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The Nelson Economist Nov 9, 1898

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Array V^>  ���'t  With which  is  incorporated THE  NATION, of  Victoria, B.C.  VOL.  II.  NELSON, B.  C,   WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER   9, 189S.  NO.   18.  THE NELSON ECONOfllST  Issued every Wednesday at the city of Nelson. B. C.  D. M. Carley Publisher  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Gne Year to Canada and United States $2.00  If paid in advance 1.50  Oae Year to Great Britain  2.50  If paid in advance  2 00  Remit by Express, Money Order,  DTaft,  P. O"  Order, or  Registered Letter.  Correspondence on matters of general interest respectfully  selicited.  Advertisements of reputable character will be inserted  upon terms which will be made known on applifcation. Only  articles of merit will be advertised in these columns and the  interests of readers will be carefully guarded against irresponsible persons and worthless articles.  EDITORIAL COMMENT.  The British Columbia Legislature   has been  summoned   to meet   on   January   5th.    Then  the   relative   strength    of   the   two     parties  will be tested.    In  the-meantime,-it. might   be  opportune  to glance over  the   record   of   the  Martin party since  its accession to power last  August.    We call it the Martin party advisedly, and  we apologize to Mr. Semlin for   being  compelled to  ignore   his presence   as   an important factor  in the  make-up of   the Martin  administration.    When Joseph Martin, by the  grace of   Lieut-Governor Mclnnes,   succeeded  to power,  the  Province  of British   Columbia  was at the zenith of its prosperity, and   its affairs were  being administered by   careful and  competent   officers.    Th��   Province,   from   its  peculiar situation demanded  liberal expenditures of money,   and these expenditures were  not being carried on   with a niggardly   hand,  />ut rather in a way that would  convince   the  intending settler and prospective investor that  our leading men had faith in   British Columbia, and were determined to afford ample fac-  ilitus   for the  new comers.   In   doing   so,   all  that was asked was that those who would reap  the   benefit  would   share   the  burden.    That  foreign investors had faith in the late administration,   the  advantageous   terms   on which  money could be secured   in the financial markets of   the world afforded   the strongest   possible   testimony.     The    Turner  C-overnment  realized the importance of legitimate development, and were prepared to pledge the  credit  of   the Province   to   the   end   that   progress  might be assisted and encouraged.    This   was  the condition of affairs when  Lieut-Governor  Mclnnes lightly brushed aside the constitution  and thrust us into the rapacious jaws of Joseph  Martin, whom the residents of a neighboring  Province had turned down, as something unholy and unclean. The policy of the old  Government was Progress, and now let us see  what the policy of the new government may  lead to. No sooner had Joseph Martin succeeded to power than a reign of false economy  began. Tried and faithful servants of the late  government were discharged to the detriment  of public service, and the spoils system in all  its iniquity, was inaugurated. Here it may  be remarked that at least ninety-five per cent,  of the victims of Joseph Martin's wrath were  Conservatives, and Liberals were and are being  called upon to fill their places. This was the  -fir.et step in the direction of the economy  promi.-ed us by the late opposition. Scarcely,  one appointment so far made in the Koot-  enays has met with the approval of the electors.  However,  it is   the'"economy" being   practised by   the Martin   government   that   meets  with the   most  general  disapproval.    British  Columbia,   at   the  present  stage of   development, should   not be  permitted to falter   and  fall by the   wayside, and   this will be  just its  position if    this  reign   of   "economy"   of   the  Martin brand continues.  The late government  in fostering many of the struggling  industries  of this Province, were enabled to approach the  money markets of  the world as  a going   concern,   but    now matters    are   changed.    The  present  administration is   advertising   to the  world its lack  of faith in the  undeveloped resources of the Province, by absolutely refusing  to give assistance to the much needed develoj -  ment of the country.    When the rude- awaken- '  ing comes,   the men   who,   to   hoodwink    the  electorate are now pursuing their work of ruin,  will find that the  financiers   have taken them  at their own value, and having sniffed the obnoxious   political   odor    attaching to   Joseph  Martin   will refuse to advance  money   where  there are no assets  and no   security.    It   now  seems as if history   wTere repeating itself in the  case of British Columbia.    Years ago the Hon.  Robert Beaven inaugurated a  reign of economy,   with   the  result that   stagnation    prevailed throughout   the length  and  breadth of  the Province.    It   only   took a  short   time to  demonstrate the fallacy of such a   policy, and  today   thereis   not one" in British   Columbia  save possibly the Lieut-Governor,  so poor   as  to reverence Robert Beaven.    If the future be  only a continuation of the past, we can imagine the inglorious end of Hon. Joseph Martin.    In the meantime, God help the country.  The London  Speaker thus describes the attitude   of France  on   ihe   Fashoda   incident:  '��� While we   are thus to   mark time   and await  Major Marchand's pleasure the French   press  is engaged in a very characteristic manoeuvre.  It  s���with the   exception of certain   journals  of no   weight   or   repute���scrupulously   courteous  in its references to this country," and is  especially complimentary to the Sirdar.    But  it assumes two   things.    The first   is that Major Marchand's position on   the Nile is a fait  accompli    which    we    are   bound   to    iiccept,  and which practically stands on the same footing   as    the   Anglo-Egyptian  occupation    of  O :n d ii r m a n; a n d   the   seco n d   i s th at   a n y a t -  tempt on  our   part to.   expedite   Major   Mar-  chand'* departure   from Fashoda   would   be a  direct   and grave   outrage upon   the   rights of  France.    Under all the honeyed   phrases and  courtesy   of  the   leading French   newspapers  these  two assumptions lurk in   unmistakable  form.    Grotesque as   the reasoning on   which  they'are founded may be,_it is -clear that they  have  been carefully   formulated,   not   merely  for home consumption, but for presentation to  the English   Foreign Office,  in the hope  that  Downing  Street    will   consent   to    treat   the  question of  the Nile in   the way in   which   it  recently treated the question of  West Africa."  The Nelson Miner objects to Attorney-General Martin appearing as Crown Prosecutor.  We rather imagine that it is only by this  means Mr. Martin could expect to get before  the courts.  A grandson of Sir Allen Napier McNab,  who was "Premier of Canada half a century  ago, died a few weeks ago in Guy's Hospital,  London. For the last five years of his life he  lived by billiard-marking and odd jobs. He  was first cousin to a peer, was well-born, well-  educated, and well-started in life, but he didn't  "get on." His name was Henry William  McNab Davenport.  Commenting on the failure of the fishers and  canners to find a common meeting place in  the matter of the fishery regulations, the  Westminister Columbian says: ''While so  much  attention   has   been   devoted  by   both  a  EfiEWaWOTSWfi^^ �� 2  THE ECONOMIST.  canners and fishermen to the question   of   the  regulations governing the  salmon   fiAhing.in  the Fraser river  and   its   estuary,  concerning  ���which   substantial  agreement   appears,   after  all is faid find dene, to be well nigh hopeless,  it may be fairly   questioned   if   both   are   not  overlooking a more vitally   important  matter  ���namely,   the   urgent   necessity   for   taking  united action    in    bringing pressure   to    bear  upon the federal authorities to have a stop put  ,if possible, by international agreement, to trap  fishing on both sides   of   the   boundary   line ;  for the experience of at least a few seasons has  given ample ground for the fear   that,   if   trap  fishing is   not   abolished,    there   will,   before  ver}^ long, be no salmon fishing on the    Fraser  or in the gulf worth   regulating.      This   is   a  matter of the most vital concern to fisherman  and canners on both sides of the line,   if they  will but view   it   from   the   broad    and far-  sighted standpoint, instead of the narrow and  short-sighted  one.     The future of   the industry, in fact,   depends     upon    the   right    and  speedy settlement of this serious question."  Victoria  and Vancouver   amateurs  are up  in arms at a recent   edict issued by   Manager  Jamicson of the Victoria and Vancouver opera  houses.    For   some   years  Victoria  has    been  scourged with amateur  performance.3,   and   it  must come in the nature of a special intervention of Providence to   the   citizens that   Manager Jamie-son    has   denied   the   use    of    his  theatres to amateurs.    Citizens, who could ill  afford   the   expenditure,   were  forced to   purchase tickets for  these performances, and   the  intimidation did not?top thers, for. they were  practically forced   to attend   th^se entertainments or   suffer a   boycott  on thier  business.  But a Nemesis in the person of Manager Jamison was on .the   track   of the   amateurs, and  the citizens will now obtain hsppy relief from  being pestered  into   buying   tickets  in   order  that they   raisjht   be   obliged to   witness   how  successful their neighbors'   children can make  idi��ts   of   themselves.    These   amateur entertainments have been the  ruin of  professional  performance* in Victoria, and Manager Jamie-  son in a long letter to-  the papers  announces  that neither   one of his  houses will be   rented  to amateurs during'the regular theatrical season.    