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The Nelson Economist Dec 20, 1902

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 1%.  ^^awjjwtwSB*^  -^L-w" _,_. ���  WJSaAj^,^ ���*&?$ w"��i-��   j  -jSjrr^W^J&WdJB^.^^^.  H"te"  -  -' ���  H7II.H-.U..HI III hi ill/mi. nul  Aiy  ��wrt..,w-...��i..,K.1^iw.^,.iTlai..>,/i,iif .,^7^    , lHJ%,fft.5^.^.|H^,i 177 ,rj_L"  * <  - !  I  f  i  ;��     . *    ,.  ���     - ���,  ���  tt 'A  and a  complete Sine  ofthe  GOfUIHC  r  ��|  ?^  >\  i  >  -��  >':  k  i  Rogers Bro&'*  Ky*�� carefully examined and  properly fitted lo the beat mute  or glomes. ""^  Repairing.  Profiii is necessary to business continuance, that is obvious. But a firm that makes  profit the sole end aimed at so ��n discovers its  mistake. Quality, to my mind, is primarily  essential. With me profit in the narrow interpretation is always subordinated to it. This i< the sagest policy both fot  you and for, me. The greatest encouragement I receive is tbat my customers always  seek quality first. Tl ey know and rightlv that  iu so doing, their profit will be more seal and  more lasting. . ->  In Bronze Goods, Vases; Candelabra, Mirrors, Call Bells, Ink Stands, Flower Stands,  Lamps, Picture Frames, Piano Lamps  L-dies' and Gentlemen's Umbrellas. They  are beauties.  American Cut Glass of all kinds.  Engraving not exceeding three  letters  free  ofcharge. ^  Mail and express orders will receive prompt  attention.  ���������<������  ������o^o^^HM^^M^^^^f^  v ^t^*************^***^ *+****+* *********0WW*********��**#***^+**4#  '..a*|.#..~MHlV*Y,i*W,,,I.t_7<,,lH***.|.  ��<5/S^  fc'HuO'i*  i   f r7*  There is no better time. Come in and see what a whole outfit costs  ���not much���and it's the concentrated essence of fun. You don't know  what real pleasure is, unless you've worked a camera and put into lasting form the beauties that you are seeing wherever you go. We have  a large stock of Plate Cameras, 1902 pattern, that we are selling at and  below cost.    A complete line of Photographic Supplies of all kinds.  \\i��i  1  m  %ssJ?  t  Cfo   SO  !TO  ^WwJ f^W  *.ya  /"l 'f^K*m*<l*ixfmmv,w>'  If ' ��� I '    .' .   . ,-  ,        ~~"_1ipi'l*>ri*i'l.M.,fr ,,, ,��� ,___^ ������,������, )i, j,,i,M| ,   J  IS, 'l if r       ll      I (t       jl. |l  I    11, I , O I    . ,il I 1 I  "��"i|       "* -t^j     i       " <"0 _���!'<��� *��      ��Vlf "Or       -I I   ~   ll       ,,-(l ���      ��l   1    !������    ��      .Vf.*,.,^        l^l,.l  i! If     If I ; ,,        ..     I II I If, l.l   ��� H��, ll   , jH  1  I.... V    'A\h_    if,    ��<        1    ,1, ' i    i   , '      iftiH if.   1.      1.    I��f   0,1    iV       k  ,0 >  1      \      1      A    "    I' ���   . '.j, ��� *'*���,! f 'li ' V       ."  ''.it,.',  "1    i.oWfi  '1     -  '   if < "^M'      .'-'<> u HZ 'ZicA,    y,iAZkh.i4i  WHItO AND BAKER STREETS,  NELSON  .,A��S$ .Attif ,^(sS3���. ^Ral,,.A  Vi,"*F      7__.'  !AAr  7,T.'  -    o,-    ij. ;��  'r     .��� '^7-^       ,i^   ,i"  ���A A-i  J       "   r ^  "Ay**-^  >  "T*-.  ���r.    ,'>  '.3   .~.v  01 ^A.?.v k- y^:^��iAM  l*-^-     ''17.5  .jS'.-Kf 'V'-i.''?'  "^ ^ ^ '   s. "> ^r-  t 0  '' *  r    '    rH,  -, ^ ^/^z  YMa>  1  �����   J.      \   -        * . *  h?i:tz  - .'. 'A1' r"'.  "        * -1. ��t    ''a  , ^ V'i a��*J  1                 " * ' *  7','     *,..''  1 , 'l'.'.'  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Special Quotations for
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Special Values in
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Large Stock of Assorted Freak
Groceries Always on Hand
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Call on us and see the fine quality of our  Ghristnias^
and   you   will   find   also  a   fine  assortment  of Candies and
Christmas Goods for Children.
Josephine Street
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All orders must be accompanied by cash and should be forwarded
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(4 fr.3  Iral  j. ^Irili ��I>.H ���Milf-tAff "���"^"-*k-J,m  "        ft  E^ffifl^Ss  *&  VOL. VI.  NELSON, B. C, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1902.  NO 23  A   >  THE NELSON ECONOMIST is issued  kvkry Saturday. Subscription : $2.00  per annum; if paid in advance, $1.50  Correspondence of general interest  r ESPKCTFULLY SOLICITED. ONLY ARTICLES  OF MKRIT WILL BE ADVERTISED IN THESE  COLUMNS, AND THE INTERESTS OP READERS  WIIL BE CAREFULLY GUARDED AGAINST  IRRK5PONSIBLE PERSONS AND WORTHLESS  ARTICLES.  EDITORIAL CO  ^^^ '���"'.'������   '*'������-���'  ^UT)I_)ACE upon earth and unto men good-  "���*_ will," is the greeting appropriate to  the season. It's a happy dispensation that  once a year though only for one day men silently let enmities be silent; in a world of  ceaseless stiuggle and unsleeping envy it is  something that one recurring day brings a  truce and a rest. And yet it is a singular  phenomenon, more interesting even than  other customs that seem inconsistent wiih the  spirit of the age. Christmas wae first observed  hy the early Christians as. a holy day to be  marked hy special service of rejoicing, but  certainly of.;, less importance and of less unmixed rejoicing than the fea*t of Easter.  Hut very early, how early we cannot learn,  there grew round the commemoration of the  Nativity a feeling of closer friendship nnd affection, a desire to gather round family  hearths and live past Christmas over again  in memory, io forget passions and trials, to he  or to seem happy and to make others happy  nnd especially to gladden the hearts of children hy the most effective means, showers of  gift* to delight and amuse them and abundance of good things to eat.  We are so thankful lor the Christmas spirit  that it Naerns an ungracious thing to analyze  il And inquire how much, if any, reliiious significance it retajns for the great majority in  this twentiety century of its commemoration.  Tlie Church marks it with ppecial services,  and yearly exhorts the faithful to again hear  the story and learn the lesson of the Babe of  Hethiehem, and women and children and a  tow thoughtful men obey the call. But to the  t'^'d man of affairs and business and the more  tired manual toiler, it is to bo feared that the  expenditure of energy arid money for theceie-  ^r.-ition of the feaet are the moot conspicuous  Matures of it and the only pleasure deirivfed-is  h\ I'ecallfng the memory of childhood9*-Ohriat-  ���iNat. times and  perhaps 8(toe  cynical nmueo*  mentand wonder how long 'twill be before all  others are as tired of Christmas as he is.  The function and relation of Christmas have  changed considerably since the days of the  first Christians who kept the feast of the Divine birth. Through the Middle Ages the  day slowly acquired the somewhat barbaric  features of a day for feast and song and merrymaking.    But what is it now to us ?.  With New Year's Day and the intervening  week it forms a continuous festival for taking a  merry leave ofthe worn out old year and extending a gay welcome to the new. But it is  more than that; it is the season of review and  retrospect. To keep a record of time we must  have divisions ; day and night, month and  month, and the seasons in their circle form  for us naiural divisions, but in the passing of  time the circle shows no sharp dividing line,  but raiher a spiral ascent. 0��r dividing line  in midwinter is wholly artificial, but as a  means ot marking time is as good as any  other could be. Tne closing days of a year  naturally suggest, themselves as a period for  looking back, just as the first days suggest  looking forward, and as in our circular course  the beginning and ending are almost coincident the two mental processes come together,  making it inevitable that a thoughtful man  should compare the measure'of his happiness  with that of the same period in other years  and think seriously of the years to come.  