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The Ledge Jan 26, 1899

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 Volume VI.   No.
ii
NEW DENVER, B.C., JANUARY 26, 1899.
Price, $2 00 Year
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SLOGAN GAMP NEWS
1..0CAT,    CHIT-CHAT.
Several sleighing* parties have visited
the town during* tbe past week.
The Knights of Pythias will give a
masquerade' ball on ■'February 14th.
TLoc;. Jenkins was up from Silverton
on Tuesaayitransacting business in New
Denver,
Palma Angrignon is shipping* in from
->nmit.'lake 40 tons- of the finest ice
iir laid down at New Denver.
Targe number of thoboys from New
ver left for Rossland to participate
he midwinter carnival there.
;finling*f- see.-treasurerof'the L. II.
'ng* Company, Silverton,   will leave
Ve coast in  a few days, in connee-
vith liis mining* interests.
'anuary thaw does not break tlie
y>f -winter.   Indeed, if  we are to
from   the storm  of the past few
a thaw' gets things in shape for a
.ai of hostilities by the elements.
- partnership heretofore existing*
en Stege  and ■ Avisou has been
-ed, Mr% Stege retaining the Nfew-
,t7 property.    Mi*.   A^isom'will
,i his time to other;;.interest's. liere-
'X ';7':'v*-:7;7     ' ■■ dX7X7Xi yd   -
der has been issued:-*l>y|Super-
7  Steele,    commanfliitg   the
•Police at Dawsou,to. the effect
>or men will he turned back
4iee, and not;allowed to enter
■'  ;PpppPPPyPdp ■■■
*=s7willSbeheld in the7Methodist
ext Sunday atTllia.mi and 7:15
■■ryJbo&y welcome.7K.Kj:Eowell.
■^j(i^^<'^ra^fbrm(CRi ASor*
Sr.OCAX    MINICKAT,    FLOAT,
LEDGE   CKOPP1NGS.
The Lake Shore. Movie, will soon ship
to Trail.
'Fifteen   men   were   laid   off by  the
Payne last Friday.
Sixty-two tons were shipped from tlie
Queen Bess last week.
Ninety tons of ore were shipped by
the Whitewater last week.
Work was resumed last week on tlie
Lakeview.    A strong* ledge is showing*.
There will be in the vicinity of 1,500
tons of ice harvested at Fort Steele this
winter.
. o
Fifteen men are employed at the
Washing-ton, and six men tit the Great
Western.
The Payne shipped 210 tons of ore
last week'; Last Chance, 1.20 • Reco, 20;
Sapphire, IS.
The Wakefield shipped four car loads
and the Vancouver
an
evening*,
'The Demands of
alson Tribune, usuallv correct,
'.bin about 818,000 of the truth
;.. Commenting' upon late dents on the Bosun mine h stated
propertv was acquired bv Mr.
rd   for  325,000.    The purchase
.as §7,500—a great snap.
e C. P. R. is now
Slocan River and
vn
Crow
its
-s Nest
lies to and from   Nelson (50 car
per day.   There are now on the
-'s Nest branch  100 cars  awaiting-
sfer to Nelson, and 40 cars are on
Nakusp branch for  the barges on
in lake to transfer.
vo members of the junior class in
local Sunday school were endeavor-
to memorize the golden text.  They
;1 turned to John 3:16 and  were renting   the   beautiful  words   of   the
,iostle thus:   "For God so  loved  the
vorld that He gave His only forgotten
, mi that whosoever believeth in  Him
•,vuld not perish but have-everlasting
The Movie Leader reaches this office
oout three weeks   after the date of
ublication.     Movie   is   distant    from
felsou 125 miles by rail and boat.   The
nails, however, are carried 450 miles,
u*st by team,   then   by   rail, again by
team/then again by rail, then by boat,
still again by rail, once again, by boat,
then still again by  train, and again by
.-ail and still again bv boat.
of ore last week,
two car loads.
The ore shipments from Whitewater
last week were: Whitewater, 93 tons;
Jackson, 15 tons.
The Ruth company is about to take
oyer the Sunrise, adjoining the Mascott,
on the. Ruth ledge.  '.•-.,:
The Emily Edithfis. sorting and sacking* ore for shipment. The new ore
house is completed..
The Antoine lias been closed down,
pending* negotiations now making for
more extensive operations.
; .JFiye.car loads of ore haye been ship-
peOy'th'e Dafde tielliSSthisirvontIi: The
late strike continues to improve.
Of all the big-'"Four Mile properties
the Emily Edith promises to lead in
the near future. Its ore bodies are
developing* marvelously.
With Saturdays shipment of one ear
load, the Bosun will have shipped SO
tons since Jan. 1st. The shipments for
the month will reach .120 tons.
The ore shipments from McGuigan
forlS9S.net up S31 tons. Of this'the
Rambler-Cariboo shipped 4R8 tons ; Antoine, 375; Dardanelles, 129; Silver
Bell, ill.
A force of men are breaking a trail to
the Two Friends mine, Springer creek,
and the ore now on the dunip will be
rawhided to Slocan City for shipment to
the Trail smelter.
The main tunnel on the EstelJa, Fort
Steele, is in 702 feet.    •
The St. Eugene mine, Moyie, will
soon become a shipper. The company
is waiting* the completion of a sidetrack
to the property.
The wages paid by the Le Roi mine
last month reached §27,000,and other expenses of running amounted to 87,000
more. Tlie number of men then employed was 300.
Dave Griffith has bought out George
Doherty's interest in the Bald Mountain, which is situated on the west bank
of Wild Horse creek, about three miles
from Fort Steele.       '
The Trail smelter is most anxious
and desirous to obtain dry ores.- One
of the largest properties in the district-
has been offered the advantageous rate
of §10 per ton, freight and smelter treatment.
Developement work o-i the Mabel,
Bull river, Fort Steele; is being steadily
pushed. The ore is quartz" carrying
from nine to 23 per cent, copper, 30
ounces in silver and SS.50 in gold. Total
values will average about" §45 to the
ton.
ROUND    THE    HUB.
Business in Slocan City is much firmer
and a better feeling generally is notice?
able
The .Adams House, Kaslo, was reopened on Saturday by the old proprietors, Adams Bros.
Jim Wardner has a railway scheme
on hand, lie will cut ice in Alaska and
ship it south. Jim always had a great
head for business.
Four hotels and one saloon shutdown
in Sandon last week rather than pav
the $250 license fee. The Bryan, Atlas
and Thistle are said to have closed
permanently, and the Vancouver and
Klondike temporarily.
The freight over the Crow's Nest road
for the past few days has been sufficient
to keep two transfer barges running.
By this means the Canadian Pacific company is moving 22 cars of freight each
dav between the terminus of the road
and Nelson.
_8S98®5_Sa'3_'SS8g_iS 3*_S__3Sg_38!B«
ED IN THE DEEP
light of day.
give up its
The people of Cody   and
Sandon to the number" of 120
Y.MIK    IMINTfirt.
Last week a two-foot solid body of
re was encountered on the Evening
>tar.
A five-foot vein of good ore lias been
uncovered on the liio Grande. The
I ay chute is 25 inches wide.
The Denna is being slowly developed. A true fissure lead carry ing galena
hasbeen disclosed of from five to 10
i.eet thickness.
The population of Ymir is  said to be
iOO.    The town lias eight hotels, a bank
.•uid numerous stores, and a company
lias been formed  to put in waterworks.
The Ymir mine has a combination 10
.stamp mill concentrator and will soon
be treating 100 tons per day. This
mine has enough ore blocked' out to
keep the plant operating for years.
The Porto Rico has a 10-stamp mill,
and the Dundee a 20-stampmill. These
properties, together with the Blackcock
and Tamarack will soon be heavy ship-i
pers, and the ore is of such richness ;
to bring the camp prominently bef*-
the mining world.
CONVENTION   IMPROVING.
Six inches of clean ore is showing in
the drift on the Noonday. N.J/Ste-
wart. A. Stewart and J. M. M. Benedum
lately commenced work on the property
under a lease from the owners.
The upper tunnel of the Bosun is in
220 feet, and the lower 350 feet. A
horse was struck in the lower tunnel
and considerable difficulty was experienced in finding the ore chute again,
it was thrown 20 feet off its regular
course.
With the opening*-of spring the L. H.
Mining Company, of Silverton, contemplates pushing* work on its valuable
gold, property, on Red mountain, on a
more extensive scale than ever before.
The management lias great confidence
in the property and will show to tlie
world that the Slocan lake can produce
as valuable gold mines as it has of silver
and lead.
The, Ruby Silver mine, adjoining the
Noble Five group, near Sandon, has
been bonded to E. J. Merrin and F.
Armstrong for 820,000. The new owners will piit a crew of men to work on a
;'0o-foot tunnel which is to be driven on
the property. The Ruby Silver is one
of the oldest claims in the Slocan country and over $2().00u of high grade ore
has already been shipped from the
mine.
Minim.
Wages in the Yukon mines are now
down to $1 per hour, without board, or
60 cents an hour with board. Butter is
$1 a pound. There is more flour in the
camp than will be used before June.
Gold Run creek, between the Dominion
and Sulphur creeks, Yukon, is showing
up marvellously.
Ore shipments from the mines of the
Rossland camp, for the year ending* Dec.
31,'.1898, were as follows: Le Roi, 66,-
000; War Eagle, 42,779; Iron Mask,
3,500; Centre Star, 2,907; Poorman, 453;
Monte Christo, 416; Velvet, 350; Cliff,
140; Giant, 114; Sunset, No. 2, 32; Deer
Park, 6! total, 116,697.
The January   shipments   of  bullion
Xuoin. Abe^Hall,^
exceed in value those of airy previous
month in thc history of the company,
or for that matter, of any mine or
smelter in Kootenay. The Tribune
says several shipments of an average
value of S1S,000 per car load have been
made each week, and the indications
lor the month are that the shipments j
will exceed 8300,000 in value.
The Nelson & Kootenay Copper
Syndicate have had an option on the
Magnolia and Copperoplis mineral
claims for the past HO days and now the
bond has been signed and the first payment made. The next payment is due
in 90 days. The exact price has not
transpired but is in the neighborhood
of $65,000. These claims, which belong-
to George Bitter, rorin an extension of
the BigCopper, the .show mine of Copper Camp, about seven miles west bf
Greenwood City.
The London & British Columbia Gold
Fields has declared a cash dividend of 20
per cent, and also a dividend of 20,000
shares in the Ymir Mine company, the
par value of which is one pound sterling.
The company has been operating in West
Kootenay for about two years and in that
time has paid its shareholders about 50
per cent, in cash dividends and holds as
assets the controlling interests in tlie
Ymir and Whitewater as well as several
other properties in the course of development.
many ot
are petitioning the Government, through Mr.
Green, for a grant to open a trail from
Cody up Cody creek, across the divide
to the source' of the south fork of Kaslo
creek.    This is a much needed trail.
Cranbrook was the scene of a large
conflagration on Monday, last week. A
representative citizen by the name of
Wun Lung, was the owner of the largest laundry in Cranbrook, and while
linden the influences of alarge dose of
"hop" his establishment caught on fire.
Charles H. Wolverton, of Nelson,
committed suicide at the Bancroft
Hotel, Boise, fdaho, last Monday, by
shooting himself through the head with
a 38-calibre Colt's revolver. The cause
ofthe rash act was despondency caused
by, financial embarrassment. Sir. Wolverton -was formerly chief of mounted
police at Nelson'but later has been employed as a:bobkk; eeper , by the Canaii-
X$- Bsjein" cTRai l^yiCj^mpany ■^yyA.;. ./a
.JOTTINGS    FROM .WHITEWATER.
Mr. Riffle, manager of the Deep, has
returned after being away on a short
vacation.
There are good reasons for believing
that the management of the Whitewater
Deep mine intend resuming work at an
early date.
meet death
It is still being
the same man-
It is not true that (he Whitewater
Deep Hotel has closed,
run at the old stand b.v
ag*er, Mr. Martin.
Wm. Meadows, the genial fruit and
news dealer, is going* out of business
here and expects to go to the far famed
Boundary country in a few weeks.
A complete telephone service is now
in good working* order between here
and the Whitewater mine. The phone
here is in the office of the K. & S. depot.
THE    BREADTH   OF    CANADA.
At a depth of 45. feet, and in a distai    ,
of 58 feet, the workmen on the Cony
tion, Silver mountain, struck a body <
ore one foot in thickness.   A sample
the galena six to eight  inches  thick (
shown   in the window of Rashdall i
Fauquier's office. It assays high, giving
146 ozs. silver  and  78   per cent. lead.
Work has been   started   on the No. 2 j
tunnel further down the mountain 9ide.
Negotiatious are pending for the sale of I ice
the" property. 'the
The Mollie Gibson   Mining Company,
of which   E.Peters,   of Victoria, B.C., is
president,   have   made  their   final   payment of  $-10,000  on   the   Mollie  Gibso"n
group of claims.    The  company  was incorporated Noy. 17th   with  a capital of
$2,000,000.    The  total  amount  paid for
the   property' is   said   to   be  $110,000.
Shipping     will     commence   at     once.
