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The Prospector Feb 15, 1896

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Array ft*
■ I
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Vol, 1.
* F v R »
**mwm0m#pttt*m&iwm■ <-r
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T .£ E L E,  8AIURD A Y
FEBRUARY    15 tn,  1396,
No
; at leastwe shall be
upon a Government
en,or to support a
ipproaohing freL
•iy
PROTECTION.   VERSUS    FREE    TRADE,
lb        the -Editor of the Pi-> sector,
Sir.    Within a teyi : ...r-h
|called upon to decide either
party whose .creed is Protect
party  pledged to somethii^H
■trade. Not th at I propose to touch for one moment on th'i political aspect of the case,simply onj
the commercial.If we are suffering from, woes,
other th an those brought on by our want of thriflt
I would aak if Free Trade is a panacea for them
all; I would not refer to the subject,but that th|
present trend of opinion in our Province would
appear to be in thedireotion of free trade.One
of the Victoria papers in season,and. out of season in nearly every issue has told us that Protection is a curse,and that free trade will Bring]
us all prosperity;and drags forward the example
of Free Trade England to prove the point.Perhaps
the.Victoria Times could hardly adduce a more '
unfortunate illustration.The British Farmer is
today utterly,hopelessly ruined,not as the Times
would have us believe by heavy rents,and by a
powerful landed aristocracy,for the land owner is
.fast following the farmer to bankruptoy-.Does the
J Editor of'the.Times know that at this moment not,
one',but hundreds of farms can be obtained rent'
free,the only oondition being that the farm is
kept in cultivation.Land,except in the immediate
vioinity of large towns,can often be -purchased at
a  price little exoeeding the amount named by the
Times in one of its issue ac  ',he annual rent paid]
by the- British Parmer.It is  „.-ue as the Time
points out  that England made a {;reat andwonderful
advance  in prosperity during the   year-.: aooceedingj
the introduction of free trade.Tnis  :'..: spite of
free trade,and not because of It'.Putting on one
side, the mighty onward push that steam and elec- i
trici,ty  ,about that time gave to industries of
all kinds,a push that benefitted England,the
great Coal and Iron pronuoer of the day more than
any natlon',Putt.lng also aside the fact that transport then was very different  to what it is now.
There was another reason .why the then wealthy
farmer of England,the type o:  John Bull himself,
h'ad for years his own home market,the finest
market in the world much to himself. War,or preparing for war,gave  the nations of Europe little
time for growing produce for export,AustriaNand
'..Italy ,Prussis (Austria ,Prussia France and in Amer-i'
lea,North & South.at that time also India,Egypt, j
Argentina,The western States of America,Manit'bbia!
and ..other wheat growing countries of the world   ji
were not thought of as exporting countries, But
to day spend a few hours in the London Docks,
and do not wonder that the British Fanner with
his chill and cloudy sky,and often drenching
harvest time is unable to compete with the.grain'ji
grown in a hundred brighter lands.not onijf'Brain,"
but watch the unloading of beef from America,
'Frozen mutton and wool from Australia and New,
Zealand,Butter,Eggs,Cheese and Fruit from Holland, Denmark,Franoe and every other nation and
country.The ocean freight on this produce even
from the distant ports of Amerloa,are but a frac
tion of the Railway rates paid by the British
Farmer , frora even the central counties of England!
This the Free Trade of England. Call it rather
the fettered trade of Britain.Her ports o.pen
free to all the natiom. of the world,the ports
of all nations,even those of her self governing
Colonies closed against her ■■   th a high protective tariff,I will not ampl.ii,  unthis subject
simply give one illustration. Co: iiero'iai. Treaties, Why even the third rate oounti I es of the
world think it a good joke when*'England propo--
aesa-commercial treaty.What has Engli-nd to give
in exchange for commercial privileges,uhe long
ago surrendered every thing,and opened free her
ports to all.Germany not content with the highest protective'tariff.gives a bounty on exported sugar and produce,thus effectually .'losing
the sugar refineries of England. To day with all
the great countries turning to industry and manufacture,with steamship transport that  simpiy
annihilates distanoe,England finds herself'ik .ie-
leasly handicapped in her own free market. We-can
hardly suppose that the levelheaded German,the
brilliant Frenchman,the cute Amerioan an-.', all
these other people are in the wrong and kn.y.'
