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The Ledge Mar 21, 1901

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Array tyutK^/nxiAM-^
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Volume VIII.   No  25.
NEW DENVER, B. C., MARCH 21, 1901.
Price, $2.00 Year ADVakoe
\
In and About the Slocan and neighboring Camps _
that are Talked About. »
%
LOCAL   CHIT-CHAT.
Garden making* is iii fashion again.
Spring job printing on tap at this
office.
Sam Brown in in the safe business at
Seattle.
Jack Gates is in Seattle, fat and well-
dressed.
Howard West i6 fencing his Union
■treet property.
John Williams has the sweetest candy
this side of New York.    ■.."'
Many families are removing from
Sandon to New Denver.
T. R. Saunders is getting his boats
ready tor the summer trade.
Murdoch McLean has returned from
Seattle, where he spent the winter.
Mr. Koch is getting divorced from
rheumatism at the Halcyon Springs.
™ -Thel highrate of taxation in Sandon
is oppressive fo many of itfcl.Hiens
D. J, Robertson Is moving his furniture business from Sandon to Nelson.
Baths should be taken regularly. Ask
John Williams for further particulars.
The government has-been requested
to expend 0600 on the Wilson creek
trail.
Miss Mary Fletcher and Fred Johnson
.will be married In Three Forks this
* T evening.
J.T.Kelly will shortly loave Three
Forks for Phoenix. He will be missed
at the Forks.
M. Duke Walker started last Thursday lor Los Angeles, Cal., where he expects to remain.
C.J. Smith, for many years with J.
. M. Harris in Sandon, will leave next
[f      month for Spokane.
There is room for another lodging
house in Sandon Beds are generally
scarce tn that burg.
Sandon will have to pay its debts or
go dry. Tho water company has given
notice to that offoct.
Tho fishing season opened Saturday
and local nltnroda are revising their
stock of scaley yarns,
David Knight, of Kaslo, and Blanche
Lawrence, of Cincinattl, were married
in Spokane Inst Friday.
Garden seeds in bulk and packages
fresh snd new. Also heat Lawn Grass
teed at Nelson's Drag Store.
Jack Lind left this week for Okotoks,
In the Alberta country, where he in
tends to locate on a good piece of farming land.
Slosan City has been Incorporated
and now the fun begins. Candidates
are plentiful and all the offices will be
hotly contested.
The people of New Denver and vicinity hive petitioned tha Local Leglsla*
%tlvo muddlers at Victoria to leave the
Mineral Act alone.
81, Patrick's Day waa thrice glorious
this year. It was celebrated Friday,
Saturday and Monday, and thoroughly
in aridtnea Sunday.
Thnrw wasn't a dissenting vote ou
the proposition submitted totheeltitent
ol Kaslo to offer a bonus of 160,000 to
i'      ..ii, „„,»,,,• ,•.„„„
The official hgurea iataty utayM.pu6.ic
•how that for the year 1900 there were
40,019 births in Ontario, 17,123 mar*
riafM and 99.GM deaths. The good
•I* nmn-inpr. «**m«. tn hf r*df*minr Us
food name in the good old way.
The Alert took a party of dancers to
filoosn City Friday night to participate
In the ball given there. Another party
went down to Silverton Saturday night
aad«tt^y,fl' «h« fit. Patrick1* rmtfert
gtrea in aid of the chorch fund.
What won't competition do! ihr*
fight for tbe coast to Kootenay charter
has become wo warm in VicUiris ltui
thsC T. R. has ottered to build the
raid wtttMNt a bonus..   Th»* i» addi-
tlonal proof that railroad competition is
a good thing for the public and ought
to be encouraged,
W R.Wills returned from an extended trip through the States and Ontario
on Tuesday. He says New Denver is
as good a place as any he struck In his
travels. '
McGillivray & McLachlan are greatly
improving the Windsor bar room by
lining the interior with metallic sheeting—something that will last forever
and is, in a measure, fire proof.
Complaint is made that small birds
are being killed by the small boys in
New Denver. If the small birds were
as plentiful as the small boys the complaint might stand, but since the former
are so few and the latter so many, it
is doubtful it a boy can get close enough
toa bird to kill it with a lydite shell.
There are nine patients in the Sandon
hospital, including Henry Peasant,
JHerbertTEeaaant,Johnny Black, fever
patients; EdCussick and Tom SairiB,
la grippe; Dan Mackenzie, operation;
John Allan, hip dislocatad. Charlie
McCullough died there on Thursday of
Intestinal obstruction. This is the only
death in ten months, during which time
161 patients have been treated.
Measurements have been taken and
the cost estimated by the Government
agent for a new bridge to be built over
Carpenter creek, and the filling in of
the road across the old creek bed from
the bridge to the bank. This would be
a big improvement, and it is one that is
much needed. The present bridge is
extremely shaky. It was put ud only
as a temporary affair in the first place,
but has been made to answer the purpose three seasons.
The St. Patrick's concert given last
Saturday evening In Miners' Union hall,
Silverton, in aid of the Catholic church,
was a most successful affair, financially
and otherwise, Between 180 nnd f85
was the amount cleared over anil above
expenses. The vocal aud instrumental
music, the readings, recitations, etc.,
were particularly well given, The
numbers given by tho children wore the
most heartily received. Miss Clara
Bennett and W. ll. Worden, of Slocan
City, assisted in tho program.
HALCYON   HOT   SPRINGS.
The Halcyon Hot Springs are on the
upper Arrow lake in British Columbia,
and in daily touch with the outside
world, two steamers stopping at the
wharf every day of the year. The hot
mineral water, which unceasingly flows
out. of.the ground, is valuable for the
curing of all skin and blood diseases.
The company owning the springs has a
large hotel and many cottages for the
accomodation of those in search of rest
or health. Many bathrooms, with all
the modern conveniences, including
plunge and steam. There is a telegraph, express and post-office in the
hotel, and twice daily the news of the
world is posted upon the bulletin board.
Thus while; patrons are regaining
health in this quiet resting place, sur-
tounded by lake and mountain scenery,
they can still enjoy all the delights of
being in daily touch with the outer
world. A drug and merchandise store
are also on the premises. A ranch of
600 acres is attached to the hotel. It is
stocked with cattle, horses and poultry.
Fresh milk and eggs, such a luxury in
the mountains are here easily obtained.
The grounds abound in beautiful dells,
waterfalls and climbing places that will
bring the blush of health to the wasted
countenance. Boats and launches provide an opportunity for aquatic recreation. Lack of space forbids a more
extendedilescription^^
health resort.
f
HLOOAN   MINBHAL.   Kf.OAT.
The tunnel on the SI nil Is in 15 feet.
The Payne was off the shipping list
last week.
Six men are working at the California
and 80 at the Hartney.
An Important strike wat made upon
the California last week.
The lower tunnel on the Monitor Is in
300 feet. It will take a year to com*
plain it.
A good pay streak of ore was encountered in the tunnel being driven on the
March Bird Fraction this week. Gnat
Mountain.
A D. Copien expect* the Cbke«o and
Cube case to coma up before the Privy
Council in England this summer. It
has already cost him over trt.OM.
Carloads six and seven of ore from
the Hartney are being hauled to the
«.l.i,.rri>i><ilil«<ii,ii*<t       TM»   nrnwnrtx'   It
\ iTftjvrr»vl«ir vrHh ever* ffvA «psm*d «rt,
It is reported that the Bosun will anon
tfsurne optnAtltm&tm* !»rg»»«al*»r.*n
heretofore Work is being pushed by
eontract on the Ion* tunnel. The <*au§e
for Che recent shut down In u«» ibe
tandon office
A very important strike was made
the past weak at tbe Noble Five. Work
waa started soma weeks ago to open up
the Noble Five ground through the
Ijut Chancr tonne! A Urge body of
Stflflf g.tltmn hnn Vw#*n i>nmniiU'ridt
The cider barrel In John William*'
•tore neve* run* ''ry. tobrt haa pr«v
bably invt*nt«*d a filling process hitherto
unknown to earthly beluga
UNDER   TBI   INFLUENCE.
Prof. Payne, hypnotist and phrenologist, gave an exhibition of his powers
in Bosun hall Saturday evening before
a small but appreciative audience. He
explained the action of mind over matter and demonstrated the many ways in
which the occult science of hypuotism
may be put to practical use in control-
ing the minds of others. His control of
his subjects was remarkable", and their
actions while under the influence added
much to tho enjoyment of the evening.
The lecture was so good that many who
wore present endeavored to have Prof
Payno repeat it Sunday evening. This
he refused to do biit has promised to
play a return date hero in a short time,
ANOTHER   MOVINO-PIOTPRK   FAKE
A more disappointed audience never
•eft Bosun hall than that which witnessed thu cinematograph reproduction
of thu Quhoii's funeral procession on
Monday evening. The fault was not
in tho pictures, but in tho lack of sufll-
ri'tiit light pow<n* behind them. Much
had bfltm nald by the Nelson press in
praise of tin* exhibition, and New Denver expected to see something reason
ably good. But it was the worst of the
kind over witnessed hero. The fact
that there wan no electric current available to give th« required light does not
excusa Manager Amiable (or attempting to give the exhibition with tbe weak
light at his command.
Work was started on tbe Kuby this
week. Wm Letterlck has a contract
for sinking '25 feet from the drift ou the
ore shoot This property Is situated
close to New Denver. One hundred
feet of tunnel work has been driven on
it, and the ledge tapped last season at a
depth of ftO feet. A drift wat run on
the ore shoot SO feet. The ore was
tacked as taken out, but no shipment
made. It run* high In silver and gold,
and It Is believed a valuable ore shoot
will be shown op by linking.
Thu government returns for 1900
show that the production of gold in
Nova Scotia w_t;W,GtX> oancea, valued
.» i*V7rt Wrt This In tti*» so^ri H*ttM?
annual vi«M *\ntm -mid wm dlwoveml
In \M). The estimated vlt»M of 1901 is
85,000 ounces, owing to new finds.
Stratum's IudefHindeiico mi in: uf Cripple Crank, Colorado, Im producing at
tbe ra lo oi #»*,UtW per any. i n .. a unary
the mine yielded on an average 120 tons
of rock per day which yielded -2| ox of
gold per ton. Total, 8,720 tons of ore.
Average yield of gold In ounce*, 9300;
tout valuation, $188,000
For the year 1900 the total shipments
of sflMr from Lond-in amottntad to
*52,fll 1,071
Send tbl* paper to yoor friend*. It
will surprise them, if they read it regularly.
A   CHAPLEAU   SETTLEMENT.
The Nelson Miner is authority for the
statement that there is a strong probability that the affairs of the Chapleau
Consolidated will be straightened but
shortly and that the property will be
operated again at an early date. R. S.
