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The Nicola Valley News Aug 19, 1910

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 I'll  Columbia Coal and Coke Co.  Plan Operations on Big Scale  Will Drive 800 Yard Tunnel  for Taking Out Goal  Granite Creek is to have a real  live coal mining- camp. The Columbia Coal and Coke company  have filed orders for a steam  plant costing $3000 to be used in  driving an 800-yard tunnel for  taking out the coal.  The company has a whole  mountain of coal at its disposal  and the quality is very high some  running as good as 65.per cent in  carbon. The property was formerly-controlled by the Earl {Syndicate, a company of English  capitalists, and they spent nearly  $100,000 in development, work.  The property was fully proved at  that time.  The original plan was to take  the ; coal out through Collin's  gulch, but this has been abandoned, and the outlet will now be  at appoint two miles this side of  Granite Creek. A townsite to  be known as Cardiff is being organized and the development  work now undertaken by the  company will mean the employ-  merit of a pretty good force of  men.  -The coal deposit extends from  Granite Creek to Tulameen and  experts say that there are mill-  lions of tons available. The coal  _i_^of.an exceptionally, good quality  for coking and valuable for black-  smithing purposes. G. F. Fraser,  manager of the company, with  Engineer Jacobs and W. L. Par-  rish, came in from Granite Creek  Tuesday night and left Wednesday morning for-<the coast. They  will be back in a few days. They  were accompanied by their wives  arid daughters who have been  spending the summer at Tulameen.  Now that transportation facilities are assured the company has  no hesitation in organizing on an  elaborate basis and it is anticipate/! that the mines will be on  the shipping list in a few months'  time.  society for some time past and it  was lai-gely through his agency  that the new club house scheme  was conceived and brought to  such a happy issue. George  Muir and Edward Pearse made  the presentation.  GENERAL CONFERENCE  The general conference in session at Victoria this week is the  greatest gathering in the history  of the Methodist church. Dignitaries from the east-as well as a  large, representation from the  west combined to give to the  convention deep interest and  much enthusiasm. Matters of  great moment to the denomination were under discussion.  LOCAL AND DISTRICT  '.'  SIR WILFRID WELCOMED  Sir Wilfrid Laurier must have  been deeply moved by the splendid character of the reception  accorded to him at Vancouver on  Tuesday. The citizens of the  Terminal City as a whole joined  in the welcome and it was one  spontaneous outburst of enthusiasm for Canada's leading citizen. Addresses of welcome, entertainment of various kinds and  a bumper public meeting in the  evening comprised the program.  In the afternoon the premier  formally opened Vancouver's  first exhibition. *  LEAVING THE VALLEY  George Robert Bates has moved  to Comox. He has taken all his  household effects and farm outfits with him, including ten head  of horses. Mr. Bates has purchased a ranch in the vicinity of  Compx and will follow the simple  farm life. He will retain his  pre-emption at Aspen Grove for  the time being. Mr. Bates made  many friends in Nicola and, his  departure will occasion much  regret.        ���-,..-  G. B. Armstrong left yesterday morning for the coast. He  will secure the plans for his new  departmental store building while  at Vancouver.  The property of the Bank of  Montreal on the Conklin estate  is now being fenced!' The erection of the magnificent residence  will- be undertaken-' in thVcourse'  of a few days, there being some  difficulty in the award of the  contract. . :  James Macdonnell came up  from the coast by Wednesday  night's train and went up the  Coldwater to the construction  camps the following day.  The Middlesboro Society will  give a social dance in their new  club house; on Tuesday evening  next, August 23. Refreshments  will be served and a general  good time is anticipated.  Philip McLean had the misfortune' to cut his left ankle with  an adz while working on one of  the  buildings  in  the city.    The  hall, Merritt: Morning prayer  and sermon 11 a. m.; evening  prayer and sermon 7:30 p. m.\>;-  Mrs. William Mclntyre will be  taken down to Vancouver tomorrow morning to undergo;  treatment by specialists.; Mrs.  Mclntyre has been seriously ill  for some time past and it is the  sincere hope of her many friends  that she will come home frorh the  coast fully restored to health* and  vigor.  : A. W. McVittie came up from  the coast last night and will remain in the valley for several  days. ,. ���-r777y  '-. Thos. Heslop returned last  night from Vancouver where He  attended the grand lodge C. O..  F. The next grand lodge will  be held in Kamloops. ;;  ; George Murray * is back from  a visit with friends at the coast*.  A. Irwin, Indian agent,, of  Kamloops, is in the valley on ofr  ficial business.  William Crowder, of Patoh,  Iowa, is here on a visit to, his  son, F. W. Crowder, of Aspen  Grove. Mr. Crowder says that  Merritt is the best looking tdwir  for its age that he has seen.  A. E. Howse with Mrs. Howse  and Miss Ruby Howse are back  from their tour through the  Okanagan and Similkameen.  They travelled by auto in charge  of Chas. Howse and went around  by Kamloops, Vernon, Penticton,  Princeton an,d Aspen Grove.    *  SIDEWALKS AT LAST  Material   Has   Arrived   and    Work   of  Laying   Starts  At last the material for the  sidewalks has arrived and Merritt  citizens will soon abandon the  road as a pedestrian's path. Two  carloads of lumber arrived Tuesday night and were unloaded the  following day. The planks are  all cut up into six feet lengths  and there are ample stringers.  The work of laying the walks is  being undertaken at once. Both  sides of Quilchena avenue, as  well as Voght street as far as the  station, will be provided with  walks.  Sensational Tragedy Was  Product of Drunken Brawl  .Presbyterian Churchr  vices Sunday, August 21: Nicola,  11 a. m.; Lower Nicola 3 p. m.;  Nicola, 7:30 p. m. Rev. W. J.  Kidd, Pastor.  HENRY STEFFENS  DEAD  Henry H. Steffens, the well  known rancher of Eight-Mile  creek, died at the Inland hospital, Kamloops, yesterday morning. Deceased had suffered for  some time from a serious ailment  and he was taken to the hospital  only last Friday.  He was 56 years of age and a  native of Hamburg, Germany.  For some time after coming to  this .country he farmed in the  vicinity of Lytton, coming to this  district about five years ago.  A widow and a family of eleven  survive. Mrs. Fred. Baker of  Ashcroft and Mrs. Melville Bailey  of Otter valley are daughters.  Miss Sophie Steffens, another  ,.-.jdaughter, has been at Coutlee  SeV- -"tor-some time and formerly lived  the work and William Mclntyre,  the popular proprietor of the  Coldwater hotel, who by the way  has been workinp untiringly in  this matter, says that he will  gladly open up a keg of nails for  anyone inclined to work.   ;���: es : ���  -  BIG CATTLE SHIPMENTS *  No less than 694 head of cattle  have been shipped by the Douglas Lake Cattle company during  the past few days consigned to P.  Burns & Co. at Vancouver. The  first installment of 301 head was  sent down on Saturday and they  averaged 1275 pounds. The  second shipment of 303 head was  sent out on Tuesday and they  averaged 1300 pounds.  VALLEY BOARD OF TRADE  A general meeting of the  Nicola Valley Board of Trade will  be held in the board room at  Nicola on the evening of Friday,  August 26, at 8 o'clock. - Business important.  in   Merritt.    There - are   in   all  three daughters and eight sons.  I        CHANCE TO WORK  ' Now that the material for the  sidewalks is here there is an excellent opportunity for the more  energetic of the citizens to donate a little time and effort towards the laying of the walks.  One hour each evening would go  a long way towards completing  Will Extend Road  Past King's Ranch  First Thirty Miles to jbe in Operation  Before the Snow Flies Next Year  Construction Work on the Kettle Valley Will be Carried on  During Winter Months���Track Laying Soon  GIVEN PURSE OF GOLD  Prior to his departure for  Clayburn the officers and'mem--  bers of the Middlesboro Society  honored R. W. W. Reid in the  presentation of a purse of gold.  Mr. Reid has been the indefati-  gible secretary-treasurer "of the  Injured member was dressed by  Dr. Tutill and Mr. McLean will  be able to be around again in a  few days.  Died���At Merritt on Wednesday, August 10, Mary Evelyn,  daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James  Wheat, aged'13 months. Funeral  in charge of Rev. Thomas Walker.  Edward Palmer, an employee  at the Middlesboro mines, met  with a rather painful accident on  Tuesday when he wrenched the  the elbow of his left arm. He  was loading coal when a shunted  car struck him, causing the injury.  William Norton is back at Quilchena after three months absence through California and  Arizona. His many friends were  glad to welcome him home.  Miss Rhodes went down on today's train to her cottage at  Lytton where! she will spend the  winter.  v ��� .-.  Miss Sophie Steffens went over  to Kamloops this morning. and  will accompany the Temains of  her father back to Merritt.  Mrs. H. H. Matthews  on a brief visit.  is away  John Edwards, inspector of  fisheries, came over from Kamloops, last night and is busy investigating certain irregularities  in this district.  Anglican Church ��� Sunday  services,   August   21,   Hyland's  Outfits are being rushed in for  construction work on the Kettle  Valley. There are now five  camps strung along the banks of  the Coldwater river leading out  of Merritt and the clearing of the  right-of-way is completed for  almost twelve miles.  James Macdonnell, head of the  contracting firm, came into the  valley Wednesday night and has  been looking oyer the ground.  Seen by The News Mr. Macdonnell had little to give out. "You  can tell the public that we are  rushing in our outfits and when  they are all here in a few days  we will have enough to complete  the whole contract."  The dinky engines are on their  way from the east and will likely  be here some time next week.  That will complete the outfits and  then the dirt will fly in earnest.  Track laying will start in two  months' time, according to Mr.  Macdonnell. The right-of-way  will be cleared for the first thirty  miles in a few weeks and then  grading operations will start and  as soon as the grading is fairly  well advanced the rails will be  put down, starting from this  end. All rails will be laid by  hand.  The thirty-mile section will  take the line up into Railway  Pass. ' 'How are you going to do  about the next thirty miles?"  was asked. "We will go ahead  with that just as soon as the first  section is completed. That will  likely be some time next year;  though it is probable that work  on the second section will start  in the spring."  There is still some possibility  that the Kettle Valley will be  sent over the Hope Pass into  Vancouver, thus giving a direct  line from Midway and the Crows  Nest district. The mining camp  at Aspen Grove will be provided  with a spur so that the transpor-  tion difficulties that have for  years held this wealthy camp  back will be removed.  Work on the V. V. & E. in the  vicinity of Tulameen has been  closed down and many of the  men have come over to work on  the Kettle Valley. Hill is suspending operations on both sides  of the line as far as construction  is concerned. Certain legislative  enactments are proving the obstacle and until these are overcome it is not likely that any  further work will be done. A  better route over the Hope is  also being sought.  Work will continue throughout  the winter on the Kettle Valley  construction. If nothing unfor-  seeh arises the first thirty miles  of the road will be in operation  by the end of 1911. The biggest  camp is located on the Voght  property about twelve miles from  town.  The location of the line is being  rushed by a large army of engineers. One crew of surveyors is  working down from Railway Pass  and two others are working this  side, one in the vicinity of Olson's  ranch.  Ranchers of the Upper Cold-  water Will Have Highway  The road leading past Del  King's ranch, about twenty miles  up the Coldwater, will be extended. Foreman Fred Seward,  with a government road gang,  will'undertake the"work at once.  The crew is now camned just  southeast of Olson's ranch, seventeen miles out, and is busy completing different repairs to the  main road. The grades will be  reduced in places and little difficulties removed.  . The ranchers living up the  Coldwater are fully assured of a  road, because if the government  gang does not reach it this year  the railroad construction crews  will be forced to build. The  present road terminates about  one -mile above King's place.  Extensive repair work will be undertaken in Voght valley as well  and it is understood that a  through=road=from^/oght==valley-=  to Aspen Grove is under con  sideration. **  BRITISH COLUMBIA HORSE  : Squadron orders No. 13 by  Major Flick commanding "D"  Squadron B. C. Horse.  Merritt Aug. 19,1910.  