sarcastically.   "If you have,-why, don't hesitate to  ���������"lay so, and I'll switch the staff around  to   accommodate   you."     The   chief's  ' eyes might be cpen to the .deficiencies  ot certain members of his force, but he  ���������^3'd not choose ii-nt others should com-  -jnent   on  lhem,   even  by  depreciaiory  3>antomime. . . '*  -"!N!ck laughed.    "'Oh,  Bundles is  all  'Tight. I guess," lie said.  "What's the matter between you and  ���������Btmdlesroth these days?" the chief en-  ^rdred.   "Tou used to be  as thick as  - thieves.    A bit ico  thick to  suit  me  -yKneiimes,"   he   added,   with   a   grim  '"irnile.  -Just a little difference of opinion,"  "replied the reporter, carelessly. "We'll  i*get over our grouch some day." He  ���������showed no Inclination to pursue the  ���������eonversation along these personal lines,  anda few minutes later took his leave.  ���������most expensive In the collection, which I  he pictured himself as purchasing and :  slipping on to Mamie's finger, with an .  appropriate accompanying speech. Nick |  had that speech down pat, and he wns j  running his eye over the ring-cases, j  preparatory to going through his cus- |  tomary mental theatricals, when he be- |  came aware that another man was also ;  regarding the Jewels, and with the eye ;  of a connoisseur. The stranger was  tall, well dressed In a frock-coat and j  silk hat. and wore an air of distinction. '  Nick looked at him once or twice out j  of the corners of his eyes, and his I  brows drew together in a puzzled  frown.    For the  moment Mamie was  In the inmost recesses of his soul, that  Nicholas Hogaboom was not far from  the truthi He had caught covert smiles  on the faces of detectives and policemen when ha had been expounding his  theories. Humiliating references to his  lack of acuteness as an officer, dropped  In casual conversation by newspaper  men, had come to his ears, and the  chief's manner had not been as cordial  of late as it used to be. There was no  disguising the fact that he had failed  lamentably in several cases entrusted  to him, and although he had plenty of  plausible explanations at command, he  nevertheless felt that It behooved hlni  to do something to re-establish a repu  forgotten.   He had seen that face r^ ! ta"������<l which was fast becoming tar-  cently. under circumstances which lent ������������������ nts^*   ,The Wotherspoon robbery afforded him a brilliant opportunity, but  the recognition nn additional interest.  and ho hnd seen It some years before, ���������  under other circumstances  which  his j  mind was unable to recall.   As he tried i  In vain to locato the brain-cell In which ;���������  this special memory was stored, he saw |  the man  raise his hat, draw a hand- j  kerehlof from his pocket, and, grasping ;  lt   delicately   between   forefinger    and i  thumb, puss lt once or twice across his  forehead.    Then   a  great  light  broke  suddenly cm the young reporter, and he  checked   a   whistle   of   astonishment  which gathered behind his lips.  What a cinch," ho whispered, as he  unfortunately he was at the present  time as far from any solution of the  mystery as ever. Nick's remarks consequently touched him on a very raw  spot, and It was with no very friendly  look that he replied:  "They say that, do they?   Well, I'll  show 'em In a little while that Bundles  ��������� ain't such a stiff as they think."  ��������� "It'll be a great thing for you, sure,"  j continued Nick, placidly, "and lt  ��������� would look pretty In print.   'Detective  Bundlesroth has again shown his old-  time sagacity, and demonstrated that,  continued" to "gaze 'fixedly 'in Tront 'of ! \?���������?*ltej>t advancing y?arf:^IS(_intel-  hlm.    He  permitted  himself the  lux  ury of snapping the finger and thumb J  of the hand In his trousers' pocket, but i  externally ho gave no sign of the tii- |  umph surging In Ills bosom.  "It's a case of shadow, sure," he said  to himself, as the man moved away  from the window, and while the tall,  silk-hatted figure strolled leisurely  along the street, the sturdy form of the  reporter loafed behind at a convenient  distance.  Before they had gone far the object  of Nick's pursuit encountered the assistant manager of one of the city  banks, and stopped for a fe%v minutes'  conversation. Nick, who happened to  be passing a corset emporium, at once  halted and became engrossed In the  contents of the window, until the two  separated after a warm handshake.  Now, it so happened that the banlc  manager lay under a slight obligation  to Nick Hogaboom, and he greeted the  young man pleasantly when they met.  "The man I was just talking to?" he  said, in reply to Nick's artless enquiry. "Oh, that's Walter Welfern ot  Boston. Been here some months trying to get people interested in a patent  soap-dish. Live? Has a Hat at 17  Marobel street. Why? D'ye want to  interview-him? Just told me he was  leaving for New Tork to-morrow for a  few weeks. Well, so long! Glad to  have seen you."  The bank manager hurried away, and  Nick abandoned the chase. He had  learned all that he wanted to know.  Fifteen minutes later he rang the boll  at 17 Marobel street.  "Mr. Welfern ain't In just now," snid  the servant who opened the door. "Did  you want to see him pertic'lar?"  "Pretty particular," replied Nick.  "When would I be likely, to catch bim  in?"  "He'll be in about ten o'clock tonight, I guess," said the servant. "He's  goin' away to-morrow on the 8.1S  train." ���������  Nick  expressed   his   thanks" for  the |  information and withdrew.  "Things are looking my way all  right," he said, "and now to play my  hand for what it's worth."  When Mamie Bundlesroth opened the  door of her father's house in response*  to Nick's ling and saw who stood outside, she blushed and beamed, and then  looked frightened.  "Paw In, Maine?" asked Nick. He  winked and ..grinned in a manner incomprehensible to the girl, but he mn..*e  no lover-like- advances. Mamie's fnce  fell.  .-���������'  "He's in the parlor, Nl��������� Mr. Hogaboom," she said, with a pathetic attempt at dignity.  "All right, Miss Bundlesroth," replied  Nlek, jocosely. "Just show me in. will  you?" and added in a low voice, as sho  preceded him. along the passage.  "Things are coming our way at lrint.  little girl; and we can afford to wait foi  led Is as acute, and his Intuition as  sure, as In the days when he bore the  reputation of being one o*f the most  astute officers on the continent.' Say,  how'd that hit you as part of the Introduction to the story? Great, wouldn't  lt?"  The smile of gratified vanity, which  had played over the detective's face  during this recitation of a possible  paragraph, faded as he realized its  visionary character.  "It'd be no more'n the truth," he  grunted.  "Well," said Nick, with a sigh, 'it's  no use gassing about what might be;  I guess I 'II drop over and see Era-  mett."  "What d'ye want to go an' see that  stiff  for?"  queried Bundles.    EmmeH  was  a  well-known   private   detective,  whom the" officers of the city force regarded    with    undisguised    hostility.  Bundles was especially bitter, Emmett  having  carried  to  a  triumphant  termination a casein which his, Bundles',  lack of success had been conspicuous.  Nick blew  a ring,  Impaled it  with  j great  exactness,   and  looked  the   de-  ! tectlve straight In the eye.  I     "I want to put him next," he said.  |     "Next to what?"  |     "To who pinched those bits of glass  at Wotherspopn's."  "And  .what  in  h   do  you   know  about lt?" Bundles seldom swore, but  he was agitated. Then Nick fired his  blast.  "I know all, about It," he said. "I  know the man; I know where he lives,  and I can put.my hand,"? on evidence.  Oh, It's a lead-pipe, and to think that  I've got to cough it all up to Emmett,  and throw down the force, and you in  particular. Say, Bundles, why ain't  we friends?"  The detective's face flushed, and his  eyes bulged out. "Are you giving It to  me straight, or are you putting up a  bluff?" he asked.  "Bluff be danined!";replled the young  man. "I've got the cards for a showdown. Look here, I'll give, you a little  bit of lt. Some years ago I was working on a paper In���������well, never mind  where, but It's quite a good-sized village. There was a big robbery trial on,  and one of the slickest crooks in the  States was in the dock. I was on the  case/and used to sit day after day in  the court room. The prisoner was a  tine-looking fellow, and when the evidence was thin and there was nothing  for me to do, I used to sit and look at  him. He had a trick ot wiping his  forehead with his handkerchief, which  struck me as peculiar���������sort of lady-like  fashion. Well, he was convicted, and  got seven'years, but on his way to the  pen he made a clean getaway, and 1  never heard that they'd pinched him  again. There was a reward of five  hundred out for him, which I guess is  still standing. At the Wotherspoon  lay-out I piped this same man, but 1  lidn't know him; couldn't think where  long.   Taking a last suck at his cigar,  and throwing lt Into a spittoon, he rose  to his feet and held out his hand.  "It's a go," he said.  "Good,"  replied Nick.    "I guess I'm  going  to  be~proud   of  iny   pa-in-law;  and   now,  maybe  we'd  better  call  in J  Mamie and give her the latest bulletin."  At eight o'clock next morning a cab  waited In front ot 17 Marobel street,  and two men stood near in animated  discourse. A trunk was brought out  and placed on the box, nnd a few minutes later a tall, well-dressed man appeared on the steps. As he leisurely  descended, the other two moved forward, still talking, and reached the  door of the cab just as the tall man  had comfortably ensconced himself.  Then, to the great surprise of the occupant, one of the pedestrians jumped  suddenly into the vehicle and seated  himself beside him.  "What does this menn?" cried Mr.  Welfern of Boston, in great Indignation.  "It's no go, Brady," said the lntrul-  er. "It's all up. Now, don't make a  beef, because there's a gun in my pocket silckln' right into your ribs. Get  in; Sam. Coachman, you know me���������  Detective Bundlesroth; drive to headquarters."  In spite of the excellent advice proffered by the detective, Mr. Welfern did  make a considerable "beef," and it was  not till a systematic search of his  trunks at the central police station had  revealed the missing articles of jewelry  that he ceased to threaten .ill kinds of  pains and, penalties for the outrage to  which,he was being subjected. Then  he accepted the situation with philosophical composure, and handed round  his cigar-case with charming cordiality.  Nicholas Hogaboom was as good as  his word. He squared the boys and  the Associated Press correspondent, as  he had promised, and Detective Bundles reaped a harvest of glory such as  he had never dreamed of. The" rewards were duly paid over to him, and  no one, not even Mamie, ever knew  that the entire credit for the achievement really belonged to another.  "How did you ever persuade paw to  let you marry me?" Mamie asked won-  deringly of her husband as they drove  from the paternal mansion, followed  by a shower of slippers discharged by  the paternal hand.  "You know what a scoop Is, don't  you?" Nick enquired.  "Of course I do. It's something that  you reporters get exclusive."  "Well," replied Nick, laughing, "this  was just a case of scoop."  And more than that Mamie could  never get him to say on the subject.  Queer Cases of Heredity.  ������'  OCTORS disagree as to the Influence of heredity. Some hold  that a great deal hinges upon  lt; others believe the contrary.  Some of the authentic stories  told to exemplify this mysterious bond between ancestors and de-  ��������� scendants are very curious.  There was a loan collection of old  portraits exhibited In London lately  and a young girl was among the visitors. She wa.s an orphan and wealthy,  but without near relatives, and was often heard to complain of the loneliness  of her position. As she passed through  the gallery one particular portrait attracted her attention and she went  back to lt more than once. Her companion saw in It nothing but the commonplace painting of a middle-aged  man in the costume of the latter part  of the last century. "It ts such a nice  kind face," said the girl, rather wistfully. "I Imagine my father might  have looked like that had he lived." As  most of the pictures were ticketed the  visitors had purchased no catalogue  but, before going away, MIns Tt. bought  one at the entrance and made a last  visit to the portrajt for which she had  felt bo strong an' attraction. To hor  astonishment she found her* own name  opposite to Its number and learned on  Inquiry,that the original was one of  her direct ancestors.  Another occult coincidence or psychological phenomenon happened a few  years ago to a Southern statesman and  financier whose family has always been  of rank In his native State. This  gentleman was overhauling old documents and letters which had been  stored in a musty chest for years and  intended to publish whatever might  be of historic value and Interest. To  his surprise he unfolded a letter yellow and time-stained, which was written In his own peculiar hand-writing,  or seemed to have been written by him,  although the date was two generations  before his birth. The signature of the  surname, which was the same as his  own, was so markedly characteristic  that he could scarcely believe his own  hand did not pen the letters.  A Loquacious Cockatoo.  Something* Like a Toronto Case.  Pa^l'f0nHv-fllU',lxii^,.���������t*,  /ni ���������������������������, -w.,,**, I I'd *-een h,m-   Two n0Ur8 aSO. In front  Detective Bundlesroth did not wear ;        ^lMa,T^eySi  -������������������.,  *.*-..,,  8arne    coon  the   appearance of a hospitable   host ; standlnff>  a���������yd *, lrieA to,8lse hlin up  appearance of a hospitable  when Nick walked jauntily Into the  parlor, ushered in by a "Here's Mr.  Hogaboom to see you, paw," from  Mamie. He fixed a stony stare on his  visitor, and emitted an interrogative  grunt, which, translated into polite  English, stood for, "To what am I indebted for the honor of this visit?"  "I dropped in  to see you. Bundles,"  began Nick,  easily,  "for two reasons.  but it was no go, till he pulled out his  wipe and mopped his fevered brow.  