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The Prospector Apr 18, 1896

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Array WEEKLY    CIRCULATION   375, COPIES.
. Volt 1. '    THE    PROSPECTOR, FORT    STEELE   B.C.
. _• — .  ■
1 SATURDAY   APRIL   18. th 189.6.
■nTTBT^
LAW   INTELLIGENCE.
LAKE    SHORE    CLAIM'S,       *
..»«■»■■..»■.■.»    ....... i   »   >»»   !■   * *   • •   I
*T^rTT*f^r*lW^f^'"l "I "I   I   I If Trv"rTTTT"rTTTTTTTTT
In Hogg   va,   Farrell   et   al, the Full Court
yesterday delivered Judgment,granting a new
trial* Below ia Mr Justice Drake's Jud<sment:-
In this case the learned judge who tried
the aotion direoted. an issue to be tried at Nelson on the truest Ion raised by the oounter-olaim
of partnership,and reserved his Judgment on the
main issue. The defendents set down the issue for
trial at Nelson before Judgment.had been rendered by the trial Judge, and the plaintiffs were
not represented. The defendents obtained a special Jury of 12, and a verdict was. rendered      •
whioh Is now appealed against,on the ground that
a Jury of 13 In oivil oases ill oontary to law,
by Cap,15,Seo.86 of the Jury Aot,1883, it was
enacted that the provisions of that aot was not
to extend to Oassiar or Kootenay,but the law in
foree prior thereto,relatinf$ to the summoning,
qualification and disqualifications of Jurymen
should be in full force in these distriota. The
■law relating to; sumnonin<; end qualification of
•Jury as defined by the Jurorn Act ,1860,was the.
law in'foroe prfbr to 1883.The law relating to
the number of jury men requisite for the trial
of a oivil" oase are not affected by the provisions of seo,86 above. What then is the law relat
Ing to the number requisite -to make lawful Jury'
In a ■ oivil oase7 fy Gap,96 of the Consolidated
Aots of 1867, 8 Jurors are to be empanelled on
the. trial of any oivil oase triable in the Sup-
teme Court and no more .No distinction is drawn
etween the special and common jury aotions.This
seotion is re-inacted by Seo,47 of Cap,3 of the
Consolidated Aots ,1883,and  is the law 'now. In
By opinion,therefore,the appeal must be allowed
with oosts,as there has been no trial before a
.lawfully constituted tribunal.
4+M-iii i ;■:+++■
EAST    KOOTENAY,
East Kootenay offers the best opportunities for
Safe investment In mining,of any like area in
the Dominion of Canada.
'H'*" i'l 'I ++4++-i+++++
COAL PIT'LDS.I'll  KOOTENAY.
The coals of the Crow Nest Pass,have attracted considerable attention,and have to a lar<?e
extent been explored and opened un.The Cretaoeous
basin or trough in whioh they oooii" la somewhat
extensive,and resembles In general character
those whioh ooour on the opposite side of the
.Rooky Mountain water-shed,be «ond tho limits of
British Columbia,In one of vhloh thn Canoade
anthraolte is Included.The &%e of those Cretaoeous rooka. app°ars to be nearly 'the same with
that of those of the Oueen Charlotte Islands,
By the prospeotinr, work which has been exeouted
in the Crow's Ne3t Pass,the existence of no less
than 16 workable ooama la said to have been determined,two of v/hiioh are reported as 14 and 30
feet respectively in thickness;
It 1b certain
that an'oxtensivi
lllilll IH il mil. —
opal field exists here.
RECORD OP A MINERAL CLAIM,    .
A reoent deoislon delivered by his Honor Judge
Splnks at Nelson,in the oase of Strobeek-va.
Rattallaok.will in all probability, have the.
effeot of settling a point, which for some time
past .has been one for" disous sion among the miners of this /ioinity. whioh the deoislon Just
rendered may prevent from oaming into court, the
first part of seotion 24 of the Mineral Aot
reads =#Any free miner having duly looated. and
recorded a mineral olaim shall be entitled to
hold the same for the period of one year from
thereoording of the. same,and thence from year
to year, without the necessity of recording.
In the oase before the oourf, the oohtention
of Bt*obeok was,that Rettaliack had not record-'
•d hjs assessment wdWt within a year from the
tote of recording the olaim. To give an instan-
oe,in this oase the olaim was reoorded.the 8th
day of May 1894. and the assessment work on the
8th day of May 1895. thereby giving rise to the
question»when did the yearly lease, which oom-
menoed on the 8th of May expire.
