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The Nicola Valley News Apr 21, 1911

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 ���Am "9  7K7*,  yfG-.--l9.lt  Vol. 2, No   10  MERRITT, B. C. APRIL 21, 1911  Price 5 Cents  ML L. Grimmett, LL. B.  Appointed City Solicitor  ���:*  4i  Mayor     Eastwood;    Appointed  Standing Committies.    ���  The first meeting of the city  council was held at nine o'clock  last Wednesday evening in the  court house. Mayor Eastwood  occupied the chair for the evening; the aldermen present being  Aldermen-Boyd, Menzies, Jackson, Munro, McMillan and Reid.  M. L. Grimmett, who has been  acting for the incorporators of  the city, acted as temporary city  clerk, and will continue to do so  until such time as the council  make the final appointment.  As this was the first meeting  of the council considerable interest was manifest in the appointment of committees, and it is believed that the'ratepayers of the  city will be well satisfied with the  appointments Mayor Eastwood  has made. There are three members of each committee, a list of  which follows, the first name on  each committee is that of the  chairman of that committee.  . Finance commtttee :��� Aldermen Reid, Boyd ..and Menzies.  Water and Light:���Aldermen  Boyd, Jackson and Munro.  Board. of; Works: ��� Aldermen  Jackson, McMillan and Reid.   .  Education:���AldermeriJVIunro,  Jackson and Reid.  .Health Committee:���Aldermen  ' McMillan, Menzies and Boyd.  1 "Among the first applications  ^recei ved for any civic offices were  , those ffir- the position as chief of  police.   The applicants were S.  ��� Gibson, Straiton, B. C, who  forwarded a testimonial to character from the mayor of Ladysmith, Harry Gate, of this city,  Joseph Food, also of this city,  and H. W. Sutcliffe who has for  some time past been a deputy  '.''provincial policeman.  .(; No action was taken by the  council in this matter, it being  deemed advisable to let such appointments, rest until a clerk of  the council has been procured.  5   In regard to the position of city  clerk the aldermen held a lengthy  discussion as to the best policy to  adopt in the choice of this officer.  /The mayor, when interrogated as  to whether or hot anyone had approached  him   on   the  matter,  stated that he had had several  conversations with Captain Forster, of Nicola, who was for some  years  city clerk of the city of  Edmonton; Alta. This gentleman  had stated that he was willing to  undertake the.position of clerk,  {assessor, tax-collector and police  'magistrate.   The aldermen, however, felt that the,police magistrate's office should be an independent one. In this Mr. Grimmett  ^concurred, pointing out that the  appointment of a magistratewas  mmattjer which rested with the  |attorney-general's   department  fexclusiyelyi the ".council having  ;*io voice''in the matter, at all,  "save to accept-.the choice of the  ;attorney-general.    John Hutchison made application for the position, but nothing was done by  the council, .save to recommend  that H.|W.p Sutcliffe be recom^  mended to the Lieutenant - governor for appointment.   But, as  has been stated before, the appointment rests with the attorney-general.  ���   The police commission is made  up of three members, the mayor  of the city being an ex-officio  chairman of that board and the  License-'Commission,' The mayor  is one member, ah alderman is  another and the third is appointed by the provincial government.  The council appointed alderman  Reid as the council's -"representative. Then followed a discussion  as to whom they7.would recommend to the government for the  other appoi ntment. Thei r choi ce  lay between H. S. Cleasby and  J. S. Morgan; on the final vote it  waa decided to recommend the  former for the office. The vote  was carried"in his favour by a  majority of; four to two.  It is interesting to note, in connection with the finances of this  board, that ...whatever, expenditures they may decide to recommend to the city, council for the  maintenance of the efficiency of  their department the council have  no alternative but tp pass on without discussion, or amendment.  The License Commission is also  composed of three members, the  mayor, an alderman and an outsider. For the council's representative Aldermen Boyd and  McMillan were proposed, and on  the vote the former was given  the .appointment. For the third  member the*names of-F. S.~Gay  and-G. B. Armstrong were-proposed, and on the vote it was  decided to recommend the latter.  A recommendation for the -appointment of a magistrate then  came up, and the aldermen expressed the -opinion .that the  finances of the city are such that  all fines imposed by the, magistrate and turned into the city, as  would be the case where the  magistrate is appointed on a  monthly salary, would be a material aid during this first year. If  the magisrrate is appointed on a  fee basis the city will receive no  returns from this department.  The application of John Hutchison- was read and  filed.     Mr.  Grimmett stated that Dr. Tutill  had signified his willingness to  accept the position if it were offered to him. One of the aldermen then proposed the name of  H. W. Sutcliffe for recommendation, and he;' was asked to state  whether he would be willing to  work on a salary of twenty-five  dollars a month. He stated that  he would, and it was decided to  recommend him.   ;���  The appointment of a city  banker was then brought up.  Aid. Menzies moved that the  Bank of Montreal be appointed  bankers for the city. This .was  seconded by Aid. Jackson. * Aid.  Boyd'then asked whether or not  it would be advisable to first ascertain from both the Bank of  Toronto, and the Bank of Montreal what rate of< interest they  would charge for loans and overdrafts ythere might be-some; dif7  ference, and it would be advisable  to secure the best possible terms.  In this all of the aldermen concurred,and it was decided" to  have the finance committee interview the local bankers on the  matter.  Some of the aldermen appeared  to have a impression that the city  bankers would attend to the details of the issues of debentures.  This, however, is not the case,  the functions of the bank in connection   with   debenture   loans  being merely to act as receivers  of monies paid to the city by the  successful    tenderers   for   any  issue.    The only case in which  the city bank may act is when  such a bank has been made fiscal  agent for the city, as well.as  banker.    The duties of a fiscal  agent are to arrange for the issue]  of bonds or stock, float them !on  the London, or any other, market  at a reserve price to be decided  in the tenders for the position as  fiscal agents and, loan  the  city  money at a fixed rate of interest  until such time as money is received from the sale of stock pr  bonds.     The fiscal agents,  say,  bid 100 for the issue.     If they  receive in the market 101 the city  gets the benefit of the extra one  per cent.    If they can only market the stock or bonds at 99 they  still* have to pay the city 100 for  the issue.   For this business they  generally charge one quarter bf  one per cent, or, on a small loan,  one half per cent.    When a city  issues debentures, the policy is to  call   for tenders for   an  issue.  Debentures   are   generally   for  thousand dollar bonds.    Where  stock is issued on fifty and one  hundred dollar certificates an opportunity is' given the small investor,   and the experiences of  Vancouver and Winnipeg are that  a  better price is  obtained   for  stock than for debentures.  The question of appointing a  city solicitor was then taken into,  consideration, and there was" a  unanimous sentiment in favor, of  appointing Mr. Grimmett, who  has worked so hard for the incorporation. He was appointed,  and offered to do the work for  $50 a month for the first year.  The new council will get down  to administrative business with  the session on Monday evening  next.  It was decided to advertise for  applicants for the position of  city clerk.  Vancouver. Rev. Fr Wagner,  .0. M. I. stated when here last  Sunday for the Easter Mass that  he was particularly pleased with  the enterprise shown by his parishioners. ..'....    SUCCESSFUL SOCIAL  The Catholic Ladies Altar Society gave a dance in Menzies  Hall last Monday evening. A  large; number of" visitors from  outside points crowded the floor  and added-to the number of local  dancers. Archie Jackson acted  as master bf ceremonies.for the  evening and deserves great credit  for his share in the success of  the entertainment.  J. H. McMillan, on the violin,'  and J. Sherer, on the piano, provided the music for the evening.  The proceeds netted about one  hundred dollars to the Altar Society. .  Lithuanians Convicted  Without Being Tried  William^Cooper has opened offices  next door to the Bank of Toronto.  LOCAL AND DISTRICT  A. ,S. Bennett has gone to  coast for a vacation.  the  Howard Lawes was in  town  during the week end.  Dick Boden was another visitor  on business over the week .end.  -��-  Rev. Wm. Murray, of Nicola,  was in' town on Thursday afternoon.  KNIGHTS OF  PYTHIAS  At a.largely attended meeting  in Reid Hall, on Granite avenue,  last Sunday afternoon a number  x��f1oral^Kmgh'ts^f^Pythial=^de^  cided definitely upon the advisability of instituting a lodge in  Merritt. On the 10th of next  month in Kamloops the annual  convention of the Knights of  Pythias will be held and the local  members of the organization decided that it would be a good opportunity to secure the Grand  Chancellor to install a lodge here.  He will be asked to come to Merritt on the ninth and put on the  degrees; then' the local council  may send a delegate to Kamloops.  There should be a great deal of  success attendant upon the efforts  local knights to organize a chapter here.  Robert Barclay ai rived in town  from a vacation journey last  Thursday evening.  R. E,- Shaw, reporter for Brad-  street's, the 'mercantile agency,  arrived in town'on Thursday evening to investigate the situation  here.  Mr. Anthony, manager of the  Willow Grange property, at Canford, was in town on business on  Thursday afternoon.  When Walter Montgomery, the  photographer, was going to Nicola to deliver photos last evening  he left his seat in the car to get  a drink of water; when he returned some photos had been  stolen.  Mr. Netherton, a conductor on  the'K.V. R.,'has purchased an  acre lot" on ' the Diamond Vale  subdivision and has planted it in  fruit trees. - He intends erecting  a $2000 house on it also. He has  brought his family here from  near Kamloops. At present they  are staying at the Coldwater  Hotel.  P.  H. B, Armstrong, of Vancouver, has been in town the past  week on business.  Bob Clark, of Nicola, was in  town several times this week, as  was also Alf Goodisson.  WANTED  GIRL WANTED:-for dining  room. Wages $40.00 per month.  Apply; Mrs. 'Boch, .Elite Restaurant.-,''''!''    y*-r ���;���;������' <!yy  CATHOLICS  WILL  BUILD  Plans have been prepared and  tenders are being called for the  erection 01 a handsome church  for the use of the Catholics of  this city. The plans may be seen  at Andrew McGoran's offices at  any time. The local Catholics  have subscribed very handsomely  towards the enterprise and their  efforts have been further extended by a grant towards the new  church by the Right Rev. Archbishop   McNeil,   archbishop    of  Ubique!  Canada bows her head in  sorrow. Four members of  the R. N. W. M. P. perjshed  thirty-five miles from Fort  Macpherson, in the Yukon,  in the discharge of their  duty. They perished miserably, starved to death, lost  within reach of succor. They  braved the Hell cold of, the  Yukon and the Yukon, relentless, claimed them for  her own.  Six men fired a volley as  their coffins were lowjered  into the frozen ground. A  minister of God read^ the  burial service of the Church  of England. . Saturnine Indians, expressionless Eskimos and a few whites heard  tiie clods rattle on their  coffins. Four: names "have  been added to the long roll  of? honour of the Royal  Norhwest Mounted Police..  It is proposed to erect a  monument to their.memory. .  Theirs was a simple code:  they went where they were  sent, counted no cost/  y  One word should suffice s  for their epitaph.  F. J. Fitzgerald, inspector;   S.   J;   Carter,   C.  F.  Kinney,    Richard    O'Hara  Taylor, constables.  Ubique I "  MINING r TEST CASES  This   morning, - before  J  Boyd J. P.,- three   miners  .were  convicted for infractions of the  Coal Mines Regulation Act rules.  Charles Graham was the prosecu-  tor-in the cases of Dan McLean  and Andrew Galitzki, and Inspector John Newton, in the case of  Stephen Davis. The former two  for whom H. Colin Clarke appeared, "pleaded guilty and were fined  five dollars and costs, the latter  was fined ten dollars and costs.  The charge against the first two  was having pipes in  their possession, inside   the mines,  and  against the latter that he had  neglected to see that a charge  v/as-prdperly=set 6ffTr==These=are  the first cases of the  kind   that  have been tried in this city under  the act and were brought  more  as test cases than anything  else  the bench recognizing that there  had been no intention on the defendants pari: to break the law.  The  infractions were .technical  rather than  moral.    Mr. Grimmett,   who   conducted the prosecutions, stated:that the object  of the trials was to warn miners  that, they must be  particularly  careful   in   carrying   out   their  duties in the manner prescribed  by law.  ed to certain evidence being given and asked to have his objection noted if the bench were to  hear the evidence' about which  he complained. He was told  that if his objection was noted  there would be no heed of hearing evidence. As ;the bench  wished to hear evidence they  REFUSED TO NOTE ANY OBJECTION TO IT BY PRISONER'S COUNSEL!  A magistrate who will know  evidence, restrain counsel and at  the same time give counsel fair  treatment, will fairly try cases,;  is an urgentnecessity, if justice  is to be administered in Merritt.  [We wish to be fair. We shall  giye! the sam- -publicityto any  defence for the. unpreceedehted  incidents dealt with above as we  have given to this criticism.���Ed]  High-handed   Action   of   Local  Bench Causes Speculation.  Last Tuesday was the day after  Easter.Monday : on the holiday  a number of Lithuanians decided  that they would celebrate. They  did so ; with the result that John  Botch nursed two black eyes.and  a lamentably enlarged olfactory  organ, his nose to wit. He swore  out warrants for. the arrest of pJ.  Bascovitch, A. Mulganes, F. Mulganes, M. Bascovitch, C. Stye.  