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The Ledge Jun 16, 1898

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Array Volume V.   No. 37.  NEW DENVER,' B. C, JUNE 16, 1898.  Price, $2,00 Year  IN THE L06AL FIELD I  n  The care of the Delaney estate has  heen placed in the hands of H. Slierran.  Fig-tires speak louder than words just  nosv. Nesv Denver's'- voter's list numbers 208,'Sainton's 155, Slocan City 145,  Silverton 03.  Knox Presbyterian church. services-  Sunday school at 2:30 p.m. Church at  7:30 pirn. Prayer meeting* at 8 p.m.  Wednesday.   James Sharpe, pastor. ���  Fred Emerson Brooks, the California  prince of entertainers, poet, orator and  genius, is advertised to give an entertainment in the Methodist church next  Tuesday evening-.  J. Irwin returned last week from a  bear hunt up Wilson creek svith as fine  a skin as was' ever sliosvn in this section. Bruin svas 'killed about 20 miles  from the mouth of Wilson creek.  'It. N. Powell.will preach in the Methodist church next Sunday, June ,19th.  Morning* at 11, subject, "Apprehended."  Evening* at 7:30, subject, "Liberty."  Everybody very heartily svelcome.  A Montana baby svas choked to death  by the nipple of a nursing bottle. This  should serve as a warning to babies all  over the land to heed the oft-repeated  injunction:    "Beware,of imitations."  On the Mollie Hughes svork is progressing* favorably, svith a continuance  of g-ood shosving's." Nesv, sti*ing*ers are  being* opened up and in every case the  shoss*ing* improves svith development.  "If the average man svere not prone  to gird ;his eonscienee svith pneumatic  tires of self-esteem," says the Toronto  Telegram, speaking* from experience,  "the jagged stones of truth might often  jar his Feelings "  Judging* from, present indications  there svon't be enough stay-at-homes to  keep house in New'Denver on Dominion Day. The great crosvd is going to  Nelson. The band, "the football and  lacrosse bovs are going dosvn.  SOS  terian church where Rev. Bro. Yates  svill conduct a Pythian service. All  Knig-hts are asked to participate in  these services.  The ice cream social given in tlie  Presbyterian church Monday night by  the Ladies Aid, svas not a grand success, hut a large number svere in attendance and the musical and literary  program svas greatly enjoyed.  Premier Turner svill be in Nesv Denver in a fesv days and svill tell us.svhat  he knosvs about his g-overnment.  MR.    BBTALLACK    HEKE.  Appeai-eil   Before   tlie    Campaign    Club  and Kxpliiinod His Position.  Tuesday evening* a special meeting  of the Political Campaign Club svas held  in Clever's hall, in honor of the presence  of John L. Ratallack, the proposed Government nominee for M.P.P. of the  Slocan Riding-. Mr. Retallack appeared  before the club not yet as a nominee,  but simply as a private individual, and  hi.s address svas in  the tone of a quiet  talk as such to the club members, set-  viesvs regard-  interests of Nesv Denver and  vicinitv.    He lngh.lv commended the  probably Sl.oOO'on the Silverton road.  In all about 810,000 svill be expended  on the roads alone. In addition to this  Nesv Denver svill receive for public improvements about SI,500;: 8600 for vault  in the Government building-, the contract for svhich has already been let,  S500 or more for street svork and sidewalk laying* and the customary  allowance of 8250 for fire hall and fire  apparatus. The latter sum has not yet  been secured, but svill in all likelihood  come, since this is a most necessary expenditure, and must be made, if not by  the Government then by the citizens of  Nesv Denver. A suitable fire hall and  adequate apparatus is essential to the  welfare of the tosvn. I  NU3ri5BB   OF   VOT-ERS.  The follosving-figures from the voters  list are furnished by i Alex Lucas, collector of votes for Slocan riding, to the  Kaslo Nesvs :  Sandon svill not celebrate Dominion  Day, and has set upon Labor Day instead. This change in arrangements  is in recognition of Nelson's proposed  celebration on the First. It is a g-ood  change and svill help both svays.  At the independent convention held  in Sandon last Thursday Wm. Hunter  svas the choice of the delegates by a  vote of 11 to 7, but he promptly svith-  . dresv in favor of Mr. Green, rind the  v.ons'eiition" settled the honor upon  \n.  The lacrosse boys are practicing  nightly for the match svitli the Nelson  team, to be pulled off on the First for a  purse of S125. The Nelson team is a  hard one to beat, but the Nesv Denver  boys are preparing* to give them a. hot  game.  A Boston nesvs paper reporter has discovered that the patriotic young ladies of  that city are wearing red, white and blue  garters. The svind must blow harder in  Boston than it does in Nesv Dens-er or else  the reporter is guessing at the facts in  the case.  It is said of one great poet that he  svrote his best verse svith a quill. And  one of the signers of the Declaration of  Independence svrote his name With-er-  spoon. The poet lauraete of Slocan city  evidently punctures his poetical svind-  bag svitli a meat axe.  A. J. Marks, of Nelson, arrived Tuesday afternoon svith horses, men and  supplies to start svork on the California.  The property svill be worked to the best  possible advantage, and no time svill be  lost getting out ore. The force of svork-  moii svill be small until the svork is  farther advanced.  The most furious windstorm of the  season came up from Slocan City Saturday afternoon. It svas something Denver  is not accustomed to and its citizens  thought a Kansas cyclone had been sidetracked this way. The report is denied  that it svas the effects of a leakage in the  newspaper office there.  An unsuccessful attempt svas made  last Wednesday night to hold a meeting of New Denver independent electors  to'appoint delegates to attend the alleged convention called to meet Thursday  at Sandon.    Only a fesv people gather  ting forth his individual  ing local interests of Nesv  highly  citizens of Nesv Denver in so successfully organizing a campaigui club, and  regretted that the citizens of sister  tosvns had failed to co-operate and  secure for themselves proper recognition from the Government as Nesv iJen-  er lias done.  Mr. Retallack svas not prepared to  delve into the larger political questions  of the day, but hoped to be able, svhen  he had shaped his campaign and started  ou his tour of speech making, to meet  Mr. Green before Ihe club," svhen he  ssrould take up the greater questions.  Hi.s present trip to the Slocan lake svas  not to open the campaign, nor to present his political vies\rs to the people.  He svould do this later. He svas travelling now as a private citizen on business  bent. He gave a brief reviesv of svhat  he had been able'to learn the Government intended doing- in the way of  public svork in and about Nesv Denver,  svhich, in a nutshell, means the carrying  out of the expressed svish of the club,  made by resolution some sveeks ago.  It will mean the expenditure of $10,000  or more hereabouts, and the making of  Nesv Denver a county court centre,  svith all the offices affixed thereto.  The meeting* svas addressed briefly  by several members. Mr. Retallack  svill visit Slocan City and .Silverton this  sveek, and hopes to return here in a  short time on a campaign tour.  THK    CAMPAIGN    CLUB   SOLID.  At the meeting of the Political Campaign Club Saturday night a little tilt  occurred betsveen speakers through the  desire on the part of one to inject individual party views into the meeting.  The question ssras quickly settled svhen  it svas overwhelmingly" demonstrated  that it svas not the svish of the club to  have discussed in the meeting the individual political siesvs of it's members.  The interests and svelfare of Nesv Denver are considered above party by the  members of the club and svill never be  lost si��-ht of in the tiresome spouting of  individual political viesvs, that can  profit nothing either to the indisidual  or to the tosvn.  PUBLIC    WORK    IN    PROGBKSS.  ed, and no meeting svas held. The  "convention" nominated Robt. F. Green  of Kaslo. New Denver svas not represented.  Parties coming dosvn from upper Mill  Creek, where they have, been doing  assessment svork on their claims, state  that they have a mammoth ledge of  fair grade copper-silver-gold quartz. It  can be traced for many miles, as it has  been uncovered on all the mountain  sides by snosv slides and measures 30  feet across.  The local K. of P. lodge has arranged  special memorial services for Sunday,  June 26. At 1 p.m. the regular K. of P.  memorial service svill, be held in the  hall for Knights only, and at 2 p.m. the  members will   march   to the   Presby-  A large number of men svere put to  svork cutting away the hill on Sixth  St. in front of the bank block this sveek.  Others are being svorked on Seventh  street, grading' for sidessralks, etc.  Seventeen thousand feet of lumber has  arrived for sidewalk purposes and  as soon as possible the streets svill he  greatly improved in this respect. This  is the start of Government svork in this  vicinity and it svill be pushed ahead as  rapidly as the funds are placed at the  disposal of the Government agent here.  STORK    ON    THE   ROADS.  In addition to the public svork being  done on the streets of Nesv Denver, the  Government svill start next sveek svith  a large  force of men   on, the   Three  Forks, Silverton and Four Mile, wagon  roads, and these public, hig'hsvays will  be put in condition for the heasyv travel  that is svaiting* their repair and sviden-  ing.  The bad condition of the Four Mile  road has greatly retarded svork in the  big Four' Mile'mines. The forces of  workmen have been reduced to the  smallest figure and cannot be increased  svitli profit until the road is in condition  for the hauling of ore and supplies over  it Four thousand dollars svill he spent  bsr the Government on this highsvav;  $3,000 on the Three Forks   road, and  Town.  Kaslo   New Denver..  Sandon   Slocan City���  Three Forks...  Ainswortli   Silverton   Whitewater...  Robson   Pilot Bay   Cody   Bear Lake   Bullour   Vevey     Aylwin   Duncan   Deer Park   Ros.bury   McG-uigaii.....  Lardo   Koka'neo   Slocan Crossing  No, of Vote*.    57_  .���  .08    155    1-15    -   m    75     .'. G3    50    21    II*    Ill    15    15  11    11    10    5    5    1    1    1  1    1,510  AMENDMENTS     TO    MINERAL     ACT.  Several    Changes   Made   That   Help   to  Make the   law Clem-.  The last legislature  got in its work on  the mineral lasv and made several  changes that settle disputed points and  make the law clearer in many respects.  The first amendment refers to the  location of fractions. In all fractions  surveyed from now on svhether stak.  ed correctly or   not,   the surveyor  may  adopt the boundary lines of the surrounding claims provided no side exceeds 1,500 feet in length. In other  words, the locator is entitled to the  s'acant ground that he claims, even if he  does not stake it in such a manner as to  include it all.  By a recent decision of the courts in  the Mollie Gibson case a prospector lost  a claim because of inability to secure the  post necessary to mark the location. The  amendment provides that in cases svhere  claims are staked above the timber  line, or the prospector cannot secure the  necessary posts, he may erect monuments of earth or stone.  In staking an extension the posts are  often planted so as to form a svedge-shape  fraction between tsvo ends of the two  claims. These fractions have often incurred great, expense, not only in recording and surveying, but in cases where  they carry the lead, and thus become of  such value as to promote litigation. The  amended act authorizes the surveyor,to  include such fraction, provided it does  not cover more than 51.65 acres, the area  I of a full claim, and pros.ded further that  tsvo location posts are together.  By failure to record assessment work  svithin the required period of one year,  either through os-ersight or misunderstanding of partnership interests, valuable claims have been lost. Nosv if a  prospector fails to record the svork svithin  a year, although the svork has been done,  he has 30 days' additional time in which  to make the "record by payment of an  extra $10. Another change regarding  the assessment ss-orkis in that particular  svhich called for svork to the amount of  $100 each year. Nosv a miner may do  and record as many assessments as he  pleases in a year by paying the recording  fee for each assessment done to the extent of $100.  In case anybody should adverse an  application lor a certificate of improvement and Crown grant, the contestant  must has-e his claim surveyed'immediately and file a plan and signed by an  authorized Provincial land surveyor svitli  the svrit.  To obtain a Crosvn grant in 1896 it svas  necessary to do assessment svork to the  amount of $500 and to have the claim  sun-eyed, svhich meant another $100. In  1897 the act ss'as amended so as to provide that up to May 1, 1898, the cost of  such survey should count as svork done  on the claim, not to exceed $100. A survey generally costs $100. Tlie last legislature extends the time to May 4,1899.  Hereafter the adverse proceedings in  connection with the title to mineral  claims, before any court, each party to  the proceedings shall give affirmative  evidence of title. Heretofore the burden  of proof was on the contestant.  The fee for recording assessment svork  has been reduced from $2.75 to $2.50.  Heretofore the fee for recording assessments has been 25 cents higher than  other fees.  Anybody who pulls dosvn a legal post  erected to mark a boundary or location  of;a mineral claim, orari'y svriting by law  required to be thereon, is liable to imprisonment for six months or a fine of  $250, or both. This is supposed to be  directed particularly toward preventing  the use of old posts by people svho re-  stake a claim and sometimes destroy  evidences of a prior location.  0F EASTERN ORIGIN  Mr. Louis Frechett, jr., son the poet  laureate of Canada, has enlisted in the  Nesv Hampshire National Guard,for the  Cuban svar.  Montreal experienced an earthquake  shock one night this sveek, svhich lasted  about 45 seconds. The shock svas felt  only in certain parts of the city.  The Hon. Mr. Turgeon, Quebec Commissioner of Mines and Agriculture,  svill be banqueted at Quebec before he  sails for England and France on 15th  June.  Madain Dandurand, svife of Senator  Dandurand, and one of the cleverest of  our French Canadian writers, has been  appointed an officer of the French  Academy.  Tsvo rich oil strikes have been made  at Inss-ood, County of Lambton. The  Imperial Oil Co., of Petrolia, and the  Standard Oil Co have obtained bonded  privileges, and have expert drillers at  svork.  THE TAX ON SEER.  UNCLE SAM���"Alt I hope Is  I'm gettla' since beer has rlz."  A 17-year-old boy, named John Benson, a son of Peter'Benson of Hamilton,  svhile bathing in the Desjardines Canal  was taken svith cramps and before  assistance reached him sank. His body  svas recovered.  Mr. M. C. Cameron, M. P. for West  Huron, has been appointed Lieutenant-  Governor of the North-West Territories  This is a $7,000 p?.r annum sit, good for  five, years,'or for as long as the holder  of it may svish to retain it.  At the Queen's drasviiig--room,on May  13th, Miss Bell, daughter of Robert  Bell, of the Dominion Geological Survey, ssras presented by the Diitche<- of  Buccleugh, Mistress of the Robes. Miss  Bell is visiting Lady Strathcona, in  London.  During the month of May the C.P.R.  company disposed of 43,000 acres to  farmers. A very large number of people are getting land this year, and  delegations from the United States are  numerous. Thirty-three hundred emigrants arrived at Winnipeg during'  May.  Sir Adolphe Carol's medical attendant, Dr. Roddick, returned to Montreal  on Sunday last from Nesv York; svhere  he had been suihmond to attend Sir  Adolphe, svho met svith an accident-  there a couple of sveeks ago. He reports that his patient is doing svell and  svill be removed to Montreal"in a sveek  or tsvo.  