Lennie, of the legal firm of Elliot &
Lennie, of Nelson, which has handled
the company's affairs since the financial
difficulties commenced, has received a
cablegram from the Chapleau's head
office in Paris, France, that indicates
the policy to be adopted by the company
with regard to its future actions. It
has been determined to reorganize the
corporation with a considerably augmented capital, the additional funds
thus accruing to be devoted to wiping
out the company's obligations and to
re-establishing tbe treasury on a sound
financial basis. Pending such reorganization, the company will pay something
over 50 cents on the dollar of its obligations and furnish the directors' personal
guarantee for the payment of the balance. A proposition to this effect is
now before the creditors, and so far as
can be learned the feeling is such that
the offer is likely to be accepted, including an extension of 60 days to the
company. The general understanding
is that the Chapleau company proposes
to extend its operations in this district
and that one of the features of the re-
i!i)Pltmcted-Compiny'8 programme will
be the acquisition of further mineral
land in addition to their present Lemon
creek holdings.
SCIENTIFIC   MISCELLANY.
It is reported that nitrate deposits of
great value and quite extensive have
been discovered in Death Valley, Cal.,
whence the principal supply of borax
comes.
Antimony in any form and copper
carbonates make fire assays for lead
entirely unreliable. Wet methods must
be resorted to where their presence is
known or suspected.
The secretary of the Copper Pro*
ducers' Association places the output
from the mines of the United States (or
the year at 800,087 tons (2,000 pounds),
and the exports at 178,754 tons.
Contracts have been made lor the exportation to Europe of 50,000 tons of
high-grade zinc ore from the mining
district of Missouri and Kansas. Zinc
ore has boon growing scarce in Europe
for several years, while the district In
question has been yielding more than
American smelter* could handle. The
disposal of tho surplus In Europe will
tend to keep up prices.
With strict reference to accurate
statement the term "tumid" applies to
a nearly horizontal passage through a
hill or mountain, open at both ends as a
railroad tunnel. Ordinarily, however,
the word is used instead of thc term
"adit," and Is understood to mean a
nearly horizontal passage from the surface through which the mining* claim
may be entered, worked or unwatered.
In round numbers the yield of the
world's sliver mines may bo placed at
»i,200 torn, of which the United States
contributed 2,199 tons, Mexico and
Central America 1,900 ions, South
America 850 ton*, Canada ISO tons,
Amtratia &5U tona and Europe SAO ions.
The remaining t*»n* came from Japan,
tin* East I tulle j. ami Africa. Thin* 88
|w*r cent of the total was from the mines
of the New World and lens than 0 per
cent those of Europe.
The production of mica in the United
Htatttwaa Urn by '2,500 tin* in 1880
M»*nlrtlflW*t.   On th* other hand, the
I demand for it ia increasing and the
I imports in !»*♦ amounted in value to
j t27»l,t»J«« agsintt I1IW.UO0 in taw*.   It
j would seem aa if mining it should be a
ttty profitable industry.  The principal
,*.'."'"'"•"»"    1«/-«l;tS«a    mto    *f».»f   tfsmti.
shire, North Carolina, South Carolina
and New Mexico.   During 1888 (A tons
of sheet mica were produced and brought
IIU8,!IM at the mine, or |l,«00 per ton,
while 4,000 tent of scrap mica were pro*
ffn^t snd sold for tW.IWI, or *i W> per
ton   During l**K», »n account of the
J Ui^£i i/re^uro of foreign frnportatfons,
| only .^l tons of sh«*«*<». were produced
an4 th** priee fell u» *l ,»»> p-r tnn; and
j I..W tona nf scrap mica, bnr if brought
alwut l-*»«ton.
Debates to Ottawa
I Important Steps Taken to Induce the Govern*
ment to Act in the Lead Problem.
The Kootenay Boards of Trade have
taken prompt action looking to the
betterment of the smelter situation. It
is proposed by the Kaslo Board to have
representative mining and business
men selected from all the mining camps
in Kootenay to go in a body to Ottawa
and present to the Dominion house the
vital need of the Government coming
promptly to the assistance of the mining
industry, by offering a bonus to induce
the erection of refineries for the treatment of the product of our silver-lead
mines. The proposed action is greatly
favored by all parties, and, if not carried
out on as large a scale as has been proposed, there is no doubt that some step
in this direction will be made, and the
importance of the matter brought before the Government.» Sandon has already taken steps in the right direction.
The Mine Owners' Association has resolved to send to Ottawa at least three
delegates. The Miners' Union will undoubtedly send one and the' city may
"s^dlll^^Otuerclmps'areTesponding
as readily.
As evidence of the earnestness ' of
the Kaslo Board of Trade the following
letter is produced:
Kaslo Board ov Taixdc,
Kaslo, B. 0., Msroh 18, W01.
To tha Editor Taa Lidos:
Dear Sir,—Kindly note that tbe people who ire
going to Ottsws to talk "bounty on lead production to the Government," are counting* upon tbe
pleasure of the company of two or three delegates from New Denver, Mr. Beaton, who Is
traveling In the Interest of the soheme, will probably get around to you In a few days. In the
meantime, bswever, I extend you a cordial invitation to get ready. There are no people more
deeply Interested than those of New Denver; and
none who, by personal testimony, can do more
to convince the Government of the Justice of our
demands.
The Intention is to get away from Kelson, via
O. N. P. R., on the J5tl». We eipect to get a very
low excursl *. n rate, and what we now know there
will be SO to 60 delegates. But the Idea Is to
have all parts of the country and all classes of
tbe community represented.
It Is thought that about 16 days will be spent
on the trip, and whila It ts possible that somn
who will go will bave business of their own to
attend to, yvt the delegation Is to be known as a
• Mining" delegation, aud Is, as a deletf-tluu, to
take up none but mining questions.
The appointment of a mining comrals4on,the
organisation of a department of mines, tbe revision of tho tariff astt effects lead Inijiortatlons;
such <|Uf«tlons as these In addition to tbe bounty
application, will be dealt with.
Yours faithfully,
U.O   HUCHUUII.
In addition to the action taken by the
Kaslo Board, tho Nelson Board of Trade
has presented the case in the following
strong language:
Wherttas, Loud mining in British Col*
umbla hat grown into a most important
industry, giving employment to a large
number of men at good wages, supporting tho population of an extensive area
In the K"Otenay districts, and adding
much to the general prosperity) and,
whereat, the Increase and development
of the industry aie certain under favor
able conditiont.whlch conditions mainly
depend on the miners being able to got
tlieir ore smelted at a reasonable charge
lor freight and treatment; and,whereas,
the demand (or thete lead ore* by
smeltf.r*s in the United States has a!mo#t
ceased, and the capacity of the smelters
now operating in British Columbia is
totally Inadequate tn treat the output
of thfcwi Hunt's, Homu of which have,
already k'tsenedthelroutputand others
have closed down on account of these
I difficulties; and, whereas, no meant of
rehning basts bunion eiitt* today tn
Canada, tht-rehy necessitating the shipment to liii'tled.Slate* iiflneiies of the
lead product of Canadian smelters, and
* tnnrh htah-'r rut* fer refininir \fnA
than formerly it now being demanded
by the American Smelting k Refining
truer,; and,whereat, there is no tendency
observable to increase the smelting
capacity In the district now suffering,
while the danner of having to pay excessive rate* (or refining continue; and,
whwoet, the i-staWlthment nt a Jwirl re-
flner.v readily aocnasiMo to tl»« .•.mfltert
in the lead producing dittiirta would
undoubtedly Ifad to the erection of
more furnaces, snd that afford the lead
mining industry the relief it now so
urgently stands in need of.
Therefore, be it resolved, That in the
opinion of this board the establishment
of a lead refinery in an accessible position in Canada is the surest and best
means of fostering and encouraging the
lead mining industry of British Columbia, and the board,respectfully urges
on the Dominion government that to
aid this important purpose, and to assist
this new industry until fully established, a bounty be granted for five years
of 85 per ton on pig lead, the product
from ores mined, smelted and refined
in Canada. The board would also
point out that In British Columbia fuel
is cheap and of excellent quality; that
it is an undoubted advantage to have a
refinery near the smelters, and that pig
load refined in British Columbia could
compete in the markets of the Orient,
which would not be the case with 'ead
refined further east; The board wouid
also suggest that if a bounty be granted
"the*goTernmenv"should*T6tain*vh6-p©wer—
of interfering in case more than fair
and profitable "refining rates were
charged.' 7
DON'T LIKE THK AMENDMENT.
A petition was clrculafed and liberally
signed in New Denver this week, pro*
testing against tbe proposed amend*
ment to the Mineral Act requiring the
first year's assessment to be recorded
at the time of recording the location.
There are many who favor the amend*
ment, howover, and claim   that  no
argument has been advanced yet in opposition to it that would stand against
the argument that would be advanced
in its favor if It were tried for a period
of five years.    As one puts it: "It
is a direct blow at the re-staking policy,
or, in other words, the laty-man's policy,
that is now permitted under our mining
laws,   With such a law in force there
would be fewer wild-cats staked, more
work done, and more properties developed.   The early development of every
claim would mean the more rapid development of the country,  Themore work
that is required upon a prospect at the
outset the better it is for the locator. It
would do away with the foolish policy
of holding a lot of unprofitable ground,
and tho money that would be aaved
yearly in recorder's fees could be put
into work on a prospect that promised
something.   Claim working will de*
velope a country; claim holding will
curse it.   Anything that require* work
on a mineral claim should be encouraged.   It may appear on the face of It
to be a hardship on tho prospector, but
Its practical working would be to bis
advantage In the long run.    It is the
man who developet that makat the
stake."     	
AMJOAN   ORE  *H!I»MKNTH.
The total amount of ore shipped from
the Slocan and Slocan City mining
divisions for the year 1000 was, approximately, lW.OflO tons. Since January 1
to March in, 1901, the thlpments have
been aa follows:
Wesk Total
Payne    VtU
l,»»t Ofcurtr*    It «st
MlocsnWar               II stn
n,utb  #m
Hasan.,  Vti
Hswrtt  VO
tvsnh**	
iraae i»im-'
*<»v*T*.»rn,...
Wonderful....
lirUlOfVWk .
TwortVnds..
*■•
Knutrprlse.
»l»rtn*_..,.i    ti
UiKiflClllilltfll      Wi
MllsrCntk	
R*W :■;:•:..,...
SMwset	
Manss HCan. OoM rklds	
awjr..-":::::::::::;:--:
Antolne.    	
ChMMt Hess ,.
Mp*ift«r 	
tiotitith        	
IVmlh .M»r .	
Hatntiltf    	
I Marl*■«»!	
K»»i/ firnuti  ...
< h»H*«u
Hj.n tiUtftr
A)s»	
    I*
Touium ~m
tt»
H
m
«
Its
*.»
l»o
■***>
ui>
aa
it
«
u
li
n
-ts
tn
Mi
10
It
10
w k q_s»
li '*&*' ■
\
• i    -.,  :■   -v.; .     ■ i
-<!■'.'-"*'.'|VV' EJ  '\
THE LEDGE, NEW DENVER, B. C, MARCH 21, 1901.
