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The Prospector Nov 23, 1895

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Array I
'vhtJT Fort Sre:£le, £7-] f uR DM V. Nov: 2^/89^ /fo5.
PLACER  .
The INVICTA 'GOLD   MINES,  Limited.
This is the title of ine English
Company, engaged in hydraulic mining on Wild Horse
Creek, B.C,      The property consists.of about amile
and a quarter of hill diggings on the North West
side of the creek,    also extensive clai*s on, the
South East side of the creek.    There is    three
excellant ditches on the property, the   largest
being five miles long and carries 1.500 inches of
water.   At the intake of this ditch is a dam sixty
feet high, which has just been completed by Mr .
David. Griffiths whose capabilities in this   line
are too well known to, need of any comment.
The gravel consists of about 60 feet of top
loose gravel, 30 feet of red gravel, and 40 feet
of a blue cement,  all of which contains gold in
paying quantities, unde these and laying   on the
bed rook,  ( which is Chloritic Slate ) is a body
of yellow river washed gravel, which bears evidenoe
of   being very.much water-worn, and now occupies
what is   known as the old channel.
,  During, the past year, the ground has been
worked on a small scale with a 15 inch pipe, with
eleven inch branches to the giants, under a
pressure of 375 feet head,    these having   proved
too small, an order has been placed with   a San
Francisco firm  ,    for the purchase of a   twenty
inch pipe, arid three new giants,  these will be at
the mine early in the spring.    Large results are
looked for, from these pipes, and giants,   and   .
•there is no doubt that if properly managed,   A
good olean up, will be the result.
The gold is coarse, and nuggets of eight
and nine dollars is common.    The largest peice
taken out during the past season, weighed   about
eight and one half ounces, valued at, $ 150.
Bie plaoer diggings in Wild Horse was discovered'
In 1864. and have been worked incessantly both by
Elites, and Chinese, and altogather it is estimated
that $17,000,000.   has been the result of this vast
amount of labor.    There still remains a vast amount
of gravel   unwashed, which will take many years of
hard work to exhaust. Tth The mining season is a
long one, it generally opens in March, and work can
be carried on until the last of November.
The estimated amount of gold taken out each
Beason, of late years has been about § 50.000.
But during the coming season, it hoped will
prove an exception, and  5100.000. would not be a
surprise   to the owners   considering the improved
"f.ohinery that the Company are now putting in.
~H-r-
THE   DIBBLE    GROUP    BONDED-
About the 1st of Nov, Mr. Wm.  Sprague got an
option on the Dibble Group of Mines,     Mr. Sprague
went to Montana, where He enlisted a Mr Thos.Chism
of Helena, to accept a half interest in the bond.
»-Mr Sprague completed his arratogments,   and on
He will commen-f
The bond is #25.0flo
do at leaJt #6.000
coming year.
Thursday arrived in Port Steele
ce work at once on the property,
and runs for one year, He is to
of development work    during the
The bond allows him to ship ore, and the net
i proceeds to apply on the bond.
It is evident that Mr Sprague has a good
mine, and He is at present trying to arraing abond
' on the Sullivan Group of Mines.
ENTERPRISE.
■M'l-H'M'i :■;■!■: :
A petition was passed around town yesterday
quite a large sum was subscribed   in a short
, and
time.
Tob-
It was the purpose of-aaking-a snow road to
acoo Plains,    This road will be a great convenience
to^Fort .Steele, as a large amount of supplies   can
be brought  in that way,
i-s-i i '.•■: ■! i i i :: :•!■;<■■:■: ir-f-r-: i i ::■:: :■:: :■;:-:-;- :«:-:■ i: i: :i-i
WANTED. WANTED, WANTED,
Wanted a Railway to haul 30.000
: tons of ore from the Port Steele District. B.C.
during the coming year.
i.-::ii.: : !■: ;i n i; : H i ; I i: :: i:; i;;:::: i 11 : i i 111 :■;■;
Messers, Donpsey, and Grassiok got their tools,but
did not get the   thief.