Squadron Mounted Drill  At Merritt,  Saturday,  August  20,6:30 p.m.    Rifles and practice  ammunition will be issued at this  parade.  Promotion  The following extract from  District Order No. 25 is published for information: British  Columbia Horse ("D" independent squadron. ) To be provisional  lieutenant (supernumerary) on  organization : Fred Armstrong  Howse, 1st April, 1910.  Charles Flick Major.  O.C. "D"B. C. H.  Robert Patton Stabbed Shappion and Shot Himself  Robert Patton, one of the best  known cowboys in the district, is  dead,, and Shappion, an Indian,  is dying, as the result of a tragedy  in the vicinity of the Indian reservation at Quilchena Wednesday night.  Patton attempted to kill Shappion, badly lacerating him about  the abdomen with a knife, and  was afterwards found dead with  several bullet wounds in his head  and body. The'general theory  is that Patton killed himself apparently under the impression  that his quarry was dead, but the  police believe that he may have  been shot by another party who  sought to exact the penalty for  the awful crime he' had under-,  taken.  An investigation is now being  conducted and two men, George  Castillion and Robert Reid, are in  gaol under close guard at Nicola  as suspects in connection with  the death of Patton. , Under the  presidency of Duncan Macphail  an inquest was opened at the  reservation this morning and its.  result is awaited with interest.  Patton and Shappion had been  drinking   hard and became engaged in a drunken melee. Shappion, who was known as a generalv  bad man,   must- have- provoked^  Patton to do the cutting- "though"*"  it may  never be known,  there -  being no eye witnesses  of the  tragedy. Shappion was cut about ���  the abdomen as well as   the leg  and is in bad shape.    The doctors  say that he is still in a critical  condition.  There are many conflicting  theories but the police suspect  that Patton was killed by one of  Shappion's friends after the' latter had been wounded, but nothing definite will be known until  the investigation has been completed; A rifle was used in the  killing.  Patton was for some time in  the employ of the Douglas Lake  Cattle company. He was a quarter breed and lived on the reservation.  ;W. A. Moir, the man who  killed Sergeant Carruthers in  Wolseley barracks, London, two  yjears ago, and Robert F. McTaggart, the Toronto wife murderer, have escaped from the  asylum at Hamilton and are still  at large. They are both insane  and desperate men.  Thomas Morgan, inspector of  mines, returned to Nanaimo, today.  Kt&YBUILD   SAWMILL  Charles Walker, head of the  American Timber Holding company, owning the bulk of the timber up the Coldwater river, will  be in Merritt tonight and will  look over the holdings of the  company. He will be accompanied by J. W. Aldrich, in  charge of the timber of the Canadian Pacific railway.  It is the general opinion of the  officers and promoters of the  American Timber Holding Company that it will be necessary to  place a mill up the Coldwater in  order to profitably operate the  limits. Plans are now completed  for the installation of a large  modern mill though nothing of  material importance will be undertaken until the conditions  have been thoroughly investigated.  ROUTE OF ��V.V.& E.  The proposed route of the V.  V. & E. railway as published in  The News two weeks ago will be :  formally adopted, according to  one of the best authorities.  This route provided that the  line come along the Tulameen  and Otter rivers from Princeton,  through Railway Pass, up the  Coldwater to July creek, along  July creek to {Boston Bar creek  and down to the Colquhalla, 14  miles from Hope. A crew of  engineers started to make surveys along this route only two  days ago and is now working  along Boston Bar creek. Another  crew will work from this end. THE NJCOLA VALLEY NEWS  Friday, August 19, 1910  Brown & Schmock  Tonsorial  Parlors  A   complete   stock   of  fectionery and candies  always on hand.  con-  Ice Cream and  Soft Drinks  W. E. BROWN     WM. SCHMOCK  MERRITT. b. c.  Coal    Coal    Coal  The Coal Hill Syndicate  is in a position to  quote you  LOWEST PRICES  on any quantity of their  now famous product.  Our mine is run free of  rock and slate and this  results in splendid furnace fuel.  LUMP  DOMESTIC  is the finest household  coal to be had and it is  delivered in Merri      or  2 Tc r  Lots  BE  A   BOOSTER  If  things   don't  just seem to suit you  An' the world seems kinder wrong,  What's the matter with a-boostin'  Just to help the things along ?  'Cause if things should stop a-goin'  We'd be in a sorry plight,  And just keep that horn a-blowin' ���  Boost 'er up with all your might.  If you see some feller ti-yin'  For to make some project go,  You can boost it up a trifle,  That's your cue to let him know  That you're not a-goin to knock it  Just because it ain't your shout,  But you're goin' to boost a little  'Cause he's got the best thing out.  Do you know there's l'.ts o' people  Settin' round in every town,  Growlin' like a broody chicken,  Knockin' every good thing down ?  Don't you be that kind o' cattle,  'Cause they ain't no use on earth.  You just be a booster rooster,  Crow an' boost for all you're worth.  If you town needs boostin', booster.  Don't hold back and see  If some other feller's willin',  Sail right in.    This country's free.  No one's got a mortgage on it.  It's just yours as much as his.  If your town is shy on boosters  You get in the boostin' biz.  ���Agricultural Southwest.  THE GILMORE ROAD  The new road around the foot  of Gilmore hill will be finished  about the end of the month.  Foreman Macdonald and his crew  are rushing the work as expeditiously as possible. The new  road will 'be twelve feet in width  and will completely do away with  the big grade over Gilmore hill.  $10.00 per  Casli with order     Proim  livery  Jos.  Graham, Mg  P.O. Box  17  Merritt, B.C.  TO BUILD HOSPITAL  The fine farm home of M.  Olson, situated about seventeen  miles up the Coldwater, has been  secured by Dr. Kerr, in charge  of me'dical work for Macdonnell  & Gzowski, and will be used as  a residence during construction.  A frame building will be constructed alongside and will be  used as a hospital for the treatment of cases brought in from  the construction camps. A nurse  will be in charge. Dr. Kerr is  now on Vancouver Island completing certain work and will be  back here the first of next month..  He is well known through the  Nicola valley, having been medical superintendent during the  construction of the present  branch of the C. P. R.  Trucking  and Dray ing  It matters not what class of  hauling it is I can give you  the best of service and  prices will suit you.  DRN MUNRO  Stables:    Coutlee Avenue  Merritt, B. C.  =OFdeT__rPromptl^Ej^cuted=  ANOTHER   TRAIL   BLAZER GONE  Angus Lamont,' a pioneer of  the   Similkameen,   died   at   his  home in Ashnola last Thursday  night from Bright's disease and  was buried at Princeton on Saturday.    The   deceased came to  the Similkameen during the year  of the Granite creek excitement,  and when the camp slumped took  up a ranch at Ashnola.    A few  years ago he sold the ranch for  $12,000,   but later on leased it,  and was living on the place at  the time of his death.    The late  Mr.    Lamont    was    a   Scotch-  Canadian by birth and about 70  years of age.    He was an. early  pioneer   of   British    Columbia,  being among the  first to make  the rush into Cariboo in '59-60.  He was  known to the few remaining old trail blazers around  Merritt,   who   will  be  sorry to  hear of his demise.  DEAL DID GO THROUGH  J. . B. Greaves returned last  Saturday night from Victoria  and on his arrival at Mei'ritt announced the transfer of his interests, as well as those of Wm.  Thompson of "Victoria, in the  Douglas Lake Cattle company.  John Ward, father of Francis  Ward, one of the present managers, has purchased the property  outright and the son will continue  as manager. Mr. Greaves will  superintend the hay making,  after which he will retire.  NOT COMING YET  J. J. Warren will not visit Merritt for some little time. The  president of the Kettle Valley  railway had completed plans for  coming here last Friday night  but unforseen things have arisen  with the result that he was  forced to a postponement. Chief  Engineer A. McCulloch, who  went down to the coast to  Mr. Warren, has returned.  meet  M. A. A. WILL MEET  A general meeting, of the  Merritt Athletic Association has  been called for the Coldwater  hotel for the evening of Tuesday,  August 23rd. A good attendance  is necessary as matters of importance are to be considered.  NEW SCHOOL STAFF  Malcolm McKenzie of New  Westminster has been appointed  to the position of. principal of  Merritt public school to succeed  Ernest Fraser. He will have for  his assistant Miss Mabel V.  Beattie of Kamloops. Both  teachers come very highly recommended.  REVIVING THE DROWNED  BEST OF GRUB  B, J. MCGREGOR  PAINTER,  PAPERHANGER,  AND SIGN WRITER  Wallpaper and Burlaps in Stock.  1  AH kinds of Wagon and Carriage  Painting done.  Quilchena Ave.    -   Merritt  Merritt Auto  Livery  points through the  district  ���a   big, time   and money  saver for travelers.  Service  is safe, fast and sure.  Rates on Application.  VAL. V. CROCKETT  Manager.  MERRITT  B. C.  The best of grub is served in  the construction camps of Macdonnell & Gzowski, up the Cold-  water, and the men are more  than pleased. The editor of The  News was a guest in the Baker  camp, about twelve miles out,  over Sunday last and he was  most favorably impressed with  the comforts and conveniences  that are provided for the men.  Under the able supervision of  Louis Busby, who is recognized  as one of the best chefs in the  land, the meals that are served  are the superior of those served  in the majority of hotels. Variety  and quality are combined and  there is every reason for satisfaction. And the Baker camp is  typical of the others.  New  THE FALL FAIRS  The dates of the fall fairs  through the upper country and  coast have been announced as  follows:  Nicola Valley,  Sept. 14.  Kamloops; Sept. ;28, 29 and 30.  Vernon, Sept. 15, 16 and 17.  Armstrong, Sept. 22 and 23.  Kelowna, Sept.'20 and 21.  Salmon Arm, Sept. 23 and 24.  Vancouver, Aug. 15 to 20 inclusive.  Victoria, Sept. 27 to Oct. 1.  New Westminster, Oct. 4 to 8  inclusive.  and Easy Plan Advocated by  Life  Saving Society  The Royal Life Saving Society  has circulated particulars of the  new Schafer method for resuscitating the apparently drowned,  and charts showing this and  other methods are being displayed at lock-houses and other places  where   boating   men   can    best  _sJ.udyJ_=___ithem_says_____T,he___Xondon,  Times.  The old way of resuscitating  apparently drowned was to lay  the patient upon his back with a  hard roll of clothing under the  shoulder, and, having fastened  the tongue to prevent suffocation, to induce respiration by  raising and lowering his arms  and pressing the chest at frequent intervals. The Schafer  method is quiet different. It is  a method- which can easily be  remembered and put into operation by one person. The same  rules apply equally whether the  subject has been drowned or is  suffering from an electric shock,  save that in the latter, case it is  necessary to find a dry surface  on which to lay him.  The patient must be laid face  downwards on the ground, and  it is well not to delay applying  the method even for the purpose  of removing or loosening the  clothing. The operator puts  himself astride or one side of the  patient, and places his hands on  the small of the other's back.  In this way his two thumbs meet  in the centre of the back and his  fingers are extended so as to  cover the ribs. The instructions  continue:  '.Then,  lean:  forward,   and,  keeping     the     arms     straight,  steadily allow the weight of your  body to fall over upon them, and  so v produce a firm downward  pressure, which must not be  violent. Remember that your  object is to press downward toward the ground, in order to decrease the size of the chest  cavity. D  "By this means the air (and  water, if there be any), is driven  out of the patient's lungs. Immediately thereafter swing backward, rapidly releasing the pressure, but without lifting the  hand's from the patient's body.  As all the muscles are in a limp  or relieved condition, the tongue  has a tendency to fall back and  and block the air-passages.  "Further, in cases of drowning, there is an enormous congestion and swelling of the liver,  combined with and caused by a  great distension of the heart,  especially at the right side. This  congested state of the liver renders the Howard method rather  dangerous, since forcible pressure upon the lower chest is apt  to cause its rupture. ",  "The Schafer method possesses  none of the disadvantages which  have been enumerated, as the  patient is laid face downwards.  It is also safe, efficient, less complicated than any other system,  and involving a minimum amount  of labor on the part of the  operator.''  H. PRIEST, Photographer  Studio Opposite Public School  Films Developed .  MERRITT, B.C.  M. L. GRIMMETT  Barrister and Solicitor  Notary Public  Solicitor for the Bank of Montreal  Nicola > - Merritt  At MerriU Monday, Wednesday, Friday  7GEO. h. broughton  Gradute S. P, S.  