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The Nelson Economist Oct 26, 1898

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 WVth vvhlch S��"WcW  porated-TME .MOTION. ��tf Ml^^'f 'S5'  '     S-i  VOL. II.  NELSON, B. C, vWEDNKSPAX ^OCTOBER  26,1  NO.  16.  - - ** >-*���-��� ���*  the' nelson ECOiSOri0T.  MAW Wedne^Uyat the city of Nelson. B. C.  D. M. Cablbt..  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  I &*?=?   :"3   -    '-:        '�������� ilil 1       J .���':<.;'��� iJ*       ���-.'-..  Oft* Teat to Canada- *��<* United Statea   XI paid in adVaae*.   oie Yea* ibU'wat Britela     ,v ������� If paid .JnadYanc^ ���..-'������-<  .PtBUWM'  .$2.00  . 1J��  . 2 00  Remit by Express, Money Order, DraSt, P. O. Order, 07  Sc��&tt��red Letter.  Correspondence on matters of general interest respectfully  ���elicited. '  AdTertiaemeritB of reptitable eh��r��cter wU1,,d�� inserted  apon terms which .will be made known on application. Only  articles of merit will be'advertised in these columns and the  interests of readers will be carefully guarded against irresponsible persons and worthless articles.  P'Vil  Hypnotism or mesmerism has been more or  t less believed in  by scientists for the past one  hundred years, and welirautHenticated  caeee >  of persons  under   the hypnotic  inftuenee'aTe  1 growing more numerous than formerly.    One  comes   from     Tprohto.     An     actress,'   Mies  ;;.,. JflprelKse Stone, during thVprogress of a .per-���  , j, iformahce pi Trilby: at the" "Princess theatre- in.  that city/is sWid to hare been actually hypnotized; by Ealpn Stewart in the^rbl�� of Svehgali.  At; a certain   part in   the play   Miss  Stone  turned in her   chair and loo&ea^ Stewart full  in , the face, ,&:..bit''of"'businSis'' wmdh1 had not  previously been used  by her.    Stewart  took  h��r?by,the hand and was leading  her across  the stag�� .^hen she Buddenly sank "at his feet.  Tb�� curtain _:was rung^ downimmediately and  those in, the house who thought that  the act  .had,  been  ftniBhed, 7a^plauded  mightily.    A  member of the company came on the front of  the stage and announced Miss Stone had been  ..seized with a fainting fit. caused by over-work.  , She.declared sh�� had been hypnotized and be-  came very .hysterical,' but recovered sufficiently to conclude the play.    This may have been  ,a genuine case of animal magnetism, but more  likely it is an advertising schieme  of some en  rising  in   daily   communication   with   the.outside  -world.   With' the jailroads8::have: sprung.up  hew towns all over the Province, and population has increased by leaps and bounds.    Th��  maiority of these towns are not, as spme would  i��iv* us beliw��, of mtt8h^room*?PW����r. W"1  ' ininy caeeft th.y *��> turrounded,^jtb,th9**  ��tiftwMH tfhat go toeBteblish ,pormai>enj,.suc-  x��BB ��  Butf  it is not only to our vast mineral  ���ttBo'urwSs SiMfw* look for future prosperity.  Iiideed, it i. quite   probable, that the  grand  ' BC��n��ry throughout: the, mountain  regions of  British  Columbia may  prove only teoond  to  our'mteeral' reiourcee as a  revenue producer  When it becomes known to .the outside  world  thai in this Province there is enough  scenery  to make   a  dosen-Switzerland*,  the   tourist  travel of the whole world must turn in this  direction.    We should, therefore, make known  tothe: leisure das*  throughout Europe that  her*'wehave  the-greatest wealth   of natural  Bcehe'ry in  Ths prophesy mad�� by Sir William Van  Horn�� a few years ago that British Columbia  was about to enter upon an ��ra of the greatest  railway building in the history of the world,  has really come to pass, and within a few  years those portions of the Province whieh  were one�� deemed absolutely inaccessible from  a transportation point  of view will be  placed  According to a medical journal,   the ordinary much maligned  tobacpo  cigarette   must  yield the  first place  as a destroyer of nerves .1  and vitality and general  enemy of  mankind.  Its successful   rival,  which has appeared   recently  in the field,  is the tea cigarette.    It is  mad��;  from unbroken   leaves   of   green   tea  mixed with a  little tea dust.    The combi a-  tion is  moistened, rolled and   inserted   in a  paper wrapper, so that outwardly it looks like  an ordinary cigarette.   The effects a �� peculiar.  The smoker first experiences a thickening senr  satioh pf th�� head and if afflicted with a desire  to sit   down.    This  phase   is followed by  a  period of intense exhilaration, which, presumably accounts for the habit; the third phase is1  nausea and disgust for food.    The beginning  of recovery is marked by a yearning for tea in  any form,    The tea  cigarette.habit is  said to  be peculiarly difficult to overcome.  Every person interested in the development  of South Africa under British auspices must  regret the defeat of the Spriggs' Ministry at  the Cape of Good Hope. It may not be generally known that since the first establishment of representative government in that  colony there has been little, if any, change in  the representation in the Assembly. The  colony was originally settled by th�� Dutch,  and the agricultural constituencies are peopled  by the  descendants  of these people.   .But by  the immigration  of late years of a large Bu-  fflish eiementy the cities have increased m arce,  and iroin causes'which it wouhHtake too, long  "to enter into mt present, friction; between,the  "original   settler5   and   the   English^  element  ? sprang ^existence;   Sir Gordon Spriggs at-  r'temittrf tii- introduce a redistribution biU by  wnicli the cities with their increased  popu)V  tion could  obtain5  fair representation m^he  ^Assembly-    In this he was deafeated.    A.dis-  iciiuiion was granted  by   the Gx>vernorv^Sir  Alfred  Milher, and the general election which  foilbwedresulted in the return of 40-Bond represent* ti**s and 39 Progressists.   :^^1^  supported Sir   Gordon  Spriggs.   ^Both   s^  were pledged to redistribution   but differed^  the^ details.    B^ late despatches we learn Sir  Gordon Spriggs has resigned, owing to a want  of confident motion,  which- was carried by  two of a majority  and moved in the  Le^  tureby Hon. W: P.  Schriener^Q^. /orm^f  Attorney-General    in     the , Cabmet.       Mr.  Schreiher is a German, by birth, l>ut  educated  at Cambridge^   He is: considered an  able but  impracticableI politician. s  It is reported from Dawson City that there  ia a typhoid fever epidemic there, and that  the deaths average threeor four daily.. * What  a delightful place to live!        - ^ - *  .8  |e  e  ���m:  m ���  The Victoria Times is of the opinion that it  ifi time for the Liberals of British Columbia to  organize.    No   doubt   the Times is   animated  with a desire to put on a  bold front, but   the  fact remains that there is-no possibility of the  Liberals of .this Province  perfecting ah ��flee- :���..  iive organization.    No matter how   much the  Liberals  pretend to  believe that they ' won a  victory in 18^6,   the* fa eta   simply   show they  have been   deceiving themselves.   In  nearly I  every constituency where victory was achieved  the fight was a three-cornered   one���rtwo Conservatives against one Liberal.    In Yale-Cariboo the means by  which the Liberals   carried  their   man   are   too  well-known t��   demand  special mention.    Moreover, many   Conservatives throughout  the Province,  led  away by  false issues, voted the Liberal ticket, and these  same Conservatives are  now   the most  active  workers against the men they helped to  elect  in 1896.    Not only were certain Conservatives**  deceived by false promisee, but many Liberals!  were   the victime  of Grit deception,   with thu  result that what was once the Liberal rarty ���-  9 THE NELSON ECONOMIST  i  ft'  ��,  I  I*.'  British Columbia is not now even a, shadow  of its former self. Bossism has also wrought  disaster and when the time comes to write the"  epitaph of the Liberalpartya fitting inscription  for its tombstone would be: "Strangled in  its infancy by  Boss Bostock and  his   ring.''  The British Columbia Review, published in  London, Eng., has the following in   regard to  the closing up of   the -Agent-General's Office :  " In   an   interview  whieh a   press   representative had with the venerable Sir Charles Tupper   this morning, he said  that   he* was very  sorry indeed  to   hear  that   the   office of  the  Agent General had been shut.; M consider it  of the utmost importance,'  said   Sir   Charles,  ' that   the   Government   of  Eritish Columbia  should    have    a    well-informed   agent     here  thoroughly acquainted with British Columbia,  and able to  give -persons  interested in   t^his  country reliable information, particularly   at  the present  time,   when  so    many   events   of  momentous importance in the development   of  the Pro vince_are oceurring.    The interests  of  British Columbia demand   that   there should  be   some    agency   for   the;  distribution     of  accurate information /regarding' the country.  So much British capital is   already   employed  in   the   developmentof   the   Province    and  Canada generally that it.is   absolutely   indispensable that statistical and other data khould  be readily. forthcoming from   some   office   tit-  uated in  the  city.'      Sir   Charles  seemed   to  .' think that the decision in question would   pro  bably be followed up by   the--appointment   of  a.new Agent- General   in   London ; and   if a  rumor current in'the.  city this   afternoon   is  correct;; 'the   British' .Columbia   Government-  have   already . regretted; ctheir  mistake,    and  speedily endeavored tQatone for  the bad im-  ^ pression previously created." ������_/"'  ������  *���'"In. an, offrhao-iJed way, a few weeks ago, The  ... Economist took occasion-to remark on the cir-  .-.cumetance that an eastern clergyman had  complained   bitterly of   the great   decrease in  .the birthrate" of .Ontario, v The matter '���would:-  not'have been ..referred -to again,v:had it not  . -h;f?n that., the Province? a daily paper published  at Vancouver, disposes of >he' birthrate question with the;foilowing"sign-ificaht-paragraph:  . * 'Se veral :of the. Province's, esteemed:-; con temporaries are learnedly discussing the*:low .birthrate \tol  Ontario, and are trying .ii&rd' to.find a reason ^for it.  The expla^ation-isfo;mte,siriipie^ ... There are.not as,-.;  many babies; Being.toorn" in. .vOn'tarip. ;U6:\V a$.:>tliere  were formerly;"       . -mx       , m   '".,.,-. V''"     .-���'���  There is a significance iQ,the5 foregoing par-  '  agraph which   merits our most   serious atier-  tipn.v   The amiable editor of the yProolrice left ..  Ontario nearly two ysar.sago.   , Up-'to th�� tibde"  of his departure from Ontario there   had been  -   no complaint as, to the decrease iri 'the birth-  >��� late of that Province: ' This  circumstance  in  :'itself may   not be ..given undue   promine.-nce,  but  when taken.in   connection with the   fact  that within  two years   from   the.time of  his  exodus   the birthrate of  Ontario had   shrunk'  to such   an   extent   as   to  provoke   comment  f.-om   a member  pf the   Anglican Synod,   we;  submit  that  there   are sufficient   grounds at  least arouse  a  suspicion   that his   departure  may have had some bearing on the backward  condition  of baby culture.    The case  simply  stated is as follows:    While  the genial editor  of;the Province lived in Ontario the  birthrate  was at, no time  below   the average, in fact it  was a little above If anything ;  then he left  and all at once, or within a reasonable space  of time, there was a noticeable decrease, so conspicuous as to excite comment.    Of course, it  may  be contended   that in   any  event   this  fallin^-off would  have   taken place,  and was  .hot necessarily consequent upon the departure  of any One living at that time in Ontario,   but  "th��  "fallacy of this   reasoning   will manifest  itself when it is pointed out that no proofs are  forthcoming to* support such an   illogical conclusion, but there is abundant   proof to demonstrate that there is a shrinkage in th�� baby  industry;   moreover, it will  be admitted   that  the editor of the Province is no longer   a resident   of that^ part   of Canada in which this  pnee     thriving    industry  is  said     to   have  shrunk and shrivelled into insignificance.    It  is hot a   sufficient   answerer to   the complaint  that even if the editor of Canada's only critical paper once more took up his residence  in  Ontario,   conditions   precisely   the   same   as  those that existed previous to the time   he left  would not prevail j all we; have to deal with is  th�� plain   fact that the   editor of the  Province  newspaper left Ontario  at vsom�� tiraie   within  the last two years, and   in a reasonable   time  thereafter a reputable   clergyman  complained  that   baby   culture   was   at a   standstill.    If  further proof were needed  to establish a   case  against the editor of the Province, we believe it  may be found iri the  paragraph quoted above,  and taken from page 4 of:that paper.   Instead  of offering some explanation for the low birthrate, he. treats the whole subject callously and  contemptuously, and   with   a  .���knowing    leer,  say^:    -'Th��   explanation   is   Vquite   simple;  there are -not- as. many ;babies't being  born   in  Ontario-now.as^.the^ This  alone;sSustains the contention that if the edi-  toj:of^he-���Province is riot .responsible for the  low birthrate, he knows" more of the matter  than he is^willihg to divulge:     ^ '  patronize a performance of "The Ballet Girl."  His Excellency did not reply, but the Countess wrote .the manager that the Earl did not  like plays 1_$-which there were ballet girls.  Countess Aberdeen may be correct in her  statement of the case, but we would prefer to  have the assurance from the lips of her husband. ��� '   \  The Winnipeg Liberals do not believe in |  taking Father Time by his forelock. A;l- ^J  though Joseph Martin, by the grace of Lieut.-  Governor Mclnness became Attorney-General  early last August, the Liberals of the prairie  capital bottled up their enthusiasm until  October 20, when they passed a resolution of  congratulation to the only Joseph.:: Perhaps  his Winnipeg friends wanted   to feel satisfied  I..'.. .... .���''������������������':-:-������ ���-���>��� t-' ���   .  of their ground. ^  One pleasing characteristic of Mr. Sifton^s  Galician friends is that they manifest a  praiseworthy desire to destrpy each other. MA  female of that tribe killed her husband and  five children, a few days ago. That woman  has built for herself a monument more enduring than marble.  An Iowa girl has brokeji through ail the  well-established rules for committing self-  destruction, by poisonin^^^^ with a break-,,  fast-of spiders.,. It._.m ay not have been the  most romantic method bf^ shuffling off this  mortal coil, but it was original and from all  accounts most effective.  ���;v:':  ..������.<*������  v   ..