, AWt'XiW-' 'Si-1   _-  ~*:<!■&A-#'i %?:e V ifi.v'
Eighth Year
Thb Ledge 1j two dollars a year in advance. When not oo paid it is 82.50 to parties worthy of credit., Legal advertising 10 cents a
nonpariel lino first insertion, and 6 emits a line each subsequent insertion. Heading notices 25 cents a line, and commercial advertising
graded in prices according to ciroumstances.        ■■■',-,'■
FELLOW PILGRIMS: Tub Lsdok Is located at New Denver. B. C, and can be traced to many parts of the earth. It cornea to the front
every Thursday and has never been raided by the sheriff, snowslided by cheap silver,or subdued by the fear of mini. It works for the trail
blazer as well as the bay-windowed and champngne-flavoreti capitalist, It aims to be on the right side of everything and believes that hell
should be administered to the wicked in large doses. It has stood the test of time, and an ever-increasing naystreak Is proof that It Is
better to tell the truth, even if the heavens do occasionally hit our smokestack, a ohute of job work is worked occasionally for the benefit
of humanity and the financier. Come in and see us. but do not pat the bull dog on the cranium, or chase the black cow from our water
barrel: one is savage and the other a victim of thirst. One of tlie noblest works of creation is the man who always pays the printer; he is
sure of a bunk in paradise, with thornless roses for a pillow by night, and nothing but gold to look at by day.
R.T. LOWERY, Editor and Financier.
The Ledge.
A pencil cross in this square
Indicates that your subscription is due, and that the editor
wishes once again to look at
your collateral.
THURSDAY,   MARCH 21, 1901.
FBOH THE EDITOR'S DPPEU STOPE.
It is a long deal that has no turn
in it. _____
The legal rate of interest in Canada has been reduced to 5 per cent.
Jim Hill is evidently making the
C. P. R. look closely at its hole
card,	
The Bun crosses the line today.
Glad to see Old Sol again in the
north. •■
"War consumes 80 per cent, of
all the money of the world's governments.      	
Easter Sunday is due on April 7,
after which the meat business will
become more active.
On the Island of Guam there is
do water fit to drink.   Kentuck-
-sa:
.« s_o?Anir!,fin_w@iii.t_et,er
up~wvu »%*—x_ v—
Sheffield is the smokiest city in
England. If it was located in B.
C. how the coal barons would prosper?
•-5"    *
Dressmakers' bills will last a
long time. One dug up in the
ruins of the city of Nipur was 3700
years old.
The Irish are noted for successful
St. Patrick concerts. It is seldom
that one is a failure, especially in a
financial sense.
California is filled with wild-cat
oil companies, always looking for
the victims who have more greed
than good sense.
The bubonic plague is in San
Francisco, and it is liable to travel
further if the yellow curse is not
tightly cinched.
Fortune awaits the lucky in
Helena. The faro bank limit has
been raised to $1,000. English
capital is not barred.
In the Slocan St. Patrick's Day
did not jar thc atmosphere and ft
passed over amid the fluttering of
many green ribbons.
Five men can hold down a lion,
while it takes nine to hold a tiger.
We have se«n *'BPPfl that ft whole
camp failed to hold down.
Baldnem ia caused by wearing
hats. Indiana and bare-headed
boys never have a sliding place for
flies on top of their heads.
Everyday the Hamilton Spec*
tator print* new* that ia 48 years
old, and still it h newN to nearly
all of its Toronto readers.
Sunflowers are valuable in Russia, and a good crop is worth *2f>
an acre. The seeds are salted and
sold on the *trwU* by |H*dilU>n*.
It took Edwin Mark ham ten
years to write the poem that made
him famou*.   Home people think
l.fcw* fhn«< furs *m4t* t\r\t>
to such dictation,
slaves of fear.
They must be
With flowers in bloom, and
spring zephyrs blowing their soft
breath upon New Denver, it seems
almost impossible that nine miles
away Sandon is still under a white
blanket. Altitude must love the
snow.
When potatoes were first sold in
Russia they caused riots. They
called them the devil's apples.
Riots have sometimes been caused
in Ireland because spuds were not
brought in. Thus do queer notions
prevail.
The tendency towards a protective tariff in England is steadily
growing, owing to the decline of
industrial power. In the United
States the tendency is towards free
trade, owing to the increase of industrial power.
Divorce should be made easy in
Canada, and marriage more difficult. As it is too many mis-mated
couples are tied by a bond that
cannot be broken, except by death.
The effect of such living is disastrous in the extreme.
——Earties-in-search-of—fliOur-milling-
sites should not pass by New Denver. We have the finest water
power in the mountains. The
waters of Carpenter creek ceaselessly rush down the gulch, never
having been tamed by the power of
man. Oh ! grinders of wheat and
others, touch them with harness
and the world will be partly your'n.
nli     i*«
At Kernie, the other day, a miner
was fined 15 and costs for setting
off a shot contrary to the rales in
one of the mines.   This has never
ivflnwi.il (ti »Vi'. «**)/
Alaska is a great -wintry for
fish. At Kyak, halibut weighing
over .150 pounds have been caught,
while at Cape Nome many suckers
hav** been caught writhing over
150 pounds.
Th* MwlM-al 'trust ol li. t". does]
not allow doctors to advertise, ft;
is surprising that members of «uch
a learned profession would submit!
The cause of the Union forces
winning the battle of Gettysburg
37 years ago has just come out.
The Minneapolis Journal states
that just before the battle Abe
Lincoln prayed to God that this
was His war, and if He would
stand by him, he would do the
same towards the Lord. After
that the Jonrnal says Abe had no
doubt as to the way Gettysburg
would go. It is to be regretted
that Abe did not start sooner. He
might have saved his country many
barrels of its best blood and mil**
lions in money.
Luther R. Marsh is a spiritualist
and lives in New York state. He
claims to have had several messages from Bob Ingersoll over the
wireless line that is rung up by
mediums. He states that the
Colonel received a frost when St.
Peter asked him for his ticket, but
after a short time all his sins were
forgiven and he passed through the
pearly gates to Paradise, where all
is joy, and he iB well satisfied. If
Harsh is right this will be a great
disappointment to the many knife*
blade asses who kicked Ingersoll
when he let go the physical life
line. They will never see him
again.    -__iiii-_________
THC     A scientist ha« disoov-
UZoQ ly ous to kiss without first
1/: cc washing the mouth and
r\lo5 HpM with an antiseptic
remedy. Tpon every Up lurks
bacteria awaiting an opportunity
to switch its location. Beware of
thr» deadly kiss, took not upon
the lips when they are cherry red
in the moonlight, for in the end
*<•< <u.«4v<«u» wm ftifug yuu, and
ihi: )m,';Ui}& mil w.k y\iu miiu <U.
early demise. Science is wonderful. It reveals many unknown
dangers-i that we have dallied with
iu the pant, only -mat-anine the
terror* oi tmetma. by an dement of
luck. While science ha* revealed
this great danger, and provided a
rernedy.it has also increased mental
amiHy. Suppose a girl with ripe,
baotervan lips should suddenly grasp
a man and kins him before he could
flood Ms mouth with antiseptics
what agony he would endure waiting for the bacteria to develop, and
carry him beyond the clouds. It
U simply awful to contemplate th**
chances we run every day, and a
man to be reasonably safe should
be a clerk in the store of a man
who does npt advertise. Bacteria
is never swapped when a man is
alone.
Work
A creed organ in
Toronto cries out
7V,4- J-I nrh^ *kat now *B ^e
m I IUIII-C time for its church
to be up and doing. Canada is
prosperous from ocean to ocean,
and $40,000 must be raised for
missions in the west. We are not
suffering out here from the lack of
creeds. Better spend the money
around home. In Toronto hundreds of girls work for wages that
would scarcely feed a canarj' bird
in the west. Most of their employers can be seen in church every
Sunday shouting to the Lord as
though He were deaf, and would
overlook them. In« Toronto hundreds of girls walk the streets at
night pandering to vice. Better
spend less money on far-away fields
and give these girls a chance. See
that female wages are raised, and
many a young woman will call you
blessed. Save bodies and the souls
will not go astray. If the eastern
church folks will raise up those
^Toxnid'tlretrti^
to do without increasing their
western connections. Instead of
sending us missionaries to fill the
occidental air with useless talk
about the mythical past, and blind
guesses about the future, it should
be the other way on. We should
send the east missionaries to preach
the gospel of humanity, and improve the social condition of those
who labor for a pittance, especially
in large cities.
FOR SALE
Black ninorcas,
B. Plymouth Rocks
Ml Sebright Bantams
$1.50 Bach.
Bggs  for Setting,  $1.80 for 18
W. A. TrlURMAN, NsIsm, B.C
Watch
Repairs
by
Nail
\\ • «-aii try* you
equally as mil bt
msll u ir yoo m
your wntfh person-
-Mr-
If yuu »«.' •. mm
wttmh fiirf u* ih*
moitr* y.iii Intend V'
tnrtm in <«•>, snd
rlMtrilx-   tb*   sij/ki
will M-ud yite lb*
l**t t<ttu*f*uttir»bl*
Ml Ik- m<m***.
Brown Bros.,
The Jewelers, Nelson.
Silk Waists
from
New York
at Mrs. Mcrkley*s
Net* Denver
Ti i \ie> rc t> d 'What's the matter
UIV CI SC   wjtn this watch ?..
Opinions Z\t tX^
ticker to a watch doctor in Spokane. After a slow examination
the watch manipulator said: "Main
spring broken, and very dirty."
The Slocanite put the watch in his
pocket and withdrew. A little
further down the street he entered
another watch shop and requested
an examination of his ailing timepiece. The second watch surgeon
examined it very closely and then
exclaimed, "You have let it fall,
and the pinion shaft is broken, and
it is otherwise disarranged, but I
can fix it up for S3." "Is it dirty?''
queried the man from the Slocan.
"Not at all. Perfectly clean."
Again the man with silver on his
boots put the watch in his jeans
and hit the paved trail. Entering
a third and larger shop than the
othei-s he was introduced to the
proprietor by a friend, and left his
watch for an examination. Returning in an hour or two he was
handed his watch with the remark
that a spring had just caught a
little, and the charge would 0be
nothing. This story is told to
illustrate how easy a man can be
parted from his money when away
from home and among dishonest
tradesmen. Such an event as the
above would probably never occur
in Kootenay.  '
The Coronation Oath to be taken
by King Edward has caused a commotion among Roman Catholics
owing to its' antipathy''to that religion. The proper thing to do is
to recognize all or none of the religions taught in the British Empire. The Catholics are very
sensitive about their religion, being
taught to place church before state,
as witness the case of Mrs. Dolpit
in Quebec.
Silver mountain bids fair to be
worthy of the name bestowed upon
it. ,'   . . ■..       a
There is room in the Slocan for
many a fine orchard and vineyard.
EVOLUTION   OF   A   *CK3fO!».
ti. (U. ft Block
nelson
COFFEE AND 4s"
OYSTER PAKLOK
CUT FLOWEUS
anh HOUSE PLANTS
. nUU MOTTO IS
FRESH GOODS
ash FULL'WEIGHT
SEATS FOR SALE ,.