A report svas circulated in Montreal  this sveek that a number, of the Dominion Bank bills, svhich svere so mysteriously stolen from the Napanee branch  last year, had been received by the city  bank from a place in southsvester'n  Manitoba. Hosvever, the manager of  the bank denied having any knosvledge  of the matter.  Sir Wm. Van Home, President of the  C.P.R., and R. B. Angus, a director of  the company, have gone to England.  It is said that the- object of their trip is  to float the bonds of the Laurentide  Pulp Co., in svhich Mr. Alger, the U. S  Secretary of War, is largely interested  It is said that the bonds to be floated  amount to over one million dollars.  sion to take up the question of railway  transportation, svith a viesv of appointing a permanent commission to deal  with the whole subject. The late Dal ton  McCarthy devoted a great .deal of his '  time and attention to"this matter and  had a resolution on the order paper for  several sessions, but nothing came of it.  Mr. Blair, the Minister of Railways, deserves the credit of appointing this  commission. Western Canada suffers  more from high railsvay rates than from  a protective tariff. The posver of the  railsvayd is increasing" so rapidly that,  if they"chose to, they could control the  parliament of the Dominion.  The British Government is about to  fortify St. John's,. N. F. The entrance  to the harbor is so svell adapted for the  placing of fortifications that the highest  naval authorities think that the city  can easily be made impregnable. The  harbor could accommodate a large fleet  and the city is also connected svith  other line harbors and svith valuables'  coal fields. The value of St. John's,  position so close to the commercial'  route betsveen Europe and America is  apparent. A British fleet stationed  there could not only protect its osvn  mercantile marine aiid the ships of an  ally crossing the Atlantic, but could  also easily destroy the merchant vessels  of any hostile nation.  SNOW   LOCATIONS.  A good Harrison Lake story is told by  prospectors relative to the stampede  to  Fire   Mountain   in   the early spring of  1897.    The snosv   svas  from 6 to 10 feet  deep, but that did not  present any difficulty to the explorers  or pres'ent them  from staking claims,  and marking one  post as discovery stake.   The limbs and  top of a pine tree svere cut off, and the  stump squared to 4 in., the regulation  dimensions.    Later, svhen the snosv had  melted,   other   prospectors came along  and finding no marks on  the  surface to  indicate that any location had been made,  started in to survey off and stake claims.  About the time they had made an actual  discovery the  men  svho  had  staked on  the   snosv   returned   to   do assessment  svork, and found  the stumps  they  had  used for location stakes, but svere obliged  to trim the lower limbs off and climb up  from 12 to 15 feet to reach a point high  enough to road  their notices.    The later  locators  recognized  the  priorits-  of the  winter prospectors' claims, and it is expected that this year's assessment work  will result in opening up a mining camp  on Fire Mountain.  WILL    "CHKEK    'KM    UP.  my navy  taking schooners as small as the kind  The Royal Society of Canada at its  recent meeting in Ottawa adopted  resolutions endorsing Capt. Bernier's  projected trip to the North Pole. It is  proposed to raise -.50,000 to cover the  entire cost of the expedition, 831,000 of  svhich svill he contributed by the Dominion and Provincial governments,  and the balance of SK'.OoO to be raised  by private subscription.  The Governor-General and the.  Countess of Aberdeen held, svhat svas  -robably the last social function of their  irilliant regime, on Monday es-ening.  It took the form of a military dinner  given by Lord Aberdeen to the, officers  of the Gos'eriior-Goneral's Foot Guards,  of svhich battalion he was a short time  ago appointed Honorary Colonel. An  "At Home" followed given by Lady  Aberdeen.  A Montreal detective, named Joseph  Kellest, was arrested in that city on  Sunday last.charged svith having' stolen  a letter said to contain the names of  Spaniards in the Lniterl States, svho are  supplying- inhumation about the svar  mos-enients, from the residence ofSenor  (Iu Pose, ex-secretary of the late Spanish legation at Washington. Kellest  denied the charge.-and the matter is being investigated.  Mr. Gilbert Parker and hi.s mother  are in Toronto this sveek. On Monday  evening Mr Parker delivered an ad-  dross, oi- more correctiy a talk, in the  hall of the Canadian Institute, to the.  members of the Women Canadian Historical Society He also lectured at  Trinity I'ni versify on Tuesday, on  "The Art of Fiction " Robert Barr, the  novelist, and his sister svere also in Toronto this sveek. Mr. Barr svas an unexpected guest at the dinner given by  the National Club to Mr. Parker.  The Dominion Government intends,  during the recess, to appoint a conimis-  The mass meeting held a week or so  ago by Nesv Denveritesto impress upon  the Government   the   need of the expenditure of the public moneys appro-  pi iated  for   svork   and   improvements  hereabout, has already been productive  of good.   The svork on the streets is the  first evidence.   Bids have been called  for the erection of the vault in the Go\r-  eriunent office, and it is highly probable  sve svill get the necessars-" funds for the  erection of a fire hall and the purchase  of fire apparatus.    Word  has been  received from the  Government officials  in reply to letters sent enclosing a copy  of the resolutions passed  here, stating  that steps has-e already  been taken to  carry out  the  expressed  svish  of Nesv  Denver's citizens.    Nothing' can --cheer,  up"' a Government official   like concerted effort on the  part  of an  intelligent  fair-minded people.  OPTION    ON     ANOTHER     PHOPEKTY.  XV. II. Sandiford, for the North-West  Mining Syndicate, of svhich he is representative, here,   has   taken   up the two  in the Harris ranch,  a short distance, from  a thirty-day option,  three men to work  its- lead through the  :��� it bare. It svill be  hlv  during the life  claims embraced  on the lake shore  Nesv Dens-er. on  and has started  tracing' the Fide  property and laytn  prospected   thonni;  of the option svith the probability that  the purchase price, said to be -Sio.00,1,  svill lie paid over at the expiration of  the Mo flays. The lead has been uncovered fully Loon feet and is traced svith  very little difficulty towards the lake on  the properties taken overliv Mr, Sandiford .  <"��n the  Fidelity   svorl  ���ind   the development  is thorough.  c   is   proceeding  of the   property  M a k > 11 k   a    ('<><><]    Showing.  Work is being' raj idly pushed for-  svard on the Gold Queer- and Mulligan  claims, svhich adjoin the Jubilee, near  Ymir. The lead on the Gild Queen can  be traced for l.uon yards a-id is li\-e feet  wide betsveen tsvo svell delined walls of  granite and slate. The. paystreak.  svhich is nosv about nine inches'svide. is  getting wider as svork advances.  msaamsmsa^omemsiBm  -HJIMilliUlUNIJ  __iuuu-i_mu_ THE LEDGE, NEW DENVER, B.C., JUNE 16, 1898.  Fifth Yeah  The Ledge.  Published every Thursday.  R. T. LOWERY, Editor and Financier.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Three months .... .75  Six "  1.25  Twelve  "   *��������  Three yeah. ���  '��.00  Transient Advertising, 25 cents per line first in  sertion, 10 cents'per line subsequent insertions  nonpareil measurement.  TO CONTRIBUTORS.  C.rres-iondenee from every partof the Kootenay  District and communications upon live topics  always acceptable. Write on both sides of the  pa->er if you wish. Always send something good  no matter how crude. Get your copy in while it  is hot, and we will do the rest.  A pencil cross in this square  indicates that your subscription is due, and that the editor  wishes once again to look at  your collateral.  THURSDAY,  JUNE 16.. 1898.  JOHN    I_.    KETALIACK.  This journal endorses John L.  Retallack as a candidate for legislative honors for the Slocan Riding.  Being solely a mining man with no  sectional interests to attend to, he is  admirably suited for the position. He  has done a great deal to develop the  Slocan, and today, being one of the  largest holders of mining property in  the District, no one is more likely to  promote legislation that will benefit  our mining industry. These are the  salient reasons for our endorsement of  Mr. Retallack's candidacy. In subsequent issues between now and election day our position will be clearly  stated. The political policy of Mr.  Green is questionable. Mr. Retallack  has taken a stand; we know where  to find him. He is for progress and  prosperity, a policy that means more  to our mining industry than anything  else. We believe through him, and  his influence at Victoria, the interests  of this section can be best served, and  as this is our prime object in running  a, newspaper���to advance the interests  of the Slocan���we shall advocate Mr.  Retallack's election.  ,  CANADA'S   PKOCtRESS.  now had a century of political change,  for the most part violent and convulsive.  She has had the National Assembly, the  Convention, the Directory, the Consulate, the Empire, the restored Empire,  the Bourbon Monarchy a second time  restored, the constitutional monarchy of  the House of Orleans, the Republic, the  Septennate, the second Empire and  finally the Republic once more. Yet she  seems no nearer the haven of rest than  ever. The fall of the French Republic,  if it comes, will be a heavy blow to popular government, svhich in all countries is  manifestly on its trial.  The war party at Washington brought  on, and must have known that it was  bringing on, war by refusing to consider  the Spanish offers, ordering Spain to  haul dosvn her flag and thus compelling  her to light for her honor. For her  honor and for that of all nations threatened, like her, by overbearing violence  Spain has fought and bled. Nor will  history fail to do her justice. She has  nosv surely done enough. She cannot  hope to hold Cuba close to the shore of  an enemy with infinitely superior resources and divided from her own shore  by the Atlantic. The conflict is useless,  and humanity demands that it should  cease.  It is not the least of evils attendant on  the svar that people are led to look on  bloodshed as an exciting spectacle and  only wish that the combatants should  show "sport." They read with unconcern that a city is suffering "all the horrors of a siege." The dire realities of  those horrors, the people devouring grass  and digging for carrion, the starving  child crying in vain for food to its famishing mother, are not present to their  minds, any more than are the agonies of  the sinking ships or the crowded hospital. Presently we may have Malay  atrocities added to Cuban carnage and  famine. That a set of unscrupulous  politicians should be able for their personal or party purposes to bring these  calamities on mankind is one of the  mysteries which, if the world is really  under moral government, may find their  solution hereafter. At all events, Spain  has done all that honor can demand,  and she may now, without disgrace, give  ear to the voice of humanity. In the  loss of distant'and discontented dependencies she would, if she knesv her own  interest, recognize a gain. Empire,  diverting the energies of her people, from  productive industry to territorial aggrandizement has been her greatest curse,  and did, in fact, more to bring about her  ruin than any other of the causes to  svhich it is commonly ascribed. Its final  surrender may restore her to herself,and  the last day of Imperial pride may be  the first of national regeneration.  more useful to the district. The supporters of the opposition will regard Mr.  Green-treatment of them as treachery,  as the scheming device of a petty self-  seeker; careless of every principle except that of personal gain. Mr. Green  has had a certain amount of popularity  and many friends. Under ordinary  circumstances his meeting in the Auditorium would have been attended by  100 men; his return from Sandon would  have been celebrated by a procession  of a mile long. As it is his friends stand  aloof and pity him for the mistake he  has made. And the public,iquick to feel  the chill atmosphere, svhich surrounds  a man who,' by some flagrant act of  trickery has degraded himself, pass him  by with silent unconcern.���Kaslo Koot-  enaine. ���  EAST   KOOTENAY   NOTES.  _��_��-_i-i _i___t->_h li _________  THE   SANDON    CONVENTION.  Last year the Yukon country yielded  $2,000,0000 in gold. This year $15,000,000  worth svill be taken out. There is, Mr.  Ogilvie says, at least $100,000,000 to  come. Four years ago; the Manitoba  wheat crop, which is better than gold,  was 17,000,000 bushels. This year the  yield svill be 50,000,000 bushels. The  North-West is progressing in like proportion. Tsvo years ago, the great coal and  mineral territory along the Crow's Nest  Railsvay could not be got at. This year  by October next, the line svill be completed to Kootenay lake, and a vast increase in development and in trade svill  take place. Three years ago there svere  men in Canada, 'shrewd fellosvs they  thought themselves to be, svho had little  faith in the future of the Canadian  Pacific Railsvay. To-day a proposition is  on foot to .vastly increase the efficiency  of that line, and to, at an early day, provide for a double track from Winnipeg to  the Pacific terminus. Meanwhile, it is  intended to so increase the efficiency of  the line, by needed svorks at various  points, as to enable the C.P.R. trains to  make the journey from -Montreal to  Vancouver in 100 hours. This is a rapid  age, and Canada means to keep up svith  the procession.  ISYSTAN DISK'S    OPINIONS.  The Prime Minister,  what majority in favor  svhen he is asked  of the plebiscite  he svill deem sufficient to svarrent legislation, naturally parries the question,  wishing to leave himself a free hand.  But he can hardly fail to see that it svill  be necessary to has-e a majority both of  the whole electorate of the Dominion and  of the whole electorate of each province.  Nothing less, apparently, svill suffice to  secure the practical executiou of a lasv  against svhich not only the tastes and  interests, but the moral conviction, be it  right or wrong, of a lar^e body of citizens, and their sense of justice svill certainly continue to rebel. From a large  proportion, even of those who svill vote  for the lasv, only a lukesvarm support of  its execution can he expected The man  who svould readily help to arrest a murderer or a thief, svill not, even if he  believes beer pernicious, help to put a  neighbor in jail for drinking or selling a  glass of beer. Not improbably he svill  help him to escape. Such is the svell-  knosvn infirmity of all sumptuary legislation. If the result of the plebiscite  should be a small majority for prohibition in the Dominion generally, svith a  majority against it in Quebec, the situation of the Government svill be extremely awksvard. The plebiscite is a weak  device for the evasion of parliamentary  responsibility, and it is not unlikely to  end in a fiasco.  The excitement of the svar has turned  away our eyes from an ev^nt of not less  importance. A general election has  taken place in France, and according to  present accounts,has left the Republican  Ministry svith a majority so small that  its life will hang by a thread svhich may  any day be cut by coalition betsveen the  monarchists and socialists, svho act in  their natural union for the overthrow of  a free constitution. The existence of the  Repi-blic will on .e more be in danger.  More and more .he posver of the army  and the army chiefs casts its advancing  shadosv over the scene. This was s-ery  evident in the Dreyfus case. The nation  cannot put up with anarchy or with total  instability of government, and the maintenance of stable government under the  Republican system seem. to be almost  hopeless in France.    