Col.   Ray,   with   T.   A. T upper,   Fred
"-tei s and Dan Dorsey, after spending
•ly-and Tuesday in NewDenver,
.*■■ 'ay evening for Sandon, where
A>   inspect   the   Dardenelles
hieh they are directors.   They
'ocan   inspecting the Molli'e
.dandles, and other proper-
v company is interested in.
Over in the Kimberley camp the North
Star Company is  still  doing  extensive
development  work,   employing only 43
men, there being a seatcity of miners in
the camp.    Tlieir hoisting  plant and air
compressor were moved from Cranbrook
to the mine last week,  and are now being installed.  This company is sinking a
double compartment shaft on the North
Star claini,   with   the intention of running out drifts  from  the  various levels
extracting  the  ore  more economically.
On the Stemwinder claini, owned by the
company, they  are driving a tunnel on
the   lead.     This   tunnel   is   in  already
about 60 feet.   The ore on  this claim is
the nearest  resemblance   to   the   Trail
Creek ores found   in East Kootenay.    It
carries gold and copper values, while the
ore found in  the   North Star  claim is a
[inre  steel   galena.    This  company will
not resume shipment;-  until the completion of the branch railway to Khnberiey.
A   tramway  is   now   being  constructed
from the mine to a point  on Mark creek
immediately  above  the townsite.    This
tramway is in length 6,000 feet, and will
be utilized to carry the ore from the mine
to the railway.
The Victoria Colonist has made several
references lately to , the breadth of Canada, but none more interesting than the
statement that a good wheat crop was
raised at Fort Providence last year. Fort
Providence is situated on the Mackenzie
river a little east of Great Slave lake, in
latitude 62 degrees north. This is more
than 900 miles north of the international
boundary. It is quite, probable that the
limit of .successful northern production
of this grain has not yet been readied,
because as the hours of daylight increase
the danger of summer frosts becomes no
greater for some distance dowu the Mackenzie valley. Of course the point is
not far distant where the season without
frost is too short ."-'or the production of
this grain, but it is highly probably that
wheat can be successfully grown, during
some years at least, 1,000 miles north of
where Canada borders upon the United
States. This makes the Canadian wheat
belt substantially as wide as that of the
United States.
In this connection mention may be
made of the fact that the latitude of
Fort .Providence is only a little higher
,t'7 i/nat of St. Petersburg, and wheat
is grown in large quantities in the country lying behind the Russian capital.
Archangel, a seaport on the White
sea, is the point of export for largoquan-
ti ties of wheat <rrown   in latitude cor res-
Two more bodies liave been drawn
down, down, into the icy depths of
Slocan lake, there to remain until
Gabriel blows liis horn. It is a well
known fact that once a body sinks below
the surface of the waters of this lake, so
beautiful to look upon and so placid
when it is stilled, it is gone forever and
will never more see the
For Slocan lake will not
dead.
The last unfortunates to
in its cold embrace were, two laboring
men ; one a native of Maine,  the other
from beneath the sunny skies of Italy.
Last Friday morning'about 2 o'clock,
while the steamer  Slocan was making
her regular nightly trip with the barge,
from   Rosebery   to   Slocan   City,   and
shortly after tiie boat  had pulled away
from   the wharf   at  Rosebery, it was
noticed by  the officer  in  charge   that
Jack Evans, one of the deck hands was
missing.   A search was instituted but
he .was not to be found on the boat, and
the belief became general that lie had
fallen overboad.   The boat was stopped
and the powerful searchlight brought
into service.   A small boat was lowered
and in the bright light the waters were
carefully   scrutinized.    The cap  worn
by Evans was found floating some distance awa3r, but   there was   no other
evidence of the man,  and after along
search the boat steamed on her course.
It is believed the unfortunate man fell
into the lake from the barge, and possibly was   stunned by striking against
the boat as he fell.    No  outcry was
heard:
Evans was a native of Maine,, it is
believed, though nothing in his effects
.i^Blft.._-JX§v^n.^inforiTia^ioEL. as to the'
whereabouts' oifany i'elaFiVesT^-A"-*'™
The following afternoon, Saturday,
when the heavy northeaster swept down
the lake, Francisco Nicoli, an Italian
laborer   stopping   at   Rosebery,    was
caught far out from shore and 'his boat
capsized.   He could not swim and was
quickly overcome by the icy water and
sank   to   rise   no   more.     Nothing is
known about him, or   if   he   has any
relatives in America.
These deaths bring the total of Slocan
lake fatalities up to four or five, none of
the bodies of the drowned ever having
been seen after they sank below the
surface. Some years ago a gang of
loggers were working near Rosebery
when one of the party feli into the
water. His companions tried to help
him by means of poles and ropes, but
he slowly sank deeper and deeper into
the frigid depths until he could be seen
no more.
lows:     "The   ownership   of   land6   by
aliens to exceed more than 320 acres by
one alien, other than those who in good
faith  have  declared  tlieir intention  to
become, citizens of the United States, is
prohibited in this state, except  where
acquired   by    inheritance  and   under
mortgage in good faith iu the ordinary
course of justice, or in the collection of
debts: ii'iid   all   conveyances',   of lands
hereinafter   made in   violation of the
above prohibition to any alien directly
or in trust for such alien shall be void.
Provided,  that the provisions  of this
section shall not apply to lands containing    valuable    deposits   of   minerals,
metals, iron, coal or lire clay, and. the
necessary lands for mills and machinery
to be used in the development thereof
and   the manufacture of  the products
therefrom.   Every corporation,  a majority of the capital stock of which is
owned by aliens, shall be considered an '
alien for the  purposes of this  prohibition." , 	
WAST    TO    LOCATE    IS    P.. C.
Mr. James A. Smart,  deputy-minister
of the interior,   has   forwarded  to  Mr.
McCreary a letter from a K. Ludhoff, of
Toledo,  Lewis County, AVaBhington, in
which   the writer   states   that a Targe
number of Germans "scattered over the
Northwestern   States,   are   desirous   of
establishing a, non-sectarian   Christian
co-operative colony.   The   members ' .o5.
the proposed colony have a capital of
more  than  $23,000 and are  anxious tc
acquire by  donation  or by purchase
large tract   of land,  preferably with
harbor and railway facilities.   They ar
inclined to favor some place in the i*r
gion of the great lakes or on the easter
tslope of the Cascade mountains in Br
•ish.7 0okixab?:*^&^whexe^\v^er_.^ould '"..'■
found in sufficient;, quantities to'obvi.
the   necessity   of   artificial   irregatioi
The letter concludes by statiug that ai.
easement   the   Dominion    Governmei
could see its way clear to granting the'
would be highly appreciated.
SECOND   TO   THE   SkOOAJN".
The Windermere mining
receiving considerable
district iu.
01
WANTS   SILVER-LEAD    OKB.
The
Hall   Mines    Smelter    Will   Treat
Letid Ores Aljout March 1st.
ST Of    HIM!
>*.el steamer Minto forced
gh the Narrows of the
Yiday last   to Robson.
onel has been opened,
T move considerable
'•iyer.   It is the inten-
' he passenger service
ver branch until the
disappeared to allow
.»..«.-/-lake schedule time.
•SVC
1  >■
The New Denver Lis hoe was advertising some lew issues ago for one
Hewitt Bostock, who represents this
constituency in the Dominion House
The Herald representative discovered
the gentleman in question at the Hotel
Revelstoke on Wednesday ni_-ht en
route from the west to Golden and Donald.—Revelstoke Herald.
the
eace
This ought to
river
i
Nakusp    &    Slocan '.Kail-way    Earnings.
The earnings of the Nakusp & Slocan
Railway, as reported to the Provincial
Government, for the vear ending June
30th, 1898, were $44,382.22 as compared
with 846,221.67 for the vear ending June
30th, 1897.
ponding to that between
and Great Slave lake. Inis ougnr. to oe
kept in mind, for it will then be seen
that no unpiecedented claim is made,
when we insist that tbe great lone land,
stretching across Canada far north of tbe
Canadian Paciiic, will yet become tbe
home of a prosperous people.
The  Hall Mines, Limited,  expect to
make a  start  in  the  treatment of lead
ores about the first of March.    The company has made a contract with the management of   the   Queen   Bess, a Slocan
mine, for the total output of the property
for the next three months.    In. addition
to this  ore,  the   company   is  receiving
regular shipments  from  several  of the
silver-lead mines in the Slocan as well as
from   some   of   the   properties. around
Ainsworth.    As soon as a sufficient stock
of lead ores is on hand to ensure a fairly
long run, the company   will   blow in the
small furnace on lead  ore  and the large
furnace on Silver King ore.    At present
tiie small furnace is being used for Silver
King ore and the large  furnace is standing idle.    The company  is getting  new
water jackets for  the  small furnace and
R.   R.   Iledley,   the company's  smelter
superintendent,  estimates  that working
upon   lead  the smelter capacity  of the
small furnace wil!   be  about SO tons per
day.    The   Nelson   Tribune  states   that
the   ore   from   the Silver   King   is   now
corning down at the   rate of 110 tone-per
day. although   two-thirds of the force at
tlie   mine   is  engaged   on   development
work.    The quality of the ore also shows
a decided improvement  over  the output
of three   months  ago.
furnace   is blown in on,
ore, it will treat about
prominence
late. It is said that the galena mineral
discoveries during the"" past summer
warrant the assertion that in the near
future it will only be second to the
Slocan as a producer of high grade ores,
and second to none a copper producer.
Its gold deposits are similar to those of
the Boundary, having immense bodies
of gold bearing quartz assaying* from
S4 to S30. Five hundred locations were
recorded during 1898. Good pack trails
extend far up the principal creeks So
far the Toby, Horse Thief, Boulder,
Ducks and No. 2 have been prospected
But from a prospectors point of view
the whole district is practically unpros-
pected.
WJXt,    MOVE    HEADOUARTEBS.
It has  been generally understood in
Cascade  for some time that the headquarters of Mann, Foley Bros. & Larson,
tliR contractors for the Robson-Penticton
branch of the Columbia <& Western railway, would soon be moved to that town.
Nothing tangible was  known, however,
until last week, when  Mr. Shepherd, in
charge  of the large  storehouse at Cascade, received  orders   to erect an office
building   at   once.     The   contract   was
awardad   to   G.   L.  Woodward,   A.  E.
Hitchcock,   A.   J.   McDonald,   and  E.
Hildebrand, and is to be finished within
ten days.    The  building will accommodate the  contractors,  paymaster Woodman and purchasing agent McLeod and
their assistants.    Mr.   Shepherd  states
that the removal from Brooklyn  to Cascade will  probably  take place after the
next monthly pay day, which is January
20th.    Thereafter  the bulk of the  business of the contractors will be transacted
in Cascade.
i-ge
When   the la
the Silver King
1.40 tons per day.
WASHIXU'J'O    AtlEV    KII.I.
Xo    Doubt,    About    It.
Jones
one of
know
OBTAIN KD    I'.Y    FKAUD.
The following notice has been issued
by the Reco Mining & Milling Company, warning the public that unrecognised certificates of stock in the company arc in circulation :
li Notice—All parties are cautioned
against buying Reco iMining & Milling
Company,' Limited, stock certificates
Nos. 242, 243, 244, 245, and 24B, in favor
of L. E. Hauk ; No. 247, in favor of L.
Paterson, ahd 218, in favor of S. T.
Arthur. Said certificate*' were obtained bv fraud and will not be redeemed.
F. 't\ Kelly, secretary."
At this time, when there is consid':
able discussion over  the  recen1'
of the Provincial Legislature :
legislation against alien min
posed amendment to the co*
the   state   of  Washington.
made the subject of a bi!1
the   house   by   Repree
Rosenhaupt Thursday,
usual  interest.    Mr.'R
provides that at the
election   to   be   held
November, 1900, the i
amendment shall be
voters, amending ar;' .-:. 2
of the state constituti s fol-
*• Before you go to dinner," Mr
continued.    :T want you to hear
my latest  and  best jokes.    Y'ou :
the   Christian   Scientists   believe   that
everything is true that they think, true.
An old negro came up to see a friend of
mine,  and   my   friend,   who  was  the
negro's employer, said :    'Ben,- you are
i late again.    What's the matter!-"   4My
:other's got the  rheumatism,' said the
:ro, \-iud I stayed up all night and
-ed him.    That is why I atn late.'
He ain't got rheumatism, Ben.' said
'ioss, 'he just thinks he has.'
The next day the negro didn't show
...it all, but came the following day.
,.'■ 'Hello, Ben," said the boss.   'Guess
■ur friend thinks he's got the rheumatism again, don't he?''
*' 'No, boss ; he thinks he's dead.  W*e
mried him yesterday.' "—The Atlanta
ournal.
,'l
The postoffice department has made
exchange of three-
for stamps of other de-
arrangements for th
cent  stamps
nominations. r
THE LEDGE, SEW D_JMV_R, B.C., JANUARY 26, 1899.
Sixth Yeas,
The Ledge.
Published every Thursday.
R. T. LOWERY, Editor and Financier.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Three mouths	
Six "	
Twelve "        	
Three yeahs	
Transient Advertising, 25 cents per line
sertion, 10 cents per line subsequent in
nonpareil measurement.