FOR ALL 4S
OPERA HOUSE Tl
PERFORMANCES
^i|m&*)&*»^^
Smoke
Tuokett
Cigar Go.
Union 3n-,:
▼     .     .    Monogram
Label   Marguerite
Hi crura BoB*wt
El Condor
w. j. mcmii.i.a.v * to Schiller
WbolMMht A*>mU for B.C.
Vincmsivw. B.C.
CHAPTER I.
"What is your name, little boy?"
asked the teacher.
"Johnny Lemon," answered the
boy.
And it was so,recorded on the roll.
CHAPTER II.
"Whatis your name?" the high
school teacher inquired.
"John Dennis Lemon," replied the
big boy.
Which was duly entered.
CHAPTER III.
"Your name, sir?" said the college
dignitary.
"J. Dennison Lemon." responded
the young* man who was about to
enroll himself as a student
Inscribed in accordance therewith.
CHAPTER IV.
"May 1 ask your name?" queried
the society editor oi the Daily Bread.
"Jean D'Ennice Le Mon," was the
reply ot the swell personage in the
opera box
And it was duly jotted down.
Manufacturing
Jewelers
Importers of Fine Watcnes. Wutchmakers and
Opticians. Send for our flue. Watch Catalogue.
OLD GOLD AND SILVER bouKht at the highest
price." : ; ■...;■
; PATENAUDE BROS.,
NELSON. B.C.
KK2K3K3 KKK K3K3K2K
Kwe
|don't
K
H
H
8
are
How you
live, or
E KNOW we can
beautify your
place. We have just un- W./1;
packed a big stock of
Wall Paper, that is absolutely the best we
have shown in this section. You will agree
with us that last year
our Wall Paper was nice
enough for any home.
This season's patterns
are even prettier, and
are sure to please you.
Let us show them to*you
and give you an estimate
of what it will cost to re-
paper the rooms. Our
friends and patrons in
adjoining towns should
be interested in this; it
makes no difference how
large or small the order. ^
Bourne Bros., W-
8
_    you live
NEW DENVER, B. C.
E. FERGUSON & CO.
NELSON, B. C.
Wholesale Liquor Merchants
Finest Stock of Imported Goods in the upper country.   All leading brands of
Canadian Whiskies
Dawson's Perfection, Usher's, De war's, Mitchell's and Doctor's
Special Scotch Whiskies
Kiinlt<n»y A (ten l« for llranswlck*lliilkt.-Oollnnder Co. IliUlitrd Tables.
El Cielo, Buona Qalana, Rosebery, Kior de Marca and La Veda Cigars
THE PROSPECTORS' EXCHANGE
N0.4K.-W, C. BLOCK, NELSON, B.C.
Quid, Hllver-Iiesd And Copier Ulnss wanted at th« EX0HANOK.
KHEB MILLING GOLD |tro|>ertlos wanted at onco for Kastern Investors.   , _
Fartlea having: mining property for sale are requested to send samples of thtlroreto
the EicbaiiKe for exhibition.
All MmplM should bo sent hy ExpreM,pn*|Mid. Correauondent-e aollelted.        _
AddressTail communications to- ANIHtKlT r.  HOdKHnEItOKn.
Telephone No. IM.  P, O. Box Ton. Nelson, B. O.
The NewmarketHotel,
NEW DENVER,   B. a
Hrs one ot the most beautiful locations tn America, and the public are
assured of pleasant accommodations.
*""   ">      I      I     "•      ~ Proprietor.
HENRY STEGE,
L.J^„ »..!
SMOKE
KEIiOWflA
CIQAR8       ^
UNION MADE
H.E.T. HAUL IAIN, C. B.
HININr.   F.N«1ST.KR
II-*' ^f» **% II V      ** ^P        W/il   *-. ***, 4* *M **. m. II
lJt«.It !l H^ <Mft   IV!SAJt&.Jl«. li <_•_« s
».«UblUhf«t  IS1T.
Capiial (all paid up) *U(Ju0,O».uu
Reiervedlund . : 7,«j0U(iX).U0
Undivided i>rv>flu -   . 1,102,7:^.72
HKAI»   orriCK.   MONTKKAI..
Kt. Hon. Utm Btratiicdka a.»d Moukt Kotai, O.CM.O. I*reaMent.
Hon. 0. A. Drommovd, Vice President,
H a Ci/hjhtom, GefMiral Manaarer.
Hranches m alt )>aru ot Canada, Newfoundland, Great Britain, and
the United BUtea.
New Denver branch
LE B. DE VEBEk, Manager
K.-W 4*. mt* Eighth .Ybab.
TBE LBLHJrJii, NEW DENVER, B. 0., MARCH 21  1901.
\
GROWING   OLD.
A little more grey in the lessening* hair.
Each day as the years go by;
A little more stooping of the form,
A little more dim the eye;
A little more faltering of the step,
As we tread life's pathway o'er,
But a little nearer every day
To the ones that have gone before.
A little more halting of the gait,
And a dullness of the ear;
A "rowing weariness of the frame
* With each swift passing year;
A fading of hopes and ambitions, too,
A faltering in life's quest;
But a little nearer every day
To a sweet and peaceful rest.
A little more lonelineBS.in life
As the dear ones pass away;
A bigger claim on the heavenly land
With every passing day;
A little further from toil and care,
A little less way to roam,
A drawing nearer to a peaceful voyage
And a happy welcome home.
—Los Angeles Herald,
CAUFOKNIA'8   OIL   FIELDS.
f
(
From time immemorial the Indians
of California have used the mineral
asphalt um for waterproofing their tepees
and canoes, and the Catholic fathers
protected their mission roofs with the
same material, it is probable that the
first refining of crude oil was accomplished by Andreas Pico in 1855 in Los
Angeles county. During the next five
years many attempts to produce illuminating oil were made, but without
•uccesB.   »
The first scientific report of petroleum
ih California was made in 1865. Professor B. Silliman spoke favorably of
the prospect of obtaining petroleum in
remunerative quantities in the state,
and in the next year many companies
were formed. Their indifferent success
was due to the fact that there was no
drilling machinery adapted to California
conditions to be had, also to the fact
that imperfect knowledge of the conditions lea to operations similar to those
in the east, which proved almost futile.
The great excitement which followed
the discoveries at Oil City, Pa., directed
attention again to the many indications
of oil in California. The boom in oil
stocks in the east reached the coast and
soon the chief news in the California
Kapers was that of oil finds. The craze
egan to cool off in 1865 It is interesting to note now that many of the successful oil wells of today are in ground
explored without avail prior to 18(.o.
The first successful refining was done
by the California Star Oil company at
almoBt the identical spot where it was
first attempted by Andreas Pico in 1855.
The new discovery of oil fields, due
to a clearer, knowledge of tiie peculiar
conditions in California, the improvement, in machinery for drilling and
(tumping, the increase in transportation
acilities and a resulting market, for
petroleum, the discovery that the deposits of coal in the state are inadequate
-tn.the steadily increasing demands fori
fuel, the introduction ofTrosh eastern
capital to develop the business are all
factors in the present eminence of the
oiljndustry in California, despite the
bunted booms of early days. In 1887
there were only four companies engaged
in petroleum minlug. Now there are
organizations innumerable, and eleven
petroleum refineries, not to mention the
asphaltuni refineries at all. Up to tho
yaar 1876 the estimated annual production of oil in California was 175,000
barrels; in 1880,877,145 barrels; in 1896,
1,252,777 barrels; In 1899, 2,292,123 barrels, and in 1900 the estimated product
was about 5,000,000 barrels.
With these hard facts about the
growth of the industry in California,
there are still many problems to solve.
No two oil districts furnish exact conditions. Experts familiar wlMi one district may have to learn everything ovei
again in another. This accounts (or
the fact that even scientific and experienced men have occasionally sunk large
Bums in dry wells.
The belt which yields In some places
coal and In others gas or oil, begins in
some unknown spot in Mexico and extends along the Pacific cnast to Alaska.
Edgar F. Howe, of the Los Angelea
Herald, who has personally inspected
nearly every oil producing district of
tho itato, says:
It is true that in many localities there
li neither oil nor coal in considerable
quantities in evidence, but the forma*
tion in which bitumens are found is
continuous, and the absence of all oil Is
due to tbe fact that there was uo provision for ita retention In the rooks. Aa
there must be natural reservoirs, in the
form of aauditone overlaid with shale,
it li evident that oil could not be expected to be present in all placet where
the formation It favorable; and thut It
it that the greet belt reaching through
the ttate is not uniformly rich In oil,
which It found only in small belt* or
poolt.
The coast range la not composed of
granite like the Blerra Nevadaa, but It
compoted of the three principal factors
of oil bearing formations everywhere in
tbe world, shale, sandstone nnd foaslll*
ferout conglomerate. Thut the oil belt
which enter* California In Han Diego
county, patting by Eltlnure. Illvenide
and I/* Anielet, and extending beyond
the confines of the ttate It of great ex*
tent. It it rlchett at far aa known in
Southern California wh«r* the reewrvolr
conditions are moat Abundant. With
Han Francitro at the northern end It
hat a length ni about fiOO triiltm, an
average width of 70 utiUt, and an area
of 411.000 equare milot.
(HI wat first produced In California in
payin-i quantltlt-a in Ventura county
There hart been about Mi wells drilled
in this I'ounty atoms.   The Union Oil
company nut down about »».  There
The rmtp*m of t,h» mtmlv In about H),im
barreit per month. The weila at*rt at
the rate of 2d to IU barrel* |*r dav,
within tbttt miMrth* 4r»» *M eat-Half,
contlniu* at thH flow for ■boot four
years and l hen i|wr«a««
tv,. ,„ ,.»v v.,ir ,.f Vim*,in   "•miiilr   U
lunteyiomlifil villi wdU.   Jt ham tmit
ship: ing trrudV oil cnnstanlly for flftfwri
years.   In »lt# north end within thr#i*
mon tho nv'-r a million of ten** of r.ii I
claim* have lw*i ioratffi.   Th* Itanrhoi
T«m>i»«'al in the Plm district wat n»-i
eentlv w-W for t7fiM.*»i.   The Oj»i rant h i
on whit.li w.v» f.mA.'.l vl.t-. tlv*i i;.,.U.«v> '
In Ihe county waa nwtmtly punhawd
from iji'imtmr flnr-l '>v tin* rtai-vf f*\) nu-\'
Asphalt   miaptm-  for  ta**Wm     Mr,
Bard began ih« ilevHnpment of oil in,
Utia w»»ty in !♦*»*.
Lot Angela* county xUtuU at thii h«**l [
ef tbe ttate in nit prmtnrtfon.   It gavej
at one time three-fourths of California's
output. The city leads the county.
The original paying well there was
sunk in 1892 and now portions of the
city are forests of derricks. It would
teem that the owners must encroach on
one another's territory, at least underground. It is estimated that a well will
drain a circumference of 150 feet. In
July, 1900, there were 829 wells in Los
Angeles city, owned by 150 companies.