That  country  has  The Sandon convention is over and  Mr. Robt. F. Green is the nominee.  There are no expressions of surprise,  suprisiiig'ly few of satisfaction. The  result was expected, predicted, predestined and foreordained. The convention svas called for that purpose. The  convention was an afterthought. Mr.  Green has been a candidate all along-.  Mr. Green was determined to be a candidate. Certain of Mr. Green's friend-  were determined that he should be a  candidate. It was only after things  were so fixed as to make certain of Mr.  Green's nomination that the convention  svas called. If any other result had  been probable there svould have been no  convention. Mr. Green svent up to  Sandon and hired a hall. Mr. Green  made up the schedule of representatives  to be allotted to each convention. He  had the announcement published in  Kaslo to g*et together a fesv of his friends,  a verv fesv. He appointed them nearly  all delegates. He took them to Sandon.  He carried the convention. He returns  a candidate. Nosv that it is all over,  svhat is it that Mr. Green represents ?  Who, among our citizens is it that he  proposes to represent in the legislature?  Mr. Green is an oppositionist, svas  four years ago the chairman of Mr.  Hume's campaign committee, reluctantly compelled by his principles to svork  i.ml vote for a"Nelson man, against a  Kaslo man. The numerous friends that  Mr. Green has through the district are  nearly all oppositionists. The only people lie can depend upon for his election  are the oppositionists. Is Mr. Green  nosr an opposition candidate or no?  Mr. Green returned from Honolulu  by way of Victoria. He tarried in Victoria and his friends say exercised much  influence svith the Government. It is  rumored that he conferred freely svith  the members of the Government, told  them that the points upon svhich he  differed from them svere fesv and easily  remedied. That running as an independent he could hold the opposition vote,  but that if the Government would put  their patronage in his hands and refrain  from encouraging a man to oppose him,  he svould agree to support them if elected. Some of those iii Kaslo svho are  talking in his favor are Government  supporters and have declared that they  srill not vote for him unless he p'edges  himself to support the Turner administration on svant of confidence motions. These facts account for the  appaling- frigidity that has so far attended Mr. Green's candidature.  The soldier, more particularly the  officer, svho on the eve of battle deserts  his colors and crosses the line svith  overtures to the enemy, is abhored by  those whom he has betrayed, and despised and suspected by those to svhoin  he tenders his services. That Mr.Green  should see the folly at the present juncture of remaining an oppositionist svould  be natural and easily understood. Many  such changes occur" in political life, but  honest and disinterested men under  such circumstances content themselves  with signifying to their late associates  that they can no longer svork svith them  and they fall into the ranks of the opposing party as privates. They do not  seek to foist themselves as candidates  for office upon the people to whom they  have heen hostile. Much less do they  seek to secure a snap election by using  the votes of their late associates before  their desertion has become knosvn. Mr.  Green has seemed to assume that there  is some act of Parliament under svhich  he alone was entitled to the seat in the  legislature. If there svas no chance to  get a nomination or an election as a  straight oppositionist, then he must run  as something else. Betsveen tsvo stools  people often come to the ground.  The Government supporters do not  need Mr. Green as a candidate. They  have plenty men better entitled to the  honor, and several whom they deem  better qualified and  calculated to be  Messrs. T. A. Knosvlton and W. R.  Lindsay arrived at Golden recently  from the east and proceeded to Otter-  tail, svith a viesv to renewing work on  the Sunday claim. They brought seven  miners svith them from tho east.  Mr. Joliffe recently left Golden for the  coast to consult with-the Hon. D.  Dewdney as to the svork to be done this  season on the claims in svhich they are  interested in the International basin.  A party of prospectors from West  Kootenas-* has located a group of claims  opposite'the Mineral King- on Toby  creek. The ore is copper and looks  very promising. Mr. Kempton has  shipped a quantity of the ore to Rossland.  Mr. Pirn, M. P. for Bedford, England,  is the president, and the Duke of Manchester the vice-president of the company that svill work the Robert E. Burns  claims on Burns basin. The company  is knosTn as the Associated Gold Mines  and is said to be the largest British corporation yet formed to explore the mining resources of B. C.  The half ton of ore from the Pretty  Girl claim at Horsethief creek, which  ,W. G. Mitchell Innes had shipped to  London, svent 50 per cent, copper and  created' quite a sensation among the  owners of the property.  The Pyramid-Kootenay group of mining properties in the Fort Steele region,  is understood to be osvned principally  by Englishmen, svho osvn the bulk of  the stock in the famous Rio Tinto Copper Mining company of Spain.  The shipments of. ore last sveek from  Fort Steele amounted to 132 tons, at a  gross valuation of S5,603._0; an average  of $55.50 per ton.  A. W. McVittie and C. D. Rand, of  Spokane, are negotiating the sale to an  English syndicate of the Golden Five  group of mining properties, situated at  the forks of Wild Horse creek. The  negotiations are nosv well under svay,  and the sale is expected to be completed shortlv.  amk of Montr  Established 1817.  Capital (all paid up) $12,000,000.00  Reserved fund : : 6,000,000.00  Undivided profits :    2     896,850.04  HEAD   OFFICE,   MONTREAL.  Rt.  Hon. Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, G.C.M.G. President.  Hon. G.. A. Drummond, Vice President,  E. S. Clouston, General Manager,  Branches iu all parts of Canada, Newfoundland, Great Britain, and  the United States. *  New Denver branch  F. J. FINUCANE, Manager.  THE    PICTURE  BIBT.E.  Don't want 110 pictur' Bible; I've kinder got a  doubt  That them thar pictur - sorter crowds the ol' time  gospel out,  It don't encourage my belief's ter fix it up like  that.  With yaller arks a-restin' on the top of Ararat,  An'  An'  red���a reg'lar fancy  blue  In  twenty mile  Moses in a gouii' o  ���'robe;"  ever'thmg a-lookin'  o'job!  An' Peter on a sea o' green 'longside a speckled  boat,  An' nothin' left o' Joseph but the colors in his  coat!  They can't improve that Bible���I don't keer how  they try,  An' I doubt if these new fixin's air approved of  in the sky!  An' though they're mighty purty, an'sorter make  a show,  Ef the Lord had wanted picture's He'd made 'cm  long ago I  So in spite o' all the Italkin', I've sorter got a  doubt  That pictur's crowds the sweetness o'thc ol' time  gospel out;  They don't encourage my beliefs���whatever they  may be���  The plain ol' family Bible is good enough for  me!    '  California Mineral Production.  HARRISON LAKE DISTRICT.  W. M. Brewer, traveling correspondent for the  N. Y. Engineering & Mining Journal, writes to  his journal regarding the Harrison Lake .district  as follows: "During 1897 there svere many discoveries of free milling gold bearing quartz  made on Cayoose Creek, and on tributaries of  Bridge River in the Lillooet Mining D'strict.  There are really three routes into the camps,  although heretofore only one, that by way of the  stage road from Ashcroft, on the Canadian Pacific Railway, has been used. Another route is  by 'he trail from Lytton to the town of Lillooet,  thence up the Bridge River. But the shortest  and most direct route for prospectors from the  coast is by Harrison Lake. To take this you  leave the "Canadian Pacific at Agassi- station,  about Go miles east of Vancouver, take stage to  Harrison Hot Springs, a distance of live miles.  There it is necessary to transfer .0 a steamer,  which makes tri-weekly trips to the head of  Harrison Lake.  "The distance between these points is about 40  miles, and a large number of claims were staked  along both shores in 1807. notwithstanding that,  there is but little reason to look for mineral until  a point about 20 miles up the lake lias been  reached. This is near the Providence mine,  which has been developed to a limited extent.  The ore carries values 111 boih gold and copper,  being of a silicious and p.yritous variety. The  development work consists of two shafts, each  about 30 ft. deep, and tunnels of various lengths.  It has not been done by practical miners, consequently is not of such a systematic cha-acter as  to enable a visitor to form any very reliable  opinion as to the value of the property. There  is .apparently a quantity of ore of good grade,  and as the mine workings are on the lake shore,  shipment of ore down the lake and by the Harrison and Fraser rivers can be made direct to the  coast by steamer at slight cost.  "The prevailing country rocks along the lake  shores are apparently porphyry, limestone and  diabases. As tlu: head of the lake is approached  granites are noticeable, and around Port Douglas  dikes of diorite have been thrown up as intrusive  rocks. These show numerous narrow fissures  filled with a hard flinty vitreous quartz.  ���The steamboat landing is at Tipella. where a  town was located in IS'.iT by the Fire .Mountain  Gold Mining Company, and a trail cut from the  landing into the mining district, a distance of 11  miles. This was the scene of great excitement  last year, and about s_o,OtXI was expended in  developing the mines, building the town, cutting  the trail, etc. The ore is represented as a free  milling gold-bearing quartz, and an attempt was  made to "treat it with a Huntington mill. This  resulted in failure at the Gold Spring mine, where  most of the work has been done and the company  has ordered a 10-stamp mill; the machinery for  which will be put in place early during the present summer.  The route to Bridge River mines from Tipela  is by Port. Douglas, four miles to the north, thence  up the Lillooet river by wagon road, built during  the (id's to accommodate the travel fo the Cariboo gold fields, to the foot of Lillocet lake; along  the shore of which is a trail to Pemberton  Meadows. Prom that point the Bridge river  can be reached either by wagon road and trail  along Anderson and Scton lakes to the town of  Lillooet, or else by trail up the Upper Lillooet  river and across the divide between that river  and the south fork of Bridge river. This latter  route is through an unexplored country, known  only to a few Indians.  A't Port Douglas, a small Indian village and  trade store, are all that remain today to mark  the spot .vhich in IS..8 was the starting point for  the Cariboo, and a mining town of consider&ble  importance in the province.  An idea as to the amount of attention  that Ontario's mineral resuroes are securing on the other side of the Atlantic can  be got from the statement that there are  nosv no less than 25 English companies  actively interested in the north-svestern  gold fields of the province. For a couple  of years past expert engineers have gone  thoroughly over the district, and as a  result of their investigations their principals are putting the capital necessary  to develop some of the deposits of the  Lake of the Woods and the Seine River  regions.  An old negro svho was hanging around  a recruiting office svas asked if he was  going to enlist.  "No, suh," he replied, "but I put five  sons in���all I had left."  "Lost some���have you?"  "Yes, suh���tsvo. One sv *__ burnt, en  de yuther died a natural death."  "A natural death?"  "Yes, suh���dey lynched him!"  And what did she say svhen you asked  her to put your love io the test?  She suggested that I might act as her  brother Mil's substitute in the war with  Spain.  The California State Milling Bureau has now  completed the statistics of production of the  several counties so far that the totals for tho  State for 1897 can be given. The figures show a  total production to the value of fc_5,103,-l-, as  compared with $24,201,398 in 1896. Of the. prin'  cipal metals it produced 815,871,401 gold, $45-,789  silver, 4991,9.-5 quicksilver. $900 platinum. $1,-40,-  066 copper, and ._,664 lead. The Increase was  not in these metals. In copper the production  was .1,300,000 greater than in 1896, but this was  more than offset by the decrease in the production of gold. The increase was in no.i-metallic  minerals, the gains being made in borax, petroleum, salt and many of the building materials,  as stone, cement and brick  C. S. RASHDALL,  Notary Public.  A. E. FAUQUIER.  RASHDALL & FAUQUIER  MINES & REAL ESTATE.  NEW DENVER, B.C.  MIXING INTERESTS BOUGHT,  SOLD  AND BONDED.      CORRESPONDENCE   INVITED   Complete lists of claims for sale.    Abstracts of claims, conveyancing.  H. T. BRAGDON,  New Denver, B.C.  Heavy and Shelf Hardware,  Mine and Mill Supplies,  Pipe and Fittings,  Paints and Oils,  Builders'and Contractors'  Supplies,  Stoves and Kitchen Ware,  Agents for Canton Steel.  ���I carry one of the largest  and best assorted stocks of  Hardware In West Kootenay,  and shall be pleased to quote  prices upon anything required  11 my line.  Political  Are thing's heard of, but never seen;  always reliable, but will never do to  bet on; are in season at all times, but  like the desert apple, turn to ashes  when touched by the tooth of an  hungry man. They are a prolific  commodity just now and we would  call your 'attention to what we consider of greater importance���pointers  on furniture. If you believe in getting the best for your money, we  agree with you and are trying to  give it to you. The best pointers you  can get are from a personal examination of the goods.  OTEL SANDON,  % "5r,  Sandon, B.C.  TpHIS NEW HOUSE, with the old name, is  well equipped to accommodate a large  number of Guests.      The building is plastered  and the rooms are unsurpassed for comfort in  the Slocan, while in the Dining Room can be  found the best food in the market.  Robert Cunning, Proprietor.  The Clifton House,  WALKER & BAKER,.  Xew    Furniture Dealers and It .pairei-s  Denver's    Ciulertaltevs and Embalniers.  N. B.���We have the only practical Undertaker  and Embalmer doing business in the Slocan.  F.  a. FAUQUIER,  NOTARY PUBLIC.  Nakusp, B.C.  Sandoi.  Has ample accommodations for .1 large number of people.     The rooms are large  and airy, and the Dining Room is provided with everything  in the market  Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers.  John Buckle3���% Prop.  Choice Groceries & Provisions  HAM & CRAWFORD.  SIXTH STREET,       -       -        -        -       -       -       NEW DENVER.  ^-Prices are right and Goods Always Fresh.  THE MINERS EXCHANGE.  Three Forks, E. C. Weaver  ASSRYE^S OF B. G.  J-JOWARD WEST,  Assoc. RS11, London, Eng  MINING ENGINEER,  ANALYTICAL CHEMIST,  & ASSAYER.  Properties   examined   and   reported on for 111  tending purchasers.  Assay office and Chemical Laboratory, Belle-  vue ave, New Denver, B C.  Travelers  Will iind the  Arlington f4otel  a pleasant place to stop at when in  Slocan City.  G.ETHING & HENDERSON, Proprietors.  J.  Silverton.  M. M. BENEDUM,  C.O.Di  Goods called  for & Delivered  AUNDRY  of  all  kinds,  write.  call  on or  SV. S. Dkesvry  Kaslo, B.C.  H. T. Twigg  Xew Denver, B.C.  DREWRY & TWIGG  Dominion and Provincial Land Surveyors.  Civil and Mining Engineers.  Bedford, McNeil Code.  _3TRashdall & Fauquier, Agents.  NOTICE       OF      APPLICATION  J-XQUOl.    LICENSE.  FOR  "VTOTICE is hereby given that 00 days from date  1. hereof I will apply to the Stipendiary Magistrate of \\rest Kootenav for a license- to sell  liquor at retail at my hotel in Three Forks, SVest  Kootenay, B. C. _  ARTHUR MULLEN.  