nothing of what Is good for their own oase,and
that the Editor of the Victoria Timet; alont; can
teach .them.If all these other nation:; have deoid-j
ed that protection Is f or their benefit,how is it
that England with her sober statesmen has ao long,
held on to free trade. No thinking man or woman,
nay no thoughtful boy or girl in England that     ,
does not' know that  their oountry is staggering
under the suioidioal policy of free trade.no
doubt its early advocates expeoted that other
nations would soon follow,and, that free trade
would.be universal. A dream, not to be realised in
our day,The English also allow sentiment to enter
into their business,and no doubt one ohief reason
was because they thought it right.The bread buyer in their country so far outnumber the bread
grower, that now they find out,that one of 'heir
own writers was right when he said, high prices,
high wages means prosperity,and that ins lightly
reducing the oost of iiving , they have ruined
and thrown out of employment1 thousands of their
own people.Muoh has been made of frhe fact  that
the farmers in many parts of protectionist America are suffering from hard times. These people
have a glutted local market, and are too far removed from a foreign one,Proteotion does benefit
■ them,and free trdde would injure them,
If England rich and wealthy with the accumulated
wealth, of centuries,"and a mighty mercantile
fleet to add to her riches /has found that she
cannot with impunity destroy her own industries,
how oan our own Province ,rioh it is true  in un->
developed resouroes,"but young and without capital,"rush recklessly to follow her example",how
can the farmers of this Province with his farm
improved and orchards planted lit great expense
compete with the broader farms and longer established orchards of Oregon,Washington and California.Have free trade if you will ,only be sure
of this,that the farmer ,ln two years will have
become extinct as a farmer;gone as an individual
j to swell the already over-crowded ranks of labor>
lsgone to the mineSfgone under hopelessly ,or if he
j la able to other landEi governed by further see-
■' lag men',not only the farmer and fruit grower, THE PROSPECTOR
SAS A T U R D A Y Feb, 15th 1896.
THE PROSPECTOR
I
IS    PUBLISHED   WEEKLY    BY    THE    PROSPECTOR Co.
A.B.Grace,Manager,
SUBSCRIPTIONS il.f.O. Per Annum.
ALL COMMUNICATIONS,  DIRECTED TO THE PROSPECTOR.
Fort    Steele    B.C.
■ • •'
..... . » ■
■i -. .". -. -
rTtr -i-i-i -r-r-i—,-*r
PROP/
SSI
Si'AL.
Chas.Maclean.
Phy:
>ieian
:c Surgeon.
Thomas. McVittie.
P.
j.s & cr-:.
H.L.Cummin's.
P.l
,.S. &  C.E,
W.J.Rooke.Cowell.
B.Sc. F.G.S.
il. Arnold ,11c: linger,
*
!otallurr,i3t &
Assayer.
FORT STEEIE
MINING ASSC
CIATI OH.
R.L.T.Galbraith.
President.
O.S.Frizzell.
Vice
R.D.Mathers.
H.W.Barnes,
Wm, Carlin.
Treasurer.
Thomas.McVittie,
Secretary,
All possible information will be furnished by the-
association,upon application to
Thomas.McVittie,Sec.Fort '"tc-ele B.C.
'i i'i-! 11-: i i i-i :■! i i-i i'l-H-i i : 11 i i i: 11 !■; ii~:-i i 111111 ;i ;■+
PROTECTION   VS   FREE TRADE.
But within two years every machine and engine
shop in the country will be closed.And what will
it benefit the miner if he does live 5<t a day
cheaper,if wages go down 504/ per day as they
surely will.With the advent of free trade will
'   . oome also a depreciation in the value of all
properties from 30,to 50 per oent.Those of us
who have lived long in the Province,can remember
Victoria as a free trade port'.many of the business houses empty,and of those oocunicd half wen?
Auctioneers offices.Ship load after ship load
coming to Victoria,consigned there because there
was no duty to pay,the cargoes sold at once by
auction for what they would fetch,and legitimate
trade at a stand-Btill.Mining must however be our.
chief support,and the Prospector and Miner must
receive every protection,the Settler and the
Mechanic come into the Province with no duties to
pay on their effects and implements,so most certainly should the Prospector.As Germany protects
her industries by giving bounties,so should our
Government refund by bounty cr otherwise to our
mine owners.With our own Provinoe t    • -e is the
strange anomaly of all tariff rev   ■ ■■■   going to
Ottawa,and our member should see tacit East k Wor.