TO CONTRIBUTORS.   -
Correspondence from every part of the
District  and communications   upon
always acceptable.   Write on both side's1
paper if you wish.   Always send somet&ii
no matter how crude.   Get your copy in
is hot. and we will do the rest
carpet-bagger importation from Win-
Monday Ellison "brought
p in the House and asked
;he Speaker against such
Martin was out of the
[g  Ellison's speech,  but
the end.,. He repeated
ed Ellison a low cur for
into   political   discussion
matters.    He   said   he told
he was bankrupt, and said he
every member ot the house
int to hear what took place.
A pencil cross m this square
indicates that your subscription is due, and that the editor
wishes once again to look at
your collateral.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 26. 1899.
SCRAPS FROM THE  EDITOR'S DESK
In another part of the Province an
hotel keeper was refused a license
because he allowed drunken men to
be fleeced at cards in his house. The
law is to be strictly, enforced in the
future.
The appointment of incompetent
men to public offices because they
vote for a victorious Government is a
direct blow at the welfare of any
country. A policy of this kind well
carried out will eventually damn any
legislature that stoops to such a
system.
The editor of this paper is now in
the east studying economy with the
tenderteet ofthe cent belt. An education of this kind has become necessary owing to the fact that the people
ofthe Slocan are so listless that they
cannot appreciate the advantages of a
live newspaper.
It is asserted by Geo. T. Angell, in
his excellent journal Our Dumb An
imals, that a teaspoonful of powdered
sulphur placed into each shoe or
stocking will positively protect the
wearer against la grippe, cholera and
other epidemic diseases.   It has been
-tested by eminent German and Eng-
. lish medical writers.
Shutting out aliens from digging
placer ground in  this Province is a
lece of dog-in-the-manager business
lat looks like the work of selfish
100I children.   If the aliens took
Dre gold out of the country than
bring in it would be excuseabie;
the reverse is always the case we
jot see any advantage  in such a
rHiLE nothing can be positively
[ted in the matter, there seems to
fclittle doubt that work on the K. &
Extension from Sandon to the Slo-
lake will be started early in the
ring months. The officials of the
are getting the right of way
iver the route . surveyed last year,
tnd their movements indicate that
piey intend doing something in the
near future.
, The B. C. Government past and
present does not deserve to have
lany friends among the press. Their
[policy towards the papers is so nar
^row that it resembles a knifeblade
seam. To save a few dollars they
have cut off a few subscriptions to the
provincial press. This is hard on the
members who lack an education.
Last winter a law was passed making
it "(legal to advertise as many claims
for certificate of improvements in one
advertisement as the owners wished.
This crazy act has caused the Province to lose thousands of dollars, as
well as the mining press. W-?,. are
surprised that the papers do noifkick
at such laws, but then some papers
would not kick if they were dead.
XO   MATCH   FOR    MARTIN.
The tyrant Capital is installing
itself against what is termed the encroachment of the tyrant Labor in
England. The English Railway Review, of London, is out with a description of a gigantic combine called
the Employers'Pari imentary Council,
the design of which is to. crush trade
unions. Two hundred and ninety-one
firms have agreed to a declaration
preserving the freedom of contract
between the employer and the employed, and promising mutual support in the event of strikes. Unions
will not be recognized. A fund of
£35,000 has been contributed to conduct the fight against unions, which
augurs wide industrial disturbance
during the coming year.
"Fighting Joe Martin" is no m
nomer for the Attorney-General
has bad a tussel with every rnembe
of the   Provincial   parliament   tha
dared to oppose  him,   and  in every
instance came out on top.    On Saturday he met Price Ellison in the lobby
of the house and roasted him on every
side,   using language   attributed to
him at a meeting held the previous
evening when Ellison  called him a
Befor'e the convening of the Provincial Legislature, the followers of
the Turner government were making
rash statements as to what their leader would do with the Semlin-Martin
people when they came together at
Victoria. In every constituency in
the Province one or more of the faithful of the Turner side let the fact be
known by much talking that the
whole kit and crew of the new government, including the Lieutenant-
Governor,, were going to be unmercifully squelched as soon as they came
in contact in the legislative halls
with their greatly over-estimated
leader Mr. Turner.
Note the contrary. Mr. Turner is
himself out of it. He has resigned
his seat, and the chances are that he
will stay out. Thc Semlin-Martin
cabinet is all powerful. They have
the reins of government and know
how to handle them. In the hands
ol a leader of Fighting Joe Martin's
calibre, the present cabinet have out
generaled Messrs. Turner et al, at
every turn.
The great, mistake of the Turner
faction was in underestimating the
power of their opponents. Mr. Turner
believed he was all powerful. His
followers had faith in. his ability to
bluff Messrs, Semlin-Martin et al, out
of existence. So important did Mr,
Turner believe his presence to be that
he chartered a tug to take him from
Vancouver to Victoria upon his arrival
from the old country, that he could
reach the Capital a few hours earlier
than by regular boat. His arrival
was heralded as by the blowing of
trumpets and firing of cannon. The
Messiah of the Opposition had arriv!
Were it not that, the winter's snow
prohibited it, his path from the boat
landing to the sacred law-making
chamber would have been strewen
with roses. He carne, he saw, but he
didn't' conqudr. Indeed, he niigh't
better have remained in England,
for his presence had no more effect
upon the Government leaders, than if
he were a thing not existing. True,
he made some loud threats and struck
some impressive attitudes, but that
wouldn't work, and finally he had to
step down and out with the best grace
he could command. His followers
are now dumfounded. Colonel Baker
has managed to get up courage
enough to speak for the Opposition in
the absence of Mr. Turner, on one or
two occasions, but he has been
squelched instanter by the indomitable Martin,
And thus it goes. A microscope is
now necessary to find the Opposition.
One thing has been demonstrated by
late developments : The Turner faction is no match for the Semlin Martin
Government. Mr. Martin has forgotten more about the tricks of politics
than Mr. Turner will ever know.
And the fact that Messrs. Martin et al
are in control is ;assurance enough to
bet on tliat they will remain, at least
until another general election is held.
camp. Another important factor to
be considered by capital is the vast
difference in the cost of mining the
ores. While it is not probable the
cost of mining in the Rossland camp
is any greater than in any of the
older camps across the border, yet
the figure at which the galena ores of
the Slocan can be produced is so vastly less in comparison, it is surprising
that capital does not show greater
zeal in taking up the many excellent
properties that have been negotiated
for in the past few months.
It is hard to explain, but the fact
remains, that English capitalists will
pay twice the amount for a low grade
proposition showing a color of gold
than they will for a body of galena
ore three times as valuable. It is
undoubtedly owing to the prevalent
prejudice towards the white metal,
but when the fact is so plainly
brought out and the greater value of
the white metal mines is proven beyond a shadow of doubt, it is hard, to
account for their persistent backwardness in taking hold of these wealth
producers of the Slocan. 7
MINING- IN    AVKSTKAr,IA.
ROSSLAND CAMP AND   THE SLOCAN.
The revised figures showing the
shipment of ore from Rossland mines
for 1898 are: Le Roi 66, COO tons, War
Eagle 42,779 tons, and various other
mines 7,918, being a total of 116,697
short tons, after deducting errors and
deficiencies. The net value of ore in
this camp has always afforded ample
scope for the imagination. The gross
value of the ore as delivered at the
local smelters is another subject on
which light needs to be shed. The
gross value of the 66,000 tons of Le
Itpi.ore producecHn 1898 is placed by
outside authority'at $25 per ton, and
the value for the 7,"9l$ tons from small
producers $23.52. This would give
a total gross valuation ofthe 116,697
at $2,842,393. During the same
£he mines of the Slocan ship-
neighbjrhood of 35.000
value ofwhich was
3.
es . before them in-
y judge \vhioh camp
return fo:* capital
ige of th 3 Slocan
one-third   that of
yet the value of
many  tihousand
hat of the 116,697
the  copper-gold
We ot the Slocan are glad to herald
to the world, in season and out of
season, the big dividends paid by
some of our best mines. This is as it
should be. But, considered in the
light of some of the big dividend-
payers oi Westralia, the Slocan properties are insignificant indeed. Take
for example the properties of the
Golden Horseshoe Mining Co., of London, situated in the Westralian section. That company has a marvelous
property in the way it is developing.
In three month's operations the mine
has paid a 75 per cent, dividend, and
it is promised by the directors to repeat the dose every three month.
At the last meeting of the stockholders, the chairman gave these
startling facts* "We have most
valuable lodes or reefs, and"remember we are not picking our ore, but
taking it as it comes from our lodes,
Our difficulty is not to be able to produce gold for our dividends, but to
keep the returns down, so as to have
about the same amount of gold eacli
month, and not to obtain 10,000 ozs.
one month and only 6,000 ozs. another, for if such things occurred then
your directors could not possibly prevent violent fluctuations in the value
of the shares, which would be bad fpr
many reasons. What we want is a
steady regular output, and we hope
you will agree with us in this policy.
Gentlemen, it is evident we have a
most valuable property, and such being the case we must take every
care of it. Since we issued the last
annual report, last week, we have a
cable from Capt. Dick (the company's
manager), dated the 22nd Dec, stating that his estimate of ore. in sight
on that day was 292,000 tons, and
worth 712,700 ozs., which calculated
at 41. per oz., 2,850,8001.. and that
the mine looks well in every respect.
* - * * Remember that at present
we are only down to the 300-ft. level,
and, from our own experience, the
deeper we go down the better is the
ore_ * . . * * Before I forget it,
there is another small matter I wish
to call your attention to, viz., that
your directors have resolved, subject
to your approval, to declare an in
terim dividend of 75 per cent., or
15s. per share, for the past three
months (viz., Oct., Nov., Dec), and
make it payable on Jan. 15th prox.,
and we sincerely trust we shall
be able to pay a similar dividend  of 75 per cent.,    as a mini-
ii*~ii*h-—i~n ~in
An ounce
of
prevention
is better than
a pound of cure
and one or two
bottles of
Fax's Sarsaparilla
taken MOW
may save yon
from a wearisome
illness later on.
Agency at
Nelson's Drag*
and Book Store
Eew Denver, B.C.
ok .b:
r<ml
.■;' EstabliJ
'■..-■':      A ■■':   ; A
Capital (all paic
Reserved fund7a
a A   Undivided profits
heAd office;
Rt. Hon. Lord Strathcona a„d M6tjnt R*
Hon. G. A. Drummoi
E. S.,
Branches in all parts of Canada, NewJ
the United States.
1 President,
jnt;'- -A "
f, General Manager,
[, Great Britain, and
New Denver branch
E. PITT, Manager
ii'-wi'^i^'goi-^rgM^iaenMe^'r^g'qt'^j^BM^^
mum, for every future three months,
and that such dividends may continue
for many, many years.''
WHEN.. THE   COWS   CG3IE    UOIME.
••Clink, clink, dank-clink, a-clinkctv-elink "—
Through the rugged brush of the pasture path,
And tlie "old hoss""stops' at tho brook to drink.
And tosses her head with a jest of wrath
With hoofs sunk deep in the brook's black loam,
And muzzle deep in tho lazy stream.
She waits for the laggard herd to conic.
With ears that droop and eyes that dream.
Her sleek sides bulge, with eontentcdness '
And her udders drip with an overflow
That blotches with white the watercress
That sags with the current to and fro
The eddies whirl where her long taii flings
Its tufted end with a listless toss.
And the gurgling water swings and sings
Like whirling wings in the brookside moss.
As tlie water clears of its muddy rile
And the. old boss drinks, with nostrils flared,
The dust, slow stealing, mile on mile,
Grows darker where the deep woods stand ensnared
On the east horizon's farthest rim.
And out of the twilight's hazy height.
Where the Dog Star loiters, white and dim,
A drifting swallow pipes good-night.
Then, drowsily, with a soul-deep breath,
The old boss raises her head and sighs,
And. bright as a sword from its guarding sheath,
The sunset gleams in her glowinc eyes.
It turns the bell at her throat to gold
And slivers the red of her silken coat,
And the tell-tale leaves of the year grown old
Turn pale in the |wols where they lie afloat.
Out of the silence, shrill and high,
A voice of tlie farmyard quavers through :
"Come, boss! come, lioss! come, boss!" Its err.
And tlie old boss softly answers,'-jMok !"
Only the call of thc cow—that's nil;
Only a wistful rnoo, and yet
It seems that 1 heard my childhood call—
And the dusk is here and my eyes are wet.
—R.C R,, in Chicago Times-Herald.
NOTICE.
All accounts due the undersigned must
be paid by the 15th of January, otherwise they will be placed in the hands of
an attorney for collection.
Ii. T. Bragdon.
F. Pyman has again commenced to do
business in New Denver; Bring your
watches to him when they are out of
order.
We do what we advertise to do.
Handsome
Rockers
lor very Httl<
money
them
WALKER & BAKER,
New    Fnvniture Dealers and Kepairevs
Denvei*'s    thulertakers and Emljulmers.
N. B.—We have the only practical Undertaker
and Embalmer doing business in the Slocan.
F.E. MORRISON, dds.
DENTIST
Crown. Plate and Bridge work.
Oflice. Broken Hill 131k.' Nelson.
I have been appointed
agent for the Lethbridge Coal Co., and
will sell their products
at reasonable   prices.