Such heart-searchings have a high value  for all who obey the ancient command, "Man,  know thyself;" and it is unfortunate that social duties so-called disturb the train of reflection. The human shrinking from sad  thoughts aud invocation of song and merry  company lo dispel melancholy reflections is a  species of moral cowardice.  However, man is a social animal, if he frequently asks the cheering services of others he  is no less willing to grant his own for his  neighbor's need. It is even remarkable to a  philosophic mind how much kindliness is exhibited during this festival season by natures  that seem hopelessly hard and selfish.  In this western land of exile which few of  its people yet regard as home, Christmas probably brings sadder reflections than elsewhere  A reminiscence wiil serye to illustrate. At a  house-party of well-to-do people, a Christmas  banquet was in progress, all had dined well  all hearts were seeming happy, laughter and,  repartee were ringing merrily, the guests were  still laiighiug over the" witty speedhes-of the  toast to the ladies when an old geptjeiuan  rose and gave the toast''Absent Friapcla.9* A  solemn hush succeeded to tbe merriment ai  the minds of all travelled suddenly home, not  ' perhaps with regret but with  thoughtful ser  iousness  which   was not conducive to noisy  mirth.  Of all the thoughts that come thronging upon the wanderer and the pioneer at Christmas ,  time, this of home and friends left far behind  is  probably the most sobering; it "i��J|&ot only/  fear that he may not see them agai&rth&t be  has  parted with them forever, but his mind  has grown a way. from them, they-/^m.^pM9W_[  as once  they were, a part oi his^'being^||ies9  .are the thoughts tbat oppress him, t&at'i^eiat.  on his noting that time is flying and all things  change.  But the*e gloomy thought^ are as old as the  self consciousness of our kind ; it has iievSr  required any exertion' to make one's self"mis*  arable; perhaps, after ^lli it is braver and  .kindlier io drive blaofe^Botiihts '.-awajr a.hd .he��  merry for awhile with th^young and careless.  If we can steal one d��y |r���*^ duilnesg even  hy enforced gaiety we%p^]'l^u^ybjtyOn;e  mirth.  .  A pleasing feature iu  mas seasons is the willingness' eves>'':;iii': these  hard fighting times to sigu a truce till th^e .day  is gone.   /'.Peace on tlie eartj|^^  men/' is a boon to weary ftu^ahity if but for  one day.. rt A^%^^^j��l^ '' ^"'���'' '"'  THK^SmemHer will not break iliis univer��  ' ifi^Z/h^y ���  ...   r)J-niv,h    ��� r     -  $$&��  '$&:  > A  \r  A,V  sal peace. . We will defer to another time our  compliments to tnbse of whom we disapprove  and wiaU a truly Merry Ciiriotmas eVeh to  well, to everybody.  The purtjl-hfand high schools have adjournal  their sessions to Monday* the 5th of January,  1903, and five or six hundred juvenile members of society are now looking round for  means of div ersion. The tests at the clo 3 of  this half of the school year are not ^6t to  hand, but the teaching staff express them%  selves as generally satisfied  with the' term's  1    '   '' ' ' \        1    A,'��� ii ������     ' '  work. Tne attendance also was^yetfy g?od  until the last month, when diphujjgria and  scarlet fever combined to interrupt it".^-1       "  The Christmas vacation shpuld be made by  parents and guardians as bright and enjoyable as possible for the young students. Thoyj  are the best and |ppst diligent pupile usually  who derive moiit jpleasure frpiya exercise and  entertainment, and their teachers report the 0  they deserve their rtward.  We euppose^ the police ��� regulations against  coaating will be relaxed as far as public safety  tempting appearance' for lovers of this healthful and animating'-pastime.'  Sleighing, skating and evening parties io?  children are now  in  order.    We wioh   to'a'l  school children a very merry  Christmas tiaae*  , a/.  ,r'V  "���V  Ai\  ' _  v *  v>iSj.L  .* >*;..{  '7;s -���a!' "  ��� m  ���&.''':."' '':"v  i, v ^ , ��7.;;<-v  - - J.M'M.  '       '        'A$%  . - ��� -   -  'AW  y.-,-A ...Urn  r\\ZAA.,l-  ,'��    .iVl-1!  ���'*' ,    hKi*��  ; . -'lA'  '..��� ���'i.y.r  1 *.-*���''���y  lA'yAip  1 ���   .    'V'-'T (  - ,1      "V-ii".'.  ,..    '.mi, ,���/.,'*  Ay^Ai  <"'fyK  , y ,t'\��\  1 .  ' v.'.^a  H ^        ��� ,'3^'  ���AAt'H  1  Vfr<  ir *  a;  .��.(  1   f  A '��  "TfflftWiii^,  rC'*'H��"Vj.  ,{t^***^m*��**^v*<  iWf" ���'��� M^H��-"y*^WT. rB?'H��n��n_.M/' hwau  l-^4��d��WS7��onW^^TWtf��_.'_iH-U_,,  M.IUi'i^W  THE NELSON ECONOMIST  !'ff.  i V  If^A-;;  Jf!'  It.:  %:  $���:  i  t?  ,J*  ^.^r^Av  > ��� .^  J3B by-lavv to raise funds for the purchase  of an electric lighting plant has been  carried by a large vote over the requisite  three-fifths���the figures being 271 for and 89  ^against. In many respects this may be regarded ap one of the greatest victories ever  won at the polls. On one side was all the  wealth of the Property-Owners Protective  Association, and arrayed against thfo.was the  rank and file of the citizens marshalled by  one man/ and this great deliverer, need it be  said, was the versatile journalist and eminent  purveyor of hen fruit���Alderman John A.  Irvine. The result establishes conclusively  that brains and energy is the potent factor in  the winning of great victories. The by-law  .:; wad.defeated when Aid. Irving girded up his  loins, stepped into the breach and snatched  victory where a less brilliant military strategist would have faltered and flrd. His manoeu-  yering was along,the lines of the most skillful  ticiics of departed British, generals, and reminds the student of history of the achieve-  ^.mefi'i%'^;;"-4MJairlborougb, Wellington, and Nel-  s6n.| Wherever the doughty alderman met  the enemv he routed him horse, foot and  far.tjilery';S;From. 8   o'clock ..in   the   morning  ������'���'��� .:-//Z"--'"'Z ;������.��� ���. .���   ;.-7 f ...-���-  until the shadows of night ca^t their mantle  around the shoulders, of grand oUl Toad  Moun|ain| General Irving, metaphorically  speaking, niinbly led his baifd of devoted followers over the breastworks, into the ttenches  up to the gatling guns of the Property*0 wners  Protective Asscciation, giving no quarter until  the ast vote was polled and victory perched  upon his banners. Then like a magnanimous general, he indulged in no noisy cackle  or undue display of superio ity over the disheartened   and vanquished  enemy,   but   like  ���  -  *''������'��� A    '.</,. -,y ��� :-    a ���    ) ,   . ���       .    :.y^.  Grant receiving the sword of Lee, he humbly  and fervently prayed for peace. Volume*  might be written of this fight for municipal  ownership, but enough has been said to  show that it was a famous victory, and now  that Has over no one will dare pluck the laurels from, the classic brow of the victorious  alderman. Oh, Tor the inspiration of a poet  ') immortalize the genius of   this great man !  John Irving was a grocery man ���-'  A journalist likewise���  He retailed the sweetest apples  To make the nicest pies,  He was a politician, too,  But go further now I can't.  Since John A. won the battle for  An electric lighting plant.  The Nelson Dramatic Company are now  rehearsing "Dandy Dick" for au early production.  M.i       By reason of discovery of -valuable iron and  a;;a^    gold deposits in the Lake UVmigami   district,  it his become necessary to make special regulations ior mining work on lands set a*ide for  forest reserves.  Chief Jarvis is calling i^r the last time upon  delinquents who overlooked the payment of  their road tax.  A placard reading, '* Will not return until  Dec. 3/- placed upon the d��>or of a residence in  West Philadelphia, was so informing to burglars that when the family did return at the  date fixed thev found the house ransacked and  silverware, jewelery and much clothing missing. The police were notified, but the thieves  had left no hints on their part.  