��-  rr'r'  The Tprpnt'p ^flegram ��Ug��ests that   when  hejis^- conarpletin^^thcl'.'' npnument to   (xeprge  ~\\^s��irigton:^W^ Lunnon,   David  Christi|';Mur^  heaHbut npt^ga^udy inscription: ,"!.-. . ���.'���������'���'''  n'<-iflmn  'm^'-' ''. a. ^WASHlfrGTON^' "' l  IAjST ^M^ItlCAN Who COULD NC)T tell  .--.A   We shall-vnot look upon,his  like again. ,.        :  While en roiote to the old country,   Hon; J.  H. Turner was interviewed at Winnipeg.    The  position of  parties in   British  Columbia  was  truthfully  outlinedv|bv  the ex-Premier.     In  reply to the question:'   ^Has the  government  decided upon some definite policy  wherewith  to   make   a    bid  for   popularity, Hon. Mr.  Turner said :'   "No, I don't think so.    They  will   probably  attempt   to   show    that  fthe  late government was extravagant in   finances.  Before our defeat, a large loan was authorized  to cover a   considerable overdraft incurred in  developing the country's   resources, its  roads  and its trails.    This loan has not been  issued  and   consequently the  overdraft still   stands  against the  province.    The members  of   the  government will hold up their hands in   holy  horror   and exclaim:    'Behold   the   extravagance of your former rulers.' "  The Martin family are bobbing up all over  the country. A brother of c,Josaph ; the  Fighter" has: recently been elected president  of the Winnipeg Liberal club. And still  people wonder at crime. ! , :  ** "...������  The:manager of���a   Montreal theatre recently extended an invitation to Earl Aberdeen to  There have been many curious escapes  from prison. Nearly twenty years ago, a  prisoner in a Dakota lock-up not only escaped  from the place in which he was confined, but  with assistance of a friend he placed the building on his sleigh and took it home. Another  strange dash for freedom is reported from New  York. It is that of Henry Bradley, a Governor's Island convict, who last week, stole a  government steamer, and in the exciting chase  by an armed guard that followed on another  steamer, he gave his pursuers the? slip.  Bradley, who belongs to New York, was an  engineer by trade. Two years ago he enlisted  in the regular army, but last year he deserted,  S3    ...    ��� ���                                ��� '. ,..'                                                    '������'���'.'���'"���'..���...���                                                                                                                                     .'                                                                                              ' U,  JjShi ....   ,        .    -    .    . .....->          ...".������ ���    .    -                       ______        FV T'HK NELSON ECONOMIST.  3  He was re-captured after a short absence   and  J sentenced to five years' imprisonment.    Along  with the other  convicts on  the island he   was  put to work on the dock, and was   assigned-to  ��� the task of coaling and getting up steam every  morning, preparatory to the arrival of the  crew on the General Fair, the government  ferry boat,   which   plies between   Liberty and  ��� Governor's island. Armed guards watched  over- the prisoners,- but-at 7 o'clock one morn-  ���   ing, while the other  convicts   worked on the  dock,   Bradlev   was alone   on    the   steamer.  Shouting to the guard at the landing slip that  something  had gone  wrong with  the engines,  ��� he said:���"I'm going to   see how she   works."  ��� Immediately there was   a   puff   of steam, the  ��� hawser was cast j way from   the boat, and be-  fore the surprised guards could   recover  from  '. their   astonishment    the   General    Fair-  had -  steamed out of the dock and was heading   for  mid-stream with Bradley for crew and passen- .  ,ger.    An outcry was at once raised, and with-.:  in four minutes the Hattie Palmer,-a   govern-  ,ment steam   lighter,  had  started in   pursuit.  .The Hattie Palmer  had an   armed   guard on  board, and put   on full   steam   in  an effort, to  i-.catch up with   the fleeing   convict.    Bradley,  -however, is an   experienced engineer, and   he  ���was able to get every inch   of speed that   was  in  the General   Fair out  of   her.    When   he  ���saw   the   Hattie   Palmer   leaving   Governor's  island in pursuit  he ran directly   for the   Atlantic dock "Brooklyn.   "With full speed on he  Tan in between a barge and- a steamer ���moored  -in the dock,   and without   waitihs; to turn  off  steam, jumped upon the barge, from which he  made his   escape   th'jough   the dock.    When  the Hattie Palmer arrived Capt. Miller found  the General Fair   firmly wedged  between  the  steamer and the barge,   with her   engine  still  running.    During^therun across Bradley  exchanged    his'prison .-'garb   for  the    working  clothes of the .engineer of  the  General   Fair,  which   were   hanging   in    the   engine   room.  The'guard on the Flattie   Palmer landed   and  made a thorough  search of the docks and the  neighborhood, but   without  finding   Bradley.  Few people were around at the time,  and   no   I  on�� seemed to have observed  the escaping engineer.    An alarm   was sent 'immediatelv   to  *��� . a/ ���   ���  police headquarters, but  Bradley has not   yet  been recaptured.  agents, by the way, in Brooklyn and at the  head office deny almost in toto many of the  statements made by the Miner/'     ��� ' *    '  It is inconceivable that   any paper in   Canada should resort to such methods, and for the  honor of   the Press,   we prefer to believe   that  theNeivs   has  been, misinformed.    No   doubt  the editor of the Rossland'Miner is anxious to  secure business  for   his paper,  but we   doubt  very much if  he ever descended so low as the  Newswould have   us believe.    If nothing else,  surely a dread of the law, in such   ca*e, made  and provided, ought  t.> prevent the   intimidation of business  men.    Jn   the   meantime  wo  prefer to believe that th�� News is   mistaken in  attributing such motives to Mr.  Race, and we  hope that gentleman will.take the earliest op-  portuity of- clearing  the Press of  British Columbia from   the stain  which   has  been cast  upon it.    Speak up, man!  The Brooklyn Neivs makes what is perhaps  the most serious charge ever brought   against  a paper in this Province, if not  Canada, when  it accuses the Rossland Miner  of having published   its recent  article on   the alleged meat  monopoly because P.   Burns & Co.   refused to  patronize the   Miner's  advertising columns to  the extent of   $40 per month.    We  reproduce  the exact words of the Neivs:    "Mr. C. E. Race,  of the Rossland Miner, thinks there is a  good  chance for anyone with $100,000 to invest, to  | start in  opposition  to   P.   Burns  &   Co., th��  meat   merchants   of   Kootenay.     The   Miner,  however, should be fair and tell also that  the  column articl�� did not come out till Burns refused to run a $40 card in the paper.    A more  intelligent idea of  the case could then be obtained   by   the    disinterested.      Mr.   Burns'  The above gem, which was received -at this office last Monday evening, demands a little explanation. At first sight, the impression might  be created that for The   Economist the   pooi-  house loomed up in the distance, arid that the  Martin-Hume Government was about to enter  upon an era of unprecedented economy.   .We  believe we can convince our readers   that this  view of the situation   is misleading and   that  the economy supposed to be practised  by  tLo  new government is   simply   a m}7th.    In  the  .first   place, _this   paper   has   never   been   addressed   to any   department   or  office   of   the  Provincial Government,   " with the exception  of the Government printing office and   the   library of the Legislative Assembly."   It is sent  to the Government printing office in exchange  for the British Columbia   Gazette, and  no bill  has ever been rendered the Provincial   Librarian for the   paper.    Several members   of the  late Government subscribed for   The   Economist ae individuals, and paid   their   subscriptions  out   of  their   own  private   funds.      No  voueher was   ever   presented   to   th��   Government for the payment of one   subscription   to  this paper.    The Economist is now forwarded  to the gentlemen of the late   cabinet,   but   addressed  to   them   as    private   members.      So  when the Provincial-Secretary expresses a   request to "discontinue to send The Economist"  o any department of the   Provincial   Government, he simply makes   a request that has no  meaning    whatever.    It   may    be    that   The  Economist is still forwarded to the offices  formerly occupied   by the   gentlemen   who   subscribed for, but it certainly   is   not  addresstd-  to those  departments,   and   should   hot   have  been opened by any person except the   person  for whom it was intended and to  whom it was  addres.-ed.     It   will thus   be   seen that   The  Economist does  not   suffer financially by  the  order  from   the  Provincial  Secretary's office,  nor does the Government save one cent   by its  order.    It would be expecting   too much  from  the present, government   to believe   that   any  one member   thereof   would    subscribe for    a  paper that he could   read for   nothing   in the l  Provincial    Library.    Incidentally,   it   v/ou.'d  be an act of. wisdom on the   part of., the Provincial Secretary if he would refrain in future  from sending such   idiotic letters from  his cle-  partinen  Circular.  Provincial Secretary's  Office.  20tii October, 1898.  Sir,���I have the honour, by direction, to request that on and after the receipt of this circular,  you 'will discontinue to send The Economist newspaper  to any Departmentor'Office of the ProvincialTxov-  ernmeut, with the exception of the Government  Printing Office and the Library of the Legislative  Assembly, Victoria. " ,  I am, Sir,  Your obedient servant,  A. Campbell, Keddijs,  Deputy Provincial Secretary.  To the Manager The Economist, Nelson- :  Without   desiring to reflect on the   present  fire brigr.de,   it must-be   said  that   a city   tho  size of N.elson should  have more   adequate fire  protection than it now enjoys.    In  the organization of   municipal   governments   the   most  difficult    question-is   how     to    provide   protection against fire.    And it would be  bordering on the marvellous  if-Nelson   were an    ex-"  caption   to   the   general  rule. .  The  funds  required to equip a fire brigade and provide the  .'necessary  apparatus to  tight a   conflagration  are usually more than a  young   municipality ,  can affjrd, with the result that it is only when  a fire occurs, the citizens discover what really  little protection they enjoy.    The  corporation  of Nelson   has   accomplished a   great deal   in  this direction, but as.His Worship pointed out  at the council  meeting  last. Monday,   a.great  deal more has to be done in the future.    There  are certai n portions   of 'Nelson, spread    over  such a   wide  area of   territory   as, it is,   that  would be completely   at   the mercy, of afire.  We refer-more   particularly to the   residences  on the hill, where a   fire would gain so   much  headway before the arrival of the brigade, that  it would have completed   its work of devastation.     We believe our present brigade could be  depended upon to do good work in almost any  emergency,  but it miiet   be confessed,   that it.  would be wise to.have a reorganization, of our  whole system of protection against fire.  The trada returns   for   the   quarter  ending  with the month of September   show  that   our  sales to the outside    world   are   decreasing   as  compared with last year;     but that   our   purchases from it and the Government's inevitably  levy  upon    these    purchase,    are    increasing.  Our exports stand at $48,400,000   as compared  with $47,800,000  for   the  same   quarter   last  year; while  our  imports reached $43,190,000  this quarter, the figure for the   same   quarter  last year being only  $32,999,000.      The   taxation on these purchases jump   from  $5,120,-  000 last year to  $6,780,000   this   year.    This  is a striking   change   in   the wrong direction,  remarks the Montreal Star.  m  -. i .. ..-.���;".  W.-m  ;:-i ���',���:''���"���':  ���;'��. ���  "' <  /.".} ���'-'���/���'���'.  ^m  -�����  %&  ��� "*  e THE NELSON ECONOMIST  MINES AND INVESTORS.  Around  all  the  Slocan   mining  camps is  found a little bird called " the  camp robber."  It is useful in its habits  so  much as   it disposes of  the garbage   which niight  otherwise  become a superfluity, but inasmuch   as in its  avarice it preventv the gopher and chipmunk  from performing the   same   useful office, and  ae, when not prevented, it will take every opportunity of stealing   everything   in   sight of  any value, at times it becomes a nuisance.    In  very much the same   category   as ''the camp-  robber" must   be clasped the Rossland mining,  broker.    Formerly the chief market  for Brit-  isn Columbia mines lay   in Spokane, and   the  Spokane mining broker was at least honest   to  the interest of his employer^ and as far as can  be expected from human nature, fairly true to  the interest of those who sought his  advice in  regard to investment.    But the Spokane mining broker was to use a vulgar expression "too  slow" for his  Rossland brother.    He was   the  gopher and chipmunk   of the camp,   performing a humble  and useful   function,   and   this  was not in keeping  with the aspiration  of the  Rossland camp-robber who coveted everything  in sight.    The staple   market veered to  Rossland, thanks to the extraordinary ramifications  of a large London company, to whose   actions  we will devote more attention at a future date,  and trading upon the demand created by  the  operations   of    this   company,   the   Rossland  broker, or rather coterie of that ilk, blossomed  forth as an incipient aggregation of Comstock  operators.    So Ion   -as the big   London company purchased properties and thereby created  a legitimate demand for those stocks, the brokers did  a large   and   profitable   business, but  when this  company   ceased  purchasing, and  there was no   further trading in those stocks,  in order  to keep up  the   excitement, a flagitious interest had to be excited, and this  was  done   by   manipulating   certain    properties.  The ring would secure for themselves control of  a property,   put in   a   manager,  furnish  him  with enough funds to   do  some   development  work, and then on the strength of an  alleged  big strike, would boom the stock three or four  hundred per cent, on its market value, and by  advertised deals  among   the members of  the  ring would induce those confiding members  of  the investing public, who are looking for a good  thing to put their  money into   the new  bonanza, and then the brokers realize.    The public in a few weeks also realize that they   have  been duped, and symptoms of a new   bonanza  that is to be���appear in the advertising quotations of the brokers.    