These five were charged with  assault. A. Mulganes was tried  before Dr. Tutill, Jl P. The trial  was quite in accordance with  legal procedure; evidence was  taken for the prosecution and the  defence, and A; Mulganes -was  found guilty. He was fined $5,  $9.85 costs, and $2 were added  because he had not obeyed the  constable's summons to jail.' ������  ;This trial was quite regular in  every: respect. It:is the first  principle: of British justice that  the accused; party iii, any."case  shall have: the i'right to :say  whether he is guilty, or not, before evidence is ;heard and the  verdict rendered,' But it must be  borne in mind-that the only trial  .whicht had^been^heliLwas thatj.of  Andrew -Mulganes: There-was  not a shred of evidence 'against''  the others, adduced, for they had  no trial. They were called in one  after another, and fined without  BEING   GIVEN  ANY   OPPORTNNITY  to know why ! They were not  tried, no evidence was brought  against them, and only one man  was asked weether he pleaded  guilty or not. Even the complainant was fined, as, the J. P.  himself stated, "he was mixed  up in the bunch 1"  Is it any wonder that foreigners J  have but a vague understanding  of the meaning of British Justice?  Coming here from the States, as  many of them do, is it any won-  der-that-they-say-thatthelaw-is���  for the rich man alone here too ?  Whether any of these men were  guilty of assault or not is neither  here nor there. They were given  no trial!   It is high time that  steps were taken   to  secure   a  magistrate who will see the principles of British fairplay upheld.  The fines for which the foreigners  were so innocently mulcted aggregate $70.25.  The News is ever ready to fight  for the maintenance of law and  order. We have given every  trial, where space permitted, due  publicity. But the treatment  accorded these foreigners is outrageous. Will it prove a deter-  ent to criminals, or otherwise?  Now we come to another phase  of this case. After these men  were fined they stated, that as  they were fined they would lay a  complaint .'and charge a third  man with a criminal offence. They  did so. He engaged H. Colin  Clarke to defend him. When the  case came up for hearing on Wednesday afternoon the information  had been amendedyon account of  objections taken ^? tephsel for  defence in the morning'. ^IDyen  then the new informatidh^^yas  defective and the prisoner wfis  discharged. *"���  But the feature of the case to  which we would call attention is  the attitude of the bench towards  counsel for defence.   He object- THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  Friday,  April 21*! 1931  FACTS   ON RECIPROCITY  The   following   article    from  World's Work, a leading   American magazine, may be   of   considerable interest to   those   who  favor reciprocity with the United  States,    The article appears   under the caption of "Some Figures  About Reciprocity" and may   be  an eye opener to those who hold  the opinion that American manufacturers are not looking to  the  monopoly of our markets:  "In the little town of Welland,  Ontario, are twenty manufacturing plants which have gone from  the United States in the last ten  years.    These include   branches  of the Plymouth Cordage Company, of Deere & Company, plow  makers from Iowa, of the Pittsburg Tube Company, of the United Motors from Detroit, arid sixteen others.    The town has,   in  fact,; been made   by   American  manufacturing plants.   Hamilton  Ont, too, boasts of 36  American  industries including branches of  the American Can Company, the  International Harvester company  the Oliver Chilled Plow  Works,  and   the   like.    And   there   are  other Canadian towns that boast  of a similar transplanting of American factories, for 755 companies from the United States have  built factories in   Canada  since  19o0.    Many of these are larger  than the original  plants   in   the  United States.  The tariff against Canada���  which was necessarily met by a  Canadian tariff against us���was  of course, designed to protect  our manufacturers; but the result  has been to drive these.750 establishments out of the country in  ten,:years. Most of them were  built on the other, side of the border: to take care of the Canadian  trade. Many, however, "moved  from the United States because  they wished to take advantage  either of the lower cost of living  for their employees or of the  more favorable tariff arrangements that Canada  enjoys   for  her products on European   markets.  "Yet the reciprocity treaty is  supposed, in codfish circles and  some agricultural areas, to be a  hindrance to American prosperity." Vernon News.  PLATINUM DREDGING  The   Platinum   Gold    Fields,  Limited, of Vancouver, which  has some twenty miles of the  Similkameen and Tulameen rivers on lease from the government, after a very thorough  test of the auriferous ground at  the forks of the rivers, have  ceased drilling and the machine  has been stored until after high  water.  It has now been thoroughly demonstrated that bedrock is deeper than supposed, probably averaging twelve feet. In any case  the pay dirt will be found to be  more extensive than suspected  by old-time placer miners who  had not the appliances for testing at depth.  A beginning has now been  made in what is not unlikely to  become a great industry. The  area of dredgable ground in  Princeton district can only be  even approximately estimated,  but lying within the river are  several hundred acres. If the  bottoms and benches are included many times more acres will  be added, in all an area large  enough for the founding of a  permanent industry. There is  also Granite creek and a number  ber of other auriferous streams  which could be worked.  In the early placer days the  rivers arid creeks were skimmed  over in the rush for big pay.  Platinum, or "white gold," was  then a drug, it having been  bought as low as 50c. and $2 an  ounce. Miners threw it away in  their quest for the more valuable  gold. Now, however, platinum  is worth $38 per oz., and there is  no doubt it will be the chief value  obtained by dredging on the Upper Tulameen and its tributaries.  Platinum in place has not been  found in commercial quantities  as yet, but the Dominion geologist is each summer trying to  solve its hidden location, believing it to be in the vicinity of  Champion, Slate, Eagle and  Kelly creeks.���Slocan Record.  CHURCH MANAGEMENT  Last Wednesday evening Isaac  Eastwood was elected manager  for the year of the Presbyterian  church. G. B. Armstrong was  elected treasurer and Philip McLean, secretary. Other managers  chosen were D. Munro, R. Ackman, R. Tait, L. Clark and A.  Gordon.  HELLO!  "A merchant is known by the  style and uality of the letterheads he uses. Here's where  the'.' 'Herald'' printery comes in.  Only fine work turned out at this  shop."  You get "uality" at the Herald evidently. At the News you  get "quality."  Steamfitting  FIRST CLASS TIN-  SHOP-��� Repairing of  all kinds done.  SECOND HAND FURNITURE AND  STOVES  We by anything you  wish to sell and sell  anything you wish  to buy.  Kennedy &  Cunningham  NICOLA AVENUE  .J  CHURCH SERVICES  METHODIST   CHURCH  ;  Services Sunday April 23rd.  Nicola ��� 11 a. m.  Lower Nicola���Afternoon Service, 3p.m.  Merritt. ��� Morning Service,  11 a. m.  Sunday School 2.30  Evening Service, 7 p. m.  Strangers always welcome.  J. W. Hedley, M. A.,  Pastor.  A Good Place  to Eat  A, B. KENNEDY  ELECTRICAL...  CONTRACTOR  Dealer in Electrical Supplies  FIXTURE SHOWROOMS:-CORNER  VOGHT ST. and COUTLIE AVE.  is appreciated by everyone.  What is nicer than to sit  down to a "good square" in  a comfortable, airy dining  room, where everything is  spick and span and the service prompt and accurate ?  You naturally enjoy your  meal���you feel in goodhuih-  or, and your digestive organs do not get out of tune.  In the  ELITE  RESTAURANT  you will find just such an  ideal place, with home cooking that cannot be surpassed. Just give it one trial  ���and then tell your friends.  $7 TICKET, $6  Nicola Valley  -Dealersi;  Prime Beef, Mutton Lamb  Veal and Pork.  Poultry, Ham and Bacon.  ^Manufacturers of-  Strictly High Grade Delicious  SAUSAGE  Fresh Fish always on  hand.       Orders receive prompt  attention.    Cattle bought and sold by the carload.  I. Eastwood  Manager ���-  MRS. J. BOCH, Proprietress  QUILCHENA AVE. MERRITT  Opposite Bennett & Reid'*  Ashcroft Hotel  [Home of the travelling public.  Good comfortable rooms and excellent dining service. > Rates,  are reasonable.   Just give us a call.   -Representative meets  all trains. ;  McGillivary & Veasey, Proprietors:  Ashcroft, B. C.  Metropolitan  MEAT MARKET  NICOLA, B.C.  The ".hoicest of Beef, Mutton, etc., always on hand.. ���'������-  Fresh Fislv Eggs and Vegetables.  .'. *   .^ v  T. HESLOP, Prop.  I  a  I  I  I  1  Boys' Clothing  X3ur_SDring_stock_of_BoysL  Clothing is now complete,  consisting of two and three  piece suits in Norfolk styles;  also in single and double  breasted styles; all sizes;  new patterns in light and  dark colours.  BRING YOUR BOYS IN  and let us fit them  out  in a new suit.  Prices :  $3.50,   4.00,   4.50,   5.00,  5.50,    6 00,    6.50,    7.(  7.50 to 9.50  Ladies Gloves  EQMNES^ENiG LiaH^  MADE  GLOVES.  Every pair Guaranteed.  Ladies' Black Glace Kid Gloves,  Dome Fasteners.  Price $1.50.  Ladies' Colored   Kid Gloves,  Dome fasteners, in Tans, Fawns and Slates  Price $1.50.  Ladies' Doe Skin Gloves,  In Grey and Fawn.  Price $1.50.  You must see these Goods  to appreciate the Exceptional Value.  Groceries  jQunJines of=Groceries_are-  always fresh and of best  quality.  Our Ham and Bacon we  recommend to you as the  best to be had.  oiled Ham is something  everyone  likes, and  you  will find our Boiled Ham  unequalled in flavour and  price.  Butter and   Eggs always  fresh and good.  Fishing Tackle  Our   stock   is very large  i  and complete, especially selected for the waters of B.C,  FISHING RODS  from $ 1.50 to $5.00 each*  Reels, 50c to 73c.   !     ^ -1  Flies of all kinds.   Prices r  2 for 5c; 3 for 25c.  Leaders in  2 and  3-yard  lengths, price 15c and 20c   J  HARDWARE  We carry a very complete  line of Hardware, Carpenters' Tools, Building Materials and Barbed ; Wire;  Call and get our Prices.  GROCERIES        BOOTS AND SHOES        LADIES' WEAR        MENS FURNISHINGS       HARDWARE FridaY.April 21, 1911  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  YOU WANT COURTESY AND PROMPT  ATTENTION  YOU WANT PROMPT DELIVERY OF YOUR  PURCHASES  v  YOU WANT A LARGE RANGE OF GOODS TO  CHOOSE FROM  YOU MAY POSSIBLY NEED AT ANY TIME,  OUR FIFTEEN EMPLOYEES WILL SHOW YOU  WHAT YOU ASK FOR.  Everything You May Need. THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  Friday,. April 21-ri9U  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY  Subscription $2.00 a year  in   advance  Six months SI. 00  FRANK M. COFFEE  J. W. ELLIS   Editor  Manager.  Que dollar per inch per month far regula advertising. Land and water notices $7.50 for 60  days. $5.00 for 30 days.  ��� Classified advertising 10 words for 25 cents  extra words 2 cents.  Special rates   furnished for large contract ad'  vertising.  Address  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  P"0, Box 20 Merritt. B.C  Phone 25.  LABEL> 12  CITY   OF  MERRITT  Last Tuesday,   at   noon,   the  mayor and   six   aldermen   were  solemnly sworn in as officers   of  the first council of this  city.    In  such towns as  this,   where   the  population is somewhat scattered  the problems  with   which   they  will have to deal will, even when  the aldermen are striving to do  their best, as we trust will always  be the case, be fecund in dissatisfactions.    It is impossible   for  every property owner and house  holder to be given what he. may  ask for when   first   the   request  is   made.    The   citizens   will do  "well to bear   in mind   that   the  wisest policy which the   council  can adopt is to ' 'make haste slowly."   The funds at the   disposal  of the aldermen during the first  ,year, when they are   unable   to  make a tax levy, are merely the  monies turned over to  them   by  the provincial government, being  a share of the taxes collected for  the year 1911.    Hence it will be  impossible to execute any,   save  the   most   imperative   improvements, during this year.  minded people. , If it means that  the news features of crimes ought  not to be 'made known by the  press, we do not agree with it.  We doubt if any harm is done by  the publication of non-sensational  accounts of crimes, but we are  very strongly of the opinion that  the idea,'^vhich seems very general, that crime is the chief source  of news, and that if associated  with it there is a certain amount  of social scandal it is all the better news is wholly wrong. We  seek to give effect to this view  by the manner in which such  matters are treated in the columns of this paper, and we think  we can go so far as to say that  the same rule is followed in British Columbia newspapers generally.���Colonist.  McBRIDE DEPARTS  ���About the end of this month  Premier McBride leaves Victoria  ior Ottawa, en route to London,  <where he will attend the coronation of King George V. When  he arrives in the east he may feel  nervous. Every politician, every  parliamentary critic, every newspaperman of the effete east, will  pour acid in his inkwell, sharpen  .his hatchet, or purchase a heavy'  hammer. For he will descend  upon them heralded as a political  prodigy. In the east they are  looking for a Conservative who  can lead his party to victory.  They have heard of McBride as  their Moses and now they will  have an opportunity to "size him  up." From- Ottawa the premier  goes to London; where they have  also heard of him. The scrutiny  _to~whi ch^hFwi I rbe"suhj"6cted^i 11"  be somewhat more courteous and  considerably more charitable than  that to which he will be submitted in Otlawa. There he will be  compared with premiers from  Overseas. The premier may be  nervous, with reason; but the  people of British Columbia are  confident.  The man whose magnanimity  prompted him to entertain a great  opponent, when other Conservative premiers of the Dominion  were "unavoidably absent"  when that opponent passed  through their provinces, is not  the man who will fail to justify  "the good opinions which his action  earned.  When in London will he recall  " the sentiments he expressed at  the banquet of the Canadian  Manufacturers' Association last  fall���" We are all good Canadians in British Columbia, but  we are still more intense Britishers I"  "CLEAN JOURNALISM^     ; , t  There is ..a^orfyof c>u|$de|n  . progress in 'the' EasferrifSfates%p  favor of what is> calle^y^'clea'h  , journalism.','   we. are not quite  r sure what is meant by it>;;Ruf; if  what is aimed at is the purging  of newspaper columns of what is  . known as "yellow'.'  it ought to  With our next issue we shall  commence a series of biographical  notices of the "Men who have  made Merritt." Under this head  we shall include all w^q, bytheir  business acumen, have~f contributed to the upbuilding of what  is, potentially, one of the best  cities in the province.  Although, perhaps, our population is not quite as large, we may  still boast that Merritt is ahead  of Victoria. Two of "our leading  department stores have auto delivery wagons. There is only one  in the capital city. Only four  years old, Merritt's business men  are surpassing the civilization of  forty years.       >.