The following poem by Charles G. D. Roberts, tbe historian, has a fine Canadian flavor.  It is enthled 'The Woodman " :  When  the grey lake-water rushes  Past the dripping alder bushes  And the beautiful autumn wind  In the fir-tree weep * and  hushes���  When the air is sharply damp  Round the solitary camp  And the moose bush in the thicket  Glimmers like a scarlet lamp-  When thebirches twinkle yellow  And the cornel bushes mellow,  And  the owl across the twilight  Trumpets-to his downy  fellow���  When the nut-fed chipmunks romp  Through the maples crimson pomp  And the slim vibprnum flushes  In the darkness of the swamp-  When the blueberries are dead,  When the rowan clusters red,  And the shy bear, summer-sickened;  In the bracken makes his bed���  On a day there comes.once more  ��� <��-.������ ...  To the latched and lonelv door,  Down the wood-road, striding silent,  One who has been  here before.  Green spruce branches for his head,  Here h*. makes his simple bed,  Crouching with the sun, and rising  When tlie dawn is frosty red.  All day long he wanders wide,  With the grey mosE for his guide,  And bis lonely axe-stroke startles  The expectant forest side.  Toward the quiet close of day  Back to camp he take's his way,  And about his sober footsteps,'  Unafraid the squirrels play.  On his roof the red leaf falls  At his door the blue jay calln,  And he hears the wood-mice hurry  Up and down  hie rough log walln ;  Hears the laughter of the loon  Thrill the dying afternoon-���  Hears the calling of the moose  Echo to tho ear 1} moor\.  .  i  I  And he hears the partridge drumming,  The belated hornet humming���  All the faint, prophetic sounds  That foretall the winter's coming.  And the wind about his eaves  Through the chilly night-wet grieves,  And the earth's dumb patience Alls him  Fellow to the falling leaves.  The Canadian Pacific Railway will issue  tickets to local points on account of the holidays at fare and one third for the round trip,  tickets good going December 23rd, 24th, 25th,  oOib, 81st and Jan. 1st, good to return up to  aud including January 3, 1903.  Another month has almost gone witnout  Aid. Irving buying a new horse for the fire  brigade.    This thing is getting monotonous.  The next City Council should seriously  consider the advisability of buying fire-belk  hy the carload. In this way a great saving  might be effected.  The XeUoit Dramatic Company is adver  tiding for a couple of good actors. No confi  dence is violated in saying that the company  has already a couple of bad actors.  And now th�� North Bruce Presbyterians  have decided to introduce instrumental music  into the ter vice ul praise. This will be a  fearful, shock, to old Covenanters of the John  Houston type.  With a flourish of trumpets the Kingston  papers announce that the citizens of the Ltnoe-  stone City have enought coal to laet them all  winter. -This conclusively establishes the fad  that the thrifty Citizens of Kingston are a  provident people.  0mmi >m*atama *���***���**  The report which was sent out from Detroit  that the Joint High .'Commission would meet  nhortly, is not correct. Sir Richard Cart-  wright Mivri there is no likelihood of yearly  meeting.  mmmM. win amt ******  , /'     ���  A filial youth of the town of KucheM ����  Hungary, has been arrested charged .wi .  keeping his father in a pigsty for two years.  The estate of the late Rev.  Joseph  Part"<  minister of the City Temple, W valued at '  than ��25,000.  x, , mmiHMHiiiiM.-iin���  The Nelson Operatic Society haB decide   ��  give tho '����� Pirates of Penzance" eome un>  February.  ri nni it.   B0I>'!  During the week tho Canada Urufe. <_��� .^  Co.Tecoiv;d a lurba consignment ol.^  Homely bound books, Huitable   for  ^ ^  presents.   Included in this consigning    _>{ ^  best   liluraturo    [ot  the    poetlwo   celt,      y  Pi,,...  Ill  A-  il if  Hi. i'i  >-      v   it  iwj^Hrt, <ir<*��r'^''JF��^^��,Mj����Wirrt,.WJ��,s  '(#��*.�� iit*.����*��>.��ift��vt**M j��,  _' .i  i  S,    ii ,:j  ��i��Wi��fj*^. fr^i*"^  _T 'A * &  _  ���  i.yA  THE NELSON ECONOMIST  ;   I lines are  undoubtedly   the   best  ever  ��� tht into British Columbia.  e  Trades and Labor Council   will  enter-  I -/the friends of labor at   a smoker   in   the  id Central this evening.  f-JMoralists may inveigh against the smok-  Hhabits.1' said an inveterate smoker, as he  BL fret*h cigar, "but outside of the comfort  king bestows, the habit frequently acts as  introducer, and a request for a match of-  breaks the ice and leads to pleasant con-  rsation when two strangers are travel-  g together or perhaps waiting for a train.*  metimes acquaintances thus formed lead to  etime friendships. It did in my case.  hen I was a young man an elderly gentle  ian. once asked me for a light. We were  ir.llovv-passenger8 on ihe rear end of a street  ur. We got into conversation and parted on  neiully terms. A few days later we met  [again, and finally became fast friends. There  came a time when that man's friendship enabled me to embark in an enterprise which  made thousands of dollars for me and laid  the foundation,of a fortune. My friend and  I remained on terms of the closest intimacy  until bis death three years ago. But for our  cigars I mi*ht have remained a poor man."  u It i< rather a curious fact," said a well-  known gentleman who sports a luxurious  heard," that one of the few occasions of my  going to church in recent years is responsible  for my growing this beard. The minisU-r hap*  pened to mention in the course of his sermon  that a man spent a third of his time in sleep,  and that one living to the age of threescore  and ten, would pad:* 23 years in.. >lujn.ber.  A* the nermon was not a particularly inter-  ���ening one, my# mind wandered away from it,  and I began calculating ��� ������how much of one's  life would he spent in a barber's shop. Allowing a reanonable time for waits and for the  actual process of t��having daily, I soon discovered that in the years left tome, if I should  attain the patriarchal age of 70, I would at  bun spend four in a 'barber's chair. Think  <>f it ! Condemned to four years in a barber's  *hn|> ! That settled it, and although that  wan 18 years ago I   have  never been   shaved  ^ion  comprehensive in its aims and interests.  At about half-past eight, the president Mr.  Fred Irvine took the chair and opened the  programme.  The first part of the programme consisted of  well-chosen and arranged vocal and instrumental music, under the able and energetic  direction of Mr. W. A. Jowett.  At the close of the musical section, Mr. J. A.  Fraser, clerk of the House of Commons, took  the chair. The Secretary of State, Mr. A. Sullivan, informed the House that its first business  was to elect a speaker. The honorable member for Albert County (Sheriff Tuck) was nominated by the premier (Mr. R. J. Clark), sec*  onded by the leader of the opposition (Mr. J.  Wilkes) and conducted by them to the throne  amid the cheers of the members, visitors and  press-gallery.  As the Governor-General (His Hon. Judge  Forin) entered, preceded by the Sergeant-at-  Arms (Mr, Lackey), all rose and sang the national anthem. The speech from the throne  contained the nsual messages but was certainly  not free from controversai matter, which will  be dealt with at future sessions.  The members for St. Lawrence (Mr. J. A. F.  Richards) and Frontenac (Mr. V. M. Gallon)  moved and seconded the reply very ably.  On motion of the Minister of Finance (Mr.  Hansford) the House then went into committee  of supply, which included the serving of coffee and cake.  It is to be hoped that tliis is but the first of  a long series of similar evenings.  hi nee.  i)  Dawson City amateurs are preparing for  mi early production of "The Bohemian Girl."  Ihreo thousand dollars will be expended in  Hl��ging Balfe's popular opera.  