It is a nearly correct estimate lo say
that the field has produced 7,182,000
barrels up to Sept. 1,1900.
The most, famous well in the world is
in the Newball district of Lob Angeles
county It has produced more than
1,500,000 brrrels since it was opened in
1876 and today it shows no sign of giving
out
Santa Barbara county poBsesaes the
oddest oil field in the world. At Sum-
merland is the only place where the
drill is sunk througfi the waters of the
ocean. The oil may thus be shipped
without even the cost of transportation
to the wharf.
In May, 1899, oil was discovered in
Kern county about six miles from
Bakersfield. The first well waB completed in September, and now there is
no place in California where the indications for oil are so favorable as in this
section. Kern county is as large as the
state of Connecticut and it is probable
that it will become the greatest oil producing county in California.
The best oil fieldsare four miles east
of Bakersfield, the metropolis of the
county. It is 814 mi'es north to San
Francisco and 168 south to Los Angeles.
The published freight rate on oil from
Bakersfield to Los Angeles is 42 cents a
barrel,  and from Bakersfield to San
Francisco  52   cents — although, large
Practically
shippers get a 45-cent rate.
Los Angeles makes the price in oil.   If
it is one dollar at Los Angeles it is a
dollar plus the freight from Los Angeles
at San Francisco.
Some of the heaviest consumers of
California oil are the Santa. Fe,and
Southern Pacific railroads, "the street
car and gas companies/the city water
works and the electric light and power
companies in Los Angeles arid San
Francisco,,and the electric light and
smelter companies and great mining
companies of Arizona.
The transportation problem has bf
course figured largely in the develop
ment of the California oil fields. For 15
years oil has been hauled iu tank cars
to Los Angeles and from Los Angeles
to San Francisco it has been conveyed
in tank ships.
Pipe lines have also been established
from the wells to the cities. There are
many of these lines rangirg from three
to 44 miles in length, with from 200 to
1,900 feet head.   Still the transportation
Juestion is a big one when the Southern
'actfic railway, although it is rapidly
building tank cars, cannot haul all the
oil it needs for its own use.
With the discovery that California
petroleum was even more valuable for
fuel than for refining commenced the
profitable production of oil. In the west
tt is found that oil is a cheaper fuel than
coal. Coal is always expensive inCali-
fni*niiLjtnri_Ht^l_A-liparr.fil-_flil_is_Bqiiiva-
lent to $1.50 a ton for coal, which in
reality costs $7.50. As a result locomotives and other engines are being
fitted with oil consumers and the oil
industry is going forward by bounds.
The western sugar refinery in a year's
consumption of oil at $1 80 per barrel
saved $46,012.15.
The greatest future for the use of
crude oil, however, will be in metallurgical work where the degree of heat
has to be adjusted with great nicety.
Many ores have not been worked in
California on account of the high price
of fuel. Tho objection is now overcome
in the use of petroleum. If the Southern Pacific company used oil only for
fuel in its locomotives and stationary
engines in California alone, it is said
that it would consume over 4,500,000
barrels of oil per year, nearly the entire
output of tho state at present.
California oil is a green-blnck crude
petroleum with an asphaltnm base. The
product of parts of Ventura county and
of the Nawlmll district in Los Angolan
county is a notable exception Those
are tho only places in the world where
tho oil is white. It looks like refined
kerosene and at the well for two years
hat brought $4.60 a barrel. The addition of thii oil to tho other dark product
gives in refining an illuminating oil of
20 per cent better quality. Hence it It
sold for mixing. It can be used for
either engine or illuminating purposes
without refining. California oil burns
better than the Pennsylvania product.
Any oil In California or In other
placet flows of ittell. When the oil
stratum It first punctured, the pretsure
of tho gat forces the oil out. but this It
quickly exbauated and the oil mutt
then be pumped. The flow from the
Beaumont, Texaa, gusher, which wat
struck Jan. 9, blew 500 feet into the air
and the derrick and all machinery wat
thrown down. On the 14th, it was
under control and capped. Thia oil
cannot be refined now as there ia sulphur in it. When the process of preparing it for the market iB discovered
and it is uncapped, the well mav flow
for two months.
In California oil is found at all depths
from the seepage on the surface to 4,000
feet in Adams canyon, Ventura county,
where ib the deepest well west of tne
Rocky mountains. The first well in
Kern county was only sixty feet deep,
while the deepest wells are in Ventura
and range from 2,000 to 2,500 feet in
depth.
The Coalinga field in Fresno county
is a district of gushers. The gushers
are intermittent, flowing every twenty
minutes when first struck, but after a
time they cease to flow. The most productive wells are 1,000 or more feet in
deoth.
, The oldest wells in the state have
been pumped for 20 years, and it is believed that the average wells, although
they are not as deep as those of Pennsylvania, which have produced for 85
years, will average longer.
The cost of wells for the first depth of
150 feet is about $800. In some districts
the cost ranges from $500 to $3,000 for
sinking1 the entire well The most expensive well cost $85,000 owing to the
character of the boring. .
As a general rule oil lands in California are good for nothing else.
There are plenty of wild cat companies, of course, with no real oil territory to build on or no satisfactory
geological evidence that oil strata exist
under their lands. Most mining enterprises which have for their object the
development of new territory,especially
when operations are conducted at a distance from any known oil field, are
"wild cat" propositions.
A great deal of California oil is used
in the manufacture of medicines and in
sprinkling dusty roads. Much of it is
consumed for lubricating, some of it
being almost pure in its lubricating
qualities.   Asphaltum is also a valuable
product.
Although it is often said that illuminating oil must be imported by California
and that native oil cannot be properly
refined for illuminating purposes, the
Standard Oil company has accepted the
product of the two refineries in San
Francisco and of that at Chino, and has
paid a good price for one of the refieries
at San Francisco.
aavttaaaAM okbam or tautab rewear*
•j>ie
yam
~CREAM
BAKING
JHWWR
Highest Honors, World's Fair
Gold Medal, Midwinter Fair
Avoid Baking Powders containing
alum. They axe Injurious to health
The iron mines of Minnesota and
Wisconsin have produced during the
past year over $130,000,000 in iron ore
and the equipments upon these iron
mines now represent an investment of
over $350,000,000 in working facilities.
JAMESJ.CODFREY
MINES,
INVESTMENTS
and INSURANC
A   CRITIC   KNOCKED.
Lord Roberts is well known to be
one ot the most modest and retiring
of men, bat the following story is not
so well known. The event happened
shortly before he left for South Africa.
At a dinner party a loud-voiced man
began giving his opinion on'many
things. After a while he came to
military matters and especially addressed bis remarks to a guest who
was somewhat below the average
stature, and who appeared to be maclv
interested, but did not say much. At
last he diverged on to Lord Roberts'
march from Cabul to Kandahar.
"If I had been Roberts," he said,
"there were one or two points in
which I would have acted differently."
"Indeed," said the other man "I
have never thought much of that
march myself. I should be glad if
you would tell me what you think
was wrong."
At this moment the host tried to
interfere, bat the loud man would
ho'j be stopped, and proceeded to
show where Roberts was wrong.
"Very interesting man that man I
was talking to," he said to his host
as they were going out. "Who is
he?"
"Oh, that was Lord Roberts him-
sell."
Seldom has a man looked so crestfallen as did that loud man at that
moment.—Dundee Journal.
Grimmett Block, Reco Ave.
Sandon, B. C.
Rents Collected.   District agent
The Great West Life Assurance Co., Winnipeg, Man.
for
Ajrent Norwich Union Fire Insurance Company.
Connecticut Fire Insurance Co., of Hartford
jEtna Fire Insurance Company.
I'hoeuix, of Hartford. Conn.,
Pacific Coast Fire Insurance Company,
Imperial Registry Company,
The Dominion of Cauadu Guarantee
Accident Insurance Company.
and
Completed reports   show   that   the-!
world's gold production in 1900 was, in
round figures, $307,000,000, an increase
of about $4,000,000-over that of 1899.
THE
BIG STORE
SANDON;
"SHKYlrmm'Mm
Office: W First Ave.
P. O. Box 37
ROSSLAND, B. C.
V.&NM'hone.       Established at Rossland 1896
Mines and Investments
PROMOTING OK MININa  DEALS AND
STOCK COMPANIES A SPECIALTY.
We hare first-claw connection*' with milling
men ami capitalists In tho United States and
Eastern Canada and can find the necessary
money to work and develop meritorious silver-
lead properties In the Lardo aid Slocan districts.
If you have a good silver-lead property with fine
surface showings, please write to us and we will
And the right party to take hold.
Rrspectfully- 8. A. HARTMAN.
Call and .see the largest
stock of Dry Goods, Carpets,
Boots, Shoes, Hats and Gents'
Furnishings in, the Slocan.
The Hunter-Kendrick Co.
J.E.Angrignon
The Leading
Hairdresser
Finest Shop in the Slocan.
BRICK
MARBLE
LIME
THE MANSFIELD MANUFACTURING COMPANY are now prepared
to supply builders and contractors
with all the above building materials.
Our products received First Prizes
and Medals the last two years at the
Spokane Exposition. The Lime that
we are now manufacturing is not
excelled., Special quotations to contractors on application.
THEMANSFIELD
MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
NELSON, B.C. P. O. BOX 688
THE MINERS'
EXCHANGE,
Three Forks
B. C.
Job Printing is an art.
It is today one of the
most advanced of arts,
and greater efforts are
being made to reach
perfection than ever
before in the history
of printing. Every up-
to-date business man
recognizes the importance of having his stationery   well printed.
YOU CAN  GET IT
AT THE LEDGE
The cost is no preater than the low-grade
work that inferior offices will give you
EXAMINATION   FOR   ASSAYERS   FOR
LICENCE   TO   PRACTICE   IN
BRITISH COLOMBIA.
TN ACCORDANCE with section 12 of the
1 "Bureau of Mines Act." examinations for
efficiency in tho practice of assaying will be held
atNelson, B. C. on the ISth April, 1001, and following days.
Entrance for the examination must be made la
wrltm/* to the Secretory of the Board of Examiners at least ten days before the date set for beginning of examination, and must be acconv
panted by the prescribed fee (*J10).
Any additional information desired may bo obtained from H. Carmichael, Secretary, Board of
Examiners, Victoria.
RICHARD McBRIDE,
Minister of Mines.
Department of Mines. Victoria,   B. C, 12th
March ,1901
NOTICE.
Brick Block,   Bellevae Ave.,
Denver, B, C,
New
Provides accommodation for
~ A~tlre~travoilinprpQbiicrrTTT~
Pleasant rooms, and good
meals. The bar is stocked
with wines, liquors and
cigars. HOT and COLD
BATHS.
HUGH M\EN, Proprietor.
ATLANTIC STEAMSHIP TICKETS
To and from European points via Canadian
and American lines,    Apply  for sailing dates
rates, tickets and full Information  to any C.
Ry agent or—
O. B.GARRBTT,
0.1'. It. Agent, New Denver.