Fortunately   for British  Columbia the local investing public remember  the proverb, "once bit���twice shy,"  and   the  Rossland promoters are  receiving what  little  support   they   get   from   those   investors  in  Eastern Canada who have not yet learned that  all is not  gold that   glitters.    At the  present  time there are not five mines in the  Rossland  camp whose stock by any parity of   reasoning  can be figured out to be worth fifty per cent, of  the price at which it is quoted in  the market.  The balance of nominal mines consist of some  properties upon  which  development  work is  being pushed that will tend to develop in the  public investor a desire to acquire stock therein, and of others upon which the money lying  dormant in the treasury is being wasted in the  chimerical hope that  something in the  shape  of a big body of ore will turn up, or that some  big syndicate will happen   along who  can be  turned down.    The Rossland  camp is not in  a healthy condition, and the recent slump in  its securities is a very tangible indication that  the investing public has realized the situation.  If a  man must  invest his   money  in  mines,  and no  better  investment  can^ as  a rule, be  secured, let him   put it  in   a dividend  payer,  whose management is   in the  hands of   business men, who   will handle it as   a   business,  and not in   a wild  cat, of whose  capabilities  he has no other guarantee than the  interested  encomiums of a mining broker.  Push Development  Work.  The New Denver Ledge expresses the  belief  that the Slocan will experience a great  influx  of capital   with the  opening of  next spring,  and advises claim holders to put in the winter  on such properties as have a promising shoeing, so that they can be turned off at a good  figure.    Each and ever}' one of the Slocan lake  towns   have   good   properties   behind   them.  Some   are   developed   into    shipping   mines,  others,   not   so   far   advanced,   can    only  be  classed as prospects, but it makes little difference just now how they are classed, the fact is  that all will soon be shippers on an  extensive  scale, and   the  towns   that  have  been   in   a  state of collapse for the past year from  the effects of the boom, will be revived and business  will proceed   on a   more extensive and  firmer  basis.    The outlook  ig indeed   bright.     The  upward tendency of business has been noticeable for some months.    In some localities, and  especially  Slocan City,   the revival   has been  wretchedly slow, but it is  now   being felt and  a better spirit, pervades the business and mining circles.    The gold, silver and copper properties   tributary   to   it are being   slowly   developed, and in every instance the  showing is  most satisfactory.    All that is needed is to at-  .-���--������ /���  tract moneyed men to this locality, and the  putting in operation one or^ two of the big  Springer or Lemon creek properties. This  might require some months, owing to the  tardiness experienced in getting wagon roads  to those localities, but that section will not  long remain inactive. New I)enver and Silverton are somewhat more fortunate than  Slocan City, though both have suffered some  from the effects of the general collapse in the  mining business. The rich Four Mile properties have contributed regularly to the business  institutions of Silverton and strengthened the  general confidence of its citizens. The coming winter promises to see scenes of great activity there. New Denver has suffered the  least of any of the lake towns and is forging  ahead at a rapid rate. The fact that it has  and ever will be the banking centre and government seat, gives it a standing that can  never be shaken. In addition to this it has  shipping mines and deleloping properties close  at hand that ensure its permanent prosperity.  With the future so promising, concludes the  Ledge, the policy of, every holder of minora*  property should be to push development work  without ceasing, and bring their properties to  that stage of development where expert buyers  can see them and buy them.  British Columbia's Future.  Mr. P. A. O'Farrell, the correspondentvin a  special letter to the Toronto Globe,: writes of  the great resourcss of British Columbia as  follows; It is in the coming century that  Canada and British Columbia in particular,  willplay a glorious part. The people of On-  taria, Quebec and the Eastern Provinces have  achieved great things, and have made the  Dominion possible, but the people of the  Northwest Territory and British Columbia  are going to wreath laurels around the brow of  the Dominion which the people of the East  have never dreamed of. British Columbia is  as extensive as France and Italy combined,  but in natural wealth and fruitfulness she exceeds, them both. Her agriculture is limited,  for her glorious mountains diminish that,  but those very mountains are storehouses of  mineral wealth sufficient to meet the wants of  the world for all time to come. British Columbia's forests are so vast and so valuable  that all the gold in the treasure vaults of all  the Empires of Europe would not suffice to  buy them. Her rivers teem with the finest  salmon, and the climate of British Columbia  is similar to ��� that of the British Isles, and  will, in the course or ages, produce a race of  people who, it is to be hoped, will imitate the  races from whom they sprang.  Mining Notes.  The Bosun is making regular shipments of  20 tons.  The Wakefield Mines will ship 75 car loads  of or�� this winter.  Nine men are employed on the Essex  group, above Silverton.  The Condor group, is showing up well with  work.     The property is being surveyed.  Twelve inches of clean galena ore has been  encountered on the " 16 to 1," situated on the  south fork-of Kaslo creek.  The New Denver Ledge is doing a great  work in bringing the mining possibilities of  the Slocan before the outside world.  The Silvertonian says: "One of the changes  to the Mineral Act that is being agitated, is  that where a prospector fails to do his annual  assessment work, the claim will not be open  for re-location but will revert to the Crown  and be advertised and sold at public auction  to th�� highest bidder."  The thorough examination of the Monte  Christo is to be undertaken by Mr. Hastings,  of the War Eagle mine, and Mr. Hardtman, of  Montreal. Both are exceptionally conservative men. The former, however, had a  better opinion of Rossland mines in general  when he first visited the district than th�� latter. Their report will be awaited with great  anxiety by the great body of shareholders in  Rossland mines.  Q.  sa*  BHB9��ffl��rat'tfaamwfflBJEg-3iM����m^ !___  ^. .JfrUMAJj&i***.  OLD EVANGELINE.  She is a Great-Great-Great-Grandmother.  From forty to fifty thousand Americans  visit the Valley of Annapolis, N. S., ��very  summer, in the first place to escape th�� heat  of the United States; in the second because a  sojourn in that part of Acadia is cheap and delightful; in the third place���and 'chiefly���because it takes in the scenes of Longfellow's  poem, "Evangeline."  Those scenes, as beautiful today as they  were early in the last century, are exploited  for all they are worth by the hotel keepers,  and for a good deal more. The hotel keepers  off Acadia live and flourish on Longfellow;  every line in "Evangeline" is worth a summer  boarder to them, and; the summer boarder  means a profit of $100 at the end of the season. : Indeed, the hotel keepers are talking  about erecting * a monument to Henry W.  Longfellow in gome part of Acadia, possibly  in Granchpre.  Despite last century's deportation ef the  Acadians there ar�� fully 20,000 of them at  the present time living between Yarmouth,  one of the gateways to the province of Nova  Scotia, and Halifax, the other, among whom  are, doubtless, many descendants of Benedict  ~ ~Lafontaine and Basil, the blacksmith.    At all  * _*3>  .eventi the  names of Lajeunesse  and  Lafon-  taine are  common enough in the valley.  All the Acadian did not leave the valley  with Evangeline and Gabriel. Many of them  who were hot pure whites managed to conceal  themselves in the "forests primeval" and  fished and hunted there until the minions of  King George had become satisfied that nothing more was to be feared from the French of  Acadia. When the crisis was over they  ��merged from the forests and settled down in  the places where their descendants are to be  found today with that strain of Indian blood  that makes them bold hunters and patient  fishermen', but unfits them for competition  with men of British descent in civilized enterprise.;:.  If L'Evangeline and other local newspapers are accurate in their statements, th��  valley contains a surprising number of centenarians. There is at least one Acadian now  living near Eelbrooke, Digby county, who is in  her 104th year. The parish register vouches  for this woman's age, and her name is Evangeline Lajeuness��. This ancient dame has  undoubtedly some Mic-a-Mac blood in her  veins, and the strain is observable in her many  descendants down to the sixth generation, as  represented by two-year-old Nanette des  Noyes, born in Eelbrooke on July 24, 1896.  Old Evangeline, for as such is she known  and venerated from Yarmouth to Halifax, was  born in August, 1795, and married in 1811.  She became the mother of eleven children, two  of whom are now living, one a son in Lowell,  Mass., the other a daughter in Yarmouth  county, N. S. This daughter���Mrs. Emma  Langlois���has had fourteen children, nine of  whom are living, but scattered, they and th��ir  descendants,  all over - the United States   and  j  rgflPWri?1.  Canada. It is a great-great-grandchild of  Mra. Langlois who is referred to as the two-  year-old, and therefore a great-great-greatgrandchild of old Evangeline. Considering  that they are Acadians this is not by any  means extraordinary, for those people marry  young, and, in fact, there is. a tradition in  Tusket which says that an old man died in  that municipality in 1873 who beat Old  Evangeline by a great, in other words, when  he departed this life, he did so as a greaV  great-great-grea.t-grandfather.  As for the personality of Evangeline, she is  quite lively and attends St. Anne's Catholic  church regularly every Sunday, rain or shine.  She does not wear glasses, in fact, if the truth  must be told, she cannot read, but she smokes  a clay pipe with great gusto and takes a pinch  of snuff now and then. She has been using  tobacco more than seventy years. As regards  the dress of the quartette it is the Acadian  peasants' Sunday best.  An Empress Mother.  It is barely possible that' the czar of all the  Russiae, having experienced the delights of  domestic peace, desires to extend something  of the same blissful condition of things all  over the earth. Perhaps this explains his  recent peace manifesto.  The czar's domestic happiness is due, of  course, to the csarina. As Princess Alice of  Hesse she was chiefly notable for her amiability. She is the favorite grand-daughter  of Queen Victoria.  The czarina lost her mother���Hbe most  imlliant, attractive and popular of all British princesses���rat a very early age, and from  that time forth her English relatives took  charge of her, her aunts, Princess Beatrice and  the Empress Frederickj and her cousins,  Princesses Maud and Victoria of Wales, l>e-  ing especially devoted to her. But the one  who most fully assumed the ^place of her  mother was good old Queen Victoria herself,  and it was to her that "Sunny," the pet name  by which the czarina used to be known among  he? relatives, turned for counsel when hesitating between her love for Nicholas on the one  hand and her reluctance to abandon the faith  in which she had been reared on f>he other.  The adviee which Qeeen Victoria gave is best  shown by the fact that the marriage took  place.  What is so winning about the czarina is her  eagerness to please, the manifest delicacy of  ���her sentiments, the innocence of a mind that  is far above the average in the quality of its  intellect, and last, but not least, the lovely  face, exquisite figure and perfect carriage, all  of which contribute to make her the most  charming sovereign lady in Christendom.  The home life of the czar and czarina is  described as idyllic. Those who were familiar  with the.austere forms of court life as it was  understood under th�� late czar affirm that a  new and charming spirit has been infused  into it ever since Nikolai Alexandrovitch  settled down to his new role. It used to consist solely of seven balls during the season and  is:  solemn silence for the remainder of the year. \  Now it embraces everything that possesses  human interest. The czarina of course is the  soul of everything that is cheerful. Her little  daughter is not wholly abandoned to nurse  and governess, as most royal children are ~  but spends much of her time with her empress mother.  Katie Lee   and Willie  Gray.  Two brown heads, with tossing curls,  Red lips shutting over pearls,  Bare feet white, and wet with dew,  Two eyes black and two eyes blue;  Little boy and girl wer6 they,  Katie Lee and Willie Gray.  They were standing where a brook  Bending like a shepherd's crook  Flashed its silver, and thick ranks  Of green willows fringed the banks;  Half in thought and half in play,  Katie, Lee and Willie Gray.  They had cheeks. as cherries red���  He was taller most a head;  She, with arms like wreaths of snow,  Swung a bucket to and fro,  As she loitered half in play,  Chattering to Willie Gray.  "Pretty Katie," Willie said,  And there came a dash of red  Through the brown ness of his cheek���  "Boys are strong and girls are weak,  And I'll carry so I will,  Katy's basket up the hill."  Katy answered with a laugh:  "No, but you may carry half;"  And, then, tossing back her icurls:  "Boys are weak as well as girls."  Do you think that Katie guessed  Half the wisdom she expressed?  Men are only boys grown tall;  Hearts don't change mueh after all;  And when long years from that da��  Katie Lee and Willie Gray  Stood again beside the brook  Bending like a shepherd's crook.  Is it strange that Willie said,  While again a dash of red  Crossed the brownness of his cheek:  "lam strong, and you are week;  Life is but a slippery steep;  Hung with shadows cold and deep.  Will you trust me, Katy, dear,  Walk beside me without fear;  May I carry if I will  AH your burdens up the hill?"  And she answered with a laugh:  "No, but you may carry half."  Close beside the little brook  Bending like a shephard's crook,  Washing with its silver hands,  Late and early at the sands,  Is a cottage, where today  Katy lives with Willie Gray,  In the porch she sits, and lo!  Swings a basket to and fro,  Vastly different from the one  That she swung in years agone;  This is long, and deep, and wide,  And has rockers at the side.  Josie S. Hunt.  A  daughter  of   Professor   Lombroso,    the  eminent criminologist, was recently acquitted  by a Turin court on   the   charge   of   being   a  contributor to a condemned socialistic news-  paper.  