The Nelson Success Club held its inaugural  meeting on Monday evening, the 15th innt.;  11"1-attendance of members and friends augurs  w��dl for tho permanency of the organization  Tl>e largo dining-room of the Waverly Hotel  wan crowded to the doors and the character of  ll*e attendance shows that the club 'is no  ^li'ct circle but a thoroughly popular institu*  ���A"  II ���    'I   '.ff       ">��H    1    !�� ,  F  Hon. W. W. B. Mclnnes has carried his  seat by a large majority. The contest was between Mr. Mclnnes and a Socialist, the Opposition failing to place a man in the field. In  view of the claim made by members of the  Opposition that they have the country with  them, their default in North Nanaimo is un-  explainable.  The skating rink opens to night.    The Nelson City band will be in attendance.  //  The election petition ag&in&t Col. Prior  was  argued at Victoria to-day.  The holiday trade in Nelson  is unusually  brisk.  HANGING THE HOLLY.  With   Polly I   chanced to   be   hanging  the  holly,  With Polly, the roguish, with Polly, the sly,  With Polly, who's  brimming   with frolic and  folly,  A quip on her lip and a jest in her eye.  The   wind, it   was grieving, and the  shadows  were weaving  Their dark web without o'er the face of the  sky;  Within it was merry with gieen leaf and ber^y,  And Polly, close by, with a   gleam  in her  eye.      ' ^  _ �� ���  "This  holly, I know, sir, you wish mistletoe,  sir!"'  Cried   Polly, as o'er us a wreath we  hung  high;  I looked  at  her, laughing,  to  see   were  she  chaffing,  And oh, what a glint there shone out from  her eye I  How like the rose-petals on which the bee settles  Her cheeks were!     Her lips were the holly  fruits dye;  "Be it   mistletoe, dear, a minute or so, dear!"  44A minute?" breathed Polly, with mirth   in  her eve.  am  So its oh, to be hanging the holly with Polly!  With Polly, the mischievous, Polly, thesly*  With Polly the genius of all that is jolly���   .  A lure on her lip, and with love in her eye!  CHRISTMAS IS COMING.  Christmas time is coming,  Coming mighty fast,  Soon we will be knowing  That it's here at last.   ; :  Hard to realize it,  But just calculate,-  And you'll find it coming  At �� rapid gait;  There are signs already  In the house and store  Of the Christmas coming,  And each day adds more.  Often in the household  There is whispering,  Guesses as to presents  That the day will bring.  In the stores there's hustling,  Making needed room  On the shelves and counters  For the Christmas boom.  Soon will all the windows  Be in glad array,  Filled with .things of,beauty,  Suited to the day.  Soon the same old problem  Will again confound���  How to make the money  We can raise go round,  For the Christmas tokens  Pleasing to the eye,  Promptly catch each fancy,  But they oft come high.  So the thoughtful mortal  Now begins to plan,  Cutting down 'oxponoes .  Every cent he can*  Well he knows that many  Things he'll have to. get���  But he welcomes Christmas,  Though he sinks in debt.  -> -  I'   ll   I  t      A   ,    . e..  i  3  1f-  . - - i  y.  7a J"  \M  Al  ,  "asS-  - A--  - -/ ^5  ' ' .3  ��� ZW.  ii rrp  ��� I        7 *   **S  ���      ��^  :.:_2  m  a 'A:M  iv,i;i  Wi ���v(j.i|iH,ire/iB��.l  , I   V.fi. I I    ,���l   '  ZhZAu'A':  W"\i ..K  , id   A   ��.    ��   f  \     ���!    ������7"H|l,,.,j.!(I��j  Mf,.',^ Ai  (:> ' ai  i ' I  '       I 1       i-  i      .,  'I  I  I i  l\  '  ,',' i    if  ' il  nr^''l,*Vr4towwM|^i��.**.^ ii(wi|<ii y  J.  if) VJ.U , ���.:.  iii  ii  , it ,i.. THE NELSON ECONOMIST  it his become necessary to make special regu-  lations.for mining work on lands set a-ide for  forest reserves.  THE by-law to raise funds for the purchase  of an electric lighting   plant   has   been  carried by   a  large vote  over   the   requisite  three-fifths-the figures being 2/1 tor  and 89  Gainst.    In many respects  this may  be regarded as   one   of the  greatest victories ever  Von at the polls.    On   one  side was all   the  Wealth   of   the   Property-Owners   Protective  Association, and arrayed against this was  the  rank and file of  the  citizens   marshalled   by  one man, and this great deliverer, need  it  be  said was the versatile journalist and eminent  purveyor of hen  fruit���Alderman  John   A.  Irvine    The   result   establishes conclusively  that brains and energy is the potent factor in  the winning  of: great   victories.    The by-law  was defeated when   Aid. Irving girded up his  loins, stepped into   the breach   and   snatched  victory where a less brilliant   military strategist would have faltered and n>d. His manceu-  veriog was along.the lines of the most skillful  relics of departed; British, generals, and reminds the student of history  of the  achieve-  .  ment of   Marlborough,  Wellington  and Nelson       Wherever the doughty alderman met  the' enemv   he routed    him    horse, foot  and  artillery. ' From  8  o'clock   in   the   morning  until the shadows of night ca.<t   their   mantle  a-ound   the   shoulders   of   grand   old   T.>ad  Mountain,   General    Irving,   m^phoncally  speaking, "��<��bly led his bund of   devo-ed followers over the breastwork?, into the t.enches  up to the gatlingguns of the Property-Owners  Protective Association, giving no quarter until  the -aet vote was polled and victory   perched  upon   bis  banner,.   Then like  a   magnanimous generaVhe induced in no noisy cackle  or undue display of superio ity   over  the disheartened   and vanquished enemy,   but  like  Grant receiving the sword of Le?, he humbly  and   fervently   prayed   for   peace.    Volume*  .     might be written of this   fight  for   municipal  ownership,   but   enough    has  been   said    to  show that it was a   famous  victory,   and now  that it.is over no one will dare pluck the laurels from the classic  brow   of   the   victorious  alderman.    Oh, Ar the inspiration of  a  poet  ���j immortalize the genius of   this great man !  John Irving was a grocery man ���  A journalist likewise���  He retailed the sweetest appleB  To make the nicest pies,  He was a politician, too,  But go further now I can't.  Since John A. won the battle for  An electric lighting plant.  Chief Jarvis is calling for the last time upon  delinquents who overlooked the payment of  their road tax.  A placard reading, " Will not retnrn until  Dec. 3," placed upon the d-��or of a residence in  West Philadelphia, was so informing to burglars that when the family did return at the  date fixed they found the house ransacked and  silverware, jt-welery and much clothing missing. The police were notified, but the thieves  had left no hints on their part.  The Nelson Dramatic Company are now  rehearsing "Dandy Dick" for an early production.  By reason of discovery of valuable iron and  gold deposits in the Lake IVmigami   district,  The following poem by  Charles G.  D. Roberts, the historian, has a fine Canadian flavor.  It is entitled "The Woodman " :  When the grey lake-wator rushes  Past the dripping alder bushes  And the beautiful autumn wind  In the fir-tree weep* and hushes���  When the air is sharply damp  Round.the solitary camp  And the moose bush in the thicket  Glimmers like a scarlet lamp��� ,  When the birches twinkle yellow  And tbe cornel hushes mellow,  And the owl across the twilight  Trumpets to his downy  fellow���  When the nut-fed chipmunks romp  Through the maples crimson pomp  And the slim viburnum flushes  In the darkness of the swamp���  When the blueberries are dead,  When the rowan clusters red,.  And the shy bear, summer-sickened,  In the bracken makes his bed���  On a day there comes once more  To the latched and lonely door,  Down the wood-road, striding silent,  One who has been  here before.  Green **pr.uce branches for his head,  Here he makes his simple bed,  |       Crouching with the sun, and rising  When the dawn is frosty red.  