The Judge by.'his deolsion,has left no room .
for further litigation upon this point, for he
f'saya that a mining lease does not expire,.until
the anniversary of the day it was taken out also
dXpiT'es. Therefore the lease taken out on the
&th day of   May, 1894<did not expire until *he
end of,the 8th day of May,1895. .   •
Those* of our miners having looatlons, as also
those who have not looations,but are desirous of
obtaining some, should read, mark, learn, and
inwardly digest the above deoislon,and having
duly digested it, govern themselves aooordingly.
■iii11iniiii n 1111-
IN    THE HOUSE.
Ottawa,April Is In the.house to day Mr.Mara
asked for some information regarding the navigation of the Columbia, Dunoan and Lardeau Rivers,
To whioh Mr.Oulmet made anon oommittal answer.
This distriot would be very much pleased if the
Member would take a little interest in the Koote
nay river, and the wants of the' distriot in general; A prominent liberal says  that  if the Oov.-
ernment oannot take the Jams out of the Kootenay,.
the people will take the Jams out of the house
at an early day.
ATTRACTING ATTENTION.
The British Columbia minim? districts are now
beginning to attraot the attention of miners and
other men, But we fail to find it reoorded that
the Members from B.C. have had their attention .
attraoted to the wants of their districts.'
It is about time that something was done In
regard to the draw In the bridge at this plaoe*,
"Navigation will soon open"and delays will, obour
that will be dangerous to those that obstruct the
navigation on navigable .vatera.
Dont forget the Mining Assoolation meeting
to night.
'   J
^.,,^,.^.1 j i>mif.»^"ii i
TOi
'CSPECTOR, FORT    STEELE   B.C.
SATURDAY   APRIL ' 18 th, 1896.
THE    PROSPECTOR.
IS PUBLISHED   SEEKLY  3Y THE  PROSPECTOR COMPANY.
A.B.Graoe, Manager.
-Oetv   One Year ,. $1.50.
Six Montha       75 $.
ALL OOMMUNICATIONS DIRECTED TO THE PROSPECTOR C |
Fort    Steele   B.C.
We are not responsible for o ommunicat iona.
H'*"l'"' H H' 1*4+4+ .-H-++++++++K4+++++r44-+++++4-+4+++-
PROFESSIONAL.
Charles Maolean,
Thomas, M> 'A tt ie .
H.L, Cummins.
W.J.Rooke. Co well,
Physician k Surgeon'.
P.L.S. k    C.E.
P.L.S.  &    C.E.
M.A.     15.Sc.    F.G.S.
N,Arnold.Wallinger,      Assayer k Metallurgist.
4441 i'i i I'M 1-4+4+ 4+++-: i-i I I ii i i i :: : : S-++++++4 -m-i-h
PORT STEELE MINING ASSOCIATION.
President,
Vice
»»
11        M
1 ) M
■R,L„T. Galbraith.
0.S (Frizz ell,
N.A.Wallinger.
Robert .Dewpsey. ,,      p™-,,
Wi 11 lam. Gar Un Tr eas ur er.
Th omas, MoVI tt ie. Se c re t a ry.
DIRECTORS.
John.Orassiok,        A.B.Graoe. H.W.Barnes.
R.L.T.Galbraith.    Thomas.  McVittie.
The next regular meeting of the Association wit
be held on Saturday April 18th.
All possible information^ill be furnished by .
the Association upon application to
Thomas.McVittie,Sec,Fort Steele B.C.
+++++++++44 I -i'l -i'l 4 •!■+++■: I' ilil- -1- .4-1 1 1 H i-i i-i-l-l-i-i-H-!
KDGTENAY  INDIAN AGENCY.
Aii3t of Water privileges submitted for reoopd,
being the quantities of water,required for Jrri-1-
gating purposes by the under-named bands of
Indians,
ffiE St, MARYIS BAND.
(fi00) Two Hundred Ihohes from St,Mary's river.
(100) One Hundred Inches from Cherry oreek.
TOBACCO PLAINS BAND.
(200) Two Hundred Inohes from a oreek running
through William Phlllipp's Pre-Emption.
(300) Two Hundred Inches from a creek known as
Reserve oreek.
COIUMBIA  IAKE BAND.
(100) One Hundred   Inohes from Marl,"jean creek.
SfUSWAP BAND.
(100)  One Hundred Inches from Shuawap oreek.
(100) One Hundred Diohes from Lilac creek.
The Agenoy, R.L.T.Galbraith.
Fort Steele B.C.' Indian Agent.
April 15th 1896.