The following extract   from Mr. Jamie-  son's   letter explains   the   matter more   fully:  "The fact   is that   from now   until   the end of  February there   is  only   one   single  week   in  which I  have not   got   from  one   to   three attractions   booked   for   both houses,   and I  am  conducting   correspondence   now   wlvch   will  most probably result in my booking that week  as well, and I am   also conducting  correspondence   which   will  undoubtedly   fill   up  whs.t  little vacant time I have   left in   the   months  of March, April and May.    If   I allow the use  of the houses in either cit}- to these entertainments, I do it with the knowledge that it is at  the expense of the business   of the regular   attraction? immediately proceeding or following  them.    Thev   have the greatest cause of com-  plaint, and do complain   most bitterly at   ray  nducing them to visit these towns by makin  representations of possible good business, and  then ruining their business and causing them  heavy loss by allowing a heavy amateur production the use of the houses just before or  just after their date, the result being the same  in either cage."  This should satisfy  the citizens, who  have  been compelled to  yield for   amateurs  in the  past, but it does not  meet with the   approval  of the amatturs.    One,  emboldened no   doubt  with past successes in the matter of intimidation, writes to the papers calling upon all amateurs to   boycott the regular theatrical   performances.    It appears to us that there should  be  some effort   made   to    accommodate    the  author of that   letter with   a   cell   in the Provincial penitentiary.    Mr.   Jamieson  is  generally regarded   as the   most successful   manager on the Pacific   coast.    He   guarantees to  Victoria and Vancouver every first-class combination that visits the coast, and in  refusing  to permit  intimidation by   amateurs  he   has  earned the good-will of all who are   interested  in the promotion of the drama" in British Columbia.  A peculiar libel case   has just been   before  the Ottawa   court,    Last   March, the   Ottawa  Citizen  reported that   Eva   Gourdeau;   a domestic, had been arrested for   theft.    In Ottawa there resides another  Eva Gourdeau,   who  is net a domestic, and who did not perpetrate  a ihef:, and  was therefore   not arrested.    The ,  father of the latter young lady read the bead-  lines in ihe paper which announced the arrest  of Eva   (iourdeau,   and   without   reading   the  article proper, called upon  the Citizen  for an  apology.     That   paper    explained    that   the  Eva   Gourdeau arrested   w?as   not   Eva Gourdeau, the eociety   young lady, but   this explanation failed to appease  the irate   father, and  proceedings for   libel were instituted at   once.  On the witness ntand the father swore to some  things aa a positive fact, which,   it appears to  us, he could not possibly know. How could he  swear that there was only one Gourdeau   fam-  i')y in Canada?    There may be a  dozen Gourdeau families right here in British   Columbia,  who do not feel that they are under any   special obligation   to   report   the  matter   to    Mr.  Gourdeau at Ottawa.    A verdict however was  returned for the   Citizen, and   Mr.   Gourdeau  was ordered to pay both   his own  smd.'the defendant's   costs.    Newspapers    as   a    general  thing are only   interested   in   publishing   the  news, and if they were compelled to   trace the  genealogical tree of every one arrested, we imagine that the reporters would never complain  of time hanging heavily upon their hands.  The Hamilton Spectator says that inasmuch  as newspaper people are averse to winning  libel suits, which cannot be won without some  cost, we may expect to see paragraphs of this  sort in careful newspaper :  Mary Jane Johnston, who resides at 231  Jemper street, where she occupies the second  room from the first landing on the right, who  has reddish hair inclined to be wavy, a freckled  face and blue eyes, with a speck of gold between two of her upper front teeth; whose  father's name was Thomas JTohnston and  whose mother's maiden name was Sophia  Smith; who speaks with a slight lisp, and  wears a strawberry mark on her left forearm,  and is inclined to run her left foot over to the  outside : and who has no relatives in this  country, was arrested last night on suspicion  of highwf y robbery. .      ���     <  Or this :  Jeremiah Judson, arresterd last evening for  carrying a jag, is not ihe Jeremiah Judson who  takes up the collection in the North Methodi&t  chureh, and is president of the country prohibition association : but an entirely different  man.  Or this :  Peregrine McGillicuddy, of Paris, Ontario,  arrested last evening on suspicion of having  a stolen ton of coal concealed on his person,  is not Tobias O'Shaughnessy, of Toronto.  -~ The reporters of the local papers, and other  press representativ s at Ottawa, were not invited to be present at. the farewell banquet  given to the Governor-General on the 1st inst.  Mr. D, J. Beaton, late editor of the Winnipeg Free Press, is in the city. It is understood that Mr. Beaton has secured control of  a Nelson newspaper and will take up his residence here. The Economist welcomes Mr.  Beaton to British Columbia.  The Queen has again taken a stand against  divorce. An English paper says: " The Queen  intimates the pronouncement on the part of  prelates might have been in stronger terms, as  she is totally averse to divorce under any  circumstances. She is willing to admit that  in no institution are there more people wronged than in marriage, nevertheless, her belief is  that, an infinitely more satisfactory state  would arise wer�� marriage made indissolvable,  both by church and state. The Queen sdds  that she has.no objection to a judical separation, her strong disapproval of divorce being  due to the liberty which it imparts to divorced  people to marry again, and to the re-marriage  of divorced people, no matter what the grounds  of divorce, she is unalterably and most strongly  opposed." This is the first official..expression  Her Majesty has given to har views on the  subject.  Mr. George W. Steevens, of the London  Daily Mail, has an article in his paper concerning Sir Herbert Kitchener, from which  the following is an extract : " His officers  and men are wheels in the machine ; he feeds  them enough to make them efficient, and  works them as mercilessly as he works himself. He will have no married officers in his  army rmarriage interferes with work. Any  officer who breaks down with the climate goes  on sick leave once ; next time he goes, and  the Egyptain army bears him on its  strength THE ECONOMIST.  MINES AND INVESTORS.  X   "X  The wonderful strike made in the Republic  mine, has overshadowed for the present, every  other stock in the market, and  the immediate  effect has   been   to  create an  intensely bull  movement in all the stocks   of the  Republic  camp.    Of the stock of the Republic mine itself, no reliable quotation  can   be   obtained,  for there is absolutely none for sale, and   this,  in itself, is one of the most satisfactory  evidences   that carl  be furnished that the strike  is really as good as it is  claimed to be.    Were  it otherwise,   the public   would  be   given the  opportunity of acquiring all the stock in this  min* that they could absorb, at just a fraction  less than market  quotationg, for at least  one  of the owners  chiefly interested, is   noted for  his happy faculty of taking fortune at the flood.  As a   speculation, and not as an   investment,  any   of  the   other   standard   Republic  Camp  stocks, are at present prices, well worth taking  a flier in,  but speculators should be satisfied  if they secure a fair profit, and must   not wait  till the property in which they  dabble, turns  out a second Republic. a  Rossland stocks   have  generally  showed a  decline, and as previously predicted, the market  is very   weak, with   every  prospect   of a  further decline.    In the Slocan things   are beginning  to  move:   as   the    snow   season   approaches.    The Slocan Star is  at the present  time in better shape, perhaps, than at any time  in   its   history.    Its   deeper   workings   have  proved the continuity of its ore body, with an  unexpected,  but very   much desired   increase  in values.    Of the Payne,   its monthly   showing, proves   it to  be the richest mine in Canada, and as it is owned by a close corporation,  who are not at all likely, to distribute any portion of their good thing, among the investing  public, it is useless to refer to it, except as   a  shining example of the marvelous  richness of  the Slocan division.    The Ruth,  continues on  the even tenor of   its way,   shipping 450  tons  per month of thirty days,neither more nor less,  and it, too, like the Slocan  Star, has a  larger  amount   of ore in sight, than   for  some  time  past.    The Queen Bess and  Idaho  are in excellent shape, and th�� last strike in the latter  property has done  much to  lessen the disappointment   which   fell   to   the   management,  when it dawned  upon them that   they were  losing  a large  percentage of their  values in  concentration.    The  Last  Chance   mine,   on  the Noble Five mountains, is a  wonder.    Although at present not shipping any   considerable quantity, just enough to pay running expenses and development work, it  will, when  the tramway is completed, be a constant shipper of at least  600 tons per   month,   and the  high value of its ore will make it a formidable  rival in reputation to   the Payne mine.    Tbe  Treasure   Vault,   Sovereign, Ivanhoe,  R.   E.  Lee, Ajax  and Noble   Five are being rapidly  and systematically developed, and many good  judges are predicting that the last four named  properties will furnish between them the most  productive  silver-lead  mines   in   the   world.  The great depth at which the ore will be struck  in these properties  under the present  plan of  development, will, if the predictions of geologists prove correct, that values and quantities  will be  found  to   improve with  depth,   place  them in th�� position of enormous shippers for  an indefinite period,   and such a consummation,   means to   the Slocan   district an   era of  unexampled   prosperity.      On   the Reco,  the  management   intend   to   push  work  on   the  Texas lead, by continuing their   tunnel   until  it touches the Deadman   ground.    