-      '���  Bob Lowery, in the Ledge,  complains of the absence of the  Harem skirt from the Greenwood  landscape. Another evidence of  the decadence of the- copper  metropolis! We Will wager drinks  around that the Greenwood of ye  olden times would have seen an  improvement on the Harem skirt.  We have hobble skirts in this  burgh. - *.-;������      ��� - ,.-* ,y -  "Too many people know the  price of everything nowadays  and the value of nothing ?"  There are more who know the  value of things but haven't the  price. A long beer on a hot ..day  for example.      '*"������  week and has a gang of skilled  workmen employed. He expects  to add more men to the force as  the works progress. Mr. Budd  is manager of the Blaimore  cement works and is a thoroughly,  practical and capable manager.���  Similkameen Star.'  JAPANESE INFLUX  Rep. Raker of California today  introduced a resolution calling on  the president for all correspond*  ence in possession of the president or setretary of state and  the secretary of war relating to  Japanese immigration to the  United States and its possessions'.  The resolution also asks the  president to inform congress  what is being done by the execute  iyel department of the'���'. gpyexn-  meht to restrict further immigration into-thiac^  sessions of Japanese coolie laborv  ��� It .provides that the president  shall notify congress as to :; what  he knowsVof Japanese immigration into Mexico andfCanada; arid  thence into the United States'.   -  Hawaii, Guam and the Philip'-  pines are mentioned in the resolution as the possess'ons in regard to which specific information  is desired. The president's correspondence with California and  San Francisco authorities during  the last five years is specifically  called for.  n,.  Joseph Martin is having trouble  with patronage in his constituency. He says he cannot getiahy  one but Tories appointed and he  won't nominate such people. Mr.  Martin must sigh for a return of  the days when tie ���? used to ^walk"  out on the streets 'and' pick up  cabinet ministers.���Colonist.  NEWS AND VIEWS  The officers of the International  TypographicaLJJnion announce  the end of the war with the  Butterick Publishing Co. The  Buttericks, the largest pattern  house on the f continent, ��� have  fought the eight-Hour day for  years, but finally consented to  employ all union labour. In this  connection, it may be stated that  the Werner Company, of Akron,  Ohio, the largest individual printing concern in the world, went  under sherriff's sale at about a  quarter of a million dollars. A  three million dollar investment  was ruined in an endeavour to  fight the union and oppose the  eight-hour day. ���Phcenix Pioneer  The Phcenix Pioneer reports a  strike of rich ore on the Black  Tail property of the Hope Mining  Company, at Republic, Wash.  The ledge is said to be six and a  half feet wide, is galena silver  ore, and assays $80 to $115  dollars.  Both Pioneer and Ledge are  enthusiastic over a strike of high  grafte ore in   the ;t&nnel*:|fft)in  HILL RESIGNS  After a brief conference  between President Taft and Secretary Knox, the resignatian of  Dr. David Jayne Hill, ambassador  to Germany, was announced at  the White House.  The only intimation of the probable reason for the resignation  came from. Dr. Hill himself, tonight wnen he pointed to the second part of his letter to President  Taft, made public earlier in the  day, which read that he had resigned "at that time," to take  effect July 1, ' 'in order that, if  you desire to do so, you may bo  able to make another appointment  to that post."  \.'Dr; Hill was en route from  New; York to Washington when  the announcement of his resignation was made at the White  House and on his arrival tonight  he was advised thae rumors were  current that he had in view some  high position in public life in the  academic world in which he always has been interested.  : "All that I am prepared to say  at this time, "he said,:' 'is that I  have no plans or engagements,  l^to^the^easons^^  tion'; they are to be found in the  second paragraph of my letter to  the president.", y;  Dr. Hill.said he intended tore-  turn to Beriin about May I, to arrange his household effects for  departure between' then and  Julyl.  Following immediately on the  announcement yesterday of the  appointment of new ambassadors  to both Turkey and Rnssia, official  Washington scented an important  diplomatic shake-up in prospect.  President Taft's- comment to  callers today was that Dr. Hill's  period of service had been entirely satisfactory.  yti  Plicerfix to Greeftwofj&i! Tll�� ore,  \$s ^truck 18(jj| f|efl f roiri the  mdtith of the'lmiri^an'd 800 fe��&  below the surface workings of  the'Defi,ahcfe^niindrl i; '"*���-'f - ;   r   "  W. J- Budd, constructor of the  havejthe sympathy^ of all ri  Trado,  Mark  Asaya-Neurall  T H  E     N E W    REMEDY    FOR  Nervous Exhaustion  Nervous Exhaustion unchecked  opens the door toNeuralgia, Headache, Insomnia, Digestive. Disturbances, Mental Depression, and  many serious organic diseases.  *Early|treatmetit with "Asaya-  iNEU^LL'ifCayerts these. It feeds  ���&eyner^es,-' induces sleep, improves the appetite and digestion,  and restores buoyancy of spirits.  A few doses convinqe. $1.50 per  bottle. Obtain from the following  GEO. M. GEMMILL,  Merritt, B. C. ���  THE PRIZE-WINNER  ' To two Lower Nicola experts  belongs the honour of taking the  record fish of the present season.  It came from a pool in. the lower  reaches of the Nicola river. This  salmon���it was a salmon���was  brought in by Dr. Stewart and  S. M. Burgess on a pole, and  weighed fifteen and three-quarter  pounds. The two fishermen are  now offering to give lessons in  icthyology to all who may desire  to ascertain the habits peculiar  to salmon.  $5.00 REWARD OFFERED  LOST.���Bay Horse, five years  old; brand L.V. on right hip;  left foot white ; lame on left hind  foot; not shod on left foot. ���Any  person delivering or giving information leading to his recovery to  the undersigned will be rewarded.  C. H. Parkinson.  A.F.&A.M.  Nicola Lodge  . No. 58 meets in  Reid's- Hall  the second  Tuesday ofeach  month at 8 p.  m.    Sojourney-  ing brothers cordially invited.  M. L. Gkimmett,       Fred S. Gay  W. M. . Secretary.  ���c* t,*\''<--*V**'  T,  IM".".'  oitreal  Established 1817.  Capital (all paid up)  Cash and Undivided Profits  Total Assets      -  Head Office:    Montreal  $14,400,000.00  $12,961,789.11  $240,000,000.00  Savings Bank Department  (Interest allowed at current rates.)  A   GENERAL   BANKING   BUSINESS   TRANSACTED  Branches in   the   Nicola Valley  MERRITT: NICOLA:  A. W. STRICKLAND. Manager. j. f. S. GILLUM, Acting Sub-Agent  H. COLIN CLARKE  Solicitor, Notary, Etc.  Solicitor for the Bank of Toronto.  Quilchena Ave. Merritt.  PHOTOGRAPHY.  JOHN   BOCH  CONTl^VCTOR   AIVP    BUIL.DI2R  All classes of work done in the best of style.  No classes barred. To say that satisfaction is  guaranteed is saying what everybody says.  We Mean It. That's all.  Telephone No. 45  Or Inquire Elite Restaurant'  WALTER MONTGOMERY  wishes to announce that he is  now ready to receive orders for  all Outdoor Photograph Work.  He guarantees satisfaction.  Orders may left at his office on  Nicola Avenue (next-door to  Herald), or at the Hotel Merritt.  Good Living  means that the food  you eat is of the very  best that can be obtained ' in the. local  market. If you buy  your meals at the  Merritt  Restaurant  -you're certain of the  best.  G.A.Hankey&Co.  LIMITED.  R c I Estate and insurant  Okanogan Lands  All Classes of Investments Placed.  Head Offices: -       - Vernon, B. C.  Merritt Livery and Peed Stable  Saddle Horses, and Single and Double Drivers  .    ,- on Shortest; Notice.  Good accomodation for horses.    Express meets  all trains. , Buggies for hire.  A. J. COUTEE, Prop.,        -       Merritt, B.C.  I AM THE MAN  you want to see.  at my goods and  NOTICE  my prices  J. S. Morgan & Son  Leroy  S. Cokely  DOMINION  &   PROVINCIAL  SURVEYOR  Subdivision Work a Specialty.  Office over Bank of  Montreal,  MERRITT, B. C.  PHONE   24  Nicola Valley  Transfer Company  TRUCKING AND DRAYING  A SPECIALTY  . . . DEALER IN . . .  Lumber, Lath,'Lime, Cement  Hay, Grain and Peed  GEORGE    RICHES  Rear Diamond Vale Store  Coutlee Ave. Merritt  ,r  m DRESSMAKING PARLOR  haa been opened over the MERRITT MERCANTILE CO. STORE  The ladies of Merritt and district will now be enabled to have the most  fastidious want supplied by a modiste of known repute.   Call,  MISS   DOOLE  Jfi  PROPRIETRESS  W. A. BARN  Contractor for Painting, Paper Hanging and  Kalsomining.  AH Work Guaranteed Eirst-class.  MERRITT,   B.  C.  Geo.   McDonald  BOOT AND SHOE MAKER  epair Work a Specialty  Let me fit you out with a pair of  Superfine Rubber Heels  Both for Ladies and Gentlemen.  VOGHT STREET  NEAR DEPOT  Commercial  Hotel  W.H.COWANJ  horseshoeing j  and general      ';  blacksmithingS  All Work Guaranteed  First Class  Cor. NICOLA AVE. and CHAPMAN ST.<  for a good  square meal.    Best.'of  accomodation and comfort  Rate $1.50 per day  Harness and!  Saddlery   ��  ? *5  Harness/^Eobes, Blankets,   ',������  Trunks, Valises)-"etc. always .��'"'  in stock. ?",,.  :���-'*[���    \       y  I y> Poultry* aWdjStloisk Foods. ):'f  '"Best"of satisfaction"jin all ���",'.&,  , departments, v,.. -Prices' are il**!  right::' " \.v: ' ���' \ ; ' \7  Agent for endelsolm and 7.  Heintzman'Pianos.     ---        '���  fr   N. J. BARWICK ��  ���;- .,>;. f *  1......... ���,...Y���JL.L.U_irv���, J.,..:,. Friday, April 21,  1911  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  "Gemmill &��� Rankine Have It"  We have formaline and bluestone for treatment  of smut in grain.    Also chloride of lime crude,  carbolic    acid,    sulphur    and    formaldehyde,  fumigators,   to   aid in your "clean up" operations.  Gemmill & Rankine  Druggists.  MERRITT, B.C.  had partaken not wisely -but too  well of the contents of a bottle  of rum, which they had procured  in the vicinity of Lytton.  LOCAL AND DISTRICT  S. N. Dancey paid the new city  ;a flying visit duri ng the week-end.  He is waiting for  from Vancouver.  some   parts  Sharp Razors and Clean Towel.  !���Brown & Durham's  52tf  ' Felix Graham left for Vancouver on business last Wednesday  morning.  *" ^Ame3>ie Privoust returned from  the line of construction on Monday morning.' .->*  \  Major   Charles,   of-Canford  was in -town -" on   business   last  ��� Thursday morning.  J, R. Whittaker and D. Dodding,  of Lower Nicola, were in town  on business'last Wednesday.,,  James Murchison returned from  Nicola last Tuesday morning. He  is not enjoying his usual good  health just now, and is eagerly  looking forward to the full opening of spring.   '       *'   *  Mrs. Stanley Kirby wentdown  to the coast on a trip Hbout a  fortnight ago. While there she  spent the time seeing the sights  and renewing acquaintanceships  with her many friends in the  western metropolis.  H. Colin Clarke- had his first  taste of fishing in B. C. last week,  when, at Canford, he hooked a  thirteen pound salmon on a No. 5  hook. He played the finny bird  for over half an hour, and finally  the fish caught the line on a  jagged rock and broke away. It  was'a big catch that might have  been.  Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. Ward,  of Douglas Lake, passed through  the city on Wednesday mornings  en route to the coast. F. B. Ward  is manager of the Douglas Lake  Cattle'Company, which owns, or  controls about one hundred and  twenty-five thousand acres of  land around the Douglas Lake.  Middy Blouses.  These Blouses are made of a good strong  quality lawn, trimmed'blue collar and cuffs.  Also in plain white, trimmed lace edging.  . Our  Price, $1.  Muslins.  -o���  L. Phillips, who replaces R. C.  Lewis as Ledger-keeper of the  local branch of the Bank of Montreal, arrived in town on Friday  evening and has taken up his duties.  :  Jesse rDobson, .the well-known  chauffeur, went down to Ashcroft  6ri a visit last Monday morning.  r , ; -;}.^r--y.  "- -'  3 v'"-���"���'-o���~���:���  ' Best Electric Massage always  on tap at Brown & Durham's  Barber shop".   25tf  Williami���opper returned from  Quilchena'1 last Sunday evening.  While t&e're he erected two chim-  nies for Mr. Lauder.  ; Mrsl Pooley returned to Nicola  last Tuesday evening. She recently? made a hurried business  trip to' the coast.  ,1t,Gv Brookes returned from a  fortnight's visit to his ranch on  the Coldwater last Tuesday night.  He expects his daughter from  Bakerfield, California, ; in the  course of a few days.  Harold Greig and a party of his  friends ..went up'in his "auto" to  Mammette Lake last Sunday afternoon. The trip^was made in  the record time of one" hour and  a half. The return in a few minutes-less than that.'"**"���*��� "'"  George and Mrs. McGruther  were rivals at the opening of the  fishing season. George caught  the first fish. It was a speckled  trout and weighed about an  eighth of an ounce, length- one  inch. His wife has beaten him  so far; she caught a grayling  about fourteen inches long and  about two pounds weight. Since  it was caugh George retails no  more fish stories..  :   Hosiery.  A special line of Ladies' Lisle Hose, in  black or tan, full-fashioned, elastic top;  spliced heel and toe.. .  Splendid,^ Value, 35c.  , Our stock of cross-bar, spots and striped  muslins is large and well assorted, ranging  in price from 15c.  Muslin Voils in suit ends of 15 yards, in  tan, blue and white grounds, floral designs.  These are the newest creations in muslins.  Price 40c yard.  Gloves.  Ladies' Short Silk Lisle Gloves, in black,  white, tan and grey. Prices from 35c.  A Full Line of Children's Straw Hats, prices 35c to $1  ���The  One .  Price Store  -For.  Real  Values  T. Morrin, formerly a farmer  in New Zeal and, arrived in the  valley last Monday evening. ,He  was, the. guest of Mr. Anthony at  Canford for a few days, during  which time he> investigated the  possibilities for going into farming in that section of the valley.  He arrived in this city yesterday  and has gone to Nicola. While he  intends to farm here he is uncertain as to where he shall locate.  Max Burger, 'an oldtimer of  Greenwood, was in-town during  the week renewing acquaintances  with other veterans of the boom  days in the copper metropolis.  j Rev.,Fr. Wagner who celebrated Easter Mass at the Garcia  home.on Sunday, left, for Kam-  lpops the following morning.  ��� Miss M. Gate did not go to Hot  Springs, as reported in our last  U.,4.  "UUl"  ...�� t** + . AM  VOCCH.1V/Il  IDBUC,_OUl-UU  her home in Coleman, Alta  M,< Cruikshank, - who has been  engaged upon, the -construction  of an irrigation ^scheme in the  vicinity of Walhachin, arrived in  town, last Wednesday evening,  after an absence -, -of -three  months. He is staying with  George McGruther.  ' ...  ���-��  } Last Friday afternoon .Bert  Goodisson' acted as host to an  auto party; Nicola Lake, where  mine Host Kirby was visited.  j R. C. Lewis left for Edmonton,  Alta., last Monday morning. He  goes to take a position in the  Bank of Montreal at the northern  metropolis. ^  '  Peter Marquette sold his hackney stallion Baron Moss to a Mr.  