■I'M i-M ii ; : 11 i: h-k !■{ : i m i i: i ::■!■:■:■:■:■:-i-i- -i-f-M-
Two individuals under the influence of skookum
water,stood on the main street,talking fight,    one
got it on the jaw.  the other on his ear.
' :■!■:■:■! : i 11 i .- i ::■:■! i : i i ::: 1111 ::■: i i:-H-:-:-»-M i hhhhH-
DONT forget the Mining Associations meeting on
the 30th of Nov.
m i : i : : t-t-H ::::■;-:■:-:-: -i~:-s-:- I !■ M i H-i-H-i-H-H- -.■:<i-:-i-:-i +
I Tom.Roberts,and Billy,Haupt have taken their
* winter supplies to the Moyea,
. -I I !■!■;■;■;■; M-I-4-H-H ; ; | ; ;,; ; H-HH-H-H-
•i'l'I'H'l-
«-+
The wind blew at the rate of 40 miles    in
an hour tnis morning,    It was all about a pair    of
i pants.
:!lhere is a rumor that Capt, Armstrong is about to
build another steamboat,    We trust that He will.
■M^M'I'H 'I I 1 I I I I I I'H'H'iH | M j.| | .|.;-:-:-;-i*i.-j-^.^^t^^
What
■h ■■:■!■ i
we want, and what we need is a weekly mail
Ore brought in from the North Star Mine, thi3
la away up in silver,   only 266 ounoes.
Next week we will issue a map of
'I'l'H'l 'I'I 'H TT-7*t**7'*-I*r'f''?*'h''«'t'■«**J'*f~f*-i~y-;—f*^—{■■
READ   the    PROSPECTOR
the Dibble Group
*-fH--rH'i i i ; i | |
James ,  Brown, will
:>n the   new road to-morrow
rM*'H«M»H"i''t*(''H''H'H''H i M'M*H■
fat* I "l-l »H"M"M"I "I
take an outfit to work on the
l-H I'U.I I'I l .' i I i |.|.|4
There was 140 mining locations reoorded in this
district, so far this year. tff
\-^'7ft£   PROSPECTOR        JSPTUPMPiY Mo\J 23" 18V,
The    PROSPECTOR,
;■; i I i i'H'M I I I I I i I I i i M I I I H-
Published weekly,  by the    PROSPECTOR    Oo.
..A.B.Grace, Manager.
: i i i l i i i-
Subscriotion
1    ;
n. Maclean.
$1,50.  per Annum.
PROFESSIONAL,
Physician    and Surgeon,
los. McVittie.
P. L,  S,
h„ L. Cummins.
-j-n-H : i : : : : i :■; i m : : : :■
P.  L.   S.     &    C. E.
FORT    STEELE    MINING    ASSOCIATION.
R.L.T.Galbraith.
0,S.,Frizzel.
R.D.'Mathers
H.W.Barnes.
Wm.Carlin.
Thos, McVittie.
President.
Vice President.
ii ii ii ii
ti ii ii ii
Treasurer.
Secretary.
{ill possible information, will be furnished by the
Association upon application to
Thos.McVittie Sec.
Port Steele,B.C.
—*-;•
The North Star Co is still taking out 265 oz
ore,
■!•: M i : »■:
There is no doubt of the future prospects    ofthis
Bristrict. We have a mineral wealth that is unsurpassed,   We have a Territory that has not    been
prospected to any great extent. We have mineethat
are developed and proved to. be rich in mineral.
We have all that is requsite to make a»rich and
prosperous mining camp,     But for want of means
of transport, all this vast mineral wealth    is idle
.There will be several thousand tons of ore ready
for shipment in the spring,    And only two small
steamboats to transport it, and all they can   possibly handle is about 125 tons in a week. And it
would take    six months to handle what ore    the
North Star Co, will take out this winter. Then
there    is the    StEugene    with several thousand tons
more, the Dibble Group, and the Wallinger property
on Elk River,    The Sullivan Group, all could ship
ore,   were it  possible to obtain transportation.