Then I tumbled right off. I found out  his name, where he lives, when he's going to make a sneak, and all about lt,  and���������and I guess that's about all at  present from yours truly."  There was a long pause. Nick sat  smoking deliberately and gazing abstractedly   Into   the  atmosphere.    The      __.      . _^   ��������� .j First,   because    I   want   to    finely  out i d(,tecUve shifted  uneaslly_In his Beat,  Passing  down   tlie  stairs  Nick  met f"whether  you    haveh*r"changed"   y0Uli=Texamlned   the  ash  of  his   cigar" with"  another reporter, to whom he imparted | mln(J about jjamle " I great  minuteness,   and   cajit    sidelong  "I haven't, then,"  replied the other,  sourly,  "an' I don't mean  to.    I sup-  repor  "-the routine Information which he had  =*Jusi received.   The other grinned.  "It's a pipe for the bird it old man  '"Bundles   has  got   the   Job   ot  putting  *. **alt on his tall," he said.    "Why,-the  ������ld Jay couldn't catch the smallpox In  *  pesihouse.   He's beginning to tum-  "kle to the fact that he's getting pretty  Bead, but thlsil bloat htm up some."  Two policemen, standing near, over- j  -heard  the remark,  and snickered  ap-  -"lircclativeiy. .     I  "Poor    old    Bundles!"    soliloquized j  Nick,  as he left the building.    "If he j  iloesn't g-t a move on, I'm afraid it's I  -going to be a case of sack;" and then  ���������he   fell   to   meditating  ruefully on  his  ������wu relations with the despised detec-  Uve.  It was true, as the chief had re-  ���������snsj-ked, tliat Nicholas Hogaboom and  Detective Kundlesroth were no longer  "thick," -ind the reason for the split  -vis a woman. Bundles had a daughter, Mamie, a bright-faced, wholesome,  attractive lass, and Mamie had found  ���������favor in the eyes of the police reporter.  3Ele *ad seen her on m?ny occasions  ���������***rnen he called for a private and con-  ���������JMeritlal chat with her father, and had  ���������*s*en her several times to the theater  "With full parental sanction. He felt It  ���������kard, therefore*, that, after, he had obtained from thc girl a blushing confession that his attachment was reciprocated, Bundles should have  Vounded on him and sternly refused to  ���������allow of an engagement. Nick pointed  ���������ut that his savings and his present  tsalary were amply sufficient to warrant  Uls taking a wife, but the father was  ���������bdurate, and forbade any intercourse  ���������fcetween the young people. Consequently the two men now confined themselves to a strictly professional relationship, and spoke to one another as  seldom n.-s possible.  Nick, stroilin,",' towards the "Courier"  D'Tic?. paused in front of the alluring  Jewelry display in the windows of Mul-  larkey & Co. Those windows had recently held a great attraction for him,  ������nd he never passed them without  HwpplEg to select a ring, usually the  looks at the other.   Presently he broke  the silence  pose you an' her have had a huggin*- j.    .^       j     y t,���������   he   nflkcd  match In the passage?" Huskily  "Then   you   suppose    wrong,"     said j     ,���������    *'  ji^l.    "For a detective you're a mighty ���������  N'lck.  poor Judge of human nature. "I'm  1 playing my cards on the table and so's  i Mame. There's no back-door business  j about us."  j     The detective's expression softened a  little.  "It ain't no use talkln', Nick," he said.  "You've got to give her up. I've got  ne objections to you personally, but  there's richer men than you wnntn to  marry my girl, an' she's got to take  one of 'em."  Nick shrugged his shoulders. "We'll  drop it, then," he snid; "antl now, how-  're things going In that Wotherspoon  business? The chief tells me he's put  you on to It. Picked up any clues yet?"  An air of profound wisdom, the air  with which the professional detective  masks the more or less of knowledge  which he happens to possess, spruad  over Bundles* face.  "Youse fellowsil get to know In good  time," he replied. "Mum's the word  Just now."  The reporter took a couple of cigars  from his pocket, and rolled one across  the table to his companion, who, after  eyeing lt for a moment with professional mistrust, bit the end off and lit It.  "It'll be a great thing- for you, Bun- i  dies,"  said  Nick,  meditatively,   as  he  blew a succession of rings  nnd lmpnlod !  them  on  his  forefinger.    "A  thousimil i  bunks ain't to be picked up every dny, i  and then there's your rep.   Say, I don't !  want to rub It Into you, old man, but  your brother cops  nre  kind   of gllnr:  you the laugh, nnd the papers are just  a bit sore on you.   Thoy nny you haven't pullcu out anything since that  ISI-  lerman hold-up, and  thnt you'd  never  have  got  wise   to   that.   If  one   of   Ilie  thugs  hadn't squealed   to  you  on   th*-.* |  q. t." I  Now, In spite; of nn overweening V.-..1- j  ity. Detective Bundlcm-oili w������h avare, j  reckon you don't wear blinders,"  replied thc police reporter, coolly.  "Now, Bundles, I'll give It to you  straight. Tou give me your word���������  and you're not tho man to go back on  It���������that 1 may marry Mnrnle Inside of  six months, nnd I'll put you next to  the whole business. Ton can pouch  all the stuff���������fifteen hundred nice,  Jutny samoleons���������and I'll see that you  t get all the credit that's coming. I'll  squnre the boys on thc other pnpers to  give you the best Mend-off any of you  cops ever had; they'll do that for me  when they know I'm going to marry  your girl. I'll pick the picture for you  out of the gallery���������It'll be there, dead  sure���������and we'll tell the people how;T)e-  tectlve Bundlesroth saw the man on the  street, und, possessing one of those  phenomenal memories, rare nmong the  cleverest of the force, thnt never forgets a face, recti lied a certain photograph sent In to the office years ago,  and worked this slight clue to a suc-  cwsful termination. Say, I'll never  need to show in the business at nil. I'll  fix the man who handles A. P. here,  and you'll get a good show In every  paper In the country. What do you  say?    Is It a go?"  As   the   reporter  proceeded,   the   1m-  nglnntlon   of  tho  detective   painted  a  series of highly-colored pictures In rapid succession.   Tfe saw himself raised  to a pinnacle far loftier than that from  which he had slipped so unaccountably.  j Ho saw his fame blnzon-.-d forth, from  1 ocean to ocean, ns the solver of a deep  mystery   nnd   the  en pi or  of  a  noted  ! malefactor   who w-is  badly "wonted."  And   last,  but  not'lenst.   lie  saw  his  I bank   account,   now   iiiully   attenuated,  I swelled Into comparative fulness by the  J (wlditlon   of     fifteen     hundred   dollius.  j Hitherto his lcputntloii at Its best had  been local; to-morrow It would be c.oit-  ! tlnental.    He   hesitated,   but   not   for  Edna, Crawford, the beautiful daughter of Chief Detective Ralph Crawford,  of Cincinnati, has brought suit for ten  thousand dollars damages against the  famous New York photographer,: Sar-  ony, for using her picture: as a corset  advertisement without her permission.  Detective Crawford was so incensed  that he threatened to thrash Sarony,  but was persuaded to let the law set tie  the matter. Sarony ' declares the girl  was given professional rates, and thus  gave him the right to use the picture  as he did. Several days ago some of  Miss Crawford's classmates were'astonished to see her. face mounted���������'. on  the body of a giddy, bespangledactres"  In a magazine and In several theatrical  papers. Next It began to appear, out  of corset "ads." and wearing two-  dollar-aiid-forty-nirie-cent shirt waists.  She was shown as a high-klcker.and in  other attitudes, the very Idea of which  shocked the young woman. Miss Crawford denies the, professional rate answer.  A really forgivable pun is one published by the Philadelphia "Ledger"  when it ascribes the suicide of the diabolical governor of Shansi by swallowing gold leaf to "a consciousness of inward gilt."  Novel Prison Discipline.  They have a novel method of maintaining discipline in the state prison  at Folsom, California, and it has  proven to be a - great success. They  have no dungeons or dark cells in the  prison, corporeal punishment is unheard  of, tying Up by the thumbs is never permitted, none of the old modes of punishment are recognized in this instlm-  tion. The system in vogue is this :  When a new prisoner is received, he Is  f.iformed that they have three different bills of fare in the prison, and that  It is optional with each man as to how  well he lives. If he is industrious, ord-  'eriyr~weir-behavedr-and���������in���������all���������thi rigs-  conforming strictly to the rules of the  prison, he Is served with excellent  food, nicely cooked. He can have  chops, steaks, eggs, tea, and coffee,  milk, and white bread; If he Is only  fairly well-behaved, and does not do  his allotted task properly, Is inclined to  growl and grumble at the regulations  of the institution, he is given ordinary  prison fare���������mush and molasses,", soup,  und corn breads; and If he is ugly and  Insubordinate, he Is'permitted to feast  on unlimited quantities of cold water  and a rather small allowance of bread.  There is said to be_an Intense rivalry  among the convicts" to enter the first  class, and once there, it is-very" seldom  that one of them has to be sent back  to a lower class.  The most loquacious cockatoo In the  world used to be owned by a civil servant In a Rlverlna township, Australia,  and as this is, perhaps, the .only bird  that  ever shut up  a political  ''wind-  Jammer" the Melbourne "Punch" deems  Its escapade worthy to be put on record.   A general election was on, and  one of the-candidates for the district  had engaged a hall wherein to address  the electors.     There was av* great attendance, and the candidate went from  scratch with a rush; but at the end of  five minutes was Interrupted by a thin,  croaking voice,  like that, of    a    little  devil suffering from ;:whooplng-cough,  which- called from one of the rafters :  "Oh, I'm full of this !"      The crowd,  suddenly discovering the cockatoo on  his perch aloft, laughed uproariously.  A. long string of Insults at the crowd  came from'the rafters. .The candidate  tried to get going again.; "The man's'  an ass !" was the cockatoo's comment,  and he Jerked lt In after every solemn  expression, of the candidate's opinion.  At; last the candidate's patience- gave  way, and, seizing the water-bottle,  he  hurled it, furiously at; the intemperate  bird. " It broke, a window, and excited  the bird to further efforts.,  Picking out  the candidate, he   heaped , reproaches  and insults upon him.   The bird won;  finding nothing left to throw, and unable  to  make  any Impression  on  the  roaring audience,   the; politician  flung  himself from the hall,  and    the    evil  bird gave the last touch    by    calling  pleasantly : "So long, so long !"     The  meeting forthwith carried resolution to  the effect that the cockatoo was a fit  and proper party to represent .that district ..In .Parliament.  Curious Bits of News.  . Electric lamps are to be substituted  In the place of gas Jets in Westminster  Abbey. It Is averred that gas has  proved Injurious to the great church by  setting up chemical change in the  limestone of which its walls, arches,  vaults and carvings are composed,  thus hastening the disintegration of  the building.  Captain K. A. Jansen of Chicago has  won the distinction of being the flrst  mariner to guide a steamship from  Lake Michigan to San Francisco by  way of the Straits of Magellan. The  craft In which he made tha voyage in  ninety-eight days is the steamer "Tam-  pico," which was built at Toledo In  1900 for the Great Lakes carrying  trade.  According to "Engineering," the net  result In respect o-f speed in naviga-,  tion is that while ten years ago the  highest sustained ocean speed was 20.7  knots, it is now 23.61 knots; the highest  speed for large warships was 22 knots,  and is now 23 knots on atrial of Rouble  the duration of those of ten years ago;  the maximum speed attained by any  craft was 25 knots, as compared with  36.581 knots now; while the number of  ships of over 20 knots was eight In  1891, and is fifty-eight now.  When the King was Prince of Wales  he refused to attend public banquets  If the press were not seated among  tho guests. On one occasion the reporters were to dine by themselves In  another room. They refused, and  brought the matter under the notice of  the Prince personally. He sent for the  mayor of the town and made a few  pointed remarks. When the banquet  commenced the reporters were accommodated with seats from which they  could have shaken hands with His  Royal Highness.  During the past four years the United  States Fish Commission has made important experiments at the station In  Duluth. They have resulted in the successful planting and acclimatization In  Lake Superior of the famous stcelhcad  salmon of the Pacific, a salt-water fish  exclusively heretofore. It was believed  that this fish would thrive In the cold,  fresh waters of Lake Superior, where  so many other salmonldae grow. Several thousand fry were planted on.thc  north shore of the lake, near Port Arthur, and at Silver Islet, both points on  the Canadian side. The following year  a larger number was planted off Isle  Royale, and since then the planting  has been kept up. Now, from time to  time, the catch of an occasional steel-  headis reported, and. from, the size of  those found it is evident that they are  growing about a pound a year in. these  fresh waters. It is also evident, from  certain modifications of some of those  specimens caught, that they have been  propagating and increasing naturally.  Fame.  She lived and wrote 'mid simple Joys and  - fears. ���������������������������������������������'  And  never  word  she wrote had power  to stir  Th*? hearts of men to laughter or to K.art  Until   thai  one  great sorrow  came   to  her.  And   then she  wrote, and  woke to praise  and   fame,  Ko* a,! unlonged for as but Idle brn.vh:  What rn.i/ttera It that they should vaunt  her   name.  Ills lips  now silent 'neath  the kl������> of  Death?  ���������Eileen Benson.  St.  Catharines.  _���������   -....������������������������  Quite a Catalogue of Virtues.  