Three Forks, B. C, June _, 1808.  W.F Jeetzel & Co,  DRUGG-ISTS, Nelson,B.C.  D  R. A.S. MARSL',.*-L.  Dentist.  Kaslo, B C  Graduate of American College of Dental Surgery  Chicago ;   GWILLIM & JOHNSON.  (McGill)  Mining Engineers  & Analy-Chemists.  Slocan City.  B O  We are now in a  position to give  thoroughly satisfactory service  and solicit your  patronage. We  make a specialty  of the finer lines  of Cambrics and  Lmens, etc. All  business cash on  delivery.  Work Done on Short Notice.  C. M. NESBITT, Prop.  ;2E_?-Rates furnished Hotels,   Steamboat Companies, etc, on application.  El Porada Ave.  J�� L. GRIMMETT, L.L.B.  BARRISTER,  Solicitor, Notary Public, Etc  Sandon, B. C. Fifth Year.  THE LEDG.E, NEW DENVER, B.C., JUNE 16/1898.  THE   KLONDIKE    CRAZE.  Yes, I've heard about Alasky 'n the Klondike  run o' gold,  But it don't make me excited fer to go where its  so cold,  'N I envy no man's forehin ef he make a little  pile,  Fer I'd ruther make my money by a-diggin' up  the sile. .  Yes,  I  know  they're  findiii'  nuggets  on   the  Tukon big ez peas,  But they hev a nine months winter when a brass  dog's tail 'd freeze;  _. the trav'liu's so up-hillish thet a furlong seems  a mile,  So I'd ruther make my money by a diggin' up  the sile.  When these fellows git their gold dust, they come  back to blow it in.  Fer it burns plum through their pocket, 'n ter  keep it seems a sin,  Till they find themselves clean busted in a very  little while,  So I'd ruther make my money by a diggin' up  the sile.  What's the use o' this excitement ?   Lettin' well  enough alone  Ib a science no one studies till they're down ter  skin 'n bone,  *N the time they spend in chasin' in the hope o'  strikin'ile  Could be used to good advantage by a-diggin' up  the sile.  CANADA'S OWN KING WILLIAM.  Let  Kr  these fellers quit this kentry ter go up 'n  freeze ter death,  ter starve until the body aint got strcnth  enough for breath,  fc'omco' them may ttrike bonanzas, 'n come back  ter sporl a pile,  But I'll Iind a heap more comfort, in-diggin* up  the sile.   -F. W. L.  THK   OMINECA   COUNTI.Y.  From the numerous enquiries that  are being- made by intending gold-seekers and prospectors concerning the  Omineca and Skeena River districts, it  may be inferred that this northerly section of the Province, once before the  scene of a gold excitement, will again,  and doubtless during the late spring  and early summer months of tlie present'year, be visited by hundreds of  white men, intent on the search for the  precious metal. Omineca is a district  of great mineral possibilities. Its  climate for six months of the year, that  is, from May to October, is delightful;  game is abundant; the streams are full  of fish, and from the prospector's point  of viesv these are highly appreciable  conditions. But���and this is a question  very frequently asked���svhat about the  topographical conditions of the district?  Is it a country that can be easily prospected? From accounts' given by old  timers, ss _io took part in the Omineca  gold rush of 72, it is learned that in  those days a great obstacle in tlie way  of travelling in the bush was presented  by the quantities of fallen timber, caused by the fierce and destructive fires  svhich had ra^ed some years previous  throughout the country. But this is  ' over 30 years ago, ancl an old miner  who visited Omineca last year, after a  a long absence, states that there is now  nothing remaining of those fallen tree  trunks, svhich have since rotted away,  hence travel nosv is much easier than "it  was.  The best route to the gold fields of  Omineca is by svay of the Skeena river  to Hazleton. The Hudson's Bay Com-  panv have tsvo small 100-ton steamboats  Riding of West Kootenay Electoral District; and  His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor has been  pleased to appoint and declare the Government  Office, Kaslo, to be the place for the nomination  of candidates foi election to the Legislative  Assembly in the Slocan Riding of West Kootenay Electoral District.  QAWADIAN  ACIFIC  AILWAY  KINO WILLIAM VAN HORNB-" Get onto the front and hind lags of the noble steed oa which I crossed th* Kettle River."  svhere the rich claims svere struck.  This point may ere long be cleared up,  as all the gouiid in the vicinity of the  creeks flowing into the Omineca 'river  has been leased to companies, and extensive preparation for hydraulicing on  a large scale are being made.  THE    SPANISH   SOLDIER.  on this river, but the passage can be  made easily enoug'h in canoes by experienced iioatmen, or Indians can be  hired to navigate the stream for a very  moderate remueneration. The river is,  hosvever, only dangerous at one season  of the year���during the June freshet���  when the current rushes through some  of the canyons at tlie rate of from 10 to  12 miles an hour. From Ha-.leton at  the forks of the Skeena there is an excellent Government trail for 60 miles to  Babine, the first portage; from Babine  to Tatlah lake 45 miles,and from Tatlah  to Manson, the heart of the gold bearing  territory, for 50 miles. The old trail  travelled by the miners of the '72 rush,  was throug'h the Livepan Pass,the summit of svhich has an altitude of about  9,000 feet, and meant a. tremendous  climb, svhich is nosvavoided The pass  was called Firepan by the Indians, from  a volcano svhich, though at present extinct, svas active enough 50 years back,  ^ and the ground for tlie space of nearly  Vfqur acres in the neighborhood of the  crater, is still so svarin that the snow  never lies on it, notsvithstanding tlie  altitude.  The Indians in the district are a  peaceable and industrious lot, and many  of them are making large sums of  money at mining. 0\\e man. Plug-hat  Tom, so named from liis ssvell head  gear, is said to have taken out of a  claim on Tom creek, 8S0,000 in gold  dust, last year. In the early days an  attempt, at least, svas made liy them to  compel the svhite man to pay for the  privilege of entering their territory, but  the demands svere only made by the  Christianized tribes at the prompting of  the priests, and svere not acceeded to  by the miners.  The   stampede   to   Omineca    really  occurred in the spring of 1897, although  some mining had been carried on in the  district previous   to that date.   It   is  estimated that as many as 6,000 men  took part in this rush,  but the district  was by no means thoroughly prospected    The   largest   nugget   found   svas  taken from the discovery claim on Lost  creek, and svas valued at S200, but S50,  $60 and S100 nuggets   svere   not at all  uncommon,   though  gold   the size  of  wheat grains   svas   more usually met  with.     The   principal    gold    bearing  creeks svere Manson,Germansen, Slate,  Lost, Black Jack,  Tom  and Vital, and  each of these streams produced a large  quantity of gold    A   claim   on Black  Jack paid, for instance, S50 per day, to  the men for some time.   On Slate creek  two or three miners cleared up six to  seven thousand dollars in tsvo seasons;  on   Germansen a dozen or so  claims  yielded from five to six thousand dollars  to  the   interest.    Robert Howell,   the  locator of   the  first   claim   on Manson  creek, took out S5,000 svorth of o-old in  one day; and from a claim called the  Tobog-gan, as a result of six days svork  the fire partners obtained $1,200 svorth  of coarse  gold   each.   The gold from  this claim svas found on the top of the  sand, which   clearly   indicated   that it  had been carried dosvn in a slide from  the hill.   The   osvners   of the ground,  hosvever,nesrer succeeded in tracing the  direction of the channel, indeed no very  systematic attempt svas made to do so,  aiid   shortly   aftersvards   the   men,  in  company svith   the  greater number of  the miners in the   country,   left to join  the rush of '74 to  Cassiar.    Thus the  Omineca gold excitement barely lasted  tsvo seasons, although five years later  the country svas again visited by prospectors.   In the opinion of old miners,  very fesv of the claims svere located on  the   original   river   bed   svhich,    they  opine, is a cross country channel, intersecting some of the creeks at the spot.  The Spanish  soldier, as described by  those who have seen him in his den, is a  small, lissom,  almost puny being, and  presents a picture the reverse of inspiring.  As he slouches along on the march,  unkempt, unshorn   and tatterdemalion,  the sight of   him   in   the  ranks  would  break the heart of an English or German  martinet���than svhoin there is no greater  stickler for form and appearance on  the  face of this earth, or at least fihe svriter  lias never seen  a greater.    But to come  back   to   our   Spaniard���huge   hemped  sandals encase   his often   sockless feet,  his trousers are  frayed and threadbare,  his ill-fitting tunic hangs  limp and loose  for want of buttons here and there, and  his cap, if he boasts of one, is flung carelessly on  the back of his head.   Hugh  svoolen gloves of a bright green hue, and  sadly in need ;of darning,  endeas-or to  conceal the scanty length  of the tunic  slees-es,   but   tss-o or  three inches of a  brown,  sinesvy   arm  insist on  peeping  forth at the least exertion.    His  rifle is  carried anyhow���sometimes at the slope,  and often   slung   behind   his back,   but  always in a different  position   to that of  his neighbor in the ranks.    The order is  ins-aribly a struggle,  ancl the  formation  is more easily guessed at than identified  by any   one   accustomed   to  the sharp,  quick  mos-ements and  straight, serried  ranks of more disciplined troops.  Yet, withal, the Spanish soldier is a  good fighter when brought to bay, as  many a bloody field has attested*. In  guerilla svarfare his fame is pre-eminent,  and amidst the greatest privation he  bears his hard lot cheerfully and uncomplainingly. Notsvithstanding his shuffling gait, he seems never to tire on the  march, and in brief is in many respects  a worthy and dangerous foe. On the  Held of lgualada, one of the fiercest fights  of the late Carlist war, a loyal regiment  that had no choice between annihilation  and surrender, unhesitatingly chose the  former and allosved itself to be mercilessly butchered, though not svithout  rendering a good account of the enemy,  svhose victory svas purchased at an  enormous sacrifice.  In the matter of food the peninsular  soldier is easily satisfied and no great  charge on the commissariat. Two meals  a day suffice him, and those are scanty j  enough. In some "smart" corps coffee !  and soup are allosved early in the morn- I  ing, but the average soldier feeds only at  9 a.m. and again at 5 p.m. One and a i  half pounds of bread, and black at that,  is the entire ration allosved per day by  the government. Any additional luxuries, save the mark, must be purchased  out of his own pocket at the regimental  canteen, which is kept within reasonable  bound by a regimental committee. The  private eats little or no meat, especially  s.-hen in active service, and to this is  attributed the svonderful recuperative  posver of Spanish soldiers, their wounds  healing extremely easy and rapidly. On  the inarch our don is satisfied svith a  chunk of dry bhick bread, a little oil and  a clove or tsvo of garlic, the svhole svash-  ed down by a modest allosvance of svater.  Truly a fighting ration that the American soldier svould find it hard to  stomach. No wonder the typical Spaniard is lean and evil smelling and unwholesome looking.  PUBLISHED    FOR   1,400    YKAKS.  PROCLAMATIONS.  [L.S.] THOS. R. MclNNES.  CANADA.  PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.  VICTORIA, by the Grace of God, of the United  Kingdom of Groat Britain and Ireland,  Queen, Defender of the Faith. &c, &c, &c.  To Our faithful the Members elected to serve in  the Legislative Assembly, of Our Province of  British Columbia, and to all whom it may  concern���Gkeeting.  A   PROCLAMATION.  D. M. EitKHTS, Attorney -General.  WHEREAS, We have thought lit, by and with  the advice and ..onsent of Our Executive  Council of Our Province of British Columbia, to  dissolve the present Legislative Assembly of Our  said Province, whici. stands prorogued until  summoned for dispatch of business.  NOW KNOW-YE that We do. fortius end,  publish this Our Royal Proclamation, and do  hereby dissolve the Legislative Assembly accordingly, and the members thereof are discharged from further attendance on same.  In Testimony SVhkkeok, We have caused  these Our Letters to be made Patent, and  the Great Seal of British Columbia to be  hereunto affixed: Witness, the Honourable  ���Thos. 11. MgInnes, Lieutenant-Governor  of Our said Province of British Columbia,  in Our City of Victoria, in Our said Province, this'seventh day of June, in the year  or Our Lord one thousand eight hundred  and ninety-eight, and iu the sixty-first year  of Our Reign.  By Command.  B. Ii. TYRSVHITT DRAKE,  Registrar of the Supreme Court.  [L.S.J THOS. R. MclNNES.  CANADA.  PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.  VICTORIA, by the Grace of God, of the United  Kingdom ol Groat Britain and Ireland,  Queen. Defender of the Faith, &c, &c, &c.  To all   to  whom  these   presents shall come,���  ecutlve Council of British Columbia* We have  this day given orders.for issuing Our SVrits in  due form, for calling aiiew Legislative Afisumbly  for Our said Province, "which Writs are to bear  date on the seventh day of June, instant, amd to  be returnable on or before the thirty-first day of  August next.  In Testimony Wiiekeop We have caused  these Our Letters to be made Patent, and  the Public Seal of the said Province to be  hereunto affixed: Witness, the Honourable  Thos. R. McInnes, Lieutenant-Governor  of Our said Province of British Columbia,  in Our City of Victoria, in Our said Province, this seventh day of June, in the  year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, and in the sixty-  first year of Our Reign.  By Command.  B. H. TYRSVHITT DRAKE,  Registrar of the Supreme Court.  PROVINCIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE.  20th May. 18-8:  HIS HONOUR the Lieutenant-Governor has  been pleased to appoint the undermentioned  persons to be Collectors of Votes, under the provisions of section 10 of the " Redistribution Act,  18-8," namely:  John D. Sibbald, of Revelstoke, for the Revelstoke Riding. SVest Kootenay Electoral District.  Alexander Lucas, of Kaslo, for the Slocan  Riding, SVest Kootenay Electoral District,  Roderick. F. Tor.MiE, of Nelson, for the Nelson Riding, West Kootenay Electoral District.  JoHNKmKur, of Rossland, for ihe Rossland  Riding, SVest Kootenay Electoral District.  And His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor has  been pleased to appoint the undermentioned person to be a Distributing Collector, under the provisions of section 17 of the said Ace, namely:���  In the former Electoral District of West Kootenay, George A. McFahland, of Nelson.  NOTIOE.  In the Matter of an assignment for the benefit of  fill their Creditors made by Nestorius Angrig-  nou and J. Edward Angrignon, lately doing  business as Hotel Keepers at New Denver,  B.C.  And in the Matter of notice to creditors to send  in their claims against the estate.  IT having been ordered that the notices for  claims inserted in The Ledce newspaper,  published at New Denver, B. C, and in the  British Columbia Gazette, be deemed sufficient  notice to the creditors of the said estate to send  in their claims to the assignee thereof;  And it having been further ordered that the  said assignee be at liberty to distribute the assets  of the said estate amongst the parties entitled  thereto, having regard to the claims of which  such assignee has notice, upon inserting notice  of such intended distribution for two weeks in  The Ledge newspaper, and the British Columbia Gazette, and upon no further notices of claims  being given meanwhile;  ; Ihereby give notice that on the twenty-seventh  (-7th) day of June, 1898,1 will distribute all assets  then available of said estate pro rata amongst  the creditors entitled thereto.  