il^iSSJ"^^^ 6  THK NBLSON ECONOMISE.  LOCAL AND  PROVINCIAL.  Wonderful East Kootenay.  W. A. Carlyle, formerly Provincial Mineralogist, thus writes of the progress of East  Kootenay: "Many people, strong financially,  have been quietly reconnoitring, and steady  advance is to be reported in East Kootenay.  There are already several very fine mines, and  others will certainly be added to the list before long. For a young country, almost unheard of seven years ago, the rate at which it  has opened up and the development of the  mines have been truly wonderful."  That's What   They All  Say.  Mr. D. D. Mann has returned to   Winnipeg  from a visit of considerable duration   in British   Columbia.    A   reporter   of the   Tribune  found   Mr.   Mann   endeavoring   to  open his  mail between the interviews and visits of those  . having business with   him at the office of the  Ipauphin   railway.    He  said that   the whole  west was in a more prosperous condition than  he had ever known it before.    A large amount  of development   work is   being done in   th��  mines and shipping will   become more   active  when   the   railways   now building   are completed.    There are now about 70 men steadily  employed in development work on the   mines  in which   Mr.   Mann is   interested,  and   the  further they get down the better the prospects  looks.    There is, however, greater   activity in  British Columbia    mining  than   people even  imagine, and Mr.   Mann   believes that in the  very near future  the whole country   from the  summit of the Rockies   to   the   coast will be  dotted over with mining camps and mills, and  reduction plants will  be as   plentiful as flour  mills on the prairie.    The whole country will  becom�� one great mining camp and one of the  greatest  fields for the production of   gold, silver, copper and lead in the world.  Birthday  Party. . . -  Master Fred  Hume,   son of  Mr.   and   Mrs.  Horace Hume, celebrated his fifth birthday by  giving a   party to   his   little  friends.    There  were   ��>resent:    The   Misses   Ethel   Mallette,  Ruth Cord ngly, Edith Maud McDonald, Lulu  Ellis, Edna   Ellis, Mary   Rutherford,   Celicia  Prosser, Evetyn Gurd, Betty Johnson,  Flossie  Johnston,   Ella    Madden,   Lillian     Russell,  Jessie Hipperson, Josie Lawrence, Ethel Lawrence,   Rachel   Robertson,   Zillah    Emerson,  Poppy McDonald,  Gretta McDonald,   Marion  Quinlan, Irene Robson, Mildred Inine, Beryl  Emerson, Geo gie   Hume,   Vera   Hume   and  Masters Campbell,   R)bertson,   Joe    Wilson,  Roy Wilson,  Reginald Cordingly, Bruce   McDonald, ahd Frederick Hume  the host.    The  little guests were chaperon'ed  by Mrs.   Horace  Hume, Mrs/Quinlan,  Mrs. Frank Beer,   Mrs.  William Beer,   Mrs.   Sutherland,  Mrs.   Simpson and Miss Clauson.    Garner were provided  and Marion Quinlan gave a   very clever tambourine dance, and Zella Emerson sang several  songs, little  Beryl   Emerson   playing the accompaniment,    The young folks adjourned to  the parlor,   of the   Hume   to tho    accompaniment of   the  grand   march   played   by Mrs.  Quinlan.    Dinner was  served  in   the  Hume  dining room.  The Kootenay.  John V. Blake has been writing a  series  of  letters for theDetroit Tribune, in    the  Course  of one which he has the following to say of the  Kootenay:   "Southward across  the Canadian  Pacific railway line along the Columbia riyer,  Arrow and Kootenay lakes, to the   boundary,  lies the Kootenay district, chiefly famous  for  what is locally known as smelting propositions,  principally an admixture of gold,  silver   and  copper ores.    This district has of recent years  been the scene of active exploitation.    Government returns show that in 1894 the product of  the ledge mines of the whole of British Columbia amounted to $874,000, and in 1897 to over  $8,000,000, chiefly   from   Kootenay, notwithstanding that coal for smelting  averaged $20  per ton, and facilities for transportation   were  incomplete.     The product  for    the    current i  year is estimated   at  $13,000,000,   with every i  prospect of indefinite increase;^   The   Canadian Pacific railway is being   extended    from  Lethbridge  west   through   the immense  coal  fields of   Crow's   Nest   pass,    the   product  of ;  which inside of a year .will   be   delivered, at  convenient points for   smelting   at a  cost  of  about $5 per ton.      This   whole   district   is   a  wooded, mountainous   Country,  the  mines, of  which will soon support   a very large   population.    It is dependent for supplies upon the  eastern prairies, but the   rich  agricultural, regions of the   state   of    Washington   are   the  nearest and cheapest source bf supplyv   if no  hostile tariff bars the  way.     The   same   may  be said as to mining machinery and   supplies  necessary for its development."  In Hymen's  Fetters.  Mr. Robert S. Lennie, of Elliott & Lennie,  barristers, Nelson, was married at New Westminister, last Wednesday, to Miss Fidith  Louise Douglas. The Columbian of last  Thursday has the following : St. Andrew's  (Presbyterian) Church was crowded, last  night, with people anxious to witness the nuptials of two well known and popular young  people, Miss Edith Louise, second daughter of  Mr. B. Douglas, and Mr, Robert Scott Lennie^  arising young barrister, of Nelson, B. C,  second son of the Rev. Robert Lennie, formerly of this city, but now of Mount Forest,  Out. It having been known for some time  that the happy event would come off last evening, a large turn out was present. Long before 8 o'clock, the hour set for the ceremony,  people began to arrive, and, before very long,  every pew in the large building and the gallery, was occupied, an unusually large sprinkling of the sterner sex being noticed. Pending  the arrival of the wedding party, the occupants of the pews discussed everything  apropos of toilettes, decorations, &c. The  latter, though simple, wer�� very effective.  Over each aisle was an arch of colored maple  leaves, the same pretty leaves appearing and  contrasting with the dark lustrous foliage of  ferns, palms,  &c, which obscured the pulpit,  while the  choir gallery  and  organ were outlined in   festoons of ivy, brightened here and  there with  clusters of brilliant pigeon berries  It was somewhat  past eight o'clock when the  bride appeared, on the arm of her  father, and  followed by her two younger sisters, as bridesmaids, proceeded up the aisle where th�� groom,  attended by Mr. Jas.   H. Lawson,  jr., of  Victoria, was already awaiting.    In the brief prelude   before   the   ceremony  commenced,  the  audience had  a fine  view of  a pretty   group.  The bride was  dressed   in   a  gown of white  Duchess   satin, trimmed   with  chiffon,   over  which fell,a pretty tulle veil, fastened   with a  "bunch of life-like orange blossoms.    About the  neck of the    bride was   a beautiful   circlet  of  pearls and emeralds,  which, with   bracelets of  the same chaste workmanship, were the gift of  the groom.    Miss Stella   Douglas was charmingly   attired, in a   dress of pal�� blue   China  silk, and Miss  Elsie in cream   satin, trimmed  with   Valenciennes  lace, both  wearing  rings  set with pearls  and emeralds,   souvenirs from  the groom.    The simple ceremony, which was  performed by  Rev. A. E.   Vert, pastor of the  church, opened with the familiar hymn, "The  Voice  that   Breathed o'er  Eden."     The   responses were .clearly uttered, and,  before very  many minute^ had  elapted,  the words were  uttered. which made  the  young couple   one.  As   the bridal party   left the church,   the organ pealed   out   the  "Wedding   March," and  the guests, , and   then   the audience, followed,  to give:- the -bride a   good send-off,  the  same  consisting of hearty expressions  of goodwill  and copious   showers  of  the inevitable  rice.  Af ��er the:recherche weddin g supper   had been  partaken -of* -at the residence   of  the   bride's  parents,; Carnarvon street, the newly-married  couple, amid.;.a renewal  of the former demonstrations, "of  good will,  took their - derjarture,  and drove to   Vancouver, and,  this morning,  proceeded .to.Victoria, where the  honeymoon  will be: spent, prior to, their returning to their  new   home ,,at   Nelson.    The invited'  guests;  after the  departure of   the bride and  groom^  enjoyed  an   impromptu  dance,    which   was  kept up  till a late hour.    The bride  who was  very popular, .especially  in  the younger society, circles, >;was the  recipient of many very  handsome wedding presents, which -included  considerable   plate.     The   number   of   these  tokens .attested the esteem in which the young  couple are held here, while large additions to  the list await their arrival at Nelson. *  Harry Scott, of  the Hamilton   Powder Co���  was in the city this week.  Some excellent samples of ore ar�� being  shown from the Marion, Eclipse, Mo*  wich and other Silver mountain properties  where th�� late strikes were made.  Eddie S��nkler, son of Judge Senkler, of St.r  Catharines, and better known to Ontario  people as-a crack football player, has been  appointed gold commissioner in the Yukon.  Perhaps Mr. Sifton wants him to organize"'hisr  scrimmage line to buck the kickers up tnere,  ���Ottawa Citizen.  m ��� THE NELSON ECONOMISE  LOCAL AND  PROVINCIAL.  Kaslo city hall is nearing completion.  Kaslo Episcopal church is without a pastor.  Rossland is getting ready for its winter ear-  nival.  The faro industry   is said to be thriving in  Sandon.  Fred Ritchie, of Rossland,   was in the  city  this week.  There is an opening at Gladstone for a good  physician.  There is a demand at Grand Forks for dwelling houses.  The clerks and   salesmen of  Rossland have  organized a union.  The Hall mines will install an electric plant  in the Silver King.  Mrs. Macdonald, wife of W. A.   Macdonald,  Q. C, is convalescent.  David King, the Kaslo newspaperman, was  in Nelson last Monday.  Wm. Hunter, the Silverton  merchant, was  in Nelson last Monday.  Mr. and Mrs. Macnaughton, Vancouver, are  registered at the Hume.  McLean Bros,  will use a new invention for  digging on their contracts.  E. O. Lewis and 0. E. Chase, bakers, Nelson,  have dissolved partnership.  Rev.   Dr. Spencer,   the revivalist   has concluded has labors at Nelson.  P. Burns & Co. have been making improvements in their butcher shop.  A large amount of development work is now  going on at Deadwood camp. B. C.  Charlie Steele, a Victoria knight of the grip,  paid Nelson a business trip last week.  The grand lodge  meeting of the  I. O. G. T.  is being held in Vancouver this week.  Mrs. King, proprietress of the Allan   Hotel,  Rossland, visited Nelson last Monday.  Mrs. John Baunerman has returned from a  visit to her old home in Renfrew, Ont.  P. J. O'Reilly, formerly of The   Economist,  will start a newspaper at Cascade City.  E. V. Bodwell,   of Bodwell & Duff,   barristers, Victoria, was in the city this week.  A.   Lucas,   organizer   of  the   Conservative  Union, is making a tour of th�� Kootenay.  The R. E. Fr nch   dramatic company   are  playing a week's engagement at Rossland.  Rossland papers give columns to reports of  prize fights, but scarcely a line to church  meetings.  The Lely concert in the Presbyterian church,  last Friday night, was a success financially  and otherwise.  J. A. McLean, commercial traveller, of  Winnipeg, was showing his samples to Nelson  merchants this week.  Rev. W. C. Rose, of Nova Scotia, will take  charge of the Baptist church, beginning his  pastorate in November.  Mr. Justice Martin had several election petitions before him last week. His Lordship  has the cases under consideration.  The executive of the Nelson Conservative  club are holding a meeting this afternoon.  Matters of importance are to be discussed.  The Brooklyn News bewails the circumstance that Sir William Van Home overlooked that important town on his recent trip.  ^  The Catholic bazaar has opened in the building lately occupied by the Lawrence Hardware Co. The bazaar will open every morning at 11 a. m.  Miss Maggie McEachern, late of Collingwood,  Ont., died last Friday night and was buried  Sunday afternoon. The deceased was 32  years of age, and came here last summer in  the hope that the change would prove beneficial.  Frank Oliver, M. P.  Among the recent visitors to Nelson were  Mr. Frank Oliver, member of the Dominion  House of Commons for Alberta, and his wife.  Mr. Oliver is publisher of the Edmonton Bulletin, the second paper published in the Northwest Territories, and a publication that has  done a great deal in bringing the resources of  its district before the attention of the outside world. Mr. Oliver's record in the Commons has been thoroughly inpependent, so  much so that at times Sir Wilfred did not feel  altogether sure of the support of the member  for Alberta. Mr. and Mrs. Oliver are traveling for pleasure in company with Geo. H. Ham  of the C. P. R. H�� refused to speak for publication.  PEOPLE OF NOTE  Notwsthstanding his seventy years, George  MacDonald, the novelist, is slowly recovering  from the effects of the sunstroke received in  August.  M. Casesar Tompson, the fomous Belgian  violinist, has received from King Humbert the  honor of kinighthood in the order of Sts  Maurice and Lazare.  Professor Koch, the German   bacteriologist,  is making an exhaustive study of malaria   in  the hospitals of Milan.      He intends to spen 1  several months in Italy.  Garrison Y. Shall, a convict in the . Connecticut State prison, knows all of Shakespeare's  plays by heart, having learned them during  the last fourteen years   of his   imprsionment.  The Grand Duke of  Mecklenburg-Sohwerin  has presented a baptismal  stone   to   the  new.  German church in Jerusalem, which is  to   b��  dedicated to Emperor William   next   month.  Sir Walter Besant, who celebrated his sixty-  second' birthday last month, was born at  Portsmouth, Eng., and graduated as eighteenth  wrangler at Cambridge thirty-nine years   ago  The Pope and his friends or distressed ber  cause of the difficulty of keeping his apartment warm enough for him in his old age.  Various devices have been tried. Furnace  heat has been suggested, but when the Pope  heard that it would cost $180,000 to- introduce it in the Vatican, with its thousands of  rooms, he dismissed the project with a motion  of his hand.  Women's National Council.  The Nelson branch of the Women's National Council are making a praiseworthy effort to  estab ish a free public library in this city  With this end in view they are soliciting "aid  from the citizens, and while they have not  succeeded as well as they hoped, they have  met with success enough to encourage them in  their effort. To consider how best to carry On  the work, the Nelson branch will hold a meeting next Saturday at 3 p. m., to which all  women are cordially invited. It might be  said, that Mayor Houston has promised substantial aid to the public library proposal.  