Kootenay get their share'.One immediate want we
have,and the Dominion Government should at onoe
by advance or guarantee enable the Crow's Nest
Railway to push their work to completion,and  tb.u
allow the valuable coal to be used for smeltin,",
our ores.Surely the Government that fails to
judiciously protect her industries and her products,fails in her first and foremost        duty,'
Michael.Phillipps,Farm< ;.\
'i I I I 1 i '. H  1 i'i i'l'l'l  i-l-l-f-l-i"f"T-i-r-:—i-i-i-i-l-v i :  '.  '.  '. -l-r-v -r*i -'. I-i
T       ' <" We have no od'tie
on the above article, Our duty,and ou
to mtuto
ineli-nnt i-
riot.and
is for the best interests of t
the columns of the Prospector is open to both
sides of the question.Lot the voice of the peopl
be heard,pro k con. Ed,
■i-i I-i-i-i i i-i-i i mi i i i-i i:-; i -;-i-;-;-:-h
1 -r-»-*t -fr-r-l-T-
HOME   INDUSTRY,
We have received from the PROVINCE PUBLISHING Co,
of Victoria; an illustrated Calendar for this
year,it oontains a map of British Columbia,which
as a work of art,and Lithography is beyond comparison ;We congratulate the PubliShero upon in sue
ing an artiole of beauty,and of use to all the
Business men of the Province, Ed.
r • :-H--r-H-H-H -H■-!•+
WILD CAT    SCHEMES,
lb   to the Editor of the Prospector,
Sir. During the last meeting of
the Mining Association,the inquiry with regard to
its position in the case of the floating of well
known wild cat schemes was met with derision.
I maintain,that it is the duty of the Association, to prevent as far as possible all such
schemes be.ln; financially floated,to oaution investors by the means of the mining papers,and to
notify the N. '/.Mining Association.One cannot pick
up an influential mining paper-without observing
the number of warnings,respecting investment in
certain mines,and why cannot the association follow the same practice. It is generally known that
in law,a person who knows of an illegal act about
to be committed and does not try to prevent it,Is
an accessary to the act and is only one degree
less culpable,than the oerionwho commits the act.
I take it,that if the association does not actively try and defeat the object of any wild cat
schemes,that it is an accessory to such scheme
and as such will forfeit the respect of everybody,
and lose the influence it is supposed to have,
beside failing to"safeguard the mining interests
of the district" which it aims to do.
Mr, contends that the association can only"
passively dlscountenanoea a wildcat scheme".and
that he is for letting every man look after himself,this,of course,is nonsense,beoause if Mr.—
expects every Investor to visit this oountry and
see the mines for himself supposing he knows anything about  nines,which is very 1 improbable,before
investing,we shall have to wait a great many years
before we progress to any great extent.I might
that it would not have worked very well in his
own ease.Passive discountenance is just the same
is connivance or accessory to,and 1 s always wrong
It is these outside investors that we want to
Interest in our tiros poets ,and i f they onoe get
to know,that dependence can be placed upon proposition!', from this s ection,we shall not have to
grumble :>.i "ir share of patronage. Another objection  '..)••',. as the chances 11 gives for blaok-
wall i.:-,-•,..ii! tho venting of personal spite.this,
wi 11 '". «l 1 ear .1 nspoetion,as nothing oan be done
without the whole wholeassociatlon dlscussing it,
attempt at either would soon be suppress-
prmarkSjof course,only apply to bona
out schemes,and not to propositions that
e dement of chance in their suooeBS,as
■nn'.vr, that assured mines on the surface
I   'a" between.   Altogether,it 8eems to
me,that the    yi-onfar outweigh the cons"ln favor
of active opposition to any and all wild oats,
and I should like the members who were absent
from the  last meeting, to o are fully oonsider,what
i.Ivy think the position of the association should
be.    Yours Truly.   H.A.Wallinger.
knd ;
led. These
1 !e v.-Pd
Old    l\    }:,
eve pylori"
are few •■.
■•r-s-.--I"-."'."*.*. "HHi"
HH-H-t-H-K-K-H-t-i'l I I'l'l'l I ll'l I'M I I I M
The above artiole needa no oomment.if you
caught a wild oat round your oamp,you would not
lake any oham es,we shall do likewise. * Ed.
The next regular meeting of the fibrt Steele Min-
in", Association,Will beheld on Saturday Evening
f'ob, sand. . ■ -
.:-.•-)..;..'-. i.i.'.,_.._./.....' u+.'1-H-H, SHifrtH-H---+W+>H"H*4MrH-H
IN   TOWN.
George. Ilogath.from tho North Star is in town.
N,'Hanson, < ' Wasa.and Mrs .Donahue, are visiting
at the Fort,
M.Phillipps,S.M. returned to Tobaooo Plains,on
Tuesday. .