This alphabetical advertisement up-  pcfired In tho London "Times" In 1812:  "To widowers and single gentlemen���������  Wanted by a lady, a situation to superintend the household and preside  at table. She Is Agreeable, Becoming,  Careful, Desirable, English, Facetious,  Generous, Honest, Industrious, Judicious, Keen, Lively, Merry, Natty,- Obedient, Philosophic, Quiet, Regular, "-Sociable, Tasteful, Useful, Vlvaclous.Wo-  ���������rnanlsh. Xuntlpplsh, Youthful, Zonlous,  et':. Addrass X. X. 7'., Slmmonds'  Library, Edgwarerond."  Palmistry Triumphant.  (Fragment from   a; Town' Romance.)  The enquirer was a little anxious as  he placed his open hand before the  earnest gaze of the soothsayer.  "You are a man of the* utmost ability"  The enquirer seemed satisfied.  "You have the organizing power of  i Kitchener and the dash of a Baden-  Powell."  Again the enquirer smiled.  "You have the tact of a Talleyrand,  tho courage of a Buonaparte, tho poetry of a Shakespeare, and the sense  of color of a Rubens, a Vandyko and  a Gainsborough."  _iV.QuIte_^true,"^^n-iurmured    tho    en ���������  qulrer.  "You could, had you wished It, have  taken a Double First at Oxford or become a Senior Wrangler at Cambridge."  The enquirer bowed acquiescence.  "I can see from your garb you are  not the Archbishop of Canterbury, and  from my knowledge of the lineaments  of the distinguished personages I am  about to mention I am sure you are  neither the Premier, the Lord Chancellor, nor the Commnnder-ln-Chlef."  "You are right," replied the enquirer.  "You occupy a position of greater  Importance. If I am not mistaken, than  either of the situations I have specified." .*-  [  "Again you aro ' correct," returned  the enquirer, "I have the honor to 1111  the post of Senior Superintendent of  the Imperial Universal (Oeneral Dry  Goods and Provision Stores, Limited."  And with mutual expressions of respect and admiration, the soothsayer  and  enquirer separated.���������"Punch."  Language in a Dog's TaiL  In the case of all hunting dogs, such  as foxhounds or  wolves,' ��������� which  pack  together; the tall is carried aloft, and  is very free in movement.    It is also  frequently rendered more conspicuous  by the tip being white,, and this is almost' invariably ' the , oase    when the  hounds are of mixed color. When" ranging the long grass of the prairie   or  jungle,   the   raised  tips    of   the  tails  would often be all that an individual  member of the band would see- of its  fellows.   There Is no doubt that hounds  habitually watch the tails of those In  front of them when drawing a.covert.  If a faint drag is detected suggestive'  of the presence of a fox, but scarcely  sufficient to be sworn, to vocally, the  tail of the finder is at once set in motion, ; and \ the "warmer  the  scent  the  qulcker'doesit wag. Others; seeing the  signal, quickly join the. first, and- there  is an. assemblage of wa.ving tails before even the least- whimper is heard.  Should the drag prove a doubtful one,  the  hounds; separate   again,: and   the  waving ceases; but, if it grows stronger when followed up, the wagging becomes more and more emphatic, until  Jpne after another the hounds begin to  Whine   and   give   tongue,   and- stream  off  In, Indian   file  along  the  line    of  ecent.    When  the pack Is  In full cry  upon a strong scent, the talis cease to  wave, but are carried aloft in full view.  The moment when the dog most enjoys  life   is   the   moment  when   he   sights  game.   That moment Is the time when  ha, wags his tall most vigorously in order to announce his discovery to his  fellow-dogs.   In this way, by the habit  of association; he got to wagging his  tall whenever he was pleased; and the  more pleased he Is the more vigorously  he wags his tail, so that the wagging  of-a-dog's-tall-under-pleasurablo-emo--  tlon can be traced directly to the time  when the dog used his tall as a signal  of the discovery of his prey.  Tiie "Dmitri Family.  Mr. Glazebrook, author oi ��������� "The  Heraldry of Smith," declared it to  be atnolutely true that a lifetime  and the fortune of an American billionaire would not suffice for an exhaustive-  history of all the Smiths in all four quarters of the globe.  Mr. Compton Ecade does not attempt  ���������anything so supremely heroic in his last  book, "The Smith Family," just published by 'Elliot*. Stock. He professes, to  use .his own words, "to review the great  Fabrieian family," whether crisped into  Smith, "smoothed into Smyth, or smidged  into Smijtii." Mr. Kende says that so  numerous are t*hc Smiths, he marvels  England lias not been transmuted into  "Smithland." An American authority is  quoted to the efl'ect that "the history of  England, is the history of families," and  then ilr. Comptoii Reticle affirms that so  far as thc Smiths represent a type, England* without them would have been very  smnll indeed. ' ��������� ���������  It is curious, Mr. Kende observes, how  the little letter "y" has proved a liugo  differentia. For, whereas the "Smiths"  ns a rule have been'money-making, the  ���������Smyths" have shown themselves chivalrous" nnd aristocratic. While the Smiths  were Jlou'ndheud, the Sinyllis suflcrcd for  Tory or diicubite principles.  Apropos of these variations in the  spelling of.."thu great pa irony mic, Mr.  Oompton JiciiiIr propounds,' a theory  which should prove of comfort to both  branches of the family. He holly combats the notion Unit thc Smyths,  Sinylhes and SiuijUia have ussumeil a  variation of ������pelli!ij* lo lend tin aristocratic flavor to u liumi'Iy name. "Nothing," he declares, "can lie further from  the truth. The original form wns Smyth���������  just as the modern 'eider' is a corruption  of the ancient 'cycler.' So-far from the  Smyths having Hmytheil lhum*>i'lvc*8. I  can discover barely "one notable instance  of the change from *i' lo *y,' but 1 can  trace numberless instances of El kin beth-  an Smyliis having bsaonic Viriorian  Smiths. The roco "spelling of the word.  Smijth is apparently due to the ingen-  iousness of some mediaeval clerk who in  writing Smyth took upon himself to do I.  both, points of the 'y,' thus producing  ���������Sinijth.'"  But what is the origin of this great*  family? The following couplet limiisiie.-.  tho answer:  Whence cometh Smith, be he knighl or  be he squire,  But from the Smith thnt forgelh at Hie  fire?  Midsummer Maxims.  Old married folks never sit in the  hammock together. A drug store in  the neighborhood Is always productive  of thirst. It usually gets too cold for  mamma and papa about 9 o'clock. The  young lady who Is always objecting to  her brother's smoking tells her young  man that she likes the odor of a good  cigar���������with tho accent on the good���������  and the young-man smiles complacently. The neighbor's piano ought really  to be tuned. The man who can restrain his natural Impulse to sprinkle  the lawn with the hose always Jollies  his next door neighbor; who can't. A  woman can sit with nothing In her  hands nnd rock, but a man ha.-i to have  a paper or a cigar or both. When the  Old Man and his neighbor get tlieir  feet on the railing side by Bide the  young man who is calling on.thc Old  Man's daughter usually pri.piso* a  stroll, for he knows they are pU*.:'.tcJ  Until bedtime.���������Ife  Mme. Eames's Diplomacy.  Many think that musical artists  should present their services for concerts given for charitable objects, says  the Philadelphia "Post!" Mme. Barnes  is also of this opinion, but she recently,  In London, put the matter in a new  light to those who Invited hor to appear gratuitously. Mme. Barnes was  one afternoon at Lord Charles Beres-  ford's, and the next day received a letter from Lady Beresford saying that  two ladles present had wanted to ask a  favor, but in her presence had lost  courage. "But I am not afraid of you,"  wrote Lady Beresford, and proceeded  to say that the ladles In question, who  happened to be extremely wealthy,  wished her to sing for nothing for a  certain charity. Mme. Barnes Immediately sat down and wrote a reply. It  was her duty, she said, to save herself  as much as possible for her operatic  performances at Covent Garden, which  wero stipulated by contract to be two  days apart so that she might give her  freshest and best to the public. She  felt, however, greatly attracted toward  tho charity named, and would make  only one condition regarding the donating of her services. She had received  800 guineas (about $1,600) for singing at  Mr. W. W. Astor's and about the same  amount at other private concerts. She  would gladly sing for nothing at the  charily concert if each one of the ladles Interested, who had so kindly  asked her, would donutc 300 guineas to  tho object for which the concert was  to be given.  As yet no replies from "the ladles Interested" hnve been received. But  Lady Beresford, not being one of the  "Interested ladles," appreciates more  fully the hun>." it tho sli^ri.'on.     . _j  Not that this is any disgrace. The name  is old enough; at any rate, i'rof elisor 11a-  liall'y lias discovered Hint a man named  Smith lived in the days of Ptolemy 111.  B.C. 227; and the occupation from which  Hie name is derived wus originally one. ol  great honor. David wah armourer to  liing Saul. Vulcan waa a pur-sun of distinction in Olympus, iu Ihe days of  flior, when none but the mightiest could  wield.the-hammer, lie was'a cynosure;  in the heroic days uf gallant little Wales  iie sat "upon the rigiit hand of the King.  But from.his high estate he .fell, to become ii mere mechanic in Norman times,  only, however, to blossom into the go'ld-  .stornig goldsmith-of. Queen Anne's" days,  irom \\ inchiir.de sprang the great industry of hanking.   '  w.it.i ihe assistance of pedigrees and  ..tlu-r liuuier Mr. Ueade sets to work to  ,n o\e thi! doctrine of hereditary charac-  ti'i istics': "For the ranks - of these' de-  ���������ii-endiuits ot primitive' iron-workers," he  -.ays, include scarcely a poet or an ideal-  si, while in matters practical they stand  ;irc-oiiiiiient.  Whatever we are, we were,  .     - "  And whatever we were, we are,  And whatever we arc, and whatever we  were,  That same shall wc always be.  Certainly Mr. licade's pedigrees and"  the list of celebrities which 'lie gives at  tlie end of his book contain the names  of many well-known men of afl'airs, not  lo mention lawyers, sailors aud soldiers.  Charitable Smiths without number have  proved the old proverb, "There is that  sentleretli. but yet incrcascth." Perhaps  the most eccentric and yet practical bequest was that of Henry Smith in 1717 to  St. Sepulchre's "to help poor maids for  husbands!" Clearly when George I.-was  king a spouse must have been a purchasable commodity, and at a moderate price.  Why should there not be a day set  apart every year to celebrate the greatness of the Smiths, after the manner of  the Smith banquet which took place in  the eighteenth century? At this "banquet the guests were Smiths to a man,  and thc president was one , Captain  Smith, Governor of Virginia. The cooks  were Smiths, the waiters also, and a  Smith said grace. Thc feast was graced  by a poet Smith, whose sole claims to  immortality rest upon the ode lie com-  poscd-for-the-occasion,-the-publisher_of   which was Jair.es Smith.  The Girl Who Didn't  (A FABLE.)  Once upon a time a girl decided that  she would go in for health rather than  fn*-hion, and would, ho a true woman,  such as men like to talk about in the  abstract.        , ' ��������� v  . She wore spring heels ou number seven  slioex, and shivered at tlie very idea of  corsets. Her waist measured thirty-six  iiichc.**!, while ' her hips - and bust were  only thirty-two. She wouldn't curl her  hair, and as she thought powder vulgar,  her face was always red and shiny.  Her clothes were all made to hang  from the shoulders, and she never sat on  her spine. By, the time she, was twenty-  five men ran when they saw her coming  or going, they never Knew which, anil  women looked at her through lorgnettes and said she was an unsexed creature!  Moral���������The easiest way is always tho  best if you are a girll���������Jf. Y. "Life."  At the Football Match.  Ne. 1���������My word, 1 wouldn't drop on ai  ball like that in front of a rush. You  might get your head kicked in and be  laid out for twenty minutes.  No. 2���������Yes, hut think of the cheers  when you got up.  "But you might never get up."  "Then think of the funeral you'd  have!"  f  I  A widow's weeds are orten the outward  and visible sign of an inward and spiritual rejoicing.  Student (to servant)���������I thought, yon  had finished sweeping my room.  College-bred Servnnt. Uirl���������Hog pardon,,  sir, bull wns just, decomposing.  Student���������What?  Collcgc-bred Servant Girl���������I wns returning to dust!  ���������,iz&;&^������K'iX#3!xiS^.  ���������^a^ogta^s  ���������*������-******������***������..^*M-Kj*-^ o  A Midnight Balloon Ascension.  A nEAI, EXPltlUENCE.  ���������  Aerostatlon.--M.   Etlenne  Glraud.  I'lntreplcle neronnute, et M. Georges  Hall  de  San  Francisco,   partis  do  Paris  clans lo Rolla, ont atterri a  Cozy,    sUue    a    5    kilometres    do  Jolsrny, apres une travorsce *le dlx  heuro3 assez mouvementoe,  onnlciuo    sons    accident.--" Lo  l'"l-  Caro."  ' E had agreed, my como.in ���������  Ion  and  I.   thnt  I   should  call for him at his house,  after dinner, not later than  eleven o'clock.  This    athletic    young  "Frenchman belongs lo a small set of  Parisian   sportsmen,   who   have  taken  up "ballooning" as a pastime.  After having exhausted nil the sen-  enttoii3 that are to be found In ordinary (.-ports, even those of "automobll-  Ing" at a breakneck speed, the members of the "Aero Club" now seek In  the air, where they Indulge in all kinds  ���������of daring fonts, tho nerve-racking excitement that they have ceased to find  on earth.  I might add that those facts wore  hut vaguely known to me before 1 hnd  "been Introduced, by a mutual frleiid.  to this new century young sportsman,  and had accepted his Invitation to accompany him In his next nerlal voyage.  When we reached the vacant lot nt  the huge gas-works of Saint Denis,  ���������where our balloon wns being Inflated,  I could not help feeling a bit alarmed  at the sight of that little bubble--only  a few hundred cubic metres���������and the  "very small basket which were soon to  take us up In the air.  