Another matter which the council has under  consideration, is arranging for the sale of  tickets to a course of lectures on cooking to be  given by Miss Livingstone, well known as a  lecturer on this subject. Miss Livingstone is  highly recommended by Count��ss Aberdeen.  She has lectured throughout Canada to large  classes, and she will come here, providing 35  tiekets can be disposed of. She charges $3  for a course of ten lessons, or 50 cents a lssson.  The Presbyterian school-room can be secured  for the lecture course. Mrs. R. W. Day, secretary of the Nelson branch, will give any further  information required oh this subject.  Sir William Van Home has got back to  Montreal. In an interview, he said that  throughout the West he observed marked  signs ef prosperity.  E^- 8  THE NELSON ECONOMIST.  r/-  THE OUTCAST.  ha- matinee tea and   I   think   it  IDa have been a   case   of leve   at  He was an   awfully  nice   fellow  'V and one easily comprehended  why  ral( Margaret had let her heart go out  Koj to him.     He was tall and straight  hai and good-looking and,he knew how  ad^ to wear his clothes.    There is noth-  Th< ing a  woman   likes so   well  as   a  oth man whose clothes.hang on  him as  for< if they were a part of his physique,  hea never   noticeable  except   for   their  has general modishness.     Probaly    it  mil was the fact of his well-fitting   gar-  ' ments    that    first   attracted   Mar-  l' garet to the hoy.  ;]. Margaret was the child of wealthy  fro parents. She lived in a fash-  ish ionable street and: a gold spoon  fou and smart clothes had been her  ma birthright       She met Hubert at   a  must  first  we; sight. The boy never dreamed of  he- telling nis love but Margaret had  of ; been used alt her life to obtain  mi what she wished and the most  wh pachydermatous of young lovers  pic could not fail to understand the  em drift of such encouragement as  in   hers.  fu; They became prosaicly engaged  lo( and because they knew Margaret's  Bi fancies were usually short lived, her  inb parents put no obstacles in the  ye way  of   Hubert's   frequent   visits.  /  ��  .8U      But     the   girl's    brother    came  dc .home from a trip abroad.     He had  re' ..mingled with dukes and duchesses,  m* counts and countesses, barons  and  and   baronesses,   until   his    mind  was imbued with false   notions    of  aristocracy.      He  was even   snob-  :   bish, a fault never laid at the dor  ]   of  his  parents   and   sister.      The  v   brother looked upon   Hubert   with  H disdain.      He  resented    his    con-  gi  slant calls and occasional  presence  w<  at dinner.       The facts of Hubert's  R   good looks, fine manner  and  well-  E   clothed figure made no   impression  P:   upon him.  j(       " This man must   come here  J<   longer,"   he said to Margaret.  " This    man ?"     returned  sister  haughtily.   . " Thi3   man  is  my future husband."  " Good God, Margaret ! What  do you mean ? My sister married  to an outcast ?"  For, in the brother's code, Hull bert's good character, good clothes  ^ and good manners could not con-  ^ done the drawback that nobody  s' knew anything about his ante-  a cedents. He had come here un-  b heralded, without letters of intro-  s' duction, with no means, and the  only fact known was that his connections lived in London.  Margaret's will could not prevail  be  gr.  ve  re  P  Q  E  i  B  E  no  the  against that of her brother, and  Hubert cam�� no more to th�� house.  Yet���a readily foreseen circumstance���not many months later  an elopement was chronicled in  San Francisco's inner circle. Margaret had flown with her Hubert.  Shortly afterward, they went upon  the stage, the modern resort of  young persons who seem unable to  make both ends meet domestically  by the ordinary methods.  I looked now for a reconciliation  with the parents, but it did not  come. The young couple*went to  New York and then to London  and it was for some months before  their names crept into our daily  papers. One day an item' appeared that was telegraphed all  over the country���the death of a  noble lord and his two eldest sons  while enjoying a yachting trip.  The estates and title thus decended  ��� o the youngest sju, who had  quarreled with his father when a  uiere lad, had gone across to America and had lived since in obscurity.  The lawyers had unearthed this  ���on, who had been discovered as an  actor i�� a vaudeville theatre in the  provinces. His stage partner was  nis wife, a beautiful woman who  was said to be the daughter of a  Californian millionaire.  Dressed up, embellished as the  s-tory appeared, the names were  accurately given. The fortunate  heir was Hubert : the partner of  -orrow, now his joy, was Margaret.  But imagine the feelings of the  brother who had spurned " the  outcast !"���The Melodiamatist. in  San Francisco Town Talk.  To preserve the health the medical profession  are unanimous in declaring that J��y's Bread  is an essential. Enjoy _ood health, and use  Joy's Bread.  LAND  REGISTRY ACT.  In the matter of an application for a duplicate of certificate of title to lot 1 (one),  liiock 10 (ten),' town of Nelson, notice is here-  iy given that it is my intention at the expiration of one month from the first publication  hereof, to issue a duplicate of the certificate of  John Roper Mull to the above lands, dated  the 10th day of March, 189 *, and numbered  15,950a.  S. Y. WOOTTON,  RcgisU-ar-General.  Land Registry Office,  Victoria, B. C, 13th September, 1888.  WANTED.  On I?aker Street, rooms suitable for Photographic Studio. Apply, with particulars, to  '���PlIOTO," KCOTOMIST Offick.  CERTIFICATE OF  IMPROVEMENTS.  t  "Hillside" mineral claim, situate in the  Nelson Mining Division of Wes-t Koetenav District. ' .  Where located:���Oh the east side of Give��ut  creek, and is the eastern extension of the  " Bodie " claim, on Toad Mountain.  Take notice that I, A. G. Gamble, Free Miner's  Certificate No. 13592 A, agent for Edward  James Buhner, Free Miner's Certificate No.  20639 A, intend, sixty days after date hereof, to  apply to the Mining "Recorder for a certificate  of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under  section 37, must bo commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 10th day of September, 1898.  A. G. Gamble, Agent.  URNS  WHOLESALE AND RETAIL  HEAD OFFICE: Nelson, B. C.  .    BRANCHES AT    . . ,  ROSSLAND TRAIL NELSON KASLO  SANDON THREE FORKS SLOCAN CITY  West Kootenay Butcher Co f  WHOLESALE AND  RETAIL DEALERS IN j?  FRESH A ND SA LT ME!A TS.        I  Caiirps supplied on shortest notice and lowest prices.  Mail orders receive careful .attention.  Nothing bht fresh and wholesome meats and supplies  $   kept in stock.  Tl  ^^^-^^^^^^^-^C-^-^^^^N$  Doors, Sashes and Turned Work, Brackets and  Office Fittings.  Satisfaction Guaranteed.    Prices Reasonable.  wwm\wmwmMwe2^^vmwMAfun*^\m9*mME&uHmi3*}Ki-JB*'Vj^^Ki  W. R. JACKSON & CO.,  Commission Agents Delmonico  Hotel, lay the market odds on  all important events.   Starting  Erice    commissions   executed,  atest betting received by cable  abv.s  Kremo Floating ���a  s Complexion, etc.  We have just received a large shipment and are selling them at  bargain prices.     Call and see them at  Opposite Queen's Hotel  Brokers and Manufacturers'Agents.  Agents for Manitoba Produce Company, Gold Drop Flour,  Wheat Manna, Manitoba Grain Co., M. R. Smith & Co's  Biscuits, Etc.  .. C P. O. Box 498.  ��Mtw_ul_u_<ii_^��mm-~ THE NELSON ECOJXQMfSF  SHORT   STOMES.  An Irish crier, being   ordered-"to  [ilear the court, did so by   this.^o-  louncement:" " Now,- then,   all  y&  dackguards that isn't lawyer, must  |iave' the coort." .-. ��� " ....      -- . !  In a New Zealand " town  one of  Jthe municipal candidates,   a   pre-,  tafi-inced Scotsman,, had  received &���  Senjfc  of a- huge Scotch ^ thistle,  Swhi.ch as; the moment happened to  [be lyi.ng on the table  of'his   committee room. ,   A friend,   entering,  vvithdr��w'suddenly with ther-emark,  "T beg  your    pardon ';.<.. I \. didri't  'know.you were at luncheon.", ���  .William    Smith     O'Brien,   the  [leader   of  the National   party   of  Jlreland,  who  was   transported  in  1849, had a   duel   in   his   younger  days, and the two men were placed  opposite each other.     Just as  the  [signal, . "One,   two,   three���fire !!'.  was   about   to   be  given,    O'Brien  cried,   " Stop !   No signal, I pray."  His opponent's second stepped  forward and said with asperity,   "This  is very irregular,    sir.     What  do  you  wish   to   say ?"      " I    wish,'5  answered. O'Brien,   "to  call   your  attention to the fact that the gentleman opposite me  has   let  the cap  fall off his pistol."  The editor of London News says  that on one occasion the   late Justice    Matthew     Crooks    Cameron  stood on the G-. T.   R. platform   at  London waiting to take  the train  for Toronto, when a^slovoxiiy-look-  ing individual came up to him and  offered to shake hands.     I do  not  know you," said the judge, leaning  forward   on   his crutch.      " Why,  I'm Billy' the porter at  the  Grigg  House.    I was one of the Witnesses  in  your  court   today."    ." Oh, indeed,"  said the  Judge,   with   the  peculiar manner he had>&fSiting  his   lower   lip   and   making    his  goatee   stick   out.      " Well, -rOBiiiy,  the court is over."  A Scotch minister and his man  were returning from an old-  fashioned marriage. " We had  better gang in by the back, the  nicht," said the minister on arriving near the manse. " What  wey?' queried Sandy. " Aweel,  there's been a deal o' whiskey gaein',  and I think it wad be better." " Na,  na, etraucht forrit, straucht  forrit," persisted Sandy. "Very  weel, then ; but, at ony rate, I'll  ^Jfc on iQ front a meenit, and  you'll tell's how I'm daein 1"  The minister then walked on a  few yards, and called back.  " How am I daein,' then, Sandy?"  "Brawly, sir, brawly," said the  beadle, "but   wha's  that wi' ye?"  _*���>*��*  .Guaranteed Superior to�� any Sweetened ililk on the flarket. Recommended  by-Physicians.^ 'Manufactured and Guaranteed by-THE MANITOBA DAIRY  COJlPANY,'L'td. ���    ^���'"\2^"'^--'.'  ��-���  ;' Mr,    Curran,   on.; on�� occasion,'  was    trying* a    ca&��  before;    Lord [.  Avonmore  arid   a; stupid   Dublin  jury, by* whom   his best  flights of  eloquence  and   wTit . were:. .w-hojly  unappreciated.      Addressing khem,  with a  side.' glance   at the judgfcy;  he stated   that   Hesipd,   a  famous.  Greek   historian,   had exactly,   expressed hi�� views, and  quoted   two*  lines     of.    Latin 1      "Why,    Mr/  Curan," said  the   judge,   " Hesiod;  was a poet  not   an   historian,   and  the lines you quote are   net   Greek..  but Latin : they occur in Juvenah".  Curran contended -thai   they   were  Greek, and the dispute grew warm.  At last, Curran. said,   "Well,   my  lord, I see w�� must   disagree.   : If  it were a matter of   law,  I   should  bow  to your  Lordship's   opinion,  but it is one of fact, and rests with  the jury to decide.     L@t us send it  up as collateral issue to   the   Jury,  and I'll be.bound that.they   will-  find it Gre_k I''  A well-known musician who  writesi^vyefy illegible hand ohc��  lent an unsually hopeless scrawl to  a friend. The latter studied it -a  minute, gave it up in despair, and J  then sat down and wrote in reply :  "I shall: be 'rhost happy to dine  with' you tomorrow at six; Kindest regards to your wife. Yours,  etc."     In less   than   half-an-hour  WHEN ^u buy.-,:, ���                                             O'KEL'L "  OKELL & MORRIS'  _: :  _r reserves  MORRIS  ^FruitPreserves  you get Vnat'are pttre British Columbia*  fruit-and sugary and your money is left at  home. ���   -  Are absolutely the  PUREST AND BEST.  TEAS AND COFFEES:  Blue Ribbon, Salada and Lipto./s Teas.       Blue Ribbon Coffee.  RANDS AND BLENDS  will you roast over a hot cooking stove during  this   warm  weather  wheti we can supply you  'with;a coal oil stove which will save  your temper   as   well  as  your pocket-?    You can do anything.with .them.  We-.h^veilso a fine line of hotisefurnishings on hand.  *3    ^  ���SM  4_-/  his friend appeared, breathless,   at  his door. "There's some misunderstanding," said he, anxiously.  " I wrote you a note asking if you  could play the piano part of the  trio at Brown's recital, and here  you've sent me an acceptance of a  dinner invitation ; I'm sorry, but  I didn't invite you to dinner P  " Well," returned the other blandly,  " I didn't suppose you'd really  sent me an invitation to dinner :  but I couldn't read a word of your  note, and in that case hereafter I  mean always to take it for granted  that you're aiking m�� to dine."  For one of his correspondents, at  least, the offender now writes  legibly.  Wagon work an.cl-.Bljick8mitliin�� in all its Branches.  lacks mith Co.  Hi A.  P&OSSEK,  Manager.  Lake St., Opp. C��urt House.  NELS��K,  B. C  r  (Established 1828.)  anufacturers of  BISOUITS AND GONFEGTIONERY  * peeE o7*PJ!oe���s:or CARLEY VICTORIA AND VANCOUVER  umphreys  Next to Nelson Hotel, Baker Street, Telephone No. 9 5.  Fresh Fruits and Candles.  Agonts for  Victoria Colonist  Seattle Timks  S. F. Bulletin  S. F. Call  Njslson Economist.  ct uysters THE NELSON ECONOMIST.  s.  v.  LOCAL AND  PROVINCIAL.  Wonderful East Kootenay.  W. A. Carlyle, formerly Provincial Mineralogist, thus writes of the progress of East  Kootenay : " Many people, strong financially,  have been quietly reconnoitring, and steady  advance is to be reported in East Kootenay.  There are already several very fine mines, and  others will certainly be added to the list before long. For a young country, almost unheard of seven years ago, the rate at which it  has opened up and the development of the  mines have been truly  wonderful."  Birthday  Party. -  Master "Fred   Hume,   son of   Mr.   and   Mrs.  " Horace Hume, celebrated his fifth birthday by  giving a   party  to   his   little  friends.    There  were   present:     The   Misses   Ethel   Mallette,  Ruth Cord ngly, Edith Maud McDonald, Lulu  Ellis, Edna   Ellis, Mary   Rutherford,   Ceiicia  Prosser, Evetyn Gurd, Betty Johnson,   Flossie  Johnston,   Ella    Madden,   Lillian     Russell,  Jessie Hipperson, Josie Lawrence, Ethel Lawrence,    Rachel    Robertson,    Zillah    Emerson,  Poppy McDonald,  Gretta McDonald,   Marion  Quinlan, Irene Robson, Mildred In ine, Beryl  Emerson, Geo gie   Hume,   Vera   Hume   and  Masters Campbell,   R)bertsoa,   Joe    Wilson,  Roy Wilson,  Reginald Cordingly, Bruce   McDonald, ahd Frederick Hume  the host.    The  little guests were chaperon'ed by Mrs. .Horace  Hume, Mrs/Quinlan,  Mrs. Frank  Beer,   Mrs.  William Beer,   Mrs.   Sutherland, Mrs.   Simpson and Miss Clauson.    Game-? were provided  and Marion Quinlan gave  a   very clever tambourine dance, and Zella Emerson sang several  songs, little  Beryl   Emerson   playing  the accompaniment,    The young folks adjourned to  the parlor   of the   Hume   to tho   accompaniment of   the  grand   march   played   by Mrs.  Quinlan.    Dinner was  served  in   the  Hume  dining room.  That's What   They All  Say.  Mr. D. D. Mann has returned to   Winnipeg  from a visit of considerable duration in Brit1  ish   Columbia.    