This  lead,  though small, has Droved very rich, and   will  in the future,  undoubtedly prove of immense  value to th�� Reco property, as after traversing  the Deadman claim for about 800 feet,  it continues through   the whole length of the  Reco  ground.    Taking  one consideration   with another,   prospects  of   solid  prosperity   around  Sandon look decidedly promising.  Mining Notes.  (New Denuer Ledge.)  Hugh Sutherland has added more men to  the force at the evening Star and Columbia.  A force of men are developing the Black  Cock, on the Nerth fork of Carpenter creek,  for Major Furlong. Winter quarters are A: being.erected.'A  E. Shannon state * that he has 10 inches of  galena on his property on Silver mountain,  below the California. He has the ledge exposed in four or five openings.  R.LKirkwook and Frank Wei-s were in  town this week purchasing supplies f<>r the  winter for work on the Mahan . and Ohio  claims, on Ten Mile. They have put up commodious quarters and will make : shippers. .��� of ���  the claims before spring.  The Enterprise, on Ten Mile, will soon  have a large force of men working agaia. The  long upraise between the No. 2 and No. 3 tunnels was finished a fortnight ago, and as soon  as the one now raising to the No. 4 is completed, the force of men will be increased. A  tunnel is being driven in from the surface  to catch the raise, and this has to go but a  few feet further. The property will then be  in grand shape.  The total shipments of ore from the Bosum  mine up to date have been 11 car loads, or  220 tons. Six shipments were made in  August and September and five in October.  The mine will do much-better this month.  Twocarloads are already out or on the way  to the wharf. The property continues to developed in a promising manner.  (Ymlr Miner.)  At the Salmo mine a gang of 25 men are  busy at work, which will be kspt up all the  winter, and they have ampl@ supplies on hand.  At the Yellowstone mine there are 16 men  employed, and they have laid in a stock of  five months' supplies. Work will be continued  throughout the winter.  The mine owners, prospectors and contributors to the building of the wagon road up  Wild Horse creek are deserving of all praise.  Those who did not give money have put in  their time. Within a week from date it will  be op@n as far as the Blackcock mine.  The following new   locations have  been re-  sen tlv made: Gold Crown���Frank Briton,  W. C. Forrester, between Bear and Wild Horse  creeks, adjoining Dundee; Great Western���  John W. Falls, about a mile from Ymir, adjoining the Great Northern; Emerald���Wil- '  liam Baker, about "four miles from Ymir, on  Salmon river.  Work has been resumed on the Blackcock.  On Monday last eight pack horses were busy  taking up supplies for the outfit. Winter  quarters are being erected for the accommodation of 20 miners. The operations are under  the direction of FA J. Davey, M. E. It is expected that by the rniddle of December the  Blackcock will .be-.shipping ore.  (SLlvertonian.)  Several miners have been temporarily laid  off at the Gomstock mines, asothe management does not wish to have too much ore broke  before the concentrator is in running order.  Development work  at the Noble  Five mine  at Cody is going steadily,on and  the mine is  reported aslooking fine     Three air drills  are.  kept at work and the tunnels  are each   being  driven ahead at the r&te of gixjeet a day.  A contract has been let to A. Trebilcock of  Sandon to run 200 feet of tunnel at the Canadian Group. The lower tunnei in now in a  distance of 400 feet and this additional 200  feet is t�� be added to it. Mr. Trebilcock was  the foreman at.the Canadian group at the  time oi the 1 ast shutdown.  Th�� work being done at the Emily Edith  mine is showing that property to be one of the  biggest concentrating propositions in the Slocan region. Considerable clean ore is encountered, but the management is pushing development, and not at present trying to separate ii from the concentrating ore, as a concentrator will eventually be erected and it  then can be handled much cheaper than attempting to sort it at present by band.  Inopportune Deaths.  Julius Cassar wa3 assassinated when he had  almost completed the task of consolidating the  administration and dominion  of   the Roman  empire,   and   his    death    opened   the     way  to that despotism   and   corruption  which  ultimately undid his work.     Henry of Navarre  was killed when   he  had   almost  healed   the  differences   between Catholic   and  Protestant  France, but Europe, and William   the   Silent  also fell when he was on the point of   uniting  the   Netherland    provinces   into* a    compact  barrier against the encroachments   of   Spain.  In  English history  Lord dive died   at  the  moment when he was the one man who could  have saved tbe American   colonies   and   kept  the Anglo-Saxon race united, but there is   the  case of Mirabeau.     He was   literally  the   one  man in France who   could   have  averted  the  horrors of the revolution, saved and   reformed  the monarchy and so spared Europe the  murderous career of Napoleon and all the devastation it brought.     If he had lived ten or even  five   years   longer,   the   history  not   only    of  France, but of Europe and  the   world,   would  have been different.      It is   in   fact   sufficient  to say that he would have made both   Robespierre and Napoleon imposible. 6  THE ECONOMIST.  to.  !  is  LOSAL  AND ��� PROVINCIAL.  J. W. Leatborn, Montreal, is in the city.  Tlie Imperial bank is now open for business.  Sandon people have ordered John Clinaman  to leave.  Work has been started on Allen   Bros', new  .opera house.  Goldie Wilson,   of   Victoria,  is   here   on  business, trip.  Mr.  and   Mrs.   R.    Lennie  have   returned  from their bridal tour.  Several Nelson Masons will visit Corinthian  lodge, Rossland, tomorrow.  Geo. C.   Shaw, commission   merchant, Victoria, was in the city this week.  Mr. Fred Irvine is rapid\y recovering  from  his recent attack of typhoid fever.  James Houston was married to Clara Red��l  at the Club Hotel, Tuesday,evening.  November   24 has   been  proclaimed   a  day  for general Thanksgiving throughout Canada.  The first consignment of Crows Nest coal is  expected to arrive b}7 barge this evening from  Kuskonook.  The Nelson Hockey club will hold a meeting November 10, to make preparations for  the coming season.  Mrs. P. E. Wilson gave birth to a daughter  last Monday, which accounts for the broad  smile on Mr. Wilson's face these days.  During the month of October 2215 tons of  ore were smelted at the Hall mines smelter,  containing approximately 48 tons  copper and  33,400 ozlsilver.  A meeting was held yesterday in th�� board  of trade rooms to di^cut-g the advisability of  establishing a public library in Nelson. A  committee of ��� ladies' consisting of Me.-clames  Roderick, Robertson, Goepel, Arthur, Da}  Taylor and McCullnck were present. The  following gentlemen were also present: Mayor  Houston, Judge Forin, Dr. Hall and Messrs.  Bowes, Kydd, Crease and J. A. Turner. It  was decided that the membership fee should  be fixed at $10 per year, $5 for six months and  $2 50 for thies months. The city will be canvassed for subscriptions. The funds now  available are $300 promised by the city and  $150 more whiteh may be counted on from  other quarters.  The Theatre.  The Bittner company have played to good  houses since the opening night, which is a  strong testimonial as to their efficiency. In  fact this organizatio : seems to be capable of  producing almost anything. Last night a  most successful production of " Michael  Strogoff " was given. The title role was taken  by Mr. Waldron, and he gave an admirable  rendition of the part. Miss, Choate was also  most effective. The other members of the  company were well up. in their parts. Tonight "Master and Man" will be; given."  Thursday and Friday nights will be "for the  Good Templars and the fire brigade. Saturday  night will conclude the'engagemenf.  The R.. E. French company will bagin a  week's engagement at the rink next Monday  night. Mr. French has long been identified  with theatrical ventures on the coast and is  regarded a very clever actor. His company  includes many well known to fame. The following is the repertoire : "Hands Across the  Sea," "Dad's Girl," "The panites," 'Ticket-  of-Leaye Man," "A Wife's Stratagem" and "A  Fair Rebel."    y ^" A      .  A   Mint For British  Columbia.  At the meeting of Canadian bankers held  in Toronto a few days ago, the president, Mr.  D. R. Wilkie, and others discussed a number  of mest i in portan t. Cana<d ian q.uestions, amo ng  them ihe'. establishment. of ��� gold coinage and  the pre&ent educational S37stem.  Rumors About Le Roi Deal.  There is an abundance of rumors at Rossland regarding theLe Roi deal, but none  of them can be authenticated. One of these  reports is to the effect that the British  America Corporation has deposited the full  purchase price of the shares of the Turner  faction at the rate of A $8.25 per share in  the Old National bank at Spokane subject  to Senator Turner's acceptance. But this  cannot be confirmed, and may only the gossip  of the street. Governor Mackintosh is in  Vancouver.  Matrimonial.  A very pretty wedding took place last evening at the residence of Mr. Alexander Ross,  Menzies strtet, when Mr. Stanley Humphreys  and Mips Jane Ross were made man and  wife, Rev. A. B. Winchester performing the  ceremony. The room was a mass of chrys-  anthuem blooms and a magnificent bell of  flowers canopied the young couple. Miss  Elizabeth Ro?s and Miss Beatrice Humphreys  were the bridesmaids and Mr James Ross  acted as groomsman. At the conclusion of  the ceremony the wedding march was played  by Miss E. V. Humphreys. The costumes  and ornaments of the bride and her maids  wrere ail charming, the bride's gold locket and  chain set in pearls, and the diamond rings of  the maids being the gifts of the groom.      Mr.  ���    Humphreys is a son of   the  late   Hon. T.   B.  Humphreys and Mrs. Humphreys is a daughter  of Mr. Ross, late of the 93rd Hi hlanders and  commissariat and transport corps. The  newly-married couple left for the mainland  this morning enroute for Nelson, where Mr.  Humphreys is in business.��� Victoria Times.  The Pretty Girl Milking Her Cow.  (Colleen Dhas  Cruidtlie-na-moA  The dewdrops were gray on the clover,  The gray mists of night were withdrawn,  The blackbird sang clear from the clover,  The hills wore the rose of the dawm.  