E. A. Cameron
SANDON.
Angrignon
NEW DENVER
Dealer in HAY, GRAIN,
ICE, WOOD, Etc
Livery and Feed Stables, General
Dray ing;. Teams meet all boats and
Trains.
C. S. R-ASHDALL-.
Notarv Public.
A. E: FAUQUIER.
RASHDALL & FAUQUIER
MINES & REAL ESTATE.
NEW DENVER, B.C.
MINING INTERESTS BOUGHT,  SOLD  and BONDED.     .CORRESPONDENCE
 INVITED—
•Abstracts of Title, to mineral claims.
QTEL SANDON,
^  Th  ^K  ^a  tJv ?K
Sandon, B.C.
HTHIS NEW HOUSE, with the old nam*
well  equipped  to  accommodate 7 a larj
number of G-uests.      The building is plastei
and the rooms are   unsurpassed  for comfor]
the Slocan, while in  the  Dining Room cai
found the best food in the market.
. " A  Robert Cunning, Proprietor.
The Clifton House,
Sai
Has ample accommodations for a large number of people. The rooms!
andairy, and the Dining Room is provided with everything! fn the]
Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers.
John Bucklej'7 Pi
Travelers
Will find the
Arlington Hotel
a, pleasant place to stop at when in
Si can City.
GETHING & HENDERSON, Proprietors.
W. S. DlSEWRY
Kaslo, B.C.
H. T. Twig a
New Denver, B.C.
DREWRY&TWIGG
Dominion and Provincial Land Surveyors
Civil and Mining Engineers.
Bedford, McNeil Code.
jt_rRashd.il] & Fauquier, Agents.
TV*. A. S. MARS A~L.
Dentist.
Kaslo, B C
Graduate of American College of. Dental Surgery
Chicago
G
WILLIM & JOHNSON.
(MeGill)
Mining Engineers
& Analy-Chemists.
Slocan  City,
H (1
WANTED.
Industrious man of character fro (ravel and■ appoint.igents.   Salary and expenses paid.
BRADLEY-GARRETSONCOMPAXV.Limited
Toronto.
J. M. M. BENEDUM,
Silverton.
P. LoCASTO, Th p.
®)j$g      111C
Provides Ladies or
Gentlemen with
Hair
Cutter
Hot
or Cold
BathS Everything First-Cla;|
Imported and Domestic Cigars, Etc.
Newmarket Block,
NewDenver.
A
[-JOWAED WEST,
Assoc. R S M, London, Eng
MINING ENGINEEK,
ANALYTICAL CHEMIST,
& ASSAYER.
Properties   examined   and   reported  on  )'„.-   m
tending purchasers.
Assay oflice and  Chemical   Laboratory.  I.fellc-
vucave. New Denver. BC.
HJi L. GRIMMETT, L.L.B
I
Solicitor,
Sandon, B. C
BARRISTER,
Solicitor, Notary Public, jEtc.
A fascinating study of th'
International Sunday Schoq
Lessons for Mi'.tl>, now-readjj
No Christian, especially j
Clergyman or Teacher.sh'oul
lie without it. Beautiful!)
hound in cloth of two colorl
with still boards. Price,o'nlj
.'!.') cents. Strongly recon)
mended by lending Clergy
men. on sale by.a 11 booB
sellers,or sent postpaid on tlj
price.bv. ■   j
BRAIJLEV-GARKETSON CO., Limited, \
Publishers, J
Toronto Can add
"P    G. FAUQUIER,
NOTARYPUBI.lt
Nakusp, B.C. ,
THE MINERS
Three Forks,
J. H. MILLWARD,
Agents.
for Sale.    Ice House;
Filled.
NEW BKNTEK. B. C. j
Livery . aed  Bait Stables
^ Sixth Year.
THE LEDGrE, NEW DENVER, B.C., JANUARY 26. 1899.
THE    CALL   TO   ARMS.
"It has been decided to mobilize the
Militia and Volunteers."—Vide Reuter's
Telegram.
Though a million foes should threaten, yet we
feel no cause for fear,
For Britain's bops are ready when there's sign of
danger near.
And thousands in our sea-girt home, in manhood's prime aud strong,
Are raising now the battle-cry. our own victorious song,
And from the bare ends ofthe earth, wherever
man may be.
Come lusty voices echoing : "We'll fight, we're
one with thee!"
Our standing army may be small, as modern
counting runs,
But then we have our Volunteers and our Colonial Sons.
The cry "To arms, tlie Volunteers," re-echoes far
and wide,
And the great heart of the nation palpitates with
love and pride,
For these are ours, aye, all of them—the youngest
and the best;
They boast of manhood's sturdy strength that
never knows unrest;
The darlings of our households and the nation's
prop and stay,
Now, let who will oppose us, we can light the
fight to-da3r.
Proclaim the news throughout the world, to ends
of earth and sea,
Our Army, Navy, Volunteers, will keep Old England free.
Adverti*7--
Whal
advertr
A mi
Adv<
the cu
oppor
the a
:   Ad "
It i
Ner
inha*
■- Ar
a c'«
T „.,
u
•iBiness.
ited in the
jrtising.
•-omer before
jds, and the
'i is given to
> its-work.
!•■ advertising is
m't been given
../ off as good seed
advertising and busi-
.Aned to the planting for
net
the la
■ AdvA Xtiig is the seed for the growing
of busine'sSiG7 7-'
.   The earth is the field.
Care .is as necessary as earth or seed.
Only weeds grow of their own account-
Render under advertising the mistakes
of advertising, but do not render under
advertising the mistakes that are not of
advertising.
A   SIKKKA    BKAK    STORY.
which soils a smoker's fingers or a handkerchief through which tobacco smoke
is exhaled, or is often noticed as deposited in the. stem of a pipe. This tarry
deposit has nothing essential in common
with nicotine, and contains but traces of
this alkaloid, when any at'all. Apart,
but only a small part (about one-seventh
in the experiments of Melsens), of the
real nicotine of tobacco is volatilized
without decomposition ; the remainder ia
burned and destroyed in the process of
smoking. , i
"Why   Indeed.
The
And not alone, in England, will our Volunteers
7 stand fast,
Our bravo' Colonial sons will nail their colors to
.   the mast,
From Ice-bound Canada the cry arises:   "We
are here.,     "
To share our Mother's burden; be there aught of
danger near;"
And the bronzed Australian Squatter takes his
rifle and his horse,
And he joins the hearty legion  of the Greater
England's force,
in   Africa,  the  miner  forgets  the   diamond's
'•   gleam
«• the gold of famed Johannesburg, and joins the
warlike stream.
Rajahs press their troops into the
long to up and be
India, the
fru v,
:1 the Volunteers, rejoicin
away ;
e'en in distant Singapore, young voices, true
and strong.
1 up the cry "To arms," and grandly rolls the
.sound along.
Aug Kong, wo. have not said much, but we
I are ready, too,
•' willing as  the others to do all that men
caii do,
'should the note of battle sound.'twill rind
ctis at, our posts,
Ait a'n atom in thc count of the contesting
■ ' ,'it.S.
■ < V        S       ■■
'"it enforced to fight, and the conscript is
■lurs.     °    7
^ draggod to battle like the soldiers of
owors. -
iceause we will not see the British flag
down,
n and home and liberty, for conscience,
and crown.
•f-fed Russian  masses, or thc French—
•lied to tight—
•ill show them England yet has not
: her might,
our army worthless, (lout it with jibes
,\T3,
oord, they never thought about our
■ ;ers.
;.,'i tlie Overland China Mail.. Hong
I'S    ON    AOVKKTISING.
■■l'ightfurdays just before the
lies are instilling into the buy-
lreciation of necessity, and a
procure it.
oeen quiet,
mst be good.
cind of weather that makes
ell, and brings them out in-
nust he cleaned, new paper
;ht,  new clothes must be
Everything, from the stable
/ill be renovated, and much
placed by new.
"iiying days.
ie days ol" the beginning of
;■ are coming,  not because
,r the Slocan say so; nor be-
ijEDGB says so,   but because
al  minds of  this country say
e is  every  indication of their
and everybody competent to
lot be wrong.
e opening of good times comes
ng days of spring and summer
hing of importance, which will
tsea between  now and fall, is
juglit about at the present time,
be considered and re-considered
s to come.
is no better  time for direct and
advertising  than during these
..ays, when everyone is in a_;recep-
,oo'1, and  is thinking about what
11 buy.
progressive and suggestive adver-
7*s inow one  of the best opportunist  the   year   for   the    sowing   of
'.,-„isinn seed, which  must spring up
.it earliest harvest of buyers.
7'he.advertisiii_ that pays is not always
i advertising during the buyingseason,
experience, has proven that prelimin-
/. publicity during a time when people
e thinkiilig about buying, is as produc-
_.ve of good results as  the direct advertising of season.
.   About this time of  the year profitable
advertising-consists of two classes:
First,  the*'direct advertising  for tlie
. sale of spring goods.
Second, thifi suggestive' advertising for
the sale of summer goods.
Set the   advertising   Spring*   in   the
springtime of. activity.
* * *
Once I spent a night with two Portuguese shepherds, who were greatly
troubled with bears, from two to four
and five visiting them nearly every
night.   One evening before sundown, a
bear,  followed by two cubs, came for
an early supper,  as  the  flock  svas being slowly  driven   toward   camp.   Joe,
the elder of the shepherds,  warned by
many  experiences,   promptly climbed a
tall  tamarack' pine  and  left the   freebooters to help  themselves,  while Ah-
toue, calling him a coward  and  declaring he  was not going to let bears eat
up his   sheep   before   his   face, set the
dogs on them  and rushed toward them
with a great noise  and   a   stick.    The
frightened  cubs  ran up a  tree and tiie
mother  ran  to meet  the  shepherd and
dogs.     Antone  stood   astonished  for a
moment, eyeing the oncoming bear, then
fled  faster   than Joe had,   closely  pursued.    He scrambled to the roof of their
little   cabin,   the  only   refuge,  quickly
available,  and,    fortunately,   the  bear,
anxious about her young, did not climb
after him, only held him  in  mortal terror a few minutes,  glaring and  threatening, then hastened  back  to her cubs,
called them down,  went to  the frightened,   huddled Hock,   killed a sheep and
feasted in peace.    As  soon  as the  beat-
left him, fearing she would return.    Antone called piteously  for cautious Joe to
show him a good,   safe tree,  up which
he  climbed    like  a   sailor   climbing   a
mast, and held  on as long   as  he could
with legs crossed, the slim pine  recommended by Joe being nearly branchless.
"So you, too, are a bear coward, as well
as Joe," I said after  hearing the story.
"Oh,  I tell you,"  said he. with frank
solemnity,   "bear   face close   by   looks
awful; she just as   soon eat me as not.
She do so as eef all my sheeps  b'long
every one to her own self. , I run to bear
this kind no more.    I take tree every
time."—Atlantic Monthly.
Did you ever stop to wonder what it is
in a man that will make him pass ashoe
by because it costs 50 cents more than he
thinks he can afford to pay when that
same man will go out with a crowd, and
spend his money like water. I have and
I never arrived at a satisfactory conclusion.. Only the other day I was in a
shoe store when a man 1 knew came in
and bought a pair of shoes. He haggled
over a quarter in the price for 15 minutes
because he said he didn't want to give
more than a certain price for a pair of
shoes—that he could not afford better
ones. Now that man smokes cigars that
he pays 15 cents apiece for; he pays 50
cents a day for his luncheon. He takes
his girl to some bIiow and .spends a ten
dollar bill; and yet when it comes to
buying shoes he kicked about twenty-
five cents.
There are lots of people just like this,
men and women both. What makes
them do it is beyond most people. They
seem to have an idea that they must
economize in some way and they pick
out their shoe man to begin on.
Uncle    Sum's   Parrot.
One of Uncle Sam's most faithful servants in the state of Maine, but one that
draws no salary, lives at the Portland
Head lighthouse. It is a large grey-
parrot, brought from Africa some time
ago, and presented the keeper of the
light. The bird soon noticed when the
fog began to blow in from the ocean,
somebody would'cry out: "Fog coming!
Blow the horn !" One-lay the fog sud-j
denly began to come in thick, and the
men did not notice it. But Poll did and
croaked out: "Fog coining! Blow* the
horn!" Ever since then, whenever fog
is perceptible, Poll always gives the
warning.
A.   Cunts   of   Hair.
/SOO LINE.
' For those who want tiie
h-BESTVA/pO-r
,«    when going   » »   ___V_S   I
■tint in United States or Canada
New Denver,
Has been re-opened under new man-
agement. The Dining Room will
always be up to the market, while
the bar will contain liquors and
cigars that cannot be
quality and flavor in
Old and new patrons
hotel just like home.
JACOBSON ■& CO.
surpassed for
the   Slocan.
will   find this
First-Ch.; /aiid Tourist Sleepers operated from
Ocean to Ocean.
Tickets issued and Baggage checked to destin
at Jon.   No Customs Difficulties.
CONNECTIONS
Revelstoke and main line points.
8:45kDaily: lv—DenverC. Siding—ar: Daily 15 50k
S:3ok ex.Sumllv N. Denver Ldg: arex.Sun.lG:00k
NELSON, TKA1L, UOSSLANU, ETC.