DOMINION and PRON1NCIAL  LAND SURVEYOR  Merritt Princeton Penticton  NOW AT MERRITT  McVittie & Cokely  Dominion and Provincial  Land Surveyors  Irrigation  Work  a  Specialty.  Office over Bank of Montreal.  Merritt, B. C.  A.;W. McVITTIE  D.L.S.. B.C.L.S.  L. S. COKELY  D.L.S., B.C.I>-.  Excursion Fares  Via  Canadian Pacific  Railway  to  ^Industrial and  'Agricultural  |    Exhibition  {August   15-20  . Vancouver.  f Tickets on sale August 15fch to  [ 20th. Final return limit August  I 24th.  [    Fare $7.95  i For the round trip from Merritt.  j- Apply to  j G. M. THOM  Agent - Merritt, B. C.  Or write to  C. B. POSTER  r  ! A. G>P'*A''      Vancouver, B.C.  and Prices are Just Right  You needn't be tied up in building your house  now because I can supply you with any grade  of lumber that you require.  Get Your Orders in Early  All Kinds of Trucking and  Draying Done.  GEORGE RICHES  Temporary offices :  Granite Avenue - MERRITT, B. C.  Paint Your House!  You can hardly anticipate the wonderfully improved appearance that follows a coat of paint  for the house or store.  Sherwin   Williams   Paints  and Varnishes  are acknowledged to be the best and you can  can do your own paintimg during leisure hours.  Full line of ready mixed paints always in stock..  Call and get a specimen card.  G. B. Armstrong  MERRITT,  9 B.C.  MERRITT'S NEW  Have   been opened  in the newly fitted out  building just north of Coutlee's livery  stable on Quilchena Ave.  Candies and Confectionery  Ice Cream and Soft Drinks  Cigars and  Tobaccos  Short Order Restaurant  Merritt Manager H. G. Statham. '  WE MANUFACTURE OUR OWN GOODS.  Nicola Valley  Dealers in Prime Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork and  Sausage, Poultry, Ham and Bacon. Fresh Fish always on  hand. Orders receive prompt attention. Cattle bought  and sold by the carload.  I. Eastwood  Manager  _Hij_��i_a_a_�� Friday, August. 19, 1910  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  Many dope fiends contracted  the drug ��� Jiabit in the cradle  Certain dangerous drugs were given to them in  . . their baby days in the form of "Soothing Syrups," .  . "colic cures" and''infantj'.friends." The harmful  effect of "soothers" containing opium, morphine,  chloroform, chloral,.etc., cannot be too strongly  stated. Do not give baby a "soother" unless  you positively must.    Then give it  Provincial News  SOOTHING SYRUP  *   and rest contented.    Nyal's Soothing'Syrup con-  "���'���   tains  no   opiates;     It   induces natural, healthy  sleep���gives  immediate   relief to baby,  calming  ..    the mother's tired nerves���rdoes hot put on soft,  .;.   flabby flesh, making the little folks easy victims  .;/. of childish diseases. ���  We .wouldn't    think   of   recommending   Nyal's  ;;    -Soothing' Syrup if   we  were   not   certain   of  its  "-beneficial effects. "  Anything you  buy:  with the name  will  give   you  entire .  satisfaction.  2450  Sold and guaranteed by  G. M. Gemmill,       Druggist,        Merritt  I have opened fine new parlors in the old restaurant  building just back of the old- Coldwater. New  Tables and everything in the best order,  Tobaccos and Cigars  A good fresh supply always on hand.  O'rders taken for fresh^butter and eggs.  W.J. Thompson,  Prop.  Merritt Livery and Feed Stable  Saddle Horses, and Single and Double Drivers  7      on Shortest Notice.  Good accomodation for horses.    Express meets  all trains.    Buggies for hire.  A. J. COUTLEE, Prop.,  Merritt, B. C.  etropolitan  MEAT MARKET  NICOLA, . C  The choicest of Beef, Mutton, etc., always onvhand.  Fresh Fish,  Eggs and Vegetables.  T. HESLOP, Prop.  A NEW STORE  I have opened a store in the Roberts' Store Building, Front  St.. Nicola, B.C. Groceries, Confectionary,. Fruits, Cigars,  Tobacco, Jewelery and Notions always in stock. I_have also  a stock of Men's Overalls, Smocks, Shirts, Underwear, Col-,  lars, Ties, Belts, Etc.;also Graniteware, Glassware,China-  ware and Tinware, that I will dispose of ata very low figure.  The best of goods. Quick sales and small profits is my  motto,    Call and be convinced. ���  A. L. LEONARD,   Proprietor.  Nanaimo will hold an athletic  meet on Labor day.  The C. P. R. have made improvements to the depot at  Ashcroft.  The Masset Review suggests  the formation of a publicity club  for Masset.  Another sawmill is being installed at Fort George. It will  have a daily capacity of 10,000  feet.  Medical Health Officer Kingston calls attention to the need  for an isolation hospital at Grand  Forks.  The whaling boat William  Grant caught ten whales in five  days at Rose harbor, Queen  Charlotte Islands. ���  The building boom continues  at Fort George, business premises  and residences being erected as  fast as materials can be procured.  C. J. Bury, general manager  of the western lines of the  C. P. R., announces that trains  will not be reduced. Other lines  are cutting down their schedules.  The new liquor license law is  already having its effect in Kamloops where a hotelkeeper was  fined $100 and costs for giving  liquor to a man apparently under  the influence.  Thousands of people are homeless in the city of Tokio, capital  of Japan, as a result of floods.  The overflowing of the river  Sumida was responsible. ' The  waters are still rising.  Premier McBride leaves Ashcroft by auto special next Tuesday for Fort George and the  northern country. If time permits he will visit Tete Jaun  Cache and go through the Yellowhead Pass.  vA concreate beacon is being  erected on Bamfield reef, an  island between Porcher island  and the mouth of the Skeena.  This is one of a chain of 200  beacons, which it is proposed to  erect at various points along the  northern coast.  Cunningham Morris, editor of  the Revelstoke Mail-Herald, is at  the coast looking for a suitable  airship which he will purchase.  Some editors fly high, but the  majority are glad of the privilege  of walking along the public  highway.  The Boundary Creek Times  says: "Alex. Robinson of Smelter Lake, Grand Forks, has contracted to deliver one million feet  of lumber to the Kettle Valley  railway   construction   camp   at  COUNTY COURT  The next si-tins of the County Court for the  district of Yale will be held at the Court House.  Nicola, on Thursday, September 22nd at 10  o'clock in the mornintr.  W. N. ROLFE.  Registrar County Court,  Nicola, August 8. 1910.  PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED  The partnership existing between William E. Brown and  William Schmock has been mutually dissolved and the undersigned will continue the business  and assume all the firm's accounts up to the night of August  8th.  ;  William Schmock  FOR SALE  One registered Jersey Bull "Merry  Maidens Duke II", born February 10th,1  1906; sire, "Merry Maidens Duke";  grand sires, "Merry Maidens Third  Son," which took first prize at St.  Louis fair and '.'Gert'es Stoke Pogis."  Dam, "Gerties Lily" with a record of  7114 pounds of milk in 12 months at 2  years old; Grand dams, "Prize Mays  Duchess II. "with a record of 7274  pounds of milk in 150 days and "Diplomas Lily" with a record of 6641 pounds  of milk in 10 months.  One registered Jersey Bull "Saturn"  born   February 27,   1910; sire, "Silver  Dawn" of "Saturna" and dam, "Lady  Betty of Saturna."  For further particulars apply to  Manager, Quinsharden Ranch.  Dot, B. C.  TVIidway. This looks like something doing in the Hot Air train  line."  The arrest at Calgary of a man  named Crowe, who has travelled  under a dozen aliases, marks the  capture of one of the most dangerous bank swindlers in the  country. He has operated in  every city of importance and the  Pinkertons have been on his  trail for several months.  Angus McGillivray, fire ranger  for the Ashcroft district, has  published a warning to those who  use the weed, and especially to  the boys who smoke the deadly  cigarette, to be careful not to  throw a burning cigar or burning  ashes from a pipe into timber or  bush. The residents of Nicola  valley would do well to follow the  same restrictions.  The Greenwood Ledge has the  following: '' The ups and downs  of mining districts are plainly  seen in the history of the Slocan.  Just thirteen years ago the business done at the mining recorder's office in New Denver  was thirty-two times, greater  than it is at the present time.  Still, there is yet concealed  within the steep mountains of  the silvery Slocan vast stores of  mineral wealth, awaiting the day  when man will force it into the  markets of the world.''  I  I  Get in on the Ground Ploor  Only a Few Good Buys Left for  You  These Prices Will Last Only Until July 15th.  It matters not whether you want  it for the speculation, for building a home or putting up a business block, we can meet your  best wishes.  Th<ec^  of Merrit is the Conklin  For information call on or address  Agents for Conklin Estate  Offices over Bank of Montreal  Merritt,   -   -   -   B. C.  '-.V'-'*. THE NICOLA VALLEY' NEWS  Friday, August 19, 19J0  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  " PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY  Subscription $2.00 a year  in   advance.  Six months $1.00  EDITOR        - - -        S. N. DANCEY  0��e dollar per inch per month for regula advertising. Land and water notices $7.50 for 60  days.-, $5.00 for. 30 days.  ������i  cents  Classified   advertising   10 words for  extra words 2 cents:  Special rates  furnished for lame contract advertising.  Address  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  P.O. Box 20 Merritt. B.C  J. B. GREAVES RETIRES  The removal from the control  of the Douglas Lake Cattle Co.,  of J. B. Greaves marks the passing from active life of one of  the most enthusiastic promoters  of the live stock industry in the  upper country. It is pleasing to  know that Mr. Greaves has decided to remain in Nicola amongst  his bid friends and amidst the  scenes of his years of activities.  The Douglas Lake Cattle Co. is  one of the largest institutions of  its kind in Canada. Even Pat  Burns with his affluence of wealth  and' live stock is but a worthy  rival. Years ago when Mr.  Greatves first came to the country  he organized the necleus of this  splendid concern, and though  two others have been associated  with him in later years still it. is  largely through the splendid  ability and tact of Mr. Greaves  that* the Douglas Lake Cattle  Co. occupies the high position  that it does today.  This same institution has done  more towards the upbuilding of  the live stock industry than any  other agency. Through it the  breeding off horses has bejen  revolutionized until today Nicola  valley horses represent the highest ;type, the inferior qualities  having been eliminated. Then  too, in the cattle industry there  has been a wonderful development and improvement,  thanks  largely to the efforts of the  Douglas Lake Cattle Co. Nicola  beef is a prize on the Vancouver  market today and commands a  better price than any other.  Mr. Greaves represents a fine  type of man���with a high sense  of duty and integrity of purpose,  ever zealous and devoted to his  task and with a wealth of energy  that would do credit to a man  many years his junior, he has  found it possible through the  blessing of good health to give  all his faculties to the promotion  of the enterprise that was so  near to his heart. He has met  with trials and difficulties but  ever full of optimism these served  as but a stimulant to urge him  on to the accomplishment of  greater things.  And now that he has sought  the quiet of private life and will  lay down the burden of activities  it is the sincere general wish of  his thousands of friends throughout the province, who have learned to love and. honor him, that in  his autumnal days he will be  blessed with a full measure of  the comforts of life and that  happiness and contentment will  be his in the broadest and deepest sense.  FLORENCE >. NIGHTINGALE  The passing of Florence Nightingale at the age of ninty years  marks the removal of one of the  most picturesque figures of the  early part of the nineteenth century. She it was who founded  the nursing profession and gave  to it that womanly grace and that  heroism that' has placed it  amongst the noblest of vocations.  During the dark hours of the  Crimean war when wounded  and dying men were rescued  from the battlefield only to be  subjected to hospital conditions  that were robbed of every vestige  of humanitarianism Florence  Nightingale prof erred her services and organizing a corps of  'thirty-eight nurses went out to  the battlefield and took charge  of the hospital work. The effect  was wonderful. Conditions improved under the direction of  her wonderful generalship and  for the first time in the history  of strife the military authorities  were brought to a proper appreciation of the important place of  hospital work on a battlefield.  Unselfishingly devoted to her  task, with a wealth of kindness  and womanly grace, she toiled  long hours through the night to  alleviate the sufferings of the  wounded soldiers in her charge.  Her sweet ministration of love  and care was but the product of  a genius for helpfulness and a  consecration to humanity.  