Divine Servioe on Sunday,it is  likely that
Mr,J.F.Armstrong,who Is a lay  reader of the
Epiaoopaa Churoh will take the  service on that
Evening.
Mr.S.Weller.a C.P.R. bridge  builder,will have
oharge of frevork of  jutting in the new tU-„
in the Port Steele bridge,
We are to have a looal agent at Port Steele,for
the Upper Kootenay.. and InternatlonalNavigution
Companies,The party .Is • from Montreal.
J.Duriok,has returned from a business trip to
Winnipeg.
J.E.Humphreys is visiting, at Port Steele,
WILD    HORSE
«*N
'jv,,, following faots,relating to the earlv days
in and around Wild Horse c reek ,have been learned from some of the old timers, still living in
the country.    It seems that a h alt' b reed named
Findlay,with two companions,while passing thro-'
ugh the countrv In the summer of 1863.  found
gold on a oreek,which In after years became
knovm as Findlay oreek, they cleaned up about
'$700. worth of pumpkin seed sold; on their way-
out to Frenchtown,near Missoula in Montana,they
sold this gold to Linklater,-a Hudson Bay Factor,
in charge of a poat on Tobaooo Plaina Vhe being
the only white man reaident In the valley at
that time. The newa of the diaoovery having
spread; the following spring saw quite a number
of men making their way into the oountry,for the
purpoae of prospecting the upper Kootenay aid
its branches; one party of  15 men came in from
Hell-gate Montanaarriving at the o roping of Wild
Horse creek on March 15th 1864,finding the spring well advanced,with grass from four to six
in length; pushing on to Findlay oreek, they were
disappointed to find the country still looked
up in ice and snow, consequently they returned
to Bummers f'J.at(henoe the name}' and Wild Horse •
oreektgome of-them camping; in the vioinlty of'
where Fort Steele now stands, About the same
time another party composed of five men jiamely,
Pat Cuddy, Curly Carrol, James Smith, Lem Harris
and Bob bore.oame in from Walla Walla,by way of
the Moyie and Joseph's Prairie; Cuddy, Smith
and Carrol went on to Findlay oreek,but Bob Dore-
and Lem Harris camped at the mouth of Wild Horse
then they in oompany with a few of the- others
who had returned from Findlay oreek,started prospecting,and finding enough gold at the 6ro3slng
to enoourage thorn to continue,they worked their
way up the oreek,the prospeots Improving as they
advanced,until at last they struok the rich
ground, about three or four miles up from where
they had started; when the first orowd got up-to
the mouth of what ianow called Brewery oreek,
they ran across a fine blaok Cayuse stud,giving
rise to the original name "Stud Horse Creek,"
whioh with the oonsent of the miners veb changed
to Wild Horse creek a few yearo afterwards by
Gold Commissioner P,0,Reilly, Bob.Dore reoorded
the first olaim,calling It the Dore,then followed the CUddy,French,Fisher and others,As much as
17.000, was taken out of tie Dore in one day,
the average being about 'JS.fiOO, producing altogether in three years the sum of 4521, 700.during
tho season of 1864 there was in the neighbourhood
of .'\000.miners on the Wild Horse,about 100 on
Fin-:ii?y oreek,with one or two hundred prospeot-
lnn; round in other parts of the country, The
Wild Horse divings paid from $20 to $50 a day
oer man*, Plndlay oreek turning out a failure,    ,
About Christmas time there .was a stampede down
the Columbia to the Splllimachene,oaused by a'
false report on the part of some miners. About
800 men wintered in the distriot in 6 4, very
little gold beinr? taken out of the oountry ..that
year. In the spring of 65 provisions became very
soaroe,flour went up to ^1,26 per pound ,Tobaooo ■
'|ll5. and other things in proportion,no beef-to
be had,about 100 head of sheep were brought in
and sold at SO*!" per pound, in faot more than half
the people were forced to go out hunt ing and '
fishing to enable them to live,  it was not'until
the 15th of May,that supplies arrived from the
Plat Head Mission, This was a very prosperous
season,there must have been from 5 ,000,to 8.OCI0.
men in the distriot,and Wild Horse'oreek paid
better in 1865 than any oreek In California,did
during its palmy days; Hundred's of men made $3,000
to $5.000 in a few months,some as high as $80 .OOd*.
"'' ' " mmmmmmm   ii ii ,mw'iiii iimiii> p£/>?.p Cp/M.
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4 4. Buckhorn.
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6. Brandon.
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6, Full House.
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9. Canton,
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10, Little Chief,
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11, Eureka,
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' 12. Vermont Boy.
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13,  Stonewall Jackson.
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16, Ontario.