All the "eclat," tho ceremonial, and  the emotional "good-byes" that usually accompany the "let her go!" of a  "balloon, were totally lacking when the  -'Rolla" left the earth. The start was  ���������effected in a quiet and business-like  manner, and the act seemed so natural  to the people who were helping U3 off,  that-thelr demeanor on this occasion  had a beneficial and soothing effect on  my excited nerve3.  -,. A few. minutes after midnight, when  the.last little sacks of sand ballast had  teen hung out over the edge of our  ���������wicker-basket, when a final "glance had  been given to the ropes, the ."net, the  valve, etc.���������with a careless "au; revolt-"  ���������'��������� from the foreman of the gas-works,  and,a parting joke from the "cocher"  -:.'.-Who':-.had driven us there���������the dark  ���������forms, whose hands were holding us  ..down, silently stepped back,-and with  -a gentle and graceful swing the "Rolla" started off bnits sixth ascension.  ��������� Had we taken with us another small  sack- of, ballast,, our balloon?could not  have left the earth. In other words,  ���������rts ascensional force' was almost balanced by the weight it was expected to  ���������carry. After rising about a hundred  yards;:and finding: a. trifle, cooler cur-  ���������; rent, which slightly, condensed the gas,  the: "Rolla" ceased to ascend. We were  'met by a gentle breeze from the north-  -west, and began to cross Paris, a cou-  3>le of! hundred feet above the city.  It would take the pen of a Carlyle to  -describe our mysterious flight over  Paris at midnight. The Impression  ���������was so startling that for an hour we  ���������never "spoke above a whisper.  Owing to the' increasing coolness of  "the atmosphere, our balloon had a  slight, though constant, tendency to  descend. But we easily kept our'altitude by -occasionally throwing overboard a spoonful or two" of ballast.  After ascertaining that we"*Would not  -come.In contact with the towers ot  Notre Dame or the sharp edges of the  Eiffel Tower, we decided to keep ths  same distance, and let the breeze do  the rest.  At out feet Paris Is breathing,' like a  monster with a million eyes.  On the right, at the very top of  Montmartre, and looming up in the'  ���������glow that" surrounds it, stands the  white basilica" of ��������� the Sacred Heart,  ���������with Its colossal marble statue of the  .Redeemer watching over the city.  The great boulevards roll out In every direction like ribbons of fire; we  oan hear, as we sail over them, the  muffled rumbling of a thousand carriages, and we watch them as * they  dodge each other in their complicated  course.  A cry, a call, from time to time,  "reaches our ears; but the others are  |ost in the mighty silence above us.  "There is  the Opera,"  whispers  the  owner, as he points to a square 'silhouette,  bathed in a lake  of electric  , light.  I seem to have no fear, merely the  sensation of relief that follows an irrevocable decision; -with the feeling  that we are tasting a forbidden fruit,  breaking some divine and primeval  raw. All our faculties are concentrated  in our eyes, and they feast on this  ������������������wonderful' sight.  "Those dark pits that dot  the surface of Paris are'gardens," explains the  ���������owner,'- "innumerable_priyate. parks;  and most Parisians live and die without ever suspecting their existence."  We cross the Place de la Bastile,  .soaring above the bronze column; with  '.its proud little Victory, whose useless  ���������wings of;metal seem childish and a bit  -ridiculous as we pass on.  :L A long and purple fissure: that cuts  -the city in twain marks the Seine, long  before we reach it. The "Rolla" feels  the cool current that rises above the  waters. A few handfuls of sand  thrown overboard, and we resume our  former position.  ' OUF eyes are now accustomed to  these weird and.unusual effects, and  few details of the picture escape us.  In the distance another bright spot,  ; Bulller, the'students' ball, in the heart  of the Latin quarter. That obscure  mass beyond lt must be the Luxembourg and Its gardens.  Here we.leave the dome of the Pantheon on our right. Below us the  lights are gradually, thinning' out; we  are passing over the crowded "faubourgs," where thousands of poor and  : tired human beings are 'Testing, in their  sleep.  An ocean of darkness and silence  opens up before us; we sail into it.  The breeze freshens,: and the glowing  blaze of Paris soon fades away in the  distance.  Prom now on the minutes drag, In  the mysterious night that "surrounds  us, nnd every moment Is heavy with  anxiety; not a sound but the awful  voice of overlusting silence. Those  hours are endless, really hard to live,  " until at last the gray dawn steps out  of the horizon.  Nature begins to awaken, and, with  tho flrst gleam of daylight, slowly the  [World comes back to life.  L .The flrst cry of ;i -juull or the rf ���������*1 ������  of a pheasant is a. delight to our ears.  A dog barks and another howls. Lazy  and sleepy peasants, leading huge oxen,  drag themselves out of their farms, on  their way to a hard day's work In the  fields. The cocks crow lustily, and, in  the distance, from the Utile town of  Nemours, comas the melodious call ot  a bugle, arousing "Pitou," the French  "Tommy Atkins," from his sleep.  The .inn drives away the soft gray  mist that lingers on the meadows; a  few shadows here and there still mark  the wooded vnlleys; but thoy soon melt  away, and a gli-rlous summer morning,  In the beautiful land of Burgundy,  bursts upon "us from every side.  * ��������������� ������������������ ��������� * *  We aro now close to the little hamlet  of Url, nnd tho voice ot a cuckoo-clock  tells us the hour, ns It pipes up in the  breeze Its live double notes.  "The temperature Is very even," remarks the cnptnln, "nnd there Is no  danger of lt rising or filling unexpectedly, nt least for un hour or more. We  might ns well travel with the guide-  rope, and skip along close to the  earth."  He slips thc Hue overboard and lowers lt carefully to the ground.  The guide-rope, though a mere cable,  about two hundred feet In length, Is a  very delicate Instrument, and, after the  anchor, the most Important accessory  to a balloon. When In operation, one  end of the rope is attached to the  basket, and a quarter or a fifth of its  length is allowed to.drag on the surface of the earth, where it regulates  automatically the air-ship's aerostatic  equilibrium.  If the balloon has a tendency to fall,  an additional portion of the guide-rope  drops on the ground. Instantly the  "Rolla" is relieved of that much  weight, and soon resumes its former  altitude.  On the other hand, should the tendency be to rise, the extra amount of  rope that lt hauls up with it means for  the "Rolla" a few pounds more to carry, and,It gradually falls, back to its  original position,  -It has also the serious advantage of  saving gas; and sand ballast as well.  "That modest young fellow you niet  at dinner the other night," remarks the  captain, "uses the guide-rope with  great success as part of the steering-  gear of his new 'aeronef/the 'Santos-  Dumont V.' We all expect to hear  within a "few weeks that SantosrDu-  mont has solved the great problem of  aerial navigation."  The farmers, who cannot understand  this new method of locomotion, are ali  eager to tug at the guide-rope, think***  ing we have decided to land.  "No, no; leave It alone!" shouts the  owner. "We are simply out for a promenade!"  The children, who are playing scarecrow with the ravenous birds in the. orchards, scream with astonishment and  delight. _An old woman folds her  hands over: her mouth; like.a megaphone and'asks:  "Where the devil are you going like  that?"  "To the moon."  "Ha! ha!    Bon voyage!"  A flock of sheep stampedes at the  sight of our shadow moving upon the  earth, and disappears iii a cloud of  dust.  "We glide peacefully over meadows  and swamps, clearing- hedges and  trees, dragging the guide-rope behlud  us. As we pass over a lake in the piric  of an Ideal country seat, wa- see th"  "Rolla".' reflected ln.,the cWar waters  below,   i ,    ' ,  ��������� Even- at this moderate height, the  farms look like children'-a, playhouses,  with their curly little" ianihs, their  wooden horses'and paint 2d cows;" and  as we approach a curve In the railroad  track, a train of cars puffs ny .ii:e a  mechanical toy, and whistles a friendly salute.      . . ���������  Here the captain calls my attention  to a dark line of clouds in the northwest.  Yesterday's "Herald" predicted a depression within the' next twenty-four  hours���������evidently a storm is creeping up  behind us. But the same wind Is driving us on, and we hope to keep out of  Its reach, even if we have to rise up in  the heavens above It.  "If our balloon obeys as lt should,  we will soon have some fun," says the  captain, as we reach the. flrst trees of  a,thick forest.  The "Rolla" is so sensitive that by  merely hauling in a few yards of the  guide-rope,, we gently" descend' on the  (tops of the trees, lightly skipping from  one to the other; we brush by an elm,  a poplar, or an ash, and pick as we  pass their fre3h green leaves.  This weird' performance, is fascinating beyond words. I have never heard  of a "promenade" on the crest of a  forest, and I wonder now and'then if I  am dreaming.  : Such accuracy of movement Is only  possible with a very small, balloon. In  ' the early hours of the day, and with a  "perfectly"even~temperature.���������Ofcourse,-  lt is always dangerous, as the slightest  mistake would lead to a hopeless disaster.  Suddenly, while crossing a deep ravine, the coolness of the air drags us  down. The rocky banks of the torrent  are upon us.  I open my mouth to offer a mild objection, when a hatful of ballast goes  overboard; we instantly shoot .up in  the air, and, before 1 can realize what  has occurred, the barometer marks six  and seven thousand feet.  "From on high one appreciates to  theli* full human things, and it is only  necessary to have reached���������. lofty altitudes to know the smallifess of whatever appears great."���������Alf. de VIgny.  I shall never forget this: first and  sudden leap to such terrifying altitudes. I thought we would never stop  rising, and stood breathless as I saw  the earth leave us, sink in at the center, and swell out' at the horizon like a  bowl.  Which' of us^has not often followed  with delighted'eyes the majestic flight  of the clouds, and longed for their libertyand thc| freedom of their voyages  In the skies?  Rolled In heavy masses by the winds  that drive them on, they move peacefully in the "sunlight like a fleet of  sombre shlp3 with prows of solid gold.  Now bunched together In small and  graceful -"group's,' thin p.nd sleek like  birds of passage, they fiy swiftly with  the breeze���������rlrldescenl. and translucent,  like, huge opals picked from the treasures of heaven, or sparkling with Immaculate candor, like the snow the  winds harvest on the crest of Inaccessible sierras and carry off on their invisible wings.  They have seen,. perhaps In a single  day; Iho countries and the homes wo  love, and cherish in remembrance or in  hope. They have passed over spots  that have beaten time to our happiest  hours; they have looked down upon  placeis that have witnessed our deepest  sorrows.  Up to their glittering le-ilm we rise,  and, cutting through the impalpable  vapor, we reach ihe upper spheres of  everlasting starlight and sunshine  where begin the.limits of the empyrean, that mysterious zone, visited only  by the queen bee, once in her lifetime,  on the day of her "nuptial flight."  The varied emotions of our trip  above the clouds are simply superhuman, but tiie owner does not seem to  enjoy them:  "A fellow can't be amused up here.  Let's go down."  I know he Is longing to play with  the trees again; but before I can answer, the valve-rope is jerked, and we  drop two or three thousand feet.  Looking up through the open appendix, I can see the interior of the balloon, tho valvo-ropa hanging In the  center, and watch the valve open and  close at tho top.  We are now traveling with the wind  at a speed of forty miles an hour, but  we feel no motion whatever. The:hills,  the meadows, thc hamlets, rush toward  us In a mnd race, as if driven by the  mighty hand of God.  The world looks like a painted atlas,  with every little detail carefully  marked. As I compare It with the  military map In my hands, I cannot  tell which is the bettor of the two;  and, moreover, at this altitude, they  seem both thc same size.  The captain Is throwing out ballast  ���������quite a* lot, It seems to me. But the  barometer is still falling. Down. we  go, and in a moment we are close  to earth again. Half a dozen peasants  are harvesting In the grain-fields.  "Captain! we are dead birds. this  time!"  "Not yet," replies theowner, "but be  sure before we touch ground to swing  up on the hoop above you, or the shock  might break your legs."  "The advice Is worth-following. No  sooner said than done*, and'the basket,  after kicking off the top of a haystack,  drops in the midst of the,dumbfounded  farmers.  Relieved for a second of its weight,  the "Rolla" bounds ahead. More ballast flies out; and we are off on another  trip to the clouds.  Exposed, as lt is, alternately to the  burning rays of the sun and the, numerous cool currents that we meet on  our way, the : "Rolla" soon becomes  flighty and hard to control. A.few  minutes later, we are nottwo hundred  feet over the meadow.  Another rise, without apparently: any  cause for it,: and soon -we, are! falling  again; this time over the ancient city  of Sens, with its beautiful cathedral in  the center, around which the quaint  old houses are huddled, and held close  together by a belt of green*boulevards.  As I wonder;-how we would 16ok; Impaled on that, sharp Gothic steeple, a  dozen pounds of ballast sends us skyward like a rocket.  *        *        *     / ���������        ��������� ���������  It was now ten o'clock." We had traveled, by actual measurement on the  -map, two hundred and eighty kilometers. The heat was increasing rapidly, and the sensitive bubble over  our heads had become' more erratic  than ever. Down it would drop a few  thousand feet, if a cloud happened' to  darken the sun, and then up three or '  four thousand, as .coon as the cloud  had passed oh. "  This constant.'