But sweeter than blackbirds and thrushes  y Her sOng, whom, the graces endow,  And pinker than dawn her soft blushes���  The pretty girl milking her" cow.  She sang, and the milk sweet and scented,  Spurted white as the breast of my dear.  She sang, and the cow, grown contented,  Gave over her kicking to hear.  Oh, wildest of little black Kerriesy  You will come at her call, I know .how,  Since my heart at her  voice leaps and scurries  The.-pretty-'girl.-milking her, cow. /  As she sang I drew nearer each''��� minute',  A captive in love's rosy chain,  And my heart every second was in it,  Grew fuller of joy and of pain ;,-..  Till Xcried out  behind her:  My storeen,  Pray guess who is holding you now!  And I felt the heart beats of my Noreen,  A  The pretty g^rl milking her cow.  I kissed her sweet eyelids to blind her,  I kissed her gold head like the silk,  The cow���who was going to bind her���  With one kick kicked over the milk,  And then, growing bolder and bolder,  I kissed from the chin to the brow,  She was mine ere the day was much older,  The pretty girl milking her cow.  ��� Pall Mall- Gazette.  F or Napoleon's Sake.  Some people are very fond of telling a story  that has a catch \n it, and so taking their listeners in.    Here is a sample of what I   mean.  Once, when in Paris, Napolian paid a visit  to a hospital for old soldiers. Among the inmates was an old man who had lost an arm.  The emperor asked him:  "Where did you lose your arm?4'  "At Austerlitz, sire."  "Then no doubt, you curse the emperor and  3^our country for your fate?"  "On the contrary," said the veteran, "for  the. emperor and my country I would sacrifice  my other arm."  "I can hardly believe it," said the emperor.  The soldier immediately drew a saber from  its sheath and lopped off the other arm.  "A most sublime act of self-sacrifice," said  the old lady who had been listening to the  yarn, totally forgetting the impossibility of a  one-armed man Gutting off his remaining arm.  The Crowrs Nest Pass Coal Co. is only awaiting the completion of the railway to bring its  coal to market. It is probable that running  arrangements will soon be made and Mr.  Charles St. Barbe, the local agent, is booking  orders for the coal in large numbers. As will  be seen by an advertisement in another column  this is the cheapest coal that ever has been or  is likely to be offered in this market.  9  {tj;.i: ft ;v  m!*- THE ECONOMIST.  MINES AND INVESTORS.  The wonderful strike made in the Republic  mine, has overshadowed for the present, every  other stock in the market, and   the immediate  effect has   been   to   create an  intensely bull  movement in all the st6cks  of the Republic  camp,    Of the stock of the Republic mine  itself, no reliable quotation  can  be  obtained,  for there is absolutely none for sale, and   this,  in itself, is one of the  most satisfactory   evidences   that can  be furnished that the strike  is really as good as it is claimed to be.    Were  it otherwise,  the public  would  be  given the  opportunity of acquiring all the stock in this  mine that they could absorb, at just a fraction  less than market   quotations, for at least   one  of the owners  chiefly  interested, is   noted for  his happy faculty of taking fortune at the flood.  As a   speculation, and not as an   investment,  any   of   the  other   standard   Republic Camp  stocks, are at present prices, well worth taking  a flier in,   but speculators should be  satisfied  if they secure a fair profit, and must   not wait  till the property in which they  dabble, turns  out a second Republic.  Rossland stocks   have   generally  showed a  decline, and as previously predicted, the market  is very   weak, with   every   prospect   of a  further decline.    In the Slocan things  are beginning   to  move    as   the    snow  season   approaches.    The Slocan Star is  at the present  time in better shape, perhaps, than at any time  in   its   history.    Its   deeper   workings   have  proved the continuity of its ore body, with an  unexpected, but very   much desired   increase  in values.    Of the Payne,   its monthly   showing, proves  it to   be the richest mine in Canada, and as it is owned by a close corporation,  who are not at all likely to distribute any portion of their good thing, among the investing  public, it is useless to refer to it, except as   a  shining example of the marvelous richness of  the Slocan division.    The Ruth,c continues on  the even tenor of   its way,   (shipping 450   tons  per month of thirty dayg,neither more nor less,  and it, too, like the Slocan  Star, has a   larger  a  amount   of ore in sight, than   for some   time  past. ~The Queen Bess and   Idaho  are in excellent shape, and the last strike in the latter  property has done  much to  lessen the disappointment   which   fell   to   the   management,  when it dawned   upon them that   they were  losing  a large  percentage of their  values in  concentration.    The   Last  Chance   mine,  on  the Noble Five mountains, is a   wonder.    Although at present not shipping any  considerable quantity, just enough to pay running expenses and development work, it  will,  when  the tramway is completed, be a constant shipper of at least  600 tons per   month,  and the  high value of its ore will make it a formidable  rival in reputation to  the Payne mine.    The  Treasure   Vault,  Sovereign, Ivanhoe,   R.   E.  Lee, Ajax  and Noble  Five are being rapidly  and systematically developed, and many good  j udges are predicting that the last four named  properties will furnish between them the most  productive  silver-lead  mines   in  the   world.  The great depth at which the ore will be struck  in these properties  under the present  plan of  development, will,  if the predictions of geologists prove correct, that values and quantities  will be  found to   improve with  depth,   place  them in the position of enormous shippers for  an indefinite period,   and such a consummation,   means to   the Slocan   district an   era of  unexampled   prosperity.     Oa   the Rko,   the  management  Intend   to   push   work on   the  Texas lead, by continuing their   tunnel   until  it touches the Deadman   ground.    This   lead,  though small, has proved very rich, and   will  in the future,  undoubtedly prove of immense  value to the Reco property, as after traversing  the Deadman claim for about 800 feet, it con-  tinuee through   the whole- length of the   Reco  ground.    Taking   one consideration   with another,   prospects  of   solid prosperity   around  Sandon look decidedly promising.  Mining  Notes.  (New Denuer Ledge.)  Hugh Sutherland has added more men to  the force at the evening  Star  and   Columbia.  A force of men are developing the Black  Cock, on the Nerth fork of Carpenter creek,  for Major Furlong.      Winter quarters ar��   be-  ing erected.  E. Shannon state - that he has 10 inches of  galena on his property on Silver mountain,  below the California. He has the ledge exposed in four or five openings.  R. I. Kirkwook and Frank-Wei's were in.  town this week purchasing supplies for the  winter for work on the Mai aa and Ohio  claims, on Ten Mile. They have put up commodious quarters and will make shippers".of  the claims before spring.  The Enterprise, on Ten Mile, will soon  have a large force of men working agaia. The  long upraise between the No. 2 and No. 3 tunnels was finished a fortnight ago, and as soon  as the one now raising to the No. 4 is completed, the force of men will be increased. A  tunnel is being driven in from the surface  to catch the raise, and this has to go but a  few feet further.     The property   will   then be  in grand shape.  The total shipments of ore from the Bosum  mine up to date have been 11 car loads, or  220 tons. Six shipments were made in  August and September and five in October.  The mine will do much better this month.  Two carloads are already out or on the way  to the wharf. The property continues to developed in a promising manner.  (Ymir Miner.)  At the Salmo mine a gang of 25 men are  busy at work, which will be kept up all the  winter, and they have ample supplies on hand.  At the Yellowstone mine there are 16 men  employed, and they have laid in a stock of  five months' supplies. Work will b�� continued  throughout the winter.  The mine owners, prospectors and contributors to the building of the wagon road up  Wild Horse creek are deserving of all praise.  Those who did not give money have put in  their time. Within a week from date it will  be open as far as the Blackcock mine.  The following new   locations have  been re-  eently made: Gold Crown���Frank Briton,  W. C. Forrester, between Bear and Wild Horse  creeks, adjoining Dundee; Great Western--.  John W. Falls, about a mile from Ymir, ad- ���  joining the Great Northern; Emerald���William Baker, about four miles from Ymir, on  Salmon river.  Work has been resumed on th�� Blackcock.  On Mondav last eight pack horses were busy  taking up* supplies for the outfit. Winter  quarters are being erected for the accommodation of 20 miners. The operations are under  the direction of F. J. Davey, M. E. It is expected that by the middle of December the  Blackcock will be shipping ore.  (Silvertonian.) ^   -  Several miners have been temporarily laid  off at tbe Comstock mines, as the management does not wish to have too much ore broke  before the concentrator is in running order.  Development work at the Noble Five mine  at Cody is going steadily on and the mine is  reported as looking fine Three air drills are  kept at work and the tunnels are(each being  driven ahead at the rate of six feet a day.  A contract has been let to A. Trebilcock of  Sandon to run 200 feet of tunnel at the Canadian Group. The lower tunnel is now in a  distance of 400 feet and this additional 200  feet i* t�� be added to it. Mr. Trebilcock was  the foreman at the Canadian group at the  time of the last shutdown.  The work being done>t the Emily Edith  mine is showing that property" to be one of the  biggest concentrating propositions in the Slocan region. Considerable clean ore is encountered, 'but the management is pushing devel-  oprne-n*,and not at present trying to separ-  &U it from the concentrating ore, as a concentrator will eventually be erected and it  then can be handled much cheaper than attempting to'sortit at present by hand.  Inopportune Deaths.  