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The Ledge Sep 22, 1898

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 ^Uju^iX^u^\  Volume V.   No. 51.  NEW DENVER, B. C, SEPTEMBER 22, 1898.  Price, $2 00 Year  1.AB0UT THE SLOGAN  The Miller creek shipped a car of ore  last week.  P. S. Andrews, Slocan City's lawyer,  has removed to Nelson.  It is said the Washington will resume  operations in a few days.  Another shipment of 20 tons was made  this week from the Bosun. .  has  continue the No. 2 drift 115 feet to the  Last Chance line, which will give  stoping* ground of over 300 feet; also to  drift 50 feet in the same direction from  the bottom of the winze.  Parris & Co.'s store,  Ten Mile,  been temporarily closed down.  A car shipment of ore from Carbonate  No. 2, Spring creek, was made this  week.  A car shipment of ore from the Native  'Silver Bell lias beenjmade that will net  :��300 a ton  Ten men are employed by the Good-  enough Company on tne drey Copper  claim, with Tom Jones as foreman.  Five men are at work on the Minnehaha. A trail has been cut from  Tributary creek and cabins are being  .built.  , Considerable work will be done on  the Eclipse this fall and winter. Several offers for the property have been  made.  The Bosun mine looks better every  day. More ore is being taken out and  a greater quantity coming into the  workings.  Work on the Sultana group, the property lately acquired by W. Ii. Sandiford  on Four Mile, has been started, and the  property will be developed as fast as  possible.  Word has been received from the new  Minster of Mines that work on a trail  from some point on the C.N.P.Ry. to the  White Grouse district will be commenced at once.  Six hundred and twenty tons of ore  were shipped from Sandon mines lust  week. Of this amount the Payne slapped -1:00 tons, Ruth 100, Last Chance 0(1,  and Slocan Star 00.  A wagon road is being built from the  lake sliore road to tlie Bosun mine.  Seven hundred dollars will be expended  ���on it. The hauling for the mine will be  done by Wm. C. E. Koch, who is also  doing the freighting for the Enterprise.  Kirkwood & Wells have just finished  erecting winter quarters on the Ohio,  Ten Mile creek, and will prosecute  work during the season. The showing  on the property is excellent, and by  spring the owners will have considerable ore on the dump.  While the Comstock mine, Four Mile,  is fulfilling the most sanguine expectations of its' owners, and thousands of  tons of ore are on the damp, and a great  ���area of it blocked out for future stoping,  it is not now probable the concentrator  will be erected there before next spring.  John McMullin was down from the  Wakefield Thursday, after putting in  several months without missing a shift.  He reports everything about the Wakefield allright, t.and says tlie mine will  surprise the mine operators when it  starts shipping in earnest, which will be  in a few week's time.  Ex-Attorney-General Eberts has directed the issuing of a writ against the  Times Publishing Co., of Victoria, for  libel. It is understood, that the proceeding is based upon the allegations  in the Times as to advice given by Mr.  Eberts, when attorney-general, to the  Lieutenant-Governor.  A lease from Braden Bros, of the  Ajax Fraction has been secured by the  Coin Mining Company, and woi k will  be renewed"on the property this week  Drifting both ways on the ledge will be  continued. The'paystreak is three to  eight iHebe's wide ami the ore. gives  ozs.   silver,  and '08  per  OF    IOCAL    INTEREST.  The C.P.R. tug boat will be ready for  traffic in a few weeks time.  H. Clever will erect a couple of dwelling houses here in the spring.  Hon. C. H. MaeKintosh has bought  the townsite of Deer Park, paying $10,000  cash for it.  E. Bragdon, son of H. T. Bragdon,  who has spent the summer here, left for  Spokane on Monday.  In the Bank of England there are  many silver ingots which have lain untouched for nearly 200 years.  Geo. Aylwin left for the east Wednesday morning. He will spend some  months with relatives in Quion, Que.  Services will be held in the Methodist  church next Sunday at 11 a.m. and 7:15  p.m. Everbody welcome. R. N. Powell,  preacher.  It is with inexpressible joy that Neil  tells the brief story of his being the  daddy of a bouncing baby girl, born to  Mrs. Gething on Tuesday.  The C.P.R. has issued orders that all  packages of money, clothing, etc., for  New Westminster fire sufferers-will he  carried-over that road free of charge.  A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs.  M. A. Wilson on Sunday, and "Tony" is  without exception the happiest of happy  men in the whole of the big silvery  Slocan.  A   MAMMOTH    LEDG1",  One of the most surprising and interesting developments of the past week  has been the find of rich gold quarts on  Boulder creek, which promises to be  richer than anything heretofore found  in the district, says the Fort Steele  Prospector. The quartz is of surprising richness, and small samples when  panned give large returns in gold.  The location of the new discovery is  on the west side of Boulder creek, about  two and one-half miles from Wild  Horse, and not over seven miles from  Fort Steele. The ledge is visible  for about 400 feet on the surface,  and the ore chute has been followed for  a distance of 150 feet.  Some two weeks ago it was reported  that a large and rich strike of silver-  lead ore had occurred on the Sullivan  groop, and that the ledge was some 30  ROSSIS XD   NEWS   NOTKS.  The Bank of Montreal is building a  substantial stone structure in Rossland.  A marked improvement is reported  on the Jumbo. The face of the.lower  tunnel is now coming into good looking  quartz.  The Copper Wonder group, on Sophie  mountain, has been surveyed by the  owners, A. G. White and Nicholas Reu-  ter. The property comprises the Copper  Wonder and the "Copper Chief.-���-���-���--  Machinery has been installed on the  Green Mouutain group, Red Mountain.  Less than 60 days ago the owners started work on the property and in two  months time an entire steam plant has  been installed.  GENERAL   FL0AT J  Several cases of scarlet and typhoid  fever are reported from Slocan City. The  sick are well guarded and taken care of  and there is little danger of it becoming  epidemic.  The postmaster of Slocan City was admitted to the hospital this week suffering with fever. Another case was  brought   in   on   the   train   Wednesday  morning.    M.    M.  charged Monday.  A report comes  grave irregularities  Works department  Heekmnn   was   dis-  from Victoria that  in the Lands and  under the  last ad-  feet in width.    Mr. E. C. Smith, manager  of  the  mine,   returned to Fort  Steele Mondav,  and  during  an interview with a Prospector reporter, said  that the  lead  was much wider, probably 100 feet at the least,  that a horse  was encountered which at that timewas  supposed to be a wall, but |later explorations have demonstrated that the led��-e  proper must be about 100 feet in width.  The Sullivan group of mines consists  of the following claims,  Hamlet, Shy-  lock and Hope, and were discovered by  Messrs.   Smith,  Clever, Burchett and  Sullivan,   in   1892,   who sold  the property  to  Spokane parties.   The  new-  company is   known    as   the Sullivan  Group Mining Co..  F.  Mogan is president. Chas. Wolf, treasurer, and  F. L.  William, secretary.   On the directory  board are Col.  Peyton,  Col. Redpath,  Major'Armstrong, 'Col. Turner, Frank  Graves, Judge Blake, F. Post,  and E.  C.Smith.   The Sullivan  is stocked for  �����2,500,000    and   is   controlled   almost  wholly by Spokane parties.    Mr.  E   C.  Smitii retaining a 2Sth interest, in fact  we may say that the Sullivan group is  ownod'and controlled  by   the principal  stockholder* of the famous Le Roi mine  of West Kootenay.  XEW   AVOUKINT.S    ON     ISNTERIM'-tlSE.  assays of   1  cent', lead.  A car load of air 'pipe arrived at Mc-  Guigau last week and is now being-  laid from the Dardenelles compressor  to tho mine to replace the defective  pipe which recently caused trouble  Air pressure will be'used to operate the  pumps, drills and hoist, and work will  be resumed as soon as the machinery is  in operation.  C M. Acatt, a South African mining  man, is about to take a lease on the  Great Western and has put eight men  to work on the property. The Great  Western mine, 'which belongs to the  Two Friends company, has a large  amount of concentrating ore in sight.  The. product was formerly handled  through the Washington mil! which has  been shut down for some time on account of the scarcity of water.  W. W. Warner has completed his contract on the. Treasure Vault of a 125-foot  upraise, connecting No. 2 drift with No.  l,"and a winze of 50 feet. The prnperty  is worked by two drifts run in on the  ledge showing continuous ore. and both  the winze, and upraise, wliich are in 250  feet, show ore ranging all the way from  eight inches to three feet. A further  contract has been let to Mr. Warner to  ministration have been brought to light  and that full enquiry will be a.sked for by  royal commission.  It will be a source of satisfaction to  the citizens to learn that a company is  being formed to put in a system" of  waterworks in the spring. One by one  New Denver acquires the accessories of  a modern metropolis.  Geo. William's new cottage is about  completed. It has tlie finest residential  location in town, overlooking the lake  at the prettiest point and at an elevation that precludes the possibility of the  view ever being cut off.  The body which was found the other  day in the river near Revelstoke has  been identified as that of Mr. Spragge,  barrister of that city, who has been missing since June. The verdict of the  coroner's jury was accidental death by  drowning.  The Sunday school picnic held Friday  in the woods near the Railroad Station  was just about, the most nicest thing the  boys and girls have had anything to do  with in a long time. About 100 people,  old and young, were fed at lunch time.  More than 50 children were present.  New- workings have been commenced  on the Enterprise. Ten Mile. No. 1  tunnel has been started 115 feet below  the No. 2, and near the end line of the  iron Horse. No. 0 tunnel has been  commenced up towards the Empress  Fraction. This is being run in to catch  the vein as exposed in the shaft sunk  during the summer. Ore in these has  been carried from the surface, further  revealing the extent of this marvelous  chute of" ore and enhencing its great  value. In the upraise between No. 2  and No. 3- workings, there is a solid  showing of three feet of ore. Every  opening on the property carries mineral  in place, all are in a position to be stop-  ed. Two hundred men could be employed on the property with ease, but  at present the force is less than 20.  OPBX1NG    OF   OPERA    HOUSE.  The work of installing the new plant  on the Deer Park is making fast progress. The big boiler is in place and  the masonry around it is being constructed. The workof constructing the  foundation for the compressor is also  under way.   It is now certain that the  giant wilf be in operation by the 1st of  ctober.  The annual meeting of the Gertrude  Gold Mining Company was held a day  or two since at Spokane and the following officers were elected : President,  Wallace Mount; vice-president, IL W.  Bonne; treasurer, A. Beamer; secretary, John W. Murphy. These officers,  with Mr. E. L. Tate, constitute the  members of the board of directors. The  main shaft on the Gertrude is to be sunk  to a depth of 200 feet. It is now down  80 feet.  The reorganization of the R. E. Lee  Company is being accomplished as  rapidly as possible. Thomas S. Gilmour  has been appointed liquidator of the old  R. E. Lee Gold Mining Company, and  is now winding* Up its affairs. Shareholders of the old company have been  given until the 15th of October to claim  their shares and pay an assessment of  1 cent, per share, in return for which  they wiil receive an equivalent issue of  stock in the new R. E Lee Gold Mines,  limited All stock in the old company  not claimed before the Kith of October  will be sold by the liquidator.  Must   Supply   a   Market.  It has been decided to  opera house about Nov  The concert to be given Wednesday  eve, Sept. 28, in Clever's hall, by the  Ladies Aid of the Methodist church, is  one full of promised surprises, and it is  claimed it will excell any of the numerous excellent concerts given by local  talent.    Mr. Kerr will   act as chairman.  The Liberal-Conservatives of Ivaslo  have organized a union with the following officers : President, C. \V. McAnn;  vice-presidents, Col. Stone and G. E.  Martin; sec.-treasurer, IE. F. Stephenson; executive committee, Messrs. Mc-  Callum, McKenzie. Moore, Godv, Hanha,  Tuck.  Now that the railroads are beginning  to advertise their rates to the Spokane  fruit fail-the people are commencing to  talk more about going and are making  their plans. The rate of -two rents a  mile appeals to all as a great improve  uient over the rate of five cents. The  difference between $4 for the round trip,  for instance, and $10 is worth considering-  Mrs. Amos Thompson leaves Saturday  on a visit to her eastern home She will  be. accompanied for most of the trip by  the Misses Everett, Griffiths, Parsons  and Foster. Miss Parsons goes from Ten  Mile, where she has been visiting with  her sister Mrs. C. IB. Taylor, to he* home  in Boston. Miss Foster, after spending  the summer with her sister Mrs. Kerr,  is returning to Scotland, and the Misses  Everett and Griffiths return to their  homes in New Brunswick.  open the new  1 bv a grand  concert given by the New Denver Brass  Band. Arrangements are now being  made to ensure the success of the affair.  The program will be confined to the  members of the band, and it will be the  first of the kind held in the town. The  concert will be followed by a ball, the  music to be furnished by the Millward  orchestra.         ���i.r>0 Tons a  Day I'mni  the  r^e Koi.  The Monetary Times, referring to  The Mining Critic's estimate of the lead  producing capacity of the Trail smelter  and the influence of its output on the  market says: -"Production on this scale  would materially increase supplies  within the Dominion and make necessary an enquiry as to the future of the  market. If the product of British Columbia smelters cannot, by reason of  excessive duties, be exported at a profit  to the United States, should not a way  be found to make shipments to Eastern  Canada remunerative. Possibly the  Quebec commissioners, to whom all  matters are popularly referred at present, can solve the lead problem."  Andrew Tunks returned to New Denver Sunday evening, after several months  absence, most of which time he has  spent in the far north. He left early  iast summer with James McDonald  for the Klondike. They went as far  over the summit as Lake Bennett  together, and there, finding that it  would be impossible for both to go  through,- they separated, McDonald taking everything he needed,and Tunks turning back. As early as it was possible  to navigate Mr. Tunks secured another  outfit and alone went over the summit  again and then went up the Stewart  river, where he spent several months  prospecting, with little success. As was  stated last week, McDonald managed to  get through and made a small stake  working a bench claim.  Mr. Tunks is not enthusiastic over the  Klondike's prospect. While he does not  doubt that gold is very nice when you  find it, and that there is lots of it where  it is liberally deposited, the act of finding these scattered depositories on the  benches and in the creek beds is too  great an undertaking for the ordinary  man.  On his northern trip he witnessed  some of the most pitiable scenes imaginable. On the trail he saw hundreds of  broken-hearted men who had become  physical wrecks through their mad exertions in trying to reach the favored  streams. Cn the trail, men were glad to  dispose of their outfits for little or nothing; fiour could be bought for a dollar a  sack, and sacks of beans, etc., were  strewn about carelessly and could be  bought for less than they cost in the  coast cities. Men were wild to g^t out,  and were rerfdy to do anything to raise  the wherewithal to pay their passage  back to civilization. Thousands who  had never handled a pick in their lives  before and had nevei been in a mining  camp, were met on the trails, most, of  of them in a broken-hearted state.  On Stewart river he met a man and  wife with two little girls. They were  trudging along under their heavy loads,  going farther and farther away from  civilization and uearer and nearer to the  frozen region from which, in all probability, they will never return. And  this is only one case of hundreds he witnessed en route. He says the scenes of  sorrow, of wrecked humanity, shattered  hopes and blasted opportunities will  never be erased from his memory, and  he hopes never to be placed where he  must witness such suffering again.  posed plan whereby John A. Finch was  to take a bond for 820,000 on the property and to admit such of the stockholders as desired to become interested with  him in the bond in proportion to their  holdings of stock. The stockholders'  meeting was held last,week in Spokane  with 670,000 of the 900,000 issued shares  of the company's stock represented. Of  these. 520,000 were known to favor the  proposed deal. Since the meeting the  secretary has received proxies for 20,-  000 more shares also favoring the bond.  It was the small minority not represented who upset the plan. They were  eastern stockholders. Nearly' every  share held in Spokane was represented  and all favored it.  When the meeting convened Mr.  Finch stated to the stockholders that he  had received several letters and telegrams from small eastern stockholders  denouncing the plan as a high-handed  proceeding and had also noted an adverse criticism in the Toronto Mail.  While he believed the plan to be a good  thing for the stockholders, large and  small, he said he did not care to undertake the project if he was to be thus  bitterly denounced by the people whom  he sought to help. So in spite of the  fact that there was a great majority of  the stock present and ready to approve  the bond Mr. Finch declined to enter  into the arrangement.  Canadian's   On   Top.  The Toronto Telegram is a strong  advocate of the principle of Canada for  Canadians. It tritely says: British  Columbia's new Government incluues  four natives of Canada and one native  of England. British Columbia's old  Government was made up of four Englishmen and one native Canadian, the  Hon. D. M. Eberts-, Attorney-General.  This change from an overwhelmingly  English  to  an    overwhelmingly   Gaii-  INVESTIGATING     LEAD     INI) USX IIY.  Che Le Roi one day last week eclipsed all records ever made in the camp m  the way of ore production. During the  21-hours ending at 0 o'clock at night,  the .mine produced 1.0 cars of ore,  averaging 2'V, tons to the car, which  made the total output barely hiss than  ���150 tons. Of this. -ion tons came from  the dump, and the rest, about 250 tons,  from the underground workings of the  mine. There are now 201 men at work  in the property, and they are operating  20 machines. < >f these, six are engaged  in stoping and the remaining 20 are  employed in development work, either  drifting, sinking, raising or crosscut-  ting.   ' '     __j_J ^   .���OTTINGS     I'ISOM   YV'rrTf-WATKI".  The lower  tunnel on   the Whitewater j  Deep has been closed  and the men have:  been put on the workings   of  the   upper  tunnel.  Republic    Pays   a   Dividend.  