All day long he wanders wide,  With the grey mose for his guide,  And his lonely axe-stroke startles  The expectant forest side. '  Toward the quiet close of day  Back to camp he takes his way,  And about his sober footsteps,  Unafraid the Fquirrels play.  On his roof the red leaf falls  At his door the bluejay eallB,  And he hears the wood-mice hurry  Up and down his rough log walln ;  HearB the laughter of the loon  Thrill the dying afternoon-���  Hearn the calling of the moose  Echo'to the earl} moon.  And he hears the partridge drumming,  The belated hornet humming���  AU the faint, prophetic sounds  That foretall the winter's coming.  And the wind about his eaves  Through the chilly night-wet grieves,  And the earth's dumb patience fills him  Fellow tu the falling leaves.  The Canadian Pacific Railway will issue  tickets to local points on account of the holidays at fare and one third for the round trip,  tickets good going December 23rd, 24th, 25ih,  SOih, 31st and Jan. 1st, good to return up to  and including January 3, 1903.  Another month has almost gone witnout  Aid. Irving buying a new horse for the fire  brigade.    This thing is getting monotonous.  The next City Council should seriously  consider the advisability of buying fire-bells  by the carload. In this way a great saving  might be effected.  The Nelron   Dramatic Company  is adver  tiding for a couple of good   actor*.    No confi  dence is violated in saying thai the company  has already a couple of bad actors.  And now the North Bruce Presbyterians  have decided to introduce instrumental music  iuio the service of praise. This will be*  fearful shock to old Covenanters ol.the John  Houston type.  ___)tiiini imiiiMiifir MMNM*'  With a flourish of trumpets the Kingston  papers announce that the citizens of ttatoj  ito... City have .nought coal to last them ��  winter. -This conclusive}), e.tablishes,the Urt  ',b.i the thrifty c.tizens of Kingston are a  provident people.  The report which was sent out ,WW"J  that the .Joint Hi3hCouimiB8ion would ��  shortly,  ^   not correct.    Sir   Richard tort-  tight lays there is no likelihood of an.earl,  meeting.  The estate of the late Rev.^^ P*  minister of the City Temple, ��8 va����ed  than ��2oj��0).  .nr.^_   ,     ||  |     T  Tb.lI^Op.r.itoB^J^gl;  give the  ���' Pirates of Penzance ��  February.  it Boo^  DurinK the week the Canada .Drug <������      (1<  Co.-rec��.v.d   a  l��rbe   ^fX' Chrm^  Homely bound books, suitable    or th-  p^entH.   Included in this ��<>" '^^.i,,  best  literature   io!   tbe    parttno  it ���"*�����_ ��w*.-tntfin,��i!��***tHH>*i��?S lines are   undoubtedly   the   best   ever  nought into British Columbia.  The Trades and Labor Council will enter-  i jn the friends of labor at a smoker in the  Grand Central this evening.  i " Moralists may inveigh against the smok-  -��� 'ing habit?," said an inveterate smoker, as he  lit a fresh cigar, ''but outside of the comfort  smoking bestows, the habit frequently acts as  Jan introducer, and a request for., a-match;often breaks the ice and leads to pleasant conversation when two strangers are travelling together or perhaps waiting for a train-  Sometimes acquaintances thus formed lead to  lifetime friendships. It did in my case.  When I was a young man an elderly gentle  man once asked me for a light. We were  follow-passengers on the rear end of a street  car. We got into conversation and parted on  friendly terms.'- A few days later we met  a^ain, and finally became fast friends. There  came a time when that man*s friendship enabled me to embark in an enterprise which  made thousands, of dollars for me and laid  the foundation of a fortune. My friend and  I remained on terms of the closest intimacy  until his death three yearn ago. But for our  cigars I mi^ht have remained** poor man."  ���' It i* rather a curious- fact,*' said a well-  known gentleman who sports a luxurious  heard, u that one of the few occasions of my  going to church in recent years is renoonsible  for my growing this beard. The minister happened to mention iu the course of his sermon  that a man spent a third of his time in sleep.  and that one living to the age of threescore  and ten, would pas* 23 years in tdtunber.  As the sermon was not a particularly interring one, my mind wandered away from it,  *nd I began calculating rnw much of one's  Iife would he spent in a barber's shop. Allowing a reasonable   time for   waits   and   for the   ti .. ..;���...  actual process of shaving daily, 1 noon dis*  covered that in the years left tome, if I should  attain the patriarchal age of 70, I would at  taut npond four in a barber's chair. Think  ��f it ! Condemned to four years in a barber's  Hhol> ! That settled it, and although that  w��h is years ago I have never been shaved  Hince." ' * -  Ihiwson City amateurs are preparing for  an (arly production of "The Bohemian Girl."  I'h^e thousand dollars will be expended in  8l��tfinn lialfe's popular opera.  1 h'' Nelson Success Club held its inaugural  ,IM>��-ting on Monday evening, the 16th inst.:  ^"������'tit-endanceof membere and friends augurs  w"l| for tjH) permanency of the organization  lh,v 'urge dining-room of the Waverly Hotel  Wl1* crowded to the doors and the character of  tl,�� attendance shows that the club 'is no  Hcl'Mf  eirole but a thoroughly popular intuitu*  THE NELSON ECONOMIST  ^on  comprehensive in its aims and interests.  At about half-past eight, the president Mr.  Fred Irvine took the chair  and opened   the  programme.  The first part of the programme consisted of  well-chosen and arranged vocal and instrumental music, under the able and energetic  direction of Mr. W. A. Jowett.  At the close of the musical section, Mr. J. A.  Fraser, clerk of the House of Commons, took  the chair. The Secretary of State, Mr. A. Sullivan, informed the House that its first business  was to elect a speaker. The honorable member for Albert County (Sheriff Tuck) was nominated by the premier (Mr. R. J. Clark), seconded by the leader of the opposition (Mr, J.  Wilkes) and conducted by them to the throne  amid the cheers of the members, visi*ors and  press-gallery.  As the Governor-General (His Hon. Judge  Forin) entered, preceded by the Sergeant-at-  Arms (Mr, Lackey), all rose and sang the national anthem. The speech from the throne  contained the nsual messages but was certainly  not free from controversal matter, which will  he dealt with at future sessions.  The members for St. Lawrence (Mr. J. A. F.  Richards) and Frontenac (Mr. V. M. Gallon)  moved and seconded the reply very ably.  On motion of the Minister of Finance (Mr.  Hansford) the House then went into committee  of supply, which included the serving of coffee and c*tke.  It is to be hoped that this is but the first of  a long series of similar evenings.  Hon. W. VV. B. Mclnnes has carried his  seat by a large majority. The contest was between Mr. Mclnnes and a Socialist, the Opposition failing to place a man in the field. In  view of the claim made by members of the  Opposition that they have the country with  them, their default in North Nanaimo is un-  explainable.  The skating rink open9 to night.    The Nelson City band will be in attendance.  The election petition against Col. Prior  was  argued at Victoria to-day.  The holiday trade in Nelson  is  unusually  brisk.  HANGING THE HOLLY.  With   Polly I   chanced to   be   hanging  the  holly,  With Polly, the roguish, with Polly, the sly,  With Polly, who's  brimming   with frolic and  folly,  A quip on her lip and a jest in her eye.  The  wind, it  was grieving, and the  shadows  were weaving  Their dark web without o'er the face of the  sky;  5  Within it was merry with--green leaf and ber^y,  And Polly, close by, with a   gleam  in her  eye.      ' ^~  "This  holly, I know, sir/you wish mistletoe,  sir!"  