W  l>. K. CummliK**., Q. S. S. Agt., Winnipeg
FAMOUS
HAMPDEN WATCHES
PRICES OK A FEW OF TUB
LEADING GRADES:
John Hancock. 31 Jewels, the leading rail-Aon
way watoh TO-J
New Railway,K ruby jewak, udju*.u<d ...OaQ
DueberOrand, 17 jewels, adjusted, a specially good watch for good time and _1 A
baitftervlM   ?10
Dueber Watch Co., 16 jeweU, a good time «Q M)
piece; satisfactory for a llttls money V"*
Ohamulou,. Jewel*, warranted satisfactory, 9tt
Those prices will compare favorably with any
legitimate Jswelery houi ...---
MUtabla eaiM In nickle.
m
alt*
Picture   rVamlnj?   and   Hnora
Moulding, write to
F.J. BRADLEY & GO
PAINTERS & DECORATORS
Mall ttiitait »«<*l»* prompt atunuon
lerj* house, cut or wast.    I have
a nickle. silver and gold filled,
fromtl.antotis.on.
O. W. GKIMMETT, Oradual* optician
and Jewslsr.
.SANUOK, B. C.
%%%%%%%%%^%%%^
■l >
P. J. RUSSELL
Buyer and Kiportn of
RAW FURS
Miners, Attention!
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS
y^} 'CROWN IRANO" *D^
TRAOI
mwwm*
PAIR AHHORTilKJJT
Hlilp hy KiprrM
NELSON, B.C
4
4%%%^%%%%%%%%%%%^<i
PniH *wd
Ornamental
Seed*, Want*, Vines,  etc,
Kxtra choice itoek of Cherry,
FV-trth,  .Iprfcof,   Pfnm   arrrf
other trait tree*.   Moat com-
|iF/»t« iUM-\t 5n th** Pmvfr)'*'-.
lUJ pMK« Catalogue tree,
M* J. HENRY,
>iiii UVitmltutot R««ui. Vanrmtvtr, tt. C.
WHITE LABOR ftSI.T
When In NEURON *»ee our
$25 Suits
*_ OfUlfrit.tVtt,   IHIitM
*vt        1     nr    **t •
Fred. J. Squire,
Manager.
Whose *>
wacc *
iTilttk KVANri'
OEM CHOP HOUSE. KA8U),
, Fi** Fl*h all the timt, ^ W*-5
! Poultry nv*tthe ttm«. 2O   UP
MARK
t
TO DELINQUENT CO-OWNERS.
To E. J. MATHEWS, or to imy person or persons to whom he may have transferred his
interest in the Hattie E mineral claim, at
Glacier creek, a tributary of Wilson creek,
.nine miles from Three Forks, and recorded In
the Record Office for the Slocan Mining
Division.
YOU ARE HEKEHV NOTIFIED that I have
expendedOne Hundred Dollars in labor and
improvements upon the above mentioned mineral
claim, in order to liold Mild mineral claim under
thc provisions of tlie Mineral Act, and if within
ataetvJay^rom^ailaU4if^Uls-na!44*-youfa!U
or refuse 10 contribute your iiru|iortIoii of such
expenditure, together with all costs of advertising, your Interest In *n!<l claim will become the
property of the subscriber under Section 4 of an
Act entitled, "An Act t<; Amend the Mineral Act
WOO." .. ■ ,.  ■'
JOSEPH U. MARTIN.
Three Forks, B. C, March 21. l'.«)l.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENT
DRNVKR, CHIKF, LAKE SHOHE, OLD
MAN »n«l KELPIE  Mineral Claims.
Situate iii the Sloc-ui Mining Division of West
Kootenay Distiict. Where located: About
ono mile southeast of N-w Denver,
TAKE NOTICE thut I, John McLatchio. of
1 the city of NelHon acting as mtvut tor R. C.
Camphell-Johiistou. free mlntr's certificate No.
the city of NelHon acting as a^ent for R.
ipbeir
B 80,086, intend, sixty day* from tlie date hereof,
to apply to the Mlninu' Ifacorder for Certificate*
of Improvements, lor the purpose of obtaining
Crown Grant* of the above claims.
And further take notli'c that action, under section 37, must lie commenced before the ismmnce
of such Certificate* ol Imiirovenii'iits.
Dated this 83rd day oi February, 100].
JOHN McLATCHIE.P.L. S.
OKA   OltANDA   Mineral Claim.
Situate In the Arrow Lake Minimr Division of
West Kootenay District.    Where located*.-
On Mineral Creek, about thn e mile* from Its
Junction with OarlliOu Creek.
•TAKE NOTICE That I, K.C.Orwsn.of Nelson ,
1   U. C, Actliiff asSKuiit for William II, Hurtt,
V, M. C. Si,47fl. TjtjorKn H. D err. V. M, C.3W».
and George «• Ann is. K. M. C. N'o  B S0,<M9,
Inland,  sixty dayi,.from .the.date hereof, to
ritr J
sixty  .....   .
apply to tlie MinlnR Kacordar for a Certificate of
Improvement, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Orant of the above claim,
And farther tako notice that action, under section J7, must b« commenced before the Issuance
of such Certificate of ImiiruvmneiiU
Dated this Doth day of October, iwxi
t-J K. C. OKEBN, l»
TENDERS.
L.H.
KOH FUROHABK OK  MIKKKAl. CLAtlfH.
UUHHUANT TO THK oitt'KK of the Honor-
I able Mr. Justice Irvlnw. listed 10th Kcptera*
»M-r. A. D, 1900, Tenders will lw received by the
undarskned up \-> the ihlrtj flrtt dayofliarth,
A. D. IML forth* puich»-« of i ha mineral claims
oftbeCom«U*ck  . ...
lurt.eltuataat or near Hllvertou, ii.
IXitrlM of the Hloeau
IWll ** *.U*.**nMb.. f 11.
nr. (llrltUh ^olun Wa) Lltn*
llvertou, ii. C, In tha
.... -   ._   mid known a* "Holiy
Troet,""Kentoi*k.v(ilrl," ■ xilvw«1il«f.,,"i!onf
»tork,'"*Wu» l-tterFractloi.." -rtilvrrCnp.'and
"Isabel l"ractl<)ti," nil Crown Oratitad clslms,
andatao theconrmiist.ir nuehliory and plant
thermit belonirtnK to the aeld Ooni|iaiiy either
tofetheror In |Mr«*rl>: Hm* ««ld Mineral Claim* tn
lie sold subject to a rliancr
WILLIAM T.HTKI.V,
official Llnuidator.
Dated thU 1th day of March, A  l> Ifioi,
fts.OraovllleHl.,
Vsiicouver, B.C.
l-ad-r lliillilinir
J"'
fId i s
CANADIAN
^ PAG!" '
Gutta Percha Wator-prooi" Fu»e has
been proved and not found wanting
fto mi hh-ho ten.   No ruuiiuiu:.
AGt.vTS.
BOURNE BROS.  W. HUNTER CO
WEVpV OIN   EH, 9. C. SILVERTON, H C.
DIRECT RXITE
VtkST
AsiAU A
Th  ALL
WKT
•» i_.UA
INKQl'Al.l.KhSKKVlri;
giTU-K TIMI".
Sl'PKHIl K^ril'.MhN I
Itiri-iiuli ll'kit. tu
st.Jome$
\\w-t ffMl* In the? f*tfv--«Vmif»rmbif« n«»riH-H.ir m>\ete with
l.i«|U<»ra ami (%«m—|W*st wrvice !hn»U(»lH.nl.
HOTEL
New Denver, B.C.
\ JaCONBON kiM.,VT9p»
tht beat of
KN<.I,ANI>
AlfSTRAMA
THK CONTINKXT
HIINA   JAPAN
PKKPAII)    TirKKTS    i H<.M
«»l,l» » .>'< NTHY.
THK
for iln.t Utilet »**,.» «ii<i (nl! »:i .tir.atimi'rall
oo or tddrtiastbe n»are«i l'« »l ■#^itt
O. B. t,AKHKTT, AatM Sr*» IVusrf.
' K. J. Co*l», At). I*. Ae« . Vatuutim.
.I.X.t'artn.n.P A.,XHswi, II. C ■ *»
■-v
THE LEDGE, NEW Di_NVEK, B.C., MARCH 21, 1901.
Eighth Yeab
MINING   RB&ORDS
SLOCAN     DIVISION.
LOCATIONS.
Feb. 27—Onyx, near New Denver, John Williams.
Its—Four Mile No 6, Four Mile ok, J C Butler.
ASSESSMENTS.
Feb 21—Smuggler. J5-Spokane Evening
fitarfr, Arab, Black Eagle. March 4-Borer.
A—Freddy. 8—Flora Temple. 8-FourMlleNo
I. 15-Isls, Carrlck. Forum, Erin, Eral, Bal-
■tonnt.
TRANSFERS.
Feb 25—Lvdia fr, \. A Sproat to J M Currie,
and i to E Shannon, Sept 14.
85—Crow fr, E F Lloyd to R Insinger, Jan 31.
J6—St Helena and Troy, sold by sheriff to JS
•C Fraser for *15,000. Feb 16.
87—Star Spangled Banner, Balmoral, Rich'
■ond, Josephine Pollard, J, J T Foley to A
Fisher, Feb 11.
Hnstler fr, re bill of sale, <J*o A Petty to M
flintzburger, Feb 15.
Mch 1—Brunswick, \, J A McKlnnon to A S
JReed, Keb 28.
Brunswick,,, same to A A Webb, Feb 88.
■I—Stanley, \, J A Austen to JO McKay, Sept 18
4—Benbou, W S Drewry to P J Hickey, June 17
Seaton fr, all Interest, F S Clements to P J
Hickey, June 80.
Benbou, Triumph, Triumph and Seaton fr, | In
*ach. P J Hickey to W C Yawkey, Feb 18.
Tom Bowling, Kanawha, 1-8, WOYawkeyto
P J Hickey, Jan 85.
Bendigo, 7-16, Bendigo fr. I, Morning, 9-80, W
H Yawkey to W C Yawkey.THov H.
Ella B,}, J T Kelly to J T Carroll, Feb l,
Province }, A Mullen to J T Carroll, Feb 1.
Province, \, Ella B, J, F L Christie to J T
Carroll, Feb 4.
•—Million, j,M J O'Brien to R McPherson.
Jan85.
WM Anderson declares he holds J Interest In
Ida, Marion and Eagle for J Gazazza.
Republican, 1, D Matheson to A McPherson,
March9.
Arden, i, E Shannon to H J Byrnes, June 5.
11-Clara Moore, Storm, J, A S Reed to C Me-
Nicholl, March 9.
Franklin fr, F Nelson to C A Anderson, Mch 7
IS—Miller Creek fr, notice of suit by Ous Fan-
drey against Emma L Warner.
16-Lake View, 1-5, MA MoDonald to D J
Matheson, Mar 9.
Royal Five, 1-5, Jeamle, 1*5, M A McDonald to
D J Matheson.     °
CEBTUICATBS OF IMPBOVEIONT.