The Republic Mining Company declared its first dividend last week. The  amount is $30,000, or three cents a share,  and it will be paid October 10th, transfer  books to be closed on October 1st. The  dividend has been anticipated for some  time, as it was known that the mine had  shipped enough ore to pay all indebtedness and to leave a handsome profit in  the treasury. It is the intention of the  company to pay a dividend regularly  each month and the amount is not expected to fall below thi-pe cents per  share.  '  Tommy'*    Politeness.  Hon  Hewitt Rostock l/ooking  matioii About Home  for Infor-  Tomiiiy  was   all  excitement  because  the visiting  lecturer  was to take dinner  at the house, but had promised to be on  his best behavior during the meal. The  ! determination to he poiite was so stiong  j upon him that he felt it incumbent to  I show his good will.  | '* Where is Mrs. Lecturer?" Tommy  j asked explosively, in pursuance of his  ! conscientious promptings. This was the  I most embarrassing question that could  I have been propunded, for the guest and  j his wife had separated. He pretended  ' not to hear, while the host kicked Tommy on the  shins.    Me realized   that he  had   blundered,   and  felt  that be must  make amends.  -'.I hope she's not sick,"  persisted the  urchin.  "We did not agree, and we thought it i ,      ,     , , . ,    ,   .     .  best for us to live apart,"  said the'visit-! !f,,(,r t'J.r,.,"niu--flll-v "������������'s1'-*1 lll(' '����������-'������* ot  or. with a view   to  ending  the nnpleas  a illness.  Hewitt Bostock, M.P. for Kootenay-  Yale-Cariboo, is again in Kootenay. Mr,  Bostock has been in Trail for the past  few days,gleaning information concerning the local smelting industry, and  especially as regards lead reduction,  with a view" to using the data thus obtained at the next session of parliament.  To the Rossland Miner,  Mr. Bostock  could not say positively  when parliament would next assemble, but  he anticipates that the session will be earlier  than usual,   probably commencing in  January.    Mr. Bostock was not prepared to say what would be the  most important  legislation  introduced   at  the  next session, but  he  expects that considerable   attention     would    be    paid  to    redistribution.     He   referred  to a  desire among prominent Liberals to .reorganize   the    representation    in    the  House  of  Commons on a  fairer  basis  than was provided  under Conservative  rule.    Me expects to  see.   many pocket  boroughs that are. considered Conservative strongholds wiped out, and greater  representation  given   to   districts  that  have increased largely in population in  recent years.    In this connection he expects that   the   Kootenay-Yale-Caribon  district will receive favorable consideration     He favored the. contention t hat  the Kootenays should be organized asa  separate, constituency, and   this he will  do his utmost to   secure at the   earliest  possible moment..    He said the division  of the district meets with   the approval  of the Ottawa administration.  Speaking  of  the  organizing  of    the'  Liberal party in   British Columbia   Mr  Bostock admitted   that  a   move, was on  adinn Government is indicative of the  growth of the Canadian element in  British Columbia's population. Eastern  Canada is filling up British Columbia,  and the Canadians in the new Government will have a chance to show that  their supremacy is an improvement  upon the domination of the English-  born rulers, who have been justly supplanted.''         Never Thirsty !  There ��� are in the world several kinds  of animals that have never swallowed a  drop  of water  in  all their lives; these  include the lamas  of Patagonia and certain gazelles of the far east.    A paroquet  lived 52 years in the London   Zoological  Gardens without  drinking  a drop,  and  some naturalists  think  that  hares take  no liquid except the dew that sometimes  forms on   the   grass  that they eat.   A  considerable   number   of   reptiles���serpents, lizards, and certain batrachians���  live and prosper in places where there is  no water at all.    Finally, there are even  in   :France,    in   the    neighborhood    of  Lozere, herds of cows and goats that almost never drink,   and  which nevertheless   produce   the   milk   of   which   the  famous   Roquefort   cheese   is   made.���  Cosmos.  PUN*    AND    JIISCELLAXKY.  "Good stuff," says   man   to  money;  "stuff," says echo.  Eternity   will  show self-love  to have  been a horrible illusion.  Love   and   money    are   dear   absent  friends that almost never meet.  Greed crucifies love daily,  not with a  ^i-oan, but with a chuckle.  To shift capital is  no great hardship���  to shift without it is the rub.  Astronomical  were used bv  22S.S B.C.  instrumen's   of    glass  the  Chinese as earlv  as  Aguinaldo, the  leader, is said to  man.  Phiilippine insurgent  be a   very   handsome  ami   notes are  10,00i i, hence  The 15th  day, v. inch  number oi  arrived ami with it came  rejoiecd the hearts of a 1  Wliitewuter citizens.  pay  i rire  ���Uures   are putiim  Quite a lew of   our  in the accetalene plants.  The   Cosgrove   minstrels     performed  and Friday nights lo ttood  here Thursday  audiences.  When you get down to the bottom of  human nature, what do you find? Wickedness? Not at all���only weakness.���  Boston Transcript.  "Didn't agree'.'" exclaimed Tommy excitedly. "Thunder! Why didn't you  light, it out like paw and maw does?"        |  This opend the way for a hearty laugh,  and tlie atmosphere was cleared. ���Detroit Free Press. ,  The tiend who murdered the Austrian  Empress deserves the severest punishment, and an awful doom has been 1  meted out to him, worse than death  itself���it is solitary confinement for life  and never to see the sun again or hold  converse with his fellow man.  the party for the next campaign, m  Provincial as well as Dominion politics.  but as to the. details of the scheme lie  was not prepared to speak at present.  As to Dominion party lines in Provincial politics, .Mr. Bostock expressed the  belief that the next e'ectious would be  fought out on that basi.-,.  Bank of Engl  backward from  00,001.  Eve.y man thinks himself  more than 'tie is worth���and h  thinks rightly.  Love may be a dream, b  God, it is a progressive and rev  dream.  numbered  the figures  taxed   for  e generally  it,   thank  >lmionarv  It r/li-ct inns    ��>('    :i     IJ:�� f. li ��*1 or.  IMans  All     KiMM-ki-U     Out.  A ll'ool   is a   fun  many other people.  To like to be   right  like, to be thought rig  ami  ���r  ie Spokesman-!  Ivcverne   bonding -  stockholder* of  t he,  most unanimous   in  eview  says   the St.  elieme   is off.    The  company   were  ai-  favoring   the   pro  ne  i lie only real  fuses to marry  doesn't ask her.  Men will alw  aren't angels a-  have anv sister-  reason  a   man  so   are a  is masculine;  t is feminine.  iy a girl  because  ������00 d  to  re-  he  iys   i<uow  ���   long  as  that women  anv of   tiiein  m their lamihes mem  THE LEDGE, NEW JJJiJNVER, B.C., .SEPTEMBER 22, 1898.  Fifth Year  The Ledge.  Published every Thursday.  R. T. LOWERY, Editor and Financier.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Three months ��� ;...-? .7  Six " 1.2o  Twelve  " 2.00  Three years  ''-00  Transient Advertising, 25 cents per line first in  sertion, 10 cents per line subsequent insertions  nonpareil measurement.  TO CONTRIBUTORS.  C jrrespondenc-e from every part of the Kootenay  .District and communications upon live topics  always acceptable. Write on both sides of the  paper if you wish. Ahvays send something good  no matter how crude. Get your copy in while it  is hot, and we will do the rest  A pencil cross m this square  indicates that your subscription is due, and that the editor  wishes once again to look at  your collateral.  TBURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22. 1898  HERB    IS    THE    OPPORTUNITY.  In acknowledging- its error in  stating that the total output of silver  in Kootenay for ten years was $1,000, -  000, when it should have been stated  as $7,302,000, to which attention was  called in a recent issue of The Ledge,  the London B. C. Review concludes:  ' 'We endorse a suggestion of The  Ledge that a copy of the report of  the Minister of Mines should be  mailed annually to the London mining papers. We would even suggest  that a copy of this important document be sent to all the leading journals in England, and if the Government will supply them we will undertake to see that they are properly  distributed and that they reach the  right people." "  We are pleased to see that the  Review endorses the suggestion made,  and the B. 0. Government should  lose no time in complying with the  request that a supply of the report of  the Minister of Mines be forwarded  to the London journal, which will  kindly undertake the proper distribution of them.  The B. C. Review is doing a good  work in London in the interest of  British Columbia, and it can be  assisted greatly if it has on hand a  quantity of the reports of the Minister  of Mines. We venture to say that  one reliable mining paper like the  Review, issuing regularly in London,  is of more real value in presenting  the virtues of British Columbia to the  mining world than would be a score  of such offices as the B. C. Government is now keeping up in one of the  fashionable suburbs of London, and  we hope the proper officials at  Victoria will take the matter in hand  and forward to the Review a supply  of the reports for distribution.  branded at some stage of the game,  but most of them have managed somehow to survive, and it is not likely  that the Province man will suffer the  agonies of hell because of it. A fool  can blaspheme his God, but it is a  wise man that makes and holds his  peace.   SCRAPS FROM THE  EDITOR'S DESK.  Lost, strayed or stolen: A fire hall  of diminutive proportions, built after  the fashion of an upright dry goods  box, weather-beaten and badly in  need of paint. Information leading  to the finding thereof will be thank  fully received and amply rewarded  by the Chief ot Police of New Denver,  or address Premier Semlin, Victoria.  ANVTH1NG    TO    KEEP    PEACE.  The Vancouver Province in commenting upon the disastrous fire at  New Westminster, said some things  editorially that were somewhat premature and entirely out of place. It  spoke of New Westminster as a city  of yesterday, and insinuated that its  citizens would not be inclined to rebuild, but would gladly take their insurance money and remove to Vancouver or some other more promising  city. All of this might be very true  ot many of the unfortunate sufferers,  but it is one of those truths that can  . never be told without injuring the  tender chords of humanity's heart,  and bringing curses upon the head of  the well-meaning but hasty writer.  As a result of its untimely remarks  The Province is being shamelessly  assailed by its jealous contemporaries  and its editor called all manner of bad  things. This is the way he takes his  medicine:  "A correspondent of the World  writes to that newspaper accusing the  editor of The Province of being a  "worm" and "a vacuous cur" and  various other unpleasant things, and  if it would make anybody feel any  better or happier the editor of The  Province will cheerfully admit that  he is the wormiest kind of a worm  and the most vacuous sort of a vacuous cur on earth. It does, however,  seem a pity that public questions and  matters cannot be discussed without  indulging in silly personalities of this  discription. Children doing it are  forgiven because of their youth, but  human beings should surely look for  something better from themselves  when they attain maturity."  While the editor of The Province  "takes his medicine like a little man"  he does not miss the opportunity to  administer a just rebuke to that class  of individuals who seem to think that  the calling of a man a curmakeshim  one.    Everv   editor   has   been  thus  The Rossland Miner is endeavoring  to attach to that city's name the appendage "The Golden City." No  harm in this and it looks well in print  so why not?  Down in Mexico they have a  strange way of doing things. The  farmers use oxen of one color in the  morning, and another color in the  afternoon. They do not know why,  but they know it must be right because their forefathers did it. We  can gather from this some idea of  where the custom tor morning and  afternoon gowns came from.  There is a custom in Japan that is  ahead of anything we have in New  Denver. When a dog barks at night  there the owner is arrested and sentenced to work a year for the neighbors that were disturbed. The dog  gets off easier, being killed. As we  do not own a dog and have neighborly neighbors, we are in favor of such  a law being put in force right now  and here.           After a brief and. fitful existence  the Wetaskiwin Free Lance has succumbed to the inevitable and has  been laid to rest where the grass is  never green and the possies have  lost their bloom. The plant has been  transferred to Innisfail, and the paper  will be issued anew by the invincible  R. Edwards. If the citizens ot Wetaskiwin would assassinate and bury  that name there might be some chance  for a newspaper there.  The London Spectator advocates a  plan which would have made the  statesmen ruling English affairs 24,  years ago open their eyes with  amazement. It proposes the abrogation of the Clayton-Bulwer treaty and  in its place one whereby the two nations of England and America guarantee for each other the control of the  Suez and the Nicaragua canals  against all comers. This would constitute a pact of invincible strength,  and the official discussion would  make the rest of the world squirm.  Stranger things have happened.  The New York Times tells the  story of a calf which seven years ago  tore a man's vest from a backyard  fence where it was hanging, chewed  up the garment and swallowed a gold  watch that was in the pocket. A few  weeks ago the calf, now a full-grown  animal, was slaughtered for beef,  and the watch was found in such a  position between the lungs that the  process of respiration, closing and  filling- the lungs, had kept the stem-  winder wound up and the watch had  lost only four minutes in seven years.  John Taylor is considering the advisability of providing his calves  with a cheap grade of watch to swal  low so that as cows they will come  home at milking time.  what he found in his heart was the presence of the Infinite. He has felt inspired he knew not how, and with the light  of the Spirit to illumine his way he has  looked, and lo! God was everywhere.  The song of birds was divine, and the  whispers of the forest revealed infinite  secrets and the music of the spheres  was no longer a legend.  "Thus man has found God in nature.  It is not the act of a dependent finding  God far away. It is the God in man  standing revealed, and showing forth  that Spirit is allpervading and indivisible, and that somehow in the divine  alchemy of creation, God and'man are  one.  "The materialist banishes God and  worships Force; the evolunsionist works  out his science under the shadow of the  Unknowable; the theologian keeps his  God in a far-away land preparing mansions for the elect. But he who has  realised that his spirit is God has already entered the 'kingdom of heaven.'  To him all things are possible.  "Gradually this idea that man to find  happiness and freedom must wait until  he is transported to a Beulah land, will  become a part of the accumulating  Christian mythology. Here and there  a spirit will"discover the presence of infinite powers in its nature, and that tlie  place where it is to find completeness is  not in a mystical region of rainbows  and emerald and streets of gold. When  man realizes that he is divine, and that  he is surrounded by beauty and harmony, every homely act that before  seemed trivial will become noble. That  which seemed dull and "unilluminecl  commonplace" will be transfigured. Man  will no longer dream of an imaginary  drama, wherein he can stalk in heroic  roles. A cup of cold water given or  received in the. name of love shall become a benediction. He will no longer  prostrat'e himself before non-resident  gods. The world no longer a vale of  tears, will stand revealed a divine instrument, entirely at' his disposal and  responsive to his touch, capable of producing infinite harmonies.  TOO   SERIOUS   l'OB   JEST.  I "Hi Willi  RAMPANT      CHCKCH1SM      VS.     THE  HOLY    SPIRIT   IX   MAN.  ��� An interesting controversy has been  going on in Kaslo between the Koot-  enain on one hand and the News,  supported by the several church  divines, on the other. It was opened  by the Kootenaian taking occasion to  rebuke the local pulpit for its narrow  interpretation of God and Chistianity.  "Instead of   replying to  our  arguments," says the Kootenaian,  "the advocates of   ceremonial   worship   have  accused  us   through   their organ, the  British Columbia News, of materialism.  Heresy has been defined as 'the creed  of your opponent,1   and   lest the pious  readers of the Kootenaian should get a  false notion of our religious-platform,  we hereby present our creed.  To begin  with, we believe in God, but we deny  that He vacates tlie rest of the universe  on Sunday to go to church.    We do not  conteud, "however,    tliat   every   rampant   excursionist   who   takes   to   the  woods and streams on Sunday is more  devout and  nearer to the Great Spirit  than tlie loud-voiced worshipper at the  Mercy Seat.    For just as 'the Pharisee  may go to the sanctuary and keep his  heart at variance  with  the suasions of  the Spirit, so the ruthless disturber of  Nature's sanctities can become an outdoor profanation on the Sabbath or any  other day.   The excursionist  does not  necessarily find God  at  Mirror lake or  Powder creek.    It is  in   his own being  that man first gets  behind tlie veil of  "matter" and finds a conscious Spirit.  There  may   bo   consciousness   in   the  mountain and in the star and the forest;  and tlie wind may be vocal with eternal  messages, but  man,   until   he  has first  found God   in   his own  heart,  cannot  commune with  other manifestations of  God:    'Not   the   clear-sighted  but the  pure-minded shall  see God in nature.'  Once having found that he has a spirit,  man unconsciously is influenced by the  sublime fact  that Spirit  is universal,  and  he   thus   becomes   attuned to the  harmonies about  him     All   nature is  transfigured.    In the j   trity of his heart  he has seen God, and not as a visitant  but   as   a   natural   expression   of the  human spirit.   Man has not known that  Just at this time a great deal of literary "rot" is being dished up by many *".f  our contemporaries regardin g the pro  hibition plebescite. The freedom with  which many of the windy scribblers  have used biblical quotations to support  their argument, both pro and con,  causes the Vancouver World to make  this earnest remonstrance:  "The question is one that has been  threshed out for years and the arguments to be adduced for and against  cannot be in consequence very original.  