A   reporter   of the   Tribune  found   Mr.   Mann  endeavoring   to   open  his  mail between the interviews and visits of those  ^..having business with   him at the office of  the  IDauphin   railway.    He  said that   the whole  west was in a more prosperous condition than  he had ever known it before.    A large amount  of development   work is   being done in   the  mines and shipping will   become more   active  when   the   railways   now building   are completed.    There are now about 70 men steadily  employed in development work on the   mines  in which   Mr.   Mann is   interested,  and    the  further they get down the better the prospects  looks.    There is, however, greater   activity in  British Columbia   mining  than   people even  imagine, and Mr.   Mann   believes that  in the  very near future  the whole country   from the  summit of the  Rockies   to   the  coast will be  dotted over with mining camps and mills, and  reduction plants will  be as   plentiful as flour  mills on the prairie.    The whole country will  becom�� one great mining camp and one of th��  greatest fields for the production of   gold, silver, copper and lead in the world.  The Kootenay.  John V. Blake has been writing a  series   of  letters for the Detroit Tribune, in    the   course  of one which he has the following to say of the  Kootenay:  "Southward across the Canadian  Pacific railway line along the Columbia river,  Arrow and Kootenay lakes, to the   boundary,  lies the Kootenay district, chiefly  famous   for  what is locally known as smelting propositions,  principally an admixture of gold,   silver   and  copper ores.    This district has of recent years  been the scene of active exploitation.    Government returns show that in 1894 the product of  the ledge mines of the whole of British Columbia amounted to $874,000, and in 1897 to over  $8,000,000, chiefly  from   Kootenay, notwithstanding that coal for smelting averaged  $20  per ton, and facilities for transportation   were  incomplete.     The product  for   the    current  year is estimated   at  $13,000,000,   with every i  prospect of indefinite increase;     The   Ganad- i  ian Pacific railway is being   extended.   from  Lethbridge west   through   the  immense  coal  ;  fields of   Crow's   Nest   pass,    the   product  of  which inside of a  year   will   be  delivered   at \  convenient points for   smelting   at a   cost   of  about $5 per ton.      This   whole  district   is   a  wooded, mountainous   Country, the  mines, of  which will soon support   a  very large   population.    It is dependent for supplies upun the  eastern prairies, but the   rich  agricultural-regions of the   state   of   Washington; are   the  nearest and cheapest source of supply,   if  no  hostile tariff bars the  way.     The   same   may  be said as to mining machinery and   supplies  necessary for its development."  In Hymen's  Fetters.  Mr. Robert S. Lennie, of Elliott & Lennie,  barristers, Nelson, was married at New Westminister, last Wednesday, to Miss Edith  Louise Douglas. The Columbian of last  Thursday has the following : St. Andrew's  (Presbyterian) Church was crowded, last  night, with people anxious to witness the nuptials of two well known and popular young  people,-Miss Edith Louise, second daughter of  Mr. B. Douglas, and Mr, Robert Scott Lennie,  a rising young barrister, of Nelson, B. C,  second son of the Rev. Robert Lennie, formerly of this city, but now of Mount Forest,  Ont. It having been known for some time  that the happy event would come off last evening, a large turn out was present. Long before 8 o'clock, the hour set for the ceremony,  people began to arrive, and, before very long,  every pew in the large building and the gallery, was occupied, an unusually large sprinkling of the sterner sex being noticed. Pending  the arrival of the wedding party, the occupants of the pews discussed everything  apropos of toilettes, decorations, &c. The  latter, though simple, were very effective.  Over each aisle was an arch of colored maple  leaves, the same pretty leaves appearing and  contrasting with the dark lustrous foliage of  ferns, palms, <fec, which obscured the pulpit,  while the choir gallery  and  organ were outlined in   festoons of ivy, brightened here and  there with clusters of brilliant pigeon berries  It was somewhat  past eight o'clock when th��  bride appeared, on the arm of her  father, and  followed by her two younger sisters, as bridesmaids, proceeded up the aisle where the groom,  attended by Mr.. Jas.   H. Lawson,  jr., of  Victoria, was already awaiting.    In the brief prelude   before   the   ceremony  commenced,   the  audience had   a fine  view of  a pretty  group.  The bride was  dressed   in  a   gown of white  Duchess  satin, trimmed   with  chiffon,   over  which fell a pretty tulle veil, fastened   with a  'bunch of life-like orange blossoms.    About the  neck of the   bride was   a beautiful  circlet  of  pearls and emeralds, which, with  bracelets of  the same chaste workmanship, were the gift of  the groom.    Miss Stella   Douglas was charmingly    attired, in a   dress of pale blue   China  silk, and Miss   Elsie in cream   Batin, trimmed  with   Valenciennes  lace, both  wearing  rings  set with pearls  and emeralds,   souvenirs from  the groom.    The simple ceremony, which was  performed by   Rev. A. E.   Vert, pastor of  the  church, opened with the familiar hymn, "The  Voice  that   Breathed o'er  Eden."     The   responses were clearly uttered, and,  before very  many rninutes^ had  elapsed,  the words  were  uttered . which made  the  young couple   one.  As   the bridal party   left the church,   the organ pealed  out   the  "Wedding   March," and  the guests, . and   then   the audience, followed,  to give-the  bride a  good send-off,  the  same  consisting of hearty expressions   of goodwill  and copious   showers   of   the inevitable   rice.  After :the\recherche wedding supper  had been  partaken:-of* -at the residence   of  the   bride's  parents,; Carnarvon street, the newly - married  couple,-amid:-a renewal of the former demonstrations, of good will,  took tneir  departure,  and drove to   Vancouver, and.  this morning,  proceeded ?tp.Victoria, where the  honeymoon  will be :spent, prior to, their returning to their  new .home i^at.. Nelson^    The  invited'  guests;  after the. departure of   the bride and  groom^  enjoyed an   imprornptu   dance,    which   was  kept up till a late hour.    The bride who was  very popular, especially   in  the younger  society circles,,: was the  recipient of many very  handsome wedding presents,  which -included  considerable* plate.     The   number   of   these,  tokens attested the esteem in which the young  couple are ;held here, while large additions to  the list await their arrival at Nelson. m  Harry Scott, of  the Hamilton  Powder Co���  was in the city this week.  Some excellent samples of ore are being  shown from the Marion, Eclipse, Mo*  wich and other Silver mountain properties  where the late strikes were made.  Eddie Senkler, son of Judge Sehkler, of St;  Catharines, and better known to Ontario  people as a crack football player, has been  appointed gold commissioner in the Yukon.  Perhaps Mr. Sifton wants him to organize his'  scrimmage line to buck th�� kickers up tnere,  ���Ottawa Citizen. THE NELSON ECONOMISE  m  LOCAL AND PROVINCIAL.  Kaslo city hall is nearing completion.  Kaslo Episcopal church is without a pastor.  Rossland is getting ready for its winter ear-  nival.  The faro industry  is said to be thriving in  Sandon.  Fred Ritchie, of Rossland,   was in the   city  this week.  There is an opening at Gladstone for a good  physician.  There is a demand at Grand Forks for dwelling houses.  The clerks and  salesmen of  Rossland have  organized a union.  The Hall mines will install an electric plant  in the Silver King.  Mrs. Macdonald, wife of W. A.   Macdonald,  Q. C, is convalescent. -  David King, the Kaslo newspaperman, wa3  in Nelson last Monday.  Wm. Hunter, the Silverton  merchant,  was  in Nelson last Monday.  Mr. and Mrs. Macnaughtori, Vancouver, are  registered at the Hume.  McLean Bros,  will use a new invention for  digging on their contracts.  E. O. Lewis and 0. E. Chase, bakers, Nelson,  have dissolved partnership.  Rev.   Dr. Spencer,   the revivalist   has concluded has labors at Nelson.  P. Burns & Co. have been making improvements in their butcher shop.  A large amount of development work is now  going on at Deadwood camp. B. C.  Charlie Steele, a Victoria knight of the grip,  paid Nelson a business trip last week.  The grand lodge meeting of the  I. O. G. T.  is being held in Vancouver this week.  Mrs. King, proprietress of the Allan   Hotel,  Rossland, visited Nelson last Monday.  Mrs. John Baunerman has returned from a  visit to her old home in Renfrew, Ont.  P. J. O'Reilly, formerly of The  Economist,  will start a newspaper at Cascade City.  E. V. Bodwell,   of Bodwell &  Duff,   barristers, Victoria, was in the city this week.  A.  Lucas,   organizer   of  the   Conservative  Union, is making a tour of the Kootenay.  The R. E. Fr nch   dramatic company   are  playing a week's engagement at Rossland.  Rossland papers give columns to reports of  prize fights, but scarcely a line to church  meetings.  The Lely concert in the Presbyterian church,  last Friday night, was a success financially  and otherwise.  J. A. McLean, commercial traveller, of  Winnipeg, was showing his samples to Nelson  merchants this week.  Rev. W. C. Rose, of Nova Scotia, will take  charge of the Baptist church, beginning his  pastorate in November.  Mr. Justice Martin had several election petitions before him last week. His Lordship  has the cases under consideration.  The executive of the Nelson Conservative  club are holding a meeting this afternoon.  Matters of importance are to be discussed.  The Brooklyn News bewails the circumstance that. Sir William Van Home overlooked that important town on his recent trip.  ^\  The Catholic bazaar has opened in the build-  ing lately occupied by the Lawrence Hardware Co. The bazaar will open ��very morning at 11 a.m.  Miss Maggie McEacher.u, late of Collingwood,  Ont., died last Friday night and was buried  Sunday afternoon. The deceased was 32  years of age, and came here last summer in  the hope that the change would prove beneficial.  Frank Oliver, M. P.  - Among the recent visitors to Nelson were  Mr. Frank Oliver, member of the Dominion  House of Commons for Alberta, and his wife.  Mr. Oliver is publisher of the Edmonton Bui-  letin, the second paper published in the Northwest Territories, and a publication that has  don�� a great deal in bringing the resources of  its district before the attention of the outside world. Mr. Oliver's record in the Commons has been thoroughly inpependent, so  much so that at times Sir Wilfred did not feel  altogether sure of the support of the member  for Alberta. Mr. and Mrs. Oliver are traveling for pleasure in company with Geo. H. Ham  of the C. P. R. H�� refused to speak for publication.  PEOPLE OF NOTE  Notwsthstanding his seventy years, George  MacDonald, the novelist, is slowly recovering  from the effects of the sunstroke received in  August.  M. Casegar Tompson, the fomous Belgian  violinist, has received from King Humbert the  honor of kinighthood in the order of Sts  Maurice and Lazare.  Professor Koch, the German   bacteriologist,  is making an exhaustive study of malaria  in  the hospitals of Milan.      He intends to spen 1  several months in Italy.  Garrison Y. Shall, a convict in the .Connecticut State prison, knows all of Shakespeare's  plays by heart, having learned them during  the last fourteen years  of his  imprsionment.  The Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin  has presented a baptismal stone to the new  German church in Jerusalem, which is to be  dedicated to Emperor William   next   month.  Sir Walter Besant, who celebrated his sixty -  second4 birthday last month, was born at  Portsmouth, Eng., and graduated as eighteenth  wrangler at Cambridge thirty-nine years   ago  The Pope and his friends or distressed ber  cause of the difficulty of keeping his apartment warm enough for him in his old age.  Various devices have been tried. Furnace  heat has been suggested, but when the Pope  heard that it would cost $180,000 to- introduce it in the Vatican, with its thousands of  rooms, he dismissed the project with a motion  of his hand.  Women's National Council.  The Nelson branch of the Women's National Council are making a praiseworthy effort to  establish   a free   public   library in    this city  With this end   in view they are soliciting   aid  from the   citizens, and   while   they  have not  succeeded  as well   as   they hoped, they   have  met with success enough to encourage them in  their effort.    To consider how best to carry on  the work, the Nelson branch will hold a meeting next   Saturday at   3 p.   m., to   which all  women are cordially   invited.    It   might  be  said, that Mayor   Houston has promised   substantial   aid    to  the public library   proposal.  Another matter which   the council has   under  consideration,   is   arranging   for  the   sale of  tickets to a course of lectures on cooking to be  given by Miss Livingstone,   well known   as a  lecturer on this subject.     Miss Livingstone is  highly recommended   by Countess   Aberdeen.  She has lectured  throughout Canada   to large  classes, and she will come here,   providing 35  tiekets can   be disposed   of.    She   charges $3.  for a course of ten lessons, or 50 cents a lssson.  The Presbyterian school-room can  be secured  for the lecture course.    Mrs. R. W. Day, secretary of the Nelson branch, will give any farther  information required oh this subject.  Sir William Van Home has got back to  Montreal. In an interview, he said that  throughout the West he observed marked  signs ef prosperity.  s$  _________     <       ' ,  te 8  THE NELSON ECONOMIST,  THE OUTCAST.  He was an awfully nice fellow  and one easily comprehended why  Margaret had let her heart go out  to him. He was tall and straight  and good-looking and he knew how  to wear his clothes. There is nothing a woman likes so well as a  man whose clothes.hang on him as  if they were a part of his physique,  never noticeable except for their  general modishness. Probaly it  was the fact of his well-fitting garments that first attracted Margaret to the boy.  Margaret was the child of wealthy  parents. She lived in a fashionable street and a gold spoon  and smart clothes had been her  birthright She met Hubert at a  matinee tea and I think it must  have been a case of leve at first  sight. The boy never dreamed of  telling ais love but Margaret had  been used ail her life to obtain  what she wished and the most  pachydermatous of young lovers  could not fail to understand the  drift of such encouragement as  hers.  They became prosaicly engaged  and because they knew Margaret's  fancies were usually short lived, her  parents put no obstacles in the  way   of   Hubert's   frequent   visits.  