A. E. FAUQUIER, Assignee.  AND SOO-PACIFIC LINE.  SHORTEST  AND  QUICKEST  ROUTE  Klondike  andthe Yukon,  Close connections and no trouble.  TO ALL  EASTERN  AND  EUROPEAN POINTS.  TO PACIFIC COAST,  JAPAN,   CHINA   AND  AUSTRALIA.  TO THE RICH and ACTIVE  MINING DISTRICTS OP  Through tickets issued  to destination.  and Baggage checked  NEW  TOURIST  CAR  SERVICE  DAILY TO ST. PAUL.  DAILY (EXCEPT TUESDAY)  TO EASTERN CANADIAN  and U. S. POINTS.  Train leaves New Denver Canyon Siding daily  at8:-15a. m. Train arrives at New Denver  Canyon Siding at 3:50 p in.  Boat connection daily (except Sunday) via  Rosehery: Leaves New Denver at 8.35 a. m;  arrives at New Denver at 4 p. in.  Ascertain   present   REDUCED   RATES  and full  information   by   addressing   nearest  local agent or���  G. B. GARRETT, Agent New Denver.  W. F. Anderson, Trav. Pass. Agt., Nelson.  E. J. Coyle, Dint. Pass. Agt., Vancouver.  g3j~X.ll sensible people travel viaC. P. Ryand  Soo line.  INTERNATIONAL     NAVIGATION  & TRADINC CO.,  LTD.  Time Card effective May 10, 181)8.  Subject to change without notice.  [L.S.]  NOTICE.  THOS. It. MclNNES.  all  ii  to   whom  REETING.  A    PROCLAMATION.  VICTORIA, by the Grace of God, of the United  Kingdom ,o.' Great Britain and Ireland,  Quken, Defender of the Faith, &c, &c, &c.  To the Returning Officer of the Slocan Riding of  SVest Kootenay Electoral District:  WHEREAS. His Honour the Lieutenant-Gov-  V.     ernor of British Columbia has, by a Proclamation bearing date the 7th day of June, 1898,  been pleased to dissolve the Legislative Assembly of the said Province; and whereas it is necessary to hold Elections throughout the said Province to fill the vacancies caused by such dissolution , We comma_d you that, notice of the time  and place of Election being duly given, you do  cause Election to be made, according to law, of  One Member to serve in the Legislative Assembly  of the Province of British Columbia for the Slocan Riding of SVest Kootenay Electoral District,  and that you do cause the nomination of Candidates at such Election to be held on the 25th day  of June, 1898, and do cause the name  of suen  Member, when so elected, whether he be present  or absent, to be certified to Our Supreme Court,  nt the City of Victoria, on or before the 31st day  of August next, the Election so made, distinctly  and openly under Our Seal duly endorsed upon  this Our SVrit.  In .Testimony  Wheheof, We have caused  there Our Letters to be made Patent under  the Gieat Seal of  Our  said  Province  of  British Columbia:    Witness, the Honourable Thomas R.( McInnes, at Our Government House, at Victoria, this seventh day of  June, in the year of Our Lord one thousand  eight hundred and ninety-eight.  By Command.  B. H. TYRWHITT DRAKE,  Registrar of the Supreme Court.  CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS  Cinderella, Medford and Keyser Fraction  Mineral Claims.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District.     Where  located:  On  the South Fork of Carpenter Creek about one  mile and a half east of Three Forks.  qiAKE NOTICE that I, George B. Dean, acting  J.    as agent for Leonard B. Keyser,free miners'  certificate No. 0910A, intend sixty days from the  date hereof to apnly to the Mining Recorder for a  certificate of improvements, for the purpose of  obtaining a Crown grant of the above claims.  And further take notice, that action under section 37. must be commenced before the issuance  of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 9th day of June, 1898.  GEORGE B. DEAN.  SS.   INTERNATIONAL.  Leaves Kaslo at 3.30 a. m. every day except  Sunday, calling ot all way points.  Connects at Five Mile Point with S. F. & N.  train at 6.45 a.m., arrives at Nelson at 7.20 a. m.  Leaves Nelson at 5 p. m., connecting at Five  Mile Point with train from Spokane, arriving at  Kaslo at 8.30 p. m.  Connects at Pilot Bay with ss. Alberta for  Bonner's Ferry and Kootenay River points.  Apex   Mineral   Claim.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District. Where located: North  of the Mountain Chief.  rpAKE NOTICE that I, Herbert T. Twigg, agent  1 for George W. Hughes, free miner's certificate No. 6_,!)75, intend, sixty days from the date  hereof to apply to the Mining Recorder for a  certificate of improvements for the purpose of  obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance of  such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 2nd day of June, 1898.  HERBERT T. TWIGG.  Convention   Fractional   Mineral   Claim.  SS. ALBERTA.  Leaves Kaslo on arrival of K. & S. train on  Saturday and Tuesday, at 5.30 p. m., and Thursday at 6 a. m., touching at all way points. Connects at Bonner's Ferry with G. N. trains.  Leaves Bonner's Ferry at 2 p. m. on Sunday,  Wednesday and Friday, arriving at Kaslo 1a.m.  next day.  Clo-e coii-ection with East Kootenay points  via Jennings and Bonner's Ferry.  GEORGE  ALEXANDER, Gen'IMgr  P. O. Box 122, Kaslo, B.C.  &  D. Al. EiiEici'S, Attorney-General.  WHEREAS, We are desirous and resolved, as  IV soon as may be, to meet Our people of Our  Province of British Columbia, and to have their  advice in Our Legislature, SS'e do make known  uur Royal Will and Pleasure to call a new  Legislative Assembly of our said Province; and  do further deejare that, by the advice of Our Ex-  NOTICE.  .   PROVINCIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,  8th June, 1898.  KIS HONOUR the   Lieutenant-Governor  has  been pleased to appoint Fletcher S.Andrews,  Esquire, to be Returning Officer for the Slocan  Heavy Miners' Rubber Goats,  Yellow Oil Coats  Lot 2288.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District.   Where located:    About  1A- miles east of New Denver, and adjoining  tlie Marion and Clipper mineral claims.  TAKE NOTICE that I, Robt. E. Palmer, as  agent for Albert Behne, of New Denver, B.  O, free miner's certificate No. 84910, intend,  sixty days from the date hereof to apply to the  Mining Recorder for a certificate of improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown grant  of the above claim.  And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance of  such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 19th day of May, 1898.  R. E'. PALMER, P.L.S.  Willa Mineral Claim.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of SVest  Kootenay district. SVhere located: Joins  Little Daisy, on Eight Mile creek.  'PAKE NOTICE that I, George Ludlow Esta-  1 brooks, as agent for The Willow Gold Alining  Company, Foreign, free miner's certificate No.  81,882, intend, sixty days from the (late hereof, to  apply to the Mining Recorder i'or a certilicate of  improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a  Crown grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under section 37. must be commenced before the issuance  of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 18th dav of April, 1S9S.  G. L. EST A BROOKS.  Nelson & Ft. Sheppard  Red  Mountain  RAILWAYS  The only all rail route without change  fears between Nelson and Rossland  nd Spokane and Rossland.  Direct Route to the   Mineral District of the Col-  villo Reservation,   Nelson, Kaslo,   Kootenay  Lake and   Slocan  Points.  Daily, Except Sunday.  Leave.  6:20 a. m  12:05 "  8:30 a.m.  AURIVE.  5:35 p.m  11:20a.m  3:10 p.m  make close  NELSON  ROSSLAND  SPOKANE  Train leaving Nelson at 8:30 a  connections at Spokane with trains for all  Pacific Coast Points.  Close connection with Steamers for Kaslo and  all Kootenay lake points.  Passengers for Kettle   River and Boundary  Creek connect at Marcus with stage daily.  KASLO & SLOGANRY  TIME CARD  Noonday  Grey   J.agio  July Mineral  iind    Fourth  Claims.  of  The oldest newspaper in the svorld is  not, as is genet ally stated, the thousand-  year-old Kin Pan, of Pekin, but The  Tsing-Pao, or Pekin News, which was  first published more than 500 years before the Norman Conquest, and which  has been pubished without intermission  for nearly 1,400 years.  TlieiTsing-Pao has the appearance of  a yellosv-backed magazine of 24 octave  pages, each page containing seven  columnsconsisting of ses-en "characters."  Tsvo editions are published���an edition ',  de luxe for the court and the upper  classes in China, at a cost of 24 cents a  month, and an edition, inferior in paper  and .printing, which costs 16 cents a  month.  The Tsing-Pao is The Times of China,  and chronicles the wealth and movements of the Emperor, the life at court,  and the reports of Ministers. It is painfully significant that every error in  printing the latter is punished with  death.  Postoffice Store, Sandon.  A4B_&/tt'9/fe/8/fe'V--9/a/Q y�� /%y&y&^%y&y%y%y%^  Situate in the. Slocan Mining Division of SVest  Kootenay District,   Where  located:   On  the  east slope of the Valley of Cody Creek, about  three miles from Codv.  THAKE NOTIOE that I, J.  H.  Gray, acting as  1    agent for Byron N.   White,   free miner's certilicate No. 74,_GO, intend, sixty days from the date  hereof, to apply to the Mining "Recorder for a  certificate of improvements, for the purpose of  ohtaining a crown grant of the above claims.  And further take notice that action under Sec.  37 must be commenced before the issuance of such  certilicate of improvements.  Dated this 8th day of September, 1897.  Subject to change without notice  Trains run on Pacific Standard Time.  Leave 8 00  " S 36  " 0 3(i  " il 51  '��� 10 03  " 10 IS  " 10 38  10 ..0  A.M.  Arr.  Arrive. 3 50 P.M  "       3.15 "  "       _15 "  ���i        L, 00 ti  1 45 "  1 33 "  1 1- "  1 00 "���  NOTICE  e  ^QllP^h* _9L ___ *__-  ^l__^ _nv^  TWO months after date I intend to make application to the Chief Commissioner of Lands  and work, Victoria, B.C., for permission to purchase the following described binds. Coininene-  'ingata post planted about UK) feet north of  Kuskanook creek and about eight miles from the  mouth of said creek, in \STest Kootenay district,  said stake being marked G.L.. N.SV. corner.  April _!J��tli, 1898. running -10chains east, thence 10  chains south, thence 10 chains west, thence 10  chains north to point of commencement and containing ion acres of land more or less.  GEORGE LESTER.  Nakusp, B.C., April 28th, 1898.  Kaslo  South Fork  Sproule's "  SSThitewat.r ;l  Bear Lake "  McGuigan '���  Cody Junction "  Sandon            Leave  CODY   LINE.  Sandon ���  Arrive, 11.15 a.m.  Cody   ���   Leave, ILL'S a.m.  ROBT. IRVING,  Traffic Mngr.  GEO. F. COPELAND,  Superintendent  For cheap railroad and steamship* tickets tc  and from all  points, applv to  S.  CAMPBELL,      " Agent, Sandon.  Leave,  Arrive,  11.00 a.m  11.20   "  Brandon, B. C,  Woman  is nearest  most womanly.  perfectioni svhen  New Denver,  Has been re-opened under new management. The Dining Room will  always be up to the market, while  the bar will contain liquors and  cigars that cannot be surpassed for  quality and flavor^ in the Slocan.  Old and new patrons will find this  hotel just like home.  JACOBSON & CO.  New  Spring  Goods,  Latest novelties  in Dress Goods for  Spring and Summer svear; ready-  made Clothing,  Neck svear, Hats,  and Caps, Boots  and Shoes ��� the  most complete stock in the lake section���at prices as low as it is possible  to make them. We invite your inspection. Look into our show- window.  vVe are displaying a fine line of  novelties.  McLachlan & McKay,  New Denver.  AGENTS���Never before has the death of any  man caused such profound sensation throughout  the world as that of Mr. Gladstone. It is therefore a real luxury to canvass for tho''memorial  edition of the "Life and SVork of Mr. Gladstone,"  because the public is ripe for it, anft the work  wil! sell on sight. Big book; low pricks; liberal  terms; freight paid. Send 75 cents ffrr Prospectus, which we return with first, order.--'  BRADLEY-G A.RRETSON COMPA^,Limited  JH-oronto.  i  $1.50  3 00  2 00  2 00  2 00  4 OO  2J60  2 50-  3��0-  5{0O  2*00  2^0.  2 00  4 00  Assay Price List:  Gold, Silver, or Lead.each   Gold, Silver and Lead, combined   Gold and Silver   Silver and Lead   Copi)er (by Electrolysis) ���   Gold, Silver, Copper and Lead   Gold and Cop* _r   I Silver and Copper   I Gold, Silver and Copiier   I Platinum   I Mercury   ! Iron or* Manganese   | Lime, Magnesium, Barium, Silica, Sulphur, each   Bismuth,Tin. Cobalt, Nickel, Antimony,  Zinc, and Arsenic, each   Coal (Fixed Carbon, Volatile Matter. Ash,  and percentage of Coke, If Coking  Coal) .".  Terms: 'Cash "With ..ample.  June 20th, 1895.  FRANK DICK,  Assayer and Analyst  BRICK  FOR   SALE.  JOHN   GOETTSCHE,  NESV DENVER.  Even   in   the   darkest    hour   of   earthly  woman's fond affection glows.���Sand.  ill, THE LEDGE, NEW D___JV.VER, B.C., JUNE 16, 1898.  Fifth Year  The Ledge.  Published every Thursday.  R. T. LOWERY, Editor and Financier.  SUBSCRIPTION RATES:  Three months   .* .75  SLx " 1-25  Twelve  "  *.��0  Three years  ���������00  Transient Advertising, 25 cents per line first in  sertion, 10 cents per line subsequent insertions  nonpareil measurement.  TO CONTRIBUTORS.  O.rrespondence from every part of the Kootenay  District and communications upon live topics  always acceptable. Write on both sides of the  paper if you wish. Always send something good  no matter how crude. Get your copy in while it  is hot, and we will do the rest.  A pencil cross in this square  indicates that your subscription, is due, and that the editor  wishes once -again to look at  your collateral.  TBUKSDAr, JUNE 16.  1898.  JOHN    I..    1CKTAT.I.ACK.  This journal endorses John L.  Retallack as a candidate for legislative honors for the Slocan Riding.  Being solely a mining man svith no  sectional interests to atbend to, he is  admirably suited for the position. He  has done a great deal to develop the  Slocan, and today, being one of the  largest holders of mining property in  the District, no one is more likely to  promote legislation that will benefit  our mining industry. These are the  salient reasons for our endorsement of  Mr. Retallack's candidacy. In subsequent issues between now and election day our position will be clearly  stated. The political policy of Mr.  Green is questionable. Mr. Retallack  has taken a stand; we knosv where  to find him. He is for progress and  prosperity, a policy that means more  to our mining industry than anything  else. We believe through him, and  bis influence at Victoria, the interests  of this section can be best served, and  as this is our prime object in running  a newspaper-���to advance the interests  of the Slocan���we shall advocate Mr.  Retallack's election.  now had a century of political change,  for the most part violent and convulsive.  She has had the National Assembly, the  Convention, the Directory, the Consulate, the Empire, the restored Empire,  the Bourbon Monarchy a second time  restored, the constitutional monarchy of  tlie House of Orleans, the Republic, the  Septennate, the second Empire and  finally the Republic once more. Yet she  seems no nearer the haven of rest than  ever. The fall of the French Republic,  if it comes, will be a heavy blow to popular government, svhich in all countries is  manifestly on its trial.  The war party at Washington brought  on, and must have known that it was  bringing on, war by refusing to consider  the Spanish offers, ordering Spain to  haul dosvn her flag and thus compelling  her to light for her honor. For her  honor and for that of all nations threatened, like her, by overbearing violence  Spain has fought and bled. Nor will  history fail to do her justice. She has  nosv surely done enough. She cannot  hope to hold Cuba close to the shore of  an enemy svith infinitely superior resources and divided from her osvn shore  by the Atlantic. The conflict is useless,  and humanity demands that it should  cease.  