But we desire to point out that the  morals of the young boys, and indeed  girls, who are growing up among us,  and whom it is intended to guard from  the evils of intemperance, must he seriously injured by the scandalous manner  in which the Book of Books is being  treated by writers in various sheets  If the newspaper .columns are to be  thrown open to every Tom, Dick and  Harry who hastens eagerly to vilify the  Bible", to assail the Master, to laugh at  other people because they believe Satan  exists, to crush out of the souls of the  little children growing up that reverence for the Gospel truths which has  made Britain the power she is in tlie  world, it may well be asked if the ideal  we are striving for can be reached. We  are ready to acknowledge that it is extremely' difficult for a newspaper to  decline the innumberable army of  cranks and faddists admission to its'  valuable space, but surely it has a perfect right to.do so, just as much as the  merchant has to dismiss the hanger on,  or the policeman to order a nuisance to  his fellows to move along. It must not,  however, be forgotten that this is a preeminently Christian country, and that  while the agnostic or the atheist has his  rights, he has not license to pervert the.  youth of the land by his almost criminal  sayings and writings. The campaign  and the consequent discusions of this  burning problem have but commenced  In all decency let, it. and kindred subjects, be treated with that respect which  its tremendous possibilities induce."  Truth is not so fascinating as beauty,  not even in the dving saint.  ��� F. Pyman has again commenced to  do business in New Denver. Bring  your watches to him when they are out  of order.    To recollect the poor is not to remember them.  For four-bits   you can  purchase  ancient newspapers at this office.  100  1898 1898  Provincial  EXHIBITION  Under the Direction of the  Royal Agricultural and  Industrial Society of  British Columbia  Oct.5 to 13, inclusive  at Now Westminster,  In   conjunction   with    tlie  Citizens' Grand  Yearly   Celebration   Bank of- Montreal  Established 1817.  Capital (all paid up) $12,000,000.00  Reserved fund : : 6,000,000.00  Undivided profits :   :     896,850.04  HEAD   OFFICE,   MONTREAL.  R/r. Hon. Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, G.C.M.G-. President.  Hon. G. A. Drummond, Vice President,  E. S. Clouston, General Manager,  Branches in all parts of Canada, Newfoundland, Great Britain, and  the United States.  New Denver branch  F. J. FINUCANE, Manager-  ���t4  ���3   )l  )/���  ���-.a��3'tiMl��'V,"iM��ii"re",,UH>i"a"'ra  SHE'Lf   MARRY   ME.  Ah. life looks very bright to rr.e  Since I have heard her say,  With sweet, becoming modesty,  She'll marry me some day���  If I will give up 'smoking;  If I will fro to church ;  If I cut the club and leave  My best friends in the lurch ���  If I will never stay out late;  But hasten home at nine,  If I will let her have her way  She's promised to be mine !  If I will move to Kensington,  And will never touch a card;  If I will buckle down to work,  And labor long and hard  To buy her stylish bonnets.  And gowns and lots of gloves  Then I may be that happy man  The lucky man she loves.  If I'll be always pleasant.  And never, never scold ;  And never make her nurse me,  And not grow cross and old ;  And always stay good-looking-  She can't stand ugly men���  If I come up to her ideal.  Why, well be married, then !  That's why I am so happy,  And why I often seem  Unconscious and abstracted���  I'm living in a dream !  She is so sweet and pretty,  And so unselfish, too !  I wonder how I won her love���  I can't believe it's true!  ���London Post.  S. RASHDALL.  Notary Public.  A. E. FAUQUIER.  Ottered 50  Cents   on the Dollar.  An important meeting" of the creditors of the B. C. Iron Works was held  at in Vancouver last week. An offer  of 50 cents on the dollar cash was made  to the unsecured creditors and this will  probably be accepted.  To  be morally insignificant  price we pay for'our sin.  is the  lo  the  Trade  Tin? Ai.hkuta Phodcci- Co. of  Calgary, contemplates sending into  the Kootenay during ihe fall and  winter regular carload shipments of  Potatoes, and other farm produce.  The trade only will be supplied and  we solicit: the eo-oDeratioii of the  Slocan dealers. For particulars and  prices write to    Thos. ir. Ingham  Box lTiS, Calgary, Alta.  Representing Alberta Produce Co..  and Manitoba Grain Co., Ltd.  RASHDALL & FAUQUIER  MINES & REAL ESTATE.  NEW DENVER, B.C.  CORRESPONDENCE  MINING INTERESTS BOUGHT,   SOLD   and BONDED.   INVITED���  Complete lists of claims for sale.    Abstracts of claims, conveyancing.  f  li  KB  H/T. BRAGDON,  New Denver, B.C.  Heavy and Shelf Hardware,  Mine and Mill Supplies,  Pipe and Fittings,  Paints and Oils, *  Builders' and Contractors'  Supplies,  Stoves and Kitchen Ware,  Agents for Canton Steel.     j  I eai-ry one of the largest  and best assorted stocks of  Hardware In West Kootenay,  and shall be pleased to quote  prices upon anything required  n my line.  OTEL sandon;  7ft     ^     7ft     */ft     *7i\     *7ft  Sandon, B.C.  -y-HIS NEW HOUSE, with the old name, is  well equipped to aceommodate a large  number of G-uests. Tlie building is plastered  and the rooms are unsurpassed for comfort in  the Slocan, while in the Dining Room can be  found the best food in the market.  Robert Cunning,  Proprietor.  The Clifton House,  We do what we advertise to do.  "In time of Peace prepare  for War."  How are your  Mattresses?  "making  If they want  over' '���new sp rin gs���  ticking ��� new  and excelsior���  now is the time to  have it done. Don't  wait for cold weather.  ��new  wool  Sandon.  Has ample accommodations for a large number of people.     The rooms are large  and airy, and the Dining Room is provided with everything  hi the market  Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers.  n  1 ��*���* r  "WJ"��  Prop.  FOR  Choice Groceries & Provision  HAM & CSAWFORD.  SIXTH STREET,  ..-������-.-        -       -       -      NEW DENVER.  ^"5-Prices are right and Goods Always Fresh.  $18,000  in   Prizes  Premium List is the largest  ever oll'ered. west of Toronto  PyroSpeetacular Bombardment of Santiago de Cuba, and  Blowing up nf the '-Maine"  followed by an up-to-date Fire  Works   Display,   which   has  been specially secured for four  nights,  at  an   enormous expense.  ���i\-.    Lacrosse      and     Baseball  ///Matches, Bicycle Meet, Aqua-  ���>^}tic,   Sailor  and    Caledonian  Sports, Promenade  Concerts.  Horse Races, Dog Show.  Open to tin' world.  The   finest    Bands   in   the  Province will  provide  music.  Special Rales over all railway and stcambo-it lines.  >fo entrance fee charged for  Exhibits.  For full  information  apply  to���  W.H.EDMONDS,  Sec. Celebration Committee.  WALKER & BAKER,  Now    Furniture Dealers and Itonairers  Denver's     Undertakers and Kinlmlmers.  N. B.���We have the only practical Undertaker  and Embalmer doing business in the Slocan.  T"-    G. FAUQUIER,  NOTARY PUBLIC.  Nakusp. B.C.  Travelers  Will find the  Arlington Hotel  a pleasant place to stop at when in  SLcan City.  GETHIXG & HENDERSON, Proprietors.  THE MINERS EXCHANGE.  Three Forks, E. C. Weaver  ASSAVE^S OF B. G.  pjOWARD WEST,  Assoc. K S M, London. Kug  MINING ENGINEER,  ANALYTICAL CHEMIST.  & ASSAYER.  in  Properties   examined    and   reported  on  foi  tending purchasers.  Assay office aud Chemical  Laboratory. Belle-  vueave. New Denver  BC.  J. M. M. BENEDUM,  Silverton.  NOTICE.  AJOTICE is hereby given that 3n days after date  i\ I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner  of Lands and works'for a special license to cul  and carry away timber from Ihe following de-  cribed lands: Commencing at a post marked  Frank Hill, southeast corner, on the west side of  Slocan Lake about five 'miles from the north end,  thence we-t eighty chains, thence north 120  chains thence east eighty chains, thence 120  chains' south to starting point, containing !'<'!>  acres. FRANK HILL.  New Denver, B. C.. July ���"���(!, lsns.  C.O.Di  Goods called  for & Delivered  1)  R. A.S. MARS'-*  jU.  Dentist.  Kaslo, B C  Graduate of American College of Dental Surgery  Chicago    G  YVILLIM & .JOHNSON.  MeGill)  Mining Engineers  & Analy-Chemists.  Slocan  City,    B <",  WANTED.  Industrious man of character to travel and appoint agents.   Salary and expenses paid.  BRADLEY-G \RRETSON COMPANY.Limited  Toronto.  AUNDRY  We are now in a  position to give  thoroughly satisfactory service  and solicit your  patronage. We  make a specialty  of the finer lines  of Cambrics and  Linens, etc. All  business cash on  delivery  Work Done on Short Notice.  C. M. NESBITT, Prop.  ;?'"'Rates furnished Hotels,   Steamboat Companies, etc, on application.  El Dorada Ave.  \{t L. GRIMMETT, L.L.B.  BARRISTER,  Solicitor, Notary Public, Etc.  Sandon, B. C. Fifth Yeah.  THE LEDGE, NEW DENVER, B.C.,  SEPTEMBER 22; 1898.  SONG   OP   THE   MYSTIC.  Father Ryan.  I walked down the Valley of Silence���  The dark, voiceless valley���alone!  And I hear not the fall of afootstep  Around me, save God's aud my own ;  And the hush of my heart is as holy  As hover where angels have flown !  Long ago was I weary of voices  Whose music my heart could not win ;  Long ago was I weary of noises  That fretted my soul with their din ;  Long ago was I weary of places  Where I met bnt tha human���and sin.  I walked in the world with the worldly ;  I craved what the world never gave.   "  And I said :   -'In the world each Ideal  That shines like a star on life's wave,  Is tossed on the shores of the Real,  And sleeps like a dream in a grave."  And still did I pine for the Perfect,  And still found the False with the True;  I sought 'mid the Human for Heaveii,   ���  But caught a mere glimpse of its Blue;  And I wept when the cloulds of the Mortal   ''  Veiled even that glimpse from my view.  And I toiled on, heart-tired of the Human,  And I moaned 'mid the masse* .of men  Till I knelt, long ago, at an altar  And I heard a voice call me.   Since then  I walk down the Vallcv of Silence  That lies far beyond mortal ken.  Do you ask what I found in the valley ?  'Tis my Trusting Place with the Divine.  Aud I fell at the feet of the Holy,  And about rne a voice said :   "Be mine."  And there rose from the depth of my spirit  An echo���"My heart shall be thine.'  Do you ask how I live in the Valley ?  I weep and I dream���and I pray.  But my tears are as sweet as the dewdrops  That fall on roses in May ;  And my prayer like a perfume from Censers  Ascendeth to God night and day.  Iti the hush of the Valley of Silence  I dream all the songs that I slug;  And the music floats down the deep Valley  Till each finds.a word for a wing.  That to hearts, like the Dove of the Deluge,  A message of peace they may bring.  But far on the deep there are billows,  That never shall break on the beach,  And I have heard songs in the Silonce  That never shall float into speech ;  And I have had dreams in the Valley  Too lofty for language to reach.  And I have seen Thoughts in the Valley���  Ah ! me, how my spirit was stirred !  And thev wear holy ve'Is on their faces,  Their footsteps can,scarcely be heard:  They pass through the Valley like Virgins,  Too pure for the touch of a word !  Do you ask me the place of the Valley,  Ye hearts that are sorrowed with care V  It licth afar between mountains.  And God and His amrels are there ;  And one is the dark mountain of Sorrow,  And one the bright mountain of Prayer.  0LDELJ 0N THE ROPE.  Ah   Seen    by  11 Writer   in  Chronicle.  the   Chicago  August  In the Chicago Chronicle, of  28, a descriptive article appears giving*  a rather sensational account of the  Slocan City celebration of May 24,1897.  The best part of the article is its reference to the great feat performed by El'  Carpenter in walking tlie tight rope.  In this connection it says :  '"Great expectations were built on the  day At least 700 people were expected  Jrom Sandon, Three Forks and New  Denver. Tlie Canadian Pacific had a  new swift passenger boat, which was to  make its first trip. As the event approached by the passage of time it was  felt by the Americans that nothing  within grasp should be suffered to  escape doing duty for tlie occasion. One  possibility bothered all the enthusiasts.  If we had" a real tight-rope walker in  town and he failed to contribute to the  entertainment someone would be to  blame. Then the search began, with  the agreement among a few that if the  fellow was as represented they would  foot the bills privately.  "The astonishment increased with  discovery. He was a little man: that  is to say. undersized. Perhaps his  years were 55 Deep furrows lined his  face. On his brow were the horizontal  wrinkles that tell of the receptive mind,  ever open to nature, and of eyes often  observing without consciousness. Their  color was distinctly Gallic or Goscogne,  of the dense blue' shade of the lapis-  lazuli. His nose, not large, was keen-  pointed and full at the nostrils, his  mouth rather thin, and chin set like the  chin of Foyaticr's chiseled symbol,  Jour le Labourer." The glance .was  rather furtive, yet when you fixed his  gaze in confidence the eye was steady  and sympathetic.  "This was Kli Carpenter. Everybody  knew him, but no one in camp suspected he was a. tight-rope walker, except  his friend Eugene Provost, the French-  Canadian. Provost was with the committee and vehemently seconded their  request in turgid French. Eli.replied  that he had not walked tlie rope for  years and was entirely out of practice.  Besides, lie had grown old and shaky;  he had the rheumatism, the inevitable  ' visitation suffered by the mountaineer,  and lastly he had lio tights or any of  the necessary paraphernalia.  "However, if need lie, he would walk  without tights. He could do it. now  that his promise had been secured. All  he needed was a little practice, and  then he would feel safe.  "Now, Eli Carpenter was known to  everyone in the Slocan and to a world  of stock gamblers and investors outside.  He was, in short, the discoverer of the  country; rather the discoverer of its  woirlerful mines.  "It is scarcely worth while trying to  tell what a country is this Slocan. ft  is nothing but angles with a few big  lake beds. In it you can never find a  level. Mountains, foothills, lake shore  inclines; thin seams of canyons choked  with bowlders and trees;'living glaciers, at whose springs caribou drink;  avalanche paths by the thousand, a  land more terrible to the explorer in  1888 than the Yukon was last year.  'Eli Carpenter had invaded this labyrinth of mountains in 1891 and found  tlie mineral resources of a present an  nual product of 815,000,000 to British  Columbia. He carried his pack on his  back, and thus became the exemplar of  Slocan wealth. His blood was French;  he was born in the quartier Marais of  Paris.  "In a heedless moment Eli had sold  for 8500 his half interest in a mine  whose millions are incalculable. This  is known as the. Payne, and is largely  owned by Alfred \V. McEwen, who  is now making" a candidacy for the  United States senate on the strength of'  the fortune he has in his grasp.  "Though the Payne was his first find  and the one that has turned the Slocan  into a habitable region, whose mountain canyons and passes are threaded  with railroads and whose wonderful  lakes are traversed by modern steamers, Carpenter, that wiry, unconquerable little Frenchman, all given to grit  and hope and   love of his fellow man.  packed his food and bedding into every  formidable altitude of that cheerless  mountain range, and was known  throughout the camps builded in its  gulches as the original pioneer.  "Sharp at 4 o'clock the chairman of  the committee entered the room and  announced that Eli was due on the  rope. No tights had been procured,  through the mismanagement usually  experienced in the public affairs of  young communities, where everybody  depends upon somebody to do something he shirks himself. "Eli had counted secretly on appearing in silks and  spangles, notwithstanding his willingness to walk the rope in his trousers,  and, though he said no word complain-  ingly, he plainly showed by the grave  look' he assumed that his confidence had  been betrayed.  " 'Qu' impore!' he exclaimed. 'I say  I walk d' rope, arivhow.'  "So Eli was led out to the third-story  front room, where his balance pole and  flying trapese and portable stove and  everything necessary to conventional  tight-rope walking", except tights, had  been stored.  "For the first moment during all the  time the waiting folk eyed the rope  with a sort of fascination no one present  could account for it trembled and  swung. Then a great shout went up.  Sure enough ! It was Eli Carpenter,  that curious old fool Frenchman, who  had taken a drink with every drinking  man in the Slocan, and who when he  had money ahvays bought wine. Not  the discoverer, the spendthrift, was  now in evidence, but an unexpected  man.  "The pupils of Eli's Gascon y eyes expanded a bit and then he shifted through  his hands in the search of equilibrum  the crooked :maple pole he had found  and dressed himself. Eli walked across  the rope and backward. He didn't  mind the loose swing or the danger in  the perpendicular vibrations. Then he  asked the chairman of the committee to  blindfold him and he repeated the exhibition. After a little rest of his nerves  while the well-intending Canadian band  plaved a musical mockery of the tune  of "Dixey" Eli went forward again with  a cook stove and an arrangement he  had made for himself. In the center of  the oscillation he sat down and cooked  a lunch of bacon and eggs. The crowd  was falling into a state of stupefaction.  He was certainly a hypnotist. Nobody  cheered any more; all looked dazed and  dumb.  "Curious to say Eli Carpenter, whose  surname originally was Carpenter, out  of the Quartier of Marais, walked the  tight rope for Barnum years ago  throughout the New England states.  When he married his young wife it was  with the agreement that upon that day  after the ceremony she would place herself entirely at his disposal. She was  of Quebec and puckily French.  "Dr. George Starr must have been  Barnum's manager at that time, for he  provided life annuities in the event of  failure. Eli Carpenter and his sweetheart were suicidally in love, for under  the suur of the moment he agreed  to walk on a tight rope across any  street in any New England city, five  stories high, and carry on his back, at  the same time, the woman who agreed  to be his wife. She was full of French  philosophic indifference, and consented.  "Thus it came that Eli Carpenter, the  whilom tight-rope walker whom thousands of New England youngsters, now  grown to manhood will remember,made  an exhibition of his prowess with his  wife on his back in the college  city of New Haven. That is to say,  shortly after having left the altar she  allowed him to seat heron his shoulders  and take her across the street five  stories high.  "The emotional experience of Eli  Carpenter may be recited, relatively,  by many men' of the mountains. The  wire ropewalker spoiled his metier and  decided, as many a thoroughbred  Frenchman has done before, to work  fortune, not out of his muscular skill,  but out of nature. He landed in Wild  Horse Gulch, British Columbia, away  back in the SOs, and took up a patch of  placer ground. His wife was home in  ���New Hampshire in the same town in  which his married sister lived. No  harm, mortal or physical, could befall  his wife, while he extracted fortune  from the gravel of the mountains.  ���'Every fall clean-up for six years Eli  sent by express from Fort Sleele on the  Kootenay river, not less than $2,000 in  pure gold to his wife. One clay he got  a letter from his sister telling him that  his wife was about to become a mother.  He promptly quit the Wild Horse  diggings and went west into the Slocan  range,'1 the heights and mysteries of  which no one else had penetrated or  solved.   