Cried   Polly, as o'er us a wreath we  hung  high;  I looked  at  her, laughing,  to  see  were  she  chaffing,  And oh, what a glint there shone out from  her eyel  How like the ro3e-petals on which the bee settles  Her cheeks were!     Her lips were the holly  fruits dye;  "Be it   mistletoe, dear, a minute or so, dear!"  **A minute?" breathed Polly, with mirth  in  her eve.  So its oh, to be hanging the holly with Polly!  With Polly, the mischievous, Polly, the sly.  With Polly the genius of all that is jolly���  A lure on her lip, and with love in her eye!  CHRISTMAS IS COMING.  Christmas time is cooling,  Coming mighty fast,  Soon we will be knowing  That it's here at last.  Hard to realize it,  But just calculate,*  And you'll find it coming  At a rapid gait.  There are signs already  In the house and store  Of the Christmas coming.  And each day adds more.   -  Often in the household  There is whispering,  Guesses as to presents  That the day will bring.  In the stores there's hustling,  Making needed room  On the shelves and .counters  For the Christmas boom.  Soon will all the windows  Be in glad array,  Filled with .things of,beauty,  Suited to the day.  Soon the same old problem  Will again confound���  How to make the m6ney  We can raise go rbujhd,  For the Christmas tokens  Pleasing to the eye,  Promptly catch each fancy  But they oft come high.  So the thoughtful mortal  Now begins to plan,  Cutting down expenses  Every cent he can.  Well he knows that many  Thirgs he'll have to get-  But he welcomes Christmas.  Though ho Dinks in debt.'  >���  07'70*ra  "      -till  -.11  5  I  a  i-T*i  ���?*;  VH:  'X4  An  -si  o%  ���^1  %-tt'HJ  o>T  ���** i  "-til  "I".'.  ���#3  lvv  V  ���������$  j,:.  ��*f>  ��ilAAiry  i.H:  j  I"  H'f       I   l-i.l  **** THE NELSON ECONOMIST  Alice Rawlins Crane.  USH has been  said   and   written  ab:>ut  the average woman of Dawson, and   it  is just about   these  some, woman I am going  to write a little more, and   as   it is  my   fortune  to  be among   th�� first arrivals in this  newly-settled town, and to have resided here  during the past four years of its growth  from  a few wretched cabins and tents erected on a  fever-stricken stretch of undrained   swamp to  a well-drained, well-built town   of  handsome  building?, containing most of the  comforts to  be met with on the��� "outside," it will   be   my  endeavor to write what my   observation   has  *  I  ^required were small in number compared   J  dered   ���M.     ���  ~ ==--  with cooka and housekeepers     All wer�� uln ,   Bldewalks-thanks to^hTT          ~  Paid, but fcw.  could savefo^/o ���   fol LT"'"  *��'*^X���*�� MuZ""*1'  price of living.                             g        the  h,gh ?��  ^ �� Poorly or.: peculiarly 21   7��"*Wi!1  t   TI.. eaus of recreation were limited.    The ^^Z^^T* *" ^^Sk  JSr.'sr^E?:fnr���*^> aide^oWn.chnessa8the  taught me concerning the changes Wh;;h have   j  Z^^n *~��* ��#  'T* '" "  gradually been brought about in most thin**      drivi     ��J!JL^* dep'0rabIe  oondiiioo that  gradually been brought about in most things  pertaining to my sex.  In the days of 1896 and 1897 there were, of  .   eourse, no female  population in   Dawson   to  speak of, for only   prospectors were   here   in  those early days and a few who had^managed  to hear of the extraordinary richness of Eldorado and Bonanza, and who bad rushed headlong to the Klondike,   hardly daring   to   believe a half of what  they   heard.    Such men  did not dream of  bringing  wives or aher female relatives with them  on  the  hard   and  hazardous journey, and Dawson   was essentially at that time a bachelor camp.  But towards the end of *97 all the civilised  world was thrilled with the news of the Klon-  dyke'a  richness, and ihei.  it was that women  as well as men were enthused with a burning  deaire to struggle into the Klondyke over the  Ghilcoot and White passes, and to risk the terrors of dangerous rapids in home-made boat-,  in order to obtiin a share of the precii.us metal which would, perchance, drive from many  a borne the gaunt wolf which had long threatened it.  In that wild rush in the spring of '98 there  were probably two women to a thousand men  and while many of the latter behaved gallantly and obliging, there were thousands  who acted like selfish brutes, and were totally indifferent to the trials, troubles and  dangers which befell others.  Ann^��ng the betre��genou�� mass of perhaps  bO.OOO men of all nationalities, and many of  the lowest grades of desperadoes, the women  who came to Dawson in '97 had to live.  The state of the so-called roads and trails,  even in Dawson, necessitated the wearing of  short sk.rte and masculine looking boots; consequently the women who come to Dawson to  lT^OU,dr Hving ��r Wh08e  occupation  took  them  abroad   on (he street*  or creeks  were  not dressed in a   manner which   added  any outside charm to fern a 1. attire.     Labor  was excessively dear, and women had to either  pay extravagant prices to carpenters, paper-  hangers, and dressmaker..,  or be  content Ao  Imun a very   rough cabin, rudely furnished,  w>U,   no more   pretence   to "show" than   the  plain, useful dresses they donned  The few lady, clerks, typewriters, and cash-  bnh on accmnt of the low standard of vulgar  Plays put on the stage and of the almost universal custom of drinking and smoking indui-  fUol ^     6 T�� tB,��rS- The ^appeared  Rf ��"a  U;1WS"��   audience as  devoid of  asteor  education, consequently   gave a performance  wh,cb   would disgrace a third- ate  oirne museum.  th?ral Rattherin^s w<?re ��". as few possessed  the means of entertaining   their   friends ; the  ��ttt-  If there has   heen a   revolution ;  ��* *- -��* ��ore  J*��%����?*.  he means of modifying   the dress oZ *B  eex .    The man who would now ��J le  Party dressed in 8 yello, S^ at lhe  other equally ugly Cume^dt T"  ���*��, and the woman who in '98 could h '*  laboriously plodding over the 1 vy r^  f  driving was out of the question   even   if there  had been conveyances and hacks in the   town  I ���but the dog then   held supreme  swaj% and  j  was sold at a price one would hesitate to pay  f  for a good hon��e elsewhere.  :       There   were   few   women   to   be   peon, the  j  streets were choked with men sitting along on  the sidewalks, smoking  and   lounging about,  I  so that women were almost compelled to either  j  stay indoors, or walk   in   the  middle  of the  ]  muddy.roads.  ;      The 'iords of creation" did   not appreciate  j  a good woman/ but lavished   their   time and  j  money on the moH lawless of the weaker sex :  I  many good and virtuous girls   who. came to  Dawson to seek honest work   in order to im-  I   prove their impoverished   condition from the  i  }  slavish position they   held   elsewhere, braved  |  to  lit*Ie purpose  the. heart-tending dangers  I   which they nobly conquered along the  trails,  :   for,   unable   to    obtain    employment,   they  |  drifted into one cf the  too numerous dance  ;   ball?, and thence to ruin and disgrace.  But under  what altered conditions do   we  now live !  In a few short j'ears   the   tent and   barren  cabin have given place to cosy building*, comfortable and sometimes richlyfurnished ; the  man  no longer cooks his  own   meals after a  hard day's work, or  complains of chronic indigestion, but   he   goes   to   his   well-ordered  home, welcomed by bis wife and perhaps little  children   who   have  just  returned   from  the  public school which is now a credit to Dawpon,  and finds a vast difference in the year of 1902  from 1898.  Woirten have come to Dawson in large num ���  hers  lately; their  journey there involved   no  hardships; fine steamers and a good railroads  have brought them quickly to their destination  which their sisters only reached after months  of weary and dangerous plodding.   