JuliuH Cajsar was assassinated when he had  almost completed the task of consolidating the  administration and dominion  of  the  Roman  empire,-*  and   his    death    opened   the     way  to that despotism   and   corruption  which   ultimately undid his work.      Henry of Navarre  was killed when   he  had   almost   healed   the  differences   between  Catholic   and   Protestant  France, but Europe, and William   the    Silent  also fell when he was on the point of   uniting  the   Netherland    provinces   into   a    compact  barrier against the  encroachments   of   Spain.  In  English history Lord Clive died   at  tbe  moment >rhen he was the one man who could  have saved the American   colonies   and   kept  the Anglo-Saxon race united, but there is   the  case of Mirabeau.     He was   literally  the   one  man in France who   could   have  averted  the  horrors of the revolution, saved and   reformed  tbe monarchy and so spared Europe the  murderous career of Napoleon and all the devastation it brought.     If he had lived ten or even  five   years   longer,   the   history not   only    of  France, but of Europe and  the   world,   would  have been different.      It is   in   fact   sufficient   M  to say that he would have made both   Robes-   ||f  pierre and Napoleon imposible.  i  hip^^s*^^^ 6  THE ECONOMIST.  LOU AX  AND   PROVINCIAL.  J. W. Leathorn, Montreal, is in the city.  The Imperial bank is now open for business.  '    Sandon people have ordered John Clinama.  to leave.  Work has been started on Allen   Bros', new  opera house.  Goldie Wilson,   of   Victoria, is   here   on a  business trip.  Mr.  and   Mrs.   R. ' Lennie   have   returned  from their bridal tour.  Several Nelson Masons will visit Corinthian  lodge, Rossland, tomorrow.  Geo. C.   Shaw, commission   merchant,  Victoria, was in the city this week.  Mr; Fred Irvine is rapidly recovering   from  his .recent attack of typhoid fever.  James Houston was married to Clara Redel  at the Club Hotel, Tuesday evening.  November   24 has   been   proclaimed   a  day  for general Thanksgiving throughout Canada,  The first consignment of Crows N��st coal is  expected to arrive b}r barge this evening from  ���Kuskonook.  The Nelson Hockey club will hold a meeting November 10, to make preparations for  the coming season.  Mrs. P. E. 'Wilson gave birth to a daughter  last ^Monday, which accounts for the broad  smile on Mr. Wilson's face these days.  During the month of October 22-15 tons of  ore were smelted at th�� Hall mines smelter,  containing approximately 48 tons copper and  .33,40.0-ozs silver..  A meeting was held yeiterday in th�� board  of trade rooms to discuss the advisability of  establishing a public library in Nelson. A  committee of ladies consisting of Me.-da.mes  Roderick, Robertson, Goepel, Arthur, Da)  Taylor and . McCullock were present. The  following gentlemen were also present: Mayor  Houston, Judge Forin, Dr. Hall and Messrs  Bowes, Kydd, Crease and J. A. Turner. It  was decided that the membership fee should  be fixed at $10 per year, $5 for six mouths and  $2 50 for thiea months. The city will he canvassed for subscriptions. The funds now  available are $300 promised by the city and  $150 more whkjh may be counted on from  other quarters.  The Theatre.  The Bittner company have  played to  good  houses since the   opening   night,   which   is   a  strong  testimonial as to   their  efficiency.    In  fact this organizatioA seems to  be capable  of  producing    almost   anything.    Last  night   a  most   successful    production     of    "Michael  Strogoff " was given.    The title role was taken  by Mr. Waldron, and he   gave  an   admirable  rendition of the part.     Miss  Choate   was also  most   effective.    The   other   members   of the  company were   well   up   in their  parts.    Tonight  "Master   and    Man7'   will   be   given."  Thursday and Friday nighta   will  be for the  Good Templars and the fire brigadeA Saturday  night will conclude the engagement.  The R.E. -French company will begin a  week's engagement at the rink next Monday  night. Mr. French has long been identified  with theatrical ventures on the coast and is-  regarded a very clever actor. His company  includes many well known to fame. The following is the repertoire'-:' "Hands Across the  Sea," "Dad's Girl," "The Danites," 'Ticket-  of-Leave Man," "A Wife's. Stratagem" and "A  Fair Rebel."      A  A  Mint For British   Columbia.  At the meeting of   Canadian  bankers held  in Toronto a few days ago, the president,  Mr.:  D. R. Wilkie, and others discussed a   number  of most important Canadian questions, among  them the establishment  of  gold  coinage.and  the present educational system.  Rumors About Le Roi Deal.  There is an abundance of rumors at Rossland regarding the Le Roi deal, but none  of them can be authenticated. One of these  reports is to the effect that the British  America Corporation has deposited the full  purchase price of the shares of the Turner  faction at the rate of $8.25 per share in  the Old National bank at Spokane subject  to Senator Turner's acceptance. But this  cannot b@ confirmed, and may only the gossip  of the street. 'Governor Mackintosh is in  Vancouver.  Matrimonial.  A very pretty wedding took place last evening at the   residence of   Mr.   Alexander Ross,  Menzies street, when Mr. Stanley Humphreys  and Mies   Jane Ross   were   made  man    and  wife, Rev. A. B.   Winchester   performing   the  ceremony.      The room was a mass   of   chrya-  anthuem   blooms  and   a   magnificent  bell of  flowers    canopied   the  young couple.       Miss  Elizabeth Ross and Miss Beatrice Humphreys  were   the   bridesmaids  and   Mr   James    Ross  acted as groomslnan.      At   the   conclusion  of  the ceremony the wedding march was    played  by Miss   E.   V.   Humphreys.      The costumes  and ornaments of  the   bride and   her   maids  were ail charming, the bride's gold locket  and  chain set in pearls, and the diamond  rings  of  the maids being the gifts of the groom.      Mr.  Humphreys is a son of   the  late  Hon. T.   B.  Humphreys and Mrs. Humphreys is a daughter  of Mr. Ross, late of the 93rd Hi hlanders and  commissariat and transport ��� corps. The  newly-married couple left for the mainland  this morning enroute for Nelson,, where Mr.  Humphreys is in business. ���Victoria Tunes.  The Pretty Girl Milking Her CoW.  (Colleen Dhas Cruidthe-na-mo.)  The dewdrops were gray on the clover,  The gray mists of night were withdrawn,  The blackbird sang clear from the clover,  The hills wore the rose of the dawn.  But sweeter than blackbirds and thrushes  AHersoDg, whom the graces endow,  And pinker than dawn her soft blushes���  The pretty girl milking her cow.  She sang, and the milk sweet and scented,  ''Spurted white as the breast of my dear.  She sang, and the cow, grown contented,  Gave over her kicking to hear.  Oh, wildest of little black Kerries,  You will come at her call, i know how,  Since my heart at her  voice leaps and  scurries-  The pretty girl milking her cow.  As she sang I drew nearer each minute,  A captive in love's rosy chain,  And my-heart every second was in it,  Grew fuller of joy and of pain  Till I cried out  behind her:  My storeen,  Pray guess who is holding you now!  And I ff.lt.the heart beats of my Noreen,  The pretty girl milking her cow.  I kissed her sweet eyelids to blind her,  T kissed her gold head like the silk,  The cow���-who was going to bind her���  With one kick kicked over the milk,  And then, growing bolder and bolder,  I kissed from the chin to the brow,  She was mine ere, the day was much older,  The pretty girl milking her cow.  ���Pall Mall Gazette.  F or Napoleon's Sake.  Some people are very fond of telling a story  that has a catch in it, and so taking their listeners in. Her�� is a sample of what I mean.  Once, when in.Paris, Napolian paid a visit  to a hospital for old soldiers. Among the inmates was an old man who had lost an arm.  The emperor asked him:  "Where did you lose 3'our arm?"  "At Austerlitzy sire."  "Then no doubt, you curse the emperor and  your country for your fate?"  "On the contrary," said the veteran, "for  the emperor and my country I would sacrifice  my other arm."  "I can hardly bslieve it," said the emperor.  The soldier immediately drew a saber   from  its sheath and lopped off the other arm.  "A most sublime act of self-sacrifice," said  the old lady who had been listening to the  yarn, totally forgetting the impossibility of a  one-armed man cutting off his remaining arm.  The Crows Nest Pass Coal Co. is only awaiting the completion of the railway to bring its  coal to market. It is probable that running  arrangements will soon be made and Mr.  Charles St. Barbe, the local agent, is booking  orders for the coal in large numbers. As will  be seen by an advertisement in another column  this is the cheapest coal that ever has been or  is likely to be offered in this market.  Is^iisoa^i^^  mm THE ECONOMIST.  Banquet,  Hanging,   Hall  Glass   Stand   Lamps.  Christmas  Gifts.  and  ;eful  a B B B Q      53 &% I  wn,  Madar  Kreoio  oating Bath  fS  ;omDi8xion. etc,  BAKER STREET, NELSON, B.C.  We have just received a large shipment and are selling them at  bargain prices.     Call and see, them at  "v  T  i-;  Is now prepared to receive orders for  |)omestio*anc! Steam Coal   and   Blacksmiths' Fuel  PRICES���Domestic and Steam Coal $5-75 per ton.  Blacksmiths' Fuel.... 10.00 per Aon.  WS-r-Gash with Order.  Office in C. W. WEST & GO'S Building. ;  <^HARLE*  Opposite Queen's Hotel  "wuwrjyu ������>^gv^"^^^rg-^t.j^:H&Jffv-TT-,/fc*wr?,irnTit'wLWjwit.w"^' ���������ctjw^.^ihwwt  W.  R.JACKSON & CO.,  Commission Agents Delnumico  Hotel, lay the market, odds ou  all important events, Starting  price commissions executed  Latest bcttin^received by cable  X,<��@   ANGELES  f^W^  sr<  9  fcel  son \auar  e<  noes Keas  BSSSS  'B  9  a  H  H  t^.  ^Hs <<&/:  To preserve the health the medical profession  are unanimous in declaring that Joy's Bread  is an essential. Enjov good health, and use  Joy's Bread.  THE   GREAT   SVHW'NG   JOURNAL   OF   THX  GREAT   SOUTHWEST.  .16 Psges, with Heavy Cover EVERY WEEK.  ��S> jp  Mining Journal on the PACI FIC COAST  Subscription $2 a Year.   Single Copies 5 cents.  SEND    FOR  'MPi-E.- Copy���-ff  110-112 N. Broadway, Los Angeles Cai.  E,  WANTE!  On Baker Street, rooms suitable for Phato-  g-raphic Studio. Apply, witil particulars, to  "Photo," Economist Ofi'icje.  TOTAL DAILY CAPACITY, 3,200   BBLS  ian an  IPS  Corner Stanley and Silica Stroets  RATBS; $i per day and up.  