.'bohbliTj" up and down  at a terrificvpace, added to the heat and  the lack of sleep, was gradually telling  on our nerves. Tph hours, in a basketr  under such circurristances.-ls about as  much as any ordinary man can stand.  Without wasting any time in idle discussion, we decided to atterrir���������in other words, to land, as soon as the neces ���������  sary arrangements for this important  operation had been completed.  The "Rolla" was then at nine thousand feet; we had lost the wind on our  way up, and below, in the west, the  storni' was rapidly gaining on us.  . We had still four sacks of sand ballast of the nine we had taken up with  us: Every knot that held.them to the  basket was carefully examined���������a precaution of vital importance, as we  would.'soon be above.the clouds again  if any-of them escaped us'in the varied  incidents that might attend our descent. -The lunch-basket and our coats  were also securely fastened, and tho  anchor partly, unlashed and made ready  -to be dropped.  I held the barometer, with eyes glued  upon ���������' Its .-.face,..' ready, to call out our  future altitudes. My; companion, with  the valve-rope in his. right and the ballast-spoon within reach, was still.gazing earnestly at the fields in the distance, where we hoped we might stand  alive a few minutes later.  Not a word had been spoken for some  time, when the captain said:  ���������l!Our_landlng,_I_thlnk,_wlll_be_a_hard_  ono���������I dislike the way. those trees "are  scattered beyond  that narrow valley.  We   never  should   have    allowed   the  J.orm to reach our heels*���������but It has to  go" now-���������"  and  his  hand  gives   the  valve-rope a long and heavy, pull.  : We can hear the gas sputter as  It  leaves the creaking silk.  Instantly "the barometer drops. We  have started on our final descent.  ���������B ��������� ':������������������-.'��������� *������������������ ��������� ���������  The captain's fondness for "valving"  had set us falling again at an awful  speed, and the sand he was throwing  out was rising around the "Rolla" in  little' thin clouds, nnd dropping like  hail on the sllk'above us.  I looked down. The earth was rising!���������rising to meet us, like a fabulous  mother eager to receive her children ip  her.outstretched arms.  I stood hypnotized andcold, until  called back to my barometer. I; saw  that the captain's teeth were set, but  his eye was clear and serene.  We now: realize to Its full extent the  gravity of: the situation.  The needle is jumping in my hands.  .^'Twenty-two hundred metres���������twenty���������  bne-flfty���������twenty-one "    The  storm  Is not a mile behind us, and the heavy-  wind that precedes it rolls in graceful  waves over the wheat and barley fields.  "Seventeen hundred .and fifty metres  ���������seventeen  hundred���������sixteen  hundred  We are falling at an angle of thirty  or forty degrees. Everything below us  is moving at lightning speed.  "Twelve hundred , and fifty���������twelve,  hundred���������eleven hundred metres "  My voice is slightly hoarse, but I call  out the numbers as fast as I see them:  and they follow each other In rapid  succession.  "Nine hundred���������eight   hundred   and  fifty���������eight hundred metres "    ���������  The sudden change of altitude makej  us both very deaf; but I can still hear  the captain say:  "Haul In the other sack of sand. We  must keep up long enough to clear  that forest and land in the field beyond, this side of the large clump of  trees."  The ballast is doing better work, and  we are not falling quite so rapidly;  but only half of the treacherous forest has been cleared. There Is more  and enough of lt, that stands threatening below us.  "We shall never sail over it," mutters the owner.  At this moment we swing Into a violent gale���������forerunner of the storm behind us���������the "Rolla" quivers in Its net.  seems to hesitate for a mere second,  and bravely leaps ahead.  "Too much of a good thing " and  above us the valve is roaring furiously.  "Whatever happens, don't Jump!"  cries the captain.  Of course, hud I done so at any time,  he would have shot up In the air ten  or fifteen thousand 'feet.  "Attention! Now is the psychological  moment."  Like a hawk swooping down on its  prey, and with the same graceful  curve, the "Rolla" clears, with ten feet  to spare, the crest of the last trees.  We hear the guide-rope dragging lr.  the branches.  As quick as a flash thc captain has  the anchor overboard.  'But the  gale Is driving us on.  and  the Iron teeth fail to bite the sod.  We clutch at the hoop and the rigging above���������and, with a crush, the  basket strikes the earth.  The shock throws us back into it.  The balloon bounds on several hundred feet, rolling like a huge football.  We are dragged, tossed, bumped and  bruised. Everything: in the basket is  smashed to pieces, and the claret on  the captain's: face looks like   .lood.  I barely have time to disengage my  neck from a couple of slender, and  wiry net-ropes that are doing their best  to strangle me.  A peasant, mowing near by, hears  our cries; he drops his scythe,, and,  kicking oft his wooden shoes, tugs at  the guide-rope lustily.  The anchor has found a soft spot,  suddenly the cable tightens, and our  aerial trip is ended.  By this time a few excited villagers  have come to the rescue from the  neighboring fields.  As.we crawl from under the tangled  mass of net-work, and rigging, a terrorized child .-falls;In a fit at the sight  of this unusual, performance, rolling in  the grass and screaming with fright.  We are both rather pale and a bit  weak in the knees; but, oh, the exquisite sensation to feel the good old  earth under our feet again!  A few steps away, "Rolla" lies panting In the sunshine.  , With every gust of, wind he seems to  exhale his life.  His quivering form is sinking rapidly; we hear his heavy sighs and watch  his quivering skin.  The plucky little fellow, makes another desperate effort to rise up to the  spheres he has conquered; but his  strength at last betrays him, and he  falls back on the green���������empty, motionless, dead.���������"Argonaut."  . Paris, June, 1901.   .  Authors at Work.  -  First Mosquito���������What's in the bucket!  Running the -growler?  Second Mosquito���������No; It's a cure for  coal-oil poison.   Have a nip ?  .  .   - mm i.  Expressive English Phrases.  tlT HAT are the most expressive  W< phrases' In colloquial , English?  " Of the dozens that slip off English-speaking tongues In the course of  a day some must be better suited for  their purpose and more characteristic  of the race that originated them than  others. When foreigners' come to this  country they catch certain' expressions  almost Immediately, and.long before  they can anempt to speak '��������� the'-- language have made them: part of their  vocabulary. It would' seem that! these  phrases must be the most expressive  in English and that they are peculiar  to the language, and "fill a long-felt  want," since.foreigners seize' so eagerly upon them.  . .Every man or woman who lands in  this country~is~ saylng-"Hurry-up"-ln-  two months., In whatever quarter. of  the city one may walk, says the New  York "Tribune," Italian or German or  Jewish, mothers will be despatching  their offspring on errands, using their  native'speech, but closing their orders  with the magic "Hurry up!" How delightfully characteristic of the nation  Is thc phrase! It Is not to be wondered  at that the new comers from the slow-  moving Old World find that they have  brought over nothing to equal.It.  "All right" rivals "Hurry up," not  because foreign tongues lack similar  expressions, but because there Is a Jolly, hall fellow well met air about ."all  right" lacking In other-phrases* of the  same character. Then, too, "all right"  takes the place not only of "good,".but  of "yes" and "I understand," and of* a  dozen other phrases which In other  languages require separate expressions.  The third phrase. which alone shares  the popularity of the flrst two is "It's  nice." This should be interesting to  purists who wish to restrict "nice" to  its': first and original meaning of "exact." No word of ancestry sufficiently  aristocratic to please, them takes the  place of "nice" In Its colloquial: meaning, and foreigners clasp it with Joy,  wholly Ignorant of the fact that they  are Outraging, the feelings; of anybody  by so doing. Other phrases besides  "Hurry up," "All right" and "It's nice"  captivate the fancy of tho newly-  landed, but these three reign supreme.  Rough-Looking Beggar���������Kind sir, be  so good as to give mo 'a trifle.';. Gentleman���������For you to go; and spend it In  drink? Rough 7 '.ting Beggar (knowingly)���������Been a b'.-sgar yourself some  time, eh?���������"Plck-Me-Up."  Mr. Anthony Hope, who is very  much in tlie public eye again  through tho success of his clever  novel "The Intrusions of Peggy," has  evidently no desire to make a secret of  his literary methods. Here is his record  of a day's work. "Let U3 suppose," lie  says, "tliat I nm bidden to write a short  story. I arrive at my working-den at  9.45, and read my letters. The rest of  the day is much ns follows:  10. Put on wri;;ni;-eoat; find a hole in  tho elbow.  10.03. Light pipe, nnd sit down in large  arm-chair by the lire.  10.15. Who the deuce can write a story  on a beastly day like this? (lt was quite  nice weather, really���������that's the urtistic  temperament.)  10.45. I must think about that confounded story. Besides, I don't believe  she meant anything, after all.  11.15. I wish t'hc���������these���������people hadn't  asked me to write for their���������pupei!  11.45. Hullo!    Will that do!  12. Hang it, that's no use!  12.30. 1 suppose if 1 happened to have  a head instead of a turnip 1 could write  that story.  12.40. Yes! No! By Jove, yes!  Where's tliRt pent Oh, where the���������! Al!  right, here it is!    Now then.   (Scribble.)  1. Lunch!    Good, I believe it's going.  1.30. Now I'll just knock it'off. (Scnl*  We.)  2.15. Well, I don't quite ice my way  to��������� Oh yes, I do I Good! That's not  *o bad.  3. One, two, three ��������� three hundrni  words, a page. Well, I've put that in in  good time anyhow!    Where's that pipe.*���������  3.15. I think 111 fetch 'em. Pitched in  passion, by Jovel  3.40. Oh, I say, look here! I've onl,\  ���������������ot about 1,200 words, and I want 2.00C.  What the deuce shall I do!  3.60. T must pad it, you know. She  mustn't take hiin yet, that's all.  4. She can't take more than * pag  'ec.\{rf.ing the fool, though; it's absurd  ������������������ou knew.  4.16. Oh, confound it!  4.45. Now 'let's see���������two, four, si:*  -���������even.   Good, I'm in the straight now!  5. Thank Heaven, that's done! Now !  uppose I must rend the thing over.  ' now it's awful rot.    Well, that's thcl  "okout, they've bought it.  5.03. It's not so bad, though, after al!  5.11. I,rather like that. I don't knp\.  iut it seems rather original.  5.16. H'm! I've read worse storie-  'linn this.  5.20. No, I'm hanged if I touch a woic  if it I    It's not half had.  5.25. Pretty smart ending!  5.30. Well, if there are a dozen men i.  'ngland who can write a bettor stor;  ban that, I should like to see 'em, that*  11!  5.35. Puff, puff, puff, puff! Well, j  lia'n't touch a pen again to-day.  "There it is���������'How a Story is Writtei  i!y One Who Has Done It.' . . . Tl'.r.  nmierk about the 'dozen men in Eng  '.md' represents a momentary phase o  ''eejing, not a reasoned opinidn."  In answer to a request to tell his rem"  ���������.���������S how lie worked. Mr. J. M. Barri*  Wioso new hook, "The Little Whiti  "UTd," has just been published, wrote tit  nllowing on a. crumpled piece of papei  hat had evidently .once contained tc  jacco:  Journalism.  . pipes    I hour  * hours  1 idea  idea 3 pars  ���������1 pars 1 leade  Fiction.  S pipes '. .*.... 1 ouncp  7 ounces  1 weel.  , 2 weeks .!..:" "... 1 ��������� chap  20 chaps   1 nib  "2 nibs   1 nove*.  E CAN SLEEP  Craft.  A writer in "Chambers' Journal" describes how a ciimc was traced to tin  criminals by an exceedingly' cunning ox  pedient:  "The Mr. Elliott I have mentioned inherited no small amount of his father'*"  courage and energy. On one occasion,  armed with nothing but a horse-pistol,  lie faced an infuriated Madras crowd  He also, with great cleverness, detected  the perpetrators of a daring robbery. Al.  the plate' of a leading hotel had been  carried away, and as the loss was seri  ous, the police were eager to apprehend  tho thieves. For some time they were  quite - baffled * but at last suspicion wai*.  concentrated on -an eating-house neai  the shore, chiefly frequented by sailors.  Having made' his arrangements, Mr. Elliott entered this house one day in the  costume of a naval officer, and ordered a  dish of eurry and rice. - The food was  soon placed before him, but accompanied  by nothing better than a pewter spoon.  This was precisely what had been expected. Handling the spoon with a contemptuous air, he asked if they expected  one of "her Majesty's officers to eat with  suoh an article as that. Searching looks  were then directed to him; but he succeeded in maintaining an appearance of  ingenuousness and simplicity. Then, af-  _ter_^a _short_d^lay,_a__silver spoon was  brought hearing the mark of" the-pluri--  dered hoi el. A few quick steps took the  magistrate���������for such he was���������to the  door, and a low whistle brought the  waiting subordinates; then the landlord,  liinilliuly and servants were' seized, and  the whole of the plate recovered."  ��������� ��������� i  Our Language.  Yet another humorous story ancnt the  idiosyncrasies of the English language  is cm rent. A .frenchman came to England with the object of making himself  master of thc tongue, and this following  sentence was given him:  "The rough cough and hiccough plough  me through." The teacher told him the  first worn was pronounced "ruff." He  thereupon said this: "Thc ruff cuff and  hicculf pluff mo thruff." -  .  "Ne, no���������the second word is pronounced''koff'I"  "Then," said the Frenchman, "it must  be the roff coff and hiccoff ploff me  throfi."  The third, fourth and fifth words were  explained with the same result, which  tho render may repeat for himself.  o-  ANDWORK NOW  What Dodd's Kidney Psils  Did for Emilien  Clouatre.  Cored Him of Pain in tho Back  xno Headache, and Made Hi"-  Well and Strong Ag  Val Racine, Que., Jan. 19.