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17. Stemwinder.
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18, Utopia,
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19, Quantrael.
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21. All Over.
11
22. ifcokleberry.
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23. Good Luck,
11
24.     .   -
11
25.  Dorval,
i»
26. Notre Dame,
11
27, Cromarty.
* i
28. Daffodil.
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20, Rowan,
11
30, Queen of the Hills.
11
31. Gem.
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32, Edith Iraotlon.
, i
33.
11
34, North Star Mill Site.
li '* "i T'T*"! -, -i -»■ -, n—| -i-i ■fTTT'T Trm
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11
1, Hamlet,
♦ i
2. Shylook.
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3. Hope.
11
4. Mountain Lion,
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5, Galore,
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6. Gift.
11
7. Gem.
11
8. Stoncy,
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10, Stormy,
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11. Major.
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No 31,
No22,Griffith.
No23,  ,,-  &
No24.Phoenla.
No2F>vSilVer Xing.
No86.HooDoo.
No 27,RookyMount ain
No28.Ethel.
No29.Mother lode
No30.Dardenelles
No31.
No3?..Mtne»alPolnt
""""iT»wlltft«I"«o33.Lllly May .
PLACER LOCATIONS.   No34Lentyz<
"'"""""."""No 35. MoKlnlay.
1,0 \'   „ No 36. Jennings
Hog.THE No37.Juno.
NofUNVICTA No38.Montrose
Nog.OOLD No39.Spotted Horse
Ho|. MINING, No40.Resoue
Not.COMPANY. No41.Daddy Sprague
NoV.,,    ,,> No42,Boston Olrl
Nofe.INTERNATlONAL  ^Lizzie
No*.PLACER No44.0old Hill
NoaO.MINIHO Oo.   '  i|045.MyEmmie
Holl.CHINA Co,        Ho48.Caledona
No.12.NIP & TUOK Oojfo^.Midaa
N*13.T.MoVlttie 0oNo48>Pat8ey Bollw
NtfU.LAIRDS.   ,-       Ho49i    •     '.
No15.JENNINGS.
No 50.
Nol6x.,,    ,,Shaft  uo51.Emma
+ -H I I I I III! I4U IH „   ■-  „--,._.
QUARTZ LOCATIONS.  jS'JJS*
■"■ ' Sostgohanoo
I'   1 31^
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iMiMtf.vui,.lijii.4,taiit.-
tlyln>,,fif,it; Stoit, /Pi, >V.'V«0.
Nol.Iron Mask,
No2.Hidden Hand.
No3.Nanoy Hanks.
No4.Sweepstakes.
No5.Maud 0.
No6.    '
Ko7.Neoehe„ '
No8.Hish-Yu.
No9. The
No10.Golden
Noll.Five
No12.Group.
Nol3.  ,, ,,
•No 14. Grundy.
NolS.Kootenay King'jj^'
Nol6. Barnes. -Uo7o*
No17.Jennings.
No 18.
No 19.Gold Bug.
"**
No55.    ,,      ,,    Ext'
u'o 56 .Winona
No 67. Erne raid
Ho58.Peroy
No59.
Nodfl.Rlohmond Hill
NoOl.Chaoman
No62.Minnie Wells
No63.Drum Lummon
No64.Doherty
No65.Dore /
No66.Chlsholm
No67.Weleh. '   ' '
No68.Ales
im.ii m uiiio
ii. »in futttm* I THE    PROSPECTOR,  FORT
SATURDAY    APRIL    IS th    1896,.
C LEAR    3 R  I ?.
T    i   ■ Edito"    Port  Ste >1j Prospector,
Sir:-   Nov; that we are an  the eve of
another election,  the power of deciding who
shall have  the Honor of representing us, fo"
another four years, has once more been placed
in the hands of the electors.    Now I shall try
to plaoe the policy of the Great Liberal Party
of Canada before   the  electors of this portion
of Yale & Qa-rribo, and leave it with them to
deoide who shall'have  that hone Mr Bostook,or
Mr Mara, During its term of office the Liberal
Party strove to advance the interests of the
country', and while in opposition,with the same
end in view. The general good,  it has, by resolutions and debates in the, house,together with
addreaaes through-out the land,stoutly maintairj
ed Its prinoiplea. The Liberal Party believing
in'freedom of trade, freedom of speech, and
freedom of conscience, is progressive in its
character.This  waa strongly exemplified by the .