They have  brought their children with them, and the little  ones   brighten the streets and   homes  by  their happy faces.    They find that the streets  are no longer  trysting places  of loafers   and  other pestf, but   are Hanked with   up-to-date  storep, filled with goods  from which it is easy  to choose   any article of food, dress  or   furniture ncsded.  In passing   up and down   the  new  rag  doll, would   be a much  rarer sight.  I  Neither does one see womon shoveling into the  j  sluice  boxes alongside of men, nor working  j  in order io add to their scanty earnings.  I       Women  are now in evidence  at our many  I  churches, librariesy social gatherings,concerts?,  j  and balls, and can also  venture to  a theatre  at times. ��  Dawson is well provided with livery stables,  and women are often seen comfortably riding  to and from the creeks in well-appointed  stage,*, which travel with ease and comparative comfort over tlie newly made Government  roads.  v "      ���*��� A**  It is said that ''experience is the most effective teacher of tbe race," and it has played  no unimportant part in the history of Dawson and the evolution of its women.  I claim that the ^ornen have  been greatly  instrumental io helping to purify the immoral  atmosphere which for a   time  hung over the  town ; by their influence they have elevated tbe  tone of the men, and are gradually  winning  for the place a name which will  no longer be  synonymous wiih overything which  a woman  should detent, hut one which shall be on a par  with .that of ony city in Canada.  The critical years of  hardship?, trials, and  stormy scenes  which   tended   to cripple the  morals and dwarf the aspirations arc happily  past, and Dawson  women  can   now step out  and take their places without a  blush.   They  can look back on their  checkered days as one  remembers a bad dream, and they can appreciate themselves no doubt, more than others  can apprr siate them, knowing what they have  done.   ' ��� ���   ���  To   many   those  bitter   experiences  have  brought out in their liyes all that is best and  noblest in women ; let ue  hope that the same  may be said of our men in DawBoihv  Dawson City.  IMMHMM  '  ;    A ���*  A dispatch from Newfoundland records the  loss of four schooners.  ��wmi���mmWMMi  The Dominion bye-elections will take place  next month.  "  or-  It is said that Lrrd Strathcona has oignifiod  his intention of giving $50,000 to McGill University for the establiehihegt of a gymnasium.  I A  N.i i  .  I *  , vi'fTl"  i...��n����mi>��<����HMi*Mll"'in,fl|"   "    "  *'<���"'   *      ''     ''   i  W>Hfli*rHHrte,��!H''JWWi*iWrtiH.WiH��WM i ",]\      .| 1 II. I     I  i  i . .        irmivnn,  ��� it-  It i '      i ll    ��� ��a^c^^��^_sS^|^^S^^^|~  THfi NELSON ECONOMIST  ti  One View of a Mo-t Point.  It may bo said  that  the  little word  "mv" placed  before  tbe word "deaa*'1  hasa significance of its  own.    When  osed between the ladies ..thus, "My deal  Mrs.   A.."  it  is   to   devote  an  extra  amount of cordiality and  friendliness,  and again when a  gentleman bo writes  to a lady of hin acquaintance it has the  same reading.  On the other hand, "My  dear Mr. 13. " is seldom or  never written by ladies to their men acquaintances,  "Dear  Mr. B. *' bein&  considered sufficiently   affectionate.      Elderly    ladies,  however, are  outside  of  this rule and  write "My dear Mr. B. '* to men whom  they havo  known  as  boya���Philadelphia North American.  Unavailing Prayer* j  Theodore F.   Seward,  the organizer ]  of the Don't Worry clubs, tells a good  story of a  little   boy who had reached  the multiplication table in thorourse of  his education.  One night he was sitting  anxiously over a piper of figures, when  his mother came ulontrand said, **John*  uie. do you find  yout   arithmetic very  banU"    "Yes,'indeed, niHiunm, I do.**  was his reply.    .���..* it was  so nwfnl hard  that I prayed, to A.God   lo help me, but  he's made  three 'mistakes uiready/'���  New York Tribune.  Ti  off ee Roasters  ers In  ea and Coffee  Wj? are offering at lowest-'prices "the best  grades of Ceylon, India, China and Japan  Our Best Mocha, and Java Coffee per  ..    . , t     pound ��  40  Mo.din and Java Blend, 3 pounds 1 00  Choice Hlend Coffee, 4 pounds.  t oo  Hpeelal Blend CofTee, ii pounds .". 1 00  it Jo Blend Coffee, 0 pounds  l 00  special Blciid Ceylon ita, per p-nind.    . 0  A TRIAL ORDER SOLICITED.  KOOTEStAY COFFEE GO.  Telephone 177.  P. O. Box if  Tlie'Prophet Iah*1.  "Loohiel, Lcclriel, beware uf tne day, ������  The prophet put on a menacing look  ail he .spake the grim words.  'Out and upon thee,'* qtioth Lochiel.  "Why should' I listen  to the sorry rav.  togs of a dotard "churl?"  "But I am a seer."  "And I an overseer," mud Lochiel,  ami he beat him forthwith four sad  flaps on the wmt.���Buffalo Enquirer,  WEST     BAKER    STREET,    NELSON  CERTIFICATE OF tfUPROVEHIEIITS  ������Grey    Eagle*'    Mineral  the KeNon Mining Divl  Contrary to a widespread belief that  bard woods give more heat in burning  than ^oft varieties it has been nhexvn  tbat the greatest power is po.ss������swl by  the wood of the linden tree, which ii  very suit. Fir stands next to linden auo  rJuiost equal to it  *��pJnJ+��u.i*-r.��i>"l*��t h*J^  ���KIMII K At'K OF f UK   UKUI.STKATIQN-  "I'* A X KXTU A-PUO VtXCl AL COM PAN V.  ���''^miunim act. I'M? A*  I IU:ri:hv ckkTTky thai the "Inter-  ";'����� 'imi   iiiirviwier Company   ..f Aitioi'-  ���; ,,as,i'n> day been registered uh an Fxtru-  \ .', ''?!.' { "inpany under tho "Computus  ;}   . Y'     10 curry out or ellect all or any of  ' "i,j,.r s ,��� the Company to which the legls-  ''o\raiiii���,ri[.y oi'thu Legislature or British  "Iron   Cap*'  and  f'hilms. situate in  slou of West Knot��*ii:iy District-  Where located: <��n the west slope of Sandv  Creek, about, four miles from Xels.ui. ,  Take notice ihat J. Fmttcis J. O'Reilly, ot  Nelnon. B. C. as agent for C. Sweeny. Free  Miner's eerMtle-ite Xo. B7I.2I2, inlend sixty  days from the d *��e hereof, to apply to the  Mining Recorder f����r certificates of improvements, for lhe purpose of obtaining Crown  grants of tlie above claims.  And further take notice thataction. under  s^etlon  :J7, must be eommenced   before  tlie  iKmiti nee m sueh certificates of improvements.  Out��Ml thls22nd day of October, 1902.  Francis J. 0'Keilt,y.  CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS  j    tiold Note MlnernlClnim.situateintheNeb  } son Mining: Division of West Kootenay Dis-  \ iriet.  j     Where located :   On east slope of 49 Creek.  Take notice   that  I.   F. C   Green,  acting  I us agent for Aaron U��� Kelly- Free Miner's  { Certificate Xo. I* 51.��11, Intend, sfxty days from  f the date hereof, tnnoplyfo the Mining He-  eorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for  the purpose of obtaining a Cro\Vn -/.Grant of  the above chtim. ���.  And further take notice that action, under  section  .17, most   bo commenced before the  Issuance of mien Certificate of Improvements  Dated this fourteenth day of November, 11)02  F. C. GKKtN,  Nelson, B.C.  CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.  '<*&$.  d-5  IS  '.  Ha);a7...��77 ,��.<_|i  is  &: Z'Z/i A- // AAA/Z^ZMg/ VMi  ^y7 :i:;'A:A.:7.li">^:-i:{Af:A��'&iyi: 1^.*  yAA7yA7i'iyAyAyiA^  mzmmmzzBiAm^  :A A 'Vo. '^a3t :'i ZA^/a^zA-. ^A'&yz  &?.  aZ.:  :- "Z]7-/A ���''.-������ '���'������'/���'A:ZiA' A/;:,'.Ty -y/-:l.  tSss  W  ZyZZyZ/AAy. f|  ''���'^'"ZyZAMz Wa  A&yAys- m  7.:.Jyy^AZ.::A'��*. >:*_$*  :'Af/' '-''A A-A ''���'."^^"M'-^'S^  :7:AiAAA.::A:fy.y^^Sp^  7:A.'AA77i:A:y7Ay7.i^iyiy^fj&  zyAAZAAy/ASA/^^i  .A'AA;y/A;yy/ZyxAZZjyM  Amm ly/fmAmymmM  ���7o,;,tMi^^mz&tawvs��; M  WWy^^MS0^\M0. M  ZZZZAZyA;0ZA0����/: ��M  m  zA:yyyA$y&��$:  yzzzyyA/zAyAiyk  -���-,���: ?-.i^.iA;<i-iy7;AA:Ai::ir>Aw ,i*i  ./���  ���-7A'-:77''-'-'' '��� ���::::A7AAA^:A^<^ ^H  ',<���;��� \ :'A.