Schooner Beer, to cents  J.   Curran, Proprietor.  CERTIFICATE OF   IiVJPROVESV3ENTS.  "Hillside" mineral claim, situate in tlie  Nelson Mining Division of West Kootenav District. *    ���  Where located:���On tlie east side of Giveout  creek, and is the eastern extension of the  " Bodie" claim, on Toad Mountain.'  Take notice that I, A. G. Gamble, Free Miner's  Certificate No. 13592 A,, agent for Edward  James.Buhner. Free Miner's Certificate No  20639 A, intend, sixty days after date hereof, to  apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate  oi* improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under  section 37, must he commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 10th day of September, 189S.  A. G. Gamble, Agent.  T. S. Gore.  H.  J. H. McGregor  P  G. M. Leishman, Victoria, Agent for British Columbia.  til  Burnet.  ,, BURNki &.UU.,  Provincial   and   Dominion  Land Sur=  veyers and Civil engineers.  Agents for Obtaining  Crown   Grants and Ab=  stract ��f Tiile t* Mineral Claims, &c.  NELSON,   -  * -   British Columbia  Before baying a  OR  Go to Painton's, tbe  ART& fiUSlCCG.8FJELSG  Strange Story From Atlin Lake.  The story is told on-the highest authority  hat in the Atlin lake district ecentlvan old  iecayed cabin was found in which were the  nouldering bones of a white man, presumably  . Russian. Besides the bones, it is said, wer^  In old-time rifle and a bag of gold dust,  alued at $15,000, at the lowest estimate. The  nan who made the lucky find at once left the  ountry, coming to Seattle, it is reported, on  he steamer City  of Seattle, early last  month.  The story of the money is doubted by some,  'i:t cv, ing from a mining engineer of the  reatest integrity it is believed to be true,  *eorge E. Tugnot, of New York city, who is  ioted among eastern capitalists as a most ex-  ertenced and valued engineer, having received  is  degree from   Columbia  College,   said last  night that about a month ago the man appeared at Skaguay with the gun, and later  deposited with the purser of the City of Seattle a bag of gold dust that weighed frors 60  to 70 pounds. He reported the find of the  old Russian's bones and showed the gun as  evidence. It was a rifle of a pattern used at  least thirty years ago and the stock was so decayed as to be almost falling off. The man  refused to say where the cabin was situated,  but Mr. Tugnot says he saw him leave the box  of metal with the purser, although every effort was made to keep it a secret.  There was much excitement among Skagway  and Atlin lake people who heard of the discovery, as it proved that the riches of that  region were known long ago, but up to the  time Mr. Tugnot left all efforts to find the cabin had been without result.  Hymeneal.  A quiet wedding  was  solemnized last evening   at 38   Argyle street,   the residence of   the  bride's father,   by Rev.   Dr. Du  Val,   the contracting parties  being Mr.  Lester V. Norman,  of the Crreat   West  Life Insurance   company,  and Miss   Elizabeth  E*plin, daughter of  Mr.  Chas.   Esplin,   of this   city.    The    bride  was  supported   by her   sister, Miss  Jessie   Esplin,  while Mr. S. Woodcmnbe, of the Union   Bank,  performed similar duties for  the groom.    The  bride and groom have taken up their residence  at 579 William street, where   they will   be  at  home to  their many   friends.���Manitoba  Free  Press.  The bride has many friends in British Columbia, with whom Thk Economist joins in  wishing Mr. and Mrs. Norman a happy and  prosperous journejr through life.  i t  i ;  a 8  THE ECONOMIST.  m  <M  A MEMORY.  BY ETHELYN REED.  "Here's health, wealth arid increasing glory to the sweetest singer in the land 1"  " The fairest of women !"  " The truest of friends !"   ,  " And the most.beloved of sweethearts," whispered a   fourth   man  in her ear, as the others raised their  glasses.  The prima donna blushed beautifully and smiled at the gay little  company. After ten years again  in her native city���the times had  changed! She had opened -the  opera season that night; those who  had known her a poor young  student with -no prospects and  much ambition heard, at last, the  voice which the great world pronounced good. And, since a prophet is without honor in his own  country oft-times,-she had awaited  the verdict of these old friends with  some trepidation. This midnight  supper celebrated a brilliant success.  Her clearest woman friend, her  manager, a newspaper writer of  some note, a fellow artiste, them  an' on whose advances she then  seemed to smile, her former 'miisic  teacher, two or three.,others of the  'company, ten in all, sat at the  table. They had eaten and drunk,  discussing eagerly and, '"excitedI37  the triumph of the present, the  promise of the future. She was  not only admired, she was loved.  ���Half-wearily at tastshe listened,  leaning back in her chair, playing  idlv with her bonbons. The  merry, enthusiastic friends were  engrossed by thoughts of the future;  her heart turned to thoughts of the  past. Their lavish .. attentions  palled on her ; one gentle service  from such as he���  "A penny for your thoughts,  lovely dreamer," cried someone  lightly.  She raised her eyes slowly.  u They are worth more than that  tome���less to you."  " Let us be the judges. You  pique our curiosity," said the  manager.  "I'll wager, since the}7 are your?,  they are as dear to us as to> you,"  declared her lover gallantly.  A quick change, characteristic of j  the woman, came over her demea-j  nor.      She sat up bright and   erect.1  " I'll put that to the test. No.  you may not hold my hand. My  thoughts are of the past, and I decline to be recalled to the present."  There was a quietly amused laugh  from the newspaper man.  She turned to him with a pretty  frown.  " I am not jesting. Do you not  sometimes want to get away from  all this, and the life it stands for���  the gaslight and this hot-scented  air and the empty glasses ? What  is so hatefully suggestive of dead  hopes, dead desires, dead " aspirations as an empty campagne glass,  a few drops, dull and yellow, like  old age, at the bottom ? Ah, well,  let us think of youth, and sweet  smelling woods, and sparkling  spring water.  " Twenty years ago I was a little  country lassie, going to a little,  old-fashioned school, and dreaming-  ]y sentimental even then. The  big girls talked of beaux, I wanted  one, too. It never dawned on me  that I must be wooed. I sallied  forth as wooer. I weighed the  merits of various small bo}Ts, and  finally decided on a pretty, grey-  eyed lad of my own age. I wrote  him a note as a beginning, signing myself i Your own dear little  ��irj.' Don't laugh. Never again  can I write a note like that, and  not he. misunderstood. You say  he was hut a small child. I am  sure if I wrote to him so now, his  beautiful spiritAis such that he  would not misunderstand. But,  '���alas-, I am no longer a trusting  little maid !  "No,-he did not Write notes to  me,' hut be brought me heaps of  flowers, and quaint, wooden 'toy*?  that he made all., his dear little  se'l f. H e w a* s a 11 d e voti on, ae d I  happy'ia-my queenship. One day  a .little-girl, whom he had known  before my reign began, returned-  from a journey, and he gave her a  huge bouquet. I was jealous and  in<;liguant, frowned at/him, smiled  on some one else, and my baby  love story ended.  ." Not forever, though. He went  to a big boy's school, and I studied  at home, but after a time we met in  the High school. Our desks  adjoined, we studied together, our  heads almost touched as we bent  over the same book of reference. 1  ���.ericrally led my class, but, when  he bested me I was glad. After  school hours, we wandered away  over the hills, searching for flower?  ���we were studying botany and  learning something else. He was  shyly happy with me. I think  I loved h.m. I rejoiced in his grave  sweetness, his intellectual strength  so rapiclel}7 developing! h& was  charmed by my vivacious prettiness  and dawning woman's wit.  " Two years of this   life,   and   I  left the village for this city,   where |  I had been born. I met himonly  once again. He had just entered the  university. Our conversation was  strained. Both remembered the  boy-and-girl love and, knowing it,  past, stood awkwardly on the edge  of the gulf widening between us.  " In a box among my treasures  is a tiny bunch of faded wild  flowers pinned on a sheet of paper  bearing his name and a date. He  gave them to ms after one of our  walks-he did not say a word, but  his soul was in his eyes, and then  and there, in my heart, I called  him my knight, as true snd brave  and good as any of the ojden  time."  " Have you followed his career ?" j  asked the   newspaper  man   in   an  odd voice.  " Ah, have.-I not ?" Is not his  success more grateful to me than  my own ?"  " Undoubtedly this pearl of great  price rejoices in yours also," sneered  the man who was her lover.  "He, the Puritan! On the  contrarv, he undo'ubtelv believes  me.-utterlv lost, who sines on the  stage   for a living."  " You belittle  your  calling,  does not," said the newspaper mal  11 You   know him !"   exclaimeS  the prima donna,   with the   eage  noss   of a   child, her  eyes   shinin  her lips parted.  " Yes, we have talked of you t  gether. I have already heard h  version of the little romance^.  She sank back with a   sig?^ h��  head    drooping.      She   wished  know so much, she could  ask notl|  ing.  "He has do changed," added tr  writer, and th@c air of saying ti  last word of a used-up topic, bi  glancing keenly at the singer.'  " You will probaby again essa  a little note. His purity of soi  will understand." The man wS:  had believed himself h@r love  arose, forgetting etiquette in h  irritation and chagrin. " I almo  believe I shall," returned the prin  donna, a flame leaping into h[  eyes.  She stood up, and the compai  prepared to depart. The new  naper man put her silken clo?  over her shoulders, and escort*  her to her carriage.  ���^  URNS  is&>-  WHOLESALE AND RETAIL  !��ca  BAD OFFICE: Nelson, B. C.  ������'.. .   .BRANCHES AT    .  ROSSLAND TRAIL ���������.-.NELSON  KASLO  SANDON ���'���'������      .      THREE FORKS                          SLOCAN CITY  <&  <&/  ii  OXB'H  \b!&   ��a ^Jos? 2     B  ^MirSi    *& Ebbs'   ^iasftS  WHOLESALE AND   RETAIL  DEALERS  liSi  f^R'ESH AND  SALT MEAT  Camps supplied on shortest notice and lowest prices.  Mail orders receive careful attention.  