...j.•.■f-.^-f-v*: ; ; : : ; : :■: :■; ; j : ; m-m . H H :< I H I I H M-1 i H i i I
Dont forget that the Fort Steele Mining Association   will hold its regular meeting on Saturday
evening Nov 30 th,
The value of    ore shipped from the mines of
and   smelters in southern Kootenay    so far this
year is   ill.811.350.
M'l m i i i i I i i i i i n i !■! : i H-f-fr-H ;■'!■! ; i i'M-f-:-: i :;■;! m iw{
The Cliff mine, and the St,Elmo has been
sold to an English syndicate, the consideration is]
$160,000 These mines are in the Trail Creek dis-
triot.
After 29 days run , with 2.500 inohes of water,
the clean op of the sluices on the Cariboo has
been completed,  the result being a cone of gold
weighing 2.435 ounoes and valued at  $41,867.
The run of the Horsefly resulted in 1.151 ounces
valued at $36,000.    The whole world has been
watching    these mines, and this is a splendid
indication of the wealth they contain.
'■i i i i M i i i i i i rH-4-i-H-.i^^-f*44-fr.H"i-H--H~iM-M-i^-H^
METAL   QUOTATIONS.
Silver     67.7/8(1;
COPPER,       ',|11,75,
kmm
'iiwumiw
f\p ,ii>
ff/e
OYlli]
&
i\
Ui<r
IftBojIIU'/'S
* s Pe/^tf',
r~T~,—
4."" ro'ir SrceiJ- U l STRICT.
Queen  \ /Afoti^we./ J
oj'fk
Hit
oiiha.
\\
Mo
[^u;
n
ii
^   P/B trace.
Scale   I'm tt /j'/iity
iffiSKi",-."-:-
This-group Of.mi.rie;s:-is sitUa&vpExtl
•of the -lower Mo ye a Lake,- distant about-thirty
miles from Fort Steele.    The old pack trail, to
Ronners Ferry running across»one of the claims.
The first locations namely   the
'St,Peter and St,Eugene were made by the Rev,d
!Father Cocola and James Cronan on information
gained from an Indian who had discovered   the
ledge while on a hunting expedition.    The Queen
of the Hills and the Moyea were staked off shortly
I afterwards by Messers A.L.Hogg and F.Houghton,
! the   Lake Shore was located by   C.Parrel and others'
.in the fall of the same year. «
'   The ledge was first discovered on the St,Eugene,
where a large body of Galena was exposed to sight
on the precipitous side of a cliff near the top
of the mountain, about 3.000 feet above the    surface at the lake, from this point the ledge can be
traced down to the waters edge.  Quite a lot    of
idevelopment work has been done on the various
i claims, on the St,Eugene property Messers Pinch Si
iCronan have at present about fifteen men employ-
,ed taking out ore for shipment next summer.
The lead is about ten feet in    width, and
assays    54 ounces in silver and 65;o lead.
;Mr Cronan says that He can take    out  14.000 tons
,of ore in the coming year.
.'On the Queen of the Hills, Moyea, and Lake Shore
.tunnels have been run in    stricking the Galena .
The ledge on these claims have the same   width,
and assays the same as the St,Eugene. The country
!rock is slate.    These claims    are very advantag-
jeously situated,    for in all probability in    the
jnear future,  the B.C.Southern R.R. will' run aoross j
ithe close to the shore at  the lake.and the veins
lay in such a manner that the whole mineral deposit
jean be worked from a tunnel running in from   the
|foot of the mountain, so that the ore can be dumpedI
right down along side the railway.
jWe    believe it i's the intention of the owners of
[the St .Eugene to construct a wagon road from the
jiead of the upper lake to a point on the Kootenay
River near Fort Steele, so as to enable them to
,ship their ore next summer, and if they do so
there is no doubt but that  the other mine owners
in the vicinity will follow suit.    These other
claims have been handicapped for the last two years
in consequence of a lawsuit respecting the ownership     but now judgment hiving been lately given
there is nothing to prevent the owners from gX™
ahead .and developing their proper* v, and there is
not much doubt ]lUt that next    ^    • ^s
Mnin^camjLalonjg. the...ahor£ .of tioym -Lake;--  ™■ -
 > -ftm Mr-0-s'psXX.Q.P^
■ATukffiY A/OK 23 &/894T---
since
T.'£   COAL FIELDS OF rAS'MCOCTTffiAY.