Her presence spread sunshine  through the hospital wards at  Scutari and through her noble  efforts and those of her corps the  ghastly mortality was reduced to  a minimum. She was known as  the "Angel of Crimea," the  noble leader of a little army of  peace, and her kindness, wisdom,  sweetness, energy, influence and  inspiration seemed undying.  She has given to the nursing  profession that what it has today. She lived that others might  profit by her works. She has  gone down to the grave honored  and loved, and out of the millions  of humanity who know the story  of her heroic life work there is  none but who will drop a tear for  the grand old woman who devoted  her life and all to the cause of  man. ���-  THE  WAY   FREIGHT  There is only one solution to  the problem of way freight distribution on the local branch line  and that is to provide separate  cars for the "Nicola and Merritt  shipments. This'suggestion has  been . laid before . the C. P. R.  freight department several times  but has been ignored. The empty  cars could both be shipped back  full of coal, and as it is many  cars are now being brought in  light.  The local train crew has now  received instructions_..to unload  the way freight at Merritt on the  way up. This means that on  some nights the train will reach  Nicola shortly before midnight  thus seriously interfering with  the mail and passengtl' service.  We know for a fact that the way  freight for Merritt often runs as  high as eight and nine tons and  this would require several hours  in unloading. Then too the train  crew would have to appropriate  so much time at Merritt for  dinner.  But on the other hand it is  necessary that the way freight  for Merritt be left here when ic  is first brought in instead of being  taken through to Nicola and  returned. T  If separate ears were provided  it would obviate the difficulty.  The latest instructions will meet  with strenuous protest at the  hands of the business men and  citizens of Nicola.  would only' be relishing to an  ordinary man. Constable Clarke  has been drawn from his peaceful slumbers during the middle  of the night on more occasions  than one and if examples could  be made of some of these hood-  r ���*  lums it might establish a good  precedent.  The Attorney General's department at Victoria has long  been considering the appointment of an additional constable.  The very f^ct that we have construction days with us with the  attendant flotsam and jetsam of  disreputably characters should be  sufficient incentive to jncrease  the local force.  NIGHT CONSTABLE  Merritt" wants a night constable and it is pretty nearly  time that such an officer was  provided. Constable Walter  Clark is a good man, one of the  best in the service, but it is unfair to expect that he can be on  duty night and day.  There is hardly a night passes  but the peace of the town is disturbed by some rowdy hoodlums  who have about as much sense  as a jackal 1. They roam through  the streets shouting and singing  and in some instances using  language that is positively distasteful to any self respecting  man, much less to the women  who happen to live in Merritt.  ,.: The cause of this misconduct  is often a glass of beer or whiskey���at  least   a   quantity   that  We hear so much nowadays  about the independent in politics  and many of the eastern papers  are holding up Col. G. T. Deni-  son as the great disciple of independence. We admire the  man of independent thought and  action, the,man who can take his  party to task when he knows it  is in the wrong, but we cannot  condone the man who wants to  organize an independent party.  Independence is a useful force,  It is nothing more  or less than  resourcefulness judiciously handled. But it should be operative  within the party ranks for there  it can accomplish the most good.  There is no room in Canada for  a third party| The two great  political factions are ample, but  what we do want is the exercise  of a greater spirit of independence within the party because  that alone tian accomplish a  remedy for miny of the wrongs  that today beset the two great  forces.    _ -\   John P. McConnell, editor of  the Saturday Sunset, is rendering a good service to the province of British Columbia, in his  descriptive sketches of different  parts of the country. It is good  publicity matter and is spread  over a big field. Bright and interesting are i the stories and  with a wealth of geographical  knowledge they should make good  reading not alone for the people of  this province Tbut for the outside  world, for after all the whole  world is interested in some way  or other in British Columbia.  .     '������.���...������   ''''.  O��� : -'   ���_���  General Baden-Powell has been  feted at the coast this week. He  inspected local corps of the Boy  Scouts of which he was the  founder.  When you want to clear your  house of flies, see that; you  get  Imitations are always  unsatisfactory.  The Coming Res  District of the Town of Merritt  7*[o those who contemplate  ^ homemaking it is well that  they give first consideration to  the question of location. One of  the greatest essentials in making  a home is to select a pleasing en-  viroment.    We have just placed  =on=the^market^what=is^to^bir  known as Merritt Terrace and its  location as well as the general  character of the district stamp  it as one of the important future  residential communities of the  town.  Situated on a lofty bluff overlooking the town and commanding a position of unrivalled scenic  wealth Merritt Terrace appeals  in no mean sense to the man wl?o  is looking for a home site. The  character of the soil is in itself  worthy of a first consideration  and general conditions are of  such a nature as to be fully reassuring. The lots all have a  frontage of one hundred feet  and range from one hundred to  two hundred and eighty feet in  depth.  Real   Choice  ^Hflfe have fixed the purchase  W prices so that they are within reach of all. Just think���an  outlay of $200 or $300 will secure  for you one~of the finest building  lots in the town. There is no  doubt as to the future of Merritt.  "ItrisTieftined to become one of=  the most active commercial centres of the upper country so that  you secure permanency in locating a home here.  E very buy is a good one. Some  of the first citizens of the town  have already advised us that they  will build on Merritt Terrace and  it is necessary that you buy at  once if you want to get one of  the choice situations. .  Come and see us and we will  be only too glad to drive you out  to the spot and show you everything. It is but a few minutes  from the heart of the .business  district.  INVESTM  Offices over Bank of Montreal.  MERRITT, B. C Friday, August 19, 1910  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  'QEMMILL HAS IT'  We have a special assortment of Kirk's famous  Soaps, comprising all the attractive kinds and  odors of this excellent line. There is a special  pay day price on them.  Call and See Them.  G. M. GEMMILL  Druggist and Stationer  Agent for Mason & Rlsch Piano.  merritt; B. C.  LOCAL AND DISTRICT  Pat Spratt spent   Sunday  at  Kamloops, going over Saturday  night.  R. W. W. Reid with Mrs. Reid  and family left by Tuesday  mprning.'s. train for their new  home in Clayburn.      .  Many of the wells in Merritt  are dry at the present time and  there   is   considerable  difficulty  with the water supply.  . -  Mrs. W. E. Dodd with the baby  and Miss. Ethel Woodward have  gone into the hills back of Lower  Nicola for a couple of weeks'  rest.  J. F. Kennedy of San Francisco has been in the valley for  several days looking" over the  situation. He is contemplating  investments.  jjtrs. M. L. /Grimmett and  family returned'' Monday night  from the coast where they have  spent the past few weeks with  relatives and friends.  lyirs. Kruhi of Seattle, who has  bee(n visiting with her mother,  Mrs. Cleary, for several weeks  pasjt, will return to her home  about the end of the month.  Rev. J. W. Hedley went down  to Victoria on Tuesday to be  presentatthe general conference  of"vthe Methodist church. He  will be back tomorrow night.  The Belgium exposition was  ravaged by fire to the extent of  two' million francs. The Canadian buildings were saved as well  as the priceless art works exhibit.  Mrs. Charles Sasseville and  family have returned to Kamloops after a pleasant stay of  several days at Nicola, where  they, were guests at the Nicola  hotel.  f ���  W. H. Richardson and H. M.  Frame, late of The News staff,  left i.Tuesday morning for Vancouver, where they will reside.  The.Vbest of good wishes will follow ;them to their new home.  One of the biggest trains that  has gone out of Merritt for some  time was taken out on Tuesday  morning. It comprised thirty-  three cars in all, fifteen cars of  cattle and eighteen cars of coal.  RoJbert Lyons ot P. Burns &  Co. left the valley Tuesday morning after spending several days  at the Douglas Lake Cattle company's ranch. He made two  shipments of cattle during his  stay.,'  While shunting cars onto the  spur back of the station building  Tuesday night the big bumper  was carried away and one of the  cars was left with only one set  of trucks on the track. The  trouble was easily adjusted.  William Muggeridge, brake-  man on the local branch, left on  Wednesday. for a two weeks'  vacation. ^He went to Salt  Spring Island where he joined  Mrs. Muggeridge, and together  they are visiting friends in different places.  George E. Hygh, the popular  proprietor of the Merritt hotel,  is building a large addition to the  building adjoining the hotel and  will convert it into an annex.  The bar will be. moved over from  the main building and other im  provements effected. Business  is good with this well known  hostelry, the accommodation  being taxed almost daily.  Born���At Dot on Monday,  August 15th, to Mr. and Mrs.  George Slater, a son.  Robert Seeley left yesterday  for New Westminster in response  to a message telling him that  Mrs. Seeley was seriously ill.  He will be back within a week.  H. L. Morley of Kamloops has  been appointed to the office of  deputy land registrar for the  district of Kamloops and Yale  during the absence of the  registrar.  William E. Brown opened out  his new tonsorial parlors to the  public this week. The equipment and furnishings are all new  and the shop presents a most  favorable appearance.  J. Angus Macdonald/ who has  been looking over the valley for  a suitable business. location, was  forced to return to Seattle owing  to the serious illness of his wife.  He will be back in Merritt in the  course of a few days.  The cattle corrals at Nicola  will very shortly, be enlarged,  the lumber being on the ground.  The installation of corrals at  Merritt has not vet been undertaken, the section crews awaiting  instructions from  headquarters.  J. A. Hutchinson of Victoria,  better known as "Hutch the  booster," arrived in Merritt on  Wednesday night. Mr. Hutchison is a former newspaperman,  but has been engaged in the  realty business of late. He has  interests in the valley.  J. P. Boyd went up the Cold-  water valley on Wednesday to  look over some land. He was  accompanied by Nelson Welsh,  and they went several miles  above Del King's ranch., On  Monday Mr. Boyd will go down  to Vancouver on a business trip.  Dan McKay returned Monday  night     from    Berlin.    Ontario.  The offices of the Nicola Valley  Investment and Land Company,  Limited, will be transferred from  the Jackson block to the Mclntyre  building across from the post-  office. Mr. Mclntyre is making1  extensive improvements in the  building which, when completed,  will provide most comfortable  and attractive offices.  Miss Agnes Vair has resigned  her position as stenographer in  the offices of the Nicola Valley  Investment and Land Company,  Limited, and will devote her  time largely to music. Miss Vair  is a brilliant musician and has  acquired such a large class of  pupils that she has found it  necessary to give more time to  class work.  As announced in The News  several weeks ago William Hargraves will locate a hardware  store in Merritt. Mr. Hargraves  was in town the other day and is*  now completing plans for the in:  auguration of the business. He  expects to start up very; shortly  on an elaborate scale carrying all  lines of hardware and agricultural machinery.  Arthur Johnston, manager of  the Revelstoke Mail-Herald,  reached Merritt Tuesday night  and returned yesterday with his  wife who has been visiting her  mother, Mrs. Cleary. Mr, Johnston is one of the pioneer newspaper men of the west. He has  seen many towns grow up,. but  he says that Merritt has $hem all  beaten. He is particularly impressed with the fine business  blocks and excellent hotels.  A. Sims Bennett, editor: of The  Herald, is bemoaning the loss of  several pieces of clothing that  were sent to him from the ninth  concession of Bruce county. On  Tuesday afternoon a bold, bad  thief entered his apartments and  appropriated the best that the  thought moulder had oh tap.  The News devil says that he  would like to know how it is that  an editor ever became the proud  possessor of so much wardrobe.  is being dumped into the hole  and the roadway will thus be  levelled up. Mr. Coutlee has  kindly volunteered to assist Mr.  