It is not the least of evils attendant on  the svar that people are led to look on  bloodshed as an exciting spectacle and  only svish that the combatants should  show "sport." They read with unconcern that a city is suffering "all the horrors of a siege." The dire realities of  those horrors, the people devouring grass  and digging for carrion, the starving  child crying in vain for food to its famishing mother, are not present to their  minds, any more than are the agonies of  the sinking ships or the crowded hospital. Presently sve may have Malay  atrocities added to Cuban carnage and  famine. That a set of unscrupulous  politicians should be able for their, personal or party purposes to bring these  calamities on mankind is one of the  mysteries which, if the world is really  under moral government, may find their  solution hereafter. At all events, Spain  has done all that honor can demand,  and she may now, without disgrace, give  ear to the voice of humanity. In the  loss of distant'and discontented dependencies she would, if she knew her own  interest, recognize a gain. Empire,  diverting the energies of her people, from  productive industry to territorial aggrandizement has been her greatest curse,  and did, in fact, more to bring about her  ruin than any other of the causes to  svhich it is commonly ascribed. Its final  surrender may restore her to herself,and  the last day of Imperial pride may be  the first of national regeneration.  more useful to the district. The supporters of the opposition svill regard Mr.  Green's treatment of them as treachery,  as the scheming device of a petty self-  seeker; careless of every principle except that of personal gain. Mr. Green  has had a certain amount of popularity  and many friends. Under ordinary  circumstances his meeting in the Auditorium svould have been attended by  100 men; his return from Sandon would  have been celebrated by a procession  of a mile long. As it is his friends stand  aloof and pity him for the mistake he  has made. And the public,iquick to feel  the chill atmosphere, svhich surrounds  a man svho, by some flagrant act of  trickery has degraded himself, pass him  by with silent unconcern.���Kaslo Koot-  enaine.   EAST   KOOTENAY   NOTES.  K___!____b_____  _Tt__i1_l_ill__1__.��  Hi llTTl.  oetr  THE SANDON CONVENTION.  CANADA'S PROGRESS.  Last year the Yukon country yielded  $2,000,0000 in gold. This year $15,000,000  worth will be taken out. There is, Mr.  Ogilvie says, at least $100,000,000 to  come. Four years ago, the Manitoba  wheat crop, which is better than gold,  was 17,000,000 bushels. This year the  yield will be 50,000,000 bushels. The  North-West is progressing in like proportion. Tsvo years ago, the great coal and  mineral territory along the Crow's Nest  Railsvay could not be got at. This year  by October next, the line will be completed to Kootenay lake, and a vast increase in development and in trade svill  take place. Three years ago there were  men in Canada, Ishrewd fellosvs they  thought themselves to be, svho had little  faith in the future of the Canadian  Pacific Railway. To-day a proposition is  on foot to vastly increase the efficiency  of that line, and to, at an early day, provide for a double track from Winnipeg to  the Pacific terminus. Meanssiiile, it is  intended to so increase the efficiency of  the line, by needed svorks at various  points, as to enable the C.P.R. trains to  make the journey from Montreal to  Vancouver in 100 hours. This is a rapid  age, and Canada means to keep up svith  the procession.  U VST AX.I") KK'S    OPINION'S.  The Prime Minister, svhen he is asked  what majority in favor of the plebiscite  he svill deem sufficient to svarrent legislation, naturally parries the question,  wishing to leave himself a free hand.  But he can hardly fail to see that it svill  be necessary to has-e a majority both of  the whole electorate of the Dominion and  of the svhole electorate of each province.  Nothing less, apparently, svill suffice to  secure the practical executiou of a lasv  against which not only the tastes and  interests, but the moral conviction, be it  right or wrong, of a lar^e. body of citizens, and their sense of justice svill certainly continue to rebel. From a large  proportion, even of those who svill vote  tor the lasv, only a lukewarm support of  its execution can he expected The man  who would readily help to arrest a murderer or a thief, svill not, even if he  believes beer pernicious, help to put a  neighbor in jail for drinking or selling a  glass of beer. Not improbably he svill  help him to escape. Such is the svell-  knosvn infirmity of all sumptuary legislation. If the result of the plebiscite  should be a small majority for prohibition in the Dominion generally, svith a  majority against it in Quebec, the situation of the Government svill be extremely awksvard. The plebiscite is a weak  device for the evasion oi parliamentary  responsibility, and it is not unlikely to  end in a fiasco.  The excitement of the svar has turned  asvay our eyes from an ev��nt of not less  importance. A general election has  taken place in France, and according to  present accounts,has left the Republican  Ministry svith a majority so small that  its life will hang by a thread svhich may  any day lie cut by coalition between the  monarchists and socialists, svho act in  their natural union for the overthrov; of  a free constitution. The existence of the  Republic will oti':e more be in danger.  More and more ..he power of tlie army  and the army chiefs casts its advancing  shadow over the scene. This was very  evident in tlie Dreyfus case. The nation  cannot put up with anarchy or with total  instability of gos-ernment, and the maintenance of stable government under the  Republican system seems to be almost  hopeless in France.    That  country  has  The Sandon convention is over and  Mr. Robt. F. Green is the nominee.  There are no expressions of surprise,  suprisingly few of satisfaction. The  result was expected, predicted, predestined and foreordained. The convention svas called for that purpose. The  convention was an afterthought. Mr.  Green has been a candidate all along.  Mr. Green vr as determined to be a candidate. Certain of Mr. Green's friends  svere determined that he should be a  candidate. It was only after things  were so fixed as to make certain of Mr.  Green's nomination chat the convention  svas called. If any other result had  been probable there would have been no  convention. Mr. Green svent up to  Sandon and hired a hall. Mr. Green  made up the schedule of representatives  to be allotted to each convention. He  had the announcement published in  ���Kaslo to get together a fesv of his friends,  a verv few. He appointed them nearly  all delegates. He took them to Sandon.  He carried the convention. He returns  a candidate. Nosv that it is all over,  svhat is it that Mr. Green represents?  Who, among our citizens is it that he  proposes to represent in the legislature?  Mr. Green is an oppositionist, svas  four years ago the chairman of Mr.  Hume's campaign committee, reluctantly compelled by his principles to svork  and vote for a"Nelson man, against a  Kaslo man. The numerous friends that  Mr. Green has through the district are  nearly all oppositionists. The only people he can depend upon for his election  are the oppositionists. Is Mr. Green  novr an opposition candidate or no?  Mr. Green returned from Honolulu  liy Avay of Victoria. He tarried in Victoria and his friends say exercised much  influence svith the Government. It is  rumored that he conferred freely svith  the members of the Government, told  them that the points upon svhich he  differed from them svere few and easily  remedied. That running as an independent he could hold the opposition vole,  but that if the Government svould put  their patronage in his hands and refrain  from encouraging a man to oppose him,  he svould agree to support them if elected. Some of those iii Kaslo svho are  talking in his favor are Government  supporters ancl have declared that they  srill not vote for him unless he p'edges  himself to support the Turner administration on want of conlidence nio-  i lions. These facts account for the  appaling frigidity that has so far attended Mr; Green's candidature.  The soldier, more particularly the  officer, who on the eve of battle deserts  liis colors and crosses the line svith  overtures to the enemy, is abhored by  those whom he has betrayed, and despised and suspected by those to svhom  he tenders his services. That Mr.Green  should see the folly at the present juncture of remaining an oppositionist svould  be natural and easily understood. Many  such changes occur in political life, but  honest and disinterested men under  such circumstances content themselves  with signifying to their late associates  that they can no longer svork svith them  and they fall into the ranks of the opposing party as privates. They do not  seek to foist themselves as candidates  for office upon the people to svhom they  have been hostile. Much less do they  seek to secure a snap election by using  the votes of their late associates before  their desertion has become known. Mr.  Green lias seemed to assume that there  is some act of Parliament under svhich.  lie alone sras entitled to the seat in the  legislature. If there svas no chance to  get a nomination or an election as a  straight oppositionist, then he must run  as something else. Betsveen tsvo stools  people often come to the ground.  The Government supporters do not  need Mr. Green as a candidate. They  have plenty men better entitled to the  honor, and several whom they deem  better  qualified and  calculated  to  be  Messrs. T. A. Knosvltou and W. R.  Lindsay arrived at Golden recently  from the east and proceeded to Otter-  tail, svith a viesv to renewing* work on  the Sunday claim. They brought seven  miners svitli them from the east.  Mr. Joliffe recently left Golden for the  coast to consult with, the Hon. D.  Dewdney as to the svork to be done this  season on the claims in svhich they are  interested in the International basin.  A party of prospectors from West  Kootenav- has located a group of claims  opposite'the Mineral King on Toby  creek. The ore is copper and looks  very promising. Mr." Keinpton has  shipped a quantity of the ore to Rossland.  Mr. Pirn, M. P. for Bedford, England,  is the president, and the Duke of Manchester the vice-president of the company that svill svork the Robert E. Burns  claims on Burns basin. The company  is kiiosrn as the Associated Gold Mines  and is said to be the largest British corporation yet formed to explore the mining resources of B. C.  The half ton of ore from the Pretty  Girl claim at Horsethief creek, svhich  W. G. Mitchell Innes had shipped to  London, svent 50 per cent, copper and  created quite a sensation among the  owners of the property.  The Pyramid-Kootenay group of mining properties in the Fort Steele region,  is understood to be osvned principally  bv Englishmen, svho osvn the bulk of  the stock in the famous Rio Tinto Copper Mining company of Spain.  The shipments of. ore last sveek from  Fort Steele amounted to 18*2 tons, at a  gross valuation of S5,603._0; an average  of $55.50 per ton.  A. W. McVittie and C. D. Rand, of  Spokane, are negotiating the sale to an  English syndicate of the Golden Five  group of mining properties, situated at  the forks of Wild Horse creek. The  negotiations are nosv svell underway,  and the sale is expected to be completed shortly.  I  Established 1817.  Capital (all paid up) $12,000,000.00  Reserved fund : : 6,000,000.00  Undivided profits :   :     896,850.04  HEAD   OFFICE,   MONTREAL.  Rt. Hon. Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, G.C. M.G. President.  Hon. G. A. Drummond, Vice President,  E. S. Clouston, General Manager,  Branches in all parts of Canada, Newfoundland, Great Britain, and  the United States.  New Denver branch  F.J. F1NUCANE, Manager:  -  THE   PICTUI-E   I.II.T.K.  Don't want no pictur'��� Bible; I've kinder got a  doubt  That them thai- pictur's sorter crowds the ol' time  gospel out,  It don't encourage my beliefs ter iix it up like  that.  With yaller arks a-restin' on the top of Ararat,  An'  a goun' o' red���a, reg'lar fancy  blue in  twenty mile  Moses in  "robe 5" ,  An' ever'thitig a-lookin'  o'Job!  An' Peter on a sea o' green 'longside a speckled  boat,  An'nothin'left o' Joseph but the color, in his  coat!  They can't improve that Bible���I don't keer how  they try,  An' I doubt if these new fixin's air approved of  in the sky!  An' though they're mighty purtr, an'sorter make  a show.  Ef the Lord had wanted picture's He'd made 'em  long ago ! .  So in spite o'all the italkin', I've sorter got a  doubt  That pictur's crowds the sweetness o' the ol' time  gospel out;  They don't encourage my beliefs���whatever they  may be���  The plain ol'family Bible is good enough for  mo!  O. S.  RASHDALL,  Notary Public.  A. E. FAUQUIER.  RASHDALL & FAUQUIER  MINES & REAL ESTATE.  NEW DENVER, B.C.  CORRESPONDENCE  MINING INTERESTS BOUGHT,  SOLD  and BONDED.   INVITED-���  Complete lists of claims for sale.    Abstracts of claims, conveyancing.  California Mineral Production.  The California Stat. Mining Bureau has nosr  completed the statistics of production of the  several counties so far that the totals for the  State for 1897 can be given. The figures show a  total production to the value of -.25,108,119, as  compared with $24,201,398 in 1896. Of the principal metals it produced 815,871.101 gold, $452,789  silver, i_91,935 quicksilver. $900 platinum, $1,540,-  666 copper, and $2,6G4 lead. The increase was  not in these metals. In copper the production  was .1.300,000 greater than in 1896, but this was  more than offset by the decrease in the production of gold. The increase was in no.i-metallic  minerals, the gains being made in borax, petroleum, salt and many of tho. building materials,  as stone, cement and brick ^^^^  HARRISON LAKE DISTRICT.  W. M, Brewer, traveling correspondent for the  N. Y. Engineering & Mining Journal, writes to  his journal regarding the Harrison Lake district  as follows: "During 1897 there were many discoveries of free milling gold bearing quartz  made on Cayonse Creek, and on tributaries of  Bridge River in the Lillooet Mining District.  There are really three route, into the camps,  although heretofore only one, that by way of the  stage road from Ashcroft, on the Canadian Pacific Railway, has been used. Another route is  by the trail from Lytton to the town of Lillooet,  thence up the Bridge River. But tho shortest  and most direct route for prospectors from the  coast is by Harrison Lake. To take this you  leave the Canadian Pacific at Agassiz station,  about 05 miles cast of Vancouver, take stage to  Harrison Hot Springs, a distance of five miles.  There it is necessary to transfer to a steamer,  which makes tri-weekly trips to the head of  Harrison Lake.  "The distance between these points is about 40  miles, and a large number of claims were staked  along both shores in 1897. notwithstanding that  there is but little reason to look for mineral until  a point about 20 miles up the lake has been  reached. This is near the Providence, mine,  which has been developed to a limited extent.  The ore carries values m both gold and copper,  being of a silicious and p.vritous variety. The  development work consists of two shafts, each  about 80 ft. deep, and tunnels of various lengths.  It has not been done by practical miners, consequently is not of such a systematic cha-acter as  to enable a visitor to form any very reliable  opinion as to the value of the property. There  is apparently a quantity of ore of good grade,  and as the mine workings are on the lake shore,  shipment of ore down tlie lake and by the Harrison and Fraser rivers can be made direct to the  coast'In' steamer at slight cost.  ���'The prevailing country rocks along the lake  shores are apparently porphyry, limestone and  diabases. As th. head of the lake, is approached  granites are noticeable, and around Port Douglas  dikes of diorite have been thrown up as intrusive  rocks. These show numerous narrow fissures  filled with a hard flinty vitreous quartz.  