The coal fields in the East Kootenay    District, in
what is known as the Crows Nest Pass. Lies in a
south    easterly direction from Fort Steele, a
Distance to the nearest available coal    about GO
miles.    These coal fields in the near future will
have a world wide reputation both on account of the
quality and   quantity to be extracted are without
doubt the  best coal fields in America.undeveloped.
The western outcrop of the field is on the
•side of a mountain in the valley of Elk River " one
of the largest tributaries of the Kootenay River,"
on the eastern    sice and the coal seams have been
t raced
,stance
of 40 miles, with surface cross
cuts inede at intervals showing the seams and walls,
The lowest known seam is some  1.500 feet above
the drainage level of the valley, and is 30 foot in
thicknes
30 feet thi
a small  ■":  1'
30 foot sea
seams  from.
in all tnaki
coal  expose-
easterly at
100 feet higher there is another   seam
ok, then comes a 3cum 15 feet thick, then
oot one, then a 7 foot one,    then another
n»    And above these are 5 more workable
. to 10 feet in thickness,    Eleven seams
rig a total of 143   feet  in thickness of    .-
d,  These seams din with the mountain
angle of    "( to 35 decrees,  the
upper seams having the least dip.
There are  three large creeks
cutting this coal field,   and the seams are exposed
on -the banks of these creeks, And openings can be
made to mine the coal without much preliminary
expense    The cuts made by the crooks bein;; more
valuable than so many tunnels to prospeot the coal
because there  is room    to operate the mines on both
sides of the creek,    And the mines are proved to be
permanent without any cost, in fact nature did the
prospecting,    In addition    to the coal on Elk River,
further erst on Martins Creek, and other tributaries
i "of   Mi che 11
'
which is ,i larce fork of Elk
River       there is another large body of coal,    above
the Elk River field, but of smaller area, a f;reat
amount of the field having been carried away by
natural causes thro, the different ages since the
coal was formed/The aggregate of the depth of the
scums of coal    in the uoper b.i3inis some what
more  than o.n Elk River,  So that if a shaft be sunk
thro,  the whole field,  there would be found 300 feet
feet    of coal in workable'aeans.    It would .he hard
\o find another field of coal    with as much coal to
the acre,  and so easy and cheap to work.
The eastern outcrop of this field, is near the
summit of the Rocky Mountains,  the average distance
from western crop hcihglO miles.    Showing a coal
,'. field 40 miles North and South, by 10 miles
East and West,  And an area exceeding 250.000. acres.
The coals in this field differ, owing no doubt
to the different ages of. the coal there being three
different qualities. The lower seams are Anthruoitio
in their nature, Whilst the upper seems    are    the
Bituminous ooala.  In between , both above and Wow
the Bituminous coals  , are a number of seams of
coal different from    anything heretofore known it
i3 somewhat similar to cannel coal,    but
superior to any cannel known.
These coals have been analysed and tested by
different parties amongst them was Prof, Hoffman,
Govt, assayer at Ottawa,   for the Geological
Department. And. the results as shown in the Department reports prove that these coals would lose
.nothing by comparing them   with the best coals of
jtho same varity in Pensylvania,    Owing to their
position these coals
an
e mined at a small cyst,
and can be placed on oars ready for shipment at
pi.25. per ton.  And with ordinary freight rates
ban be placed on nil the western markets to compete
with any and all of the coals now used.