With him all the time was the  mile is not far short of 300. That is to  say, its area is more than 11 times that  of Great Britain and Ireland, and almost one-half that of the United States,  exclusive of Alaska; its population is 10  times that of Great Britain and Ireland  and more than six times that of the  United States. In fact, more than one-  fourth of the total population of the  globe is concentrated within the boundaries of China proper.  The great commercial nations of the  world are now all trying to get shares  of the trade of this yast and populous  country. For not only is China large  and populous, but she" is also wealthy,  for her inhabitants are both, industrious  and frugal, and, besides, as compared  with the people of European countries  they have been greatly spared the disastrous commerce-destroying effects of  war, both f0reig*n and internecine.  Centuries ago the Chinese had made  great progress toward civilization".  Their skill in the manufacturing arts  and in agriculture and horticulture was  for ages superior to that of western nations. But, unfortunately for their  advancement, they are conservative,  self conceited and" averse to improvement, especially if they have to learn  improvement from others. As yet  they have almost wholly ignored the  ideas and methods of modern western  civilization. They have scarcely any  railways, "but few steamships, almost  no steam power manufactories, and no  telephones. The only modern improvident, which they have made use of is  the telegraph. Some years ago (in  1876) a European company secured the  privilege of building a short railwav  from Shanghai, but it was scarcely built  before the government got fearful of its  influence and b-night it up and stopped  its running. But the Chinese people  are not averse to foreign trade; on the  contrary, they are rather fond of it. If  only the thing could happen in China  that happened in Japan, that is to say,  if only the government could fall into  the hands of rulers who were open-  minded to improvement and inclined to  be progressive, the rush that China  would make toward civilization and  the adoption of modern trade methods  and modern processes of manufacture  would be startling.  At present the foreign trade of China  is largely in the hands of the English.  In the year 1896 the foreign export  trade of China amounted to $167,000,000.  Of this amount $132,500,000 was with  Great Britain and her dependencies;  $10,000,000 with the United States;  something over $6,000,000 with the continent of Europe exclusive of Russia,  and less than ��2,000,000 with Russia. In  the same year the foreign import trade  OflChina was $102,500,000, of which  $56,000,000 was with Great Britain and  her dependencies; a little over $9,000,-  000 with the United States; $15,000,000  with the continent of Europe, exclusive  Of Russia, and $12,500,000 with Russia.  ..The rest of her trade was principally  -���with Japan. The policy of the government of China has always been to prevent or restrict foreign trade; and even  to-day foreign trade can be carried on  .in only 26 Chinese ports���the so-calied  "treaty ports." The policy of Great  Britain has been to secure by treaty as  large a privilege of trading "with China  as possible; then to throw open the  privilege to the world, but to follow it  up with such commercial activity on  her own part as would secure to her the  lion's share of the resulting trade. Of  the 26 ports now by treaty open to the  world for trade 23 "have been secured  by Great Britain and three by Japan.  China's principal exports are tea and  silk, tea constituting about one-third  silk (principally raw silk) fully one-half  of her total export trade. Other principal exports are sugar, straw braid  (one-twentieth of her total exportation),  hides,' paper, china ware and pottery.  Her principal imports are opium aiid  cotton goods, opium constituting a fifth  and cotton goods considerably more  than half of her total import trade.  Other principal imports are woolen  goods and machinery,coal and kerosene  oil. A considerable" importation is also  made of raw cotton. But if China only  had the blessings of enlightened and  progressive government this disposition of exports and imports would not  long  continue.    China's   resources   of  coal are among the finest and certainly  among the largest in the whole world.  And near her coal fields are v*tst deposits of some of the richest iron ores in  the world.   Again a great portion of  the soil of  China is extremely fertile.  There are indeed   two regions, one of  red soil and another, much vaster, of  yellow soil, that are among the most  fertile in the world.    It is because of  the extent   and fertility of the yellow  soil of China that yellow is the imperial  color and the emperor called the "yellow lord."   The climate, too, of China  permits almost the whole range of use- J  ful   vegetable  products to be raised.  Growth of cotton is already very great  because for seven centuries cotton has  been the staple cloth for the clothing of  the people.   And  already   it   is being  manufactured by   modern machinery.  But both the growth of cotton and its  manufacture by modern methods would  be enormously increased if only facilities for internal transportation and freedom   from  unjust   taxation   could   be  secured.   If, in short, China only had  railways and a  good and enlightened  system' of government her progress and  prosperity'would soon make the western world envious.   But her  government is not only stupidly unprogres-  sive;   it is also disastrously wasteful.  About 70 per cent, of the whole revenue  of the country is lost to the public use  through   the" malfeasance of officials.  And only about 85 miles of  railway  have as yet been opened, although it  must be said that 200 to 250 miles more  are under construction.  CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS  Dominion,  Felix  St. Keverne, O. IJ. H., Exetei  and    Payne   Fractional  Mineral    Claims.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  , Kootenay District.   Where  located:    On  Payne mountain, on the north slope.  ���JUKE NOTICE   That I,  Charles  Moore, of  L   Kaslo, B. C, and acting as agent for the St.  Keverne Alining Company, Ltd., free miner's  certificate    Xo.    12.130A,   intend,   sixty    days  from the date hereof  to apply to the Mining  Recorder   for    a    certificate     of     improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown  Grant of the above claims.  And further take notice that action under  Section 37 must be commenced before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 5th day of September, 1S!'8.  Charles moore, p.l.s.  Rio Mineral Claim.  qawadian  Pacific  K  AILWAY  AND SOO-PACIFIC LINE.  SHORTEST  AND  QUICKEST  ROUTE  Klondike  and the Yukon,  TO ALL   EASTERN  AND  EUROPEAN POINTS.  TO PACIFIC COAST,  JAPAN,   CHINA   AND  AUSTRALIA.  to the nicii and active  MINING DISTRICTS OF  Itijrht   From    "Ome.  The editor of the Rossland Times is  an Englishman right from the old 'ome,  and ought to" kno.v what he is talking-  about. Savs he: "Hurrah! Hurrah!  The little '"White Father" has spoken  and at his mandate millions upon millions of human beings will turn their  swords into plough shares, will be men  instead of downtrodden slaves. The  Czar of Russia���my the gods bless him  ���has done in one moment what the entire European world has not even dared  to think of. Hurrah, T say again; ere  very long Europe will be as free as the  United States and Canada. Let me  think.  "Europe is as to the masses as peaceably inclined as is Hawaii. But by intolerable fraud and wickedness, cruelty  and murder, her governing" upper  classes have woven a network around  each country, the whole and entire object of which is simply elevation to  those who rule and death to the ruled.  We weep at the,, tales of the Cuban  sufferings: are their sufferings as intense as those of the tens of thousands  now dying of hunger in the streets of  London. Ought we not to realize that  if charity is to go round, let us begin  by showering our collections on our  own flesh and blood?''  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay  District.      Where  located: In  Best Basin, MeGuigan Creek, near Okanagan  mineral claim.  TAKE NOTICE that I, William S. Drewry, aet-  1   ing- as agent for E. A. Bielenberg, free miner's  certificate No. 25807A, DanielCosgriff, free miner's  certificate No.J7��2A and T.F.Cosgrifr. free miner's  certificate Xo. 47(��A, intend sixty days from the  date hereof to apply to the Mining Recorder for a  certilicate of improvements, for the purpose of  obtaining a Crown grant of the above claim.  _ And further take notice, that action under section 37. must be commenced before the issuance  of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 27th dav of August, 1818.  W. S. DREWRY.  ���Jeauette Mineral Claim.  ���Situate in the Slooan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District. Where located: Four  miles east of Rosebery, east of Wilson creek.  TAKE NOTICE that I. Herbert T. Twigg,  1 agent for Frank Kelly, Free Miner's Certificate No. 12087A, intend, sixty days from the date  hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a  Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of  obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under  section 37, must be commenced before the  issuance of such certificate of Improvements.  Dated this 25th day of August, 1898.  HERBERT T. TWIGG.  Silver   Bell  No.  2   and   Dump  Mineral Claims.  Fraction  Reasonable  , Prices  and the best and freshest line of  Groceries,  Canned Goods,  Fine Teas and Coffees  Are the rule at  T. H. Hoben's  \V. S. Due why  Kaslo, B.C.  H. T. Twjgo  New Denver, B.C.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District. Where located: Adjoining the Surprise, Keno and Gladstone  mineral claims, in Best Basin, MeGuigan  creek. u  TAKE NOTICE that I, William S. Dreury,  �� acting as agent for the Native Stiver Bell  Mining Company, Limited, of Rossland, B. C,  Free Miner's Certificate No. 18145A, intend  sixty davs from the date hereof to apply to the  Mining Recorder for a certificate of improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown grant  of the above claim.  And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance of  such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 18th day of August, 1898.  XV: S. DREWRY.  Black Fox, Keel Fox,   Grey Wolf,   Black  Bear, Black Fox Fraction, Bed Fox  Fraction,   Grey    Wolf  Fraction,  and    Black     Bear     Fraction  Mineral    Claims.  Situate in the Arrow Lake Mining Division of  West Kootenay District. Where located: In  Cariboo Creek Camp, north of Snow Creek.  'PAKE NOTICE that I, A. P. Patrick, acting  1 as agent for The Silver Queen Mining Co.,  Limited Liability, Free Miner's Certificate No.  10742A, intend, sixty days from the date  hereof to apply to the Mining Recorder for a  certificate of improvements for the purpose of  obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claims.  And further take notice that action under section 87 must be commenced before the issuance of  such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 15th day of August, 1898.  A. P. PATRICK.  L. 2S17 G. 1.  Constant Mineral Claim.  Situate in  tho Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District.   Where located:  On Cody  Creek and adjoining the Bolander mineral  claim, L. 21-13 G. 1.  TAKE NOTICE thai I, A. S. Farwell. as agent  1    for A.   W. MeUine. F. M. C (11727,   W. L.  Hoge, F. M. C. ,s:i08<>, E.   V.  MeCtine, F. M. C.  85:'22,   intend,    sixty    days    from    the:   dale  hereof,    to     apply     to  * the      Mining    Recorder for a certificate of  improvements for  the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the  above claim.  And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance  of such certilicate of improvements.  Dated this lllli day of .July. 18ns.  A. S. FARWELL.  Close connections and no trouble.  Through tickets issued and Baggage checked  to destination.  TO I IRIQTf    I-ASS REVELSTOKE  ��� SV"";-\iJi? ' "    DAILY TO ST. PAUL.  CARS      DAILY (except Wednesday)  v/n,,u        TO EASTERNCANADIAN  A\u U. S. POINTS.  Daily train leaves Xew Denver Canyon Siding  8:4.1 a. m. Arrives New Denver Canyon Siding  8:50 p in.  Boat connection daily (except Sunday; via  Rosebery: Leaves New Denver 8.35 a. in;  arrives New Denver A p. m.  Ascertain   present   REDUCED   RATES  and full information by addressing nearest  local agent or���  G. B. GARRETT, Agent New Denver.  W. F. Anderson, Trav. Pass. Agt., Nelson.  E. J. Coy Us, Dist. Pass. Agt., Vancouver.  S3i' &.H'sensible people travel via C. P. Ry and  Soo line. '  ~      l irtta  Nelson & Ft. Sheppard  Red  Mountain  RAILWAYS  The only all rail route without change  of cars between Nelson and Rossland  and Spokane a nd Rossland.  Direct Route to the   Mineral District of the Col-  ville Reservation,   Nelson, Kaslo,  Kootenay  Lake and   Slocan  Points.  DAILY  SERVICE.  Leave.  6:20 a.m.  12:05 "  8:30 a. m.  NELSON  ROSSLAND  SPOKANE  Train leaving Nelson at 8:30 a. m  Arrive.  5:35 p.m  11:20a.m.  3:10 p.m  make close:  connections at Spokane with trains for all  Pacific Coast Points,  Close connection with Steamers for Kaslo and  all Kootenay lake points.  Passengers for Kettle  River and Boundary  Creek connect at Marcus with stage daily.  C. G. DIXON, Spokane, Wash  INTERNATIONAL     NAVIGATION  . & TRADING1)0.,  LTD.  Summer Time Card effective June 20,1898.  Subject to change without notice.  SS.  Scuth Bound  Read down.  INTERNATIONAL.  North Bound  Read up.  SANDON  Train lvs Dally, l.Oii pm   Train ar daily 10.50 am  KASLO  " ar ���' ''.l*> pm Train Iv '' S.OO am  CBoat lv 3.30 am ���Kaslo��� Boat ar S.30 pm^  ��.       "     1-30 am    Ainsworth "'      7.30 pmc  C"*      "     5.00 am    Pilot Bay "     fi.45 pm ���""  o       "     5.30 am      Balfour "      0.10 pm7^  ""Boat ar (i.-io am. Five Mile Pt       "     5.23 pm *  ."       "     7.15 am      Nelson " lv 1.15 pm53-  a Train ar 10.05 am Northport Train lvl.55 pmj"?  ==       "      il so am  Rossland "    12.05 nnvs  <��"      "       3lopm    Spokane "      s.3o amq  Read down.  Daily train lv 1.  SS.  I'M  DREWRY & TWIGG  Dominion and Provincial Land Surveyors.  Civil and Mining Engineers.  Bedford, McNeil Code.  iT5?'RashdaIl & Fauquier, Agents.  old French  vost."  TRADE  Canadian voyas'eur,  Pro-  f f ^fff ffffffffff f ? f f ff fff f 9 ff f f ff ff  CENTERS   OF  ASIA.  EASTERN  ��� ���     V.  BY   SBYMOUK  EATON.  China, to the student of commerce,  is the most interesting country on the  globe.   The reason for this is that its  area is so large, its population so vast  and its  chances   for  development  so  magnificent.   The total area of the empire,   according to   late   estimates, is  4,218,401 square miles.   Otherestimates  make it 4,468,470 square miles.    The  greatness of this  area may be understood from a   few   comparisons.   It is  about one-twelfth of the total land surface of the globe.   It is two and one-  fourth times that of European Russia  It  is almost one and one-half  times the  total area of the United States, exclu- j  sive of Alaska.   But   all of   this terri-!  tory is not of equal commercial interest. J  The   Chinese   empire   consists   of six |  parts:   China proper, Manchuria, Mon- j  golia,   Thibet,  Jung-aria and Eastern  Turkestan.   Because of recent treaties, j  which gave to Russia the right to build |  and "('-'introl" railways in Manchuria j  ���ostensibly for the purpose of securing j  for the Russian Transsiberian railway j1  a   jvVorter   route  to  Vladivostock, its j  Pafai'r' terminus���Manchuria   becomes i i  no       ���'" '"'^ally a Russian possession. !  T     cfY'/r    , Juhgaria, Thibet and Mon- j I  /"%'/thinly   inhabited countries,!  sca.J{>   / semi-civilized.   But the part,'  w'iic*Ti   remains   when these "'depend-ji  mciei " are   left out of consideration��� \  China   proper���is at   once one of the \ (  largest    most   thickly   populated   and  most fe.-tile countries'on the face of the  globe, a��-ul one also of the most richly  endowed".'ii mineral products.    Its area  is 1,336,84.1. square miles, its population  is 386,000,0u \   Its population per square i  WHOLESALE G  Agents for B. O. Sugar Refinery and Royal  City Planing Mills."  Alturus, Alps  and Alps Fraction Miner  Claims.  tl  T  Situated in tlie Slocan Minim.' Division of  West Kootenay District. Where located:  On divide between Wilson Creek and north  fork Carpenter Creek.  A.KE NOT1CK that T, Hcrhert T. Twijrff.  a wnt for ihe Golden Canyon Gold and Silver  Mining Company. Free Miner's Certificate No.  32i;52a. intend, no days from date hereof, to apply to  the Miiiiinr Recorder for a certificate of improvements for the purpose of obtaining" a Crown grant  of the above claims.  And.    further   take    notice,   that,   action  under    section    37.    must     he'    commenced  before the issuance of such certificate of Im'  provements.  Dated this 18th day of August 1S08.  HERBERT T. TWIGG.  ALBERTA.  Read up.  Sandon  mi        Daily train ar lo,50 am  Kaslo  ar 3.15 pin ������ Iv   S.OO am  .y   Boat lv 5.011 pm Mo&T Boa tar 1.00 pm  �������       "   O.Sopin Ainsworth H'.:at ar ll.-io pm_.  gec '   ".no pm   Pilot Bay        ���'      11 00 pmo  ���P " 1.0.0" [mi Kuskniiook       '"     ���        '  '��� I'B.on pm Goat River      "'  # '���    l.oo am   Boundary  "g B " ar S.oo ain Roinier's'P'ry ' lv  >xTrain lv ll.-io am " Train ar  "*       ���"     ar-'.-15 pm Spokane      "    Iv  s.cO pm;  0.00 \nnjj  5.00 pni>,  i.oo pnrg  1.15 pm 5  .50 amcQ  Apis Miiioral Claim.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District. Where iocatcd: About  threc-ijuartcrs of a mile from Sandon and  adjoining the Slocan Belle mineral claim.  TAKE NOTICE that we. E. M. Sandilands.  free miner's certilicate No. lll.'1-iA, June lsti  1S!)8, Sanilon; ami .J. H. Gray, freo.miner's certificate No, 1527a, August iM, 1S!I7. Kaslo, intend  sixty days from the date hereof to apply to the  Mininir Recorder for a certilicate of improvements, for the purpose, of obtaining a Crown  grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance  of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this llth day of August. l��)S.  Conductor .Mineral  Claim.  SPECIAL KOOTENAV LAKE SERVICE,  Commencing June l'0, lStiS.  On Monday. Thursday and Friday ss Alberta  will leave Ka��Io 5 p. m.'for.Ainsworth, Pilot Bay,  and Nelson. Leaving Nelson at S a. m., Tuesday, Friday and Saturday, calling at Pilot Bay,  Ainsworth and Kaslo, and all way points.  GEORGE   ALEXANDER, Gcn'l Mgr  P. O. Box 1'.'2, Kaslo. B.C.  KASLO & SLOCAN RY  TIME CAED  Taking effect 1.00 o'clock a. m.  Sept. 1, 1898, Pacific or 120th Meridian time.  Subject to change without notice  Leave S  "    S  30 A.M.  Arrive.  New Denver,  Has been re-opened under new management. The Dining Room will  always be up to the market, while  the   bar   will  contain  cigars that cannot be  quality   and flavor   in  Old and  new patrons  hotel just like home.  JACOBSON & CO.  Mquors and  surpassed for  the Slocan.  will  find this  fp.j  Situate in ihe Slocan Mining Division of West,  Kootenay nistriet. Where located: Twin  Lakes Basin.  A.KK NOTICE that I. Herbert T. Twigg.  igent for William H. Elson, Free Mincr'scer-  tnicaie Xo.i's.ViA, intend, sixty days from the date  hereof, to aiiply to the. Mining Recorder for a  certificate of improvements, for the purpose of  obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.  And further take, notice that action under Sec.  .'S7 must be commenced before the issuance of such  certilicate of improvements.  Dated thisssth day of July. iS-is.  HERBERT T. TWIGG.  A IT.  ���   0 15  '  10 00  ��� 10 on  ' 10 20  1 io .tt  10  15  3 30  i 05  S 10  .' CO  L  .'0  M  23  15  P.M  Leave, 11.oo  ll.io  Arrive. 11.25  ROBT. IRVING,  Traffic Mngr.  GEO V.  Kaslo  South Fork  Sproule's  Whitewaw:  Bear Lake  MeGuigan '       1  Cody Junction "      1  Sandon Leave 1  CODY   LINE.  i ��� Sandon ���  Arrive,  11.5!' a.m  Cody Junction Leave, 11.5o a.m  ��� "Codv   ��� "    11.35 a.m  For cheat)  and from all  Mollic  Tryo  Hughes,  Ileal  i, and   Kinkora  Idea No.  M inoral  2, Pinto,  Claims.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay   District.  Where located: About  one mile north of Now  Denver, on the shore  of Slocan Lake.  'PAKE NOTICE that I.   W.  S.   Drewry, of the  L    town of Kaslo.  acting   as   agent for M. E.  Bragdon. Free Miner's Certilicate  No. Sooi'i: II.  ('lever. Free 'iiner'sCertiiieate No. ]n:i7!iA; Harry  Sheran. \'"rey .Miner's Certilicate No. 12001A: and  Tho.-.. Aviso u. Free Miner's Certilicate No. 1' it'll A.  intend sixty days from  the date   hereof to  to the Miniuu   Recorder  for a   cert  proveiiieuts for t he purpose of obtaining  grant of the above claims.  And further take not ice  that  action under se<  rion :;7 must he commenced  before  the issuanc  of such certilicate of improvements.  Dated tliisllth dav of Jnlv. istis  ' W. S. DREWKY  S.  railroad and  mints, applv  CAMPBELL,  COPELAND,  Superintendent  steamship tickets tc  to  Agent, Sandon.  Brandon, B. C,  Assay Price List  creof to apply  tilicate of lm-  AGENTS.  lam just, starting the'best thing tor money-  making you have seta for many a day. Your  name and address will bring the golden information.  T. II.  LINSCOTT. Toronto  Gold, Silver, or Lead.each  $1.50  Gold, Silver and Lead, combined  3 oo  Gold and Silver  2 00  Silver and Lead  2 on  Copi'cr (by Electrolysis)  2 00  Gold. Silver. Copper and Lead  -I 00  Gold and Copper  2 50  Silver and Copper  2 50  Gold. Silver and Copper  3 00  Platinum  5 00  i Crown | Mercury  2    >  Iron or Manganese  i On  Lime. Magnesium, Barium, Silica, Sulphur, each  2 00  Bismuth. Tin, Cobalt. Nickel, Antimony,  Zinc, and Arsenic, each  1 o<)  Coal (Fixed Carbon. Volatile Matter. Ash,  and percentage of Coke, if Coking  Coal)   .  Terms: '.Cash With .Sample.  June 20th. I��i5.  FRANK DICK,  Assayer and Analyst  i^gaRjmjaetmnrjmwd'Juiaum* THE LEDOE, NEvV Di^JSiVEE, B.C., SEPTEMBER 22, 1898.  Fifth Yeah  The Ledge.  Published every Thursday.  R. T. LOWERY, Editor and Financier.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Three mouths ���?.<*'  Six "  1.25  Twelve "  2.00  Three years  "���.oo  Transient Advertising, 25 cents per line first in  sertion, 10 cents per line subsequent insertions  nonpareil measurement.  TO CONTRIBUTORS.  C jrrespondence from every part of the Kootenay  ��� District and communications upon live topics  always acceptable. Write on both sides of the  paper if you wish. Always send something good  no matter how crude. Get your copy in while it  is hot, and we will do the rest  A pencil cross in this square  indicates that your subscription is due, and that the editor  wishes once again to look at  your collateral.  TEURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22. ��� 1898  HERK    IS    THE    OPPORTUNITY.  In acknowledging its error in  stating that the total output of silver  in Kootenay for ten years was $1,000, -  000, when it should have been stated  as $7,302,000, to which attention was  called in a recent issue of The Ledge,  the London B. C. Review concludes:  ' 'We endorse a Suggestion of The  Ledge that a copy of the report of  the Minister of Mines should be  mailed annually to the London mining papers. We would even suggest  that a copy of this important document be sent to all the leading journals in England, and it the Government will supply them we will undertake to see that they are properly  distributed and that they reach the  right people."  We are pleased to see that the  Review endorses the suggestion made,  and the B. C. Government should  lose no time in complying with the  request that a supply of the report of  the Minister of Mines be forwarded  to the London journal, which will  kindly undertake the proper distribution of them.  The B. C. Review is doing a good  work in London in the interest of  British Columbia, and it can be  assisted greatly if it has on hand a  quantity of the reports of the Minister  of Mines. We venture to say that  one reliable mining paper like the  Review, issuing regularly in London,  is of more real value in presenting  the virtues of British Columbia to the  nrihing world than would be a score  of such offices as the B. C. Government is now keeping up in one of the  fashionable suburbs of London, and  we hope the proper officials at  Victoria will take the matter in hand  and forward to the Review a supply  of the reports for distribution.  branded at some stage of the game,  but most of them have managed somehow to survive, and it is not likely  that the Province man will suffer the  agonies of hell because of it. A fool  can blaspheme his God, but it is a  wise man that makes and holds his  peace. __  SCRAPS FROM THE  EDITOR'S DESK.  The Rossland Miner is endeavoring  to attach to that city's name the appendage "The Golden City." No  harm in this and it looks well in print  so why not?  Down in Mexico they have a  strange way of doing things. The  farmers use oxen of one color in the  morning, and another color in the  afternoon. They do not know why,  but they know it must be right because their forefathers did it. We  can gather from this some idea of  where the custom tor morning and  afternoon gowns came from.  There is a custom in Japan that is  ahead of anything we have in New  Denver. When a dog barks at night  there the owner is arrested and sentenced to work a year for the neighbors that were disturbed. The dog  gets off easier, being killed. As we  do not own a dog and have neighborly neighbors, we are in favor of such  a law being put in force right now  and here.  After a brief  the Wetaskiwin  cum bed to the  been laid to rest  Lost, strayed or stolen: A fire hall  of diminutive proportions, built after  the fashion of an upright dry goods  box,,, weather-beaten and badly in  need of paint. Information leading  to the finding thereof, will be thank  fully received and amply rewarded  by the Chief of Police of New Denver,  or address Premier Semlin, Victoria.  ANYTHING    TO    KEEP    PEACE.  The Vancouver Province in commenting upon the disastrous Are at  New Westminster, said some things  editorially that were somewhat premature and entirely out of place. It  spoke of New Westminster as. a city  of yesterday, and insinuated that its  citizens would not be inclined to rebuild, but would gladly take their insurance money and remove to Vancouver or some other more promising  city. All of this might be very true  ot many of the unfortunate sufferers,  but it is one of those truths that can  . never be told without injuring the  tender chords of humanity's heart,  and bringing curses upon the head of  the well-meaning but hasty writer.  As a result of its untimely remarks  The Province is being shamelessly  assailed by its jealous contemporaries  and its editor called all manner of bad  things. This is the way he takes his  medicine:  "A correspondent of the World  writes to that newspaper accusing the  editor of The Province of being a  ���'worm" and "a vacuous cur" and  various other unpleasant things, and  if it would make anybody feel any  better or happier the editor of The  Province will cheerfully admit that  he is the wormiest kind of a worm  and the most vacuous sort of a vacuous cur on earth. It does, however,  seem a pity that public questions and  matters cannot be discussed without  indulging in silly personalities of this  discription. Children doing it are  forgiven because of their youth, but  human beings should surely look for  something better from themselves  when they attain maturity."  While the editor of The Province  "takes his medicine like a little man"  he does not miss the opportunity to  administer a just rebuke to that class  of individuals who seem to think that  the calling of a man a curmakeshim  one.    Everv   editor   has   been  thus  and fitful existence  Free Lance has sue-  inevitable and has  where the grass is  never green and the possies have  lost their bloom. The plant has been  transferred to Innisfail, and the paper  will be issued anew by the invincible  R. Edwards. If the citizens ot Wetaskiwin would assassinate and bury  that name there might be some chance  for a newspaper there.  The London Spectator advocates a  plan which would have made the  statesmen ruling English affairs 24  years ago open their eyes with  amazement. It proposes the abrogation of the Clayton-Bulwer treaty and  in its place one whereby the two nations of England and America guarantee for each other the control of the  Suez and the Nicaragua canals  against all comers. This would constitute a pact of invincible strength,  and the official discussion would  make the rest of the world squirm.  Stranger things have happened.  The New York Times tells the  story of a calf which seven years ago  tore a man's vest from a backyard  fence where it was hanging, chewed  up the garment and swallowed a gold  watch that was in the pocket. A few  weeks ago the calf, now a full-grown  animal, was slaughtered for beef,  and the watch was found in such a  position between the lungs that the  process of respiration, closing and  filling the lungs, had kept the stem-  winder wound up and the watch had  lost only four minutes in seven years.  John Taylor is considering the advisability of providing his calves  with a cheap grade of watch to swal  low so that as cows they will come  home at milking time.  RAMPANT      CHURCHISM      VS.      THE  HOLY    SPIRIT   IN   MAN.  ���  An interesting* controversy  has been  going- on in Kaslo between the Koot-  enain on   one   hand   and   the   News,  supported   by    the   several     church  divines, on the other.   It was opened  by the Kootenaian taking* occasion to  rebuke the local pulpit for its narrow  interpretation of God and Chistianity.  "instead of replying to our arguments," says the Kootenaian, "the advocates of   ceremonial   worship   have  accused   us   through  their  the  British Columbia News, of materialism.  Heresy has been defined as 'the creed  of your opponent,'   and   lest  readers of the Kootenaian  'the  the  pious  should get a  false notion of our religious platform,  we hereby present our creed.  To begin  with, we believe in God, but we deny  that Ke vacates the rest of the universe  on Sunday to go to church.    We do not  contend,   however,    that   every   rampant   excursionist  who   takes ' to   the  woods and streams on Sunday is more  devout and nearer to the Great Spirit  than the loud-voiced worshipper at the  Mercy Seat.    For just as the Pharisee  may go to tlie sanctuary and keep his  heart at variance with the suasions of  the Spirit, so tlie ruthless disturber of  Nature's sanctities can become an outdoor profanation on the Sabbath or any  other day.    The excursionist  does not  necessarily find God  at  Mirror lake or  Powder creek,    ft is  in  his own being*  (hat man  first g*ets behind the veil of  "matter"  and finds a conscious Spirit.  There  may   be   consciousness   in   the  mountain and in the star and the forest:  and the wind may be vocal with eternal  messages, but  man,  until   he  has first  found God   in   his own   heart,  cannot  commune with  other manifestations of  God:    'Not   the   clear-sighted  but  the  pure-minded shall  see God  in nature."  Once having* found that he has a spirit,  man unconsciously is influenced by the  sublime  fact that  Spirit is universal,  and  he   thus   becomes   attuned to the  harmonies about  him     Ali   nature  is  transfigured.    In the ���   irity of his heart  he has seen God, and not as a visitant  but   as   a   natural   expression   of  the  human spirit.   Man has not known that  what he found in his heart was the presence of the Infinite. He has felt.inspired he knew not how, and with the light  of the Spirit to illumine his way he has  looked, and lo! God was everywhere.  The song of birds was divine, and the  whispers of the forest revealed infinite  secrets and the music of the spheres  was no longer a legend.  "Thus man has found God in nature.  It is not the act of a dependent finding  God far away. It is the God in man  standing revealed, and showing forth  that Spirit is allpervading and indivisible, and that somehow in the divine  alchemy of creation, God and man are  one.  "The materialist banishes God and  worships Force; the evolunsionist works  out his science under the shadow of the  Unknowable; the theologian keeps his  God in a far-away land preparing mansions for the elect. But he who has  realised that his spirit is God has already entered the 'kingdom of heaven.'  To him all things are possible.  "Gradually this idea that man to find  happiness and freedom must wait until  he is transported to a Beulah land, will  become a part of the accumulating  Christian mythology. Here and there  a spirit will discover the presence of infinite powers in its nature, and that the  place where it is to lind completeness is  not in a mystical region of rainbows  and emerald and streets of gold. When  man realizes that he is divine, and that  he is surrounded by beauty and harmony, every homely act that before  seenied trivial will become noble. That  which seemed dull and "unilluinined  commonplace" will be transfigured. Man  will no longer dream of an imaginary  drama, wherein he can stalk in heroic  roles. A cup of cold water given or  received in the name of love shall become a benediction.' He will no longer  prostrate himself before non-resident  gods. The world no long-er a vale of  tears, will stand revealed a divine instrument, entirely at his disposal and  responsive to his touch, capable of producing infinite harmonies.  TOO   SKRIOUS    POE   JEST.  Just at this time a great deal of literary "rot" is being dished up by many of  our contemporaries regarding* the pro  hibition plebescite. The freedom with  which many of the windy scribblers  have used biblical quotations'to support  their argument, both pro and con,  causes the Vancouver World to make  this earnest remonstrance :  "The question is one that has been  threshed out for years and the arguments to be adduced for and against  cannot be in consequence very original.  But we desire to point out that the  morals of the young boys, and indeed  girls, who are growing up among us,  and whom it is intended to guard from  the evils of intemperance, must be seri-  ouslv injured by the scandalous manner  in which the Book of Books is being-  treated by writers in various sheets  if the newspaper .columns are to be  thrown open to every Tom, Dick and  Harrv who hastens eagerly to vilify the  Bible'i to assail the Master, to laugh at  other people because they believe Satan  exists, to crush out of the souls of the  little children growing* up that reverence for the Gospel truths which has  made Britain the power she is in the  world, it may well be asked if the ideal  we are striving for can be reached. We  are ready to acknowledge that it is extremely' difficult for a newspaper to  decline the innumberable army of  cranks and faddists admission to its  valuable space, but surely it has a perfect right to do so, just as much as the  merchant has to dismiss the hanger on,  or the policeman to order a nuisance to  his fellows to move along. It must not,  however, be forgotten that this is a preeminently Christian country, and thai  while the agnostic or the atheist lias his  rights, he has not license to pervert the.  youth of the land by his almost criminal  sayings and writings. The campaign  and the consequent dimensions of this  burning problem have but commenced  In all decency let it. and kindred subjects, be treated with that respect which  its tremendous possibilities induce."  Truth is not so fascinating as beauty,  not even in the clving saint.  |B*hA��J'tela'telh^  F. Pyman has again commenced to  do business in New Denver. Bring  your watches to him when they are out  of order.  To recollect the poor is not to remember them.  For  four-bits   you  can  purchase  100  ancient newspapers at this office.  1898 1898  Provincial  EXHIBITION  Under the Direction of the  Royal Agricultural and  Industrial Society of  British Columbia  Oct. 5 to 13, inclusive  nt. Xew Westminster,       r^,  In    conjunction   with    the  f(f  Citizens' Grand  Yearly   Celebration   ��am  oetreal  Established  1817.  Capital (all paid up) $12,000,000.00  Reserved fund : : 6,000,000.00  Undivided profits '.:    :     896,850.04  HEAD   OFFICE,   MONTREAL.  Rt. Hon. Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, G.C.M.G. President.  Hon. G. A. Drummond, Vice President,  E. S. Clouston, General Manager,  Branches in all parts of Canada, Newfoundland, Great Britain, and  the United States. ~  New Denver branch  F.J. FINUCaNE, Manager:  !  w  ���^w^^W4Wi�� ��<u��^<MBxa^��>mv-^-j-^giri^a'��air,1?y','^''-ff VH 'm^-Wii .najLiu vJM-*-nT>TT��?Tr^ig-ne-��  SHE'LL   MARRY   ME.  Ah, life looks very bright to ir.e  Since I liave heard her say,  With sweet, becoming modesty,  She'll marry me some day���  If I will give up smoking;  If I will go to church ;  If I cut the club and leave  My best friends in the lurch;  If I will never stay out late���;  But hasten home at nine,  If I will let her have her way  She's promised to be mine!  If I will move to Kensington,  And will never touch a card ;  If I will buckle down to work,  And labor long and hard  To buy her stylish bonnets.  And gowns and lots of gloves  Then I may be that happy man  The lucky man she loves.  If I'll be always pleasant.  And never, never scold ;  And never make her nurse me,  And not grow cross and old ;  And always stay good-looking-  She can't stand ugly men���  If I come up to her ideal,  Why, well be married, then !  That's why I am so happy,  And why I often seem  Unconscious and abstracted���  I'm living in a dream !  She is so sweet and pretty,  And so unselfish, too!  I wonder how I won her love���  I can't believe it's true!  ���London Post.  C. S. RASHDALL.  Notary Public.  A. E. FAUQUIER.  Oll'eveil 50  Cents  on tlie Dollar.  An important meeting* of the creditors of the B. C. Iron Works was held  at in Vancouver last week. An offer  of 50 cents on the dollar cash was made  to the unsecured creditors and this will  probably be accepted.  To be morally insignificant is the  price we pay for our sin.  Tiik Ai.Hi-iiTA Pi-onuCE Co. of  Calgary, contemplates sending into  the Kootenay during the fall and  winter .regular carload shipments, of  Potatoes, and'other farm produce.  The trade only will be supplied and  we solicit the eo-oncration of the  Slocan dealers. For particulars and  prices write to    Thos. II. Ixgkam  I'ox -'"���S, Calgary, Alta.  Representing Alberta Produce. Co..  and Manitoba Grain Co., Ltd.  ^  RASHDALL & FAUQUIER  MINES & REAL ESTATE.  NEW DENVER, B.C.  MIXING INTERESTS BOUGHT,   SOLD  and BONDED.      CORRESPONDENCE   INVITED ���  Complete lists of claims for sale.    Abstracts of claims, conveyancing.  H. T. BRAGDON,  New Denver, B.C.  Heavy and Shelf Hardware,  Mine and Mill Supplies,  Pipe and Fittings,  Paints and Oils, ,,  Builders' and Contractors'  Supplies,  Stoves and Kitchen Ware,  Agents for Canton Steel.  