Baynes, of Kamloops, and the  animal was shipped out^from  Nicola on a special car last Saturday morning. The price paid by  the purchaser is understood to  have been two thousand dollars.  . Val H. Crockett contemplates  the purchase of a motor cycle.  This will come in very handy for  transporting a passenger to Nicola or Princeton when it is inadvisable to utilise an auto. It is  on record that a motor cycle has  come through from Princeton to  Merritt in two hours and a quarter.  GENERAL DRY GOODS,MEN'S CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, BOOTS & SHOES  Mcdonald block        -        quilchena avenue  M.' L. Grimmett returned from'  Vancouver on Wednesday''evening in' time for the first meeting  of the Council of the City ofMer-  ritt. ���  Ronald Campbell wentdown to  Vancouver on "business during  the early part of the week'and is  expected back by Saturday night  LOWER NICOLA NOTES.  -' Joseph   Collett   visited' town  during the early part of the week.  ^P:H; Kennedy,  known as "P. H. of Kennedy  mountain," arrived in town last  Tuesday, and will be here some  time on a visit.  i  o���  William Mclntyre went down  to Vancouver last Sunday morning, catching the regular "Sunday Special" to the Bridge. He  will meet his wife and children  at Bellingham, Wash, .during the  week and bring them back to  town. They have spent the past  winter travelling through Lower  familiarly-California.  An advertisement in the News  will bring the business.  - The dam of the White Pine  Lumber company is almost completed; ���- :.    , ���.  ... Johnny Manning of Dot, was in  town this week.  Major Flick has secured a large  contract for mining timbers. It  will keep him busy for some time.  Dr.   Stewsrt   and family are  i visiting Major and Mrs. Flick.  Dr. White, superintendent of  missions of the Methodist church  was in town last Sunday morn-  The Bank of Toronto  Incorporated  1855.  Paid-up Capital   -  Reserve Fund  Head ^Office Toronto.  $4,000,000  $4,950,000  Savings  Bank Department  One Dollar Opens an Account.  Interest Allowed at the Highest Current Rates.  Money Loaned on Proper Security.  MERRITT BRANCH       ''"<��� A. N. B. ROGERS, Manager  ^Charles L. Betterton and Hugh  McGuire arrived in town from  Victoria on Tuesday evening.  They left again for'Aspen Grove  the following morning.  : Joseph Graham, general manager of the Coal Hill Syndicate  Collieries, returned from Vancouver on Saturday evening. He  went to the coast for his health.  L. Studebaker expects to have  his 90 h.p* Chadwick ready for  thel road by'the. end of next week.  W. J. Warren, president of.the  K. V. R. R., arrived in town on  Tuesday evening, after making  a tour of the right of way of the  railroad. He stated that he did  not expect that any more steel  laying will De proceeded with  until the first thirty imile grade  is completed, This he expects  will be done about the end- of  July.  Edgar, Vachon, local chief of  provincial police, acted as host to  a party of four who went down  to Kamloops oh Wednesday morning. The four guests were appointed as government guests by  Magistrate Tutill last Tuesday.  Two of them were Indians who  NOTICE  TENDERS will be received by the  undersigned up to the22nd day of April  1911, at 5 p.m., for the Purchase of  Block 27, Subdivision of Lot No. 54,  Group One, New Westminster Distrcit,  situated in the City of Vancouver, and  being the site of the old Provincial  Court House. Each tender must be  enclosed in a registered letter and must  be addressed to the undersigned, and  plainly marked " Tender for Old Vancouver Court House Site;" and must be  accompanied by an accepted cheque for  ten per cent, of the first payment of the  purshase money. Payment for the property will be accepted in instalments of  one^quarter of the purhase money.  The first of such instalments to be paid  Avithin thirty days after the acceptance  of the tender, and the other.' three annually thereafter, with interest at the  rate of six per cent, per annum. In the  event of the person whose tender is  accepted failing to complete the first  instalment within thirty days of the  notice of such acceptance the sale to  him will be cancelled and his ten per  cent deposit forfeited. The cheques of  unsuccessful tenderors will be returned.  The highest or any tender will not  necessarily be accepted. No commission  of any kind will be allowed.  WILLIAM R.'ROSS,     yT  Minister of Lands.  ..���  ; Department of Lands,  Vitoria, B; C.  March 7th, .1911.  ing.  Harvey Woodward has sold his  ranch in California and has gone  to reside in Alberta.  W. E. Scott, deputy minister  for agriculture, when visiting  Lower Nicola was very much  struck with the quality of the  land around here and stated that  if he owned a. ranch he would  not sell cleared land under $200  per acre.  SIMPSON'S JEWELRY STORE  Agent for Waterman's Pens and Edison Phonographs.  C.   Collett is in the^ fruit  ness just now.  busi-  Corporation of the City of Merritt  Applications for the combined  offices of City Clerk, Assessor  and Collector for the *,City;, of  Merritt will be' receivedy by the  undersigned up to noon, Monday, ,24th inst. Applicant will  pleaso state salary required and  qualifications.  ISAAC EASTWOOD,  Mayor.  Dated 20th April, 1911.  NOTICE  Seated bids will be received  up to April 22nd, for. the construction of church building 24x  60. Plans and spe sificatioas can  be -seen at Merritt Lumber Yard.  Catholic Church Building  Committee.  Hawley & Fleming  Building Contractors  SPECIALTY:    Plastering   and   Concrete  Work.  Estimates on all lines cheerfully given.  P. O. Box 50.  Merritt, B. C.  Under new management and many improved facilities.  More accommodation and of the best.  In every department we aim to please, and we generally succeed.  COMMERCIAL TRADE A SPECIALTY.  Best of Wines and Liquors Always in Stock.  GOE. McGRUTHER, Prop,  Merritt, B. C. THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  Friday. April 21   1911^  To Eradicate  Tuberculosis  ._  (i  Good Work Being Done by the  Provincial Department.  of Agriculture  An important circular notification to all agriculturists and  dairymen, with respect to the  necessity of exerting all possible  endeavor to secure the stamping  out of bovine tuberculosis, is  being sent out by the live stock  commissioner for the province,  M. A. Jull.  In his communication to the  directly interested parties, the  live stock commissioner deals  with the subject at length. He  says in part:  "British   Columbia  has   probably not had so much of the  disease as other parts where the  dairy industry has been highly  developed, such as in some of the  eastern states; however, we have  enough to give us sufficient cause  to take every precaution for its  eradication.   While there is yet  little of it, we should see that it  is ^entirely eradicated, in order  that our dairymen may be in a  position  to  breed healty herds  and produce wholesome milk.  ' 'While there are many features  concerned in the eradication of  this disease, and while various  methods have been adopted in  other parts, it is to be seen that  in British Columbia the work has  been progressing favourably.  One significant feature in our  work is the co-operation on the  part of the dairymen. Many of  .our dairymen are - anxious to  maintain herds free from the  disease, and are having their  :herds officially tested and pre  mises inspected!by the provincial  veterinary inspectors, of whom  there are four in the province.  On the other hand, many dairymen have little or no knowledge  of the disease, and do not realize'  the importance of its eradication.  This department has been carrying on educational work throughout the province, in an endeavor  to show our dairymen the hature  of the disease and why it should  be eradicated from our herds.  "It is possible that the gerieral  public does not realize the material assistance the government is  giving them by compensating  them for all slaughtered animals  which are affected by the disease.  This is more than is being done  in any other part, and.the responsibility of completely eradicating the disease largely lies  with the dairymen. Anyone  wishing to have their herds tested  and their dairy premises inspected should apply to Dr. A. Knight,  chief veterinary inspector, Sardis,  B. C, under whose charge the  work is being carried on."  MEXICAN MATTERS  President Taft is determined  that battles between Mexican  federals and insurrectos shall not  be fought on American soil. He  is equally determined that the  lives of American non-combatants shall not be endangered by  the forces of President diaz and  those of General Madero.  Future combats between the  rebels and the forces of the Mexican government must not be  fought out so close to the American line as to put in jeopardy  the lives and property of Americans.  Through the state department  PROVINCIAL   ELECTIONS   ACT.  YALE ELECTORAL DISTRICT.  TAKE NOTICE that I have received objections in writing to the rrtdnf'^n  of the following names on the Register of Voters for the Yale Electoral District  on the grounds stated below.  And take notice that, at a Court of Revision to be held on the 1st day of  May, 1911, at Ashcroft Court House, at 11 o'clock in the forenoon, I shall hear and  determine the said objections, and unless such named persons or some other  Provincial voter on their behalf satisfies me that such objections are not well  founded, I shall strike such names off the said Register.  H. P. CHRISTIE,  Registrar of Voters.  -.-    Dated this 1st day of April, 1911.  �� The following persons are reported absent from the district:��� 9-12  the president tonight notified the  Mexican government that it must  see to it that hereafter no such  unfortunate incidents as that of  yesterday at Agua Prieta,  when  two Americans were killed and  eleven  wounded, be allowed to  occur.    Through the war department of justice, the   president  sent' a similar warning   to   the  insurrectos at Agua. Prieta.  .. The   view   expressed   at   the  White House tonight that these  warnings will be observed to the  letter, and that no more battles  will be fought near the border.  Neither the president nor any of  his advisors whom he called into  consultation tonight was inclined  to regard the incident at Agua  Prieta as a foreaunner of any-i  thing  more   seaious,   but   they  concluded that it must  not   be  repeated.  The president knows that battle  grounds are not chosen like places  for the holding of athletic contests, but at the same time he  takes the position that preparations for battle must be made by  the hostile forces with due consideration of the effect upon non-  combatant Americans.  The president knows that sortie  of the American spectators at  the affair near Douglas were  eager to see the fight and might  have got top close to the engaged  forces, but he has been informed  also that warning was given to  the insurrectos, at least, not to  get too close to the United States.  Hereafter this goverment expects both insurrectos. and the  federal troops to erect trenches  or make their lines of battle far  enough away from American soil  to make it certain that Americans  engaged in occupations of peace  will not be interrupted.  Mr. Taft feels that his order  sending the troops to Texas has  been entirely justified by-the developments of the last few days.  He is more certain than ever that  conditions in the southern republic are alarming. He is hoping  that there will be no need for any  SO PARTIESIwishing to order Lumber in carload Lots, I offer  to deliver, on track at Merritt, Lumber^ Sash, Doors and ail  Millwork at Vancouver wholesale prices, plus freight, and guarantee grades as specified. As an illustration of my retail prices,  I offer at my yard, Dewey, Vancouver and Winnipeg designs of  Glass Doors at 10 per cent less than quoted by the f. Eaton Co.,  and you don't have to pay freight from Winnipeg either.  YOURS TRULY,  The Merritt Lumber Yard   ANDREW McGORAN, -  PROPRIETOR   No.  Name.  Place.  13 Allett, Albert Barnett '..*"..'. Middlesboro.  25 Anthier, George .". Agassiz.  30 Armstrong, .C-& F Agassiz.  61 Bates, George Robert Aspen Grove.  ���83T-rrrBremann���William Nicolas   136 Carter, George ;��� : Middlesboro.  145.... Charlton, Carrall... ." .......Nicola.  213... iDempsey, Otto  .'. .Merritt.  241... .Duncan, James. :.....��� *.'. Lytton.  263.. .'.English, Nelson ..  .Agassiz.  272.... Parr, Howard Elmer ....". Nicola.  276 Farr, Rutherford .-:';...'.. Dot, Nicola.  295... .Foster, Joseph W.  ... .Merritt.  303..;. Fraser, Ernest Merritt.  309...:. Frith, Arthur Gray Nicola.  355 Gourlay, Austen Cyril Strong Merritt.  361 Gray, David Middlesboro.  362 Gray, James ..Middlesboro.  369... .Grote, August W.....-.  .Lower Nicola.  378 Hall, John Agassiz.  385.... Hammillion, Andrew...' Agassiz.  386..;.Hamilton, Frederick Ord Agassiz.  387...'. Hamilton, Lucius John Agassiz.  388 Hamilton, James Wellesley Agassiz.  509... Lee, Henry St. George Nicola.  ���535 Longsden,. Alfred Edward  Merritt.  553.... Main, Christian Chesley Middlesboro.  560.... Marshall, Frederick Coutlee.  565.. .'.Martin, Joseph Lytton.  569 Maul, Christian 22 Mile House.  609.. ..Murray, John W    Coldwater.  624.... McArthur,' Bert ,  .Merritt.  661 McGuckie, Thomas..:.......... Middlesboro.  690.. /.McMillan, Hugh ' Agassiz.  730.:-.' .Osen, Berger........................... .Aspen GroVe.  798...���'. Revell, George William  Merritt.  Are Your Kidneys  Working Properly?  It WUl Pay You Well to Make Sore  There's been a lot of-"guessing" about  rheumatism and rheumatic pains generally, but you can be dead sure that little  pam across your back came from decreased kidney action.  The kidney's duty is to filter the blood  ���take out the impurities collected by  the returning blood stream���do it just  like absorbent cotton in a funnel filters  the impurities from polluted water.  When the kidneys are not working you  are bound for one of two courses���Diabetes and Bright's Disease or Rheumatism, Lumbago and Sciatica. The former course is usually fatal, and the latter  always painful, but you need not have  either, as they both can be easily prevented.  The very best prescription for all kidney troubles is Nyal's Stone Root Com-  further movement to the south,  but if there should be, he knows  that 20,000 American troops are  near the Rio Grande and that on  the river and the Mexican border  itself is alrerdy a force that is  not insignificant*.  The president's action followed  a conference with Attorney-General Wickersham, Secretary of  War Dickinson and Acting Secretary of State Wilson.  M. L. GRIMMETT, LL.B.  Barrister and Solicitor  Notary Public  Solicitor for the Bank of Montreal  Barwick Slock  Merritt  NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.  pound,  but  801..;'.Rice, William  817.....Roberts, Jefferson Davis.  818y. .Roberts, Julius Caesar...;'.  821... .Robertson, Frank.....'..'.  849..;-:Schwartz, Henry ........  915..:". Stephens,' David  .Nicola.  .Foster's Bar.  .Foster's Bar.  .Harrison Hot Springs.  . I ytton.  Lytton.  ��� ���  Mr ...  941...' .Tanahill, John Barbour.....:..-. ;Hope.  945..