National Liberal convention held at Ottawa June
1893, when Liberals from every section of the
Dominion assembled and without any previous-
arrangement prooeeded at once to take council
together upon'the political situation; the result of their deliberations are embodied in a
series of resolutions whioh contain a reasser-
tlon of their line of policy marked out by the
resolutions previously moved in the house, and
debatedjthese resolutions form a platform upon
which the Liberals in every seotion from the
Atlantio to the' Paoifio,stands. It is hot sectional in its,soope ,it-applies to the whole   WL
Dominion. The Liberal 1 e ad er" inHon, Willi red. -
Laurier". the Liberal party has a leader worthy
to wear, the mantle of leadership,whioh has   descended in line of succession from such men as,
Robert Baldwin, George Brown, Alexander MoKen-
zie,and Edward Blake, He is a born leader of
men',firm,patient,steadfast of purpose,high minded,liberal in every thought,and thoroughly
Canadian in his every ambition and asperations
for his oountry, His charming eloquence as a
speaker,is known everywhere in the Dominion.
His politioal principles and love of liberty, ,
have oome to him through the same fountains
from which his fellow Liberals of British origin!
have drawn their inspirations,'He is ,a national
leader to whom Canadians of vhat ever Provinoe,
0 rigin, Condition,or Creed,look upon,as the
exponent of the principles of freedom of trade,.
Freedom of speech,Freedom of conscience,For
twenty five years he has been a Representative
of the people in parliament',H.is qualities as a
oitlzen and a statesmanhave become thoroughly
known to the publio',and also by. his opponents,
as well as friends,as one, who, after this long
and severe ordeal,is admitted to be a stateaman
of broad ,Liberal and Patriotio asperations,and
as a man stands before the People of Canada with
out fearjand without reproaoh;i.n this oontest,
Mr Laurier,asks the people of'Canada to declare
that the Government     be carried on,not for a*
party,but for the oountry ,not for the oombinea
and corporations,but  for ttic  plain unorganized,
and unsubsidlzed people. He asks that Government
shall not oomblne tobe a rrere agency fo'r the
oreation of plaoes,and the distribution of offi-
oes'.He asks the Farmers*to say by their votes if
they are satisfied that the oost of administration shculd go up, as the prio'e of their produofs
go down", He askB the Working man to say if they
are satisfied with the polioy of making millionaires in a few industries,If they are prospering
under the eoonomio system that keeps down wages,
-i
and keeps up the price of store goods       and
household neoeaaarlea.   He..asks the Canadian
People to aay if they are satisfied with the
lamentable failure of the Government plan for •
settling the Northwest, villi oh las  cost  us  so
much money. He aaka the Canadian People  to aay
that a Government whioh has wasted the Publio
Money,and squandered the publio patrimony,and
a polioy which has failed to fulfil 'one of the
promisee of its authors,and brought upon the
oountry all the lamentable consequences fore
told by its opponents,shall be overthrown.
CANADA rescued from the domination of the
oombinea,agriculture emancipated,progress stimulated.    Never mind how you voted in past elections, you are not the chattle of any party leader, or the serf of any politioal organization-,
Never mind if you'were a government supporter
in other days,it is your business now to oon-
sjder facts as demonstrated in your   own experience ;the man who oannot vote agalnBt"his party1
for.-his country is unworthy of the franohise
and unfit for citizenship in a free country Jit
is to the interest of every elector in thas
valley to weigh the past actions of the conservative party in the balance,and if found wanting, to mark their ballots for HEWIT BOSTOOK
the oandidate of the Liberal Party; The-party
that,in every oountry has been the means of
raising the downtrodden,and lifting the-oppressed.    That you Have as3ooiated yourself with   •
the party whose reoord has been one of continued struggle for the freedom,and the rights of
all in the oommunity it beoomes us to show that
we are worthy sons of our/'.fathers,and maintain
tfur rights to the liberties oomnltted to us.
Thanking you.Mr Editor,for this space in,
your valuable paper. I an yours truly,
A.MoK.Leitoh,
The Prospect ir has ho politics,we are inde-
pendent,ahd will publish any proper communication from either side. Ei.
44-4H++++ 44++-H-44-+
ROUND    TOWN,
Dont forget the Mining Assoolation meeting
to night.
Divine Service will be held in the Sohool Room
on Sunday evening at '7,30 O'clook,
The White 8wan came in from Jennings ,last. Monday loaded with a consignment  for the, Amerioan
Store.
Ike Williams and his son Nick, went down the
river in the White Swan,Cap't Monteih,had lix
.passengers on the down trip*.
7The Mather saw mill is running ort full time,
with lots of orders to 'fill.
We learn that N.Hanson.at Wasa is getting out
the timber for the new draw to the bridge.