Armstrong in the undertaking  and has ^donated a team and a  man. Pat Cantlon has the contract for excavating.  ������������o   MINING EXAMS.  The   yearly   mining  examinations were held at the Merritt  public   school   this week under  the supervision of Thomas Morgan, inspector of mines, and B.  Browitt,   superintendent of the  Diamond   Vale   Collieries,   who  holds   the   appointment  of   examiner for this district.   Twelve  candidates wrote,  four in first  class, seven in the second class  and one in the third. Certificates  are graded,  a manager holding  first class,  an overman second  class and fire boss a third.  rea  Established  1817. Head Office:  PAID UP CAPITAL $14,400,000.  Montreal  REST $12,000,000  Sir Edward Clouston, Bart.  President and General Manager.  Branches in all the principal cities and towns in Canada,  also in London, Eng., New York, Chicago and Spokane.  Savings Bank Department  (Interest allowed at current rates.)  BRANCHES IN NICOLA VALLEY  NICOLA: MERRITT:  A. W. 8TRICKLAND, Manager. s. L. SMITH, Acting Sub-Agent  RUSHING INCORPORATION  The matter of securing incorporation is well advanced. Frank  Bailey is completing the survey  and the list of property owners  within the restricted area will be  obtained at the government  offices in Nicola and Kamloops in  the course of a few days. M.  L. Grimmett will draw up the  ^necessary papers and the petition  :will then be submitted to the  property owners for their names.  For Values in  WATCHES  Call and See Us  We have a watch to suit every pocket.  We guarantee all watches,, and if they are not satisfactory  we will refund your money.  Call and see our stock of Tie Pins, Fobs,  Wedding Presents  Etc.    Splendid values at  James Simpson's Jewelry Store  Repairs'Guaranteed.        Watchmaker and Jeweler  THE CRIPPEN CASE  \ The death of the coroner who  was sitting on the enquiry into  the finding of the body, supposed  to be that of Belle Ellmore, in  the basement of the Crippen  home, has necessitated a fresh  start and all the evidence is being  recited again. Crippen and the  LeNeve girl will be back in England in about two weeks and then  the enquiry will assume a more  interesting stage.   s�����   THE FINEST HOSTELRY IN THE UPPER  COUNTRY-JUST OPENED.  LUXURIOUSLY FURNISHED WITH BEST  CUISINE AND ACCOMMODATION.  FINEST BRANDS OF WINES AND LIQUORS  where he has spent the past six  months at his old home. Mr.  McKay says that he enjoyed his  visit for it was thirty-five years  since he had left the old home.  "But lam glad to get back. I  tell you there is no place like  Nicola." Mr. McKay's many  friends were glad to welcome him  back.  Roy L. Thomas, who for the  past few weeks has been in the  employ of J. Q. Leonard, Nicola,  prior to which he was a member  of the staff of G. B. Armstrong,  left by Thursday morning's  train for Kelowna where he will  enter the employ of Biggin &  Poole, general merchants. His  many friends through Nicola  valley will wish him the best of  .good luck in the Okanagan town.  "Big Sioux" Schmidt has been  down from Aspen Grove for  several days and will leave  shortly for the coast going on  down to- California. He has  completed work on his mineral  claims at Aspen Grove for this  year at least, but will be back  early in the spring. Mr. Schmidt  says that the Aspen Grove district will beat them all out as  soon as the railroad gets through  and those who know the district  are of the same opinion.  NOBLE WOMAN GONE  Florence Nightingale, the hero  of Crimea, died at her London  home last Saturday at the mature  age of 90 years.    She was the  only woman to receive the Order  of   Merit  and   was one of the  noblest   specimens   of  her  sex  ever   given   to   the   service   of  humanity.     During    the   dark  hours of the Crimean war she  led a company of nurses on to  the    battlefield    and   many   a  wounded or dying soldier knew  full well the gracious blessing of  her presence and her kindly and  sweet ministrations of love and  careT^SKe^wairthe only surviv^  ing figure of the early part of  the nineteenth century.  NICOLA CATTLE BEST  "Nicola beef is in great demand at the coast. The butchers  are all clamoring for it and will  even pay more for it.'' Robert  G. Lyons, chief buyer for P.  Burns & Co., made this interesting statement to The News on  Tuesday.  The steers that we are shipping today average 1400 pounds  and that is exceptionally good.  Of course the cows bring the  average down to 1300 pounds,  but even at that it is hard to  beat."   ".-;.-���  The Douglas Lake Cattle company has a contract for shipping  300 head of cattle every Tuesday  for at least three months and  they are all going to P. Burns &  Co. at Vancouver.  HOLDING HANEY IN GAOL  A   novel   method   has   been  adopted to ensure the custody of  William   Haney,    the   notorious  train  robber, bandit and   murderer,   in   the   county  gaol   at  Dillon, Montana.   The police believe that Haney had confederates working on the outside  to  effect his escape and evidence of  this.;was found in different tools  found outside Haney's cell.  ���. But Haney will not escape, for  the police have had the steel bars  of the cell windows,  as well as  the   brrs of the door,   charged  with ,2000   volts of electricity,  which means death for the man  who will touch it.   The Canadian  officers are now on their way to  bring Haney back..' He will face  the charge of murdering Constable Jsaac-Deckerat-Ashcroft  Wm. McIntyre, prop.  MERRITT, B.C.  You Need  a Summer  Suit  It is a question that o nf ronts every man just about now.  I have a omplete line of the best old ountry loths and give  the best of satisfaction in both workmanship and quality of  goods.      . Pri es are reasonable and will fit the smallest  purse.  Just opening up in the Old Nash Building, Quilhena, Ave.  Two doors west of the new Coldwater Hotel.  CLEANING AND PRESSING A SPECIALTY  -GIVE ME! A TRIAL AND IT WILL PAY YOU  C. STEPHENSON, Merchant Tailor  MERRITT, B. C.  erritt Restaurant  as well as the charge of holding  up the C. P. R. express at Ducks  GOOD PIECE OF WORK  To George B. Armstrong the  citizens of Merritt will be indebted for the removal of one of  the bad holes along Quilchena  avenue, near Alex. Coutlee's  livery stables. The earth that is  taken from the excavation for  Mr.   Armstrong's new building  HERE'S A GOOD ONE  Seldom it is that one gets a  real good joke on a Scotchman,  but here's a good one:  This particular Scotchman  visited one of the residents living  away back on the Diamond Vale  townsite the other night at an  hour when most people are in  bed.  The object of his visit had been  effecting certain improvements  about the place principal amongst  was the provision of a well, the  excavation having been left exposed with no means of warning.  The housewife heard a rather  unusual disturbance outside but  did not attach any anxiety to it.  Just then there was a vigorous  knocking at the door.  "Who's there?" called the  housewife.  "It's I, Jock���," was the  response. "I hae a parcel for  your guid mon."  " Look out for the well," were  the cautioning words of the  woman of the house.  "Hoot, lassie, I be' in the  waul," retorted the visitor, and  when the door was opened to receive the stranger he certainly  looked the part. j  A satisfied customer is the best advertisement  you can have���ask any of our regular boarders. They will tell you that they get the best  <**f service at the Merritt Restaurant. Delicacies  of the season always on hand.    Bread for Sale.  ANDREW HOGAN  Quilcheiia Ave. PROPRIETOR Merritt, B. C.  [NEW TONSORIAL PARLORS  l_j .   . ������-~���r���r  Anti-septic Shop  Will open tomorrow, Saturday,  August 13th, in the new building  on Voght street, back of the  Nicola Valley Meat Market.  Complete Service in all Departments.  Complete New Outfit and Furnishings.  BROWN  PR0FRIET0  No matter what you may require we can do it-do it well.  ^Thie Nicola Valley New*. THE NICOLA VALLIgy NEWS'  Friday, August-19, 1910  When in  .. call at the ..  Commercial  Hotel  iV   .1      h-st   of  Rate *l.50 per day  Quilchena  Hotel  Quilchena, B.C. ,p  One of the finest hotels in the upper  country. Excellent accomodation for  travellers and tourists. Hot and cold  water baths.    Best of wines and liquors.  Terms $2.00 a day and upwards.  Jos. Guichon  Proprietor  THE LION AN  THE  By CHARLES KLEIN.  A Story of American Life Novelized From the Plav h  ARTHUR   HORNBLOIV.  COPYRIGHT.     190 6.    BY     G.     W.     DILLINGHAM*  COMPANY  Automobiles  ANCOUVER AUTOMOBILE AND  CYCLE CO., LIMITED  Garage and Salesrooms--  632-636 Seymour   Street,  Vancouver  "Cadillac"   "Oldsmobile" "Oakland"  Touring  and Runabnut Models.  "Rapid." Commercial Trucks.  Demonstrations Arranged.  NOTICE  Season 1910  Imported pure bred Clydesdale  Stallion  BARON  DERBY  "No. 9491 in Canadian National  Records, and 14580 in Clydesdale  Horse Society of Great Britain  and Ireland. Sired by Barons  Pride, Dam Gitana by Hiawatha, will serve limited number of broken mares at Quinsharden ranch, Dot, B. C, and  at points between Quinsharden  ranch and Merritt during the  season.  See posters for further particulars as to dates etc.  Imported   pure   bred   Hackney  LPony Stallion  Harriestoun  Meteor  No. 10892 Hackney Horse Society  of Great Britain and Ireland.  Foalded in a07, sired by Johnie  Cope outofl t e Follie Perkins  by Sir Waldie, will serve a limited number of broken mares at  Quinsharden ranch, Dot, B. C,  during this season.  Mares must not exceed 141-2  hands in height.  Harriestoun Meteor was the  winner of first in Junior Stallion  clossand in the Pony Champion  class at the recent Horse Show  in Vancouver.  Terms  $20.00   for the  Season.  H. ABBOTT,  Owner.  Continued from last week.  The following morning she received  a tetter from Stott. lie was dclightou  to hear the good news regarding her  important discovery, and lie urged her  to lose no time in securing the letters  nnd forwarding them to -Massapequa.  when he would immediately go to  Washington and lay (hem before the  senate. Documentary evidence of that  conclusive nature, he went ou to say.  would prove of the very highest value  in clearing her father's name. He  added that the judge and her mother  ..'ere as' well as circumstances would  permit aud that they were not in the.  least worried about her protracted ftb-  ence. Tier Aunt Milly had already  .eturned to Europe, and Eudoxia was  ���fill threatening to leave daily.  Shirley needed no urging. She quite  realized the importance, of acting  quickly, hut it was not easy to get  at the letters. The library was usually Uept locked when the great man  was away, aud on the few occasions  when access to it was possible the lynx  eyed Mr. Bagley was always ou guard.  Short as had been her stay in the Ryder household Shirley already shared  Jefferson's antipathy to the English  secretary, whose 'manner grew more  supercilious and overbearing as he  drew nearer the date when he expected to ran off with one of the riches)  catches of the season. He had no!  sought the acquaintance of his employer's biographer since her arrival  and, with the exception of a rude stare,  had not deigned to notice her, whicb  attitude of haughty indifference was  all the more remarkable in view of the  fact that the Hon. Fitzroy usually jel'l  nothing unturned to cultivate a flirtatious intimacy with every attractive  f.nnale he met. : The truth was thai  what with Mr. Ryder's demands upon  his services and his own preparation?  for his coming matrimonial venture. . in,  which he had so much at stake, he had  neither time nor inclination to indulge  his customary amorous diversions.  Miss Roberts had called at the house  several times, ostensibly to see Mrs.  Ryder, and when introduced to Shirley  she had condescended to give the latter a supercilious nod. Her conversation was generally of the silly, vacuous sort, concerning chiefly new dresses  or bonnets, and,Shirley, at once read  her character���frivolous, amusement  loving, empty headed, irresponsible���  ji_st the kind of girl to do something  foolish without weighing the consequences. After chatting a few moments with Mrs. Ryder she would usually vanish, and one day after oue of  (hose mysterious disappearances Shirley happened to pass the library and  caught sight of her and Mr. Bagley  conversing in subdued and eager tones,  it was very evident that the elopement  scheme was fast maturing. If the  scandal was to be prevented, Jefferson'  ought to see his father and acquaint  him with the facts without delay. It  was probable that at the same time he  would make an effort to secure the letters. Meantime she must be patient.  Too much hurry might spoil every-  ihing.  So the days passed, Shirley devoting  almost all her time to the history she  had undertaken. She saw nothing of  Ryder senior, but a good deal of his  wife, to whom she soon became much.  ITTtaclMl^Slie^fouird^her-an"amlabler  ���rood natured woman, entirely free  from that offensive arrogance and patronizing condescension which usually  mark the parvenu as distinct from  the thoroughbred. Mrs. Ryder had no  claims to distinguished lineage; on the  contrary, she was the daughter of a  country grocer when the then rising oil  man married her, and of educational  advantages she had had little or none.  