The R,»v'd,M.Coooola,has gone to Golden on a visU TH   E      PROSPECTOR,
. «■-vij •! l" i»aj '.'Sbr> v i
PICT'    pah    &   SHOVSLL.
A convention of the Officers of the North West
Mining Association,will beheld in Spokane,on
the 2Snd of February, A banquet will be tender
ed to the v-isiting Officials  .It i3 expected
that all the mining districts of the North West
will be prepresented.The President of the Fort
Steele Mining Association,      R.L.T.Galbraith.
has been invited,and it is to be regretted that
he will be unable to be present ,as this will be
the largest,and. most important gathering of thosf
interested in mining,ever held in the Stales or
Province.
-w-t-t-H-K -: : -H- •*++++++
Divine Ser
Evening at
DIVINE SERV1
rice at the Seine
7.1/3 01 clock,S:
-I'l'l'l I 1 I-W—l-i-T-H
. Room next Sunday
oject,Dreams.
■^m    THE CHINESE NEW YEAR.
The evening,on whioh the new moon,"in February"
appears,is New Years Eve in China.It  is tho
greatest holiday of the year,it is also the only
Sunday in tho entire Chinese year.and the people
stop all work,put on their best clothes,"if they
have any,new if possible'.and re joice and celebrate in their own peculiar way.Shoot Fire-works
Fire oraokers,Chineso bombs,in fact make all the
noise possible,and drink Sam Suie."Whiskey".
Give presents wrapped in red paper,oall on their
friends,pay all their debts,take a bath,(the
only one in the ycar)and enjoy themselves in the
greatest possible degree.They are compelled to    .
pay their debts on thin day or go into bankruptoj|
it i s a bad day for t! " d ebtor in China, for the
creditor can enter the Ii ouse and help himself to
any thing he wants,Red the most brilliant and
gorgeous red possible is over everything,    littlel
signs,figures and symb.-ils are on,and over their
doors,red wrapping paper about ttheir presents,
even eggs are painted red,and offered to their
Gods.at night the air 1 s re.i with the fire from
burning 0rackers,used to scare away the devils
of misfortune,and bad luck for the coming year.
They s it u pall n ight,for there is a supersti-"
tion,that the 0 ne who for ten successive years
sees the sunrise on Hew Years morning,will
have a long 1 ife.A peculiar custom is the running of the children through the streets,offering their small vioes for sale.in order to star
the year with.-a oleun record',1 want to sell my
little Uffgf'they cry",I want to sell my stealing habits,who wants to buy my vanity,or my
selfishness and my bad temper,if they find any |
purchasers,1t is not rocordedtts they hold on to
the stealing habits through life.The grand •
finale,is a tremendous,and sudden burst of first
works,a l?rge decoction of sam auie, and a
prolongc sitting at Fan Tan."gambling",
HE IS THE MAN.
DINNER AT THE LORflKIOH EXECUTIONERS AT STEELE.
A number of the residents of Fort fteelp.were
invited by the above august personage to a
sumptious spread,on Chinese New Year::.all the
delioacies of the Flowery Kingdom were on the
table,whioh were done justice to by the guests,
who did not appear awed by dining with 'ouch an '
important functionary to the Chinese Emperor,
as the Lord High Executioner,It is needless to
say that yold Captain,left the Flowery Kingdom
for state reasons,and to save his head,
■I'l-I'l *M,-M-I*H"M"I-M"f'
' A sign is out ,a cook wanted. ,at .one of the
principals hotels in town,
S A T U R D A Y, Fob,15 th,1896,
COURT   PROCEEDINGS.
Before.M.Phlllipps(S.M. and T.MoVittie.J.P.
On Monday last,Charles .Lent?:,appeared before the
Magistrates,to answer to a charge of smuggling
goods into the   oountry.Customs oollector Clark,
prosecuted,and Constable Barnes proved the case
against Lentz.Who had no defence.Lentz,was fined
$ 60, and costs,the whole amounting to $ 60.
The goods were confiscated to the Crown. '
'il 1 ii':; : 1 : i i 1 1 i i ', 1 i i i
WILL BE SOLD.
|The confiscated goods  ,will be sold in thirty days'
and the Treasury of the Dominion thereby increased by the proceeds,
M-i-i'i'i'i i-i 1 i-M ; 1:1: m-
CUSTOMS SEISURE.