I carry one of the largest  and best assorted stocks of  Hardware hi West Kootenay,  and shall be pleased to quote  prices upon anything required  ii'my line.  OTEL SANDON,  *?K    vft    ^A    vft  ��� vft    "7ft  Sandon, B.C.  HPHIS NEW HOUSE, with the old name, is  well equipped to accommodate a large  number of Guests. The building is plastered  and the rooms are unsurpassed for comfort in  the Slocan, while in the Dining Room can be  found the best food in the market.  Robert Cunning, Proprietor.  The Clifton House,  We do what we advertise to do.  "In time of Peace prepare  tor War."  How are your  Mattresses?  If they want "making  over"���new springs���  ������new ticking ��� new  wool and excelsior���  now is the time to  have it done. Don't  wait for cold weather.  Sandon.  Has ample accommodations for a large number of people.     The rooms are large  and airy, and the Dining Room is provided with everything  in the market  Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers.  John Buckle}', Prop.  p  ON  $18,000  in   Prizes  Premium List is the largest  ever oll'ered west of Toronto  Py ro-.Spectac u lfir Bombardment of Santiago de Cuba, and  Blowintr up of the '-Maine"  followed bv an u">-to-date Fire  Works Display, wliich has  been specially secured for four  nights, ut an enormous expense.  Lacrosse and Baseball  Matches, Bicveie Meet, Aquatic, Sailor and Caledonian  Sports. Promenade Concerts.  Morse Races, Di>g Show.  Open to the world.  The finest Bands in the  Province will  provide  music.  Special Rates over all railway and steamboat lines.  No entrance fee charged for  Exhibits.  For full information apply  to���  XV. H. EDMONDS,  Sec. Celebration  Committee.  WALKER & BAKER,  New    Kuriii'tun; Dealers and Itepairers  Denver's     Under takers and Embalmers.  N. B.���We have the only practical Undertaker  and Emlmlmer doing business in the Slocan.  -"���n    G.  FAUQUIER,  NOTARY PUBLIC.  Nakusp. B.C.  HAM & CRAWFORD,  SIXTH STREET,       -       -        ...       .       NEW DENVER.  ^-Prices are right and Goods Always Fresh.  THE MINERS EXCHANGE.  Three Forks, E. C. Weaver  AsSflYE^S OF B. G.  JjOWARD WEST,  Assoc. R S M. London. Eng  MINING ENGINEER,  ANALYTICAL CHEMIST,  A ASSAYER.  Properties   examined    and   reported  on  iVi    in  tending purchasers.  Assay office aud Chemical   Laboratory. Belle-  vueave. Xew Denver. BC.  J. M. M. BENEDUM,  Silverton.  Travelers  Will find the  Arlington Hotel  a pleasant place to stop at when in  SLean City.  GETHING & HENDERSON, Proprietors.  notice"       ~~  AJOTICE is herebv given that 3n days after date  i\ I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner  of Lauds and works'for a special license to cut  and carry away timber from the following de -  cribed lands: Commencing at a post marked  Frank Hill, southeast comer, on the west side of  Slocan Lake about five miles from the nortb end,  thence -.vo-t eighty chains, thence north 120  chains thenee east eightv chains, thence 120  cbams'south to starting point, containing iifi'i  acres FRANK HILL.  New Denver, B. C. July :��>, isfiH.  T)  R. A.S. MARS'-',..��..L.  Dentist.  Kaslo, B C  Graduate of American College of Dental Surgery  Chicago .  /~1 WILL1M & JOHNSON.  VX    ���        (McGill)  Mining Engineers  & Analy-Chemists.  iC.O.DiJ      Goods called  for & Delivered  Slocan  City,  B C.  WANTED.  Industrious man of character to travel and appoint agents.   Salary and expenses paid.  BRADLEY-G \RRETS0N COMPANY.Limitcd  Toronto.  AUNDRY  We are now in a  position to give  thoroughly satisfactory service  and solicit your  patronage. We  make a specialty  of the finer lines  of Cambrics and  Linens, etc. All  business cash on  delivery.  Work Done on Short Notice.  C. M. NESBITT, Prop.  i����'llates furnished Hotels,   Steamboat Companies, etc, on application.  El Dorada Ave.  j^t L. GRIMMETT, L.L.B.  BARRISTER,  Solicitor, Notary Public, Etc.  Sandon, B. C. Fifth Year.  THE LEDGHE, NEW DENVER, B.C.,  SEPTEMBER 22; 1898.  SONG   OF   THE   MYSTIC.  Father Ryan.  I walked down the Valley of Silence���  The dark, voiceless valley���alone!  And I hear not the fall of a footstep  Around me, save God's and my own ;  And the hush of my heart is as holy  .  As hover where angels have flown !  Long ago was I weary of voices  Whose music my heart could not win ;  Long ago was I weary of noises  That fretted my soul with their din ;  Long ago was I weary of places  Where I met font tha human���and sin.  I walked in the world with the worldly;  Icraved what the world never gave,   ���  And I said :   "'In the world each Ideal  That shines like a star on life's wave,  Is tossed on the shores of the Real,  And sleeps like a dream m a grave."  And still did I pine for the Perfect,  And still found the False with the True;  I sought'mid the Human for Heaven,  But caught a mere glimpse of its Blue;  And I wept when the cloulds of the Mortal   ���  Veiled even that glimpse from my view.  And I toiled on, heart-tired of the Human,  And I moaned 'mid the maze* of men  Till I knelt, long ago, at an altar  And I heard a voice call me.   Since then  I walk down the Valley of Siience  That lies far beyond mortal ken.  Do you ask what I found in the valley '}  'Tis my Trusting Place with the Divine.  And I fell at the feet of the Holy,  And about me a voice said:   "Be mine."  And there rosa from the depth of my spirit  An echo���"My heart shall be thine.'  Do you ask how I live in the Valley 'I  I weep and I dream���aud I pray.  But my tears are as sweet as the dewdrops  That fall on roses in May ���  And my prayer like a perfume from Censers  Ascendeth to God night and day.  In the hush of the Valley of Silence  I dream all the songs that I sing;  And the music rloat3down the deep Valley  Till each finds a word for a wing.  That to hearts, like tho Dove of the Deluge,  A message of peace they may bring.  But far on the deep there are billows,  That never shall break on the beach,  And I have heard songs in the Silence  That never shall float into speech ;  And I have had dreams in the Valley  Too lofty for language to reach.  And I have seen Thoughts in the Valley���  Ah ! me, how my spirit was stirred !  And thev wear holy ve'ls on their faces,  Their footsteps can,scarcely foe heard:  Thev pass through the Valley like Virgins,  Too pure for the touch of a word !  .'���Do you ask me the place of the Valley,  Ye hearts that are sorrowed with care ?  It lieth afar between mountains.  And God and His angels are there ; ,  And one is the dark mountain of Sorrow,  And one the bright mountain of Prayer.  OLD ELI m THE ROPE.  Ah   Sewn    by  a "Writer   in  Chronicle.  tho   Chicago  Iii tlie Chicago Chronicle of  August  28, a descriptive article appears giving-  a rather sensational account of the  Slocan City celebration of May 24,1897.  The best part of the article is its reference to the great feat performed by El'  Carpenter in walking the tight rope,  in this connection it says :  '"Great expectations were built on the  day At least 700 people were expected  from Sandon, Three Forks and New  Denver. The Canadian Pacific had a  new swift passenger boat, whicli was to  make its first trip. As the event approached by the passage of time it was  Felt by the Americans that nothing  within grasp should be suffered to  escape doing duty for the occasion. One  possibility bothered all the enthusiasts.  If we had a real tight-rope walker in  town and he failed to contribute to the  entertainment someone would bo to  blame. Then tlie search began, with  the agreement among a few that if the  fellow was as represented they would  foot the bills privately.  '���The astonishment increased with  discovery. He was a little man; that  is to say, undersized. Perhaps his  years we've 55 Deep furrows lined his  face. On his brow were the horizontal  wrinkles that tell of the receptive mind,  ever open to nature, and of eyes often  observing without consciousness. Their  color was distinctly Gallic or Goscogne,  of the dense blue' shade of the lapis-  lazuli. His nose, not large, was keen-  pointed and full at the nostrils, his  mouth rather thin, and chin set like the  chin of Foyatier's chiseled symbol,  Jour le Labourer." The glance was  rather furtive, yet when you fixed his  gaze in confidence the eye was steady  and sympathetic.  "This was Eli Carpenter. Everybody  knew him, but no one in camp suspected he was a tight-rope walker, except  his friend Eugene Provost, the French-  Canadian. .Provost was with tlie committee and vehemently seconded then-  request in turgid French. Eli replied  that he had not walked the rope for  years and was entirely out of practice.  Besides, he had grown old and shaky;  he had the rheumatism, the inevitable  visitation suffered by the mountaineer,  and lastly he had no tights or any of  the necessary paraphernalia.  "However", it need be, he would walk  without tights. He could do it, now  that his promise had been secured. All  he needed was a little practice, and  then he would feel safe.  "Now, Eli Carpenter was known to  everyone in the Slocan and to a world  of stock gamblers and investors outside.  He was, in short, the discoverer of the  country; rather the discoverer of its  woirlerful mines.  "ft is scarcely worth while trying to  tell what a country is this Slocan. It  is nothing but angles with a few big-  lake beds. In it you can never find a  level. Mountains, foothills, lake shore  inclines; thin seams of canyons choked  with bowlders and trees; * living glaciers, at whose springs caribou 'drink;  avalanche paths by the thousand, a  land more terrible to the explorer in  1'888 than the Yukon was last year.  "Eli Carpenter had invaded this labyrinth of mountains in 1891 and found  the mineral resources of a present an  nual product of 815,000,000 to British  Columbia. He carried his pack on his  back, and thus became the exemplar of  Slocan wealth. His blood was French;  he was born in the quartier Marais of  Paris.  "In a heedless moment Eli had sold  for SoOO his half interest in a mine  whose millions are incalculable. This  is known as the Payne, and is largely  owned by Alfred \V. McEwen, who  is now making* a candidacy for the  United States senate on the strength olv  the fortune he has in his grasp.  "Though the Payne was his first find  and the one that has turned the Slocan  into a habitable region, whose mountain canyons and passes are threaded  with railroads and whose wonderful  lakes are traversed by modern steamers, Carpenter, that wiry, unconquerable little Frenchman, all given to grit  and hope and   love of his fellow man.  packed his food and bedding into every  formidable altitude of that cheerless  mountain range, and was known  throughout the camps builded in its  gulches as the original pioneer.  "Sharp at 4 o'clock the chairman of  the committee entered the room and  announced that Eli was due on the  rope. No tights had been procured,  through the mismanagement -usually  experienced in the public affairs of  young communities, where everybody  depends upon somebody to do something he shirks himself. Eli had counted secretly on appearing in silks and  spangles, notwithstanding his willingness to walk the rope in his trousers,  aud, though he said no word complain-  ingly, he plainly showed by the grave  look* he assumed that his confidence had  been betrayed.  " 'Qu' impore!' he exclaimed. 'I say  I walk d' rope, anyhow.'  "So Eli was led out to the third-story  front room, where his balance pole and  flying trapese and portable stove and  everything necessary to conventional  tight-rope walking, except tights, had  been stored.  "For the first moment during all the  time the waiting folk eyed the rope  with a sort of fascination no one present  could account for it trembled and  swung. Then a great shout went up.  Sure enough ! It was Eli Carpenter,  that curious old fool Frenchman, who  had taken a drink with every drinking  man in the Slocan, and avIio when he  had money always bought wine. Not  the discoverer, the spendthrift, was  now in evidence, but an unexpected  man.  "The pupils of Eli's Gascony eyes expanded fi bit and then he shifted through  his hands in the search of equilibrum  tlie crooked .maple pole he had found  and dressed himself. Eli walked across  the rope and backward. He didn't  mind the loose swing or the danger in  the perpendicular vibrations. Then he  asked the chairman of the committee to  blindfold him and he repeated the exhibition;1 After a little rest of his nerves  while the well-intending Canadian band  plaved a musical mockery of the tune  of "Dixey" Eli went forward again with  a cook stove and an 'arrangement he  had made for himself. In the center of  the oscillation he sat down and cooked  a lunch of bacon and eggs. The crowd  was falling into a state of stupefaction.  He was certainly a hypnotist. Nobody  cheered any more; all looked dazed and  dumb.  "Curious to say Eli Carpenter, whose  surname originally was Carpenter, out  of the Quartier of Marais, walked the  tight   rope   for   Barnum    years    ag"0  mile is not far short of 300. That is to  say, its area is more than 11 times that  of Great Britain and Ireland, and almost one-half that of the United States,  exclusive of Alaska; its population is 10  times that of Great Britain and Ireland  and more than six times that of the  United States. In fact, more than one-  fourth of the total population of the  globe is concentrated within the boundaries of China proper.  The great commercial nations of the  world are now all trying to get shares  of the trade of this -fast'and populous  country. For not only is China* large  and populous, but she" is also wealthy,  for her inhabitants are both industrious  and frugal, and, besides, as compared  with the people of European countries  they have been greatly spared the disastrous commerce-destroying effects of  war, both foreign and internecine.  Centuries ago the Chinese had made  great progress toward civilization.  Their skill in the manufacturing arts  and in agriculture and horticulture was  for ages superior to that of western nations. But, unfortunately for their  advancement, they are conservative,  self conceited and" averse to improvement, especially if they have to learn  improvement from others. As yet  they have almost wholly ignored the  ideas and methods of modern western  civilization. They have scarcely any  railways, "but few steamships, almost  no steam power manufactories, and no  telephones. The only modern improv-  ment, which they have made use of is  the telegraph. " Some years ago (in  1876) a European company secured the  privilege of building a short railway  from Shanghai, but it was scarcely built  before the government got fearful of its  influence and bought it up and stopped  its running. But the Chinese people  are not averse to foreign trade; on the  contrary, they are rather fond of it. If  only the thing could happen in China  that happened in Japan, that is to say,  if only the government could fall into  the hands of rulers who were open-  minded to improvement and inclined to  coal are among the finest and certainly  among the largest in the whole world.  And near her coal fields are v#tst deposits of some of the richest iron ores in  the world.   Again a great portion of  the soil of  China  is extremely fertile.  There are indeed   two regions, one of  red soil and another, much  vaster, of  yellow soil, that are among the most  fertile in the world.    It is because ot  the extent  and fertility of the.yellow  soil of China that yellow is the imperial  color and the emperor called the "yellow lord."   The climate, too, of China  permits almost the whole, range of useful   vegetable   products to be raised.  Growth of cotton is already very g-reat  because for seven centuries cotton has  been the staple cloth for the clothing of  the people.   And  already   it  is being  manufactured  by   modern machinery.  But both the growth of cotton and its  manufacture by modern.methods would  be enormously increased if only facilities for internal transportation and freedom   from   unjust   taxation   could   be  secured.    If, in short, China only had  railways and a  good and enlightened  system' of government her progress and  prosperity would soon make the western world envious.   But her  government is not only stupidly unprogres-  sive;   it is also disastrously wasteful.  About 70 per cent, of the whole revenue  of the country is lost to the public use  through   the" malfeasance of officials.  And only about 85 miles of  railway  have as yet been opened, although it  must be said that 200 to 250 miles more  are under construction.  CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS  rjoniiiiioii,  Kelix  St. Keverne, O. JJ. H., Exeter,  stud    Payne    Fractional  Mineral    Claim*.  ACIFIC  P  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District.   Where   located:    On  Payne mountain, on the north slope.  'PAKE  NOTICE   That  1,  Charles  afoore, of  L    Kaslo, B. C, and acting as ajrent for the St.  Keverne Mining Company, Ltd., free miner's  certificate    Xo.    i2,l.''iiA,   intend,,  sixty   days  from the date hereof  to apply to the'Mining  Recorder    for    a    certificate     of     improvements for the purpose of obtaining a  Crown  Grant of the above claims.  And further take notice that action under  Section .'17 must be commenced  before the issuance of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this .1th dav of September. I��li8.  CH.AR.LES MOORE, P.L.S.  Kio Mineral Claim.  R  AND SOO-PACIFIC LINE.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District.      Where  located: In  Best Basin, MeGuigan Creek. nearOkana^aii  mineral claim.  'PAKE NOTICE (hat I, William S. Drewrv, aet-  J.    Iiiff as ntfent for E. A. Biclenfoery, free miner's  certificate No. 2.W.7A, Daniel Cosfrri if, free miner's  certificate No.J7('2A and T.F.CosBrifl". free miner's  certilicate No. ���17IWA, intend sixty days from the  date hereof to apnly to the Mininir Recorder for a  certificate of improvements, for the purpose of  obtaining a 'Crown tfrant of the above claim.  And further take notice, that notion under section .17. must be commenced before the issuance  of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this i7th day of August. 181*8  W. S. DREWRY.  TO ALL  EASTERN  AND  EUJiOPEAX POINTS.  TO PACIFIC COAST,  JAPAN,   CHINA   AND  .  AUSTRALIA.  TO THE RICH and ACTIVE  MINING DISTRICTS OF  Kiglit   From   'Ome.  throughout the New England states.  When he married his young wife it was  with the agreement that upon that day  after the ceremony she would place herself entirely at his disposal. She was  of Quebec and puekily, French.  "Dr. George Starr must have'been  Barnum's manager at that time, for he  provided life annuities in the event of  failure. Eli Carpenter and his sweetheart were suicidally in love, for under  the spur of the moment he agreed  to walk on a tight rope across any  street in any New England city, five  stories high, and carry on his back, at  the same time, the woman who agreed  to be his wife.' She was full of French  philosophic indifference, and consented.  "Thus it came that Eli Carpenter, the  whilom tight-rope walker whom thousands of New England youngsters, now  grown to manhood will remember,made  an exhibition of his prowess with his  wife on his back in the college  city of New Haven. That is to say,  shortly after having left the altar she  allowed him to seat heron his shoulders  and take her across the street five  stories high.  "The emotional experience of KIT  Carpenter may be recited, relatively,  by many men' of the mountains. The  wire ropewalker spoiled his metier and  decided, as many a thoroughbred  Frenchman has done before, to work  fortune, not out of his muscular skill,  but out of nature. He landed in Wild  Horse Gulch, British Columbia, away  back in the 80s, and took up a patch of  placer ground. His wife was home in  New Hampshire in the same town in  which ins married sister lived. No  harm, mortal or physical, could befall  his wife, while he' extracted fortune  from the gravel of the mountains.  ���'Every fall clean-up for six years Eli  sent by express from Fort Steele on the  Kootenay river, not less than $2,000 in  pure gold to his wife. One day he got  a letter from his sister telling him that  his wife was about to become a mother.  He promptly quit the Wild Horse  diggings and went west into the Slocan  range, the heights and mysteries of  which no one else had penetrated or  solved. With him all the time was the  old French Canadian vovageur, Provost."  be progressive, the rush that China  would make toward civilization ' and  the adoption of modern trade methods  and modern processes of manufacture  would be startling.  At present the foreign trade of China  is largely in the hands of the English.  In the year 1896 the foreign export  trade of China amounted to $167,000,000.  Of this amount $132,500,000 was with  Great Britain and her dependencies;  $10,000,000 with the United States-  something over $6,000,000 with the continent of Europe exclusive of Russia,  and less than $2,000,000 with Russia. In  the same year the foreign import trade  of |China was $102,500,000, of which  .$56,000,000 was with Great Britain and  her dependencies; a little over $9,000,-  000 with the United States; $15,000,000  with the continent of Europe, exclusive  of Russia, and $12,500,000 with Russia.  . The rest of her trade was principally  .with Japan. The policy of the government of China has always been to prevent or restrict foreign trade; and even  to-day foreign trade can be carried on  in only 26 Chinese ports���the so-called  "treaty ports." The policy of Great  Britain has been to secure by treaty as  large a privilege of trading 'with China  as possible; then to ��� throw open the  privilege to the world, but to follow it  up with such commercial activity on  her own part as would secure to her the  lion's share of the resulting trade. Of  the 26 ports now by treaty open to the  world for trade 23 "have been secured  by Great Britain and three by Japan.  China's principal exports are tea and  silk, tea constituting about one-third  silk (principally rawsilk) fully one-half  of her total export trade. Other principal exports are sugar, straw braid  (one-twentieth of her total exportation),  hides, paper, china ware and pottery.  Her principal imports are opium and  cotton goods, opium constituting a fifth  and cotton goods considerably more  than half of her total import trade.  Other principal imports are woolen  goods and machinery,coal and kerosene  oil. A considerable importation is also  made of raw cotton. But if China only  had the blessings of enlightened and  progressive ��� government this disposition of exports and imports would not  long   continue.    Chinas   resources   of  The editor of the Rossland Times is  an Englishman right from the old 'ome,  and ought to knoiv what he is talking  about. Savs he:' "Hurrah! Hurrah!  The little '"White Father" has spoken  and at his mandate millions upon millions of human beings will turn their  swords into plough shares, will be men  instead of downtrodden slaves. The  Czar of Russia���my the gods bless him  ���has done in one moment what the entire European world has not even dared  to think of. ;Hurrah, I say again; ere  very long Europe will be as free as the  United States and Canada. Let me  think.  "Europe is as to the masses as peaceably inclined as is Hawaii. But by intolerable fraud and wickedness, cruelty  and murder, her governing upper  classes have woven a network around  each country, the whole and entire object of which is simply elevation to  those who rule and death to the ruled.  We weep at the tales of the Cuban  sufferings: are their sufferings as intense as those of the tens of thousands  now dying" of hunger in the streets of  London. Ought we not to realize that  if charity is to go round, let us ..begin  by showering our collections on our  own flesh and blood?"  Jeuuette Mineral Claim.  Situate in the Slocan Mining- Division of West  Kootenay District. Where located: Four  miles east of Rosebery, east of Wilson creek.  "PAKE NOTICE that I. Herbert T. Twipg,  I iif-'ent for Frank Kelly, Free Miner's Certificate No. li'ORTA, intend, sixty days from the date  hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a  Certificate of Improvements, for Ihe purpose of  obtaining-a Crown Grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that notion, under  -section '17, must be commenced before the  issuance of such certificate of Improvements.  Dated this atoli day of August, 18f)S.  HERBERT T\ TWIGG.  Silvei  'Jell   No.  a   mul   Dump   Fraction  Mineral Claims.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District. Wliere located: Adjoining1 the Surprise, Kcno and Gladstone  mineral claims, In Best Basin, MeGuigan  creek.  q*UKE NOTICE that I, William S... Dreury,  1 acting-as agent for the Native Silver Bell  Mining Company, Limited, of Rossland, B. C.  Free Miner's Certificate No. 13M.1A. intend  sixty days from the date hereof to apply to the  Mining Recorder for a certificate or improvements for tlie purpose of obtaining a Crown grant  of the above claim.  And further take notice that action under section 37 must bo commenced before the issuance of  such, certificate of improvements.  Dated this lSth day of August, 1898.  XV. S. DREWRY.  Reasonable  Prices  and the best and freshest line of  Groceries,  Canned Goods,  Fine Teas and Coffees  Are the rule at  T. H.  XV. S. DKL'WUY  Kaslo, B.C.  H. T. Twig��  "few Denver, B.C.  DREWRY & TWIGG  Dominion and Provincial Land Surveyor?  Civil and Mining Engineers.  Bedford, McNeil Code.  ,T3~'RashdaIl & Fauquier, Agents.  Black Vox, lied Vox,   Grey Wolf,   Black  Bear, Black Fox Fraction, Bed Fox  Fraction,   Grey    Wolf   Fraction,  ami    liJack      Hear     Fraction  Mineral    Claims.  Situate in the Arrow Lake Mining Division of  West Kootenay District. Where located: In  Cariboo Creek Camp, north of Snow Creek.  'PAKE NOTICE that I, A. P. Patrick, acting  1 as agent for The Silver Queen Mining- Co.,  Limited Liability, Free Miner's Certificate No.  10742A, intend, sixty days from the date  hereof to apply to the Mining Recorder for a  certificate of improvements for the purpose of  obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claims.  Aiid further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance of  such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 15th day of August, 1808.  A. P. PATRICK.  L. 2S17G-. i.  Constant Mineral Claim.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District. Where located: On Cody  Creek and adjoining the Bolander mineral  claim. L. 2113 G. 1.  'PAKE NOTICE that I, A. S. Farwell. as aircnt  1 for A. XV. McCune. F. M. O. CI 727, W. L.  Hoge, F.M. C. ,s:i0SfS. E. V. McCune, F. M. C.  N.1''22, intend, sixty days from the date  hereof, to apply to ' the .Mining- Recorder for n. certilicate of improvement's for  the purpose of obtaining a crown gnin* of the  above claim.  And further fake notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance  of such certilicate of improvements.  Dated this llili day of .I'ulv, is'is.  A. S. FARWELL.  SHORTEST  AND  QUICKEST  ROUTE  Klondike  and the Yukon,  Close connections and no trouble.  Through tickets issued and Bag-gage cheeked  to destination.  THI IRIQ-n    PASS REVELSTOKE  �� S'tM "'j?  '. f    DAILY TO ST. PAUL.  CARS      DAILY (except Wednesday)  W"U       TO EASTERN CANADIAN  and U. S. POINTS.  Daily train leaves New Denver Canyon Siding  S:4n a. m. Arrives New Denver Canyon Siding  3:.10p m.  Boat connection daily (except Sunday? via  Rosebery: Leaves New Denver 8.35 a. m;  arrives New Denver 4 p. rri'.  Ascertain  present   REDUCED   RATES  and full  information   by   addressing   nearest  local agent or���  G. B. GARRETT, Agent New Denver.  W. F. Anderson, Trav. Pass. Agt., Nelson.  E. J. Coyle, Dist. Pass. Agt., Vancouver.  GST All sensible people travel via C. P. Ry and  Soo line.  Nelson & Ft. Slieppard  Red  Mountain  RAILWAYS  The only all rail route without change  of cars between Nelson and Rossland  and Spokane s nd Rossland.  Direct Route to the  Mineral District of the Col-  villo Reservation,   Nelson, Kaslo,   Kootenay  Lake and   Slocan  Points.  DAILY  SERVICE.  Leave. '  6:20 a. rn.  12:05 "  8:30 a.m.  NELSON  ROSSLAND  SPOKANE  Train leaving Nelson at"8:3() a. m  Arrive.  5:35 p.m  11:20a.m.  3:10 p.m  make close.-  connections at Spokane with trains for all  Pacific Coast Points,  Close connection with Steamers for Kaslo and  all Kootenay lake points.  Passengers for Kettle   River and Boundary  Creek connect at Marcus with stage daily.  C G. DIXON, Spokane, Wash  INTERNATIONAL     NAVIGATION  . & TRADING _C0.,  LTD.  Summer Time Card effective June 20,18D8.  >'> Subject to change without notice.  SS.  South Round  Read down.  INTERNATIONAL.  North Bound  Read up.  SANDON  Train Ivs, Dally, l.on pm   Train ar daily 10.50 am  KASI.O  '���   ar      ���'      .'l.-i.l pm   Train lv   ''  CBoat lv 3.30 am    ���Kaslo���    Boat i  'd.      "     1.30 am    Ainsworth  Cf      "     5.00 am    Pilot Bay "  o       "     5.30 am      Balfour "  i'Boatarfi.to am. Five Mile Pt  7.15 am      Nelson  'i.'ini Northport  Rossland  Spokane  c Train ar 10.0:  Train  11 2i�� am  M lo inn  8.00 am  S.S0 pm rj  7.30 pm g  "������15 Pm =  ii.10 pm-"  /).23pm "^  Iv 1.15 pnii>-  lvl.5.5 pmj^  12.05 pm-;:  K..10 aniQ  Read down.  Daily train lv i.om p  SS. ALBERTA.  Allurii  A 1 p-  and Alps Fraction Mineral  Claims.  TRADE  CENTERS  ASIA.  OF  EASTERN  BY   SEYMOUR  EATON.  China, to the student of commerce,  is the most interesting" country on the  globe.   The reason for this is that its  area is so larg*e, its population so vast  and its   chances   for  development  so  magnificent.   The total area of the empire,   according*  to  late  estimates, is  4,218,401 square miles.   Overestimates  make it 4,468,470 square miles.    The  greatness of this   area may be understood from a   few  comparisons.   It is  about one-twelfth of the total land surface of the globe.   It is two and one-  fourth times that of European Russia  It  is almost one and one-half  times the  total area of the United States, exclusive of Alaska.    But   all of  this territory is not of equal commercial interest.  The  Chinese  empire  consists   of six  parts:   China proper, Manchuria, Mon- j  g-olia,   Thibet,  Jungaria and Eastern j  Turkestan.   Because of recent treaties, |  which ��"ave to Russia the rig-ht to build j  and ������(���'��'. troi" railways in Manchuria i  ���ostensibly for the purpose of securing*  for the Russian  Transsiberian railway  a   A*'orter   route   to Vladivostock, it's  WHOLESALE GROCE  Agents for B. (J. Sugar Refinery and Royal  City Planing Mills."  Situated 'in .the Slocan  Minim;  Division   of ���  West Kootenay District.     Where located:  On divide between   Wilson Creek and north j  fork Carpenter Creek. j  'PAKE: NOTICE that 1. Herbert T. TwiW.  I u'Aint for the Golden Canyon Gold and Silver j  Milliner Company. Free Miner's Certilicate- No. j  UitiSiA. intend, fin days from date, hereof, tonpply to |  the Miniiiir Recvrdcr for a certilicate, of improvements forth*: purpose of obtaining a Crown irraiit !  of the. aboveclaiiiis. I  And.    further   take    notice,   that    action !  under    section    37.    must,    be     commenced  before the issuance of such certificate of fm  provemenfs.  Dated this lSth day of August l.SDS.  HERBKRT T. TVVKIO.  .���moon  m        Daily  Knsio  ar 3.15 pin  Boat. Iv ii.tr.i pin M'i&'l  "   ii.20 pm Ainsworth M'  iyj        ���   7.oo pm   I'ilot Bay  " " Pi.mi pm Kusknnook .'    '���  ���' 12.00 pm ('oat River  '������   l.ii:i am  !!��� iindary  5   *" sir k.iio :iin II iiincr's 'F'ry '  ���j;Traiii' Iv il. I" am      "       Train  ar 2.-l'i pin Spokane  ���H  ii  Read up.  train arlo./Vi am  ��� lv  s.oo am  Boat nr 1.00 pm  at in- ll.lo pin_  11 i-O pm ��  s.copm?  li.iKijmi^  .l.i.io pm >,  2.oo pin's  1.1.1 pm��  "..KJiiniO"  SIM'C'AI, KonTKXA V  I  CoiniiieiieiiiL; .Imi'  On Monday. Thursday anr    .  will leave Ka~Io .1 p. m.'for Ainsworth  and N'elson,    I.es.viiiL'- Xelsoii  at s a  ���\KK SKRVICK,  20, ISilS.  Friday as Alberta  I'ilot Bay,  in., Tues-  The  A'-'orter  Paciiic terminus���Manchuria becomes  now practically a Russian possession.  Turkestan, Juiig*aria, Thibet and Mon-  -ilia are thinly inhabited countries,  scarcely semi-civilized. But the part  which remains when these "dependencies" are left outf of consideration-  China proper���is at once one of the  larg*est, most thickly populated and  most fertile countries on the face of the  g'lobc, and one also of the most richly  endoAved hi mineral products. Its area  is 1,33(3,841 square miles, its population  is 386,000,000.   Its population per square  New Denver,  Has been re-opened ".ruler new man  agfement.  always be up  The Dining"  Room will  to  the market, while  the  in  bar   will   contain  cigars that cannot be  quality   and  flavor  Old and   new  patrons  hotel just like home.  JACOBSON ct CO.  .liquors   and  surpassed for  the   Slocan.  find this  wi  Apis lUinersil  Claim.  Situate in the Slocan .Miniiif,' Division of West  Kootenay District. Wliere ioeated: About  three-ouarters of a mile from Sandon and  adjoinnu; the. Slocan Belle mineral claim.  TAKE NOTICE that we. K. M. Sandilands,  free miner's certificate Xo. 111:!2a, June 1st.  ISilS, Sandon; and J. H. Gray, frco miner's certificate No. -t527a, A ugust 22d." is:i7. Kaslo. intend  sixty days from the date hereof to apply to the  Mhiinj.'- Recorder for a certilicate of improvements!" for the purpose of obtaining a Crown  grant of tlie above claim.  ." And further take notice that action under section 37 must foe commenced before the issuance  of such certih'cate of improvements.  Dated this 11th day of August. l��i��.  Conductor "ttincM'iil  Claim.  Situate ill the slocan Mining- Division of West  Kootenay tdstrict. Wliere located: Twin  Lakes Basin.  'PAKE NOTICE that I. Herbert T. Twiirp,  JL agent 'for William H. Elson, Free Miner'scer-  tificate No. ilMnA, intend, sixty days from the date  hereof, to apply to the Minliijr'Recorder for a  certilicate of improvements, for the purpose of  obtaining a crown grant of the above claim.  And further lake notice that action under Sec.  37 must be commenced before the issuance of such  certificate of improvements.  Dated this2Sth day of Jnlv. isfis.  HERBERT T. TWIGG.  day, Friday and Saturday, calliiii/at I'ilot. Bay,  Ainswortlnind Kaslo. aiid all way points.  GE" iKOF.   A I.KXAXDKR, fieii'l Mlt  P.O. Box 122. Kaslo. B.C.  KASLO&SLOCAN RY  TIME CARD  Taking" effect 1.00 o'clock a. m.  Sept. 1, 1S98, Pacific or 120th Meridian time.  Subject to change without notice  Leave 8  "    8  'Jii A.M.  Arr.  ���i 1.1  10  (HI  Hi os  10 2o  1(1 ."'�����  10 -1.1  Kaslo  South Fork  Sproule's  Whitewaw  Bear Lake  MeGuii-'an  Cody .Junction  Arrive,  3 30 P  :; (i.i  i io ���  2 CS ���  : .'o  !  .'if-      '  1 23  M  Leave 1 1.1  Leave,  Sandon  CODY    LINE.  ll.oo a.m ��� Sainton ���  Arrive,  11..Iii a.m  "      il.l"   " Cody .Junction Leave. 11..Ki a.m  Arrive, 11.2.1  -     ��� "Oulv   -- "    n.'-.la.m  KOBT. IRVING,  Traffic Miifrr.  GEO F. COPELAND,  Superintendent  For ehenii railp'ad and .steamship tickets  tc  and from all points, apply to  S.  CAMPBELL,  Agent, Sandon.  Motile.  Hujrlies,   ltcsil   Idea  No.  ~,   1'  Tryon,  Jilld   Kinkoi'ii  Mill oral   Claims  ���to, j  Brandon, B. C,  Sit.nate in the Slocan Minim; Division of West  Kootenay  District. Where located: About  one mile north of New  Denver,  on the shore  of Slocan Lii ke.  'PAKK NOTICE Hint I,  W.  S.   Dre.wry, of the  i    town ol   Kaslo.   actinir   ns   a^eiit for M ��� E.  Brairdon. Free Miner's Certificate  No. S.1o27: II.  (.'lever. Free Miiicr'sCerlifieate No. pi',i7!<A: Harry  Sheran. Free Miner's Certificate No. 12oolA:  and  Thos. Aviso 11. Free Miner's Certificate No. 1 null A,  intend sixty days from  the 'late  hereof to apply  to the Miiiiiii1   Recorder  for a  certificate of improvements for t he purpose of ofotahiin!.' it Crown  ji'raut of the above claims.  And further take notice  that  action under section .'!7 must be commenced   before  the issii.-uiee  ot such certificate of improvi-niciiis.  Dated this llth dav of .inly. ISii.S  ' W. S. DREWKV  Assay Price List  .eiid.each   Lead, combined   Gold, silver, or I  Gold, Silver and  Gold and Silver   Silver and  Lead   Cot"'ei-iby Electrolysis)   Gold, Silver. Copper and Lead   Gold and Copper   Silver and Copper   Golii. Silver and Copper   I'l.-ttiuum   Mercury   I pm or Maiiirancsc   Linie, Matriicsiuni, Barium. Silica, Sulphur, each   Bismuth,Tin. Cobalt. Nickel, Antimony,  Zinc, ;ind Arsenic, each   Coal (Fixed Carbon. Volatile Matter. Ash,  and percentiiL'e of Coke, if Cokinii  Coal..   Terms: '.Csisli Willi Sample.  June -intli. i��i.1.  51. .VI  .'j I si  2 oO  i 00  2 IKl  ���I OO  2 .10  2 .10  8 00  .1 no  *>     1  2 on  2 "(j  T'       [am just, startiiifj- the  best  thin/r tor money- j,,|K.->ntii  ivi"i "      "  ggj making you have seen for many a day.   Your '        "     -   " LL      .��-_-.    -.,������  ���^ name and address will briiiK the solden inform- FRANK.    DICK.  / W W%SWWW%/W%S%/%/W ftt'��"' T. H. LINSCOTT. Toronto Awmyer amUnnlvrt THE LEDGE, NEW DENVER, B.C., SEPTEMBER 22, 1898.  Fifth Yeap.  MINIXG   RECORDS.  The following is a complete list of the  mining transactions recorded ���.���uruig- the  week in the,several mining divisions oi  the Slocan. Those of New Den-re ��� were  as follow.- :���  !.'".'ATi'iXS.  Sei'T. is���Random, C-arpenter. Henry JJr..wji.  Cove He.-uiFi-iictioii. MeGuiKAii Sidiu.e. .same.  Labor Da>. Silver mountain, Ru.--cl i'onald  SKI'T I-i���Belmont, Finuel creek  Peter Gram.  Rodnev. Eif-dit Mile, G��o Parkinson.  Silver Cord, Four Mile, i'aul Green.  SEl'T Hi���Fit/., north fork Carpenter. Alice  Treuerv.  Yorkshire Boy, Silverton, John K Kolierts.  Nanev Lee, slime, A L Roberts.  Prince, north fork-Carpenter, Jas Black and A  C Van Moerkeske. . '  Pasby, south fork Carpenter, J no Docksteader.  Sept  10���Silverinc,  Dardanelles  basin, John  Swanson.  Orient Fraction, Sandon creek, G B Knowles.  Maud N, Martin creek, John Bte Martin.  Maud M. same, Jos B Martin.  Ella, Glacier creek, O Lemieux,  Ellise, same. John B Martin.  Black Diamond, Four Mile,Norman McMillan.  ASSESSMENTS.  Sei'T 13���Permit to transfer work from Noonday to Grey Eagle and Fourth of July.  Sept 13���Carrie, Ada Bell, Treasure Vault,  Naoma,-Alley-ash, Ajax.  Seit 11���Winton. Islington, Pure Gold.  Sei'T 15���Drum Lummond, Valkyrie.  Seit 16���Cand K,.Grey Fox, Legal Tender.  Sept 17���Conder, Bay State, Producer.  CEI'.l'IKICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.  Sept 13���Ocean.  Sept 17-J 10, W HE, Silverton Boy, Cres  cent, Emily Edith. Jenny Jones Fraction, Arena  Fraction.  TKAXSKEKS..  Sept 13���Little Dora },' P Chisholm to Marion  Lees, Sept 12.  Banshee, John Vallanee to Roulette M & M Co,  Sept 10.  Seit 15��� Mazeppa J, Randolph Sauuders to  Andrew J Murphy, Aug 24.  Willa, Frank Watson to The Willa Gold Mining  Co, April 27.  Sept ie���Bay State, Ferguson Armstrong to  Nathan S Tucker, Sept 9.  Province 3/16, James D Ryan to David Sloan,  Septl.  Sept 17���Jehova "-, Joseph B Martin to Arthur  Mullen, Sept 15. $332.50.  