March 7—Victor. Newport, Gone Batchelor,
Dolly Vardeti, S D fr, Legal fr.
ABANDONMENTS.
Feb 82—O R Smith abandons Oversight, near
.NewDenver.
SLOCAN   CITY   DIVISION.
LOCATIONS.
Feb 28—Viking fr, Springer ok, O Henderson.
Mar 5—Allda B, Springer ok, C E Barber.
ASSESSMENTS.
Feb 85—Kokomo.  Mar 2-Creole    7—Enter-
•jprlse fr.
. TRANSFERS.
Feb 85-Black Prince J. J Elliot to D Arr.ot.
Same 1-16, D Arnet to J C Shook.
88—Golden West, J P Drlscoll gives notice of
telaim to one-half Interest, owing to R C Graham's
aicense expiring.
Truro, J McKlnnon claims A Behne's Interest
•a a delinquent.
Republic, Bonanza. American Eagle and Bell,
T Montgomery and D Sutherland to H Lake, of
Detroit, option to purchase to May 1.
87—Golden Belt |,JB Thompson to Jane
Wolf.
Mar5-0PE),MLNicholson to D Brandon.
8-Lu Lu J. Wm Kerr to RD Kennedy.
 Normor.LlttleJ)orritt.Aunty„L»lu.all.,Ricl»*.
aaondj, P'Hauck to J EHorrle,
CERTIFICATES OF IMPROVEMENTS.
Mar 9—Enterprise fr.
AINSWORTH   DIVISION.
LOCATIONS.
Feb 81—Sandow,Campbell ck, A Jardlnc.
85-Brlttanlc, 71r miles n w from Kaslo, C J
*app*.
I7-Tricker, Kootenay lake, R T Martin.
Mar 4—Rex, Kootenay lake, F L Fitch.
•-Dublin, Coffee ck, fi B Thomson.
Toronto, Coffee ok, J L Stamford.
ABHB8SMKNT8.
Feb «-Coppcr Star, Rodney, Mollie, Delhi,
Delamar. 85-Paysrreak. 88-Patricks (4 years).
Mar 8-Galon, Sholer, Glazier, North America.
7-Iron Hand fr. O—Hlll Hursh.
TBAN8FXU8.
FebJl-Sandow. all mt, A Jardine to Globe
Mining Co.  Con M.
M-True Blue, Peacock and Ooppsr Queen, all
lot, W J Fraser and W E Stevenson to Angus
Campbell. Conffl.
85-SummltandHeclaJ, EEChlpman to W
Houston. Con |l.
8tt-Blrd 1*8, J P Miller to N P Johanson. Con
tlBO.     >
Mar O-Bond on Boxen Ophlr and Neglected,
J H Wereley, W h Jeffrey,Chas Faas and W ri
Crawford to LA Thurston.  Con *to,ono.
_8-PretorIa J, 8 M Boy dire* to J h Stamford,
Con «.
Pretoria J, W F Lennox to L Rrnst. Con tl,
0-Power of Attorney, C If llrindle to A H 0
Brlndlfl.
Blackburn L C H Brlndlu to J Malley.
niackbnrn Mt, 0 H llrlndln to 0 W Greonlue.
Blackburn 41*4, C II Hrlinllo to F L Mclnnls.
11-Vlctor *, W H Wotmoro to Wm Lewis.
M --Orion |r, A Hclienlnr to It Williams.
a whiskey manufacturer can use blue stone,
prusslo acid, arsenic, etc., In the commodity he
dispenses at a fabulouu profit, and there Is no
kick.
At an inquiry held in Liverpool, Eng., recently
concerning a death attributed to beer poisoning,
Dr Campbell Brown deposed to testing samples
of sulphuric acid said to have been supplied by
Messrs. Nicholson to Messrs. Bostock, the glucose
manufacturers, and stated that some of the cr\s
tals obtained in the analysis were almost entirely
composed of white arsenic. He had made a
calculation of tbe total amount of arsenic which
would be found in thirty weeks delivery of beer,
and it gave a total of over four tons of white
arsenic, or 2,191,000 grains per week, which, if
divided into equal doses and administered at one
time, was enough to kill one millloi people, or
the whole ot the inhabitants of Great Britain in
a season. " >
The vast pllgrimags of Bacchus devotees
places both the questions of prohibition and
stute ownership of the whiskey business too far
across the golden hills of time to be within
measurable distance of praotlcal politics for
many yvjars to come, but surely such iniquitous,
unblushing legalized murder would not,. If men
had as much brains as they have stomaohs, be
tolerated.
When the Holmes castle tragedies were dls
covered In Chicago, public Indignation was
aroused to lynch law temperature. When a poor
Ignorant duffer of a negro in Texas committed
an outrage on a white woman a few days ago,
the Texans made a public holiday and held a
public demonstration to lynch tbe poor fool, and
after saturating him with coal oil, set fire to him
In the prison yard. But for years that rich,
educated, civilized article, the brewer, has been
wilfully and deliberately doing to death by slow
poison the worshippers of Bacchus, and yet the
law Interferes not, and public opinion calmly sits
by, makes an Indignant gesture perhaps, but
such is his Infatuation for the, damning stuff,
notwithstanding the many clear, horrible,heartrending proofs of this wholesale legalized murder, not a thing Is done, and the guardians of the
public health and life are either powerless, lazyi
or personally interested In this shameful business
to Interfere. And yet we boast of our civilization.
Savagery, rather I
No wonder that the people are taking the
hatchet in hand and attempting what the law is
either powerless or afraid to undertake. The
action bf Mrs. Nation and her hatchet brigade Is
but a storm signal of the mighty tornado, which
some of these fine days, manned by wronged'
Buffering and oppressed men, women and children, wil; arraign themselves, not only against
ihe whiskey trust, but against the rapaolous
crowd of millionaires, trust mongers and monopolists, who are thieving and murdering the
poor unfortunates of helpless and starving
humanity to satisfy and magnify their Infernal
greed. , YEL D'AORB.
Kootenay. B.C., March 16th, 1901.
come out of, the box his way. Another draft was made on his roll of
bills, nnd then another, and still an*
other. At the end of two hours Levy
was loser to the tune of $16,500. He
arose from his seat, and was about to
leave. He hesitated a moment; and
turning toward the table he noticed
the queen had won three times,
"Hold the deal, please," he observed,
at the same time reaching over and
placing a bill on the queen.; The
card won, and the dealer paid the
bet for $1,000. Moving the whole
Bum over on theace,Levy won again.
The deal was now near the close, and
the Montana sport calmly waited tor
the last turn. It soon came, with a
ten, jack and seven in the box.
"I call it seven-jaok, for the two
thousand," cried Levy. It came ten-
seven, and Levy unconcernedly left
the table. The gamt proceeded as
though nothing out of the ordinary
had happened.
The Fright the Ghost Had.
During a confirmation tour in the
diocese of Peterborough, the late
bishop of London put up one evening
at an old manor house, and slept in a
room supposed to be haunted. Next
morning at breakfast the bishop was
asked whether he had seen the ghost.
"Yes," he replied, with great solemnity, "but I have laid the spirit; it
will never trouble you again.
Being further questioned upon the
subject, the bishop said:
"The ghost instantly vanished
when I asked for a subscription toward the restoration of Peterborough
cathedral. "—Argonaut
When Fears aro Railed in Louisiana.
While Bishop Potter of the Episcopal church was traveling through
Louisiana some years ago he addressed inquiries to his fellow-passengers with a view of obtaining knowledge regarding the orchards and
fruit interests of the state.
"Do you raise pears in Louisiana ?"
inquired the bishop.
"We do," responded the Louisian-
ian, "if we have threes or better. "~
San Francisco Call.
1890
Established in Nelson
1890
American
Watches
Diamonds
Jewelery
AU work guaranteed at—
Nelson, B, C.
.a*.
Are you needing goods in our line?
If so why not send us a trial order? We
will convince you of the superiority of )Q(
our stock, and facilities for supplying [jf]
your wants. Jfj
Our MAIL ORDER business is large
and constantly growing because we
have the goods at right prices, and give
each order prompt and careful attention.
Our Watch Making and Jewelery
Departments have no equal in B. C.
JACOB DOVER'S B
THH JErWraLilDR,.
niiiiiiiiiiiiiim
••al
THK  NIK   Or   HAD   WIIIHKKY.
UNDER   THK   HOOK.
"French Levy," the well-known
Montana gambler, is dead. He died
in Butte a few days ago, and as is so
often tbe case with members of that
calling, he died broke.
At one time Levy was one of the
most noted gamblers in Montana. He
was a plunger, and no game was too
stiff for him to »play. When fortune
was running his way, Levy had a
greatbankaccount, and. his.games
had no limit. His favorite game was
poker, but faro commanded a good
deal of his attention.
No sport in the west had more nerve
than Ltivy, and no man had a more
tender heart. In the flush days he
spent a vast amount of money in
charity, and yet few people knew
anything about it. Tne wife of a
noted western Congressman owes her
education to Levy, But he was not
much given to sentiment; his trade
did not promote that characteristic.
In 1876 Levy paid a visit to Virginia
City, Nev. Times were flush and
money a drug on the market. Con.
Virginia apd California mines were
each paying $1,080,000 every, month
in dividends, and the 8,000 miners on
the Comstock were earning $4 a day.
Stooks were fluctuating, and fortunes
were made and lost In a day. The
very air was charged with the spirit
of speculation. An hour alter Levy
landed In the town, he was in BUI
Dormer's luxurious club rooms. There
was an air of quiet elegance about
the place that contrasted strangely
with tbe Montana housos. Levy
thought tho house was run to merely
catch the dry goods clerks, bookkeepers and such like. But he concluded to chance It. Taking a seat
at tho crowded table, ho inquired as
to what was the limit. The dealer
glanced at Levy, recognized a real
sport, and without saying a word,
Klnted to the celling. Then the play
gan. Levy dropped ten twenties
on the king and coppered the Ave
spot for a similar sura. They lost on
tne turn. Five hundred dollar-) went
down on the ace, but ll remained
there only a moment—the dealer
transferred It to another part of the
table where a mine superintendent
had won. Levy drew from hia pooket
a roll of bills and passing over a thou*
sand dollars asked for blot chocks.
He tried one s.vstem after another,
but somehow tho cards would not
The fact that the American Smelting
& Refining company is to increase its
capital stock to $100,000,000 reflects the
general condition of the mining industry
in North America. This company now
contemplates purchasing a number of
smelters scattered over a wide area and
in acquiring same will expend in the
neighborhood of 120,000,000.
JOHN WILLIAMS
Dealer In
IMPORTED
AN0 DOMESTIC CIGARS
ANDTOBAOCOES,
PIPES, &C.
Van Camp Lunch Goods, Confection-
cry and Fruit
BATHS IN CONNECTION.
Newmarket Block.        NewDenver
Hill Bros.
Manufacturers of
ber
and
Shingles
CONDENSED ADS.