Customs Collector,Clark,accompanied by Constable
Barne3,on last Saturday went as far a3 Bull River
and seized some two hundred sacks of oats that
had been stored In a correl at Beavens ranch.the
goods had not been reported at the Custom House.
Some employees of Messers.Derosler & Demars,had
dumped their loads at'that point,as the sleighing
was not good,however as it was a clear violation
of the law,the Collector seized the oats,and reported the matter to the Chief Collector at
' New Westminster.The parties put up bonds to
the amount of 4J 500. and the goods were released.
+-h i-ii-i ii-; 11-:; I'l'i-H-
THE   NIP & TUCK.
This olaim has been loascd.by the purohasers, to
'Mr.J.M.Buxton,of Vancouver,who io well known in
raining ciroles. Mr,Buxton,ha3 associated with
hlm,a number of English Capitalists,They will
put in a new Hydraulic Mining plant,and will push
work on the olaim during the coming season.This
property is situated on Wild Horse oreek,and is
considered very rioh.We heartily wisth the Gentlemen engaged in the enterprise,Success.
It is reported that,two of the parties who acted
as asent3 in the Hip % Tuck sale,are kicking over
a division of the commission.a little Law,will
help to divide   it all right.
1 -i-i-i i-M 1 i-i-i-ii-i-i-Hi-i-i-ii-
AT   HOME.
If there is one place more than another,that you
feel just at home,It is at Mrs,Huckle's, This was
the unanimous expression of all *o,had the pleas
ure of an invitation to her social gathering on
Monday Evening last.Games,Cards.Musio and other
amusements were indulged in,by the Guests who
were loud in their praises of Mine Hostess
and her amiable assistant Miss.Bailey. Among the
Guests present Wwere Mr,& Mrs.Frizzell.Mr.& Mrs.
Levett.Mr.fc Mrs.Duriok, Messers,McVittie.Doyle.
Dempsey.Orasslok.and others,
A pleasant Evening was spent at the residence of
Mr,& Mrs,N.A.Wallinger,on Monday Evening last,       j
With Musio and Games the time passed too
quickly for the invited 0uest3.among whom was,
Mrs.Henry,Mi8s.Arnold.Me3sor3,Leach and Hayden
and others.
The Chlnook,has been blowing for the last  few
days,Sleighing is a thing of the past,And tho
sprinkler will soon be a necessity on Riverside
Avenue to lay the dust.
-I-I -I-IH-H-l-l I I I I I I 1 'I H-H-
Jap.King, Is in from the Moyea Mines.
Willlam.Bossee,has gone to the Moyea,to work on
the St,Eugene -Mine.
Three taams oame in over tho new road,from Tobao-
00 Plains, yesterday.
I. il»V <     ■■ "■!—nr '—— n ' T H
T A X
NOTICE.
(SOUTHER*' DIVISION    OP EAST KOOTENAY,
NOTICE IS HEREBY  JIVEll.That  in accord
d'anoe with the  Statutes,RevenueTax,and all other
taxes levied under the  assessment act are now due
for the year 1896,and payable at my office in
Fort Steele.If paid on,or before June 30th 1896.
One half cf one per cent,or. real property,
Two per oent,on assessed valu? of wild land.
One third of one per cent,on personal property,
If paid after June 30th 1896.
Two thirds of one
per cent,on real property.
Two and one half per cent,on Cosessed value of
wild land.
One half of one per cent.on personal property,
Rtrvenue tax'of $3 for pvery male  person over 18
years years of age.      All per ons,who are in
arrears of taxe3 cue up to the  31st of Dee 1895.
are requested to pay the same,or costs will be
incurred at an early date,
C,M.Edwards., OoHector & '.'. -;sessor.
Southern Division of East Kootenay Distriot.
lort Steele B.C.
.■J-H'l-H'H'i'.l'l. i'lWfrt-i»W-»i-r-i*-i-*t-r »"l ■ I'i- l-i-l 'i i  i 1 1 i '. i l-H-Hi-r
C A R L I Ii   &   D U RICK.
GENERAL    MERCHANDISE.
AGENTS FOR THE CALIFORNIA. GIANT POWDER COMPANY,
MINING    S U P P h:)l E S,
AGENTS FOR SLATER & SONS,   CELEBRATED 'SH0E§.
■I'M l.|0'l«M'i'M»U'i It I I H I i'i i'l I'i IH-M4+ i'i i I'l-i'vi-r-r-*
("Navigation and
UPPER    COLUMBIAN
(.Tramway Co-.
EXPRESS THROUGH RATE 10$ PER POUND,
FREIGHT,  GOLDEN TO, FORT STEELE'.