'The steamboat landing is at Tipella. where a  town was located in 1897 bv the Fire Mountain  Gold Mining Company, and a trail cut from the  landing into the mining district, a distance of 11  miles. This was the scene of great excitement  last year, and about .-.lO.OoO was expended in  developing the mines, building the town, cutting  the trail, etc. The ore is represented as a free  milling gold-bearing quartz, and an attempt was  made to treat it with a Huntington mill. This  resulted in failure at the Gold Spring mine, where  most of the work has been done and" the company  has ordered a 10-stamp mill: the machinery for  which will lie put in place early during the present summer.  The route to Bridge River mines from Tipola  is by Port Douglas, four miles to ihe north, thence  up the Lillooet river by wagon road, built, during  the no's to accommodate the travel to the Cariboo gold fields, to the foot of Lillooet lake; along  the shore of which is a trail to l'emberton  Meadows. From that point the Bridge river  can be reached either by v..'iron road and trail  along Anderson and Scion lakes to the town of  Lillooet, or else by trail up the Upper Lillooet  river and across ilie divide between that river  and the south fork of Bridge river. This latter  route is through un unexplored country, known  only to a few Indians.  A't Port Douglas, a small Indian village and  trade store, are all that remain today to mark  the spot which iu 1S58 was the starting point for  the Cariboo, and a mining town of considerable  importance in the province.  An idea as to tlie amount of attention  that Ontario's mineral resurces are securing on the other side of the Atlantic can  be got from the statement that there are  now no less than 25 English companies  actively interested in the north-western  gold fields of the province. For a couple  of years past expert engineers have gone  thoroughly over the district, and as a  result of their investigations their principals are putting the capital necessary  to develop some of the deposits of the  Lake of the Woods and the.Seine River  regions.  An old negro who was hanging around  a recruiting office was asked if he was  going to enlist.  "No, suh," he replied, "but I put five  sons in���all I had left."  "Lost some���have you?"  "Yes, suh���two. Une wuz burnt, en  de vuther died a natural death."  "A natural death?"  "Yes, suh���dey lynched him!"  And what did she say when you asked  her to put your love io the test?  She suggested that I might act as her  brother Bill's substitute in the war with  ���H- T. BRAGDON,  New Denver, B.C.  Heavy and Shelf Hardware,  Mine and Mill Supplies,  Pipe and Fittings,  Paints and Oils,  Builders' and Contractors'  Supplies,  Stoves and Kitchen Ware,  Agents for Canton Steel.  I carry one of the largest  and best assorted stocks of  Hardware in' West Kootenay,  and shall be pleased to quote  prices upon anything required  n my line.  OTEL SANDON,  % vK % ^ ^ .^  Sandon, B.C.  npH-S NEW HOUSE, with the old name, is  well equipped to aceommodate a large  number of Guests. The building is plastered  and the rooms are unsurpassed for comfort in  the Slocan, while in the Dining Room can be  found the best food in the market.  Robert Cunning, Proprietor.  Are things heard of, but never seen;  always reliable, but will never do to  bet on; are in season at all times, but  like the desert apple, turn to ashes  when touched by the tooth of an  hungry man. They are a prolific  commodity just now and we would  call your 'attention to what we consider of greater importance���pointers  on furniture. If you believe in getting the best for your money, we  agree with you and are trying to  give it to you. The best pointers you  can get are from a personal examination of the goods.  WALKER & BAKER,  New   ITurnitin-. Dealers and Kepaivers  Denver's     Undertakers and Kmbaimers.  N. B.-Wc have the only practical Undertaker  and Embalmer doing business in the Slocan.  The Clifton House,  Sandor  Has ample accommodations for a large number of people.     The rooms are large  and airy, and the Dining Room is provided with everything in the market  Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers.  John Buckle}, Prop.  Choice Groceries & Provisions  F.  G- FAUQUIER,  NOTARY PUBLIC.  .ALL ON,  HAM & CRAWFORD.  SIXTH STREET,       -       -        -        -       -       -       NEW DENVER.  .7. _���-Prices are right and Goods Always Fresh.  Nakusp, B.C.  THE MINERS EXCHANGE.  Three Forks, E. C. Weaver  A.SSRYEHS OF B. G.  [-JOWARD WEST,  Assoc. It S M, London, Eng  MINING ENGINEER,  ANALYTICAL CHEMIST,  & ASSAYER.  ��� Properties   examined   and   reported on for m  tending purchasers.  Assay office and Chemical  Laboratory, Belle-  vue ave, New Denver, B C.  J.  Silverton.  M. M. BENEDUM,  Travelers  Will find the  Arlington Hotel  a pleasant place to stop at when in  Slocan City.  GETHING & HENDERSON, Proprietors.  For Assay  Supplies  C.O.Di  Goods called  for & Delivered  W. S. Dkewiiy  Kaslo, B.C.  H. T. Twigg  New Denver, B.C.  DREWRY & TWIGG  Dominion and Provincial Land Surveyors.  Civil and Mining Engineers.  Bedford, McNeil Code.  __TRashdall & Fauquier, Agents.  NOTICE       OX.       APPLICATION  I-KjUOl.   LICENSE.  FOR  Spain.  "VTOTICE is hereby given that 30 days from date  I. hereof I will apply to the Stipendiary Magistrate of West Kootenay for a license- to sell  liquor at retail at my hotel in Three Porks, West  Kootenay, B. C. ���  ARTHUR MULLEN.  Three Forks, B. C, June 2,1898.  of all  kinds,  write.  call  on or  W.FJeetzel & Co,  DRUGGISTS, Nelson,B.C.  D  R. A.S. MARSL' -..-.L.  Dentist.  Kaslo, B C  Graduate of American College of Dental Surgery  Chicago .  p WILLIM &  JOHNSON,  (McGil V)  Mining Engineers  & Analy-Chemists.  Slocan City.  B O  AUNDRY  We are now in a  position to give  thoroughly satisfactory service  and solicit your  patronage. We  make a specialty  of the finer lines  of Cambrics and  Linens, etc. All  business cash on  delivery.  Work Done on Short Notice.  C. M. NESBITT, Prop.  ^-��"Rates furnished Hotels,   Steamboat Companies, etc, on application.  El ftorada Ave.  ]��f L. GRIMMETT, L.L.B.  BARRISTER,  Solicitor, Notary Public, Etc.  Sandon, B. C. Fifth Year.  THE LEDG-E, NEW DENVER, B.C., JUNE 16, 1898.  THE   KLONDIKE    CRAZE.  Yes, I've heard about Alasky 'n the Klondike  run o' gold,  But it don't make me excited fer to go -where its  so cold,  *N I envy no man's forchiu ef he make a little  pile,  Fer I'd ruther make my money by a-diggm   up  the sile.  Yes,  I  know they're  nndin'  nuggets  ou   the  Yukon big ez peas,  But they hev a nine months winter when a brass  dog's tail 'd freeze;  'N the trav'lin's so up-hillish thet a furlong seems  a mile,  So I'd ruther make my money by a diggin' up  the sile.  When these fellows git their gold dust, they come  back to blow it in,  Fer it burns plum through their pocket, 'n ter  keep it seems a sin,  Till thej- iind themselves clean busted in a very  little while,  So I'd ruther make my money by a diggin' up  the sile.  What's the use o' this excitement ?'  Lettin' well  enough alone  Ib a science no one studies till they're down ter  skin 'n bone,  *N the time they spend in cliu.in.' in the hope o  strikin' iio ,  Could be used to good advantage by a-diggm up  the sile  CANADA'S OWN KING WILLIAM.  Let  Br  i back  these fellers��� tjti.it this kentry ter go up'n  freeze ter death, '.,,���'  ter starve 'until the body aint got streutn  enough for breath.  Sonic ii them may ttrike bonanzas, 'n conn;  ter sport a pile,    But I'll iind a heap more comfort, in-diggln' up  the Silo. .. ,,  ���F. W. L.  THK    OMINECA   COUNTKY.  From the numerous  enquiries that  arc being* made by intending*gold-seekers   iind   prospectors   concerning'   the  Omineca and Skeena River  districts, it  may be inferred that this northerly section of the   Province, once before the  scene of a gold excitement, will again,  and doubtless during the late spring  and early summer months of the pres-  ent'year,   be   visited   by   hundreds of  white men, intent on the search for the  precious metal.    Omineca is a district  of    great    mineral   possibilities.     Its  climate for six months of the year, that  is, from May to October, is delightful;  game is abundant; the streams are full  of fish, and from  the prospector's point  of view these  are   highly appreciable  conditions.   But���and this is a question  very frequently asked���what about the  topographical conditions of the district?  Is it a country that can be easily prospected?   From accounts given by old  timers, who took  part in the Omineca  gold rush of   72,  it is learned that in  those davs a great obstacle in the vray  of travelling in the bush was presented  by the quantities of fallen timber, caused by the  fierce and destructive fires  which had raged some years previous  throughout   the   country.   But this is  over 30 years   ago,   and an old miner  who visited Omineca last year, after a  a long absence, states that there is now  nothing remaining of those fallen tree  trunks, which have since rotted away,  hence travel now is much easier than it  was.  The best route to the gold fields of  Omineca is by way of the Skeena river  to Hazleton. The Hudson's Bay Company have two small 100-ton steamboats  on this river, but the passage can be  made easily enough in canoes by experienced boatmen, or Indians can be  liired to navigate the stream for a very  moderate remueneration. The river is,  however, only dangerous at one season  of the year���during the June freshet-  Riding of WestKootenay Electoral District; and  His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor has been  pleased to appoint and declare the Government  Office, Kaslo, to be the place for the nomination  of candidates foi election to the Legislative  Assembly in the Slocan Riding of WestKootenay Electoral District.  AILWAY  KINO WILLIAM VAN HORNB-" Qet onto the front and hind legs of the noble steed on which I crossed the Kettle River.'  where the rich claims were struck.  This point may ere long be cleared up,  as all the g-ound in the vicinity of the  creeks flowing into the Omineca river  has been leased to companies, and extensive preparation for hydraulic'ing on  a larg*e scale are being made.  THE    SPANISH   SOLDIEB.  when the current rushes through some  \  of the canyons at the rate of from 10 to  12 miles an hour. From Hazleton at  the forks of the Skeena there is an excellent Government trail for 60 miles to  Babine, the first portage; from Babine  to Tatlah lake 45 miles,and from Tatlah  to Manson, the heart of the gold bearing  territory, for 50 miles. The old trail  travelle"d by the miners of the 7-2 rush,  was tlirough the Livepan Pass,the summit of which has an altitude of about  9,000 feet, and meant a tremendous  climb, which is now avoided The pass  was called Firepan by the Indians, from  a volcano which, though at present extinct, was active enough 50 years back,  and the ground for the space, of nearly  four acres in the neighborhood of the  crater, is still so warm that the snow  never lies on it, notwithstanding the  altitude.  The Indians in the district are a  peaceable and industrious lot, and many  of them are making large sums of  "money at mining. One man. Plug-hat  Tom, so named from his swell head  gear, is said to have taken out nf a  claim on Tom creek, $S0,000 in gold  dust, last year. In the early days an  attempt, afc'l east, was made liy them to  compel the white man to pay for the  privilege of entering their territory, but  the demands were only made by the  Christianized tribes at the prompting of  the priests, and were not acceeded to  bv the miner. .  "The   stampede   to   Omineca    really  occurred in the spring of 1897, although  some mining had been carried on in the  district  previous   to  that date.   It   is  estimated that as many as 6,000 men  took part in this rush,  but the district  was bv no means thoroughly prospected    IMie   largest   nugget   found   was  taken from the discovery claim on Lost  creek, and was valued at 8200. but 850,  S60 and ��100 nuggets   were   not at all  uncommon,   though   gold   the size of  wheat grains   was   more usually met  with.     The   principal    gold    bearing  creeks were Manson,Germansen, Slate,  Lost, Black Jack,  Tom and Vital, and  each of these streams produced a large  quantity of gold    A   claim   on Black  Jack paid, for instance,  S50 per day, to  the men for some time.   On Slate creek  two or three miners  cleared up six to  seven thousand dollars in two seasons;  on   Germansen a dozen or so claims  yielded from five to six thousand dollars  to   the   interest.    Robert Howell,   the  locator of   the   first   claim   on Manson  creek, took out S5,000 worth of gold in  one day; and from a claim called the  Toboggan, as a result of six days work  the five partners obtained ��1,200 worth  of coarse  gold   each.    The gold from  this claim was found on the top of the  sand, which   clearly   indicated   that it  had been carried down in a slide from  the hill.    The   owners   of the ground,  however,never succeeded in tracing the  direction of the channel, indeed no very  systematic attempt was made to do so,  and   shortly   afterwards   the   men,   in  company with   the  greater number of  the miners in the   country,   left to join  the rush of 74 to  Cassiar.   Thus the  Omineca gold excitement barely lasted  two seasons, although five years later  the country was again  visited by prospectors.    In the opinion of old miners,  very few of the claims were located on  the   original   river   bed   which,   they  opine, is a cross country channel, intersecting some of the creeks at the spot.  The Spanish  soldier, as described by  those who have seen him in his den, is a  small, lissom,  almost puny being, and  presents a picture the reverse of inspiring.  As he slouches along on the march,  unkempt, unshorn   and tatterdemalion,  the sight of   him   in   the  ranks  would  break the heart of an English or German  martinet���than whom there is no greater  stickler for form and appearance on the  face of this earth, or at least #he writer  has never seen  a greater.    But to come  back   to   our   Spaniard���huge   hemped  sandals encase   his often   socidess feet,  his trousers are frayed and threadbare,  his ill-fitting tunic hangs  limp and loose  for want of buttons here and there, and  his cap, if he boasts of one, is flung carelessly on  the back of his head.   Hugh  woolen gloves of a bright green hue, and  sadly in need ;of darning,  endeavor to  conceal the scanty length  of the tunic  sleeves,   but   two or   three inches of a  brown,  sinewy   arm   insist  on  peeping  forth at the least exertion.   His  rifle is  carried anyhow���sometime- at the slope,  and often   slung   behind   his back,   but  always in a different  position  to that of  his neighbor in the ranks.    The order is  invaribly a struggle,  and the  formation  is more easily guessed at than identified  by any   one   accustomed   to  the sharp,  quick  movements and  straight, serried  ranks of more disciplined troops.  Yet, withal, the Spanish soldier is a  good fighter when brought to bay, as  many a bloody field has attested. In  guerilla warfare his fame is pre-eminent,  and amidst the greatest privation he  bears his hard lot cheerfully and uncomplainingly. -Notwithstanding his shuffling gait, he seems never to tire on the  march, and in brief is in many respects  a worthy and dangerous "foe. On the  field of lguahvla, one of the fiercest fights  of the late Caiiist war, a loyal regiment  that had no choice between annihilation  and surrender, unhesitatingly chose the  former and allowed itself to be mercilessly butchered, though not without  rendering a good account of the enemy,  whose victory was purchased at an j  enormous sacrifice.  In the matter of food  the  peninsular  soldier is easily   satisfied  and  no  great  charge on the commissariat.    