���������(Special.)���������Among those in this neighborhood who openly procliam the  bcnfit they have received from the  use of Dodd's Kidney Pills is Emilien Clouatre. AI. Clouatre was Song a  sufferer Irom that most trying of  troubles, Pain in the Back, that adds  to its inconvenience the disquieting  knowledge that it is one of the surest  symptoms of Kidney Disease  Now M. Clouatre is well and strong  able to do a good day's work and  enjoy a good night's sleep. Interviewed regarding his case, he says:  "I am not. able to do otherwise  than praise Dodd's Kidney Pills, for  I am cured. I work wcU. When I go  up to bed I let rest. Before I used  Dodd's Kidney Pills I got up feeling  more fatigued than the night before.  I had pain in the back and headache  which bothered my rest. I took nine  boxes of Dodd's Kidney Pills and am  cured. :I praise them, to alt whe  speak to me about them."  Others suffering from the pains and  aches resulting from Kidney Complaints. have followed M. Clouatie's  advice and used Dodd's Kidney Pills.  They too are compelled to admit the  truth of the oft-repeated statement,  "There is no form of Kidney Complaint that Dodd's Kidney Pills Can  not cure."  A MINOR IN THE CAROL  (Ehore's ���������> minor in the earol, there's  a knell ba every ohime,  Uraoatuigi through Ihe misty daylight  tain  returning  Christmas   time;  (Ilhore'sl a cloud up-*n the mountain,  there's a sorrow on the sea,        .  Tihose wiio onco. made Christmas  britgihter now will come 'no more  t������ me. .,'....'..  Holly -berries, pale youf Te'Aness, D  be dull,   srwe.*-',  mistletoe,  lln. (the yule-log's ruling embers, 'let  ' us see the loni ago,  Stay the dancers' feet, a moment,  bosh, awhile the merry tiuie; '  Sorrow turns .her darke-nod! pages-  reeds again each tear-marked  runs.  fEhey (were beaatitfnl and noble, they  -   wore tender, they were gay���������  JjwtQbjed with us .aad bore our bur-  dan, jturned our darkest eight  to Hay;  ���������Bo.***, iwhisn Christmas comes recall-  Ln****, there's a catching of the  breath.  And its vibrant joy is muffled by  tho chilly hand of death..  ���������Yetj shall Memory wave hor sceptre  ������������������show fcliem ouce more as they  -(were, /  Lovo recall each form' and "feature;  fill each sad  a.n<l' vacant chair.  While wo hear tho joy-bells ringing,  sing the ca'rol glad and free;  Join once more the feast, well ordered, jjojous as it used to be.  And,   It" Memory     thus be   regnant,  shall  not  Fiitii's  strong angcl-  haad,  Tet (dispel the doi.."--fi.rig spectres that  around us gr-imly stand-  Teach us  now   to   ������������������������������������asp -the 'Future,  as  wa  hold     tho precious   Past;  A'nd   believe   that'  Somewhere, Some  Day, We  shall   clasp our owji at  last! *������  ���������Bernard MteEvoy.      A Bill Vv. Story.  -j*r~������s������rsT". .  The heresy frequently insinuated that  publishers grow inordinately rich at the  expense of the author was once amusingly illiistrated -by the late Bill Nye at an  authors' dinner in London. "Just, a year  ago," said he", "I was walking on the  principal-street of Indianapolis, when I  met a man whose appearance 6howed  that he was reduced to the very deptln  of poverty. His clothes were ragged, hii  face unshaven, his hair long and mntted  .ind his feet unshod. As I passed him, a  look-of_recognition~cime-into his-eye.������������������  "'Nye, old fellow, don't you know  tne ? Don't yoii know Abel P. J ones,  Who was your classmate at college 1'  "'What, Jones! Is it really you!  Well, well, what can I do for you?'  ���������"For Heaven's sake help inc. I am  starving.   Lend mc half a dollar.'  "I felt in my pockets. They were  empty. I had no money myself. But a  bright thought flashed through my mind.  "'Abel, I can't lend you thc half-dollar: I haven't got it. But look here���������I'll  tell you what I will do: I'll let you publish my next book.'  "Gentlemen, that was just a year ago;  and this month Abel P. Jones sent ma  tn invitation to go to Europe with hia  In his steam yaoht."  "Colonel," asked the Northern undertaker, "do you people of the South be-'  lieve in cremation!" "Sometimes, sub.,"  replied the colonel, "when we think plain  lynchin' wouldn't begin to fit the crime,  BUh.V���������"Catholic:'Standard, and Times."  She had been shopping, nnd'lie was naturally disturbed. "I hope you didn't,  spend much money while you were dowa  town to-day," he remarked. "Not a cent,  except caT-fnre, George." she answered  reassuringly. "I hnd everylliing charg-iaw'*'  ���������Ohjcago  "Eveni.ng_ "Post."  Journalistic Emulation.  A distinguished journalist, has informed the public that he invariably  jots down idea.*)���������to be subsequently  worked up into articles���������at the moment  of their occurrence. In illustration of  the good result*; of this practice he  states that itn idea, which was afterwards worth five guineas, once came to  him when he whs washing liis handa.  Fired hy this example, several journalists  havo made srnniiroiiipnts for taking a  complete bath.���������"Punch."  Young "Lady Thrown  From Her Horse  Holland .banding. Jan. 21.���������Miss Ethel  Grniit'iatn, 'daughter, of John Grantham of  tills place, was found iylng iinconiclous in  tlieir lane this afternoon. She was riding  .nnd "������������������ii thrown from the norsc. Her liroln  '* 'WHv' and the doctor is unable to  s-.v ...TT^c result of tho fall will he. as  ** I-*- '.Iritn.^jni is still unconscious.  Mont Pelf".  Mr.   George   Keer-v*.    ':   -���������    >v--t t*-:;  Martinique    on    the    *' V .:-   ���������-���������it**���������*.  respondent    ���������for    the    "Oui:o<:k,"    hii������*t**-  gathercd   in   hb    book,   "The Tragedj;?  of    Pelce,"    the    results    of   his      oli-i  serrations in May last.   He takes issue ;  in his conclU3ion3*with most of the geolof-.  gisus as to the nature and causes of the.  catastrophe that swept St. Pierre out ot-*  existence on May 8.   Considerable spaci;  is *-:"������n to an argument to show  that s  f -**W -ry of a cloud of inflammable gati-  from tho volcano is unsupported.*.  ������������������������������������-���������*   what   actually   occurred   vraM-i.  ���������,ui>re ,,.*,.���������oly a scorching of the mottiK* j  tiaiiiside by a" "red-hot hurricane'* of su*>** y  perhcatcd" steam.     Tlio position of   th������   :  vent that discharged the hot blast couM;,  not be definitely determined at tho tim������ -  of this expedition, becaiue the disturbed -  state of the volcano and thc heat of th*-.  slope  made  proper  observations  out oL  the question.   But from a study of suck  facts as Mr. Kennan  was able  to a-***- -  semble, and from a comparison with do***-  .  6Criptions of   other   volcanic  explosions***,,  notably   that  of   the  Japanese  volcan*  Bandru-snn, in  1SSS. and  that of Tara-  wera in ISS-fl, he concludes that the dis*  charge which destroyed St. Pierre and it*  thirty thousand people in less than tare**  minutes had its origin at or near thfe.  summit, and not from the lower crateij  where the disturbance began;  that th*  blast was composed  of steam and lav*  dust disintegrated by  exploding steam,,,  ���������nd  had  practically  no  inflammable OS.*.*  asphyxiating gases  in  it;   that  the tar-  habitants  of  St.  Pierre  and   the    meHL-  killed in  the roadstead  came  to  their  death  by  means  of   the   overpowering  heat of tho onrushmg steam and the stuv-  hotter dust particles carried in  it, or������. -  after being  stunned, were  burned    ti-*;  death by the fires started in inuammabte*-���������: .  objects'by the volcanic dust.  The growth of dread of the devastafc**-U;  ing volcano in tho minds of the visiting-; ..  observers makes an interesting record-  They arrived on tiie scene with apparently little other emotion than. a.. livelf-  interest and curiosity.   On one occasion,  when Mr. Kennan  and his party wero*.  driving toward the smoking Pelee, frona.  which the natives were fleeing in panic-  struck silence, carrying their chattels antl  their little children,- one,   woman    exclaimed, "Look at the poor unfortunates-  ���������going   toward   the   mountain!"     This    _  was  the  attitude of  the native  negro.  The cultivated residents, like Mr. Clerc, __  who   accompanied   thc    party,   showed.*  great courage.   But their more personal  relation to the catastrophe exposed theme  to greater strain.   Mr. Clerc insisted one  retreating  from  low-lying,   unprotected,  spots when an eruption was beginning;-  and   once,   while   they    were    prowling;,  among   the unrecognizable dead  ot  the*,  country villas in  uie Roxelane Valley,.  "he broke down ia a fit of sobbing ami-  walked away  from  the .party  until hac  could regain his self-control."   Tho visi--  tors caught some of this nervousness be���������  fore  they were  done  with   their  wor.fc_  After  this   day   among   the   dead,  Mr-.  Kennan spent a most uneasy night. Th-av  se-cond night after, Pelee broke into art.,  eruption, and the party left Vive for at.  "  safer spot, but returned later in the nightK'.  in their scientific enthusiasm and woulci-  not be rescued hy their distracted host-   ,  The   next  day   Pelee  wt>s  still  violent-  Mr. Kennan'a    fellow-nr. turalist,     over--   ,  come with the work of'the  night, lay*  *  ill abed and left him to brood over th������~  yelloW mud clouds and black showers of  falling dust.    He describe--; his growing..  anxiety in this manner:  "Before noon I had heroine so wrought*-  up by anxiety and ncr\ous strain that -  my imagination.began to run away wittrt.  trie, and I suddenly felt n vng-.ie but ovei-- -  whelming premonition  cf some  impend���������  ,  ing catastrophe.   Going to Mr. .Taecaci'a-.*. ���������  bedside, I said to him: 'If you feel able  to get up, I wish you v ould come aaif-  look at this volcano.'   Ha walked feebly   '  to  thc side window in  the upper story*_ ���������  of tho house, gazed fixedly at the vol-'  cano for fully-a minute, and then said:-  'It looks as Vesuvius -rnii.-t have looked'  five  minutes  before   the   destruction  oC  Pompeii.   If you want to g."- out of this,   .  I'm ready to go.*   I've h<*en wanting to*  get out of this,' I said, "for the last four  hours.      The  thing ,is  getting  on    my-*  nerves.    If you and Vi'r'.in are able t������  ride I'm  in  favor of    living  here ' afc-  onee.*   We summoned Mr. Chaueeli held!-. ���������  a   volcano   council,   .    .   .   and   startetP-  for Acier, leaving "Vive to :'���������-. f.ilc."        ..   .  The book is a record ei perhaps the,*  most appalling disaster, directly refer*-  able to a volcano, that has been observed in historic times. The tone is'un��������� -  assuming. Conditions a*, -wen ure-sefg'  down oponmindedly and plainly, and the  testimony taken from witnesses is car******,  fully analyzed.  CaptnriBg-������ Girl Graduate/  "Yes,"   said   tbe   young   man,   aa  h������  threw himself at the feet of thc sweefr  girl graduate, "I love you, and would g������   .  to the world's end for you."  "You could not go to' the end of th������.-  world for me, James. The world, as it is,  called, is round like a bail, slightly flat*.  teaed-at-the-poles Qne_oi_tlip_fir3t les*������-_  sons-in the elementary gi-ngrnphy is devoted, to the shape of the globe. . Yot������>.  mint have studied it when you were st-  hov."  "Of course I did, but- "  "And it ii no longer it theory. Cir*������-  cumnavigators haver established that  fact."  "I know; hut what I meant was thai  I would do anything to please you. ,. Ah!  Minerva, if you onlv knew the aohins*.  -.old- " ������������������.-��������������������������� *-������.  "There is no such thing as a roio������  James. Nature abhors a \acuum. But^  admitting that there could be sueh s*>  thing,' how could the void you speak off  be a void if there was an aclie in it!*'  "I meant to say tha t my life will fo*  lonely without you, thnt jou are mj*  daily' thought and my nightly dream. B  would po anywhere to be wii-h you. if  you were in Australia or at the North:  Pole 1 would fly to you.   I       f  "Fly! Men won't fly yet, dear *boy������  Even when the laws of gravity are sue***  eessfully overcome, there will still ra**-  main, says a late scientific authority,  the difficulty of maintaining a bkl*>  unco���������:���������"  "Well, at all events," exclaimed th%  youth, 'Tie got a pretty fair b&luect  at my bunkers, and I want you to b**t  my wife.   There!"  "Well, J.-.i.'.cs, since vou put it in that  light I >*  Let the curtain fall.  lA  Sunday School Teacher���������You  ber the beautiful trip you took into th������  country last summer, and went tbraafffe  n lovely "p"*rk to your treat? Te*fJ met  what you first observed when you vftStedt  that home of Nature! Scholar���������^Kee*(|  off'.thi*_ sra ss," .   . . _   . in  PROTECT  YOURSELF  FROM THK SKVERK FROST WITH \  CHAMOIS  VEST  We have them to fit Men.  Ladies and Children, and  at very reasonable prices *^_  ���������AT���������  CanadaDrug & Book Co  NOTES OF  NEWS  Miss M. Ada-i"  head this week.  nun* up i foi it Ai-rc w*  KVed. Krasei-, gold coimiiissinnri'.  left yesterday I'm- thu Fis-.li Itivi*p  i.-imp.  ���������.Sailed Sodas (MeC'orinicU"*.) n  "���������(infection in biscuit. (*. I"!. Ilninc A:  Co., Ltd.  ('en. .S. MrCurler ami A. K. Kiiu-uid  li'tuinrd on Kaiimlay oveiiing from  Ottawa.  O. Inches lias luketi a position in AV.  Hews' drug store, (lining tin? Jailer's  absence in the enM.  A meeting of the Liberal Association  will be held at the Central hotel  l-'i-iday evening at S..S0. All Liberals  invited.  M. Coining returned from North  Carolina this morning. ���������  Walter Hews left on Tui'siliiy's No. 1  on a visit to liis parents at Milton,  Ont.  \V. B. Pool cnnie up fi-oin the smith  last, niglil, and went south to Arrowhead this morning.  ti.'tnong's Chocolates and lion lions,  finest of Can nil inn confectionery. C  II. Muiiie it Oo. Ltd.  It i.s reported in town this morning  I hat .Slii'rhT Reclgravi-s dropped ilimd  at Golden yesterday.  Look out for the date of the "Birthday Social" under the auspices nl* Ilie  Liulies A ill of the Methodist <:l>i"'-'li.  Miss K. Duncan, who lias been  visiting friends in Arrowhead for the  past, two weeks, returned l.o Ilie city  lust night.  -Ontario apples Iiy the pound or  bun-el.    CD. MuiueiN- Co. I.id.  W. Keynolds, u C.I'. It. liinkesnuit'..  who was operated on by Dr. (,'ross a  few weeks ago for apeiulieiti.**, is  recovering rapidly mul will soon lie  buck lo work again fully recovered.  ���������Don"l he suspicious oi" the roncei I.  on.April 2nd. The iiovelstoke lacrosse  flub gimi'itntee the best concert ever  here. As good ns hall' a dozen ( oi mi.i*  tion Choir's.  CORRESPONDENCE.  To tlie l-Mlmr of lim II EiMi.r,:  Silt, ���������I beg In sav that "Parent's"  letter was well 1 iuieil unil much to the  point.  The Piiifessi.r eviilenlly found the  school trustees easy and worked theni  for some ol'llie most pulilii* and cheapest, advert ising he ever yct-ui-pd.  No woiulei" lln.* gentleman jollies  liiein Iiy publicly <lei.-Iuring lhem to he  liro.'icl minileil nnd liliei-nl. Oerlainly  Ihey dealt, verv liberally with the  Piolessoi*. so far ns we know, .so lie  sin nils up I'ni" I hem aceoi'ilingly.  While l'rol'essoi' lleplunn who, I  believe, leaches *'i elineinenl" -ind  "eliipietle," denion.slrules his own  "leliued"'sense ."ind manner hy culling  "parent's" tatter "siincliinonioiis  twiulille" ."ind ������������������hysleiiciil,"' I slill think  fail* minded people "having no axe*,  lo grind"' will iiiimil pulilie si-liools  sliiuil.l not be given over I'm purpnses  of atlvei Using to every travelling  concern Unit may hit, llielnwn lor a  lew days. You musi excuse my iliclion  Mr. Kililoi", whiili may Inek ' "riline-  ment''."ts 1 have not taken u "course."  In eiiiieliision I expect, very lew of  your leaders wmleil ihi'migh Hie  lenglhly "'reply" of tlie Professor, as  nil admit, that "parents have n right to  del.einiiiie wliat. inlluences shall  surround their children dining theii  etliicalional career.  II. HDIVAl(IIS.  J. Theo Wilson arrived in the cily  on No. 2 this morning l.o lake eliiuge  nf the editorial department of the  Hehai.d.  Me?. D.  Little and  family  came in  from   Kamloops   this   morning,    antl'  -    will with Mr. Little make  their-'home  here in the future.  The mation of the hospital desires to  acknowledge witli thanks $20 in gold  fiom .Messrs. Taylor Bros. <fc Goorge.in  aid of the X-Kny fund.  .lodge J. B. Cni'ti:--, wlio wns in the  r-ily 10 days awaiting the opening of  navigation on the Arm. left, on J-"ridny  for Goldfields ovpi- the ice.  W , Maedonald, manager of the  Imperial Bank at Ferguson, who with  Mrs. Macdonald litis been the city for  the past week, left yesterday morning  for Ferguson.  A party consisting of 321 Unified  boys from the Burnardo Home sailed  on the s. s. Canada last week for  Canada, and 150 girls will sail on A pi.  13. The linmberof Bai-nardo children  who have been sent, to Canada, how  totals f'78.        0  ���������Tapping's opera house April 2nd.  Remember the date. Jessie AlnclaeliKn  will be there.  King Dodd, the C. P. 1*1. engineer,  met with a nasly accident, on Monday  in oue of lhe snow sheds ei st. Mr,  Dodd had his head out of the cab  window when n piece of ice struck  liim on the head, making a nasly  wound.  ���������The reserved seat plan is opened at  Canada Drug Store. Don't leave oil  getting a good seat anil then be cross.  A. H. Floeter. M. IS., who has been  in charge of the mines and construction of the tramway and stampmill at  Goldfields for the Northwestern  Development Syndicate, left by yesterday's No. 2 on a two months visit to  his home at Hancock. Mich.  Mr. J. Irwin, of the Arrow Lake  Lumber Co., returned on Tuesday with  .Mrs. Irwin from the coast nnd went  south to Arrowhead yesterday. The  Arrowhead Lumber Co. have pur-'  chosee at Vancouver a f.g boat to be  used on tbe lake for the purposes of  the company.  Brigadier Margraves, of Ilie Siha-  tion Army, will bold special seniles  in Kevelstoke un .Saturday and Sunday  next. On Saturday, evening ,i social  will lie held at tbe Salvation Aini>  liar-racks, admission 25 cents. K\ ci j -  body welcome.  At the last meeting of the Lulies  Aid of tbe Hospital the President, Mis.  Carrol hers, resigned, owing to hei  leaving for the Old Counti > on lhe  10th of next nionth. A vote ot tb inks  by tbe Aid was tendered to Mi.**.  Caii'iitbet'S for her services on bell ill ol  the Society and the Hospital. '  Tke McPlieu Co. put on the best  sliuw of any company on the i o nl in  Manitoba today ami employ none but  good steady artists. Acrobilu md  other performances were well len lied  by the audience.���������Melita Rnteipuse.  The McPliet* company will .ippeti in  Tapping's opera, bouse on Silmd,i>  and Monday next, March 2S .mil .,()  Dr. Cliippeilielcl left lastAVeclnesd.iv  for Victoria, where be will piosonl  himself for examination holoio Ibe  British Columbia Medical Boaid The  Board meets to examine candid,ties  about tbe lirst of May. after Mbieb the  doctor will return lo Kevelstoke dm ing  the -first week in 31 ay to lesuine  .practice.  In tii  The C P R Strike  I 'litui oi tlio II nm i)  ���������Tlie  light  lot  m   HeielstoUe  sir,*  icnurlii  ){. 10. is ii.,u |nni.  M.ni'h   22nd    tl  lite   now  being  b\ the I'   U. ol  i ci i-is.    On  {-unci ,.\  machinists     weie  CODINGS  Miss Jessie MaclACIilaii,  style?   in   gent's  at' C.B. Huuie-V  ���������The very   latest  hsU   now   .showing   f*o"������.  At the ping pong meeting on Saturday evening the following committee  was appointed to make arrangements  for the proposed tournament which  will take place early next month:���������  Misses Spurling, Fraser and Buck, and  Messrs. Anderson. Boyd, Pinkliam  and McDonald.  Tbe s.1*. Minlo made an elfort with  the ice breaker to get through to  Beaton and Coinnplix on Monday.  She only succeeded in making half a  mile from Arrowhead, when she had to  abandon the effort owing to the  thickness of ice whicli could not be  successfully broken.  "We sell J. D. King's union made  footwear for men. women and ' children.    O. B. Hume it Co.. Ltd.  The summer service of the Canadian  Pacific is likely to be just the same as  last year so far as tbe Imperial Limited  train is concerned.    The train will  be  put on  on June 7f.li   from   Montreal  and on June 13 at   Vancouver.    The  first Imperial Limited will reach  here  on June 0. going west,  and  June   15,  going ea=t.     Tbe schedule will be tbe  same     as     last   year,   the    Imperial  'Limited     being   tri-weekly,   arriving  from the east on Tuesday, Friday and  Sunday and from the west on Monday  Thursday   and   Saturday.    The east-  bound   train   will  reach   here,   at 9:20  p.m., and leave at 9:50. and  tbe westbound arrive at 0:15 h.iii., and leave at  7 a.m.���������Winnipeg Free Press.  The  Pet  o-F  Royalty   and  Pride of Scotland.  thc  This famous Prima Donn.i is (o  appeal" in Revelstoke Opera Hou**e on  Thursday, April 2nd. This is Ke\el  stoke's last chance for some je.us of  bearing one of the very best singers*  which is proven by the immense  crowds who greet ber whores ei tlie  has been. She is coming beie iindet  tbe auspices of theRuvelstoke Licuisse  Club, who guarantee a lirst class Concert and wish the patronage of the  citizens.  Miss Macliichlaii sang al K.unioops  Tuesday last and there w>is not standing room: also at Calgary evetj se.it  was sold for days ahead.  oideicd   luck,  to woik In lb  u (ji.iud  \ ice-Piesiilent Holmes     A lew ol  Ilie  men, J belieie   10 in niimbei, ic-inned  fiom   the   L. 15. J<   I'  ami leiunud to  woik.     Ptesstue   was   binnglil to Ileai  on the lielpeis ilso but thev i el used to  go buck and an* now mote detei mined  than e\ei tosl.mcl *>>ioiiIdei to *lionldei  with then   btotbei union sts and light  Ihe b it tie to a finish.    Tin   in. nn li ������u*  is   now    on   alum   ionlinu* d< spile   11  Illinois to tlietonti.u \       'I hat ������e\.ei il  machinists   ha\e    leluined   lo   vifilicides   not   ellcc t   u**-       We   stand   on  pimciple and ������ ill not  40   lurk on 0111  biotbei unionists.    The men who lin\c  letmned   to   1111k   cii-nol    as   union  men   woik   with   scab   lielpeis, su   the  Company .tie still up against it.    Tlie  Company hi ought ll.iee men fiom thu  V.inconvoi l*'edci'.il  1'nion to jieisiiade  the lielpeis   heie  fo  go b,u k. fo n01 lc.  These men cune heic  on ,1 p i ���������*.*-, given  them bv (he   ('. P. U    ami   they come  without cieilenti.il, horn   then "union.  The\ aie only took in tbe hands ot the  ollicials   at   Ibis  point     Then   tactics  aie   lo   e u nc-i   ihe  lielpeis scpeiateh  and bullilose them   inlo going to woik  but   the   lielpeis tl    H'-iclstoLe shotis  .ne good   union   men   ami   know  too  niiKhlo   b������ Jnlldosud   ny Llnci* such  men as (be C"P. 1{   bale seen ted to do  then duly woik in Bevelslokc  At noon today two ofiiual*-. ot 'he  U. I! li. E Wcincleied mlo the bai ol  tbe Union Hotel, quite bv accident  of ionise, and m.*.ile an mlei esling  dist oveiy v^lllcll m iy piobably tliiuw  some lig'it on the action ol the machinists beie \'ire-L>iesiilent IToline.s  and an oth e 1 lutein ltujual union oiticei  weie having quite ,1 ii ir i*dl> chat  a'ongwith the mastei mechanic and  sttpetiiitondent ol this division Itis  lepoilecl tlicv 01 ink to the success of  the I" ii R C and union putu ipies  in geneial I c.iti hat rlly credit the  rumoi but it 111 ij be *-o. anyhow  wh.it wete the boys doing ,i������ the\ did  not pass 1 our tl .be -nbsciiption list m  aid ol the t,ti ike fund. They seem to  have missed  l good eluince  I     TlIlMlNlOV,  Managei C" U 1! F. Div. 07.  Kevelstoke. ALueb 21tb.  Now thnt Our Grocery Stock is all  disposed- of, we are able to turn our  attention to otlicr.J.incs.  Wr. Offkr You A Largk   Ranok Ok  AT   COST  Twcniy Per Cent discount  MEK'S HEAVY RUBBERS  AHD OVERSHOES . . .  Groat   Bargains in       '    .   "  ���������  ilEM'S BOOTS A^0 SHOES.  Aih! for a  few davs longer only  25  pm cmi. DISCOUNT  QH OUR DRY000DS STOCK  LIMITED.  ,"^.tf-i������i"**'"������**-ri**i!*���������^^  *^*^M,HyMiB-jTO!^������m.,*i^rimwig*Ei(^^ WI. ."IIIJ  tyty*  tyty  tyty  XOJ'ICIO  Sutiiu i*. lun-li". "iiou'liil ii\ti (Ins utci dill*  [Mill iiinh tntlu ll.n tin Chiefrmiimissiniit 1 11  I mil*. 111I Minks f 1 1 -.-iii ml lu in u in ml imt  1 uii iu.i\ iiiiiIki 11'nii I 11 fnllci*.* 111,1 iu' nl"(I  1 mil*. 111 Wi_**t K'ihilIii!" -  ( nliiiniiicili��������� it .1 ]iu*.i liluiloil i. 1 lln inn 111 "ide  in tin. ((1I11111I11111M.1    il I fiim miles., .st, 1111111  tin inuiitli nf W unit in ci iiilcisliil Ind H1.I..11  sons tuiilii'i l.niil III ulc il 'Jolin WllldlK"'1*" s  simtli uislciniii.1   1>'-I    llli-lii*-' 1101 til JO111lmill"*,  ltKIII.1.'  List    "*(l   C-ll HIM   till WO    SOlltll     ICll < ll ' 1IU,  iliciin m st sue hums In jn.ml or Miiiiiiiinci.iiiLiit  liiti-il tlie'ltli ilii". .11 Mai ill, VttH  IOIIN W1LLOI (dim  NOTICK.  Nciiict is li* rol>> ki\(������ii I hut SO dins after iliito  7 Mill ti|.|ih to tin 1 liipf Comiiii*.sliiiier) (if  I iiucls mul Wcuk"- Tor ft spLcuil license tn ml  unci emu iiiMiv tinilior fiom the followim;  ilesiriliod Iniids 111 West Knoteiiiii   ���������  Cnikiiiu'iic'Iii"; nt 11 post plumed cm the soi'tli  side nf Lniitic rl\ci, JK niili'i iilioii Kilo  creek, mid mnrkecl 'll*f Cui.iiiiin^'s unrlli  oust LOrucr post," tlicniu south -lu ('litium  tin nee weii 1W 1 Iinin**, tliLiice north 10 cluiiiis,  thenee en*<l 100 chain* to the plnte of com  meiiLOinenl  Pilled the lull dny of Muieli, l'Kl"  W   C. Ct-MMINC*.  A Fair Sample  *'Ve=b   slm-i   ^luck   1, er leiggi**!!   of  course  wlii'ie jei aom?   Oh! ih.at'a all  OK.      I   know   dm )   thi    compant V  mle������ .ire  that   ihiej   theii   employi-b  niusn't niflul'ili in lii|iioi������h (hie) whilst  on duty   but  (hici   Tin   .1   pmilegecl  cbaractersb fhif 1 bec-itise without   my  \altiable ������et % isLe**; the companj   would  h.-ne to ihic)submit to tin   fle"inancl*=h  of   the   IJri.J-! K. '  *  *  *   J-:\m=e   rne  the best concert ever here orbkelv to i slur   Tin siclc, 1 m goin    to <-\pcji      U.  be   here.      There   ui-e   nboiit UK)seats 1 B. II  h. ish  no good.     1 tu   all light.  alreaclv booked. , Yesh1 old girl that s good it till'  The above is not   an   evtracl    from  but    in\body  to lv near the  . . talion lale on   Monrlav   niKht   would  Beloiy  is  what  tlie  Victoria people   |.,ue l,<*ud -.nulai   miudhn   snatches  tluiikof Miss Alaeliichlan:-- ' ol w���������u..i������iiinn from i hi* ���������,,.ni 1, nf<m,.  A gieat smge'r. and a wonun of [^f tho-e hemic ' -uppoi tet^, or thr.7".!-*.  chaniung presence, is umc.uliUclK lhe I p ,n ,ts .11 tempt to pieveni its em-  tinaninious verdict of all who heatd I v\0y<>* |rom cii*miu/iii<*-  Miss Mi.clachlan. the .Scottish pnmi I ' Wo o|tl,n -,7,,, 0,".|��������� POini,ni^ 1  donna, who. with .Mr. Bui-h u, it. a \^lvl P,,*,.s i0K ,u|, ng dunking ulnNt  ible   pinnist.   appea.-ed    ,1    the , on (hj(.v ,lllr, |1P|���������.W. ��������� ��������� p,.,f(,7 t|}  |l|t.t  that nun shn tie! be disciplined Imt not  Remember the date, April 2j  j     jlieatiove is not   an  Reserved Seats on Sale at the Canada  the <; p i**.'*. mle books  Drug ������ Booh  Co's���������$1.00 Each. {who   had   peirh.mted  NOTICK.  \1H1ct ishlicli*. Kiie 1 th it s \l\ 11 i\h "iftci dllo  I 1 ill --ijpl In IIil liiu lilt! Chi "f Ociliui'.iiioiui  cf I, mils oul \\ oiks fni pci nl l.i eiisos tniutiiiid  cair\ iw.u ti!iih(.i Hum the fi*lliiuim; deseiilinl  Kud   111 M L������t K'lute 11\   -  Nimiliei One  ('01 uneiic mc nt 1 jio";t pi mtcd on tlieciit iide  of Wiiml Riili    ibnnl tlnee iii*1l- up ".ml rim  1111 maiked 'John JlcDon ild s smith nc*,t ( ninoi  prist,     tliLiiLU   1101th   SO   Llllil'Jl,   tlieuie  0 isfc fcO  1 linns   tlieiiLC snntli S11 cn.niLS, tliLine  u(st   --0  ch mis to point uf LcmitiiL]ic*,iiiL]it  Xunilie   ti\o  ( oi iinciiLing "t   . postnl luted on the eist, side  of < luck riit-i, ibnufc one iii.le IjiLk fiom uici  on  1 liLiich ilio.it loiirlLenmiles up 1 ici notn aionth,  md liiarkLd   John  MilJonalds south (veil. Lonu 1  po-t'   tlmiCL   ll.n Hi  SO lIiuiis    tliLULi*   en-it SI  (hams    tliLiRe s.jutli SO ch mis, tlicnci   MLSt  1*0  (linns to the point:  of coiiiihenceiiicnt  lliltul tliclOth div of Mmc'i, 11CI3  .IOIIX IIlTION ll.n  NOTICE.  Nonei",.  \otiee is herein idion that 10da\s nfter iliite  I will nppli to the Chief CommlssloiiLr of  l.nnils mul WoikH for 11 spec Inl lleonie to nut  mid emu iii\a\ flmlicr Irani the follouln^  doserlbed lnn.lsln West Kootennj ���������  ComniciicinK nt a post planted I}*i miles  below Hotilder c reel, on the smith Nlde of  Canoe ri\er, and marked "Ous Iledstrom'*!  1101 th oast corner post," thenee south 40  c hams, thence wot ICO chains, tlience north  10 eliains, tliLnec east lfO eliains tn the ,*o nt  of eo.miitfiiceuisnt  "Dated the* lltli da\ of Mnri'h, TK)J  I, US HEDBTROM*  very  Victoria. 'Hei' big, nn'lliiiv, me7/o  soprano voice, so flexible, so full nf  feeling, zeal and fire, tha'. won lot her  a 'World wide reputation in the n'd  lands, rang on,*, as sweet and k'uiioiis  as ever. She cultivated her heaters  from start to finish. ���������Daily Times  SENEGA  Gives instant  relief.  If you are desirous of breaking  up a Cold you should tn a  Bottle of Senega.  lu 0.1 k 1 1-       Ol,   no'  1   to   iii.inp liiei'c-hcs  then tin ir sti ike  they aie allow  \\ ith imponitj  ftishaiely within the In tmds of  possibility th it Ibis individual bus ,t  \<*stige a meie atom, of conscience  letr, in oidei to anmhi'ite 111 toto be  swamped it tilth mto\ietn|s, paitieu-  luly is it it is limushed giatis bj a  iesident ot the louei town.  IT WOLL CURE  A  BAD  COLD  25c. and 50c. per Bottle  J������Jtl-:i'AieKI> OM.V  liV  NO I ff L  (])iit\ (It.-, -ifter *1' r inf ifl to >ppjy r*> th<������  ���������f Incf ( omim-'iont i of J nnN itwl ^ orU.>* for 11  ���������*pu ml I if on-"* fo i nt tn 1 r in \ u ts timlw* 1 fr> in  t]w fnllots-fii^ iU sc-ili (1 J nuts in tin I)i-*trn t of  \\ < ot KofttcK (\   -  ( mmiK iu nf; it u \u *��������� plnnU t\ ihn i ������-. i irtor** of  it, mil. iIiom I ii in li f n 11 vn 1 our milf south of  f n (Ufn ni iiKtnuikrd M \trf utv-*n rth west  foriin prut, thtiMt1 t )tt Ki> (li miih th n't "���������uiiiLJi  rOuMiii" tlirm ��������� s\n t V\ pinin-i thtn-r north P0  < li liim to tin   pi ������u  ul I<Vn''l'*^  Ditifl V \r h ii I   I-Vi-  \i  \f.^ \ttr\  ���������SiitKti i-i litrLln ^J^en tliat si\t\ <1 i\n niter (Kte  Iniiu.-to ippls io the Jlon tlie Chief Comniis  s oiui -mi r*Aiulj md ^ork*- for spociil iict'nse1* to  tu' niul t i~n ls i\ Mnihii ftmu the fi-llouInji,  ilt"-cul������*t!il 1 Lt d-j i i \\ est Kooten i\ ���������  Vmnboi One  < oiii'ntrc itiK it i. post planted on the south -.id*1  of tlio ( nl ii in hi i river, ihout fom or fi\e utiles  1������ To������ Mirpn-i* Iliprd-*, nen thc mouth of eieck  Mid mirk\.d \\ illi mi John-on i noitli west tninei  jM������-t tliLine smith fcO thuns, thence (Mat **0  I'lini- tin. ru e north SO ch nil'-, thence wist SO  tii un-to tin* point of comment uncut  Number'two  C-rmi1 titi ii ,z it ipost pi mtul on the ���������*outh -^idt  of ( hiinniT. ri\i r nt, ir the outlet nf Kmil tskct  IsUf ��������� nrl irn"\t(l 'Willi mi fohiisoii s nnith cms.1  1 rtv t po-t th* in t "Otith SO chums, thenci weit  an tin l'i-. them*, 'lorth Vi chain-* tlnMiii e mt SO  t1 aunt i thi* point "f cmiuniMK liiu nt  Oitcl th** lltft ilt\ of AI-arch 10<)J  W11J.1AM   MMJ.NSrN  NOTICr  rh  *> (h-m    ft*  ll LtJ I uitoiirl to \ppK to t lilt  ���������>������������������>-'��������� . _^- j.j-j^i^j >������_.������l_\\������iknfn c  t*\n t ������l lin ii*."1 to Mit mil carr* t������ iv timlinr from  ti * f'dli-u niir dt ���������*���������? hIm d 1 -nd-* in tht iliMtiut uf  W<   t l\o������ tMll^  ( Ofillll'1 '   U^!   ft     k   p   *-.t phllt<-d t HO lllllt S liclott  lr*nrlt <i>������k md tnw inth sontli of dohtttrc nn  wi'I iniirkid *"r S rbii'lt -t in ith -ttt������t tormi  po-it      tht-iii*   -i������iith   V*   t li un*    thr nt t'   l ist t-u  u.rth h������ flu dim,   th< in i   \t(������Hl   s*i  [ * nf lii^niiiiii^  ULIIli    JOd'  f.    **   rfl\UV  I   U   ill) ���������������  i h tin-*  n.t.  tb* ii-* i  Loth.   J J  I  S-'h  !���������  NOTICK  Xotice Is herebv ci\en tlint 10 <la>s nfter dnte  I will npph to the Chief Commissioner of  LhiuIs nnd Works for a special licence to eut  nnd carrv atta\ timber from the following  desenberi InnciB in Weat Kootena>:~  Commonchig nt a post planted at the mouth  ofKell} creek, and marked "Tohn McMahon's  north west corner post," thence south 10  chain-, tlience east 1G0 chnins, thenen north  40 chains, thence we-UlbO chains to thc point  of (ommencement.  Dated the llth da> of MnrQh, 1903  JOHN McMAKON*.  NO'lTOE.  >otice U herebj gi\en that ������T0 davs nfter date  I will appl> to the Chief Commlssfoner of  Lands and Works for n speeinl license to cut  and carr}* assns timber from the following  described lands in W est Kootena> ���������  Comment inj?   nt  a   post    planted  opposite  ellv creek, on the noitli bide of Canoe mer.  nnd marked "John McMahon's south west  cornei post, tbence north 80 chains, tbence  east SO eliains, thence south bi> chains, thence  west SO (linins to thc point of commencement.  Dated the llth da\ of Maicii. 1901  JOHN McMaIION.  NOTILT,  riii'U ilaw Lft<rdir^ I intend to ������.ppjv, U\ th*  fhi-rf (���������Miiitji-"*!! nt r of *L*nid������ .ind V\ork*i for i  ���������*t o I >] |ir*-n * t mt ih'Ipiits ns ts tifiittor fiom  tijif f lio-Ain^ tit**.* ri(K*(i I iiid-t in tht* dlstrii t of  \\ est K<k ton v>  -  f ommui' iiu <-t i post pKnfed ni the (fiilrl-  yTrrtin tr nf 2 i n tk -*������(oiith from fi*ddttre irn md  in irk* d ' I M Do>lr >��������� >orth wst conn r ikmi ,  th* nn ii-t l'i fh-un-* thuire bouth K/) rJunin,  th*t?ML������ -ive^t tuhuni. thpii������pn.firtlt  \?U rhtius to  thf   p'*1* f  Of  If ,ifIlMll)^  n il������ il Af trcli Oth, 1'fO  f   M   WiYlM  NOTICK  Not let Ii hcitby���������'iven that.0da>s after date  Twill iippl\ to thc Chief CommlflHioncr of  LandH and Works for aspcclal lkcns*: to cut  Hiidrarrv nwa> timber from the following  descrihed lnnd**ln W est Kontcnn> ���������  Cominencine; at u post planted *2J<J miles  aTkuu K'ellv ( reckon the north bank of Canoe  river, and marked "deo JoIiiimoti'h south  * ust -rorncr post," thence north 10 chain",  thence w*m Jw< bains thence south tOchtilus  thrnru oiiMt no chains to the point of com  in*'ti( cment  Dated Mm.* mil da>;of March, 1001  GKO. JOHNSrOV.  Walter Bews. JlfeJ  Next  J>rup{li*4t   and    MaMonor.  xt IhiMiuf'.Ii-i'k  \onc r  llmtv iIi\h iftirdili I ini/nd Ni"pj)l\ In the  lliM f f 'riumi^^M in i *if I ind-. ind Woili* fori  -tp( t nt In "f n-t to i ut iim'I * irrj iwa% tiiiilici finn  tin UA\( v.\nA 'It <4i mIk d I mils til (Ik (IhIik t of  Wml Kn ill n "\  f ninni' in in-i? ill " |������'������''t I������* ������������������'L*������' " f"-' I'Ntrt mi  h ul 1| null** -"until of t������o!dstn nn iriuiki I *! \|  I>fi\|i -4 noitli Mint i-.nn i pint lln in* uiit ������0  i li uif theni l* Hoitth H') iIiiiim fli' ii* i- < ml 10  chain.*.! tlience north 100 (.���������IiiiIiih In l.lic jilnee of  iH'giimiiiK'  Hated March Oth, 1W>:.. i  J. M.  l������f������VLK.  NOTJCF.  Ihnrvdi ���������* tft*"r duU' f mt*n'l to ippl> to Iho  fluff ( oiuriii-wir th r of f*a������'ls ind Work* foi i  so* ciil li*f nso tor nt and t irry away tlnilxtr from  Im f Honing rif ��������������� rlUrl Unci* in thc district of  West Kootfii 1^   -  f oinnicrif in^ it i poif plinfcd on <tnl'Mrr am  trail about X uilli'f* noutli from fiolrl^rrr iu\ Hid  mnrkfd lU s Ilni'ltf Honth v^ftt (orn*r no'tt,'  th-f'iKc ( w( 40 (lmiu-t tliLrid noilh I'Otiiainx,  thr nit uosr 10 fUmnn thciu* ���������amtli 160 chiuni to  thr phin r f bc>.iiiuiii^  OitcdTth M irth. JfKr?  (r  -t  prrMii  NOTfCfi.  \otice i������ hcrcb> Kl\en that 10 da\s after  date I will fippl> to On' Chief Commissioner of  L a n (If* nnd \\ork������ fornHpectal license to cut  and tnrr> awaj timber from the following  d">icrlb(d lands In Went Kootena> ���������  CommcnelnKata post plaMled 2V^milos above  Kctty en ok, ou the north bank of Canoe  rh'r, and marked ' G. Johuston'fi ������outh ������e������t  forner f*o������t," thence north 10 cl.airiN, thence  i tiHilut r httlriw. theneo nonth 10 chalnfi, thence  wCHt KiO <h films to the pointof com men* cment  Imifd the llth da> of March, 1901  (r. JOHNSTON'  SP^SMG  ss  ���������������99  JilST  We are read}' now to supply you witli handsome " GOCARTS." VVc have them in all sizes,  colors and shapes.  Come in and see for yourselves.  FiiRi'-JlTURE THAT'FURNJSHES-  If you   want   anything'   in   the way of Furniture  Thc  following   lines  CASF3TS,   L^QLEU^iS,   BEORQOI^ S5JITSS,  &c,  &C.  you can  be supplied here,  are woriliv of consideration  l'i; t.*rt;.kin c  i:.nliiiliiiiiiL". Kli"  .Fumitu!*������  ���������  DeaSers, Etc  >lac:ii'H/.ii" Ait'inu".  nr*rrnirT*ii',";i*t,i.\ui*jljiiiiii*iii'.*������iii3-a  SIBBALD & FIELD,  /rj������~ c.v. u. townsitk. .���������   .���������������������������'   :.  mer maka townsitk. - .��������� ���������  ������������r- (iKuitAKH townsite. . ���������:������������������  ftSSP-   CAM1JOIIXK TOWNSITK,'.-'���������.-��������� ;_'  Ctiiimlii I'l'i'ir.iiiii'iil A Wcsiurn '     ./'  Ciiiiiuln Murii'tiii'd C'(*r|ioriitlon. ���������;'-"'.''  Colniiliil linciiinmit mul f.iinn iJoinpiiny.   ^���������  ���������Mill I Ire Cnlci'oiiliin I lie.      Alius 1 Im  ( iiiiiiiluiii 1 Ire    Miii'iimlli* 1 lie     Nnrthein 1 Iio  iiiiiiriliiiu I lu     Mimilti'-itir liiu    (.ri-ul WeH I.In'  Oi mui,  \(< I'Io111 mul i.iiniii'iu>c    ( oufuitpriiiu-ii I Ifo  ,(i.iuiiliiiii AidiU'iii .M.-iirn'ice (o    ( oiiiioclii ul I ut!  FINANCIAL-)^  COAL rOIt KALB,  1IOVSKS FOU SAUS  CONVEYANCINO.  AND JtKNT.  1). SIBBAI.D, Notary I'ubli-.  KhVPlSJOKti*  i) n.  CHAS. M. FinLD.  TO CAMBORNE AND GOLDFIELDS FKOft BEATON  Shortest and Host Direct Route to the Fish River (jolt! Camps.  Ilith *-,t ("j leuis  llt.itoli fin Cold Cuiipi mi  uin.il nf .Beds  at  iniiiii^ it di*.tliiHtinn llnil bimo .illcriionu  i lot 1.   noon,  SI ililes  sii|i)iln'il   villi   single  fm .un put df lhe Distml  Dniililc,   Smlille mul I'lol* Horse i mul Iromlil Teawi  Proprietor.  I EC A-^E IT !.  ThG lai"go-,t sloek of tlio hit est WATCHES,  CLOCKS, KINGS, SILVER Vi'Allls,^ CUT  GLASS, FASHIONABLE .TEWiH.IfyV Etc.  My many year***' experience enables ine to buy  goods nt the right prices, enabling ^hie to  Bell to the public ut reahonable pi ices'.-'' .,  j:   -3-TJ-3T  BAUBBE/.  WATCH niSPAIRING  A SPECIALTY.  I SUITS FOR BOYS AT HALF PRICE  I . ���������:   $7 Suits for $3.50.  $3.50 vSuits for $1.75.  $5 Suits for $2.50.  $2.50 Suits for $(.'25  $4 50 Frieze Overcoats for $2 25  EDWARD J. BOURHE,  Revelstoke Station. Bourne Bros.' Old Stand.  i**iW������*-r*>*"*'r'"*i**f**^^  NOTICE.  en   Mill ninth to tlie Clnef CoiiinussKincr of L hkIh ami  Woiks foi i spen il liccnie l������ nit mil inili a������ i>  timber frinn the fiilln** tiig de*,( i ilnd laiul>( in West  Kdiiteiiu* ���������  (iinuiiLiii nip: it a prmt nppo-ttte Kcllv cioLk, mi.l  iniiikeil "II MiMiliAns Himtli e.iKt <01 nei pott,'  tliemujtortli P0 j.linius, tlience i\ost SO ill nils,  tlience **iiutir 80 iliiiliis^llience e.ist 1*0 tli.iins tn  tin' point of iiiiiinienieiiu'iit  II Hi il the llth (lav nrMmill, 11)01  i*    Mi MA HON  NOTICK.  NOTICE.  Notice iHlicieln f*nen thai .10 dais after d.itcl  will nppli to the Culef Coiiiinl*iHioiiei of "Lands .mil  WurkHloi aHiietnl lkeiiHC to cut mul inri> av.ni  tinibei from tlie follnnliiK ilemrlljeil htiuls in West  Kootepii) ���������  C'nniiiieni Inn at n post pluntt-d J00 > mlsnlioie  K'elly creek, on the KOiith Hide, ami marked "I!  .McM.lIioii'h north ea������t cornel post,' thence west  Mil) chains them e Nouth 40 rlialiis theiicu cant 1(10  tli.iins, tiiLiiLi" noitli 40 tluiiii*i to Uie place of  (oiniiHiicenieiit  Dated the 11 til dn\ of M.ireli, 1001.  K  Jle.MAHflX.  NOTICK.  NnittG ih horcl)> x\\on Hint R0da><i nftonlato I  111 nppl> to the ciiicMJoininlHsioiiLr of Lands and  UorkHfora Hpecial license to i iitiuirl nm n^\ i\  Xcitir-f ifl hrr^hy kivpii Hint 10 d i\n iftoi ilnlo I  uilf fipf'l)  ''"'  tti" * tiicf   C'iitunlf<HloiH r of  I,;unls  ���������iiifl HorlcH for  iivin llm>������ r fn  W i nt Kooteimy ���������  f ommrtn me   at  (rc#k nnd innrltrd "Jriih s McMalion'H ������oiitli eiit  ,t hocMilI IIco'Iiih* to cut ntifl tarn  pit*; tlmlH r from tm /ollowmf*; dt^niTlbcd lands In  post   planted   on   Boulder  NOTICE.  OIK i: IS  Ill.nnilV f.IVI'N  Hint Tin* Ired  N  intend to  (.onipuny to  Koblnson   i umlior    ("ompiinj       I.lniitcd,  .   nppli   to dial  piinv  Mmlteil.'  nppli   to ehaiiRa   the "nanie nf the  ��������� HAftllOJ*. UjMUEXt COMPANY  Dated February 12th, 190U.  HAI1VI5Y McCARTER it PINKUAJr,  Fob-12*ilin, Sollellors for the Compniiy,  orii( r post, theneo north HO chatllH, llicnrc ucst 80  fhulls, thence nonth  80  chains, thence   cant 80  (hams to the point of commencement  Dited the lllh(lav of March, 190.1  JAMES McMAIION  timber fiom the follou lllj; described 1 uhIh ill West  Kootcna> ���������  Commencing at i post planted on Boulder creek,  niul marked '3unie������ M...M.ilion'n sontli nest corner  post,' tlience north 80 chnins, tbence cast 80  ��������� li tins tlience honth 80 clmiim, thence ������f������t 8o  clixlmi to the point of comineiieoment  ll.iti d Die Uth d iv of M ircll, 1������03  IAMKS MtMAHOX  For Sale  For Sale.  A Oramoplione in first  class order,  wilh 32 records, all   up   to   (late.    $21  buys die lot, ��������������� bargain.     Apply] at  ��������� Hun aj,d office.  TIN I) KeBtdences on MrKenzic Aienue, with  modern improvemente, fiWO each on eas)  tcrmi  TWO Reiidences on Third Street, east, icry  convenient for rail*ra> men, 11800 each, ea&y  terms.  ONE  Residence on  First Street,   east,  cosh  required J500. aubject to mortgage.  Apply to,  KARVE/, Mc3ATaEa*������PI--KHAM.  Permit us to draw your  attention to the wisdom of  presenting your family with  Choice Lot  The first step toward providing for them a home of  their own.  A part onlv of the amount  usually spenl on pretty but  useless presents will make  the flist payment.  REAL  ESTATE  Is the basis of all wealth,  and you can now lay the  foundation of your own  prosperity while making  someone else happy.  Call and investigate, we  have other tilings to tell  you on the subject of How  to Own a House of your  Own.  LEWIS BROS,  Affents Smeltor Townelt*  NOTIOE.  Five Roomed Houso to Rent Furnished $12  Ser month, including water.    Apply Herald  ffice or  MRS.  U. X.AUQHKAD,  Second Street,  h  i  si  ^S^SSSSS^^^^^Sm^^^^^^

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