International, Thursday Fraction, A in each, L  W Parkinson to John II Thompson. Get 12.  Ml  L-iit   wor  throng  >���' the parents and teachits to mark  rv closely any partiouhirity that chiH-  "ookinir  at ol'  glit:,thfv do not know of any differ-  ld 'than that which they see  recti ve eyes, consequently  cannot relate their trouble-- to their parents as'they are entirely unconscious of  their defect. Therefore. "1 wish'i emphasize most enii)hatii:allv that it is the  duty  v    .  ren'iuay have in looking  at objects at a  lotnz distance or  close   at hand, such as  squinting their eyes,   frowning, looking  sidewise from partially closed eyes, and  particularly, regarding  the  distance at  which  they hold  their  reading  matter  from their  eyes for  it  is natural for a  child, or for" a   grown' person  for  that  matter, who has  normal sight,   to hold  clearly printed reading" matter about 15  inches from their eyes.    Should  this be  varied to any  extent,   such  as drawing  the reading  quite   close to the eyes or  holding it at arm's length, it is almost a  sure sign that there is something wrong.  ���Omaha World-Herald.  Oregon City 1, International J, Thursday Fractional ;,,.John H Thompson to John a. Whittier  and David XV Moore, Oct 13.  Shareholder ��. W Ryan to Oliver T Stone,  Sept 8.  Power of Attorney. R George to W B George,  July 30.  J" Sept 19���Polo, Charlotte Henderson  to   T M  Banting, April 1, ��1,600.  Black Diamond ��, Norman McMillan to H M.  Walker, Sept If).  March Bird and Snowflake, J- in each, J C  Butler to same, Sept 19.  AINSWORTH   DIVISION.  LOCATIONS.  Sept 7���Maggie. M A Kelly; Sharper Fraction,  P H Walsh; Morning Mine, H Griffith; Park  Hill, Alex Dodds; Wishbone, Fairview, EN  Owen; Cashier, H Griffith.  Sept 8���Columbia Fraction, D Angus; Isora,  R A Cameron, W A Talbot; Allan,Jos C Kinzier.  Sept9���Egalite Fraction, H C Thomlinson;  Hobson Fraction, Alice Trenery; Edith, D  Tuomey; Stella May, T H MeCowan.  Seit 10���Skye, Chas Moore.  Sept 12���Lily Kane, Robert Kane; Mountain  Lion, P J Whalen; Blue Jay, P J Whalen and J  Swanson ; . Columbia, J Swanson; Lespy, J  Casazza and P J Whalen; Minnie, W H Bell;  Blue Bird, A lex Ruffillo; St Lawrence Fraction,  J W Livers; Harriett, OO Weese. Ainsworth.  Sept-13���South' Tom Fraction, Montreal &  Kootenay Mining Co, Ainsworth; I X L, A K  Little: Rich Hill. W M Wright; Landymount,  R H Mayne; Isabella. W L McKenzie: Liverpool,  R Williams; Edina, M Heddle; Broo'klin, W N  Luke. R Densmore, R Elliott, W H Vroom;  Kimarnock, T Stevenson; Summitt, C N Owen;  Annie Florence, J 11 Piper; Paymaster, J J  Casey; Rambler, J J Casey and J H Piper:  Coulterville, S D Landecker; Mountain Goat, J  J Cassey: Poor Man, D WHarris; Code, J H Jackson; Billy Davis, S P Jobe; Butler, Homer  Draper: Slavni, J II Jackson; Gold Dust, S  Denomie; Victory, M Moulse.  assessments.  Sept 7���Liberty, Lucky Boy, Margaret, Dora,  Bonanza, Mayflower, Tennessee, Tiger, Yamler-  bilt, Sunflower. Nancv Hanks, Consolidated,  Mollie Marsh, B N I, Native Silver, Vernon, Hill  Top, Commonwealth, Sultan, Republic.  SeptS���Crown Jewel, Escanaba. Hazel, Essex,  Bedrock, Mexico Fraction. Montezuma No i,  Harris, Silver Glance.  Seit!)���Lost Lead, Egalite, Faustina. Hope,  Ainsworth, Lake View. Queen Mali. Douglas,  Panther, Klondyke, Norwood.  Sept li���Mollie, Helen Mars, Dalveen. Summerset, Ellen May, Wandering Goat.  Sept 13���Pay Ore Fraction.  TKAXSKEKS.  Sept 8���Certificate of satisfaction of Gold Commissioner as to work done on the Blue. Bell to  count on Fraction No i for Crown grant as well  as on Hendryx No 3.  Sept !)���Fawstina *-, Egalite -J, Henry Sheran  to Wm Th.mlinson.SlOO.  Seit 10��� Alice and Zuni *, T P Lindsay to R  B Merritt. -sl,0!K).  Agreement of Jos Werner and M M Grothe to  sell Valpariso and Government tojE J Matthews.  Sept 13���August, John Riddell to O A Sutherland, 5100.  Pay Ore Fraction. J McCue to Pat McCue.  CARE    OF     CHILDREN'S    EYESIGHT.  Now that the care of the eyesight  ] among the pupils of our public schools  has become one of the cares of the teacher, it may be of interest to many to  know the causes and effects of eye strain  on different children. The writer who  has alwavs taken special interest in defective sight as it exists among school  children, quotes a few of-his personal  experiences.  About two  year?   ago  a lady brought  two of her sons to me to have their eyes  examined to see if  glasses  were needed,  iiged respectively  nine and eleven.    l-die  had taken this   step   partially on  my invitation, and as a matter   of precaution,  as she was well  aware   that both herself  and her husband had defective eyes, and  part of her children   were  already wear-!  in-i glasses for troubles which were with-1  out   doubt    hereditary.-   In    answer   to j  questions about the genera! health of the I  children, their  dispositions,   complaints i  they made regarding headache, etc., she,  made the following statement: !  "lam really puzzeled to know what j  to do with the older boy, lie seems so!  to be spoiling for a light. Mis health ;  seems very good, with the exception of,  headache after studv. but he is not near-:  THE   HYGIENE    OF   THE   EYES.  A Few I'leful Hint*   on   the Care of the  Organs  of Sight.  Dr. L. W. Fox, professor of ophthalmology, Medico-Chirurgical college, Philadelphia, formulates the following rule's  for the care of the eyes:  First���Avoid sudden changes from  dark to brilliant light.  Second���Avoid the use of stimulants  and all drugs which affect the nervous  system.  Third���Avoid reading when lying  down, or when mentally and physically  exhausted.  Fourth���When the eyes feel tired rest  them by looking at objects at a long distance.  Fifth���Pay special attention to the  hygiene of the body, for that which tends  to promote the general health acts beneficially upon the eyes.  Sixth���Up to 40 years of age, bathe  the eyes twice daily in cold water.  Seventh���After, 50 bathe the eyes  morning and evening with water so hot  that you wonder how you stand it; follow this with cold water, that will make  tbern glow with warmth.  Eighth���Old persons should avoid  reading much by artificial light, be  guarded as to diet, and avoid sitting up  late at night.  Ninth���Do not depend on your own  judgement in selecting spectacles.  Tenth���Do not give up in despair when  you are informed that a cataract is developing; remember, in these days of  advanced surgery it can be removed with  little danger to the vision.  A   SERIOUS   QUESTION*.  The i^ew York Sun boldly asserts  that the women of that city are, in large  and increasing numbers, wearing" men's  shoes, men's stockings and���hist!���only  think of it���pyjamas ! The Journal has  no way of verifying" this remarkable  report, but judging by the latter day  tendencies of the feminine mind in tlie  matter of dress, there is probably some  foundation for the assertion.  After all, it is perfectly natural for  women to adopt the male shoe, boy's  size. They have from time immemorial  worn shoes too thin for use and many a  girl has seriously impaired her health  for tlie sake of showing off her dainty  foot to advantage. The adoption of  men's stockings is a startling advance  toward the appropriation of the entire  male costume. It is difficult to comprehend what a woman wants with men's  stockings, innocent of delicate embroidery and plain as a pikestaff; but they  must have some mysterious reason or a  woman's reason���": because 1 want  them." What does she want with  pyjamas? It would puzzle a congress  of tailor s to find out, but milady will  simpl'v say she wants them, "because  she wants them." Here is the up-to-  date girl with shoes, stockings, pyjar  mas, shirts, collars, cravats, hats, cuffs,  designed for men, deliberately appropriated, burglariously procured! What  shall be done? Wouldn't it be a good  idea to call a great dress congress for  men to determine how far they can  have patience while their sartorial outfits are persistently appropriated by the  up-to-date women?  Thank heaven, the male trousers are  temporarily safe.���Minneapolis Journal.  THE   SLIME   OX   FISHES.  to l.��e injured so that there  was upon it  some .spot.uncovered by the slime, upon j  that -Mpot   some   minute   fragment   of:  fungu>. s/i small as to be  -carc.ely more. '  than visible, would   be   likely to lodge.  ( hice lodged, the  fungus is reproduced  very fast.  Fish-sometimes recover from attacks  of fungus, bur much more, often they do  hot. The fungus d;splu(-es trie skill.  inflammation is set up, and it-he place,  attacked becomes practically a sore.  With its continued growth the fungus  may cover the side of the fish and extend over the gills and finally kill it.���  N   Y. Sun.  SAME   COSOroX    MISTAKES.  To sleep exposed to a direct draught at  any season.  It is a mistake to  work when you are j  not in a fit condition to do so.  To take off heavy underclothing be- j  cause you have become overheated.  To conclude that the smallest room in  the house is large enough to sleep in.  To think that the more a person eats  the healthier and stronger he will become.  To imagine that if a little work or exercise is good, violent or prolonged exercise is better.  To go to bed late at night and rise at  daybreak and imagine that every hour  taken from sleep is an hour gained.  To believe that children can do as  much work as grown people, and that  the more they study the more they learn.  To give unnecessary time to a certain  established routine of housekeeping  when it could be much more profitably  spent in rest or recreation.  To eat as if you had only a minute in  which to finish the meal, or to eat without an appetite, or to continue after it  has been satisfied to gratify the taste.  To imagine that whatever remedy  causes one to feel immediately better, as  alcoholic stimulants, for example, is good  for the system without regard to the  after effects.  H. H. Knox,  Ha  L-d, t.  Newmarket  Block mid is prepared to repair  everv description of  Disabled  Watches.  DON'T DO IT.  Don't ask a woman questions. Give  her time and she'll tell you all you want  to know.  Don't marry a girl who isn't afraid  of a mouse, or you'll be kept busy regretting it.       '  Don't get the idea into your head that  a baby cuts teeth; it's the teeth that cut  the baby.  Don't think because a girl loves you  from the bottom of her heart that ttiere  isn't plenty of roomat the top.���Chicago  News.      "   WANTED.���A First-Class pant and  vest maker, at once. H. J. Robie, The  Tailor, New Denver.  Specials  innewSuitings  THE  SELKIRK  HOTEL  SILVERTON, B.C.  Is a new three-story hotel situated near the wharf. The  house is plastered and. the  rooms are furnished in a  manner calculated to make  travelers call again. Mining"  and Commercial men will appreciate the home comforts of  this hotel.  BRANDON & BARRETT  Come immediately and get the benefit of lirst  choice of the laro-e stock of  i  I  just received at the  POSTOFFICE STORE.  //Ktf-That cut rate shoe sale is not quite over yet, but it will not last  much longer.   Call and get a bargain. SANDON, B.C.  D.E.GellatIy&Sons  <��I<i7r^*  )  hi.  a-  :ii   s'-huul   for bis  thvT."  ������;l ci.-  \iZ<-  ..I  ;ii'  lis-'.-  li.-r   :  ���l;ri>  anv-!  ;.u  ���il  i :u'  !>:am)nat.i(iT!  iH'T (i:h.\ I -I  V'.III!'.'.'!'   '.:  i .>n;  av  ~0 la!" il'l  his youii  A''i'i' in.-i.  presi.'ribi  told ri)'-  did not ;  I did :';..:  mother i  when i.iu-  that, the .  ous ehiuii_'e- in her .-mi, and In- won' 'ihcin  constantly and could not bear to bi- without them. I!" '.'���';'.h now picking up in  his school ������.-���'"!'!-:. and was better natured  'ban she ha-! ever known him before.  This, child   is only one   of   many thousand-   in    '"ir   school--   to-day   who  are  i.-tinu'   i  rlassi'Sr  limine  , i  ,-mi-K'.:  '.���sen: !i!iii-.  ehibh'eti  nr  which timi-  b e ; i, 1. i : u i ���  ! a m.'irvel-  A fish just taken from the water, if  handled, is found to be slippery and  coated with slime. All fishes, themean-  est and the noblest, ldllifish and shark,  shad, salmon, and trout, wear this  slime.    They could not exist without it.  The slime is secreted usually in a  continuous series of ducts with numerous opening, arranged in a line extending along "the side of the fish. More  often they are not observable-at all.  Some fishes store this secretion in pores  distributed over the whole surface, of  the body, the larger number, however,  in pores in lateral lines. There are  also pores for the secretion of mucus, or  slime, in a lish's head.  The slime is exuded through the  with-1 divisions between the scales to the outer  skin or covering, transparent, and haying elasticity and tenacity, and often  considerable" body It would not be  remarkable for a fair-sized fish, say a  fish of two pounds weight, to have a  coating of slime a thircf-second of an  inch in thickness. Fishes vary greatly  in the amount of slime which they  secret; the eel will suggest itself as one  rhar is very slimy.  The fish's slimy coating reduces its  friction when in motion and helps to  increase irs speed. It aids in protecting  tiie scales from injury, being of sufficient substance rr serve ill some measure  a-   a.   cushion.     The    slimv   covering  T. ha vi! In tuly received a stuck oi  ivcll-sulecti'd, bainls'ime suitintrs  for Spring- make-iiji. ami I o:u'n-  esily invito your inspection of  them. Sonic excellent qualities  .-iinl patterns, and at especially  low prices���lower than ever pur  upon the market in this Miction  before.  I g'uarant.ee :i   neat, natty  lit,  and satisfaction in  every .particular.        Are you wanting a Spring  suit?  P* 31. A. WILSON,  �� The Reliable Slocan Tailor.  tNewmarket Blk. Xew Denver. B. C.       $  purist  <xx\d  fafioijep   ���DEALERS IN ������  Farm Produce, Fruits,  and Vegetables, oka���*��� Lake,  ��� O        * U* P  O. BRUCE'S LANDING  ' ' *  For the convenience of the trade a stock is always kept on hand in the  Jelland Building, SANDON, Mines supplied at wholesale rates. Cars  loaded with Produce, Fruits and Vegetables are run into the Slocan every  TEN DAYS, and orders can be delivered en route.  NEW DENVER,   B. C.  Provides ample and pleasant accommodation for the traveling public.  Telegrams for rooms promptly attended to.  STEGE fcAVISON,       -       -       -       -      '- ,   -       Proprietors.  Dealers in  Hardware,  Tin   and   Graniteware,  Miners' Supplies, Paints, Oils, Glass and Putty, Doors & Windows.  9     0BC��  ������<?���  f��  New  Dress  Goods,  NOTICE.  All accounts due me must be settled forthwith  or they will be placed in court for collection.  J H. CLEVER.  Xew Denver. Aug'. IS. 1S98.  i Of/  Latest novelties  in Dress Goods for  Summer and Fall  wear; also ready-  made Clothing,  Neck wear, Hats,  and Caps, Boots  and Shoes ��� the  most complete stock in the lake section���at prices as low as it is possible  to make them. We invite your inspection. Look into our show- window.  We are displaying a fine line of  novelties.  McLachlan & McKay,  Xew Denver.  Tfip   108 Bishopsgate St.  X JL1. w (withini  British L0ND0N:ENG-  Mlbsci"      "���'          Columbia  Review  ocan  Sunscribtioii,'----.'..'"!! per annum  To Brokers. "Miniiifr  Engineers, owners of  Alininpr Claims. Mining Engineers,Assiiy-  ers,  Journalists   and  others-  Advertise in the B. C. Review,  the only representative B. C. Journal in Europe.   A Good Investment.  and other  Stationery  are  DR. MILLOY,  DENTIST  Rooms in Reeo Hotel, Sandon.  OTEL V EVEY  Your business  cjaill  suffer.  rli.  i h.-ini to hold, and so c.n-  11 ti v i 11 <_r  .-nll.-d '1  (i W11.       i  til"  ;��� di>i'o.-!ttoi  ami -Mujijd  ���.-'.   thrmtub  s ruined, and tiro  by   Uifir parent  no  fault of their  j,   i's it the more readily io escape, ii'otn  il-   enemies,    l!   is   sonierinn.'s   rejiuir-  ii.-iii: \<i o'lier  fishes, wliich are repelled  !>v \\ s iidor.     !i    i-   the   slime   from  the  ' Holies !i;un!ieii   that   makes   the   anivler  ���-.iiieil li>hv"as the expression o,-nos  A most- important function of the lish's  , slimy coatiii;;' is   to   protect   it from tin:  ; attacks of fiiu.e-us.   a   form of plant  life  found in all waters,   salt-  and fresh, in-  : eluding the, purest.    The sliine  covers  i the. entire exterior  surface  of  the fish,  ; includnijr tlie  fins.    Fundus  does   not  Off  ai.s bom with a defect i attach to the sliine : but if the fish were  <YO  .... Next to a healthy bank account the most essential thins: {[\\  to a BUSINFJ3S MAN is to have his writing- stationery and #Jj  business cards, etc., of irood quality and printed in business ||||  stylo. A man in business does not necessarily mean A BUSI- <t)l  NESS MAN. Some men are as careless about their stationery /Kl  as about- their business���don't care how it is printed so long- as k)  it is cheap. To these we want to talk. With our increased wt  facilities we can fill your orders for Job Printing1 as cheap as /jj!  the cheapest, and the quality of the work and stock is unsur- 'W  passed���-even in the large cities. Samples of stock and work ��|  open to your inspection. All classes of work���from atri-colored ��<|  sheet poster to the daintiest and handsomest wedding stationery, m  Whatever you want, don't overlook The Ledge Power VR  Pimxtixg Pi,axt. the best equipped office  west of Red River. {(({  Dining Room and Bar. First-  class in every respect. Rooms  well furnished. Trail open to  Ten and Twelve Mile creeks.  Pack and Saddle Animals to hire.  ALLEN & CORY, Proprietor.--.  Vevev, Slocan Lake, B.C.  OS  NEW  DENVER, B.C.  An office of the Slocan Hospital lias  been opened at Sandon under the  medical superintendence of DR.  P. H. POWERS. Subscribers on presentation of their orders or tickets at  the Sandon of/ice will receive medical  or surgical treatment and the necessary medicines free of charge!"  All serious cases will be admitted  to the Hospital for treatment.  Miners in regular employ, subscribing through their payroll, can  secure all the privileges of theabove.  For further information apply to���  J. E. Brouse, M.D.,  New Denyer, B.C.  ASLO HOTEL  Family & Commercial.  arge  And  Comfortable  Rooms  Fitted with every modern  convenience. Special protection against fire. Rates $2.50  and $3 per day.  COCKLE & PAP WORTH,  Proprietors.  &  The  Nakusp,  MUCK  KOK    SALE.  .IdllN*   GOKTTSCH'E,  XKW IHCXVEK.  - u coiiifortnlilc hotel tor travellers  to si up ;\t..  Mrs. McDougald."  ailv.  !ii  AGENTS.  '!,ifi' .-ini!   Wni'k  nt   Mr.  uiil.    Tliipi ciliriiii! jusr  t-i njiiUi' 111- >i >i - v-. I ,Diil�� In-. '��� i��-ii'  'ir.-' i!;iy.;.i i'-nirirru-yral'-nli, < > ��� '.V  L"i in I'wti i ii.:- iliiriii.u'niK' v.vr!;. aunt her -7 in '].'.  Inmrs. aiiila'ii(i!l!"l-!i'l in 1 1 ilav.*. &e.. &e. I'l'.'.-i'-  e.-l hijnk a.^i-nt'- !inii:H!7.a mi the market. I It:  i-diiniiissiiin pnifl. Write quiek i'.h- I rue \>;\v\i-h:  lars.  M'ADLEY-'IAI'KKTSO'X CO.. IJiniL-ii.  Tin-out!'  FRED J. SaUIEE  Nelson, B. C.  Merchant Tailor.  Troi  nil Line  ei'inirs  of Suitino's and  il"-ivs on hand.  '�����%.'  ATLANTIC STEAMSHIP TiGKETS.  To ami fr<mi Europi'MH points via Canad'an  and Aineriean lines. Apply Cor sailing daves.  rales, tickets and full information to any C. V.  Ry auent '>r--  Ct- M. CAI.'I-ETT.  C. I*. If. Aiicrit. Xe��- Denver.  WM. STri'T. 'icii. S. S. A.L't., WinnijipLr.  Mwm, MM. k Go.,  .IXSURAKCE  al"'1 General Commissson  Agents.  NJKW DEXVKIi. 1J. C._  Beiuo" g-ood at  man rich.  ligures never made a 

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