-..Taylor, Peter Lytton.  953..'. .Thibodeau, Peter    Spences Bridge.  959..';. Thomas, Roland Francis Harrison Hot Springs.  967..;. Thompson, .Carlyle  Middlesboro.  968.. ���; .Thompson, Thomas . ...;..... ..Merritt.  1001..-L .Wallace, William Henry. ..Agassiz.  1094..;. Wilson, William Duncan  Merritt.  1075..;.. Woodward, Ernest Marshall ........ Nicola Lake.  The following are reported deceased :���  56:... Barton, Charles! ;.. Merritt.  645..... McDonald, Royal Edwin Agassiz.  707. .���. .McTaggart, John  .Cisco.  720: .**..Noble, James.  .Lytton.  920... .Stewart, Ronald D. Merritt..  971. a .Titman, Peter ......'  .Ashcroft.  993..'. .Voght, William.... .Coutlee.  1039.:.. Whipple, Joseph B. .':  Merritt.  1063..-. Wilson, John . ........ ..'���  .Petite Creek.  It   is   no   "patent"   medicine,   sdentific_prescrip_tion composed  of Stoneroot, Buchu, Juniper and other  remedies of proved value.- More than  that, it has been proved by thousands  nho have had .glad relief from its use.  There's nothing quite so miserable as  the dragging results of sick kidneys.  You are trifling with your own futute  when you neglect so simple a precaution,  as a. pleasant home treatment with Nyal's  Stone Root Compound when results are  so certain.  It soothes bladder irritation, gives  you rest and comfort at night, and makes  life once more enjoyable.  The kidneys, liver and bladder are all  dependent upon one another, and Nyal's  Stone Root Compound is particularly  designed to help them all.  Sold and Guaranteed by  Gemmill & Rankin,    -   Merritt.  One for each'everyday ailment  Merritt School  SEALED. TENDERS, superscribed  "Tender for Merritt School," will be  received by the Honourable the Minister of Public Works up to noon of Monday, the 1st day of May, 1911, for "the  erection and completion of a four-room  frame school with basement, etc., at  Merritt, B.'C, in the Yale Electoral  District.  Plans, specifications, contract- and  forms of tender may be seen on and after the 7th day of April, 1911, at the  offices of H. S. Cleasby, Esq., Secretary  to the School Board, Coutlee, B. C. ���;  the Government Agent, Nicola; and the  Department of Public Works, "Victoria.  Each proposal must be accompanied  by an accepted bank "cheque or certify  cate of deposit on a chartered bank of  Canada, made payable to the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, for  the sum of $500 which shall be forfeited if the party tendering to decline to  enter into contract when called upon to  do so, or if he fail to complete the work  contracted for. The.cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenders  will be returned to them upon the exe  cution of the contract.  Tenders will not be considered unless  made out on the forms supplied, signed  with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes furnished. '  The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.  J. E. GRIFFITH,  Public Works Engineer  Department of Public Works,  ,'i      Victoria, B. C, 3rd April, 1911.5  8-12  WM  COOPER  General Contractor of Plastering  BRICK, STONE, CEMENT BLOCKS AND  GENERAL CEMENT WORK.  ALL WORK NEATLY AND PROMPTLY EXECUTED:  PRESSED CEMENT STEPS, GRAVE STONES,  FENCE POSTS, ETC.  "^?=.  ew Coldwater Hotel  THE FINEST HOSTELRY IN THE UPPER  COUNTRYrJUST OPENED.  LUXURIOUSLY FURNISHED WITH BEST  CUISINE AND ACCOMMODATION.  FINEST BRANDS OF WINES AND LIQUORS  Wm. McIntyre, prop.  MERRITT, B.C.  High Quality Goods  :al;fjEastem; Prices  The time has come when it-is folly to send to the far  east for your goods. Since our affiliation with Ryrie Bros; of  Toronto, we cover .a greater territory than ever, with bur  fine mail oriier service.  Send your orders to our Vancouver store.  The return mail brings you the goods. Write for our  illustrated catalogue.  Hen & Sons, Limited  Jewelery Mail Order House  Geo. E. Trorey, Man. Dir. Vancouver, B. C.  The St ar Restaur ant  Voght Street,   Merritt. ' -  The place where you get just what  you   want,   and  just   the   way   you  want it, at any time you want it.',  Have you tried the Star Yet ?  STEEL  & FAULKNER  Proprietors.  Phone 37  P. O. Boz 7  Smith & Clarke  Bakers and Confectioners.  MANUFACTURERS OF    _i  All kinds of Chocolates and  General Candy.  All Goods Made at Kamloops and Merritt Factories.  $2  For  ~^r:stai:x;r;:.:".*:":  ������i.i���,.iiL_ PKID A Y.April 21, 1911  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  mswmsssmmmmssBmmtnM,  ffttsai^iagssgsas^^  is there at present. However, just centre your eyes and investments on the DIAMOND VALE properties in MERRITT, as I expect to make an  announcement any day to the effect of a 50 and 100 per cent, increase in values on  Acres, Half Acres and City Lots.    The prices are now ranging from $300 to $550.  TERMS within the reach  of any person.    Also intending purchasers are informed  THAT  NO  BUILDING  RESTRICTIONS  PREVAIL  on Diamond Vale property.    Everybody is treated alike, poor or rich.  awiiiiwiwtiWftwiM^iffi^^  Merritt's New Subdivision; in fact the best situated, with  the finest view, free from gully or swamp, and has ideal  opportunities for the best sanitation in Merritt ever placed on the Merritt Realty  Market. Some very choice frontage Lots, the best in the subdivision for $125 and  $150.    Terms: $25 and $50 cash; balance $10 monthly.  ,,^  .00  First Cash Payment  and  Monthly buys a Lot  in Block 31.  This Lot lies between C. P. R. track  and the Bridge on  Voght Street, and  close to the Priest  property.  MINER'S  the balance extending over two years,  WILL BUY  ner Lots in the City  of Merritt.  Ideal  Location  for  Hotel or Business  Block.  I am subdividing  one of the finest  and best Ranches  in the Nicola Valley  and will have same  for sale  about the 1st May.  I have  i  ation. Investigate  PRICES  will   be   the   most  reasonable  ever  placed before  the public.  WATCH  FOR FUTURE  ANNOUNCEMENT.  TWO  tJ.A.Li��a  no  on  Quilchena  Avenue  in  Block 19  Close   to   the  Diamond   Vale  Store.  Houses.  Cottages.  Business Lots.  Mercantile Blocks.  Residential Lots.  Acreage.  Ranches.  I can supply your  wants many investment, as I control  exclusively more  properties than any  operator in Nicola  Valley.  REAL ESTATE  REFERENCE:   BANK OF MONTREAL  Phone 38.  MERRITT, B. 0.  FINANCIAL BROKER  Office Morgan Bldg  v  .Y;t. THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  Friday.  April 21   1911  OUR LETTER BOX  Merritt, B. G.  -^ April 20th, 1911.  Editor Nicola Valley News.  Dear Sir:���Will you be kind  enough to allow me space to reply  to .the public accusation made  against the Board of Trade by  Dr. Tutill at the Citizens meeting  April 10th and reported in your  last issue, giving the impression  that the Board of Trade had taken  the matter of Public Health out  of the hands of the local Health  Officer.  Over 18 months ago a resolution was passed at a Board of  Trade meeting to urge The Prov-  cial Board of Health to take action to improve the sanitary condition of Merritt.  The ioilovving reply was received:���  October 1st. 1909.  A. C. Gowley, Esq.  Secy. Board of Trade,  Merritt.  Dear Sir:���I have the honour  to acknowledge yours of the 20th.  Regarding the subject matter  of your letter, I am writing to  the Government Agent at Nicola  to visit Merritt and look into the  question complained of, and take  such action as he may see to be  necessary and submit report to  this Board.  Your obedient servant,  . C. J. Fagan.  Secy. Provincial Board of Health.  Victoria.  This letter, or the action of the  Board of Trade did not alter the  relation of the Local Health officer with his  superiors  in   any  shape or form.  The Board of Trade tried to  better the condition of this town  by   invoking the aid  of headquarters, but no authority  was  ever vested in them toward that  end, and their action did not deprive Dr. Tutill of any power or  authority he possessed.  Yours faithfully,  H. Priest.  Secy. Board of Trade.  OPPOSES RECIPROCITY  SIR G. W.  ROSS THINKS CANADA  SHOULD NOT BE TIED UP.  CHURCH SERVICES  '"-',    ST.   MICHAEL'S CHURCH  Services, Sunday, Apriil 23 :���  Canford: 9a. m., 10.30,11 a.m.  Parish Hall:   Sunday  School,  2:30 p. m.  Lower Nicola : 4 p. m.  Parish Hall: Evening Prayer,  7.30 p.m.  : Tuesday, 25th, St. Mark's Day,  Holy Communion, 7.30 a.m.  Wednesday,   Evening   Prayer  arid choir practice, 7.30 p.m.  Friday, Boys' meeting, 7 p. m.  Rev. T. Walker, Vicar.  Former Premier' of Ontario In Historic Address Before the Toronto  Board of Trade Gives His Reasons  for Maintaining the Present Tariff  ���Phenomenal Growth of Industries Would End.  In a speech eloquent, logical and  comprehensive, Sir Geo. W. Ross discussed the question of reciprocity  before a largely attended meeting of  Jthe Board of Trade in Toronto recently. "The negotiation of a reciprocity treaty with the United  States," he said, "has been a somewhat familiar subject to Canadians  for two generations. Ever since the  repeal of the treaty of 1854, over forty  years ago, it has been frequntly  discussed on both sides of the line."  After discussing the political effect  on Canada of reciprocity. Sir George  took up the economic problem. He  said:  A   Poor   Bargain.  "But, assuming that bona fide proposals for reciprocity are to be submitted, let me mention a few considerations that require the most careful  attention.  (1) We must not forget that the  mere exchange of certain articles  may involve a great deal more than  appears on the surface. For example���to abolish the duty on wheat on  both sides of the line looks fair, but  to accept an offer of that kind pure  and simple would, in my opinion, be  a poor bargain for Canada. I believe that the longer the American  tariff of 25 cents a bushel on Canadian wheat is maintained the better  for us. Canadian wheat has now a  distinct place in .-'the British market.  If the market of the United States  were freely opened it would be impossible to maintain its identity in  passing through American elevators,  and Canada would be the loser to the  extent of any reduction in price.  "A similar observation will apply  to    flour.     Manitoba    flour    usually  PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH  Services for Sunday, April 23 :  Lower Nicola, 3 p. m.  Merritt, 7.30 p.m.  Rev. W. J. Kidd, B.A., B.D.  Conservative  Meeting  Saturday  Evening  III  ��s��d  Important business.  Menzies' Hall  op. m.  SIR   GEORGE   W.   ROSS.  brings a higher price on Mark Lane  than any American brand. Who  coiild vouch for the genuineness of  this brand if American wheat moved  freely across the border? The poorer  qualities on the south side of the line  would be fort;,"-od by the products of  Canadian mills, and the better qualities on the north -��ide would be deteriorated by mixture from the south  Such an'interchange would be throwing away ail the. advantages we possess from the great wheat belt oi  Manitoba  and the west.  Canadian   Cheese   Pre-eminent.  "In the same way Canadian eheeso.  ,'ifter^ycars^j3f__exp_er_iment   a nd__Jjirgp_  expenditure of money, has driven  American cheese out of the British  market. How could this pre-eminence be preserved if Canadian cheese  passed through the hands of American shippers over the border? We  have, therefore, to consider not the  first profit, if profit there be, but the  ultimate effect upon an industry  which yields us annually about $-10.  000,000. The advance of a few cents  in price in exceptional conditions of  the market should not dominate the  Senerul effect on the large, aspect of  the question and the business interests of all the cheese factories of  Canada.  "The question of our lumbering industry has also its future aspect. No  doubt the admission of lumber into  the American market free of duty  would enhance the value of lumber  and probably the value of all standing marketable timber in Canada.  But the personal interests of the  lumbermen are not to be alone considered. One of the greatest questions now before the people of Canada is how to conserve their forests.;  Mr. Clifford Sifton, chairman of the  Commission of Natural Resources,  speaking before the Empire Club on  the 20th inst., said: 'At the end of  twenty years the United States would  have no timber for sale in the ordinary way. In Canada the supply  was large, but if the supply in the  United States ran out, the supply in  Ccinada would last the United States  for only seven years. The time must  come, however, when the people of  Canada would demand legislation  prohibiting the export of marketable  timber.' This is the national view,  and the only view which will do justice to Canadian interests. Can this  view be .maintained under a treaty?  "In I860,, when the old treaty was  repealed, we were poor in banking  capital, in skilled labor, in agriculture and in manufactures. A treaty  then would have afforded some relief. To-day conditions are different���  different because the repeal of the  treaty removed every prop on which.  we had formerly leaned, and the true  temper of the Anglo-Saxon spirit waa  roused to action. I think no country  in the world affords a better illustration  of public spirit th.uA Canada  when the United State:? in 136fi flung  our poverty in our faces and told us  our only choice wa? starvation or annexation. It is said that the fabled  wrestler Anteau = , whom Hercules  sought to crush, sprang to his fe��t  whenever his shoulders touched the  earth. We touched the earth in 186H  but. like Anteaus. we sprang to our  feet, and by our unaided strength wt  have made the name of Canada great  among the nations of the world, and  so Hercules now wonders if it would  not be better for him to pour a libation at our feet than wrestle with us  in the commercial amphitheatre of  this country.  Growth of Manufactures.  "Nor does it appear to mo to be  necessary that we should worry ourselves much over reciprocity is;  manufactures. The secretary of the  Manufacturers' Association said that  only three per cent, of th* imports  of the United States from Canada  consisted of manufactured goods. Tf  the Americans want more of the excellent products of our factories let  them reduce their tariff, and I have  no doubt many of them will be glad  to wear our cotton and our woollen  goods. But even in spite of our exclusion from, the United States our  factories have prospered.  United States  as  a   Market.'  "But suppose the markets of thf  United States were thrown open 'to  us, would, that not greatly chance  our prosperity? The United Stated-  lie along our border for 4.000 miles,  with a population of ninety millions.  If you have anything to sell, there is  an unlimited market for us���why not  let us enjoy it? This is a fascinat.'ng  picture, but there is another side to  it. The boundary is just as long fot  the Americans as for the Canadians',  and a reciprocity treaty that opened  one side of the line would also open  the other. While our seven millions  were getting into the American markets with our merchandise, the American ninety millions were getting  into Canada, and the home market  always the best, where not glutted  with goods, would be rendered .practically valueless. The fruit-crowej  would find American fruit in the  market before him. and everywhere  so abundant that his trade would l>"  ruined. The flour merchant, the seed  merchant, the- dealer in provisions  such as bacon, butter and cheese  would be similarly situated, and any  occasional sale that he could make  in the United States would be poor  compensation for the losses incurred-  on account of the surfeit of the home  market by American goods.  "But in a still, larger sense .Canadians would stand.to lose from the  opening of the American markets  and that is very clearly put by Sena-.  tor Beveridge in .a speech .recently  delivered on . reciprocity. He says:  'There must be reciprocity, with Canada. .Our tariff with the rest of the  world.does not apply to our northern���  neighbor. That policy already has  driven American manufacturers  across the Canadian borders, buiit  vast plants with American capital  ���on Canadian soil, employing Canadian workingmen to supply trade.  That capital should be kept at home  to employ American workingmen to  supply Canadian demand.',  "Here we have another -statement,  this time from a distinguished Senator, as to the effect of our present  commercial relations with the United  States which President Taft is so  anxious to change. Senator Beveridge  says: 'The American ' tariff ha-  driven American manufacturer.-  across the Canadian border, built  vast plants with American capital on  Canadian soil,' and so on.' Well, suppose it has. and we are told that  American ��� capital to the .extent . ol  $225,000,000 has been invested 'in  Canada is that a condition that we  should seek to change?. If the Americans change it of their own. motion we cannot help it, but surely- wi-  should not encourage ��� negotiations  which would prevent the investment  of capital from any quarter in Can.  ada. If there is anything we need  it is capital for our industries, and  farms and mines and factories./ lint  "noticei ���. anotheTTobsery'a"tto"n~of~tlre���dis~  tinguished Senator. He says: 'That  capital should be- kept at home to  employ American ������ workmen to supply  Canadian demand.' Well, let me tell  Senator Beveridge thatsome time age  we allowed American workmen to ���  supply Canadian demand, but if he  ever hopes that: this .will happen  again, then 1 very much ���mistake the  Canadian sentiment of to-day. Americans now supply us with; about  f80.000.000 of manufactured- goods.  Even that is too much, but to increase it ��s Senator Beveridge pro  poses would be treason to Canadian  industries, the very thought of which  makes one shrink from the eon-  sequences.  Relations   With   Mother   Country.  "Next let us consider the effect  which reciprocity might have up-m  our business relations with the moth-  er country. I leave out of consideration the presumption of many Americans that' better trade relations with  the United States might lead to poii  tieal union. If the United States supplied the only market, available fot  Canadians a treaty might have some  political effect. But we are not dependent upon the United Stat"s in  any sense for.--.our markets, and if we  make a treaty it is to be assumed  that we will give a quid pro'qi.%i for  any favors we receive. Canadians,  surely would not be bribed by privileges for which they paid. But il  trade and loyalty are to be considered;  together it is the mother country  that has the -first claims upon us  In the face of a duty of 2">.7 per cent,  on all the goods we sell t< her she  allows tree access- to net- m irket.  while the Americans exact n duty ot  forty-two per-cent.- for n similar privilege. The British market is also  a steady market and not subjected  to the' fluctuations of*, the Criicauo  Corn Exchange.nr to .the manipulation of speculators. It is not liable  to be closed against us by the expiration of any treaty or by the ���  manipulation of any trust. So long  as the British Emntre endures we  tri'iy eype.-t the British market to be  accessible to us. If we have any  tav is V) bestow that is the market  with   the   strongest   claim* or if   we  anticipate any favors, such as a preference over f'>reie;n traders, it is in  the British market that these favors  are most liki-lv to be obtained; we  certa'nly would not iook for them  in the market? ;,i the United States.  One thinsr i- pertain, we cannot have  reciprocity in wheat and British-preference   at   the   same  time.  What  British  Capital   Is  Doing.  "Then, airain. the British market  has alwnys been tuir base of supplies lor every large national and  industrial undertaking. It was with  British capital that we. built our railways and dug our canals. Nearly  every large municipal work in Canada was carried ">ut by loans in London. Hriti-Ii capital is now building  two transcontinental railways. Tt  lights aiir streets, lays down our  sewers builds our waterworks and  carries us from continent to'contin-  ent. Tn the last five years, according  to The Monetary Times, the sum of  $605,453,856 has been invested in  Canada, ot which $97,500,000 ha9  been invested in enterprises for the  development of the country. Mr.  Parish, an eminent London author-  itv on finance, says that Canada ha3  absorbed ��300.000.000 of British  capital.  "In considering further investments would the capitalists be more  likely to decide for Canada if our  trade were directed to the United'  States? for that is what reciprocity  means. Just now the current is with  us. If we proceed with the construction of the' Georgian Bay Canal and  the Hudson Bay Railway and the  enlargement of the Welland Canal,  not to say a variety of smaller enterprises, we will need two or three  hundred millions in the next few  years. Where are they to come from?  Certainly not from the United States.  Capital is sensitive. Let us not give  to it a jolt in this important stage of  national   development.  Effects  on   National   Autonomy.  "Reciprocity would -not help our  national autonomy. A treaty means  an obligation, and an obligation is  subject to interpretation. The Washington Treaty contained several obligations. One was the free admission of fish into the United States.  Interpreted, it still meant free fish,  hut not the packages in which they  were put up. The Washington treaty  allowed the use of certain American  canals in exchange for the free us>;  of Canadian .canals. Interpreted it  meant that the .vessels or." barg'-s  could pass only if they were unloaded  .when they entered American territory. Under a reciprocity treatv the  two countries will no doubt undertake certain obligations which, possibly, when they come to be interacted mnv not mean what either  party understood them to mean. But  the oblisition will continue during  the life of the treaty, to the annoyance ot  one ,or  both  parties.  "For my part I do not, want to see  any act of the Canadian people subject to interpretation at Washington.  Only once in 100 years did we get  full justice in the interpretation of  treaties affecting' Canada, and that  was before The Hague Tribunal a  month ago. Our tariff act is now  interpreted at Ottawa, and any complaint from the United States or-anywhere else is settled by Canadian officers. Right or wrong we are our  own masters. This would not be the  case under a treaty. If we differed  from the United States authorities  what redress had we? Perhaps we-  could call out the Canadian navy.  (Laughter.) We might withdraw  from the treaty, but that would  mean irritation and possibly international good-will. And now where  does my. argument lead? Evidently  to this "conclusion: that Canada does  not stand in any great need of a  reciprocity treaty with the United  States.  Leave Well.-Alone.  "Let us not want to be better unless we are sure of the effects of the  medicine. We are free from entanglements with ':he United States. We  cannot be embarrassed by any  amendments we make in our tariff^  "oyifwe are we can. aiter~jt_ourselves���  A treaty we cannot alter. We have  taken the duty off binder twine and;  barbed wire and corn, and we have  given the Americans a free list of  goods under Which they sold us last  year $79,471,000 worth of merchandise on which there was no duty. If  they are anxious for better trade relations with Canada, let them negotiate through their own Congress at  Washington, and reduce, their tariff  as it may suit them,' and. let. us reciprocate, if we deem it expedient,  through the  Parliament of Canada.  "Theirs is the first move on the  commercial chessboard. We -ive  Great Britain a preference without  any treaty or even negotiations; why  should we treat the Americans with  greater formality? At the same time,  let us receive their -, representatives  with the utmost courtesy. They have  proposals to make, we want to know  what they are. They should be made  as openly as if they were submitted  to Parliament. Public opinion; should  be heard upon .them, end there the  matter should rest until the United  States Congress had given its sane-'  tion and approval' to the action of its,  representatives.    It   would   then   be  LAND ACT  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.     District of Nicola.  Take notice that Sarah Hills of  Toronto, occupation spinster, intends to apply for.permission to  purchase the following- described  lands:���  Commencing at a post planted  about 3 miles east and 20 chains  north of the northeast corner of  Lot 1137, thence north 80 chains,  thence east 40 chains, thence  south 80 chains, thence west 40  chains to point of commencement.  Sarah Hills.  Alonzo B. Roberts. Agent.  March 26th. 1911; 10-19  LAND ACT  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that Benjamin  Hills, of Toronto, occupation  traveller, intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following- described lands:���  Commencing at a post planted  about three miles east and sixty  chains north of the northeast  corner of Lot. 1137, thence north  one mile, thence west one mile,  thence south one mile, -thence  east one mile to point of commencement. ;  Benjamin Hills.  Alonzo B. Roberts, Agent.  March 26th: 1911. 10-19  mile to point of commencement.  Julia Ord.  Alonzo B. Roberts, Agent.  March 25th. 1911. 10-19  LAND ACT  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.     District of Nicola.  Take notice that Lewis Ord of  Montreal, occupation engineer,  intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described lands:���  Commencing at a post planted  at the northeast corner of Lot  1137, thence north one mile,  then ce east one mile, thence south  one mile, thence west one mile to  point of commencement.  Lewis Ord.  Alonzo B. Roberts, Agent.  March 25th. 1911.     . 10-19  similar action Mhifi ..the public inter-,  est so to do-^briry". in this way can  we' preserve perfect freedom from the',  possible entanglements of a treaty  which, ho matter how carefully draft-'  ed, is liable to be misunderstood and  misinterpreted.  "An adjustment of the trade relations between the ; two countries by  the independent legislation of both  rather than by treaty is the only safe  course, as it affords publicity in the  first instance and admits of perfect  freedom of action thereafter. In the  meantime let Canada continue to  sell her merchandise wherever she  finds a market, and, trusting in that  Providence . which has always filled ���.  her, bams with plenty and made her -  -merchants princes in the land, lei,!  Her not hazard her trade or her in-;  dependence for expectations that may  never be realized, nor place herself  under obligations that might interfere with the fullest development ol  her industrial prosperity **�� the years  to come."  LAND ACT  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that Grace Johnston of Montreal, occupation  spinster, intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following described lands:���  Commencingat.a post planted  about.2.miles.east of the northeast corner of Lot 1137, thence  north one mile, thence west one  mile?thence south one mile, thence  east one mile to point of commencement.  Grace Johnston.  Alonzo B. Roberts, Agent.  March 26th. 1911. 10-19  LAND ACT  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.     District of Nicola.  Take notice that R. Ernest  Johnston of Montreal occupation  engineer, intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following decribed lands:���  Commencing at a post planted  about 2 miles east of the northeast corner of Lot 1137, thence  south one mile, thence west one  mile, thence north one mile,  thence east one mile to point of  commen cemen t.  R. Ernest Johnston.  Alonzo B. Roberts, Agent.  March 26th. 1911. 10-19  LAND ACT  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District. District of Nicola.  ' Take notice that Lacey R. Johnston of Montreal, occupation engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following  described lands:���  Commencing at a post planted  about three, miles east and 60  chains north of the northeast  corner, of. Lot 1137, thence south  one mile, thence west one mile,  thence , north one mile,. thence  east one mile to point of commencement.  Lacey R.. Johnston  - Alonzo B. Roberts, Agent.  March 26th. 1611. 10-19  LAND ACT  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice tnat LeonardEvans  of Vancouver, occupation piano  tuner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following  described lands:���  Commencing at a post planted  near the southwest corner of Lot  1137, thence west one mile, thence  north one mile, thence east one  mile, thence south one mile to  point of commencement.  Leonard' Evans.  Alonzo B. Roberts, Agent.  March 25th. 1911. 10-19  DAILY   STAGE  SERVICE  y.        LAND ACT  Kamloops: Division of Yale Land  District.     District of Nicola.  Take notice that Marj ory Evans  of Vancouver, occupation married  .woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following  described lands :���  Commencing at a post planted  about 2 miles east and 20 chains  south of the northeast corner of  Lot 1137, thence south 60 chains,  thence east 60 chains, thence  north 60 chains, thence west 60  chains to point of commencement.  Marjory Evans.  Alonzo B. Roberts, Agent.  March 26th. 1911. 10-19  LAND ACT  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.     District of Nicola.  Take notice that Thomas Evans  of Vancouver, occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following  described-lands;���  Commencing at a post planted  at the northeast corner of  Lot  _r  1137,    thence   north   one   mile,  the duty of t^ one  mile,   thehce  xi       ui._ ,..*��.-��� south one mile, thence east one  mile to point of commencement.  Thomas Evans.  Alonzo B.Roberts. Agent.  March 26th. 1911. 10-19  LAND ACT  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that Julia Ord of  Montreal, occupation married  woman, intends to apply forpermission to purchase the following  described lands:���  Commencing at a post planted  at the northeast corner of Lot  1137, thence south one mile,  thence east one mile, thence  north one mile, thence west one  A stage will leave the Merritt.  