Nothing but fresh and wholesome meats and supplies  kept in stock.  4  -&-  T  Mi  ��  ^.^^^-^^^^  rers' Agents.  Agents for Manitoba Produce Compan}^ Gold Drop Flour,  Wheat Manna, Manitoba Grain Co., M. ��� R. Smith & Co's  Biscuits, Etc.  NELSON, B. C. P. O. 80x498.  ] I  m  IIi1MAIIMUI��1HIIWi..UIII��UWUIIM>^^ THE ECONOMIST.  Banquet, Hanging, Hall and  Glass Stand Lamps. Useful  Christmas Gifts.  Goods and .Prices Right.  BAKER STRE  ,  B.C  Is now prepared to receive orders for  omestic and Steam Goal   and   Blacksmiths'  PRICES���Domestic and Steam Coal ..$5 75 per ton.  Blacksmiths' Fuel'.-......'..-������........ 10.00 per ton.  ERMS���Cash with Order.    ���-  Ofi&ce in C. W. WEST & CO'S Building.  Fuel  aby's Own  aU(  n  My-lady's;,-���, Kremo: Floating Bath  i:"~'  'g ���onip!exion,;:etG. ���  IV  We have just received a large shipment and are selling them at  A   ,:y    ���  bargain prices,     Call and see them at  ��2r  DRUG STORB  Opposite Queen's Hotel  0��3S3^*9LaWJ'fHL-JJ!llL_jraJL.U ���  "���umnmjnt^uvj.v i>^hj*w*wm wj  WJW^'J'W'Wrmw-w pu u*w ���;���uwjiw^su �������� mjmjtn^m  *^^>'><CWl"i.'WUi*T*'��'<w|!iii  W. R. JACKSON & CO.,  'Commission A-gents Delmonico  Hotel, lay the market odd si on  .all important events. Starting  price commissions executed  Latest betting received by cable  Su1  aolce1  p  a m  Satisfaction Guaranteed.    Prices Reasonable.  9  S  H  TOTAL DAILY CAPACITY/ 8,200  BBLS.  ILVIE'S - HUNGARIAN and - OGILVIE'S -6LEN0RA.  ^^<g B gaaa Bf   S Mama  G. M. Leishman, Victoria, Agent for British Columbia  ��,����   ANGELES  II #   +*--*b\$    lire   y ^^' *' <  THE   GREAT 'MINING   JOURNAL   OF   THJ  GREAT   SOUTHWEST.  16 Pages, with Heavy Cover EVERY WEEK..'"  Get r-  Mining Journal on tnePACIFIC COAST.  Subscription $2 a Year.   Single Copies 5 cents.  SEND    FOR  P*1  CAS  110-112 N. Broadway, Los Angeles Cal.  To preservethe health the medical profession  are unanimous in declaring that joy's Bread  is an essential. Enjoy good health, and use  Joy's Bread.  WANTED.  Corner Stanley and Silioa Streets.  RATES; $i per day and tip.  Schooner Beer. 10  cents  E. J.   Curran, Proprietor.  T. S. Gore.  H.  Bitrnet.  J. H. McGregor  Provincial   and   Dominion  Land  Sur=  veyors and Civil engineers.  Agents for Obtaining: Crown   Grants and Ab=  stract ��f Tiilet�� Mineral Claims, &c.  NELSON,   -  --British  Columbia  ���.On Baker Street, rooms suitable for Photographic Studio. Apply, with particulars, to  "PiiOToA 'Economist Officio.  CERTIFICATE OF  'IMPROVEMENTS.  "Hillside "��� mineral claim, situate in the  Nelson Mining Divisioivof VVe&t Kootenay District.  Where located:���On the east side of Giveout  creek, and- is the eastern extension of the  " Bodie" claim, on Toad Mountain.  Take notice that J, A. G. Gamble, Free Miner's  Certificate No. 18592 A. agent for Edward  James Buhner, Free Miner's Certificate No.  20639 A, intend, sixty days after date hereof, to  apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate  of imyjrovements, for the"'purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under  section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 10th day of September, 189S.  A. G. Gamble, Agent. ;  Before buying a  OR  Go to Painton's, the  Strange Story From Atlin Lake.  The story is told on the highest authority  iat in the iUiin lake district ecently an old  jecayed cabin was found in which were the  louldering bones of a white man, presumabty  Russian. Besides the bones, it is said, were  [n old-time rifle and a bag of gold dust,  (alued at $15,000, at the lowest estimate. The  tan who made the lucky find at once left the  mntry, coming to Seattle, it is reported, on  |ie steamer City of Seattle, early last month.  The story of the money is doubted by some,  lut cc^pbg from a mining engineer of the  reatest integrity it is believed to be true,  |eorge E. Tugnot, of New York city, who is  loted among eastern capitalists as a most ex-  krienced and valued engineer, having received  Is   degree from   Columbia  College,   said last  night that about a month ago the man appeared at Skaguay with the gun, and later  deposited with the purser of the City of Seattle a bag of gold dust that weighed frora 60  to 70 pounds. He reported the find of the  old Russian's bones and showed the gun as  evidence. It was a rifle of a pattern used at  least thirty years ago and the stock was so decayed as to be almost falling off. The man  refused to say where the cabin was situated,  but Mr. Tugnot says he saw him leave the box  of metal with the purser, although every effort was made to keep it a secret.  There was much excitement among Skagway  and .Atlin lake people who heard of the discovery, as it proved that the riches of that  region were known long ago, but up to the  time Mr. Tugnot left all efforts to find the cabin had been without result.  Hymeneal.  A quiet wedding was solemnized last evening at 38 Argyle street, the residence of the  bride's father, by Rev. Dr. Du Val, the contracting parties being Mr. Lester V. Norman,  of the Great West Life Insurance company,  and Miss Elizabeth Esplin, daughter of Mr.  Chas. Esplin, of this cit}r. The bride was  supported by her sister, Miss Jessie Esplin,  while Mr. S. Woodcombe, of the Union Bank,  performed similar duties for the groom. The  bride and groom have taken up their residence  at 579 William ?treet, where they will be at  home to  their many   friends.���Manitoba   Free  Press.  The bride has many friends in British Columbia, with whom The Economist joins in  wishing Mr. and Mrs. Norman a happy and  prosperous journe}r through life.  iiiiM��j��iMEjaM��auAeij��M^WI��^^ 8  THE ECONOMIST.  A MEMORY.  BY   ETHELYN   REED.  "Here's health, wealth'and increasing glory to the sweetest sin--  gerin the land T'  " The fairest of women !"  " The truest of friends !"  " And the most beloved of sweethearts," whispered a   fourth   man  i n her ear, as the others raised their  glasses.';-; . ' ; y  The prima donna blushed beauti-  fuliy and smiled, at the gay little  company. After ten years again  in her native city���the times had  changed ! She had opened the  opera season, that night; those who  had known her A a poor young  student ; with no prospects and,  much ambition heard, at last, the  voice which the great world pronounced good. And, since a prophet ia witfiouthonor in his own  country oft-times, she had awaited  the verdict of these old friends vg.it h  some trepidation. "This midnighi  supper celebrated a brilliant success.  Her dearest woman friend, her  manager, a -.newspaper- writer of  some note, a fellow artiste, them  an on whose advances she then  seemed to smile, her former music  teacher, two or three others of the  corn nany. ten in all, sat at the  table. They had eaten and drunk,  discussing .eagerly and excitedly  the triumph of the present, the  promise of the future. She was  not only admired, she was loved.  Half-wearily at last she listened,  leaning back in her chair, playing  idlv with her bonboos. The  merry, enthusiastic "friends were  engrossed by thoughts of the future;  her heart turned to thoughts of the  past. Their lavish attentions-  palled on her ; one gentle service  from such as he���  " A penny for your thoughts,  lovely dreamer," cried someone  lightly.  She raised her eyesslowl}7.  "They are worth-more than that  to me  " Let   us   he    the   judges.      Yen  '"     said  She turned to him with a pretty  frown.  " I am not jesting. Do you not  sometimes want to get away from  all this, and the life it stands for���  the gaslight and this hot-scented  air and the empty glasses ? What  is so hatefully suggestive of dead  hopes, dead- desires, dead aspirations as an empty campagne glass,  a few drops, dull and yeilow, like  old age, at the bottom ?. Ah,-well',  let us thin k of youth, and sweet  smelling woods, and sparkling  spring water. 0  "Twenty years ago I was a little  country lassie, going to a little,  ofd-fashioned school, and dreaming-  ly sentimental even v thenA The  big girls talked of beaux, I wanted  one, too. It never dawned on me  that I must be wooed. I sallied  forth as wooer. I ������'.'���.weighed- the  merits of various small bo vs, and  finally decided on a pretty, grey-  eyed lad of my own a.ge. I wrote  him a note as a beginning, signing myself �� Your own    dear  little  girL' Doii'tlaugh. Never again  can I write a not�� like that, and  not he misunderstood A You say  he was but a small child. I vam  sure if I wrote to him so now, his  b e A u t i f u i ep it it is s u c h that he  would   not  misunderstand.      But,  T  L  -less to you.:  he  pique    our   curiosity,'  manager.  a  I'll waaer, since they are vour-\  they*are as dear to us as to you,"  declared her lover gallantly.  A quick change, characteristic of  the woman, came over her demeanor.      She sat up bright and   erect.  " I'll put that to the test. No.  you may hot hold my hand. My  thoughts are of the past, and I decline to be recalled to the present."  There was a quietly amused laugh  from the newspaper man.  aiaF,   i   am   no   longer  a   trusting  ,y;.  little maid i  " No, he did not write notes to  me, but he brought me heaps of  flowers, and quaint, wooden toys  that he made all his , dear .little  self. He was all devotion, aiK.1 I  happy in my queenship. One day  a little girl, whom he had known  before my reign began, returned  from a journey, .and he gave her a  huge bouquet. I was jealous and  indignant, frowned a, t b i m, smlied  on some one else, and my baby  love story ended.  " Not forever, though. He went  to a big boy's school, and I studied  at home, but after a time we met in  the    High    school. Our    de^ks  ad joined, we studied together, our  heads almost touched as we bent  over the same book of reference. 1  iien^raliy led my class, but, when  he bested me I was glad. .After  school hours, we wandered away  over the hills, searching for flowers  ��� sve were studying botan}^ and  learning something else. He was  shyly happy with me. I think  I loved h:m. I rejoiced in his grave  sweetness, his intellectual strength  so rapidely developing! he was  charm@d by my vivacious prettiness  and dawning woman's wit.  " Two years of this   life,   and   I  left the village for this city,   where  I had been born.     I met himonly  once again. Pie had just entered the  university.     Our conversation was  strained.     