Some eight or ten left Steele,to work on the
upper Kootenay,
H,J.Edson,"Johnny on the spot" has gone back   to
the- States,
Several new locations have been recorded this
week.
First it is Bostook,then its Mara; Then its
Mara,and the Bostook.all right, all wrong,   '
-. ,<:..*
1 THE   PROSPECTOR    FORT   STEELE B.C.
The Fisher Co,with six partners,about  $100,000.
the Dore Co,ten partners ,.$150,000. Reese and Oo
575.000, Griffith    Co. three partners $30,000.
while dozens of othe« oomoanies made their thousands, Hundreds of nutgets were taken out rangv
ing from 16 ok'a downwards,      8 and 10 oz pieoes
bein-'-i quite.oomnon, ths largest nugget was found
by the Michael Reynolds Co,weighing 36 oz's,
altogether there must have been nearly five millions in gold dust realized during the season,
most of it going to the States, via Walla Walla
and'Montana,aa the majority of the miners were
Americans,or American citizens. Large sums of
money was spent in the construction of ditches.
The Victoria ditch,Dore k Co,oost  $40,000. the
Town ditch, Reese Dore Ss Co $150.000, Stone '« Co
ditch $12,000,. Dawson Sc  Co $10,000. all complet
ed this year.. At this time the camp was in   a
flourishing 3cndition,with- fully 5,000 men min-
'lng oh the oreek, be side a numbers   of prospectors, Traders, a, roe  aid Cattle ranchers ,Butoh-
-t.h.
The Hudson Bay Co alao moved
ers & so , ...      	
their post fron Tobacco Plains to the banks of
Wild Horse,not far from where Fort Steele now
'stands,Mlohael Phillipps succeeding Linklfetter
as Factor.   Tho first gold Comnissioner was'
J.O.Hayne appointed in 1864,sucoeeded    fcythe
•following.in the order mentioned, The Hon,P.O.'
Reilly.,Leogheri,(who died on the oreek) Riahby,
Ball, A.W.Vowell, Cornelius Booth,,Wm Fernie,
Ed Kelly, and A.W.Vowell again  ,also was gold
Comaissioner in 1835, when the head office was
removed to Dorald on the C.PjR.    The first Recorders ware WinYomg,  yjhlte, and James Normansel
the latter came into the country with Col Moody.
The first Justices of the Peace,were John T Galbraith, W.W.Morrow aid  John Shaw.   John T Galbraith having looated the ground on which Port
Steele is at present situated.in the fall of
1,834, where he in company with Col Keeler and
Marion Nolan, establish nd a trading post and
ferry,the two latter ma  bought out by Galbraith
who carried on the businesa himself assisted by
his. brother James Galbraith who was 'succeeded
by R.L.T.Galbraith the present owner of the prop'
erty. The'following were the firat representatives of the district.,in the Legislature.
Smith of Big Bend,Edgar Dewdney the present Governor, Robert Skinner,  Chas  Todd, John A Mara,
R.L.T.Galbraith, W. C.Melly and A.W.Vowell.   The
mails in those days had to be carried a long
distanoe,one route was byway of Hope,the first
mail oarriero being 7m Ronald,John Johnson,and
James Wardle.There waa another mail by way of
'Valla Walla the carrier being Thos Keogh.    Prior
to confederation the Government imposed a tax
of 50$ .an ounoe on all gold going out of the
oountry,whioh was the oauae of a lot of amuggllng
the oonsequenoe being that the returns given in
the mining reports, give a very inadequate idea
of the amount of gold taken out of the creek; it
has been estimated by old timers and those that
should know.that there must have been at the very
least; $9,000,000. extracted from Wild Horse
during the three or four years following Its dis-
oovery,and they oonslder that a fair eatimate of
the total output up to the present time would be
in the neighbourhood of $17,000,000. At the time
of oonfederation,a Custom House was established
id the distriot,Henry Seeley being the first col-
leotor,he died at Joseph's Prairie,and was suo-
oeeded.by John Oustavus Norris.who was superannuated in 1890,and is at present living in Vic-
toria.There were several well known and ecorn-
trio oh ar aot ers ,who beoamo quite celebrities in
their way, among them may be mentioncdJoe Freeman a butoher,oommonly known aa Portugese Joe
5? Uht °0Untry wlth ^50.000.in cash,made
out of the butoherlng business.
SATURDAY   APRIL   18 th 3896.
mmmm—»»» ■[..—.■■....-■.■I mm mmmmkw*mm*M*~»*m*mm*~m**t**Hvmi »>    •-■—-7-.•„■,* «,•«..„'
Another, oalled Tobaooo Callaghan, also use!   to
make trips to the Hudson Bay Post at Tobaoa .