livery stables every morning at  8 o'clock for the end of construction on the Kettle Valley up the  Coldwater. Stage leaves the  other end at the same hour daily.  Baggage and express carried.  ALEX. COUTLEE Prop .  CANADBAN  (fffiil>*!fflftri I.  Train Leaves Ten o'Clock  Daily (except Sunday) for  All Points East and West.  Tickets on sale to all points  Canada and United States.  Accommodation re seryed  and complete passage booked to any part of Great  Britain. Next Empress sails  March 24th from St. John.  For further particulars call on  V.R..L. WHEELER  Agent       '.-'"���        Merritt, B.C.  Or write to  H.;W. BRODIE  General Passenger Agent  Vancouver, B.C.  -tir? rjs xnxzziunuwEMMa Friday. April 21, 1911  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  NOTICE  PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given  that, under the authority contained in  section 131 of the " Land Act," a regulation has been approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council fixing the  minimum sale prices of firsta-d second-  class lands at $10 and $5 per acre, respectively.  This regulation further provides that  the prices fixed therein shall apply to  all lands with respect to which the  application to purchase is given favourable consideration after this date, notwithstanding the date of such application or any delay thatmay have occurred  in the consideration of the same.  Further notice is hereby given that  . all persons who have pending applications to purchase lands under the provisions of sections 34 or 36 of the "Land  Act" and who are not willing to complete such purposes under the prices  fixed'by the aforesaid regulation shall  be at liberty to withdraw such applications and receive refund of the moneys  deposited on account of such applica-  - tiohs.  WILLIAM R. ROSS,  '   " Minister of Lands  Department of Lands,  Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.  8-16  FOR   SALE  Three-roomed House and Lot on  Quilchena Avenue. Price $1600;  $600 cash, balance spread over  18 months at seven per cent. ���  Apply, J. Cairns. Merritt, B. C.  reserve.  NOTICE is hereby given that all vacant Crown lands not already under reserve, situated within the boundaries of  the Land Recording Distiict, are reserved from any alienation under the  "Land Act" except by pre- emption.  ROBT. A. renwick.  Deputy Minister of Lands.  Department of Lands,  Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.  .    8-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Yale.  Take notice that I, Effie J.-Edwards,  of Vancouver, occupation married woman, intend to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  south east corner about one and one  half miles in a south east direction  from the south east corner of Lot 784,  thence north 80 chains, west 80 chains,  south 80 chains, east 80 chains to place  of beginning, claiming 640 acres of  pasture land.  Effie J. Edwards  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 2, 1911. 3-12  "Coal-Mines Regulation Act'  t    ��� Notice op Examinations.  NOTICE is hereby given that Examinations will be held for First-, Second-,  and Third-class Certificates of Competency under the provisions of the "Coalmines Regulation Act, at Nanaimo,  Fernie," Cumberland, and Merritt,- on  the &th, 10th and 11th days of May, 1911,  commencing-at nine o'clock in the forenoon.  The subjects will be as follows :���  First-class Candidates��� .  Mining Act and Special Rules.  Mine Gases.  Ventilation.     .     .   y -__ _   ,."._���  General Work.  Mine Machinery.  Surveying.    .  Second-class Candidates���,  Mining Act and Special Rules. .  Mine Gases.  Ventilation.  General Work.  Third-class Candidates���   -.  Mining Act and Special Rules.  'Mine Gases and General Work.  . Applications " must be  made  to  the  undersigned not later than Wednesday,  May 3rd,   1911,   accompanied   by   the  statutory fee as follows :���  By an applicant for First-  class Examination .: .   $10.00  By an applicant for Second-  .   class Examination ....     10.00  By an applicant for Third-  class Examination        5.00  The applications must be accompanied  by original  testimonials and evidence  .  ntatinf,   +l��rt*. .       ���..--- -   - -  -*����..w..����� bftmv ��� ��� ~^  D Land Act  Nicola Land District. Kamloops Division of Yale  Take notice that Edward John Rhodes, of  Nicola, occupation hotel clerk, intends to apply  for permission to purchase the" following described lands :  Commencing at a post planted at the southeast  corner about two miles east of Missezula Lake  and about one mile south of Price's Creek, thence  north one mile, thence west one mile, thence south  one mile, thence east one mile to poinc of commencement.  EDWARD JOHN RHODES,  Per William Munro, Ag-ent.  Date 23rd January, 1911. 1-9  Land Act  Nicola Land District. Kamloops Division of Yale  Take notice that Allister Black Fletcher, of  Merritt, occupation clerk, intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following described  lands:     ' .  Commencing: at a post planted at the southeast  corner, about three miles east of Missezula Lake  and two miles south of Prices Creek, thence north  one mile, thence west one. mile, thence south one  mile, thence east one mile to point of commencement. ' '  ALLISTER BLACK FLETCHER,    ' .  Per William Munro, Agent.  Date 23rd January, 1911.   ' 1-9 '  Land Act \  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Yale.  Take notice that James Edwards of  Vancouver, occupation hotel keeper,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing "t a post planted at the  northeast corner aboutonemile and one  half in an southeasterly direction  from the south east corner of Lot 784,  thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains,  north 80 chains, east 80 chains, to  place of beginning, claiming 640 acres  of pasture land.  James Edwards  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 2, 1911. 3-12  and Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that I, Guy H. Mulligan,  of Vanouver, occupation salesman, intend to apply for permission to purchase  the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner, three miles north and  30 chains west of the northwest corner  of Lot 902, thence north 80 chains, east  80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80  chains to place of beginning, claiming  640 acres of pasture land.  Guy H. Mulligan,  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 2, 1911. 3-12  ���- (a) If a canditate for First-class,  thai he is a British Subject and has had  at least five years' in or about the practical working of a coal-mine, and is at  least twenty-five years of age :  ��� (b) If a candidate for Second-class,  that he has had at least five years' ex-  ih or about the practical working of a  coal-mine :.  '���   (c)   If a candidate  for Thirdr-class,  'that he has had at least three years'  .experience: in or about the  practical  working of a coal-mine :  (d) A candidate .for a Certificate of  .Competency as Manager, Overman,  Shiftboss, Fireboss, or Shot-lighter  shall forward a certificate from a medical practitioner, duly qualified to prac-  ���tice as such in the Province of British  Columbia, showing that he has taken a  course in ambulance work fitting him,  the said candidate, to give first aid to  persons injured in coal-mining. operations.  By order of the Board.  FRANCIS H. SHEPHERD,  Secretary.  "* Nanaimo, B. C,  January 21st, 1911. 9-12  '.. y Land .'Act  Nicola Land District i Kamloops Division of Yale  Take notice that DONALD MACPHAIL, of  Middlesboro, occupation clerk, - intends to apply  for permission to purchase the following described lands: '  Commencing at a post planted at the northeast  corner, about three miles east of Missezula Lake,  and two miles from Prices Creek, thence west one  mile, thence south one mile, thence east one mile,  thence north one mile to point of commencement.  ' DONALD MACPHAIL,  -    , Per William Munro, Agent  Date January 23d. 1911. '       1-9  Land Act  Nicola Land District.   Kamloops Division of Yale  Take notice that WILLIAM MUNRO, of Nicola,  occupation rancher, intends to apply for.permission to purchase the following described lands :  Commencing at a post planted at the northeast  corner, about three miles cast of Missezula Lake,  and about two miles south of Priees Creek, thence  east one mile, thence south one mile, thence west  one mile, thence north one mile to point of commencement. - - '"��� ���  *" WILLIAM MUNRO.  Date 23rd January, 1911. 1-9  Land Act  Kamioops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Yale.  Take notice that Grace E. Spankie,  of Vancouver, occupation married woman, intends to apply for' permission  to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner four miles north and  one. mile west of northwest corner of  Lot 902, thence north 80 chains, east  80, chains, south 80' chains, west 80  chains to place of beginning, claiming  640 acres of pasture land.  ��� - '   ,      ', Grace E. Spankie  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  ' February 2, 1911.        ,  3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that Alick McPherson, of  Vancouver, B. C, occupation R. R. contractor, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  northwest corner, about four miles  north and one half mile west from the  northwest corner of Lot 902, thence  east 80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80  chains, north 80 chains to place of beginning, claiming 640 acres of pasture  land.  Alick McPherson.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 2, 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  , District.   District of Nicola.  . Take notice that I Charles Davey of  Vancouver, opjjupation bookkeeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  northwest corner about three miles  north and 30 chains west of the northwest corner of Lot 902, thence south  80 chains, east 80 chains, ' north 80  chains, West 80 chains to place ,of beginning. Claiming 640 acres of pasture  land.  Charles Davey  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 2. 1911.   - 3-12  ���" Land .Act  Kamloops Division Nicola Land District.  District of Yale.  Take notice that Marie Gjellstad, of Valva, N.D.,  occupation spinster, intends to apply for permis-  sion-to~purchase the~f ollowing described lands":  Commencing at a post planted about a quarter  of a mile east from the point where the north line  of the Sooloose Indian Reserve is intersected by  the Mammell Lake waggon road and on the north  boundary of said reserve, thence north 80 chains,  thence east 80 chains, thence south 80 chains,  thence west 80 chains to place of beginning, containing 640 acres in all.  ' i MARIE GJELLSTAD,  By her Agent, Hans Peter Gjellstad.  Date January 18th. 1911. 1-9  ' Land Act  ; -Kamloops Division of Yale District.  t District of Nicola.  Take notice that Martin L. Grimmett,  of Nicola, B. C, occupation barrister,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencingat a post planted one  mpe west, of the northwest corner of  Lqt 1779, thence south one mile, thence  east one mile, thence north one mile,  thence west one mile to point of commencement.  "���'���'",'��� Martin L. Grimmett.  ,;-,.*.;   Archibald W. McVittie, Agent.  March112, 1911 8-17  Land Act Notice. '"  Nicola Land District  Kamloops Division of Yale ..  Take notice  that I  Perley Russell of  Princeton, occupation clerk, intends to  apply for permission  to purchase  the  following described lands:���  :   Commencing at post planted 20 chains  West of the North  East   corrier Post  of G. P. Myren's  Pre-emption,   Otter  Valley; thencs East 20  chains:  thence  North 20 chains; thenct West20chains  thence South   20  chains,   to   point of  commencement,   containi g   40  acres,  more or less.  Perley Russell,  G. P. Myren AGEnt. '*  Date 23rd. November, 1910.  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  . Eistrict.    District of Nicola.  -Take notice that Mary E. Adair, of  Revelstoke, o^upation married woman, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  northwest corner about one and one  half miles in a south east direction  from south east corner of Lot 784,  thence south 80 chains, east 80 chains,  north 80 chains, west 80 chains to place  of beginning, claiming 640 acres of  pasture land.  Mary E. Adair.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 2, 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that Clara W. Abbutt, of  Seattle, Washington, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:.  Commencing at a post planted, at the  southeast corner, about four and one  half miles west and 30 chains south of  northwest corner of Lot 902, thence  north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south  80 chains, east 80 chains, claiming 640  acres of pasture land.  Clara W. Abbutt.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 7. 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.   District of Nicola.  Take notice that Ernest Adair, of  Revelstoke, B. C,, occupation physician,  intends to apply .for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner, about one and one  half miles in a southeastdirection from  southeast corner of Lot 784, thence  north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south  80 chains, west 80 chains to place of  beginning, claiming 640 acres of pasture land.  Ernest Adair.  Hugh McGuire, Agent  February 2, 1911 3-12  corner of Let 1775. thence west 80 chain?, thence  south 80 chains, thence cast SO chains, thence  north 80 chains to the place of beginning, claimin  320 acres of pasture land.  ELSA C. DAVEY. Applicant.'  Hugh McGuiie, Agent  Feb. 8th, 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division Nicola Land  District���District of Yale.  Take notice that Louis York, of Victoria, B.  B., occupation real estate agent, intends to  apply for permission to purchase the following  described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the southeast  corner, about one mile south and twenty chains  west of the southeast corner of lot 903, thence  west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80 chains,  south 80 chains to place of beginning, claiming  640 acres of pasture land,  LOUIS YORK, Applicant.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  Land Act  Nicola Land District. Kamloops Division of Yale  Take notice that J, llai.k Oiamc, of Spokane  Wash., occupation hotel clerk, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post piantcd at the northwest  corner, about one and one half miles west of the  southwest corner of Lot 9G3.thence south SOchains  thence cast 80 chains, thence north ��0 chains,  thence west 80 chains to place of bcgii.i.ii g  claiming 6-10 acres of pasture land.  HANK GRAME. Applicant.  Hujsh McGuire. Agent.  Feb. 11th, 1911. 3-12  Feb. 10th. 1911.  3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.   District of Nicola.  