It was purely by accident that she was  (he wife of the richest man in the  world, and, while she enjoyed the prestige her husband's prominence gave  her, she never allowed it' to turn her  head. She gave away large sums for  charitable purposes and, strange to  say, when the gift came direct from  her the money was never returned on  the plea that it was "tainted." She  shared her husband's dislike for entertaining and led practically the life of  a recluse. Tho advent of Shirley, therefore, Into her quiet and uneventful existence was as welcome as sunshine  when it breaks through the clouds after days of gloom. Quite a friendship  sprang up between the two women,  and when tired of writing Shirley  would go Into Mrs. Ryder's room and  chat until the financier's wife began to  look forward to these little impromptu  visits, so much she enjoyed them.  Nothing more had been said concerning Jefferson and Miss Roberts. The  young man had not yet seen his father,  but his mother knew he was only waiting an opportunity to demand an explanation of the engagement announcements. Her husband, on the other  hand, desired the match more than  ever, owing to the continued importunities of Senator Roberts. As usual,  Mrs. Ryder confided these little domestic troubles to Shirley.  "Jefferson." she said, "is very angry.  He is determined not to marry the  girl, and when he and his father do  meet there'll be another scene."  "What   objection   has   your   son   to  Miss Roberts?" inquired sniney innocently.  "Ob. tho usual reason." sisrhnd tho  mother, "and I've no doubt lie knows  best. He's in love with another' girl--  a Miss Rossmore."  "Oh, yes." answered Shirley simply.  "Mr. Ryder spoke of her."  Mrs. Ryder, was silent and presently she left the' girl alone with her  work.  The next afternoon Shirley was in  her room busy writing when there  came" a tap at her door. Thinking it  was another visit from Mrs. Ryder,  she did not look up, but cried out pleasantly:  "Come in!"  John Ryder entered., T-Te smiled, cordially and. as if apologizing for the  intrusion, 'said amiably:  "1 thought I'd run up to see bow yon  were getting along.".  . His coming was so unexpected' that  for a moment Shirley was startled, but  s'dfi quickly regained her composure  and asked him to take a seat. He  seemed pleased to find her making such  good progress, and he stopped to answer a number of questions she put to  him. Shirley tried to be cordial, but  when she looked well at him and noted  tne keen, hawk-like eyes, the cruel,  vindictive lines about the mouth, the  square set, relentless jaw���Wall street  had gone wrong with the Colossus that  day, and he was still wearing his war  paint���she recalled the wrong this man  had done her father, and she felt how  bitterly she hated him. The more her  mind dwelt upon it the more exasperated she was to think she should be  (here, a guest under his roof, and it  was only with the greatest difficulty  that she remained civil.  "What is the moral of your life?"  she demanded, bluntly. ......  He was quick to note the contemptuous tone in her voice, and he gave her  a seen, searching look as if he were  trying to read her thoughts and fathom  the reason for her very evident hostility toward him.  "What do you mean?" he asked.  "I mean what can you show as your  life work? Most men whose lives are  big enough to call for biographies have  done something useful. They have  been; famous statesmen,; eminent scientists, celebrated authors, great inventors.    What have you done?"  The question appeared to stagger  him. The audacity of any one putting  such a question to a man in his own  bouse was incredible. He squared his  jaws, and his clinched fist descended  heavily on the table.  "What have I done?" he cried. "I  have built up the greatest fortune ever  accumulated by one . man. My fabulous wealth has caused my name to  spread to the four corners of the earth.  Is that not an achievement to relate  to future generations?"  Shirley gave a little shrug of her  shoulders.  ���'Future generations will talce no interest in you or your millions." she  said calmly. "Our civilization will  have made such progress by that time  that people  will   merely  wondpr  why  wo. in ou-r nay. Toieraren men oi your  class so long. Now It is different. The  'world is money'-ui'ad-: You are a person of Importance, iu the eyes of the  . untilinUiug multitude, but it only envies you'your fortune; it does not admire you personally. When you die,  people will count..your millions.-not  your good deeds."  "tie laughed cynically and'di'ew up a  chair near her- desk. -As. a general  thing. John Ryder never wasted words  on women. He had but a poor opinion  or .heir .mentality and considered it be-  npaih the dignity of any man to enter  in'to serious argument with' a woman.  In fact.-it was seldom he condescended to argue with any one. He gave order:; and talked to people; he had no  patience to be talked to. Yet he found  ��� liimsHI' -listening with interest to this  yc:..:g .woman who expressed herself  !-���() .Y:'..!!-.!y. It was a decided novelty  for !:i::'i ���:> hear the'truth.'  ������\Y!.:v. do.'1 care what the world  .-'ays when I'm dead?" he asked with  a  fi!.'< ed   laugh.  "You do care." replied Shirley gravely. "Yen may. school yourself to'.believe that you are indifferent to the  ���_;-(:;! ..���;!:.liosi of yf.ur fellow man. hut  right down." in your, .heart you do care,  ���every man does, whether lie be multimillionaire or a sneak thief."  "Yoi. class the- two' together. I notice." hp_said bitterly.  "It is .often a distinction without a  difference." she rejoined  promptly.  lie remained sileiit for a 'moment or  two; toying nervously with a paper  knife. TJien, arrogantly, and as if anxious to impress her with' his importance, he said:  (To be' eon ti n ue d.)  .   ;  s   ;  T  I  3 have c-5;crimg up a Lumber Yard on  Voght street just across from the G. P.  IL station, where I will carry a full line of  all classes of building material including  lumber, shingles, line, cement, etc.  Prices Will be Right  Quality of the Best,  Order Early.  All Orders Quickly Pilled  ���- Andrew McGoran  Offices in Lumber Yard.  The Bo and B.  Automobile Co.  SHOW ROOMS  New Masonic.Temple Bldg.  Cor.   Georgia and Seymour Sis.  Vancouver, B.C.'  P. O."Box'367.'  The The The  REO FORD WHITE  When in North Bend stop at  'j_r_ .  C.P.R. Hotel  ''"' You can get the best satis-  -   faction for your money.    Local  trains stop thirty minutes for  .  ' lunch.    We .have, the name of  keeping one of the test host-  elries along the line.  J. C. Clarence  Manager  LABOR DAY  Quilchena, B, ���  This is the big day of the year for the valley. This year's  bill will be better than any previous year and many outside  horses will compete.  Good Purses Hung up in all  Events  This Meet Always Brings Out the Best  Horses of the District.  Remember the Day and Date  Monday, September 5th  For information or in sending entries, address: ....  Joseph Guichon, Jr.  ;    Quilchena, B. C.  BHB >  ,'fii  ���______.''  __________  '<3__8i  'jBB  GBS>  SUBSCRIBE FOR TRE NEWS 0HLV $2.00  MERRITT HOMESITES  AND BUSINESS PROPERTY  The future of Merritt as a Commercial, Industrial and  Mining centre is now assured  The Kettle Valley Railway will be Built  at an Early Date  Acre and half acre blocks at Merritt at today's prices  will prove profitable buying. Only a limited number  to sell.    Prices and full particulars from:  The Diamond Vale  Supply Co.,  .:<*,������  Lft  Terms to suit all  purses  Merritt, B. C.  o_r.'    JL   ��  Manager.  Act now���profit  accordingly Friday, August    , 1910  'tBfi Nicola valley news  Land Act  Nicola Land District  District of Yale  Take notice that Robert Frank Morrison of Kelowna, B.C., occupation  Merchant,, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: .  .   ,  Commencing at a post planted at the  northwest corner of lot 1154 thence  east forty-three (43) chains and seventy (70) links to the west boundary ot  the land applied for by Louis Holman,  thence north sixty-six (66) chains and  fifty-five (55) links to the north west  corner of Frederic Armstrong's land,  thence west forty-three (43).chains  and (70) links, thence south sixth-six  (66) chains and fifty-five (55) links to  the point of commencement and containing two hundred arid ninety (A'O)  acres more or less.  Robert Frank Morrison  June 13, 1910.  Land Act Notice.  ��� .-.,������-, Nicola - Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.,  Take notice that Maxwell Adams, of  12 South Parade, Southsea, England,  occupation Barrister-at-Law, intends to  apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands :  Commencing at a post planted on the  North side of the Quilchena river, about  4 miles East of Lot 696, thence North  80 chains, thence East 40 chains, thence  South 80 chains, thence West 40 chains.  Maxwell Adams  Archibald W. McVittie, Agent.  June 6th, 1910.        21-30  Land Ret  Nicola Land District  District of Yale  Take notice that Frederic Armstr-ng  of Kelowna, B.C., occupation Accountant, intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  north east corner  of   the land   applied  for  by   ' ewis   Holman,   thence  north  forty  (40)   chains,   thence  west   forty  (40)   chains,   thence   south  forty   (40)  chains, thence east forty (40) chains to  point of commencement and containing  one hundred and sixty (160) acres more  or less. -.-'"-���..  Frederic Armstrong.  June 13, 1910.  Davis   of  intends to  the following  LAND ACT.  Nicola Land District.  Distoict of Yale.  Take notice that   Frederic   George  Kelowna, B. C. occupation merchant,  apply for permission  to purchase  d<Commenc.n(?S'at a posf planted at the Northeast  corner of Lot 1154, thence South 40 chains, thence  East 47 decimal 66 chains to the West boundary  of the land applied for by H..J. J. Tillbrook  thence Norrh 15 decimal 38 chains, thence East  16 chains to the Southwest corner _of f. uu-  Moulin's land, thence North nine decimal one six  - <9.16) chains, thence West three decimal seven  nought (3.70) chains to the point of commencement and contain. r.g- one hundred and thirty-  seven  decimal four four   137.44   acres,   more or  ,e8S' FREDERIC GEORGE DAVIS.  Date June 13, 1910.       32.  Land Act  Nicola Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that Leonie R. Brother-  ton, of Broom Road, Teddington, England, occupation spinster, intends to  apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted in the  middle of the West boundary of Maxwell Adam's application of even date,  thence North 80 chains, thence West80  chains, thence South 80 chains, thence  East 80 chains.  Leonie R. Brotherton.  Archibald W. McVittie, Agent.  June 6, 1910.        21-30 '  80 chains, thenee1 East 80 chains, thence  North 80 chains.    '  Lewis Ord.  Archibald W. McVitte, Agent.  June 7, 1910.       71-30  LAND ACT.  Nicola Land District.  District of Yale.  Take notice that .Thomas Nicol Morrison of  Kelowna. B. U., occupation merchant, intends to  apply for permission to purchase the following  described lands: ',_.���_.      c    ..   c  Commencing at a post planted 20 chains East of  the Northwest corner of the land applied for by  Frederic Armstrong., thence West 63 chains. 70  links to the Northwest corner of the land applied  for by R. F. Morrison, thence North 40 chains,  thence East 63 chains 70 links, thence South 40  chains to the point of commencement, containing-  254 acres more or tag^ ^^ MORRISON.  Date June 13. 1910.  Land Act  Nicola Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice   that Lacey R. Johnson,  Railway   Engineer,   of Montreal, Quebec, intends to apply   for permission to  purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of Leonie R. Brother-  ton's application of equal date, thence  South 80 chains, thence West 80 chains,  thence North 80 chains,  thence East 80  chains.-  Lacey R. Johnson.  Archibald W. McVittia, Agent.  June 6th, 1910.        21-30.  Land Act  Kamloops    Division  of   Yale    Land  District.    District of Nicola.  TAKE notice that Solomon Shrimp-  ton of Nicola, occupation rancher, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following  described   lands:-^  Commencing at a post planted at the  Northeast corner of Lot 691 thence 60  chains North, thence 60 chains West,  thence 60 chains South, thence 60 chains  East to point of commencement containing 360 acres more or less.  SOLOMON SHRIMPTON  Per Richard Hazlehurst, Agent  Dated June 17th 1910. 21-30  Land Act  Dis-  Land Act  Nicola Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.'  Take notice that Julia Ord,   of Montreal, Quebec, married0 woman,   intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands :  Commencing at a post planted about  20 chains North of the Southwest corner of Leonie R. Brotherton's application of June 6, thence North 80  chains, thence West 80 chains, thence  South 80 chains, thence East 80 chains.  Julia Ord.  Archibald W. McVittie, Agent.  June 7, 1910.        21-30.  Kamloops Division of  Yale  Land  trict.    