Both  remembered    the  boy-^nd-girl love and, knowing   it  past, stood awkwardly on the  edge  of the gulf widening between us.  r " In a box   among my  treasures  i.s-'aA tiny   bunch    of   faded   wild  flowers pinned on a sheet of   paper  bearing his name and a date.      He  gave them to me  after   one of   our  walks-he did not say a   word,   but  his soul was in his eyes,   and then  and there, in   my���,   heart,   I  called  him my knight, as true and   bra ye  and   good   as   any   of    the    olden  time." ;���.;'";;���'; ���'.;'���'���'*������ ' -  " Hsive you followed his career ?"  asked the newspaper man in an  odd voice.  "Ah, have I not ?". Is not his  success more grateful to me than  my own ?" A  " Undoubtedly this pearl of great  price rejoices in yours also," sneered  the man who was her lover.  "He, the Puritan ! On the  contrary, he undoubtely believes  me iitt.e'.r 1 y lost, who sings pa the  stage   for a living.  71  "You belittle  your  calling,  does not," said the newspaper mat  " You   know  him 1"   exclaim  the prima donna,   with the   eagej  ness   of a  cbild,her  eyes   shinitj  her lips parted.  " Yes; we have talked of you tj  gether. I have already heard h)  version of the little romancggL  She sank back with a   siJ^f'  hj  head    drooping.      She   wished  know so much, she could  ask not]  ingA. ..A .'.'���'���  ,;   A  "He has no changed," added til  writer, and th�� air of saying ill  last word of a used-up topic, bij  glancing keenly at .-the singer.v-  "You will probaby again essaj  a. little note. His purity of so1  will understand." The man wlj  had believed himself her lovej  arose, forgetting etiquette in hi  irritation and chagrin. '" I almoj  believe I shall," returned the prin  donna, a flame leaping intoAh]  eyes. '.-.. ��� /A'" .  She stood up, and the com pari  prepared to depart. Th�� newj  paper man put her silken cloaj  over her shoulders, and escortej  her to her carriage.      '  WHOLESALE AND RETAIL  iiV  c  HEAD ��� OFFICE..:'Nelson, B.C...  .    BRANCHES AT   ....  ROSSLAND TRAiL NELSON KASLO  SANDON . THREE FORKS SLOCAN CITY  *&-  *  nay by  WHOLESALE AND   RETAIL DEALERS   IN  ft  nff^Ma  gZSBST  ���szss  ��  Camps supplied on shortest notice and lowest prices.  Mail orders receive careful attention.  Nothing but fresh and wholesome meats and supplies  kept in stock.  I#��3P;  L  Sana       "<e? 8    Bgflj   W   $za%Jty       CVS S^iHattA^ %JB   ���  rokers a  lanuta  rers'  Agents for Manitoba Produce Company, Gold Drop Flour,  Wheat Manna, Manitoba Grain Co., M. R. Smith & Co's  Biscuits, Ktc.  NELSON, B. C. P. O. Box 498.  1!  'i'SSS  Sfc^^^j^^Sill^^^v^ Sa'  .���_       _.   .     .    .   . 11  ���r ��� ���- -������--. ���....Pi.ii.muiL.ii.mi   '"I1.' J L'.,7:'*'��"''''-JJ ,.-'-'.'lk.-":'"'^''.''.'.''T"-?!. THE ECONOMIST.  11  i.   > i  SHORT   STORIES.  The Archbishop of Canterbury  is singular among the roll of English Primates for his hatred of  pomp and decoration. Once  when the guest of a country clergyman he was much annoyed by the  display of silver candlesticks in his  room. After his lordship's departure these silver candlesticks  were nowhere to be seen. The distressed clergyman at one�� wrote  to the bishop, as he then was, telling him of his Iosp, and adding,  "Can you tell us what has happened ?" The reply came by wire:  "Poor, but honest ; look in the  chest of drawers."  Once Tried no Family will Use any Other.  Satisfaction Guaranteed by the  GARLEY& PEEL, Nelson, B. G.,  Agents for the Kootenay.  ancouver  W. J. QUINLAN, D. D.S.  DENTIST  An old Irish laborer walked   into the luxurhiH studio of William  -.-''��� Y Y      . . -    'I  Keith, the artist, a few days ago,  and asked for money to obtain a  meal. He explained that he had  just been discharged from the  country hospital and was to weak  to work. Mr. Keith gave him a  quarter, and he departed. One of  four young ladies, art students,  who were present, said: "Mr.  Keith, can't we hire that old man  and sketch him ?" Keith ran  out and caught him, and said :" If  you can't work and want to make  a dollar, come back to my rooms.  The young ladies want to paint  you." The Irishman hesitated,  so Keith remarked: " Ic won't  take long, and it's an easy way to  make a dollar." " Oi know that,"  was the reply : " but Oi wa-i a-wun-  derin'how th' divil Oi'd git th'  paint off afterward.''  Mara Block,  Baker Street, Nelson  Special attention given to crown and bridg��  work and the painless extraction of teeth by  ���cal anesthetics.  Archbishop Tait's coachman was  a very original character. One  day a clergyman, who called at  the palace, asked him whether he  still had as much to do as ever.  The answer was sublime. " There's  always a goodish bit doing, sir ;  but it has been a trifle easier sine3  w�� took young Party into the business/' The Right Rsv. Edward  Parry had recently been appointed  Bishop Suffragan of Dover.  Optician and Watchmaker,  cKillop   Block,   Baker   street.  All work guaranteed.  Telephone 93   For  ELSON   EXPRESS  J. J. Dervin, Mgr.  Stand  Opposite  Centra!   Fruit  Store  m  "i  Queen Automatic Refrigerators  Lightning Ice Cream Freezers^  Pails made of Best Virginia White Cedar, with Electric welded wire hoops  Puritan WickSess Oil Stoves  Ask for  NELSON HARDWARE OO.  when    you    order  matches.       T h en  sure  you   will  of having the best.  COMriANDING ATTENTION  is sinipty a matter of being  well dressed.  Those who wear garments  cut and tailored by tis will receive all the attention a well  dressed man deserves.  Our winter suits of Harris  Homespuns are marvels of  good quality, good style and  good workmaship. The  value is great.  EECri  inn ii iiiiiimhiii im  a  f  a  Tinsmlthirig  AND  Josephine Street  eating  Neisoo.  AND  We are direct Importers and Wholesale Dealers in  ,   HAVANA   GiGARS,   ETC  All the leading brands always in stock.  YATES    STREET,  a     J�����  8 ^\, jP���" 8���%?  VICTORIA, B.C.  GEO,. L.. LENNOX  BARRISTER and  SOLICITOR  LAW OFFICE  Baker Street, Nelson  GOOD BATH  SMOOTH SHAVE  AND HAIRCUT  AS  YOU  LIKE  IT,  GO  TO  THE  Temple Building, Victoria.    Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.  70 Bansmguail Si., London.  Genera! Shipping & Insurance Agents  Commission Merchants. Forwarders and Warehousemen. Lumber  Merchants and Tue, Boat Agents. Orders executed for every description of British and Foreign Merchandise.   Charters effected.  Goods and Merchandise of every description Insured against loss by  Fire.   Marine risks covered.  Life, Accident and Boiler Insurance in the best offices. Klondike  Risks accepted.  .Miners' Outfits Insured.  Loans and Mort^a^es Negotiated. Kstates Managed and Rents  Collected.   Debentures bought and sold.  two doora east of the Post Office.  W. J, Morrison, Prop.  GENERAL  F1NANG1AL  AGENTS. 12  THE ECONOMIST.  Liquors  Wines  Cigars  Beer  Tobaccos  Carpets  Mattings  Dry Goods  Boots and Shoes  Tents  Cigal-ettes  Cement  Rugs  Curtains  Flour and Feed  Drill Steel  Ore Bags  ^WiSS**��*'  Plaster  Pire Clay  Teas  Etc.  KOOTENAY BRANCH  Victoria, B. C,    Vancouver, B. C, and London, Eng.  NELSON, B. C.  ^^^���^������^^^^  **Hexai��gnt-K  ODDS  AND ENDS.  "Are you acquainted with any  society people?" "Ob, yes, I know  a thing or two."  ��"��� SOO-PACIFIC  LINE  HRECT and SUPERIOR SERVICE  ROUTE  To Eastern and European points.   To Pacific  joaet, China, Japan,  and Australia points.  ���OTJRIST CARS  Models of comfort  'ass Revelstoke daily to   St.  Paul  >aily (except Wednesday) to  Kastern points  CONNECTIONS!  To Rossland and main line points :  Xaily'   " Daily  [:40 p.m. leaves���NELSON���arrives 10;30 p.m.  lootenay Lake���Kaslo  Route.   Str.  Kokanee  Gx. Sun. .Ex. Sun,  p.m.    leaves ��� NELSON ��� arrives :   11 a.ju.  Kootenay River Route, Str. Nelson :  Mondays. "Wednesdays and Fridays.  a. m.    leaves'���NELSON ��� arrives 6:S0 p. m.  Makes��on��ection at Pilot Bay with str Kokanee  j n both directions. Steamers on their respective  routes call at principal landings in both di  rect*ons, and at other points ivhen signalled .  Slocan Citv, Slocan Lake points and Sandon  Except Sunday Except Sunday  9 a.m.   leaves ��� NELSON ��� arrives   2:20 p.m.  Ascertain  rates   and   full information from  nearest local agent or from GEO. S. BEER, City  iTieket Agent,   Nelson,  B.  C.   J.  HAMILTON,  Agent, Nelson, B. C.  . "If you kiss me again I will call  mamma." "Well, I don't mind;  she is still a young looking woman."  Mamma���"I wish you could get  George a nice situation." Papa���  "I'm afraid I can't suit George. He  wants a place in which time will  hang heavily on his hands."  Daughter���"George says he fear>  he can't support me in thest3Tle I'm  accustomed to." The father���  "Marry him, anyhow. 1 can't  keep it up much longer myself."  "I should like to go to my mother-  in-law's funeral this afternoon, sir,"  said the book-keeper to the "old  man." "So should I," replied the  proprietor, as he turned to his desk  again.  W. F. Anderson,  Travelling Pass. Agent,  Nelson. B.C.  E. J. Coyle,  Dist. Pass. Agent  Vancouver B.C.  "I shall hold him in sweet remembrance," said the potentate  of Bwkplo. He could hardly have  done otherwise. Even at home the  young missionary had been spoken  of as one of excellent taste.  Atlantic Steamship Tickets.  To and from European points via Canadian  land American lines.    Apply for sailing dates,  rates, tickets and full information to any C. P.  |Rw. a^ent or  G. S.  BEER,  C.  P-  R. Agent,  Nelson.  W    .  STITT,  Gen    S-   S. Agt., Winnipeg.  Dominion and  Land Surveyor,  Opp. Custom House, lelson* B.  "Well," said the absent-minded  and new arrival in Hades, as he  mopped his perspiring brow,  "there's something to be thankful  for down here, anyway. Folks  won't always be yelling at me to  shut the door."  George���"You do not call on  Miss Rosebud now?" Jack���"No,  I got disgusted. She has such a  coarse laugh." George���"I never  noticed that." Jack���"You would  if you'd been within hearing when  I proposed to her."  HAVE    OPENED    AT  Next flie Bank of Britisb Columbia,  A FULL LINE OF  -AND-  tJ^lt  _"_.  ',  . ii.  ���>������.,.���.������.���.����� !��������������      im .11.111   ���    ������������ jrn ni'i ir-aj'|i| ,, inf. niir ��v IH'.1"T �����!������ ���������'"-r.���*r" 'H ��t ����������  ��� "i yu-.- i"i��<tim Bif"H fusJPFi 'IjiJWa ������ ���.".I I m.*-TF'P- "Wl*?*���Ti i��;:,.1iV'   s��l\'il'  .IS -*'.'!''.''''���;   ' i *y^f[\lt  JV.'"?''J'.'-'^i'~''

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