[Condensed advertisements, such as For Sale,
wanted, Lost, Strayed, Stolen, Births, Deaths,
Marriages, Personal, Hotels, Legal, Medical,etc,,
are Inserted when not exceeding 80 words for
25 cents each insertion. Each five words or less
over i> words are live cents additional.]
FOR SALH.
DRY ORB PROPERTY, North Pork Carpenter creek-ALPS. ALPS FRACTION,
and ALTURUS-Crown Grants obtained. Apply, W. J. MCMILLAN ft CO., Vancouver, B.C.
TR.AXN-HJD NXJKSB1
MISS STOUGHTON
TRAINED NURSE, is open for engagements.
Address- SI.OOAIT, B..O.
H. GIEGERICH
Staple and Fancy
GROCERIES
To tht Editor of Thk Lrdos :
Dear8lr,-Tlic loth century hu.glrtn birth to
three new phases of tho whiskey trust which hu
done more to clear ihe atmosphere and consoll*
date puhlh opinion on the temiwrancc question
than alt the Intemperate bandying* and clap
trap of temiwraiio* traddlori for the last Un
years. First in Importum* comes Mm. Nation
and herliatcheti secondly, the beer polsonlnv In
England; and thirdly, the attitude of Premier
Row In Ontario, and thu anion of tha Roblln
government In Manitoba, tho former lu repudl*
atlng the claims of the prohibition crank and the
Utter In reftudlatliiK their own prohibition legislation.
This latter pliaw of thu question has demonstrated beyond the shadow of a doubt the un*
willingness, U-criiifci or their inability to deal
with It, of public men to legislate along these
tines, and lis* theruby compelled prohibitionists
to ransack tlio toiiiri, of law and twramon sense
for some oUmr*.lutl'm. Mrs. Nation's crusade
hasdtnwi.itruudn,.>l«Arly wean b# shown to
tbe blind bats of pulillu opinion that the much
i«i**i in AmiM* j.r.ii'iiimiuu saw is to an intents
tiiiiljmr 'il"i" n iii ■nilV" llduiy null fii.|.|« m.t ju'i-
Dibit.
The beer polsotilnir In England Is tbe most
lerious |<lu« nl Urn <jut**tlun, and from which
prill-ably tlm lw*t result* will follow, becauM it
ha* Iwlk'sti'i1 sit Hourly, that lie who runs may
»*.,iililllill*i .i. il..    A*Al*,W«M*  W»Mj.i*t'«,*iiA   tn*
fatuallon fur dram drinking.  Noor.it dtnlee tht
tnr*K of tht; wlilnki-y habit, yet nerertheluM and
»olwllli«Uiiillii« men and women mutt hare
tbtlr weotlrr.|*i>' Hi' oraythur'an practically to
kavt placed it In the catalogue of neoeailllM.
Hence it Is all tl a more Important that tht
a nlhorltlff should net that the «>*!«'«» drink U
fn-e from the damnable adulteration, which Is 1 __
•las, nne of the chief cher*eterlrt!e* *.f the whl»*   -,     „ ,, „
a-y buslne...  II a tmker nut* a tump of slum  0ar &-KKABC1 WUgOlia  lUOCt  all Sun*
Into bis dough to make his bn*d  white and day tralni.
•pongy,<#tti» milkman forget* to shingle his ——
^u:,^?lrarrXtr:r,',^  Saddle Howes arrack ^im-n.
butt»r, h.. la lined or i*rompiiy acnt u, mm. But       Feed Stablei at New Denver.
TEHSTTS A) AWNINOS.
THEO. MADSON, Nelson, 0. O., mimufac-
1    tures Tents, Awnings, Horse and Wajfon
Cover*, and all kinds of Canvas Goods.
L3HINTIST.
DENTIST
DR. MORRISON,
NELSON, U. 0.      Cor. WAltD & BAKER 8ts.
SANITARIUM.
Orders shipped to all parts
Country.     Mill at head
—Slocan Lake. -
of the
of
Postoffice address. Rosebery.
JAMES  CROFT,
GRAYING
Hauling and Packing; to Mines,
and general local business.
WOOD   AND   COAL    FOR    SALE
New Denver, B. O.
Brewers of Fine Lager Beer and Porter—the best In the land.   Correspondence solicited.   Address—
R. REISTERER& CO., Nelson, B.C.
#
H.BYER8 & CO..
HEAVY  AND  SHELF
HARDWARE
Goal, Iron,
Steel, Blowers,
Water Motors,
Truax Ore Cars,
Ore Buckets,
Rails, Belting,
Packing, Wire Rope.
Tin and Sheet
Ironworkers
NELSON, B.C.
KASLO, B. C.
SANDON, B. O.
P.BURNS&C0.
 .Havejhops^n^^ 	
of Kootenay and Boundary. They sell the
best meat obtainable and aim to give satisfaction to every customer. Try a line of their
steal
P.   BURNS   &   CO.
California
Wine Co.,
NELSON, B.C.
Wholesale dealers tn
NOTICE TO
uuri- ii hn b I  II
Rusluont PhyslPiaii
HALCYON HOT SPRINGS SANITARIUM. ThuuioHtcompleU'U r i I Til
on Uio Gontlmmt of North Araurl* n L A L I Q
ca. Sllunted midst snmery un
rivalled for Grandeur. Hunting
Fishing and Excursions Il«n
and Nurse. Tutarraphlc communication with nil
parts of the world! two mails arrive and depart
every day. It* bathes cure, all nervous and
muscular disensi'si It* waters heal all Kidney.
Liver and Stomach Ailments. Terms: #16 to m
pur week •ccordliiK to residence in hotel or
villas, The price or a round-trlii ticket between
New Denver and Halcyon, obtainable all the
year round nnd ifood for W) day*, Is rt.U. Hal*
cyon Sprlnir*, Arrow Lake, B. O,
SUnVOYOR,
A.
H HEYLANI), Eiifnneor and Provincial
Laud Surveyor.  Sandon.
Diiuas,
les.
r. TKKTSKL * CO.,
Dealer* In all Uiuifii and
Kelson, II. 0.
Aawyers' Hu|»
TAILORS,
TR.   CAMKKON, Haiidou. MMiuftrttirei
.  Clothliiit toorden mid sollelts palMiiam
"" ta*»iis.
from til eli
•VV_iOl««o-l«   Merohantt,
rrURNKR, IlKKTOM * CO., Wln.l«»le
X MerrhHtitf and Importers; Liquors, Cljrars
aud Dry OckxIs. Nelsuii. Vancouver, Victoria,
•nd London, Kim
Agent for
AAAMllill **•*■»*■  *•«-*.    T°H**   OIIOLDITOII   A   CO.,    Nelson,
OOnriU/IM nAMni COM   lmporur..Wholea.leOra)ers..ilPro»lslon
UUUUflllt       UnilULLO
GiANI POWDER
FIENDS!
AmoncHii prlcen.
ftnythlnayou want
I will now sell
Hollo,      Pilm«,
Kodaks at
American'prlcw.  Send for price* on
you want.
rHATMEAHN, Kaslo, B.C
SILVERWARE
A tall line of Silverware and choice
Confectionery at
nrsJ.H.Wereley's
Josephine Ht, New Denver.
Choice Wines
and Fragrant
Cigars   **
Agents for Calgary Beer.
HEfyTASLO HOTEL    V
TiK
Fasully *
■trcl-l.
L
arge
And
WADD8 BROS
PHOTOGRAPHERS
VANCOUVER an* NCL80N, B.C.
J. W. BALMAIN
CIVIL ENGINEER,
AROHITEOT, ETO.
O. Boi IT0.
HANDON, II. C.
d.K.OLARK,
MINES
and MINING
Keporta, Examination! and Manage*
ment.
NEW DENVER,  ■  B. O.
Comfortable
Rooms
Fitted with every modern
convenience. Special protection against fire. Rates $2.50
and $3 per day.
COCKLE & PAPWORTH,
Proprietor*.
DENTISTRY.
DR.
MILLOY
ROSSLAND
IIm hod J» year* •mHtnesi In (total work, tn4
make* a sfMcUHy or Ootd Bridge Work.
Most complete Dental Office Id B. C.
OUR CORBET DEPARTMENT IS l!|'*TO.DATK
IN AM. 8TYU;S AND
PRICES.
Imiiiiimiimiiii
I
Fred. Irvine & Co.
NELSON, B. C
[NEWUNEOK 8PIKE8 and
RIBBON ENDS JUST IN, \
FPlKF.Sfrom5cto.7X
i
Ladies
KASI.0
A1NHWORTH
RANDOM
PALMA ANGRIGNON
General Draying: Mining Supplies and Heavy Transportation a Specialty.
Mam i *******.
H.
UmOHiTXa,
wTsonAxii,      '
BARRIHTKR k «OW0»TOR
NOTAKV VVliUe.
fciiifan.in.O.
J? t. 01IHIHTIK. _. h. It., lUrrlster. So*
*, lk*lt«r. Vnurj* Publlr. Hand -n, B. 0.,
very Krlilajr at	
Ilrsin
! Mllvrrto.1.
L. OniMMKTT. „. I,.
Holkltor. Notary I'oMIr
tt
H.. \Utr.aur,
Hsndon.B.C
ranch OIb>« at New Uoiivrr affrv H«tortl*y
HOTHHiB
'lUIK l.Kf.ANK 1IOI7MK, Xnku.n. B. C„
I l<r"vtdei «o»d *croinm<«l»ilm,« f«r traveler*.
mm McIK.naai.n-
M'HK ARMNOTON  	
J   •, Jl-L-tM?.!^.!-!..^?!*!? *'"• Po'«•t^>*r,
**>•   'livnivo A M*»r«m»fl*
HftTRI., slwtiiOltfj
Let u» ctsitii vuu
81'RINO
wmiiieH oi uur
DKEBS GOODS.
HiiW
Gentlemen
ii >ou want Ihe uooOtesvi U\u\yt out tn uwntx
«e«r, write iu, or visit a* when in Neleon
k*V
Wash Fabrics
A lovt'ly displiiy uf thii «teanon'i
cholwut pattern* mid wenvt**,
novtiltli-Hinntrollwl (ixiluilvulv
byu*. Dlmltl*t,Sw|iw«ii,Fr«m*"h
<»rg»n(H««, M«rctn*ixi'il, Foulard*.
nnd Hher*   Priest '!.1c to "iOi- y(f.
New Cotton Waists
Superb creation* in whitn tudcol*
ored, correct style* of 1901     Tbme
nuklnjf wli'Ction* now have the ad-
vantajr* of tizefl and etcluwlte nor
ftltiea.   Price* IHoW.
SOI.K AGENTS FOR
Rt'TTF.HICK PATERSS.
Fred. Irvine & Co,
MMM*MMMMtt*Mtt«
rRUNKS ANi» VALISES OF
ALL SIZES ahhSTYLKS
at VERY MW PRICES
TUB ONLY RELIABLE,  f NELSON, B. C.
■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ItlHIPIltttett****^*****"********!*!**^
li
/
i

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