But the girl's brother came  .home from a trip abroad. He had  ^mingled with dukes and duchessee,  counts and countesses, barons and  and baronesses, until his mind  was imbued with fal?e notions of  aristocracy. He was even snobbish, a fault never laid at the do)r  of his parents and sister. The  brother looked upon Hubert with  disdain. He resented his constant calls and occasional presence  at dinner. The facts of Hubert's  good looks, fine manner and well-  clothed figure made no impression  upon him.  ..'���" This man must   come here   no  longer,"   he said to Margaret.  " This man ?" returned the  sister haughtily. " Thi3 man is  my future husband."  " Good God, Margaret ! What  do you mean ? My sister married  to an outcast ?"  For, in the brother's code, Hubert's good character, good clothes  and good manners could not condone the drawback that nobody  knew anything about his antecedents. He had come here unheralded, without letters of introduction, with no means, and the  only fact known was that his connections lived in London.  Margaret's will could not prevail  against that of her brother, and  Hubert came no more to the house.  Yet���a readily foreseen circumstance���not many months later  an elopement was chronicled in  San Francisco's inner circle. Margaret had flown with her Hubert.  Shortly afterward, they went upon  the stage, the modern resort of  young persons who seem unable to  make both ends meet domestically  by the ordinary methods.  I looked now for a reconciliation  with the parents,   but   it   did   not  come.     The young couple^went  to  New York   and  then   to    London  and it was for some months before  their names   crept   into   our daily  papers.      One day   an    item    appeared    that   was   telegraphed  all  over the country���the   death of   a  noble  lord and his two eldest sons  while   enjoying   a   yachting   trip.  The estates and title thus decended  ��� o    the   youngest  S->n,    who    had  quarreled with his  father   when   a  uiere lad,  had gone across to America and had lived since in obscurity.  The  lawyers   had   unearthed    this  ��on, who had been discovered as an  actor i�� a vaudeville theatre in the  i-rovinces.      His fotage partner was  liis wife, a  beautiful woman   who  was said to be the   daughter   of  a  Californian millionaire.  Dressed up, embellished as the  i-tbry appeared, the names were  accurately given. The fortunate  heir was Hubert : the partner of  -orrovv, now his joy, was   Margaret.  But imagine the feelings of the  brother who had spurned " the  outcast !"���The Melodiamatist. in  San Francisco Town Talk.  To preserve the health the medical profession  are unanimous in declaring that J��y's Bread  is an essential. Enjoy good health, and use  Joy's Bread.  LAND  REGISTRY ACT.  In the matter of an application for a duplicate of certificate of title to lot 1 (one),  li'iock 10 (ten),' town of Nelson, notice is hereby given that it is my intention at the expiration oX'.one month;from the first publication  hereof, to issue a duplicate of the certificate of  John Roper Hull to the above lands, dated  i he 10th day of March, 189 s, and numbered  16,950a.  S. Y. WOOTTON,  Registrar-General.  Land Registry Office,  Victoria, B. C, 13th September, 1808.  WANTED.  On Beaker Street, rooms suitable for Photographic Studio. Apply, with particulars, to  '���1*110x0," Economist Offick.  CERTIFICATE OF   IMPROVEMENTS.  "Hillside" mineral claim, situate ia the  Nelson Mining Division of Wes-t Kootenav District. * .  Where located:���On the east side of Giveout  creek, and is the eastern extension of the  " Bodie" claim, on Toad Mountain.  Take notice that I, A. G. Gamble, Free Miner's  Certificate No. 13592 A, agent for Edward  James Buhner, Free Miner's Certificate Na.  20639 A, intend, sixty days after date hereof, to  apply to tho Mining Recorder for a certificate  oi" improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under  section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 10th day of September, 1898.  A. G. Gamble, Agent.  HEAD OFFICE: Nelson, B. C.  .    BRANCHES-AT'  ROSSLAND TRAIL NELSON KASLO  SANDON THREE FORKS SLOCAN CITY  *  &  West Kootenay Butcher Co  WHOLESALE AND retail dealers in  rRHSH A ND SALT ME A TS.  Camps supplied oii.shortest notice and lowest prices. |  Mail orders receive careful .attention. , U  Nothing bht fresh and wholesome meats and supplies i  |   kept in stock. ^  - E. C. TRAVES, .Manaqer.      I  Doors, Sashes and Turned Work, Brackets and  I  Satisfaction Guaranteed.    Prices Reasonable.  a  9  f  irji_iii_tt_i^B-��i��Br.aj^_uw����--u^  W. R. JACKSON & CO.,  Commission Agents Delmonico  Hotel, lay the market odds on  all important events.    Starting  Erice    commissions   executed  latest betting received by cable  abv^s  We have just received a large shipment and are selling them at  bargain prices.    Call and see them at  .   my Laay s,   Rremo  dam Roy's Complexion, etc.  HP  E'  Opposite Queen's Hotel  Brokers and Manufacturers' Agents.  Agents for Manitoba Produce Company, Gold Drop Flour,  Wheat Manna, Manitoba Grain Co., M. R. Smith & Co's  Biscuits, Btc.  NELSON, B. C; P. O. 80x498,  W^^^^^^^^^^^SBm^^^^^^^Oi^^^mmim^mmmimMm^m^m'maimmmm THE NBIvSON BCQN&MIST  3bbe_!  SHORT   STQ&lES.  An Irish crier, being   ordered-"to  dear the court, did so by ��� this ,.&n-  iouncement:~ " Now/ then,   all  y;_j  dackguardg that isn't lawyer- mu��t  [ave the coort." .. ���   " .... ...��"'���> ���'���')  lii a New Zealand   town   one of  he municipal  candidates,   a   pre-,  jgjjnced Scotsman,, had  received a-  ;��nt  of a- huge Scotch   thistle,  jwhich as the moment happened to.  be' lying on the table  of "his   com-  mittee room. "���:. '.A-friend,    entering,  [withdrew suddenly with thex-emark,  |aI   beg   your    pardon;.;, I. didn't  ���knowyou were at luncheon.", ���  William    Smith     O'Brien,   the  Header   of  the National   party   of  Ireland,   who   was-transported  in  [1849, had a   duel   in   his   younger  days, and the two men were placed  opposite each other.      Just ^s   the  jsignal,    "One,  two,   three���fire \]l  |was   about   to  be  given,    O'Brien  (cried,   " Stop !   No signal, I pray."  'His opponent's second stepped  forward and said with asperity,   "This  is very irregular,    sir.     What  do  you  wish  to   say ?''     " I    wish,"  answered. O'Brien,   "to  call   your  attention to the fact that the gentleman opposite me   has   let  the cap  fall off hia pistol."  The editor of London News  says  that on one occasion the   late Justice    Matthew     Crooks    Cameron  stood on the G. T.   R.  platform   at  London waiting to take   the  train  for Toronto, when a^slovonly-Iook-  ing individual came up to him and  offered to shake hands.     I do   not  know you," said the judge, leaning  forward   on   his crutch.      " Why,  I'm Billy' the porter at  the  Grigg  House.    I was one of the witnesses  in  your   court   today."     " Oh, indeed,"  said the  Judge,   with   the  peculiar manner he had'o^Mting  his   lower: lip   and   making    his  goatee  stick   out.      " Well,-Billyh  the court is over."  A Scotch minister and his man  were returning from an old-  fashioned marriage. " We had  better gang in by the back, th��  mcht," said the minister on arriving near the manse. " What  wey?' queried Sandy. " Aweel,  there's been a deal o' whiskey gaehi',  and I think it wad be better." u Na,  na, straucht forrit, straucht  forrit," persisted Sandy. " Very  weel, then j but, at ony rate, I'll  ^P^ on *n front a meenit, and  you'll toll's how I'm daein 1"  The minister then walked on a  few yards, and called back.  St How am I daein,' then, Sandy?"  "Brawly, sir, brawly," said the  beadle, " but   wha's  that wi' ye?"  ��MM.  -��� Guaranteed SMperlor'toany Sweeteiiec! fli'lk on the ./larket..   Recommended  hy>iPhysicj&ns\.-rM and Guaranteed by THE MANITOBA DAIRY  6  ;' Mr,    Curran,   on - one  occasion,  was    trying-a    ca&��   before;   .Lord  Avonmo're  arid  a; stupid .Dublin  jury, by* whom   his.best  flights of  eloquence  and   wit . were:. ,wholly  unappreciated.     Addressing jfchera,  with a  side.' glance   at the   judg fcr  he stated   that   Hesipd,   a  famous.  Greek   historian,   had exactly,  ex:  pressed hii views, and  quoted   two  lines     of.   Latin 1      "Why,   .Mr/  Curan," said   the   judge,   " Hesiodf,  was a poet not   an   historian,   and  the lin��s you quote are   nc t   Greek,  but Latin : they occur in Juvenali".  Curran contended  tha/,   they   were  Greek, and the dispute grew warm.  At last, Curran  said,   " Well,   my  lord, I see we  must   disagree.  - If  it were a matter of  law, I   should  bow   to "your   Lordship's   opinion,  but it is one of fact, and rests  with  the jury to decide.     L@t us send it  up as collateral issue to   the   Jury,  and I'll be.bound that, they will���  find it Grefck T '���'���.  A    well-known    musician    who  writes.a^efy   illegible  hand   onca  sent an unsually hopeless scrawl to  a friend.     The latter studied it * af  minute, gave it up in despair,  and  then sat down and wrote in reply .*   .  "I sha.lL, be ^ihost   happy  to   dine  with' you tomorrow at  six.   Kindest regards to your   wife.     Yours,  etc."     In less   than   half-an-hour  his friend appeared, breathless,   at  his door.     "There's   some  misunderstanding,"  said   he,   anxiously.  " I wrote you a note asking if you  could play the   piano   part  of   the  trio at  Brown's   recital,   and   here  you've sent me an acceptance  of a  dinner invitation ;   I'm sorry,  but  I didn't  invite  you   to   dinner I '  " Well," returned the other blandly,  " I  didn't   suppose    you'd    really  sent me an  invitation  to   dinner :  but I couldn't read a word of your  not��, and in that  case   hereafter I  mean always to take it for granted  that  you're  asking m��   to dine."  For one of his   correspondents, at  least,    the   offender    now    writes  legibly.  w  HEIST you buy,;.  sLE^ ..r^i-F:ort Preserves *���  you get =Vhat-are. pure British Columbia." Are absolutely the  fruit-and sugar,.and your money is left at PUREST AND BEST.  home.  -!To":_TmrjlJL5JULJ^  TEAS AND COFFEES:  Blue Ribbon, Salada and Liptor/s Teas.       Blue Ribbon Coffee.  ' BRANDS AND BLENDS  \  wiil you roast over a hot cooking stove during  this warm weather when we can supply you  with a coal oil stove which will save 3^our temper as well as  your pocket1?    You can do anything with .them.  We. h?J ve-also a fine line of house .furnishings on hand.  % I   I  sft'SJ"'-!..-  5  Wagon work an.d-.Bk*ck8inithing- in All its Branches.  Hi A.  PROSSER,'Manager. Lak�� St.,  Opp. Court House.  NELSON,  B. C  (Established 1828.)  anufacturers of  BI SOU ITS AND OONREOTIONERY  _'p&"���r��i!S?.,orCARLBY VICTORIA AND VANCOUVER  umphreys  Next to Nelson Hotel, Baker Street, Telephone No. 9J.  Fresh Fruits ai  Agonts for  Victoria Colonist  Skattltc Tjmks  S. F. Bulletin  S. F. Call  Nhlson "Economist.  elect Oysters  In Bulk.  Kfc III  __*E  m  im  _z5__ IO  I  anc  Ma  to j  anc  to i  ma-  if t  ne^  ged  wai  me  gai  i  paj  ion  i  anc  >,.  bir*  ma  ha]  Big  ���tell  bee  ���wb|  pa<  cot  dri  hej  anj  far  pa;  J  wa  .ho  -mi  coi  ari  ���"��� w a  ���,���.���   k  -a|  i bij ���  vof  'hi]  dp  8ti  a��  m  cf  '  ' ft  si  SI!  m  d(  tc  b<  ai  ���d��  k  c*  h  d  o:  n  " KOOTENAY LAKE SAW MILL  G. O. BUCHANAN,, Proprietor.  Orders   Promptly   Filled   and, Sash &  Satisfactien   Given.      Nelson   Mouldin  Yard, Foot ��f Hendryx Street [Turned  JOHN RAE9 AGENT.  , Lumber,  Lath,  Shingles.  every paper injthe Province, irrespective of party politic*.  The   Largest   Supply   of]  Horse      Blankets      Ever  Brought into   the Koote-'  Every one High Grade   Article.    Inspection in-  B.G  Certificate of Im  "Gold Island" mineral claim: situate in the  felson Mining Division of west Mootenay  L. M. Livingstone,  Brooklyn,  is  i n the city.  YMIR.  O.   M. Rosendal��  has   returned  from Oregan with his bride.  Marsh V. Adams has been appointed deputy sheriff for the Slocan.  A great number of tickets have  been sold for the concert in the  rink Friday evening.  Special Correspondence of The Economist.  Last Thursday an acetyl ine gas  generator exploded in J. A. Gilkor's  store, the result being that Fred  Burns and a man called Ross were  badly scorched about the fac*.  Fi e  totally destroyed  the Tam-  arac mi) e, bunk and cook house on  Saturday morning.    It is supposed  that the bush rats overturned some  An   attempt   will   be    made   to  -natches.  arouse interest in the Nelson   gun  #   Johv Lightbody met with a ser-  ^i���v ious  accident    last   week.     While  chopping gome underbrush, the a*e  slipptd and entered hie knee, caue- j  ing a very painful wound.    Ha was  taken to   the  Nelson Hospital   for  treatment.  Ymirites   would    like   to   know  what     the      Government   intends  doing for them in the way of building trails and   roads.    Lately  numerous petitions ha^e been   circulated   and  forwarded   to   the  gold  commissioner   and   the Hon.    the  minister of. mines,   but to date we  have heard nothing respecting our  petitions.  We were  in   hopes  that  when our  representative  occupied  th�� position of   minister  of   mines  that  we   would get   back   a small  percentage at   least   of   our  hard  earned money, which we pay into  the   Provincial   Treasury   in   the  form of  recording and   assessment  fees, poll  tax and miners licensee.  A short time ago property  holders  despairing   of ever   seeing  a road  Nelson Mining  District.  Where located:���Two miles east of Ymlr.  Take notice that I, Walter Askew. Free Miner's Certificate No. 2,630 A, for myself, and  acting as agentfor W.C. Forrester, Free Miner's Certificate No. 98,363, and Charles W,  Arnould, Free Miner's Certificate No; 2,629 A,  intend, sixty days from the date hereof, to f f����/i^^"���__r �� ��!��nn��ate ��� of Improvement  apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate Jh�� aiiS?*?��f���^ obt*-pin* a crown grant <  offmprovements, for the purpose of obtaining       ?n^��tlla;���:. ���,.���'���:   ���"������  _. nmvn irrant of t,h�� ahr��v�� -Wim ��� I __���*n5f ruJtner���_**��� no*ice that action, unde  ���_��� 3 mu,st *>����� commenced before the i!  ^ff a��^_^^Ifl_!����?;of improvement..  "Big Bump "mineral claim, situate inTtlB  Nelson Mining Division of West Kootenay Df  trlct. ��� - .'.]  Where located : Salmon Biver, North Fori  about twelve miles from Erie.  Take notice that I, John A. Coryell, as agei  for the Big Bump Gold Mining Company, Fr��  Miner'- Certificate No. 13081A, intend, six!  days from the date hereof, to apply to the ail  ing recorder for a certificate of improvement  And further take notice that action, under  section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 17th day of September, 1893.  iLTBRAS-BV.  The contract for removing the  bodies from the old cemetery to the  new one has been awarded to Farley & Simpson.  stogies* of Application ����>  Purcd��a��  tand.  