Take notice that John Lynch, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel clerk,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southeast corner, about 120 chains east  of the northeast corner of Lot 1757,  thence west 20 chains, north 80 chains,  east 40 chains, south 20 chains! east 40  chains, south 40 chains, west 60 chains,  south 20 chains, to place of beginning,  claiming 400 acres of pasture land.  John Lynch.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 3, 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division Nicola Land  District���District of Yale.  Take notice that Richard Hall, of Victoria. B.C..  occupation finance agent, intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the southwest  corner, about one mile south and 20 chains west of  the southeast corner of Lot 903, thence east 80  chains, thence north 80 chains, thence west 60  chains, north 20 chains, west 20 chains, to place of  beginning, claiming EE0 acres of pasture land.  RICHARD HALL, Applicant.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  Feb. 10th. 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that Henry Maden, Jr.,  of Yakima, Wash., occupation hotel  clerk, intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southeast corner, 40 chains wett of  southeast coi ner of Lot 97, thence scuth  60 chains, west 80 chains, north ��0  chains, east 40 chains, south 20 chains,  east 40 chains to pla^e of beginning,  claiming 560 acres of pasture land.  Henry. Maden, "Jr.  Hugh McGuire. Agent.  February 18th, 1911 3-12  Land Act  Nicola Land District.    District of  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that 60 days after date  Alexander Beath of Vancouver, occupation Broker, intends to 'apply'for permission to purchase the .following' described land: Commencing at,a post  planted 80 chains north of the N.E. corner of Lot 1776, thence.' north 80 chains,  thence east 80 chains, thence south 80  chains, thence west 80>chains to point  of commencement, contsvining 640,acres  more or less. ..."���������'  Alexvnder Beath, Applicant.  E.B. Tingley, Agent.  Dated January 28, 1911. Bl-7  Land Act  KamloopsDivision-of-=Yale-Land  District.   District of Nicola.  Take notice that Henry H. Jones  of Victoria, occupation financial agent,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  northeast corner about four miles north  and one and a half mile west of the noi th  west corner of Lot 902, thence south  80 chains, west 80 chains, north 80  cnains, east 80 chains, to place of beginning, claiming 640 acres of pasture  land.  Henry H. Jones  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 2, 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  ������> District.   District of Nicola.  Take notice that Eva J. Lynch, of  Vancouver, occupation married woman,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Comencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner, 20 chains north of  northeast corner of Lot 1757, thence  north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south  80 chains," west 80 chains to place of  beginning, claiming 640 acres of pasture  land.  Eva J. Lynch  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 3, 19*3 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.   District of Nicola.  Take notice that William Abbutt, of  Seattle, Washington, occupation hotel  keeper, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands: _���'  Commencing at a post planted at the  southwest corner, about four and one  half miles west and 30 chains south of  north west corner of Lot 902, thence  north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south  80 chains, west 80 chains, to place of  beginning, clain<��ng 640 acres of pasture  land.  William Abbutt.  Hugh McGuire. Agent.  February 7, 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Nicola Land District���District of Yale.  Take noticethatl. Colly M. Wasden, of Victoria,  B. C, occupation rancher, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing ata point planted at the northwest  corner, about two and one half miles west of  southwest corner of Lot 902, thence east 80 chains,  south 60 chains, west 80 ehains, north SO chains to  place of beginning, claiming four hundred acres  of pasture land.  COLLY M. WASDEN. Applicant,  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  Feb. 8th, 1911. 3-12 ������  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale.   .  Nicola Land District.       :���  Take notice that Nellie Farnell, of  Victoria, B. C, spinster, inlends--1o  apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  southeast corner, about 100 chains west  and 20 chains south of southwest corner  of Lot 97, thence south 40 chains, west  80 chains, north 40 chains, east SO chains  to place of bcgimiirg, claiming 320  acres of pasture land. -  Nellie Farnell.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 18th, 1911 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division Nicola Land  - District.    District of Yale.  Take notiee thot Hattie M Wasden, df Victoria,  B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply  for permission to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the northeast  corner, about two and one half miles west and 80  chains south-of. southwest corner of���Lot-902.  thence west 80 chains, thence south 30 chains,  ��hence east 80 chains, thence north SO chains to  place of beginning,' claiming 240 acres of pasture  land.  HATTIE M. WASDEN, Applicant.  Hugh McGuire, Agent  Feb. 11th, 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.   District of Nicola.  ���Take notice that Charles LrBetterton*-  of Victoria, B. C.. occupation financial  agent, intends to apply for permission'  to purchase the following describee}  lands:  . Commencing at a post planted at the  northeast corner, one mile west and one  and a half miles north of S.W. corner  of Lot 902, thence west 60 chains, south  80 ohains, east 80 chains, north 40 chains  to south boundary line of Jack McDonald's application to purchase, thence  west 20 chains, thence north 40 chains  to place of beginning, claiming 560 acres  of pasture land.  Charles L. Betterton.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 3, 1911 3-12 5  Laild  Act  Kamloops Division Nico'a Land District.  District of Yale.  Take notice that I, Tom Fichard, of Yakima.  Wash., occupation hotelkeeper. intend to apply  for permission to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the southwest  corner, about 100 chains west and 30 chains south  of the southwest corner of Lot 97, thence east 80  chaina, thence north 80 chains, thence west 80  chains, thence south 80 chains to place of beginning, claiming 640 acres of pasture land.  TOM PICHARD, Applicant,  Hugh McGuire. Agent.  Feb. 18th, 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Nicola Land District.    Kamloops Division of Yale  Take notice that I, Frank G. Gowan,  of Victoria, B. C., occupation commercial agent, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands: ��� ������  '  Commencing at a post planted at.the  southeast corner, about one mile east  and-20 chains south of the southeast  corner of Lot 1775, thence north,80  chains, thence west SO chains, thence  south 80 chains, thence east 80 chain's  to place of beginning, claiming 640 acres  of pasture land.  FRANK G. GOWAN,  Applicant.,. ^  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  Feb. 11th, 1911. 3-12. >  Land Act  Kamloops Division Nicola Land District.  ....  =District of Yale.          Takenotice thatl, Henry B. Madden, of Yakima,  Wash., occupation hotelkeeper, intend to apply  for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commercing at a post planted at the northwest  corner, 40 chains west of the southeast corner of  Lot 97, thence south 60 chains, thence east 80  chains, thence north 80 chaina, thence west 40  chains, thence south 20 chains, thence west 40  chains to place of beginning, claiming 660 acres  of pasture land.  HENRY B. MADDEN, Applicant.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  Feb. 8th, 1911. 3-12  and Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that I, James E. Spankie,  of Vancouver, occupation physician,  intend to apply for permission to purchase the:following, described lands:  yjommencing al a post planted at the  southeast corner, about four miles north  and one mile westof the northwest corner of Lot 902, thence west 80 chains,  north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south  80 chains to place of beginning, claiming 640 acres of pasture land:  James E. Spankie  Hugh McGuire, Agent  February^ 1911. 3-12.  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that Maud C. Ijjetterton,  of Victoria^ B.-C, occupation married  woman, intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described  lands: V "X  Commencing at a post planted at the  southeast corner, one mile west and one  and Z half miles north of S. W- corner  of Lot902, thence west80 chaihs, thence  north 80 chains, east 80 chains', south 80  chains to place of beginning, claiming  640 acres of pasture land.  Maud C. Betterton.  Hugh McGuire; Agent.  February 3, 1911 3-12-  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola. .'  Take notice that Paul Engen, of Otter  Valley, B.C.. occupation rancher, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  northwest corner, 20 chains north of  northeast corner of Lot 1757, thence  east 80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80  chains, north 80 chains, claiming 640  acres of pasture land.  Paul Engen.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  February 3, 1911 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division Nicola Land District.  DUtrict of Yale.  Take notice that William Edwards, of Spokane.  Wash., occupation real estate agent, intends to  apply for permission to purchase the following  described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the northeast  corner, about 80 chains south and 20 chains cost  of the southeast corner of Lot 903, thence south 80  chains, thence west. 80 chains, thence north 80  chains, thenceeast 80 chains to place of beginning,  claiming 640 acres of pasture land.  WILLIAM EDWARDS, Applicant.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  Feb. 10th. 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Nicola Land District. Kamloops Division of Yale  Take notice that I, Chrise Chieholm, of Cobalt,  Ontario, occupation mining engineer, intend "to  apply for permission to purchase the following  described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  south west corner, about one mile east  and 20 chains south of southeast corner  of Lot 1775, thence north 80 chains,  thence east 80 chains, thence south.80  chains, thence west 80 chains to place  of beginning, claiming 640 acres' of  pasture lands.  CHRISE CHISHOLM,  ���'������ ��� Applicant. '���.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  Feb. 11th, 1911. . 3-12 \  Land Act  Nicola Land District.   Kamloops Division of Yale  Take notice that I, Lena Workman, of Vietoria  B. C,  occupation sales lady, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following described  lands: = ��� = =���  Commencing at a post piantcd at the northwest  eorner, about one mile east and 20 chnins south of  southeast corner of Lot 1775, thence south 80  chains, thence east 80 chains, thence north 80  chains, thence west SO chains to place of beginning,  elaiming 640 acres of pasture lands.  LENA WORKMAN. Applicant.   ���  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  Feb. 11th, 1911. 3-12  L^und Act-     .  :    Kamloops Division Nicola Land District.  ;; District of Yale.  Take notice that I, William Gordon, of Spokane,  Wash., occupation commission agent, intend to  apply for permission.to purchase the following  described lands:        ;   .���-.��������� ,,  Commencing at a post planted at the northwest  corner, about 80 chains' south and 20 chains east of  southeast corner of Lot'90S, thence east 80 chains,  thence south 80 chains, thence west' 80 chains,  north 80 chains to place of beginning, claiming  340 acres of pasture land.  WILLIAM GORDON. Applicant.  Hugh McGuire, Agent.  Feb. 10th, 1911. ������'.   3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division Nicola Land District.  District or Yale.  Take notice that I, Elsa C. Davey, of Vancouver,  B. C, occupation married woman, intend to apply  for permission to purchase the following decribed  lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the northeast  corner, abou< 60 chains north of the northwest  Land Act-  Nicoia Land District.   Kamloops Division of Yale  Take notice that I, Gus Hollay, of Spokane.  Wash., occupation gentleman, intend to apply for  permission to purchase the following described  lands:  Commencing at a post planted nt thc northeast  corner, about one mile east and 20 chains south of  the southeast corner of Lot 1775, thence south 80  chains, thence west 80 chains, thence north ��0  chains, thence cast SO chains to place of beginning,  claiming 640 acres of pasture lands.  GUS HOLLAY, Applicant.  Hugh McGuire, Agent,  Feb. 11th. 1911. 3-12  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale District.  District of Nicola.  Take notice that Margaret M. Grimmett, of Nicola, B.-C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted one  mile west of the northwest corner of  Lpt 1779, thence west one mile, thence  south one mile, thence east one mile,  thence north one mile to poin of commencement.  Margaret M. Grimmett.  Archibald W. McVittie, Agent.  March 12th. 1911 8-17   -  All changes tor advertisements ap  pearing in  the Nicola  Valley  News,  must be in the    hands of the print  ers no later than Wednesday night  No guarantee can otherwise be given  that tho changes will be made. 10  THE NIGOLA VALLEY NEWS  Friday,, April 21/1911  IT PA Y S    TO    D E A   WITH    U S  We have just received a beautiful line of  Ladies'  �������  Real Parisian models  ���something unique-  no two alike���most  perfect so far shown  in Merritt.  We have a car of  S T0 ARRIVE IN ABOUT 2 WEEKS  OUR  TUREDEPT  ���  Studebaker  is the most popular in prices and quality.   A full  range of Screen Doors,  We are headquarters for  Cement and  ���oc  :;direcfsfro^  |Ben^  five shortly.IThey  comprises^  range ^i^  farm truck to tlie  latest sty lesr! of  high grade buggies  aster  A Car of  BR I C  arrive on Saturday.   Our stock is  most complete  A car of the  -j,-. ..  ;^iyv<y  Her�� are some of bur latest  traigM  Iron Bedsteads, Wire a nd  of Wool Mattresses,  The choicest lot  l:LV-::LatJ'TW'""'-  TIES  ^~^SH1RTS^~  SUMMER VESTS  HOSIERY  and GLOVES.  We lead the fashions.  They are selling  fast. Come and  inspect our styles  ���they lead.  Potatoes "��:  They are selling fast.  Get your seed order  in now.  We are Sole Agents for ��the  best and cheapest Wire Pence.  \li ^LJ^CI  we carry the choicest  lines in greatest variety  at prices made to please  the most careful buyer.  Buy your   goods from  OGILVT  '$<  .... ri-iral HmveAlnAl-fli JElltfMmi^  For  BREAD  For  PASTRY  always gihres satisfaction!  More loaves to the barrell. Highest  grade made in the   ritish Empire.  NEW COLLETT BLDG.  QUILCHENA AVENUE

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