District of Nicola  Take notice that sixty days after  date I, Catherine R. Winny, of Middlesboro, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���  Commencing at a post planted 40  chains south of the south west corner  of Lot 977, running east 40 chains,  thence south 40 chains, thenee west 40  chains, thence north 40 chains to point  of commencement.    -  CATHERINE R. WINNY  R. H. Winny, Agent.  Nicola, June 18, 1910.  Land Act.  Kamloops Division of Yale  Land Dis  trict.    District of Nicola'.  Take notice that George W. Sawyer  of Southsea, England, occupation  British Army Officer, intends to apply  for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  South West corner of Lot 714, thence  East 40 chains, thence South 40 chains,  thence West 40 chains, thence North  40 chains to point of commencement.  GEORGE W. SAWYER, Col.  Per Archibald W. McVittie, Agent.  July 11. 1910.  Dis  WATER NOTICE  Land Notice  Nicola Land District.  ;��� Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that 60 days ; after date  Euphemia  Beath  of Vancouver, married woman, -intends to  apply for permission to purchase  the  following de  scribed   land:     Commencing    at    the  North-east corner of Lot  1776,   thence  South 80 chains, thence East 80 chains,  thence North  80  chains,   thence West  80 chains to  point of "commencement,  containing 640 acres more or less.  Euphemia Beath, Applicant.  "i: E. B. Tingley, Agent.  Dated June 14, 1910.       22-31  Land Act  Nicola Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that Grace  Johnson, of  Montreal, Quebec, spinster,   intends to  applyfor permission   to  purchase   the  following described lands:  Commencing at: a post planted one  mile South of the Southeast corner of  Julia Ord's application of equal date,  thence North 80 chains, thence West 80  chains, thence South 80 chains, thence  East 80 chains.  Grace Johnson.  Archibald W. McVittie, Agent.  June 7, 1910.        21-30  Notice is hereby Riven that an application will  be made under Part V of the "Water Act 1909,"  to obtain a license in the Kamloops Division of  Yale District.  (a) The name, address and occupation of the  applicant: John C. Lay. ock, rancher, Mammette  Lake.  (b) The name of the lake. Lake about three  miles east of Mammette Lake.  (d) The quantity of water���All the lake contains.  (e) The character of proposed works���dam,  ditch and flume.  (f) The premises on which water is to be used-  Lot 1324.  (g) The purpose for which water is to be used-  Irrigation. .���'������.  (h) If for irrigation describe the land intended  to be irrigated, giving acreage���About 30 acres.  (j) Area of Crown land intended to be occupied  by the proposed works���50 square yards.  [k] This notice was posted on the. 24th day of  June 1910 and application will be made to the commissioners on the 25th day of July 1910.  JOHN C. LAYCOCK,  Mammette Lake.  Land Act.  Kamloops division of  Yale   Land  trict.     District of Nicola  Take notice that sixty days afterdate  I, Thomas Henry Dancey, of Picton,  Ont, Manufacturer, intends to apply  for permission to purchase the following described lands:���  Commencing at a post planted at the  northeast corner of Frank Bailey's application, thence 40 chains north, thence  forty chains west, thence 40 chains  south and thence 40 chains east to point  commencement and comprising i.60  acres more or less.  Thomas Henry Dancey, Applicant  Frank Bailey, Agent.  Dated August 1st, 1910.  Land Notice.  Nicola Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that 60 days after date  Charles Beath of Vancouver, occupation  Student, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land; commencing at a post planted  80 chains North of the N. E. corner of  Lot 1776, thence North 80 chains,  thence East 80 chains, thence South 80  cnains, thence West 80 chains to point  of commencement, and containing 640  acres more or less.  Charles Beath, Applicant.  E. B. Tingley, Agent.  Dated JuneJ.4,���1910. 22-31  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that I Sophia Steffens of  Mamette Lake Road, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  N. E. corner of Pre-emption record 565,  thence 40 chains East, thence 40 chains  South, thence 40 chains West, thence  40 chains North to commencement of  initial post.  Sophia Steffens.  C. P. H. Steffens, Agent.  June 30, 1910. 22-31  Land Act  Nicola Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that R.   Ernest Johnson,  of Montreal, Quebec, Railway Engineer,  intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southeast corner of Grace Johnson's  application of even date, thence South  80 chains, thence West 80 chains, thence  North 80 chains, thence East 80 chains.  R. Ernest Johnson.  Archiaald W. McVittie, Agent.  June 7, 1910.        21-30  Land Act "!;  Nicola   Division   of    Kamloops  Land District  District of Yale  Take notice that Philip DuMou-  lin of Kelowna, B.C., occupation  Bank Manager, intends to apply  for permission to purchase the  following described land. Commencing at a post planted on the  north side of Chain lake, thence  north twenty chains, thence west  twenty chains, thence south forty  chains, thence east to the shore  of Chain lake, thence easterly  along the north shore of Chain  lake to point of commencement  and containing eighty acres.  Philip DuMoulin,  David Barnes, Agent,  May 9th, 1910.  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale.     District  ������   of Nicola  Take notice that sixty days after  date I, Stanley Nelson Dancey, Publisher, of Merritt, B.C., intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:���  Commencing at a post planted at the  southeast corner of Tot 301, thence 20  chains east, thence 80 chains south,  thence 40 chains west, thence 80 chains  north and 20 chains east to point of  commencement, comprising 320 acres  more or less.  S. N. Dancey. Applicant.  Frank Bailey, Agent.  Dated August 1st, 1910  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale District.  District of Nicola.  Take notice that Ethel W. Sawyer,  of 26 Lancaster Gate Terrace, occupation married woman, intends to apply  for permission to purchase the following described lands:  , Commencing at a poft planted at the  South West corner of Lot 714, thence  North 80 chains, thence West 80 chains,  thence Soutff 80 chains, thence East 80  chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.  ETHEL W. SAWYER.  Per Archibald W. McVittie.  July 11, 1910.       25-34  Land Act Notice  NICOLA AND KAMLOOPS LAND DISTRICT.  Districc of Yale.  - Take notice that Joseph Logan Thompson of  Vancouver, occupation, farmer,  intends to apply  for permission to purchase the following described  lands:  : Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of Lot 751, about two miles south of  Ssjamette Lake, thence 80 chains North, thence 40  cnains West, thence 80 chains South, thence 40  chains East, to point of commencement, and  containing 320 acres more or less.  JOSEPH LOGAN THOMPSON.  Frank Bailey, Agent.  Dated March 16th. 1910.  Land Act  Land Act  Nicola Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that Leonard  Evans, of  Vancouver, B. C, Piano Tuner, intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands :  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lot 1137, thence  West 80 chains, thence North 80 chains,  thence=Eastr80chains7=thence=South=80  chains.  Leonard Evans.  ArchibBld W. McVittie, Agent.  June 8, 1910.    21-23.  Coal Notice.  Thirty days after date I intend to  make application for a license to prospect for Coal and Petroleum on the  following described land; commencing  at a post, planted at the North-east  corner 6f Lot 669, thence West 40  chains, thence North 20 chains, thence  East 20 chains thence North 10 chains,  thence East 20 chains, thence North 30  chains, thence East 20 chains, more or  less to the West line of Lot 1304,  thence South 40 chains, thence West 20  chains, thence South 20 chains to psint  of commencement,, containing 160 acres  more or iess.  . W. G. MURRAY,  June 15, 1910        22-27 Locator.  Land Act Notice  Nicola-Kamloops Land District.  Yale District.  Take notice that I, A. W. Strickland, of Nicola,  B. C., occupation bank manager, intends to apply  for permission to purchase the following described  lands :  Commencing at a post piantcd 40 chains north of  the northwest corner of Lot 573, thence 40 chains  north, thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains  south ana thence 40 chains west to point of commencement.  A. W. STRICKLAND, Applicant.  Stanley Kirby, Agent.  Dated April 11th, 1910. 10-18  Land Act  Nicola Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take  notice  that Thomas Evans, of  Vancouver, B. C,   gentleman,   intends  to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the  Southwest corner of Lewis Ord's application, which is equivalent to the  Northeast corner of Lot 1137, thence  North 80 chains, thence West 80 chains,  thence South 80 chains, thence East 80  chains,  Thomas Evans.  Archibald W. McVittie, Agent.  June 8, 1912.       21-30  Kamloops Division of Yale Land District.  District of Ashcroft.  Takt notice that Wallace R. Parker of Vancouver,  B.C.,  occupption carpenter,  intends to  apply for permission to; purchase the following  des  ribed lands: '  Ccommencing at a post planted about one and s  hallf miles South of Pre-emption No. 757 (Upper  Coldwater) thence running South 40 chains,  t hence West 40 chains, thence North 40 chains,  the nee East 40 chains to point of commencement,  tandcon taining 160 acres more or less.  WALLACE R. PARKER.  R. 6. Stanley Anthony, Agent.  Date May 17th. 1910. 19-28  Land Act  Nicola Division of Kamloops Land District.  District of Yale.  TAKE notice that I, Maxwell Jenkins, of Ke-  -lowna^occupation-laborer,=intends=to-apply-for  permission to purchase the following described  lands :���  Commencing at a post planted at the north  east corner of land applied for by F. W. Fraser,  thence north twenty chains, thence west forty  chains, thence south twenty chains, thence east  forty chains to point of commencement, and containing eighty acres, more or less,  MAXWELL S. JENKINS.  June 13. 1910.  Land Act  TAKE notice that sixty days after date I, Charles Montague Winny, of Middlesboro, occupation  engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the south  east corner of Pre-emption No. 235, and running  north 80 chains,thence,'east 40 chains, thence  south 80 chains, thence west 40 chains to point of  commencement.  CHARLES MONTAGUE WINNY.  R. H. Winny. Agent.  Nicola. June 17th. 1910, 19-28  Land Act  Nicola Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that Marjory Evans, of  Vancouver, B.'-.C, married  woman, intends to apply for  permission   to  purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted 20  chains South of the Northeast corner  of R. Ernest Johnson's application of  equal date, thence East 40 chains,  thence South 40 chains, thence West 40  chains, thence North 40 chains.  Marjory Evans.  Aachibald W. McVittie, Agent.  June 7, 1910.    .   21-23  Land Act  Nicola Land District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that Lewis Ord, of Montreal, Quebec, Mechanical Engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands :  Commencing at a post planted in the  middle of the West boundary of Grace  Johnson's application of even date,  thence West 80  chains,   thence  South  Land Act  TAKE notice that sixty days after date I, Sarah  Winny, of Nicola, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted at the south east  corner of Lot 6987, and running west 40 chains,  thence south 80 chains, thence cast 40 chains,  thence north 80 chains to point of commencement.  SARAH WINNY.  R. H. Winny. Agent.  Nicola, June 17, 1910. 19-28  Land Act  Nicola Division of Kamloops  Land District  District of Yale  Take notice that Frank William  Fraser of Kelowna, B.C., occupation Cannery Manager, intends  to apply for permission to purchase the following described  land. Commencing at a post  planted on the north shore of  Chain lake and running north  -forty chains, thence east eighty  chains, thence south twenty  chains, thence west five chains  more or less to t he shore of Chain  lake, thence wsterly along the  north shore ol Chain lake eighty  chains-moro-r-r-less^to^the^point-  of commencement, and containing 160 acres more or less.  Frank William Fraser.  Mayth, 19 10.  land act  "TAKE NOTICE, that David   Beath,   of   Van  ���     couver, occupation broker,  intends to apply  for    pemission   to purchase  the    following  described land:  Commencing at a po3t planted 80 chains East of  the N. E. Corner of Lot 1776, Otter Valley, running North 80 chains, thence East 80 chains,  thence South 80 ohains, thence West 80 chains to  point of commencement.   Containing 640 acres.  David Beath, Applicant  Per E. B. Tingley, Agent  Dated 29th April, 1910. 14-22  All changes for advertisements ap  pearing in the Nicola Valley News,  must be in the hands of the print  ers no later than Wednesday night  No guarantee can otherwise he given  that the changes will be made.  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale Land  District.    District of Nicola.  