&:50k ex. Sun: lv N. Denver Ldg: ar ex. Sun 14.00k
Ascertain rates .'111(1  full  information   by addressing nearest local .audit or—
G. B. GARRETT, A gent New Denver.
jy-F- Anderson, Trav. Pass. Agt.. Nelson-
h. .1. Coyle, Dist. Pass. Agf., Vancouver.
How to get there is via  C. P. Ry & -Soo Line:
TO LETTER-WRITERS
[Adv<
SUITABLE   .POOD.
A letter from a corporal in the Astor
battery, now at Manilla, tells of a present which General Wesley Merritt received just as lie was starting for Paris. It
is a cane made out of hair. It contains
locks from almost 1,200 girls. Contributions were by no means confined to
blondes or brunettes, natives or foreigners, every nationality and type being
represented. It weighed almost fifteen
pounds, and was shaped so as to represent the letter ;T, a Philippine emblem
for valor.	
CUAU(!U  OF THE   DUTCH   liRIGADK.
HE    Postal   Authority'■■
advice   to    all     who
write letters is to have
the name and address
of the writer  printed
upon    tlie    envelope.
This  saves time  and
prevents letters going
to' the    Dead   Letter
Office.      In   order   to
help out the public in
this  important matter
- we will print your name and address uijon UK) No. 7 white envelopes and mail them to any part
of Canada upon receipt of
75 CENTS.
THE LEDGE, NewDenver.
k
'SYSTEM,
By using* the New Denver envelope in your
correspondence. Printed with* your name in
the return corner, and
sold  by The Ledge at
FIRST HUNDRED,
FIFTY   CENTS   each   subsequent hundred.
Call and see sample and leave your
orders.   We are printing* now.
NELSON & FORT SHEPPARD CO.
RED MOUNTAIN RY CO.
The all rail and direct route
between   the  Kootenay
..District and..
All British Columbia Ponts
Pacific Coast Points
Puget .Sound Points
Eastern Canada and the
United States.
$1.00
Connects at Spokane with
GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY
NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILWAY
0. R. R, & NAVIGATION CO.
Leaves Nelson 9:40 a. m.
Blanched almons give the higher nerve
or brain and muscle food; no heat or
waste.
or   brain  food,
They
In harmony or' method is the success of
business.
if the rudder will not steer the sails,
and the sails will not mind the rudder,
there might just as well be neither rudder, nor sails.
If there is not enough lire under the
water, or enough water over the lire, the
boiler will not run the engine.
Goods cannot be weighed in the scale
that does not balance.
Success is the composite result of harmonious conditions.
Black goods do not look well in the
dark, nor do white goods show thedepih
of their whiteness when overwhitened
wflh too much white light.
A forty-dollar overcoat, on a rickety
counter, in a dusty store, with shabby
salesmen, drives away the little business
that blunders in.
The office boy is at the bottom of the
ladder <-*f business, but his round must
always be around and look well, or the
ladder of business is unbusiness-like.
Business cannot be successful unless
each detail works in harmony with the
other, that each line may pull with its
full strength with neither slack nor
attain.
There must not be waste of space, waste
of goods, nor waste of energy.
There must neither be extravagance
nor over-economy.
The wear of frictiou is the wear that
wears out the profit.
Advertising must harmonize with tha
business, or else business must harmonize with advertising.. Each should
meet the other on the half-way platform
of mutual cehcession.
Walnuts  give   nerve
muscle, heat and waste.
Pine kernels give heat and stay
serve as a substitute for bread.
Green watei grapes are blood purifying, but of little food value; reject pips
and skins.
Blue grapes are feeding and blood purifying*; too rich for those who suffer
from'the liver.
Tomatoes; hig'her nerve or brain food
and waste; no heat; they are thinning
and stimulating;  do not swallow skins.
Juicy fruits give more or less the higher nerve or brain, and, some few, muscle
food and waste; no heat.
Apples supply the higher nerve or
brain food; supply heat and waste, but
are not muscle-feeding. They should be
avoided by those who suffer from the
liver.
Oranges are refreshing and feeding,
but are not good if the liver is out of
order.
Green tigs are excellent food.
How    to    Live    to    be   ii    Hun tired.
"Follow the nineteen health commandments and you may live for a
century," says Sir James Sawyer, one
of the most eminent physicians in England.
These are the nineteen health commandments, according to the Sir James
Sawyer version:
Sleep at least eight hours of every
twenty-four.
Sleep on your right side.
Keep your bedroom window open.
liave a mat at your bedroom door.
Never let your bedstead rest against
the wall.
Abstain from cold tubs in the morning, but take a bath of the temperature
of the body.
Exercise before breakfast.
Eat little meat and see that it is well
cooked.
Drink no milk.
Eat plenty of fat to feed thecells,which
destroys the disease germs.
Avoid intoxicants, which destroy those
cells.
Take daily exercise in the open air.
Allow no pet animals in your living
rooms. They are apt to carry about
disease germs.
Live in the country if you can.
AVatch the three D's—drinking water,
damp and drains.
Have change of occupation.
A few sdeps, a few sdeps,
A few sd*ps onward.
Uh to de har,
Valked dot, few hundredt.
All dose who vus seated
Got ub vhen dhey heard,
Some von had shouted :
"Forwarts, an' took a trink !"
Uh—pedfore you could vink—
Uh to he bar,
Valked dot few hundredt.
Dheirs not to got some fear
Ov trinking- lager bier ;
No one valked to de rear.
But ub—square lib to de bar—
Valked dot few hundredt.
Lager in front ov dhem,
Lager at back ov dhem,
Lager all roundt ov dhem,
Bobbledt unt sehbarkelt.
O, de vild seharge dhey made,
Vhile de vorld vondert
How dhey could trink all dot,
Right dere in von sair.e schbot,
Nople few hundredt!
With due apologies to one Tennyson.
VUS    AND    FOLLY.
WHOLESALE GROCERS
Agents for B. C. Sugar Refinery and Royal
City Planing Mills."
Maps furnished, Tickets sold and information
given by local and connecting line Ticket agents
C. G. DIXON, G. P. & T. A.
Spokane, Wash
NAVIGATION
& TRADINCCO.,   LTD.
Summer Time Card effective June, 20, 1898.
Subject to change without notice.
SS.
South Bound
Bead down.
Wifey—Do you think there is a man
that could conscientiously say to his
wife: "You are the only woman 1 ever
loved ?"
Hubby—Only one that I can think of.
Wifey—AVho"?   You, deadest?
Hubby—Oh, no; Adam.
She (at tbe garden gate)—Won't you
come in for a little while, Georgie, dear?
George—No-o; I think not.
. She-r-Oh, I do wish  you  would!    It's
so lonesome.    Mother has  gone out and
father is  up  stairs,  groaning  with   the
rheumatism in the legs.
George (eagerlv)—Both legs?
She—Yes.
George—Then 1 think I will come in
for a while.
Two canny Scots walking to Achter-
muchy saw an uncouth figure standing
in a district field. After gazing intently
one said:
"It's never moving, so its tatta (potato)
bogie" (scarecrow).
"it's no tatta bogie," replied the other.
"It's a man working bv the dav.''
INTERNATIONAL.    A
.  North Bound
Read up.
SANDON
Train lvs Daily, 1.00 pm   Train ar daily 10.50 am
KASLO
■'* ar •'. 8.-15 pm Train lv " S.00 am.
GBoat 1 v 3.30 am —Kaslo— Boat ar 8.30 pm »■>
£.    . "     4.30 am   Ainsworth "      7.30 pm?
<<.      "     5.00 am    Pilot Bay "     0.45 nm =
re       "     5.30 am      Balfour "      (i.10 pmK
jiBoat ar G.'iO am, Five Mile Pt        "      5.23 pmB
w™    7     7.15 am      Nelson "Iv4.45pm«
_ Tram ar 10.05 am Northport Train lv 1.55 pm **»
g,      '"      1120 am  Rossland "    12.05 pm1?
■■<       *'       3 10 pm    Spokane "      8.30 amp
Read up.,
train ar 10.50 am.
SS. ALBERTA.
Read down.
Sandon
Daily train lv 1.00 pm        Daily
Kaslo
"   ^     sir 3.45 pm ;' lv   8.00 am
#   Boat lv 5.00 pin             Mo&T Boat ar 1.00 pm;
A;       "   <i.20pm Ainsworth Boat ar 11.40 pnw
' -   '  '11 OOpmo
• »
7.00 pm   Pilot Bay
<£
* 10.00 pm Kuskonook       "
' 12.00pm Goat River      "
• 1.00 am  Boundary       "
5_    '* ar 8.00 am Bonner's F'ry '    lv
>x Train lv 11.10 am      "      Train ar
•*     ar 2.45 pm Spokane      ';     lv
8.00 pm£
0.00 pm^
5.00 pm x
2.00 pm*3
1.15 pmg
7.50 amco
P0,
fe
xh
W
T' '* ■ frequent and short holidays,
"'•'"ur ambition,
-temper.
•;ot
ine   Really    Is.
'./.ascertainable scien-
~-enough,  as is often
ii-n
\wn,  oily material
fo
yhich  is generally
de
•,.though in reality
th
oroduced bv the
acti  .               /
roody fiber of the
leal
ire is a colorless
flui.
consistence and
stro
"ing odor, but it
darLciio
air  and light,
becoming
ar'nd then brown.
so that it locxvt .n
i  darkened condi
tion, something  li.
;.ube   tarry matter
A dose of one-half drachm of ipecacuanha to produce full vomiting. The
removal of morbid secretions from the
stomach causes the desire for alcohol to
immediately subside.—Dr. Higinbothani.
The finest torn!) in Great Britain is
undoubtedly tliat of the Duke of Hamilton, in the grounds of the Duke's sent.
It cost over £200,000.
A Frenchman has discovered a remedy
instantaneous in its effects for the horrible burns caused by the use of oil of
vitrol. It is a soft paste of calcined
magnesia and water, with which the
parts burned are covered to the thickness of an inch. It alleviates the pain
almost immediately, and when the paste i
is removed no scar remains. !
"Can you tell me what kind of weath- \
er we. may expect next month?" wrote !
a subscriber to the editor of a paper.        |
The editor replied as follows: "It is j
my belief that the weather next month j
will be verv much like vour subscrip- ;
tion." " " i
The enquirer  wondered   for  an   hour !
what the editor was driving  at when he !
happened to think of  the  word "unsettled."    He sent the  required  sum next
day.
In the Crimean war 05,015 lives were
sacrified, and at Borodino, when the
French and Russians fought, 78,000 men
were left dead on the battlefield. There
were 250,000 troops in the combat in that
engagement.
WANTED
Industrious     men    of
character to travel and
appoint ii<rcuts.    Salary and expenses paid.
Bhai)LKV-Gahi:kison Co., Limitkd. Toronto.
Is tlie finest west ofthe Red River
 The   Ledge   carries     the
largest stock of Printing* Stationery in Kootenay, and can do
finer work  than  any  print shop
west of Lake Superior	
 There are oi Vices thai: quote
seemingly lower prices,   but qual-
Tirrc    Ledge
SPECIAL KOOTENAY LAKE SERVICE;
Commenciiifr June 20,189S.
On Monday, Thursday and Friday ss Alberta-
will leave Ivaslo 5 p. m. for Ainsworth, Pilot Bay,
and Nelson.   Lef.viiifj; Nelson at S a. m., Tuesday, h riday and .Saturday, calling at Pilot Bay
Ainsworth and Kaslo, aud all way points.
„   ,  „   GEORGE   ALEXANDER, Geii'Ulgr-
P. O. Box 122, Kaslo. B.C.
TIME CARD
m.
Taking* effect  1.00 o'clock a.
Sept. 1, 18£    Paciiic or 120th Meridian time.
Subject to change without notice
Leave
ity   considered,
lower than any
blacksmiths employed,
ders by mail,   express.,
paek train      ....
is
No Chinese or
Send or-
f'reiffht or
Air.
s :*n
s /;">
ii I.'.
10 oo
10 (18
10 20
io :it
10 .1.1
A.M.
Vrrive, 3 30 P.M
3 or,
"
2   10
<(
2 on
ii
"          1   /SO
11
i :■£
tt
1 25
k
..cave 1  l;>
"
Leave,
m
Kaslo
South Fork'
S oroide's
\\ hitewatar
Hear Lake
McGm'tcaii
Codv .'Junction
Sandon
CODY    LINE.
ll.oo a.m — Sandon —  Arrive,  11.:>>.> a.m
11.1'1   " Codv Junction Leave, 11..V) a rn
Arrive. 11.2.1   "     -   Cody    - '*     l].:-ii1a..m
ROBT. IRVING-,
Traffic Mntrr.