We predict that the quality and cheapness of these
coals when once developed will astonish the westfi.t
"'"mining dowJ  Hon.,      Ii i" now eight ;/c
this' 00 a field was discovered, ana a very       _
oertinont question to be asked is why if this       .
field    is so valuable?    it has not been opened up
before this.    The only answer that can be
Kiwi is that the Company formed to work this
field and. whose monev  an3 enterprise have made its*
value k"own to the world,    Have met with the most
determined opposition in .ill their efforts to
raise money to build a Railroad thro, the Crows
Nest ?■ ss fro- a Oomoany ( C.P.R.R.Oo.) Who, owin,
to want of means  is unable to build the road, yet
by their financial connections able to block the
•""■■7 for others-.  And at the  some time  sending out
millions of  lollars to the United States    which
would be kept   in Can-add.  if these coal mines were
developed, and transportation afforded to the
mines of East and West Kootenay.
from
-hie'-'
WHY    ?Z    KICK.
airing the last 20 or  30 years,   the exports
East Kootenay have not required great transport- lion facilities, in as much as
could be classed under one head.    "" Gold,
...a, of course needs anything but economical m4
expeditious transport, Tiu;:. state of things is
rapidly altering and consequently means of transport should endeavor to keen pace with the times',
The great question bein
economical ra^ans.
route for this    ent
Situated as we arc, in a narrow valley, with
at ore-sent , only one means of transport, and that
by water and this only available to the North I
and to the South, the latter route should not he I
hard to choose; "hit this is just
to the south -'-'-' hiwo an '
'ihioh is the    most
which is the most advantageous
;y of commerce to take,
come
•rn
here  th" rub
nlimitod mark"t,
but ar.o unable to take advantage of this,    on
account of the Govrnment persisting in '.-"fusing
to improve  the river,    so giving "us several months
more of navigation, for the paltry reason, that  It
also benefits the United Stater,;  to the North, we
have no market,  and less transport,.'.!ion;
But a paternal blessing from the Government    for
assisting home'industries  ( which are conr.pic uous
by       their   abscenoc as far as mining is concerned.  )    Why should this country be retarded   and
kept'back by Government in order " not  to benefit
the States"1,    if this fostering Government    is so
mxious to help this country and declines us means
of transport,  Why does  it not build a custom
smelter.    We hear of expormmcntal farms, Orchards,
Dairies,kept  for the benefit of the Agriculturist,
why not build stnelto'-s  for the benefit of   prospectors, and mine owners   The Government saw fit t
expend a  large sum of money    to improve    the Columbia River from Golden to its source, which has
done but very little,  if an" good to this section,
and now when the idea of improving the Kootenay,
with an absolute certain!ty 0!' doing u work    of
great Importance is brought up,  they put forward
the aforesaid paltry excuse as the reason for not
so doing;  it savours a great deal of cutting   off
one,s rose to spite or/',3 face.
We have heard  , of course, that private reasons
.md.erl.ay this refusal to improve the navigation,
■but Aire do not want to take  them into account,
as "hearsay"  is not dependable, but it must seem
strange and beyond comprehension to visitors,why
the Government does not take every means in its'
power to afford ordinary facilities of transportation to a country of such vcat promise of
mineral wealth; by helping us now wo should be
in position in a few years to help ourselves
to.need help from no one', in fact self supporting,   reside- paying more than our share towards
Provincial expenses.
i":'"!'-":-f-i^-^--'-^--!-M-v-i-:--^4^4-H-H-i-f-i-:-.i-i-f-
Mlg    PROSPECTOR,#1.50.  per YEAR..
1      SUBSCRIBE r
n t » t. t «    «.   n„ * t * » Ihe   AllSHlii *rr7T\T~
CARLIN    &    DURIC JfL^—-^-——
I'HM H'i-i-rl-l i-i II i I ii-M-H-K-l
Successors    to   Carlin & Lake.
Port    Steele,    B. C.
DEALERS    in
CIOTHI N G,  '
DRY    GOODS,
BOOTS    &    SHOES.