(.A AAyA'^iiiPykZA  AA0yAAAplA(��yiM  yyyySSSSw  iA|ii|if  .:A:ptl;;@!pl  '���'���liimhfa extohdH.  , '"i; ��;;h<1 ����f��ieeof t;��e Company is situate  '('A^ |ii> oi Mllwaukee.Htate ot1 Wisconsin,  ^V|,a1;V';'i;iu',',[ 'f^bc capital of tlie Company  each ' ll,vlt,*Ml   hll�� ,0��0iK> Hbares uf $1(H)  ^i!1ll!;!!l''ll,1t1,,l!i,,<,<>riboC(im!��uny in this Pro-  H .'.'. w",,.V,,<- ,n lh�� Uhy of'Nelson, and  a I,. ,!.. I \!,,1l,o��lnijnon, Barrister,tve, whose  ���',    .s^,lN N<lHonaiuresald, Is the attorney of  O. West (Fractional)'Mineral Claim,situate  In tlie Nelson Mining Division of West Koo-  fenny. District...-  ��� Where located: On Toad Mountain.  ripunn.,,,,   v. ,�� .... Take notice that I, F, C. Green, acting as  s* ihmi i        ,' [l,,!l'.*',l,,l,ul/>l ,,lt������ ^inipuny j agent for Aaron 11. Kelly, Free Miner's Certl-  ...���.���!'IHM,.<*��<|. divided  Inio BKOiHi Hhiiri.H.iiiA4iiMii||7.ll(0   . ^0,     Bf,i,23i.    Intend,    sixty   days  from the date hereof, to apply to the  Mining ��� "Ree/mler for a Cert I Ilea te of  ���Improvement*, for the purpose ol obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under  section Jl", must be commenced before the Is-  Will buy a first-class, well-made  Suit of clothes at my establishment.  '"Puny   (not  empowered  . of  to Issue or  Hi.- i  llJU,,s|t.r HtiM'it).  u,"r,,��npany Is limited,  Mh",ri,.,,v. ,,,,!,\!��>������ ���'of'BHtisrTVdiiViiohVnio'H  "���'v   ��>i  November, ono thotisaml nine  <i|V'. ���!!. u,1V,,r ,,n > ViamYand seal  of brilee at  and t.\V<-,t  "ilihliv.l  !'"s,l ,,    , ��. Y. WWOOTTON,  B��'glst.mr of Joint Stock Companies.  r ' jl'^'llouhiu are the objects for which the  -,! |ll,l> is. cNtahllNhed:���  in��� ll,i;;!!,1u,1",'nre, sell and deal In harvest-  Miuk . ,,Hm' ,<m>,s ,u��d implements of all  Miu\Vl.'ri !��� V ���? burveshM's, hinders, reapers,  ,.,il,,','iIUU��,M1. holders and Nhredders; agri-  all ' nmcnlnei-y, tools and implements of  u,,,i V, ,s I h,,,|d<M' twine; and all repair imrta  use l .,..''. devices, materials and articles  ,u ��.�� intended for use, in connection with  ,,,,'">.i  oi harvesting or agricultural  nut*  T,! .;;14M,,N������' bnplentents:  tl,,   , ' ^M^''  ��b  'be  manufacture  or produc-  (,        '. aim to deal  In any  materials or pro-  uiu   ,i,       ' l,,a��v h<t ,1MtMl "b ����1' hi connection  ,.1,1,.'!,',   "Niutueturoof harvesting or agrl-  ���p, ' ; ."������'���ilneH, tools and Implements;  wis,,', l!,MNi ,or' obtain, register, mmisc or other-  Nfll ,^i,|Uil'<N a,ul t��> bold, use, own, operate.  I|(1, ','. r'}?b of otherwise dispose of, any trade  Pi-oviVi.', nV l,u,,ies, patents, Inventions, Itn-  uiii, , ' ,,,H an<l in'ocesMCH used In connection  |.(|j ^cuie��l under, letters patent of the  wis,.      ^"ites ot of other eouiilrles or other-  suance of Mttch Certificate of Improvements.  tecnth day of November, l����2  Dated this fourteen I  F. C GllKKN,  Nelson. H. C  Notice To Delinquent Co-Owncro  ToTbomas Bennett. Albert Bennett, Maggie  LouIko Fennel 1. George A. Iftinter, James  Bourke,and every other persons or persons  having or claiming any interest In the ������Galena" Mineral Claim situate about six miles  north of Haltnon Siding and two miles west  ofthe Nelson and Fort. Hheppard Hallway,  In the Nelson Mining Division, District ol  West Kootenay.     ,  Yon and each of yon are hereby notified  that I have expended one hundred dollars  In order to hold the above mentioned  mineral claim under the provisions ot  the Mineral Act, and amendments thereto,  and if within ninety days IVom the  dale of this notice you fall or retuse to  contribute vour portion of sueh expenditure  together with all costs of advertising your Interest In said claini will become the pro-  i.ertvof the subscriber under Section four ol  an Act entitled ���' An Act To Amend Ihe  Mlm.n,-A..l.lW��.�� .   M   Ml!tjAUKN,  IJv ]|l��Atlorm\v, lt. M. Mnrrtoimkl.  Dnltfil (Ilia Htli m��.V "I Ocxwmlior.HMW.  TE^MONI3.lock:, nelson  0HN  WlcLATCH IE  Dominion and  Provincial  Land Surveyor  ip. Customs House, Nelscp.B  fA0DS BTOS-  PEED  AFETY  ATl'SFACTl'ON  >nOfH..^  ���Ayy  The East and West are almost ono when fcho  means of transit Is the C. P. It.' A glance at  this condensed time table will convince you  of this fact:  Leave Nelson 5 a. m.f  Arrive Winnipeg 2nd day 8:50 a.m.  Ar ri ve Bt. Paul 2nd day 0:40 p. m.  ���������;,���   Arrive Chicago 8rd day 9:80'a.m,  Arrive Toronto 4th day 2:45 p.m.     .  Arrive Montreal 4th day 0:40 p.m.  Arrive Now York 6th day 8.55 a. m  Close Connections for ill East  ern Points.  flKWIMf^Wf^  M      |>rU _.   m  Vancouver and Neleon  BAHEH STREET, NELSON,  B. C  The splendidly equipped tourist cars oithlB  company leave for tlie .Ka��t as fo lown:  Front Dim more Junction dally for Bt Paul.  Front Kootenay Landing, Tuesday and  Saturdays for Torontot Montreal, and all  Fastern polntu.  Further Information as io why the C. P. E.  Is the most dowlrnblc route acroHs the continent will be cheerfully furnished on application to  J.B. OAHTFdt,  DliKt.Pass. Agt.,  Nelson.  E. J. OOYLTC.  A. G, P. A.  Vauconver  i   ��i i '������  l/'zlli  ., ' li'  il*'"  (7    j    '   I'   HI  <jWfvjB-��<Klf>jl..J{l^t*fM,U *<*fa   Ak-J.  %     fj       Wfl     ,,       fy   ,i f       o'   svJ    'I . ,    V ,   ,      ,(,    .1 ���      ,���,, ,'.i  u Hi'',i  i     \ i   '-Si   "iZ'i'^yAihy    'a i >71  .     , iu(��a   ih,'   i   :.   ,!  zaiz:  ���iy-  i y  lU.i  Ifi        1    H��.  .'<>   ��,r   A  r'  A ''  Am'  uf  < a  i-*H   w*t*-i*ll'**'tu���Mtl *H*^|f .il.*.* m.ii.  . I,,      ,_.    ..i  nt   . ^        ii, i, i, .1      -n  i'i   , i , >' y  id   i\  i '   l!      "! ,     ' >    ' ,       U-    I'd ���  \   .,    ll  'io       in  ' *r! "\v  H 1\| Ir      if  ,\��- I  '   A i  i'' A  ��� ^ '*  J ^jV" i, i. *  \  ' ��� '    ���  "oh!"^!;  y. , ' AA y  ' '^v���>^.���^ V .'v'"'   '  hi    li> . ',    Ui    h       ,   \_        .,   V, ������ ,i*   ,'   .|i l\   "  V  I  t  THE NELSON ECONOMIST  see our  partment.  finished moving into the "P. Burns Block, we invite the public to call and  premises and inspect onr stock, as we are showing complete ranges in each de-  adeis8 Department  Ladies Silk Blouses in  ail  leading  shades.    Cashmere and French Flannel Shirt Waists.  Ladies* Neckwear���A very choice  and pretty selection in Silk Ties,  Tabs,   Chiffon   Collars,   Lace Collars  i   and Boleros, just received for the holi-  |   dav trade.  *  \       Ladies* handkerchiefs in endless va-  j   riety.  Ladies' Kid Gloves.  Furs���Large range  of  Ladies' and  Children's   Fur  Ruffs,   Boas,   Muffs,  Collars,   Seal Jackets,   all   the plates  styles.  Gents' Oepartfnenf.  Mens Smoking Jackets, Dressing  Gowns and Travelling Rugs, Kid  Gloves, Silk Suspenders, SilkScarfs  and Mufflers. See our latest novelties.  ladies mnd Seni' Silk Umbrella��.   Ju_%%  the thing for Christmas Presents  See Our Fancy Ware S3<3$arfcme��i-  x^emon  jreei..����.*.��.<��...������. ............���<.����.������*����..   ... .........25c per lb  v/range 1 eei............... �����......., . , . , , ......... ,,2,*jc per lb  v. 1 iron 1 ee��...............  25c per lb  Raisins (Seeded) ., 12 J^c per lb  ' >\  - > 1 WW*  Currants (Cleaned):.../.. ,. ;.,, (M���;,...., v.;.. 12^c per lb  Sultanas ,, #..,..,.##;;;.....,;;;_.ia}ic per lb  Walnuts      ...V..��.....���...#���.,....25c per lb  /vimonds,....*.. ,..........,,��;....,..,��...,,,,'jstjjc'pcrlb  reet  "Wvwtfif  A*ft%<^ jjw��?^^^M^fc^^^ ***** *****> y "*~   ^"-ril"-^ '  0 ����  ftt">i��****(l��.V*��!��T���-  ���p-���*<���*-> ������  ����T".HHrWW��*��WM*H<��fc^rt'^ H.  , ,  -a    -      >-. *\��.    ��   -   ,.~<u_, 1     | l| if- f  urn*!-     '   i      iLt" ' t",'*"*wm,  <    *l 7    It     I  ,,    .<|>IF>       iiji>.   -jjr    ��tn ��1f.H    ���

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