GEO  F. COPELAND,
Superintendent
For ciioiin  railroad and steamship tickets  tc
and from all  points, applv to
S.  CAMPBELL,      " Agent, Sandon.
The Prosuectors' Assay Office
Brandon, B. C,
   If you are in the Slocan   metropolis call  in and sen
our plant, bat do not touch our bull pup's pup, or allow the cyclop
caused by our fast cylinder press to blow your plug hat out c
rear tunnel.       Come in folks when you have any job print'
do, or cash thai is too heavy  to carry,  and  we   will giv
profitable solution of your trouble.     Come, gentle pilgrims
Assay Price List:
it Lead.each  $i..io
nd Lead, combined  sioo
*r  2 00
«d  2 00
lectrolysis)  a 00
. Copper and Lead  4 00
.'['per  2 so
■Copper  2 50
;r and Copper  sjOO
-  5-00
  o
Manganese  o 00
aKiiesium, Barium, Silica, fiul-
eaeh ,  2 00
Tin, Cobalt, Nickel. Antimony,
% and Arsenic, each  4 00
.'ixed Carbon, Volatile Matter, Ash,
-id: percentage of  Coke, if Coking
-Coal)	
Terms: '/Cash With .Sample.
June 20th. 1895. *
FRANK DICK,
Assayer and Analyst THE LEDGE, NEftV DENVER, B.C., JANUARY 26, 1899.
OSXOXIOUS    LEGISLATION.
Tin.*    Placer     Mines   Alien    Bill   X»t
Credit   to   the  Province.
While the Provincial Legislatu^
the moral and legal right to
alien prohibitory measure,  th
its doing so is questionable,
seen no better discussion of th.
than that of the Winnipeg Fr<
Jan. 14th,which is worthy of re|
and careful perusal:
"The United States Con
sooner passed a law admittii,
to their placer deposits as frc
cans, when the British Col
lature passes a bill prohibiting1
from equal privileges in Britn**W>_iolui_.
bia placer deposits.   The Uniteu States,
•which pursues a very selfish policy as a
rule, began at  last  to  legislate in the
right direction, but the British Columbia
Legislature is scarcely wise, in view of
the enormous mineral resources of that
Province, which will not be anything
like developed in the lifetime of the present generation.    It may be said that the
placer deposits at Atlin lake are limited
in extent, but even so,  the Province of
British Columbia will suffer more from
the advertisement the alien bill will give
it,   and  the   feeling of   unfriendliness
which it will arouse,  than any possible
gain.   The feeling in  favor of excluding
Americans is not based on any distinction between placer and quartz, because
it exists very strongly in certain sections
of  British  Columbia and elsewhere in
Canada,   and   has found expression in
parliament itself against allowing Americans to hold mineral lands in Kootenay.
The feeling is not, therefore, because the
Atlin  lake deposits are  merely  placer
and cannot last long, but because of the
growing popularity of the cry of keep the
Americans out,   that we are  independent of them and  can  get along without
them.    It may be described as the policy
of the closed door, as contrasted with the
British policy  of the  open ,door.    The
Kootenay would scarcely  yet have been
heard of in the older portions of Canada
if it had not been for the Americans who'
went in there, invested their capital and
brought their experience and enterprise
to bear in developing low   grade ores.
After they had  shown  something of the
great richness of that section of Canada,
and had built towns and equipped them
with municipal needs and opened bleak
mountains and  brought   out to  public
view the silver and gold that lay there,
some Canadians cry "but, what business
have these Americans  in our  country,
American money  circulates  there and
Americans are employed in the  mines.
The mines would not have existed but
for Americans, and there was no one in
Canada   who   had the knowledge   and
experience of developing refractory ores,
and    those   who   had   were   naturally
brought  from   the   United   States.    A
Canadian who knew nothing more of the
mineral resources of the Kootenay than
he could gather from  gazing at a phots-
graph   of   a   mountain,   for   which  he
would not give ten cents, cries out when
the mountain is converted into a mine,
that it belongs to him, and those around
about it belong to to him, and the government should build a fence around it,
is acting" a childish   part and the fact
that he cannot go into the United States
owing to state laws and hold mineral
property in his own name is a poor ex-
>cu8e   for    such conduct.    The   people
\of    Nova  Scotia   were  fortunate    and
^highly   pleased   at  getting the Americans to go there and develope their coal
mines.   With the vast mineral riches
possessed by British Columbia and the
Yukon it would  be unwise  to phut out
/capital and experience because the birthplace of the investor or worker was not
in Canada, for the reason that too many
men cannot go to work getting the minerals out of the  ground that have been
lying there for ages and which would
continue to   be   there   for hundreds of
years to come if the development of them
v/as   confined   to   those few Canadians
whose occupation it is to go into the
mines.
"It is satisfactory to know that Canadians and British have within the past
18 months acquired large interests in
some of the best mines in the Rossland
district, and have also invested small
amounts cin the Slocan district. It is
desirable to have as many Britishers
interested there as possible, but Canada
is not a land of capitalists, and if British
investors are slow the country cannot
continue to lie undeveloped. If the
Americans had not shown the way in
southern British Columbia, and built
the first railway there and revealed the
mineral v.ealth of the region, not a
dollar of British capital would be invested there to-day."
JLKA.D    SMELTIKO'   PROBLEM.
Nelson Tribune.IJobiM-t K. Hedlev and
J. J. Campbell, of the Hall Mines, Ltd.,
sng-gestecrthat some such arrangement
7a* made ..-with respect to lead
s was made with respect to
jities. some years ago. When
pund that owing; to an excess of
here was a difficulty in treat-
'er ore locally, the ore was sent
,ers in the eastern States, and
Voclamation issued by the Can-
sGovernment, the copper ing*ots
.ch ore were admitted duty "free
Canada at Montreal. Their idea
riiat some such experiment could be
'de with the lead products of Canaan .mines smelted in the United
tates. While such a course might not
iiave a direct effect upon the smelting-
"industry of the Dominion, it could not
fail to have a beneficial effect upon the
lead manufacturing; industries of Canada, and thus place upon an equal footing with similar industries in the
United States in the purchase of their
raw material, they might create a home
market for lead which would justify the
smelting* and refining of the lead ores of
Kootenay in Kootenay.
Dormouse DelicaclN.
Brawn was originally a Boman dish
and was eaten with garum, and cow's
and calf's foot jellies were likewise
daiutiss with Rome's tipper ten in tha
time of tbe Caesars. One would hardly
suppose that black puddings were so
old as the reign of Tiberius, but this ia
the fact. They were made of pig's
blood, with little cubes of fat inter-
epcrsed in the compound, and were the
invention of a gentleman who rejoiced
in the name of Bambonselvergius. It
was he who invented all kinds of sausages—that is, meat stuffed into skins,
which, we take it, is the ground plan,
so to speak, of a saus-uge.
This gentleman also wrote a learned
treatise'on the fattening of dormice foi
the table, for at one period dormice
were a craKe. There was dormouse soup,
dormouse sausage, dormouse brawn, dormouse cooked in every conceivable way,
and the demand for this delicacy in
prize sizes was so great that there was
room for a book, on the subject, though
unfortunately this book is lost to posterity, and theonlyknowledgewhichwe
have of the fattening of dormice in
Rome is from Petronius Arbiter, who
tells us that they became fat by sleeping.
Tie also tells us that tba best sauce to
eat with dormouse is a mixture of poppy seed and honey, a mixture which
probably had the merit of inducing sleejj
after a meal. The redeeming feature oi
Roman cookery was that absolute cleanliness was insisted on. Vegetables were
ou no account to be cut with a steel oi
iron knife, silver, gold or amber being
de rigueur in all high class kitchens.
The saucepans used were of silver or ol
gold, while tinned saucepans were used
by the poorer classes.—New York Post.
very=
First=class
When I buy from the
manufacturers Staple
and Fancy Groceries
1 make it a point to
get the very best in
all lines, My stock
of Cured Meats is the
best in the market;
Hams, swcetanil juk;v
us can bc boar]'*
B:.icoii tlicit is eve il>
:*-tril \}X   v-l!:h   '.*.*■'., -i .•
leunimJ )a"t N jflie
liiic-sl las'c
Victoria
Store for the best
obtainable in the
Haberdasher Jine.
Our stock of
Gents' Furnishing
Goods is not behind that of the
big city stores.. .
Ladies' Footwear
as dainty as the
daintiest and as
serviceable as the
best.   Mail orders.
n, B.:.G, January, 1899
Sixth Ye
E, Ro Athertoe Co,;
Saedoo
Ltd,
aELSTOKE,
Headquarters for mining
men. Everything first-
class.     Eates, $2 a day.
J. V. PERKS, Proprietor.
CEFfflF^
Daisy, Eastern,   Hampton,   Victory and
CIsiTt'iiue Mineral Claims.
Should the negotiations which are
being* made at Washington, withariew
to securing* some measure of reciprocity
in lead ores and bullion end in failure,
as now seems probable, the attempt of
the Trail smelter to profitable treat the
lead ores of Kootenay will be watched
with interest. Backed as it is by the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company, the
Trail smelter will have an advantage
over other Canadian smelters in the experiment which it will make. If its
effort is successful other smelters will
doubtless enter the field, but at present
there is a disposition on the part of
other smeller men to sit back and note
what success attends the experiment of
the Trail works.
Should tlie Trail smelter lind the
margin of profit on lead smelting too
small under present conditions, it will
then be tor the Federal Gorerninent to
decide what shall be done to foster the
industry in .such a way that mining-
shall ncit pay too heavy a tribute.
As matters stand at present, the United States   collects   a duty of one and
one-half cents a   pound upon the lead
contents of ail  ore.  imported int&-' _J_e
States.   She also collects a dutv
and one-eigth cents upon lead
The effect   of   this is that- it  cc
eighths of a cent more per pi!
import lead bullion  than  it   dr
ore, and there is the further dra
to Canadian smelting in that the
ers in the United States are alio-**1
rebate of the import duty provided
smelter   product   is   shipped   to s;
point outside the  United States
though it is   apparent that an e
duty upon lead ore would assist
smelting in this district, local smelt?
men are slow to advocate it, as they ar
not sure that it would not have a depressing effect upon mining.
In discussing  the   matter with the
Why She lalced Hypnotism.
A young woman from Washington
has discovered a practical use for hypnotism and declares that at last she sees
its value. She was visiting a young
artist, who, with her chaperon, observes
all the proprieties,! in a studio up town
in New York city. The Washington
young woman was called on by her
physician, who happens to be skilled in
the ways and wiles of hypnotism. The
chaperon was eager, as many women
seem to be, to be hypnotized when the
conversation turned on that subject and
the doctor's skill with the art.
The doctor was a trifle chary about
showing his powers, hut the two
younger women begged him to gratify
the elder woman's curiosity. The chaperon smiled to herself and bubbled
with delight when the doctor finally
consented to experiment on her. In 15
minutes it was the turn of the two girls
to bubble with satisfaction. Under the
doctor's persuasive power the chaperon
was lost to the world and all but tho
M. D.'s power.
"At last!" exclaimed the Washington girl. "Here at last is a practical use
for hypnotism. Anything that can put
a chaperon to sleep is worth having
about. Teach me, oh, doctor!''—New
_ork World.
Situate in tlie Slocan Mining Division of West
Kootenay District. Where located: West
of Howsbn Creek, near tlie Alamo.
•TAKE NOTICE that I. \V. S. Drewry. as agent
I for Thc Scottish Colonial Gold Fields. Ltd.,
F. M. Cert. No. 333lj")A. and George \V. Hushes,
F. M. Cert. Ko. 01075. intend sixty days from the
dale hereof to apply to tbe Mining- Recorder
for certificates of improvements for tlie purpose
of obtaining Crown grants of each of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced, before the issuance
of such certificates of improvements.
Dated this 20th day of January, 18!)!).      '.
326 <• --Ay       W.S.'DREWBr.
Jas. M. Patterson
*&  Co.
Dealers in
Purchased £M payment made as soon
after the receipt of ore as samples can be
assayed.
Quotations given upon the receipt of
samplesA
The Hall Mines, Limited
ros.
Are selling the choicest
Staple & Fancy Groceries
that can be obtained anywhere. Mail your orders
if you can't visit our store.
SANDON- , RQSSLA1
and a complete line of
JLiol; 328«—Gladstone Mineral Cliiim..
Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of W est.
Kootenay District.   Where located:] About
five miles east of McGuigan Station ofthe
Kaslo and Sloean Railway, adjoin fog thc
Cariboc  Mineral claim of the Rambler and
Cariboo Con.  Gold and Silver'Minink Company. I     . ■
TAKE NOTICE that I, Robert E. Palmer, as
1    agent  for  Edward Mahon,  F.  M.~C. No
1)1537, and A. W. Siegle, F. M.C. No.4052a,intend
sixty days from the date hereof to apply to.the
Mining 'Recorder for a certificate of improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown grant
of tiie above claim.
And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance of
such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 2Gth day of January, ISO!).
Byes tested and glasses
■fitted for any vision
Whitewater, B.C,
m®&m®®9@M>9j9®®
>m9»mmw	
DR. MILLOY,
Dealers in
Hardware,  Tin   and "Granite1
Miners' Supplies, Paints, Oils, Glass and Putty, Doors & Windc
HvH. Knox,
Has removed to the
Newmarket
Cornier, Sultana,  Iron Mask, Iron Mask
Fraction   and  Baltimore ITi-actiou
3I.ineval    Claims.
Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West
Kootenav   District.      Where   located:    On
Four Mile Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Herbert T.Twig-,agent
L   for the   North-West'  Mining   Syndicate.