Plains,where he would purchase royal rope black
strap tobaooo and bring it up to Wild Horse and
sell it to the miners at %7, per pound.
In-spite of the number of men on the  creek, .
the primitive state of the oountry,and the ab- •
soenoeof the representatives of the law,there   :
.was .only one murder committed in the year 1364,
whioh oooured during the celebration of the 4th
'of Judy, a man named Walker shot  tho thumb off
one named Yeast Powder Bill,who in turn shot
Walker,"killing him",Bill was acquitted on con-'
dition'that he left the country,it seems  rather
a strange way of dealing with such a crime, but
in-all probability the miners knew what they
were aboU,t .anyway Bill left the country and that
was 'the end of it, The only other murder com-
mitted,was the killing of a oonstable named
John Laws on, a Canadian from 3righton On t, who
was shot while trying to arrest a horse thief
named Brown,the oulprit trade his escape, but
was afterwards killed at Browns creek near Bon-
ners ferry,,   At this time it was neoessary in
the transfer of prisoners to the coast,to pass
through a portion of the United States,win oh.
gave them opportunities for esoaping, to obviate this diffioulty the Government built what
was known as the Moyie and Fort Shepard trail,
which passed entirely through British Territory',
it was oommenced in 1865,and finished through
to Hope in 66. under the supervision of Edgar
Dewdney,the oost being in the neighbourhood, of
$135,000, This route is not travelled over now,
and the trail has become a memory of the past,
through the opening up of other means of communications,Times have ohanged sinoe those early
days', Steamboats are now running on the river,
Waggon roads through the country,Railroad communication Impossibility of the near future; in
faot the v/hole oountry has undergone a great
change since those days .
■¥ l-ll IIIIHn-H-l-H-t-
1893. 1894. 1895.  1896,
The subsequent History,of Wild Horse,- for a
number of years is substantially that oi! the
sudden rise,and subsequent s.,ow deoline in importance of plaoer gold mining .In the last four
years placer mining haa improved to a great extent,there are now several large oompanies actively engaged in hydrjulio mining; and the coming season promises to be one of great impoSanoe
to this distriot,both in plaoer and quartz mining,68 Quartz looations have been made on Wild
Horse and its tributaries,Many extensive leads
have been discovered,that are rioh In minerals,
Gold, Silver,Copper and Lead; and the future may
show that the palmy dayB of f lid Horse are not
passed and gone, but to the oontary Yet to Come.
Mil II I I I II I II I I I I II
LARGE LEADS ON WILD HORSE.
Gold Hill, 260 feet in width,andl400 feet in
length,'  Gold Quartz.
Sweepstakes, Maud S,and Nanoy Hanks, lead is 400
feet in witdth, the ore , Iron Sulphurets carrying Oold and Silver.
Dardanelles, a rioh strong lead, assaying high In
gold.
The Neoahe and Highue, a 24 foot lead.
The Iron Mask,and Hidden Hand, a 50 foot lead.
The Bald Mountain, Doherty,    Lilly May,Montana.
Boston 0irl,Kootenay King,The Golden Five Group.
MyEmmle.Liazle.Hoodoo.Rooky Mountain,Mo ther Lode,
Ethel, together with many othera.all gold propositions   of value.
—4
mm THE   PROSPECTOR,  FORT    STEELE   B.C.
SATURDAY   APRIL,  18 th, |896,
CARLIN    k   D U R I 0 K.
GENERAL   MERCHANDISE,
AGISTS POR THE CALIFORNIA GIANT POWDER COMPANY.
MINING    SUPPLIES   A   HARDWARE,
AOEHTS POR SLATER * SONS CELEBRATED SHOES.
■M 11 m H I I I I l l-l i'i M'i ii I-i-i-i ii-:-: :i-i-:-i ivi m i :■:
(Navigation
THB   U   PPER    COLUMBIA]       and
[Tramway Co.
OOlCEH.ClALENA, WINDERMERE, CMAL FLATS, THUNDER
HILL,WASA,& FORT STEELE.
|3tage leaves Golden and Fort SteeleEvery Tuesday.
EXPRESS   RATES,
Oolden to Fort Steele 10$ per Pound.
Speoial   rates given on more valuable parcels!
PASSENGER   RATES,
Through $16,00     Local 10$ per Mile.
TJI.B,Ooohrane,Pres.     P.P.Armstrong,Manager.