Class A i 3.00.
Class B i 2.50.
Class C   \ 2.00.     •'
Class D $ l.lSo'.
T.H.B.Cochrane,Pres.       F.P.Armstrong, Manager.
■i-'-:  ■i-i-i  i 1-1 i  i"i'-l-l  ! i i-i }'.;";--;--i-i-i--,-,-.[-i"i'-i-I-i-i-'--: ■:-:- i I 1 ■',•■', i'i-r-i
THE   STEELE   H O U S .:..
Tiffl OLDEST AND.BEST HOTEL IN  FCIRT STEELE.
Strictly First Class.
FREE SAMPLE ROOM FOR CIMEROIaL MEN,
Chas, Levett, Prop.
S A T OH A Y   Feb,15th 1896.
-i--f -f v-r-i-r-H—:-
-l-i'i-'i-t I I'I I i ;-*-;-i--f-!--;-'i"l'i-r-r.-v~T-i'"l-l'"WI"'-l"
C 0 H E L I.    &    W A L L I  ii   } E R.
A S S A Y E R S    *    M E T A L L IJ R 0 1 S T S,
Fort    Steele-    3.0,
■l-l i i i I : I i -l-i-M- I-I-I -I -1-1-1 -l-4-H-i--l-;-',--i--.-:-r-.-. -.-i-~.-,--.--H-t~.--r
COBB     fr    BRA N D  '■.  U
GENE R A, L    B I. A C K S M I T II I W G
AND   WOODWORK E R,
HORSE    SHOEING    a' S P E 0 I A L T Y.
■t-r-i-h J—rHH- I-K-N-l- ■ i -i •{•*+ M -t-f-K-.'-r -K-M- "f-i-r-i-T-i-T-i—T-f -M* >fr-M-f -I-
D E M P  S E Y    &   Q R A' B S I 0 K.
-,C OUTH A 0 T 0. R S   is   B U I L D E R S,
Fort   Steel,;    B.O,
THE    AMERICAN    STORE.
GENERAL-   MERCHANDISE,
GIANT    POWDER,  MINING SUPPLIES & HARDWARE.
GROCERIES    &   PROVISIONS.
B.W.J ONES.
Fort Steele B.C.
Jennings Montana
:-l-l'"i-l'-T"l"l )■!■:
THE    UPPER   KOOTENAY    NAVIGATION    COMPANY.
STEAMER ANNERLY.
FORT    STEELE,B.C.    &    JENNINGS    MONtT.  ;'
FOR   EXPRESS, AND   FREIGHT   RATES    APPLY    TO
B.W.J ONES. ';,
Jennings, Montana,
-I'i-i -i-l-'l-1 'I-I—
-H-i-W-i-i l-l'
D A L G A R D M 0    HOUSE,
THE LARGEST AND MOST COMMODIOUS HOUSE IN STEELE.
BOARD BY THE DAY OR WEEK.
R.D Esthers, Prop. Fort   Steele B.O.
rl'i-l'-'
,-,--;'. . , ,' ,','.*'. r .'-,-.
•H-i-H
When   you   come   to   Fort   Steele ?.,
Call on, A. M 0 R I N. And get a
GOOD    CIGAR.
THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD FOR YOU.
THE   MOUNTAIN    H 0 U S E.
Fort    Steele   B.C.
GOOD ENOUGH FOR MOST ANYBODY.
H.J.E D S 0 N,Prop.
THE MISSION STOP. E.
GENERAL.MEROHANDIS E.
THE   HIGHEST,
CASH PRICE
PAID FOR FURS.
T,L 0 V E.Prop.
-:~s-.-i--H-"i-:~r-'~s-.--;-.--■ 1 f i: :-: ;■* i i; h 11 i !■!» i h in 11 11 I rM-N
THE    C 0 L U M B'l  A   LAUNDRY.
WASHING    AMENDING.
Mrs., L E W I S.
-m i-;-i-i-i-i'-i'-f-i--i-w-i'i'i! t':'i^i'j>K'-H-»-H-H-H'-frM-t-iW'-»-»4--f-»
J A M E S, H I 0 H W A R D E N.
Tonsorial   Artfcst,-
SHAVING    &   H A I R 0 U T T I N G.
Everything   neat   and.   clean,
l-f-i-H-l-H l-l 11 li'M I'l'H-H-fr-H'N !■ l-'l-i-i-;l I-H-H-l-H-
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE PROSPECTOR, fx.vo.PER YEAR.

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