Limited, K.  M. Cert.   No.  32G76 A,   Charles A.
Raslidall.F. M. Cert. No. 10!):.':*   A., Arnold'E.
Fauquier, F. M. Cert. No. 5737 A, and Edward
Stewart F. M. Cert. No. 33301  A   intend, sixty
days  from   the   date   hereof   to   apply  to  the
Mining  Recorder   for certificates  ol   improvements, for  the purpose of obtaining a Crown
grant of each of thc above claims.
' And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 22nd dav of December. 18!)S.
" HERBERT T. TWIGG.
Slocan Sovereign .Mineral Ciaim.,
t*.i-.vl,i niem JCfown.
i-Aiss'ju—1 s'..*nt a half dollar to that
c-oiKi-nj which advertised au appliance
lor k'.u'.'phig gas bills down, and got it
this morning.
DoijKon—What did they send you?
Hobson—A paperwr-id-i- —N(>w York
Cormuo.rrinl
Not Needed.
"I have bore a neat and pretty little
lr.ii.CT n;i.•!!!•> :" began the agent.
-Ac ! ' Xi at home,'' said the busi-
i;i'.■;•• ii;:... -;i ...v. "I'm married."—Ciu-
cu.-iin' • i   i-i;*_ercial Tribune.
The statement Is made by a Boston
newspaper that no policemen are ever
•stationed on Boston Common except ou
Sundays and holiday*.
For Salb.—Tlie following goods: (100
feet 14 and 16 inch riveted pipe, new:
2 elbows, 1 tap, 7 short pieces; will stand
a pressure of H20foot head. One 0-foot
Pel ton wheel as good as new with some
extra buckets, new journals, etc. All
in complete order. Outfit can be seen
at my mill across the lake from New
Denver. Cost me, freight, dutv and
goods, $1,350. Wheel cost new $1,200,
f'.o.b. factory. I will sell outfit for $1,200.
cash. S. M. Wharton, East Spokane,
Wash., or cave The Ledge.
T
Situated in the Slocan Mininsr Division of
West Kootenay District. Where located:
One-half mile north of Cody.
AKE NOTICE that I, Herbert T. Twigg.
agent for the Sloean Mines Exploration and
Development Company, Limited, F. M. Cert.
No. 130'jii A. intend, sixty days from the date
hereof, to anply to the Mining .Recorder for a
certificate "f improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.
And,further take notice that action under Sec.
37 must be commenced before the issuance of such
certificate of improvements.
Dated this 22nd (lav of December. 18JIS.
* HERBERT T. TWIGG.
Continental  Mineral Claim.
Rooms ih Reco Hotel, Sandon.
FEED J. SQUIRE
Nelson, B. C.
Merchant Tailor.
Full Line  of Suitings and
Trouserings aJwavs on hand.
Block and is preparedjto repair
ever*-' description of
Disabled
Watches.
ATLANTIC STEAMSHIP TICKETS.
To and from European points via Canadian
and American lines. Apply for sailing dates,
rates, tickets and full information to any C. P.
Ry agent or—
•     c G. B. GARRETT,
C. P. R. Agent, New Denver.
Wil. STITT, 3en. S. S. Agt., Winnipeg.
L
arge
And
Comi
Rooms
Fitted with every!
convenience.   Special
tion against.'fire. Rate
and $3 per day.
COCKLE & PAPWOfl
Pror
The
NEW DENVER,   B. C
Situate in the Slocan Minintr Division of West
Kootenay  District.       Where   located:  at
tlii! bead of Twin Lakes Basin, adjoining the
Idaho, Morning, Ivy Leaf and Mazeppa mineral claims.
rpAKE NOTICE that •]. William S. Drewry, act-
1    iug as agent for the Scottish Colonial Gold
Fields', limited, free miner's-certilieate No. 3.".f'2."iA,
and George W, Hindies. free, miner's certificate
No.   IM!175,   intend, sixty   days   from   the   date
hereof, to apply to-the Mining Recorder for a
Certilieate of Improvements,   for the purpose of
obtaining a Crown ('• rant of the above claini.
And further take notice that action, under
section ."7. must be commenced before the
issuance of such certilieate of Improvements.
Dated this 17th day or November, 1S!)S.
W. S. DREWRY.
NOTICE.
HE UNDERSIGNEr hereby sive notice
at the partnership heretofore existing be-
under the style or firm of Stege & Avi-
tel keepers at the Newmarket hotel, at
er, B Chas thus day  been dissolved
consent.
nts due to the late firm  of Stege &
lie paid forthwith to Henry Stege.
ts due by the said late firm will
'ry Stege.
HENRY STEGE,
THOMAS AVISON.
iiLEsS. Rash halt,.
Notary Public.
.24, ISO).
I  am just  starting the
best   thing   for    money
ftseen for many a day.     Your
I will brine the golden inform-
T. H. LINSCOTT, Toronto.
Shiinist, Jtushfovd, General .Sheridan,
and Snowstorm  Fraction
Mineral Claims.
Provides ample and pleasant accommodation for the traveling- public.
Telegrams for rooms promptly attended to.
STEGE fc AVISON,
Proprietors.
Nakus
Is a comfortable hotel for travellers'1
to stop at. /
Mrs. McDougald/
brick:
FOR   S41.LE. j
JOHN'.GOEJTTSbl
NEW DENVER"
T
Situate in the Slocan Mininfj Division of West
Kootenay District. Where located: Part
of the R. E. Lee group, near Sandon.
V\KE NOTICE that I. George Alexander, free
miners' certificate No. 7t,e(l.l, intend, sixty
days from the date hereof to apply to the
Mining Recorder for a certilieate of improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown
grant of tlie above claims.
And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certilieate of improvements.
tember, 1
G. ALEXANDER.
njir
Dated this 30th day of September, 1898
nvl7
Nancy Hanks No. 8   Blineral Claini.
Situate in the Slocan City Mining Division of
West Kootenay District. Where located: On
north slope of Springer Creek, about 2£ miles
from Slocan Lake.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Alfred Driscoll, acting
as agent for H. E. Graves, F. M. C. No. 5KMa,
Kate Scott. F.M.C. No. 41307, W. B. Dennison, F.
M. C. No. 610A, and Frederick Rowbottom, F. M.
C. No. G29A, intend, sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate of improvements for
the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the
above claim.
And further take notice that action under section 87 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 21flt day of October, 1898. oc27
You Can
"Rfl\qs
By selecting your
BROOCHES
PENDANTS.'.
NECKLACES
BRACELETS
RING
Set with Diamonds
Emeralds, Opals, Pearls,
Rubies and Olivines	
From the imme
G-old, «■<>.('
from   1111 *(!£: V*M»
SHI I il
ck of Watches in Solid
yer .Cases, in. all sizes
Lady's to those
severe work.
ve i \0i§[WS^^ for either Office, Hall,
ware.
ware and
Goods bought in
Orders   by mail promptly
DOVER, Nelson, B. C.
iMmmami THE LEDGE. N1&V DENVER, B.C., JANUARY 26, 1899
OBNOXIOUS .LEGISLATION.
The    Placer    Mines   Alien    Kill
Credit  to   the   Province.
Not
While the  Provincial Legislator,
the  moral and  legal right to
alien prohibitory measure,   th
its doing so ia questionable,
seen no better discussion of th
than that of the Winnipeg Fr<
Jan. 14th,which is worthy of ri
and careful perusal:
"The United States Con
sooner passed a law admitti
to their placer deposits as f _]
cana, when the British Col
lature passes a bill prohibiting!	
from equal privileges in BritiMRJoTum
bia placer deposits.   The Uniteu States,
which pursues a very selfish policy as a
rule, oegan at  last  to  legislate in the
right direction, but the British Columbia
Legislature is scarcely wise, in view of
the enormous mineral resources of that
Province,  which  will  not be anything
like developed in the lifetime of the present generation.    It may be said that the
placer deposits at Atlin lake are limited
in extent, but even so,  the Province of
British Columbia will suffer more from
the advertisement the alien bill will give
it,   and   the   feeling  of   unfriendliness
which it will arouse,  than any possible
gain.   The feeling in favor of excluding
Americans is not based on any distinction between placer and quartz", because
it exists very strongly in certain sections
of British  Columbia and elsewhere in
Canada, . and   has found expression in
parliament itself against allowing Americans to hold mineral lands in Kootenay.
The feeling is not, therefore, because the
Atlin  lake  deposits  are   merely   placer
and cannot last long, but because of the
growing popularity of the cry of keep the
Americans out,  that we are independent of them and  can  get  along without
them.    It may be described as.the policy
of the closed door, as contrasted with the
British policy  of  the open door.    The
Kootenay would scarcely  yet have been
heard of in the older portions of Canada
if it had not been for the Americans who
went in there, invested their capital and
brought their experience and enterprise
to bear in  developing low   grade ores.
After they had shown something of the
great richness of that section of Canada,
and had built towns and equipped them
with municipal needs and opened bleak
mountains  ahd  brought   out to  public
view the silver and gold that lay there,
some Canadians cry out, .what business
have these Americans in our country,
American  money  circulates there  and
Americans are employed ' in.the  mines.
The mines would not have existed but
for Americans, and there was no one in
Canada   who   had the knowledge  and
experience of developing refractory ores,
and    those   who   had   were   naturally
brought   from   the   United  States.    A
Canadian who knew nothing more of the
mineral resources of the Kootenay than
he could gather from  gazing at a phots-
graph   of   a   mountain,,  for   which he
would not give ten cents, cries out when
the mountain is converted into a mine,
that it belongs to him, and those around
about it belong to to him, and the government should build a fence around it,
acting* a childish   part and the fact
that he cannot go into the United States
owing to state laws and hold mineral
property in his own name is a poor ex-
>cuse   for    such conduct.     The   people
[of    Nova  Scotia   were  fortunate    and
jkhighly   pleased   at  getting the Ameri-
i cans to go there and develope their coal
mines.   With the vast mineral riches
possessed by British Columbia and the
Yukon it would be unwise to shut out
^/capital and experience because the birthplace of the investor or worker was not
in Canada, for the reason that too many
men cannot go to work getting the minerals out of the ground that have been
lying there for ages aud which would
continue to  be   there   for hundreds of
years to come if the development of them
was   confined   to   those few Canadians
whose occupation it is to go into the
mines.
"It is satisfactory to know that Canadians and British have within the past
18 months acquired large interests in
some of the best mines in the Rossland
district, and have also invested small
amounts in the Slocan district. It is
desirable to have as many Britishers
interested there as possible, but Canada
is not a land of capitalists, and if British
investors are slow the country cannot
continue to lie undeveloped. If the
Americans had not shown the way in
southern British Columbia, and built
the first railway there and revealed the
mineral v.ealth of the region, not a
dollar of British capital would be invested there to-day."
Nelson Tribmie iloln.rt 11.. Hedloy and
J. J. Campbell,''Qf the Hall Mines, Ltd.,
suggestedthat some such arrangement
7e made with respect to lead
s was made with respect to
raties some years ago. When
und that owing to an excess of
here was a difficulty in treat-
'er ore locally, the ore was sent
Ors in the eastern States, and
■reclamation issued by the Can-
Government, the copper ingots
ch ore were admitted dutyfree
Canada at Montreal. Their idea
[hat some such experiment could be
'de with the lead products of Can-
an mines smelted in the United
Itates. While such a course might not
liave a direct effect upon the smelting
Industry of the Dominion,, it could not
fail to have a beneficial effect upon the
lead manufacturing industries of Canada, and thus place upon an equal footing with similar industries in the
United States in the purchase of their
raw material, they might create a home
market for lead whieliVould justify the
smelting and refining of the lead ores of
Kootenay in Kootenay.
Donnonse Delicacies.
Brawn was originally a Roman dish
and was eaten with garum, and cow'a
and calf's foot jellies were likewise
daiutiss with Rome's upper ten in tha
time of the Caesars. One would hardly
suppose that black puddings were so
old as the reign of Tiberius, but this ia
the fact. They were made of pig's
blood, with little cubes of fat interspersed in the compound, and were the
invention of a gentleman who rejoiced
in the name of Bambonselvergius. It
was he who invented all kinds of san-
Bages—that is, meat stuffed into skins,
which, wo take it, is the ground plan,
so to speak, of a sausage.
Tins gentleman also wrote a learned
treatise on the fattening of dormice foi
the table, for at one period dormice
were a craze. There was dormouse soup,
dormouse sausage, dormouse brawn, dormouse cooked in every conceivable way,
and the demand for this delicacy in
prize sizes was so great that there was
room for a book ou the subject, though
unfortunately this book is lost to posterity, and the only knowledge which we
have of the fattening of dormice in
Rome is from Petrouius Arbiter, whe
tells us that they became fat by sleeping.
He also tells us that tha best sauce to
eat with dormouse,is a mixture of poppy seed and honey, a mixture which
probably had the merit of inducing sleep
after a meal. The, redeeming feature oi
Roman cookery was that absolute cleanliness was insisted on. Vegetables were
on no account to be cut with a steel oi
iron knife, silver, gold or amber being
de rigueur in all high class kitchens.