MINING    SUPPLIES*    H A R D ,W A R E.
■i i ■' i !■: i I I-
tii'lii  ii  i l  i t M M  i ■!' i I M  i i  iiit'l.'i'lii1
Navigation
UPPER    COLUMBIA      i Tramway      C 0.
"The   A' M E R"l 0 AN     S T 0 R E .
■f m-h I !■;■:■: ;■! : i ; -1 i i >■; I I i !■: i i: I i.' 11 mi
GENERAL     MERCHANDISE.
MINING SUPPLIES & HARDWARE.
DRY GOODS, • NOTIONS.
BLANKETS.
HATS    ft CAPS. BOOTS & SHOES.
GROCERIES,    HAMS,    &    BACON.
B. W. J 0 N ES , ' Port   Steele   B.C.
i :■■: mm i
M
EXPRESS,  Through rate 5$ per Pound
FREIGHT.
U"'P
Golden to Port Steele, Class    A. J3.0C   3,  sjz.50.
C,   12.00.  D.   $1.50.
T. B. It. Cochrane,  Pres.  F.  P. Armstrong Mi
anager.
: i: : i i-i-i 11 i iai ■:■■»• i i-i nuiti m-mi-
t i i .. i i'.
The   STEELE   HOUSE!*
The    OLDEST and   BEST   HOTEL in FORT STEELE.
Strictly First Class,
Free Sample Room for Commercial Men.
Chas, Levett, Prop.
."lie
-fr-H-3 "i-H-K'-j-H^-H-fr-r-H -:-X- -r M-M- ■: -1- i ■*■■ i-r-H-Nl-hH S"I-f-i-
C  R 0 W E L L    &   WALLINGER.
A  S S A Y E R S    ft
METALLURGISTS.
Port Steele    B. C.
D  .    B R A N D E R  .
0 E N E R A L B L A C K' S M I T H I N G
And WOOD WORK.
HORSE SHOEING A SPECILTY.
'. ■! I'll I'M I •'. .' I '1% M '.' I'l .' '. ■! ! ■! I 'I'M'I i I I i'l
Dont  forget the
COLUMBIA LAUNDRY.
W ASHING  and  MENDING .'
Mrs, LEWIS,
•j-x-i-i-i■;-:-;-m-m-h-i-f+ »»-h-t-h■!■:■:-;-h-i •■;■■; :-m.|-i*•:->■
J  A M E S  . H 1  G H W A R D E N  .
T  0 I. S 0 R I A L    ARTIST,
s h a v r i: o   ft  h a i R'C u t t i n g.
Every thing neat and clean.
( i i I i ill I I i I i'ill -H M'l'I'H-H'H-yll-H- W+f-H-H-H-H+H-:
PER   KOOTENAY    NAVIGATION Co.
•■: m : i < i i m i i I : i i mm-l-
~^     "'"n For 'EXPNESS--aTid-.PREIGHT   RATES
"'}■'■   - | S\''-,      apply to
-~-■■•„^;:_r-5.       B> I..J-0-JJ S. Jennings   Montana
»■■■■.. m :: !■:: ; : i i-m s-k-i : m
DALGARDNO'  HOUSE.
Fort Steele B.C. ^^^^^^
LARGEST and most COMMODIOUS HOUSE in FORT STEELE
BOARD by the DAY or WEEK.
R, D. MATHERS. Prop.
The   MOUNTAIN   HOUSE.
Port   Steele   B.C.
GOOD ENOUGH FOR MOST ANYBODY.
i
H. J.  E D S 0 N' .
Prop,
! : :; i i i i i i i i ii i i i-ii'i I ii i-i Mil i'i-i-ill-:: ;;i;iini:i:
^all   on   A. M 0 R A N . when in Port Steele
and   get a   rjood    CIGAR.-.
THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD FOR YOU.
The    MISSION    STORE.
GENERAL   MERCHANDISE,
FURS   BOUGHT or taken in EXCHANGE forCOODS
T. I- 0 VE ; Prop.
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