+ I-I-I |.| ).'| | | | |,|.| 1 li-l i ill |.| 1.H4-4-4-++4444++++++-:-
THE    STEELE   HOUSE.
' THE   OLDEST, AND 3EST HOTEL IN FORT STEELE.
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS.
FREE SAMPLE ROOM FOR COMMERCIAL MEN.
Charles.Levett,Prop.
0 0 W E L L   k   WALLINGER.
>   S S A Y E R S    k   METALLURGISTS.
Port   St»le   B.C.
I i m ii ii ill i'i i i i : i i i i ; :: : i : i'i-i+++-;4-i-.4-:~:-:-:-:
C    0 B B   k.   B R A N D E R.
0 E N E R A L B L A C K S I! I T H I N 0,
AND WOODWORKING.
H 0 R S E—S HOEING A SPECIALTY.
i 11 H-i'H-i-i'i i i'l'l i I i'i I i : i-i i i■ i : :i-i':4+-:-+-i-+-:-++-:-:-
I
D E M P S E Y    k    0 R A  S S I C K.
f      CONTRACTORS   k   BUILDER S.
Port   Steele   B.C.
I I 11 l l l l-l l l l l l l I Mil 11 ll l I+4-+SK44-: :-;-; i : ;-.-:
THE    COL   U M B I A    LAUNDRY.
WASHING    k   M E N D I II r .
Mrs, LEWI S,
H'-I-I'M l-l'l'l'l II I II r-l-H-++44~i-
,READ THE,
.SUBSCRIBE POR THE
PROSPECTOR   111.50,  per Yea
THE    AMERICAN   STORE.
GENERAL    MER   CUANDISE.
GIANT   POWDER, MINING    SUPPLIES . &   HARDWARE,
GROCERIES   k   PROVISIONS,
SUPPLIES FOR MINERS AND PROSPB3T0RS.
B. W. JONES.
Fort Steele B.C. Jennings,Montana,
"T* -i'l"-i1i'-»-i-i,illL4"i 't' IP1 J '•   l-i 4 1 'i'l"l  1 'I   l"T*t"W"l I 'i TrTTTTTTTTTH^lT
THE    UPPER   KOOTENAY   NAVIGATION    OOMPANY.
STEAMER   ANNERLY,
Will leave Jennings Montana, for Fort Steele B.O,
April lftth 1892.
POR FREIGHT AND EXPRESS RATES APPLY TO
B.W.J 0 N E S,Jennings Montana.
. . _, ■ . ..  . ..... i «■ ............  ■■   ■■  * ■ » *
t~t •—• . • r-p"v m,rTmi •* "rt'TT'i ll'i i i "lit'* i li  l *l"l l 71 ^rr^r^r^^r
THE    DALGARDNO   HOUSE..
Fort   Steele   B.C.
Now under the management of
A. M 0 R I N,
In a large new,and attractive Hotel of        '..
quiet elegance in all. its
appointment a,with a cU3lne
and service of superior. .
excellence,
Special rates by the month.
THE    MISSION    S T 0 R E.   ,'
*
0 E N E' R A L   M E R C H A N D I S E;
THE HIGHEST,
CASH PRICE
PAID FOR PURS.
======3=      T.L 0 V E.    i4.-j---u.tB
SI   EUgerie Mission.
; : : -—-:-t++++4 i-M I !+4l-i M-i-l-l-l ll III l-l l-l M H
'!  HE    MOUNTAIN    H 0 U S E,
Port Steele B.C.
William, Ibrnyth, Proprietor.
This is one of the lest appointed Hotels in the
Port Steele a strict.
Every room is comfortably  famished.
THE MOUNTAIN HOUSE DINING ROOM.
Is under the management of
RIGGINGS  k BLODOETT.
'."lien you visit Port Steele, You will miss it if
You dont   stop at the Mountain House.
,"'i ■(', -j' j "i-*t*-f *ir~r ■ r-.-r*T,*T" r*T I "i H"r*T*"H"*f*r*W**r I   W"*|"?f*»*l ■W'^l"T,llf*T',T*^T*'
J A M E S. H I 0 H W A R D E N.
Tonsorial   Artist,
S If A V I N 0   k: I-I A I R 0 U T T INO...   .
-.   saaass^sassaasaataaaaa^asaaasB.BariBaqsw   ■
Everything   neat   and-' clean.';,,      i,'• ,
+44-+4-+-J ;■■ -  -•■--■-' r4444-4++KH+44-+'I III I H'l'H'.i|'>'frft,''>1,1 4
 "-—"'" " '" "" ' ', ■',,', '.'-'' '*•
w_

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