The saucepaus used were of silver or oi
gold, while tinned saucepans were used
by the poorer classes. —2-Iew York Post.
very=
ng
First=class
When I buy from the
manufacturers Staple
and Fancy Groceries
1 make it a point to
get the very best in
all lines, My stock
of Cured Meats is the
best in the market;
B'anis, sweet and juLy
as can bc load'-,
Bacon ilii.it is ove il>
r-tril p.iil v. i!:h Xj .<y7
lean 'an J. ]a?t 1" a tha
liiic-st las!c
Store for the best
obtainable in the
Haberdasher line.
Our stock of ... i
Gents'Furnishing
G-oods is not behind that of the'
big city stores...
Ladies' Footwear
as dainty as the
daintiest and as
serviceable as the
best.   Mailorders.
E, R. Athertoe.Co,-, Ltd,
Sandon
ELSTOKE,
Purchased iKM payment made as soon
after the receipt of ore as samples can be
assayed^: . 7-7" ■', y
Quotations given upon the receipt of
samples.
The Hall Mines, Limited
4 tmm,  ' NP* fPfY
i^^^^^^lk^^M^^^^V^-V^^I^^H^'
J.
Headquarters for mining
men. Everything first-
class.     Rates, $2 a day.
V. PERKS, Proprietor.
IiEAD ' SaiEIiTING   I'KOBLEM.
Should the   negotiations   which are'
being made at Washington, with ariew
to securing some measure of reciprocity
in lead ores and bullion end iu failure,
as now seems probable, the. attempt of
the Trail smelter to profitable treat the
lead ores of  Kootenay  will be watched
with interest.    Backed   as   it is by the
Canadian-Pacific Railway Company, the
Trail smelter  will  have an advantage
over other Canadian smelters in the experiment which it will make. If its
effort is successful other smelters will
doubtless enter the field, but at present
there is a disposition on tlie part of
other smelter men to sit back and note
what success attends the experiment of
the Trail works.
Should the Trail smelter find the
margin of profit on lead smelting too
small under present conditions, it will
then l)o for the Federal Gorerninent to
decide, what shall be done to foster the
industry in such a way that mining
shall not pay too heavy a tribute.
As matters stand at present, the United States   collects   a duty of one and
one-half cents a   pound upon the lead
contents of all  ore imported in
States.   She also collects a dut
and one-eigtli cents upon lead
The effect   of   this is that it  c<
eighths of a cent  more per pi
import lead  bullion  than  it   d
ore, and there is the further di
to Canadian smelting in that the
ers in the United States are alio
rebate of the import duty provide
smelter   product   is   shipped   to s
point outside the   United States
though it is  apparent that an e
duty upon lead ore would assist
smelting in this district, local sm(
men are slow to advocate it, as they
not sure that it would not have a de
pressing effect upon mining.
In discussing  the   matter with
Why She Liked Hypnotism.
A young woman from Washington
has discovered a practical use for hypnotism and declares that at last she sees
its value. She was visiting a young
artist, who, with her chaperon, observes
all the proprieties, 1 in a studio up town
in New York city. The Washington
young woman was called on by her
physician, who happens to be skilled in
the ways and wiles of hypnotism. The
chaperon was eager, as many women
seem to be, to be hypnotized when the
conversation turned on that subject and
the doctor's skill with the art.
The doctor was a trifle chary about
showing his powers, but the two
younger women begged him to gratify
the elder woman's curiosity. The chaperon smiled to herself and bubbled
with delight when the doctor finally
consented to experiment on her. In lf>
minutes it was tbe turn of the two girls
to bubble with satisfaction. Under the
doctor's persuasive power the chaperon
was lost to the world and all but the
M. D.'s power.
"At last!" exclaimed the Washington girl. "Here at last is a practical use
for hypnotism. Anything that can put
a chaperon to sleep is worth having
about. Teach me, oh, doctor!''«—New
York World.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
Daisy,  KaM.ern,   Hampton,   Victory ami
Cl'irence Mineral Claims.
Situate in ilio Slocan Mining* Division of West
Kootenay District. Where located: West
oi' Howsoii Creek, near the Alamo.
TiAKE NOTICE that I, W. S. Drewry, as agent
1 for The Scottish Colonial G-old Fields. Ltd.,
F. M. Cert. No. SSS-.TiA. and George \V. Hughes,
F. M.- Cert. No. 01075, intend sixty days from the
date hereof to apply to the Minintr Recorder
for certificates of improvements for the purpose
of obtaining Crown grants of each of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificates of improvements.
Dated this *-'Gth day of January, 18fl<).     i
j26« W. S.DREW--RY-.
Jas* M. Patterson
%■ Co.
Dealers in
ros;
Are  selling the choicest
Staple & Fancy Groceries
that can be obtained anywhere. Mail your orders
if yon can't visit our store.
SANDON^— ~-=  ' RQSSLfl
Stationery
and a complete line of
Dealers in
Lot 3SJ80—Gladstone Mineral Claim.
Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of '••v est
Kootenay District.  Where located:! About
live miles east of McGuigan Station ofthe
Kaslo and Slocan Railway, adjoin iliir the
Cariboc  Mineral claim of the Rainier and
Cariboo Con., Gold and Silver Mining Company. I
"T»AKE NOTICE that I, Robert E. Palmer, as
JL    agent  for  Edward Mahon, F.  M.~C No
!)4537, and A. W. Siegle.F. M.C.No.4052A.intend
sixty davs from the date hereof to applv to.the
Mining Recorder- for a certificate or improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown grant
of the above claim.
And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance of
such certilieate of improvements.
Dated this 20th day of January, 1800.  "
Eyes tested and glasses
fitted for any vision
Whitewater, B.C,
DR. MILLOY,
Hardware,  Tin   and : Granite^
Miners' Supplies, Paints, Oils, Glass and Putty, Doors & Windc
H. H. Knox,
Has removed to the
Newmarket
Condor, Sultana,  Iron Mask, Iron Mask
Fraction  and  Baltimore Fraction
Mineral   Claims.
Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West
Kootenav   District.      Where  located:    On
Four Mile Creek.
rPAKE NOTICE that I, Herbert T.T wig'i-.agent
L   for  the    North-West'  Mining   Syndicate.
Limited, i<.  M. Cert.  No. 3*>«76 A,  Charles A.
Rashdall.F. M. Cert. No. I0!)*i2   ft., Arnold E.
Fauquier. F. M. Cert. No. 5787 A, and Edward
Stewart F. M. Cert. No. 333G4 A   intend, sixty
days  from   the   date   hereof   to   apply to  the
Mining-  Recorder   for certificates ot   improvements, for   the purpose of obtaining a Crown
grant of each of the above claims.
And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 22nd dav of December. lS'iS.
' HERBERT T. TWIGG-.
Slocan Sovereign Mineral Ciaiiii.
c».«ci>.-s TfJiem  JCJown.
7Abs'ju—1 .sent a half dollar to that
colicf.iii which advertised an appliance
lor keeping gas bills down, and got it
this raorning.
Dofosou—What did they send you?
i-iobson—A paper w A.'.."hi: —Nww York
Comux-'.rr'i'il
"I
letter
en-
op
Not Needed.
hare bore a neat and pretty littln
if:* :' began the agent.
;   ' at home,"' said  the  husi-
.•a ..'y.   "I'm married. "--CiM-
i'lioiercial Tribune.
Situated in the Sloean Mining Division of
West Kootenay District. Where located:
One-half mile north of Cody.
'PAKE NOTICE that I, Herbert T. Twiprs,
_ aijcnt for the Sloean Mines Exploration and
Development Company, Limited, F. M. Cert.
No.KiO'ji A. intend, sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
certificate of improvements, for tlie purpose of
obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.
' And fuVthor take notice that action under Sec.
37 must lie commenced before the issuance of such
certilieate of improvements.
Dated this i-'nd ilav of December. 1S9S.
•   HERBERT T. TWIGG.
Rooms ih Reco Hotel, Sandon.
FRED J. SQUIRE
Nelson, B. C.
Merchant Tailor.
Full Line  of Suitings and
Trouserings aJwavs on hand.
Block and is prcparcd;.to repair
every description of
Disabled
Watches.
ATLANTIC STEAMSHIP TICKETS.
To and from European points via Canadian
and American lines. Apply for sailing dates,
rates, tickets and full information to any C.P.
Ry agent or—
•'. G. B. GARRETT,
C. P. R. Agent, New Denver.
WM. STITT, Sen. S. S. Agt., Winnipeg.
L
arge
And
Com!
Rooms
Fitted with every!
convenience.   Special
tion against!fire. TRateiS
and $3 per day.
COCKLE & PAPWOf
Proii
The
Continental   Mineral Claim.
The statement is made by a Boston
newspaper that no policemen are ever
•stationed on Boston Common except on
Sundays ana holidays.
For Sale.—The following goods: (iOO
feet 14 and 16 inch riveted pipe, new:
2 elbows, 1 tap, 7 short pieces;, will stimd
a pressure of H'20-foot head. One (i-foot
Pelton wheel as fjood as new with some
extra buckets, new journals, etc. All
in complete order. Outfit can be seen
at my mill across the lake from New
Denver. Cost me, freight, dutv and
goods, $1,350. Wheel cost new $1,200,
f.o.b. factory. I will sell outfit for $1,200
cash. S. M. Wharton, East Spokane,
Wash., or care The Ledge.
Situate in the Slocan Milling Division of West
Kootenay  District. .    Where   located:   at
the head of Twin Lakes liasin. adjoining the
Idaho, Morning, Ivy Leaf and Mazeppa mineral claims.
rpAKE NOTICE that I. William 8. Dreivrv, act-
JL    ing- as Rii'ent for the Scotiish Colonial Gold
Fields, li m ited. free miner's curt i licale No. !i:!"i.*i A,
and Geoifre W. Hnulies. free miner's cert hi wile
N*o.   O-l'.iTS,   intend, sixty  days  from   the   chte
hereof, to apply to  the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements,   for the  purpose of
ohtainintra Crown fIrani of the ahove claim.
And further fake notice that action, under
section :'.",. must he_ commenced before the
issuance of such certilieate of Improvements.
Hated  this 17th day of Xoveinlier, l.Hiis.
\V. S. DREWKY.
NEW DENVER,   B. C.
Provides ample and pleasant accommodation for the traveling- public.
Telegrams for rooms promptly attended to.
STEGE &AVISON,       -       .....'. Proprietors.
Nakus
Is a comfortable hotel for traveller'si
to stop at. /
Mrs. McDoug-ald/
brick;
FOR  S^LE.i
JOHN ■GOEJTTSOI
NEW DEJ,NVEl!
(DTK
CE.
HE UNDERSIGXF/r hereby prive notice
the partnership heretofore existing: be-
under tho style or firm of Stege & Avi-
tcl keepers at the Newmarket hotel, at
er, B C, has thus day been dissolved
consent.
due to the late firm of Stege &
o paid forthwith to Henry Stege,
ts due by the said lute firm will
ry Stege.
HENRY STEGE,
THOMAS AVISON.
;jl_s S. Rash halt,,
Notary Public.
24, 1899.
I  am  just  starting the
r_    best   thing   for   money
'seen for many a day.    Your
ill brins the golden inform-
T. H. LINSCOTT, Toronto.
Sliiiniii,  Ilushf'ortl, General Sheridan,
:ind Snowstorm   Fraction
Mineral Cliiims.
Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West
Kootenay District. Where located: Part
of the R. E. Lee group, near Sandon.
i-PAKE NOTICE that I. George Alexander, free
JL miners' certificate No. 71,oil), intend, sixty
davs from the date hereof to apply to the
Mining Recorder for a certilieate of improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown
grant of the above claims.
And further lake notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 30th day of September, 1898
nvlT G. ALEXANDER.
Nancy Hanks No. 2  Mineral Claim.
Situate in   thc Slocan City Mining Division   of
West Kootenay District.   Where located:   On
north slope of Springer Creek, about 21 miles
from Slocan Lake.
TiAKE NOTICE that I, Alfred Driscoll, acting
1   as agent for H. E. Graves, F. M. C. No. 54iilA,
Kate Scott. F.M.C. No. 11367, W. B. Demiison, F.
M. C. No. 610a, and Frederick Rowbottom, F. M.
C. No. G29A, intend, sixty days from the date
hereof,    to    apply     to     the     Mining    Recorder for a certificate of improvements for
the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the
above claim.
And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance
of such certificate of improvements.
Dated this 21st day of October, 1898.
You Can
By selecting your
oc27
I2_i
BROOCHES
PENDANTS
NECKLACES
BRACELET!
RINGS
Set with Diamonds
Emeralds, Opals, Pearls,
Rubies and Olivines
From tlip, immau
G-old, «;..!. | K:M
from   iIn
Hiii.-il
Mantle
Columbia
The Well
1847 Koger-i o?^
this store ■wifefJ!.
attended to. £_ ^i«
*"■£•?
>k of Watches in Solid
er Oases, in all sizes
Lady's to  those
st severe work.
Office, Hall,
ing in British
g§-welery and Silverware.
JjWiiden Britannia Hollow-ware and
■nd Spoons.   . Goods bought in
1 E. Orders   by mail  promptly
DOVER, Nelson, B. C.
3JgSa8fgfl ^■«M_iuift_i[__|_UMy--BMA

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