Sixty days after date I Intend to apply to the  Chief Commissioner of Lands and works for  permission to purchase the following described  unsurveyed and unreserved land, vis.: Beginning at a post set on the south bask of Kootenay River about 2% miles west of Nelson, and  marked "E. C. Arthur's Northeast Corner,"  thenee south forty chains, thenee west forty  ehalns, thence north forty chains more or less  to the Kootenay river, thenee east, following  the meandering* of the Kootenay river, to the  point of beginning, containing one hundred  and sixty aeres more or less.  July JO, 1898. EC. A-THUfi.  I i.i  ii, ..... i fir '   ��� ,    '  XBBTIPICATI OP IBPROfB-IBHTS.  "Second Relief" mineral claim, situate in  the Nelson Mining Division of West Kootenay  District.  Where located : North fork ot Salmon River,  about twelve miles from Erie.  Take notice that I, John A. Coryell, as agent  for J. A-.--Finch,- Free Miner's Certificate No.  1674A, intend, sixty days from the date hereof,  to apply to the raining recorder for a certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under  section 87, must be commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 9th day of August, 1893.  Johk A. Coktsll, Agent  Dated this 9th day of August/1898.  John A. Coryell, agent.  CCRTIFICATS OP IKPROVSMENT8.  "Relief Fraction " mineral claim, situate ii  the Nelsea Mining Division of West Kootenai  District. "i  Where losated : North fork of Salmon Biverj  about twelve miles from Erie.  Take notice that I, John A. Coryell, as agent  j for R. K. Nelll, Free Miner's Crrtiflcats Nol  J 4948A, intend, sixty days from the date hereofm  to apply to the mining recorder for a certifl|  cate of improvements; for the*purpose of obf  taining a crown grant of the above claim.  ���  And further take notice that action, undei  section 87, must bo commenced before the in  suance of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this ��t_ day of August, 1898.  John A. Coryell, agent.  is announced that W. C. McLean, the contractor, will be married in Revelstoke, this week to  Miss Annie McDonald.  From the appearance of the people on th�� streets one w>uId surmise that the "miscellaneous receipts" of the city council will be  unusually large this month.  CSSTIFICATB OP i-iPROVSI-BESTS  11 Grand Union " mineral claim, situate in  the Nelson Mining Division of West Kootenay  Distriet.  Where located : North fork of 8almen River,  about twelve miles from Erie.  Take notice that I, John A. Coryell, as agent  fer R. K. Neill, Free Miner's Certificate No.  *��48A, intend, sixty days from the date hereof,  to apply to the mining recorder for a certificate  ���f improvements, for the purpese of obtaining  a crown grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under  section 87, must be commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Datsd this 9th day of August J833.  Johh A. Cosysll, agent.  CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS;  "Star Shine" mineral claim, situate .-in.'the  Nelson Mining Division of West Kootenay distriet.    ...���:���'���' --'���:���-:"-  Where located : North fork of Salmon River,  about twelve miles from Erie.  Take notice that I, John A. Coryell, as agent  for R. K., Neill, free miner's certificate No.  4048A, intend, sixty days from the date hereef,  to apply to the mining recorder for ft certificate of improvements, for the purpose of ob-  taininga crown grant'of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under!  section37, must be commeneed before the is-!  suance ot such certificate of improvements.  Dated this9tir day of August, 1898.  JeHN A. Coryell, agent.  E. Billings is in the city making  preparations for the opening of the |      r ~        ���__,��.��.������  Bittner dramatic company at the I bmJt UP Wild Horse creek, under  skating rink, next Monday even- ^����k to build it themselves, coming. The cempany will be here mencing at the North Fork and  for one week and will open with continuing it to ifa�� South Fork a  Bartley Campbell's "Galley Slave." I ^i-tance of about three miles.    Thib  work   has   been    finished   without  Truly a good name is better than  precious ointment, as Mr. Gordon  Hunter has reason to believe.  This gentleman was recently appointed gold commissioner for the  Yukon, but had to decline on account of the ill-health of his wife.  His  appointment was endorsed by  J  Certificate of Imnrovomente.  ^'Princess Ida" mineral claim, situate in  the Nelson mining division of West Kootenay District. *  Where located :���On Morning Mountain,  near the head waters of Sandy Creek.  Take notice that I, John MclLatchie, acting  as agent for B. R. -C. Walbey, Free Miner's  Certificate No, 2657 A, William H. Bambury,  Free Miner's Certificate No. 2751 A, and Michael Egan, Free Miner's Certificate No. 2584  A, intend, sixty days from the date hereof, to  apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate  of improvements, for the purpose of obtaining  a Crown grant of the above claim. And further take notice that action, under section 37,  must be commenced before the issuance of  such certificate of improvements.  Dated this first day of October, 1898.  John McLatchie, P. L. S.  CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.  " Canadian Queen " mineral claim, situate in  the Nelson Mining Division ol��West. Kootenay  district. ��  Where located : North Fork of Salmon River,  about two miles from Erie.  Take notice that I, John A. Coryell, as agent  for W. F. Mitchell, Free Miner's Certificate Ne.  3S678 A, E. M. Ingram, Free Miner's Certificate  No. No. 5292 A, and A. B. Ingram, Free Miner's'  Certificate No. 8888 A, intend sixty days fr<wi  the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Reco r< Ifr  for a certificate of improvements, for the pur  pose of obtaining a Crown grant of the abov?  claim.  And further take notice that action, und^r  seetion 87, must be commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this $th day of September, 1898.  John A. Cokykll.  wear Phalr Hotel, Victoria Street Nel����a.  one cent being received from the  government. We are determined  to ha vethis district recognized, and  would like to know who is the  proper authority   to go  to for aid.  Rev. Father Rivers, of Rossland,  is in the city.  Thk Brack in an & Ker Milling  Co. L t. have opened a branch in  Kootenay with Mr. Frank B. Gibbs  as agent. Mr. Gibbs has charge of  the whole district and will make  Nelson his headquarters. The  National mills need no introduction  to the people of Kootenay as their  product speaks for itself.  Archetict   Ewart is   preparing  plana for a theatre building to be  erected at the corner of Victoria  and Ward streets. The ground  floor is to be used for stores and the  floor above will be so arrangecl^  accommodate theatrical companies  and dancing parties. Allan Bros.,  the projectors expect to complete  the building by Christmas. THE NEI^SON BCONOMIST  11  NOTES AND COMMENTS.  Ottawa   Citizens   Mr.  ~Goldwrn  >mith in the Weekly   Sun   objects  the   infliction ,of    the.Doukho-  jorstis,   Gallicians,  Islanders and  >ws upon Canada under- Mr. Sif-  bn's. immigration policy.     .He es-  ecially objects to the Doukhobor-  Kjt's, . as   not   proper   material    for  [iii__jliri'g "up    a  British; province.  I'gree'; With'"' Mr.'. Smith."/ Yet  Le   Doukhoborstis   have   much in  >mrrion with   the   Bystander   in  ieir dislike" of war  and   military  jrvice. ���  IP-  Before.buying a  OR -  Go to Painton's, the  A .'good story is told of the Minster of- Public Instruction in.  'ranee. A committee of the Ih-  jrrrational Arbitration and Peace  .ssociation had waited upon him  [nd drged that he should give his  [pproval to a book written for'  (drools by Darmestesfer"6_i'the.iiis-  >tyloi civilization, in which "the  tathor enlarged upon th�� . blessings  if peace. The Minister's: "reply,  flustrates a widespread,. tendency.  If human nature. " It is beauti-  |-ifrs lovely !"hesaid. "It is one  kely. to impart into the   hearjb, of  jouth a. love of peace.     Every boy  jhall have it���-as   soon  as    France  as recovered Alsance-Lorraine.  CLUB  HOTEL  Corner Stanley and Silica Streets  RATE#; $i per day and up.-  Schooner Beer, 10 cents  E. J.  Curran, Proprietor.  T. S. Goke.        H. Burnet.        J. H. McGregor  GORE, BURNET & CO.,  Provincial   and   Dominion Land  Sur**  ,.   veyors and Civil engineers.  Agents for .Obtaining- Crown   Grants and Ab  . stract ef Tiile to Mineral Claims, Sue.  NELSON,   -  - -   British Columbia  ,  Optician and latcjiitiaker,  SVIcKlllop:: Block-;::Baker.'.street.  A-ll-work^gnaranteed,.'  A Yorkshire Socialist, explain-  ig to a friend the principles, of  ocialism, remarked that all  ossessioris should be shared  dually.    " If you had two horses,"  d   the friend^ "would you give"  teevone?" ;������" Of  course,"    replied  ���ie Socialist.-    " ���������And  ifyoti   had  vo-cows, would you do the.same?":  Of dourse I should."    " Well, sup-  osin g noWj" said the f riend,slo wly,  you had two pige>, would you give  fie   one of  them ?^.' "Eh !    that's  'ettin'ower near   home," said   the  ther, slyly ; " tha kriaws  I've got  wo pigs."   Which story is   a   par-  ble.  -     Telfepti-he 93-For   ""'  NELSON   EXPRESS  ,, J. j.. Deryjn, Mgr.  Stand   Opposite   Central   Fruit   Store  W. JL QUINLAN, D. DvSl.  '������%-: v  ��� ���   'DENTIST'-"*- ���      -:  Mara Block,  Baker Street, Nelson  / Special attention given' to crown ..and bridge  w��rk arid the painless'extraction of teeth by'  ocal aaaathetjes. '-.  BARRISTER and SOLICITOR .  I.AW OFFICE :        - Baker Street. Nelson  when you order  matches. T h en  you   will   be   sure  of having the best.  Queen Automatic Refrigerators  Lightning Ice Cream Freezers^  Pails made of Best Virginia White Cedar, with Electric welded wire hoops  Puritan Wickiess Oi! Stoves  r  * . .   .  ..  nelson hardware: CO  We are now* receiving our  Holiday    Goods    and '..willr.  have more to say regarding  tHern" in   Future * issues   of  Th��: Economise .      ,.".,..'"  -CanadaDrug&jBook Company,  COMMANDING -ATTENTION    \./:  is   simply."ia   matter   of being  well dressed.  Those who wear garments  cut and tailored by us will receive all the attention a . well  dressed -man deserves. - ;  Our winter suits of Harris  Homespuns are marvels of  good quality, good style and  goo<i' ; workmanship. The  value1 is great. ....'���  9  ;!  GOOD BATH  SMOOTH SHAVE  AND HAIRCUT  AS  YOU  IvIKK  IT, GO  TO  THE)  i-ro doors east of the Post Office.  W. J. Morrison, Prop.  eatiti;  Josephine Street  Pack and..sa^.<ll.e .horses furnished; on shortest   poti.ee. :    Telephone. 67-  Open .day and night.  ELLY & STEEPER, props.  We are direct Importers and Wholesale Dealers ia  ,   HAVANA   OIGARS,   ETO.  All the leading brands always ia stock.  Pgll       SamsM torn-    ��bb���^       4*@Hr        M Mama     B Jw-ft J__��     &am&  Nelson.   YATES    STREET,  V/GTOR/A'B.a.  rjggrowgsginragsa^^ 12  THE NELSON ECONOMIST.  I  Liquors  Wines  Cigars  Tobaccos  Carpets  Mattings  Dry Goods  Boots and Shoes  Tents  Cigarettes  Cement  Flour and Feed  Drill Steel  Ore Bags  Fire Clay  Curtains  KOOTENAY BRANCH  Victoria, B. C,   Vancouver, B. C, and London, En*.  NELSON, B.C.  ODDS AND ENDS.  *����� SOO-PACIFIC LINE  DIRECT and SUPERIOR SERVIC  ROUTE  T�� Eastern And European points.   To P��cifl��  C��ut, China, Japan, and Australia points.  TOURIST CARS  Models of comfort  Pass Revelstoke daily to   St.  Paul  Daily (except Wednesday) to  Kastern points  CONNECTIONS:  To Rossland and main line point* :  ��*0 p.m. leaves-NELSON-arrires 10:30 p.m.  Kootenay Lake-Kaslo  Route.   Str. Kokane*  fplm.11'leaves- NELSON - arrires : 11 a.r_:  Kootenay River Route, Str. Nelson:  Mondays. Wednesdays and Fridays.  7 a m leaves - NELSON - arrives 6:30 p. m.  MVL'kps con_ection at Pilot Bay with str Kokanee  ^ both directions. Steamers on their respective  routes call at principal landings m both di-  re^ona andat othertpoints when signalled.-  Slocan Citv, Slocan Lake PointJ^edDfsnudn��dnay  fVS* fe^7- NELSON _ arr�� ^S  Ascertain rates and full information from  nearest local agent or from GEO S^EER,.City  Ticket Agent, Nelson, B. C. J. HAMILIO^  Agent, Nelson, B. C.  W. F. An_��r��on,  Travelling Pass. Agent,  Nelson, B.C.  E. J. Coyle,  Dist. Pass. Agent  Vancouver B.C.  Atlantic Steamship Tickets.  To and from European points via Canadian  and American lines. Apply for sailing dates,  rates, tickets and full information to any C. P.  Rt. agent or  6. S.  BEER,  C.  P-  R- Agent,  Nelson.  W        STITT, Gen    S.   S. Agt., Winnipeg.  Provincial  Opp. ���ustom House, Helson, B.C  Willing to oblige: .��' You ar��  well fitted for the position, but I  should prefer a married man."  " Perhaps w�� can arrange that.  I *ee you have daughters."  " It is sad," said one girl," that  go   many  men  nowadays  have a  great deal more ��� money (than  \ r tins." " Ye?," sighed another;  4 and so little money at that."  " Bridget, you've broken as much  china, this month, as your wages  amount to. Now, how, can we  pi event this occurring again ?" sOk  don't know, mum, unless yea raises  m�� wages."  " At my last place," said a cook,  4 I should have been very comfortable if the master hadn't been a  photographer." " Why,      what  difference could that make?"  44 You see, at the dinner-table he  used to photograph the joints before they were removed to the kitchen."  Young Mr. Fits came in from  his daily toil and passed his wife  with merely a friendly nod. "I  think you forgot something," she  said with a pout. " I believe I  did," said he, and then kisBed   her.  "Really," el e said. "I wasn't  thinking of that all. I was thinking of baking-power."  Garrulous boarder���" For ten  years my habits were as regular as  as clock-work. I rose at the  stroke of six ; half an hour later I  sat down to breakfast ; at seven I  was . t work, dined at twelve, ate  supper at six, and was in bed at  half-past nine ; ate only hearty  food, and wasn't ill a single   day."  Sarcastic boarder���" Dear me !  And what were yoti in for ?" (Awful silence),  ilvie  TOTAL DAILY CAPACJTY,-8f200 BBLS.  IGILVIE'S HUNGARIAN and OGILVIE'S GLENGRJ  OQILVIE   -  MILLING   -  COMPAN  G. M. Leishman, Victoria, Agent for British Columbia.  Temple Building, Victoria.    Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.  70 Bassinghall St., London.  General Shipping & Insurance Agents  Commission Merchants. Forwarders and "Warehousemen. Lumber  Merchants and Tug Boat Agents. Orders executed for every description of British and Foreign Merchandise.   Charters effected.  - Goods and Merchandise of every description Insured, against loss by  Fire.   Marine risks covered.  Life, Accident and Boiler Insurance in the best offices. Klondike  Bisks accepted.   Miners'Outfits Insured. - ..  Loans and Mortgages Negotiated. Estates Managed and Rents  Collected.   Debentures bought and sold.  DEALER II  ^Cry Grjcds, Ciothln  oofs and Shoes, rials, Caps and Gents' Furnishings.  apest Place in the City  extBankof Montreal, NELSON, B. C.  ���rf^wsga  .IK-*-1*  5i" ^,>B.1

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