Take notice that Charles James  Stewart of Vancouver; occupation  salesman, intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following described lands: Com-  ninecing at a post planted about  one mile South of pre-emption  757 Upper Coldwater, thence  running South 40 chaihs, thence  West 40 chains, thence North 40  chains, thence East 40 chains to  point of commencement, and  containing 160   acres   more   or  Charles James Stewart  R. G. Stanley Anthony, Agent  Date May 17, 1910.  Merritt's New Eating House  Everything Clean and Well Kept.  Meals at all hours. Tickets of 21 meals $6. Single meals 50c.  Nothing tastes better than a homemade meal and that is  what you get here.    All cooking by lady cooks.  North End of old Leonard Building,  Voght Street Merritt, B. C.  Spend   your summer vacation at^  SAVONAS  along the shores o'f Kamloops Lake.    Splendid fishing and hunting.  Pleasure spot for  sportsmen  Lakeview Hotel  Provides   for your every want while you  are enjoying the   beauty  |of .this popular resort.  Adam Ferguson, Proprietor  L  Look up Your Jewelery Wants  in Our Catalogue  ��� and you will readily see how you can save a large percentage by sending your orders to our Mail Dept.  Buy at BIRKS in Vancouver  The finest goods manufactured in the world. All orders  promptly attended to and shipged prepaid. - Money  refunded if not entirely satisfactory.  Henry Birks & Sons, Limited  Jewelery Mail Order House  Geo. E. Trorey, Man. Dir. Vancouver, B. C-  The Beauty Spot of British Columbia  HOPE  Picturesquely situated along the banks of the Fraser River and  a history as romantic as the place is beautiful.  Coiquahalla Hotel  We can offer you scenic beauty, comfort and pleasure���what  more do you want.    Good hunting and fishing.    Future railroad centre.  Fred. Parnaby, Proprietor  Coiquahalla Hotel Hope, B. C.  P^C  LIQUOR LICENSE ACT 1910  Notice is hereby given that on  the 11th day of September next  application will be made to the  Superintendent of Provincial Police for the grant of a license for  the sale of liquor by wholesale in  and upon the property described  as Lot 8, Block 17, C.P.R. town-  site survey in the Town of Merritt.  Joseph Food,  Applicant.  Dated this 11th day of Aug., '10  o-u^fiap  ������A  Real  Genuine  Snap  Six Inside Lots In  Will be sold at a Sacrifice.  Hazelton is destined to be one tf the greatest commercial  centres in the north���the head of navigation on the SkA^na  River.  This offer will only hold good for a few days and it is a  chance to get in on the ground floor.  Six Lots in the business district of the town  $300 Cash  will handle them.    Price $150 each or $900 for the lot and one-third  down,  Address:  Box D, Nicola Valley News.  Job Printing  No matter what you may require we can do it-do it well.  ^The Nicola Valley New*. 8  THE NICOLA VALLEY NEWS  Friday, August 19, 1910  ���wnwiTinuWyuK  What Our Correspondents  Have to Say  ASHCROOT  There is a dearth of houses in  Ashcroft.  A creamery will be established  at 150-Mile House.  Mrs. Martley, the founder of  the Grange ranch at Marble  Canyon, is dead.  Large shipments are coming  through Quesnel for the Grand  Trunk Pacific railway.  At Barkerville bread is selling  for 25 cents per loaf and eggs  are one dollar per dozen.  Rev. Magnus Henderson has  been taken to the sanitorium at  Kamloops in a condition of poor  health.  Traffic through "the gateway"  is still heavy, there being a  large influx into the northern  country. ���  James Reid, Limited, Quesnel,  are offering their business for  sale. - This will mark the removal  of   one- of the  oldest   business i  houses in this district.  SAVONA  George C. Cowan, the well  known explorer, has returned  from his fifth annual trip to Ne-  chaco and the country north of  Fort George. Mr. Cowan, who  was again accompanied by Mr.  -Penrose, staked a large amount  of timber and agricultural land.  Thomas Houston returned to  Savona from Kamloops and left  for the west.  Mrs. Mark McAbee has been  the guest of her sister, Mrs. T.  C. Cooney, for the past few days.  The   many   friends of Leslie  Camaron, manager of the   Mon  arch Lumber company, will be  glad to learn that, while not out  of danger, he is holding his own  against that dread disease,  typhoid fever.  Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Edmonds  and family are camping on the  shores of Kamloops lake at  Savona.  The Dominion government survey party, which is classifying  the land along Three-Mile creek  and from there across the range  to Peterson creek in the Mamette  lake district, has completed the  work in this section.  A. H. Cotton left on Saturday  on a trip to the coast. While  away he will take in the big fair  at Vancouver.  The Canadian Northern survey  party, under Engineer Hanning-  ton, after being camped for some  time near the Savona bridge, has  moved east. Last Wednesday  the boys gave a dance in honor  of the Savona people, with whom  they made many friends.  The recent heavy rains did considerable damage to the road up  Deadman's creek and hauling of  lumber to the B. C. D. A. camps  had to be suspended for a few  days.  An enjoyable dance was held  last Friday night in the town  hall. The last few dances have  been so well attended that it is I  the intention to hold one weekly  despite the hot weather.  The school trustees are now  arranging for a new teacher,  Miss Bajus, who taught school  here for the past six months,  having resigned.  Mrs. Mortimer is visiting in  Kamloops.  Mrs. C. E. Leighton has gone  to Kamloops on a visit.  IN THE SPORTING WORLD  In last Saturday's lacrosse in  the east the Tecumsehs took-the  measure of the Montrealers to the  tune of 8,to 5. Shamrocks beat  the Ottawas by the same score,  while the Nationals trimmed the  Ottawas.  Vancouver Athletic club has  cinched the amateur" la'crosse  championship.  Jack Gillis, the.lanky Vancouver policeman, took second place  in the all-round athletic championship trials at Chicago last  Saturday. He was just 82 points  behind F. C. Thompson of Occidental college, Los Angeles, who  scored first place with a total of  6991 points. Gillis had 6909  points. Gillis took second in  putting 16 pound shot, fix^st in  high, jump, first in 16 pound  hammer throw, second in 56  pound weight throw,, third.in.120  yard hurdles.  At the courts of the Nicola  Tennis club tomorrow afternoon  teams from Merritt and Nicola  will try conclusions for the big  silver mug that has annually been  the object of contest. There will  be three doubles and two singles  and there promises to be some  real genuine sport. The Nicola  club have made arrangements to  provide an afternoon of good enjoyment.  For the second time this season Vancouver vanquished . the  Minto cup holders of New Westminster in the professional lacrosse series. The game was  played in Vancouver on Saturday  and was one of the fastest and  most" sensational of the season.  The score was 2 to 1.  Vancouver will have another  race meet, opening September  3i'd and ending the following  Saturday.  WATER NOTICE  Notice is htiroby Kiven that an application will  be made under Part V. of the "Water Act. 1909."  to obtain a licence in the Yale.Division of Nicola.  District.  .The name, address and occupation of the applicant C. A. Seaton, Merrjtt, B.C. mine surveyor.  ;(b) The name of the lake, stream or source.  Mid-day Valley Creek.  ;(c)    The point of diversion:  Where creek meets  my eastern lire.  ��� -(d) The quantity of water���One cubic foot.  ��� (e)   The   character   of.proposed works���Ditch.  i(f. The premises on which water is to be used ���  My pre-emption No.'807.  (tc) The purpose for which water is to be used ���  Irrigation ar.d domestic.  .(h) If for irrigation describe the land intended  to be irriKated. givinir aci-eime��� My pie-ciuptioii  of ICO acres more or. leys.  (j) Area of Crown land intended to be occupied  by the proposed works���None.  [k] This notice was posted on tho 19th day of  August. 1910. and application will be made to the  commissioners on the 19th duy of __.eptember,19_.U.  [1]    Give  the   names    and    addresses   of   any  riparian   proprietors   or   licenses   who or whose  lands are  likely   to  be '..(touted   by the tironoscd  works, either above or below the outlet. ���None.  C. A.SKATON.  Merritt, 13. C.  First-class board arid room  can be had at the Diamond  Vale Boarding House  MRS. BULLOCK, Proprietoress  ...  Land. Act Notice  Nicola District. Kamloops Division of Yale. .  Take notice that Fanny Mitchell  Adams of Southsea, England,  spinster, intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following described lands;  : Commencing, at a post planted  at.the Northwest corner of lot  1761 near Aspen Grove, thence  west one mile, thence south one  mile, thence east one mile, thence  north one mile.  Fanny Mitchell Adams.  Per Archibald W. McVittie.  July 17, 1910.        27-36  Commencing at a post one mile  north of the northwest Corner of  lot 1761, hear Aspen Gi'ove;  thence north one mile,; thence  west one mile, thenee south one  mile, thence east one mile.  Kate Morgan  Per Archibald W. McVittie.  : July 17, 1910.        27-36  Land Act  Nicola District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that Charles McVittie, barristers clerk of Renfrew, Ont., intends to apply for  permission to purchase the following described lands:  Commencing at a post planted  one mile north of the northwest  corner of Lot 1761, near Aspen  Grove, thence north 40 chains,  thence east 80 chaihs, thence  south 40 chains, thence west 80  chains.  Charles McVitte  . Per Archibald W. McVittie  July 17, 1910.        27-36.  Harness aric!  Saddlery  Harness, Robes, Blankets,  Trunks, Valises, etc. always  in stock.  Poultry and Stock Foods.  Best of satisfaction in all  departments. Prices are  right.  Agent for Mendelsohn  and  Heintzman Pianos.  Land Act  Nicola District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that Gladys Morgan of Toronto,'- Ont.. spinster,  intends to apply for permission  to purchase the following described lands.  Commencing at a post at the  Northwest corner of Lot 1761,  near Aspen Grove, thence west  one mile, thence north one mile,  thence east one mile, thence  south one mile.  Gladys Morgan  Per Archibald W. McVittie.  July 17, 1010.    -   27-36  Land Act  Nicola District.  Kamloops Division of Yale.  Take notice that Kate Morgan  of Toronto, Ontario, married  woman, intends to apply for permission, to purchase the following  described lands.  Land Act  Kamloops Division of  Yale.     District  of Nicola  Take notice that sixty days after date I, W. B.  Bailey, of Califorria, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:  Situated one mile from Del King's ranch, and  connnoncingr at a p. st 10 chains east of S. N.  Dancey's southwest c rncr. thence 30 chains east,  thence SO chains south, thence 40 chains west,  thence 80 chains north, thence 10 chains east to  point of commencement and containing- 320  acres more or less.  W. B. BAILEY, locator.  Frank Bailey, agent.  Dated August 1st, 1910. 27-36  Land Act  Kamloops Division of Yale  Land District���District of Nicola.  Take notice that sixty days after date I, Frank  Bailey, mining engineer, of Merritt, B. C, intend  to apply for permission to purchase the following  described lands:  Starting at a post planted at the northwest  corner of Olson's ranch, thenee 40 chains west,  thence 40 chains north, thence 40 chains east, and  thence 40 chains south to point of commencement,  and containing 160 acres more or less.  FRANK BAILEY, locator.  Dated August 1st. 1910. 27-38  N. J. BARWICK  Nicola  Merritt  Lytton's Popnlar Hotelry  IkiiHie Hotel  Good   Meals,   Good Comfortable  Beds and Best Serv'ce.     Rates  Reasonable.  Walter C Keeble  Proprietor,  :  .    .. LYTTON, 6.C.  Globe Hotel  LYTTON, B. C.  One of the oldest and  best hosteh-ies in the  district. Good accommodation in all depart-  pax'tments.  A. F.   HAUTIER,   - -  Prop.  LYTTON, B. C.  G.A.Hankey&Co.  LIMITED.  Real Estate and Insurance  Okanogan Lands  All Classes of Investments Placed.  Head Offices: -      - Vernon, B. C.  offering for these two weeks all our Summer Goods at prices that will surprise you.  You will save money if you buy during this sale.    Here are a few of the specials :  All  Goods  Sold  for  Cash  During  Sale.  Ladies  White   Petticoats  Regular $2.25 and $3.50.  Special $1.75 and $2.75.  Ladies' Night Gowns  Regular $1.50 and $2.25  Special $1.00 and $1.75  Ladies' and Children's  Hygeian Vests  Special 15c and up.  Ladies' and Children's  Stockings, Handkerchiefs,  Laces   and   Ribbons   all  come under this sale.   Be  sure and see these snaps.  Ladies'and Children's  Canvas Boots and Shoes  at 24 per cent. off.  New is the time to buy.  Men's Canvas Shoes  Regular $2.50  Special $1.75  Men's Balbriggan Underwear  Regular $2.00 Suit.  Special $1.75 per Suit.  Men's Balbriggan Underwear  Regular $1.50 Suit  Special $1.00 per Suit.  AH  Goods  Sold  for  Cash  During  Sale.  These are only a few of the lines that we will be offering.    We want you to come and  see for yourself  just what we have and we feel sure that you will be satisfied with every purchase because our goods are all  new and up-to-date, NOT OLD SHOP WORN AND OUT OF DATE.  mmwam'ammiiwiiwat

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