Two meals  a day suliice him, and  those  are scanty  enough.   In some "smart" corps coffee  and soup are allowed early  in the morning, but the average soldier feeds only at  9 a.m. and again  at 5 p.m.    One and a  half pounds of bread,   and black at that,  is the entire ration allowed  per day by  the government.    Any additional  luxuries, save the mark, must be purchased  out of his own pocket at the regimental  canteen, which is kept within reasonable  bound by a regimental committee.    The  private eats little or no   meat, especially  when in  active  service,   and   to this is  attributed   the  wonderful   recuperative  power of Spanish  soldiers, their wounds  healing extremely easy and rapidly.   On  the  march  our don  is satisfied with  a  chunk of dry bluck bread, a little oil and  a clove or two of garlic, the whole washed down by a modest allowance of water.  Truly a fighting  ration that the American  soldier    would    find   it    hard    to  stomach.    No wonder the  typical Spaniard is lean  and  evil  smelling and unwholesome looking.  PUBLISHED    FOR    1,400    YKAKS.  PROCLAMATIONS.  [L.S.] THOS. R. MclNNES.  CANADA.  PROVINCE OP BRITISH COLUMBIA.  VICTORIA, by the Grace of God, of the United  Kingdom   of  Great  Britain   and   Ireland.  Queen, Defender of the Faith, &c, &c, &c.  To Our faithful the Members elected to serve in  the Legislative Assembly of Our Province of  British Columbia, and to all whom it may  concern���Gkeki'ing.  D,  A   PROCLAMATION.  M. Eiikkts. Attorney-General.  WHEREAS, We have thought lit, by and with  V1 the advice and consent of Our Executive  Council of Our Province of British Columbia, to  dissolve the present Legislative Assembly of Our  said Province, whici. stands prorogued until  summoned for dispatch of business.  NOW KNOW YE that We do. for this end,  publish this Our Royal Proclamation, and do  hereby dissolve the Legislative Assembly accordingly, and the members thereof are discharged from further attendance ou same.  In Testimony Whkkeo. , We have caused  these Our Letters to be made Patent, and  the Great Seal of British Columbia to be  hereunto affixed: Witness, the Honourable  ���Tuos. R. McInnes, Lieutenant-Governor  of Our said Province of British Columbia,  in Our City of Victoria, in Our said Province, this seventh day of June, in the vear  or Our Lord one thousand eight hundred  and iiinefc.v-oight, and in the sixtv-lirst year  of Our Reign.  By  Command.  B. Ii.  Ret  TVRWIUTT DRAKE.  istrar of the Supreme Court.  [L.S.J THOS. R. MclNNES.  CANADA.  PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.  VICTORIA, by the Grace of God, of the United  Kinsrdom  ol   Great Britain and  Ireland,  Qukkn. Defender of the Faith, &c, &c, &c.  To all   to   whom  these   presents shall  eeufive Council ot British Columbia, We have  this day given orders for issuing Our Writs in  due form, for calling a new Legislative Af-smbly  for Our said Province, -which Writs are to bear  date on the seventh day of June, instant, and to  be returnable on or before the thirty-first dav of  August next.  In Testimony Whekeo. We have caused  these Our Letters to be made Patent, and  the Public Seal of the said Province to be  hereunto affixed: Witness, the Honourable  Thos. R. McInnes, Lieutenant-Governor  of Our said Province of British Columbia,  in Our City of Victoria, in Our said Province, this seventh day of June, in the  year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, and in the sixty-  first year of Our Reign.  By Command.  B. H. TYRWHITT DRAKE,  Registrar of the Supreme Court.  [L.S.]  NOTICE.  THOS. R. MclNNES.  e______n ______ _g__a ���*_______=_.  PROVINCIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE.  _0th May. 1808.  HIS HONOUR the Lieutenant-Governor has  been pleased to appoint the undermentioned  persons to be Collectors of Votes, under the provisions of section l. of the " Redistribution Act,  1898," namely:  John D. Siiuiau.. of Revelstoke. for the Revelstoke Riding. West Kootenay Electoral District.  Alexander Lucas, of Kaslo. for the Slocan  Riding, WestKootenay Electoral District.  Rodei'ICk F. Toi.mie, of Nelson, for the Nelson Riding, WestKootenay Electoral District.  Joii.N'KiKKUr. of Rossland. for (he Rossland  Riding, West Kootenay Electoral District.  And His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor has  been pleased to appoint the undermentioned person to be a Distributing Collector, under the provisions of section 17 of the said Ace, namely:���  In tlie former Electoral District of West Kootenay, Gkoiuie A. McFahi.and, of Nelson.  NOTICE.  In the Matter of an assignment for the benefit of  all their Creditors made by Nestorius Angrig-  non and J. Edward Angrignon, lately doing  business as Hotel Keepers at New Denver,  B. C.  And in the Matter of notice to creditors to send  in their claims against the estate.  TT having been ordered that the notices for  1 claims inserted in The Ledce newspaper,  published at New Denver, B. C, and in the  British Columbia Gazette, be deemed sufficient  notice to the creditors of the said estate to send  iu their claims to the assignee thereof;  And it haying been further ordered that the  said assignee be at liberty to distribute the assets  oi the said estate amongst the parties entitled  thereto, having regard to the claims of whicli  such assignee has notice, upon inserting notice  of such intended distribution for two weeks in  The Ledge newspaper, and the British Columbia Gazette, and upon no further notices of claims  being given meanwhile;  I hereby give notice that on the twenty-seventh  (27th) day of June, 1898,1 will distribute all asset,  then available of said estate pro rata amongst  the creditors entitled thereto.  A. E. FAUQUIER, Assignee.  AND SOO-PACIFIC LINE.  TO ALL   EASTEKN   ASTD  EURO. EAST I'OINTS.  TO I'ACIFIC COAST,  JAl-AN,   CHINA   AND-  AUSTRALIA.  TO THE KICK and ACTIVE  MINING DISTRICTS OF  DAILY TO ST. PAUL.  SHORTEST  AND  QUICKEST  ROUTE  Klondike  andthe Yukon,  Close connections and no trouble.  Through tickets issued and Baggage checked  to destination.  NEW  TOIJRI^T  A A  n      '      DAILY (KXCEI'T TUESDAY)  OAK TO EASTERN CANADIAN  SERVICE     AN"U- s P0INTS  Train leaves New Denver Canyon Siding daily  at 8:15 a. m. Train arrives at New Denver  Canyon Siding at 3:-0]i in.  Boat connection daily (except Sundav) via.  Rosehery: Leaves New Denver at 8.35" a. m;  arrives at New Denver at 4 p. m.  Ascertain   present   REDUCED   RATES  and full information   by   addressing   nearest  local agent or���  G. B. GARRETT, Agent New Denver.  W. F. Anderson, Trav. Pass. Agt., Nelson.  E. J. Coyle, Dist. Pass. Agt., Vancouver.  _2T 4.11 sensible people travel via C. P. Ry and  Soo line.  INTERNATIONAL     KAVICATION  & TRADING CO.,   LTD.  Time Card effective May 10, 1898.  Subject to change without notice.  CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS  Cinderella, Medford and Keyser Fraction  Mineral Claims.  all   to   whom  Greeting.  A  come,-  VICTORIA, by the Grace of God, of the United  Kingdom o.' Great Britain and Ireland,  Queen, Defender of the Faith, &c, &c, &c.  To the Returning Officer of the Slocan Riding of  West Kootenay Electoral District:  \U"HEREAS. His Honour the Lieutenant-Go v-  >�� ernor of British Columbia has, by a Proclamation bearing date the 7th day of June, 1898,  been pleased to dissolve the Legislative! Assembly of the said Province; and whereas it is necessary to hold Elections throughout the said Province to fill the vacancies caused by such dissolution, We command you that, notice of the time  and place of Election being duly given, you do  cause Election to be made, according to law, of  One Member to serve in the Legislative Assembly  of the Province of British Columbia for the Slocan Riding of West Kootenay Electoral District,  and that you do cause the nomination of Candidates ut such Election to be held on the 25th dav  of June, 181)8, and do cause the name of such  Member, when so elected, whether he be present  or absent, to be certified to Our Supreme Court,  at the City of Victoria, on or before the 31st day  of August next, the Election so made, distinctly  and openly under Our Seal duly endorsed upon  f this Our Writ.  In Testimony Whereof, We have caused  there Our Letters to be made Patent under  the Gieat Seal of Our said Province of  British Columbia: Witness, the Honourable Thomas R. McInnes, at Our Government House, at Victoria, this seventh day of  June, in the year of Our Lord one thousand  eight hundred and ninety-eight.  By Command.  B. H. TYRWHITT DRAKE,  Registrar of the Supreme Court.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay  District.     Where  located: On  the South Fork of Carpenter Creek about one  mile and a half east of Three Forks.  riiAKE NOTICE that I, George B. Dean, acting  JL    as agent for Leonard B. Keyser,free miners'  certificate No. G910A, intend sixty days from the  date hereof to apnly to the Mining Recorder for a  certificate of improvements, for the purpose of  obtaining a Crown grant of the above claims.  And further take notice, that action under section 37. must be commenced before the issuance  of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 9th dav of June, 1898.  GEORGE B. DEAN.  SS.  INTERNATIONAL.  Leaves Kaslo at 3.30 a. m. every day except  Sunday, calling at all way points.  Connects at Five Mile Point with S. F. &N.  train at 6.45 a.m., arrives at Nelson at 7.20 a. m.  Leaves Nelson at 5 p. m., connecting at Five  Mile Point with train from Spokane, arriving at  Kaslo at 8.30 p. m.  Connects at Pilot Bay with ss. Alberta for  Bonner's Ferry and Kootenay River points.  Apex   Mineral   Claim.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District. Where located: North  of the Mountain Chief.  TAKE NOTICE that I, Herbert T. Twigg, agent  ior George W. Hughes, free miner's certificate No. 64,975, intend, sixty days from the date  hereof to apply to the Mining Recorder for a  certificate of improvements for the purpose of  obtaining a Crown Grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance of  such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 2nd day of June, 1898.  HERBERT T. TWIGG.  Convention   fractional   Mineral   Claim.  SS. ALBERTA.  Leaves Kaslo on arrival of K. & S. train on  Saturday and Tuesday, at 5.30 p. m., and Thursday at6 a. m., touching at all wav points. Connects at Bonner's Ferry with G. N. trains.  Leaves Bonner's Ferry at 2 p. m. on Sunday,  Wednesday and Friday, arriving at Kaslo 1 a. m.  next day.  Clo-e connection with East Kootenay points  via Jennings and Bonner's Ferry.  GEORGE  ALEXANDER, Gen'l Mgr  P. O. Box 122, Kaslo, B.C.  k  PROCLAMATION.  D. AL Eiieuts, Attorney-General.  WHEREAS, We are desirous and resolved, as  i V soon as may be, to meet Our people of Our  Province of British Columbia, and to have their  advice in Our Legislature, We do make known  uur Royal Will and Pleasure to call a new  Legislative Assembly of our said Province; and  do further deejai. that, by the advice of Our Ex-  NOTICE.  PROVINCIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,  8th June, 1898.  KIS HONOUR, the   Lieutenant-Governor   lias  been pleased to appoint Fletcher S.Andrews,  Esquire, to be Returning Officer for the Slocan  Lot 2288.  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay District.   Where located:    About  H miles east of New Denver, and adjoining  tlie Marion and Clipper mineral claims.  TAKE NOTICE that I, Robt. E. Palmer, as  agent for Albert Bchne, of New Denver, B.  C. free miner's certificate No. 81910, intend,  sixty days from the date hereof to apply to the  Mining Recorder for a certificate of improvements for the purpose of obtaining a Crown grant  of the above claim.  And further take notice that action under section 37 must be commenced before the issuance of  such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 19th day of Mav, 1898.  r. e: PALMER, P.L.S.  Willa Mineral Claim.  Heavy Miners' Rubber Coats,  Yellow Oil Coats  auss  AT  Postoffice Store, Sandon  The oldest newspaper in the world is  not, as is generally stated, the thousand-  year-old Kin Pan, of Pekin, but The  Tsing-Pao, or Pekin News, which was  first published more than 500 years before the Norman Conquest, and which  has been pubished without intermission  for nearly 1,400 years.  TlieiTsing-Pao has the appearance of  a yellow-backed magazine of 24 octave  pages, each page containing seven  columns consisting ofseven "characters."  Two editions are published���an edition  de luxe for the court and the upper  classes in China, at a cost of 24 cents a  month, and an edition, inferior in paper  and .printing, which costs 16 cents a  month.  The Tsing-Pao is The Times of China,  and chronicles the wealth and movements of the Emperor, the life at court,  and the reports of Ministers. It is painfully significant that every error in  printing the latter is punished with  death.  Woman is nearest perfection | when  most womanly.  ��Z&Z^'��/��/��/��/��/*��/��/��/�� /% /&/��/@/��/��/��/��/��/��^  The  ames  Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West  Kootenay district. Where located: Joins  Little Daisy, on Eight Mile creek.  "PAKE NOTICE that* I, George Ludlow Esta-  1 brooks, as agent for The Willow Gold Mining  Company, Foreign, free miner's certilicate No.  8-1,882, intend, sixty days from the date hereof, to  apply to the Mining Recorder for a certificate of  improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a  Crown grant of the above claim.  And further take notice that action, under section .17, must be commenced before the issuance  of such certificate of improvements.  Dated this 18th day of April, 1S9.S.  G. L. EST A BROOKS.  Noonday  Grey   .Eagle  July Mineral  and    _<'  Claims.  ourth    of  Situate in the Slocan  Mining Division of West  Kootenay District.   Where  located:   On  the  east slope of the Valley of Cody Creek, about  three miles from Cody.  ���pA'KE NOTICE that I, J.  H.  Gray, acting as  1    agent for Byron N.  White, free miner's certificate No. 74,2(>o, intend, sixty da vs from the date  hereof, to apply  to the Mining "Recorder for a  certificate of  improvements, for the purpose of  obtaining a crown grant of the above claims.  And further take notice that action under See.  37 must be commenced before tho issuance of such  certilicate of improvements.  Dated this Sth dav of September, 1897.  Nelson & Ft. Sheppard  Red  Mountain  RAILWAYS  The only all rail route without change  fears between Nelson and Rossland  nd Spokane and Rossland.  Direct Route to the   Mi _>  eral District of the Col-  villo Reservation,   Nelson,  Kaslo,   Kootenay  Lake and   Slocan  Points.  Daily, Except Sunday.  Leave. Arrive.  6:20 a.m.        NELSON        5:35 p.m  12:05 " ROSSLAND      11:20a.m  8:30 a.m.       SPOKANE      3:10 p.m  Train leaving Nelson at 8:30 a. m. make close  connections at Spokane with trains for all  Pacific Coast Points.  Close connection with Steamers for Kaslo and  all Kootenay lake points.  Passengers for Kettle   River and Boundary  Creek connect, at Marcus with stage daily.  KASLO & SLOGAN RY'  TIME CARD  Subject to change without notice  Trains run on Pacific Standard Time.  Leave 8 00  " S 30  ��� " 0 3(1  " !l 31  '���10 03  " 10 18  ������ 10 38  AlT.  10 /i0  A.M.  Arrive, 3 SO  " 3 15  '��� 2 15  00  46  33  12  00  P.M  11.00 a.m  11.2(1  "  NOTICE  T  TWO months after date I intend to make appli-  and work, Victoria, 11.C, for permission to purchase the following described binds. Commencing..!, a post planted about loo feet north of  Kuskanook creek and about eight miles front Ihe  mouth of said creek, in West Kootenay district,  said slake Ix.-inir marked G.L.. N.W. corner,  April _!ith, 1898, running 10chain's east, thence -10  chains south, thence lo chains west, thence 10  chains north to point of commencement and containing Kio acres of land more or les_.  GEORGE LESTER.  Nakusp, B.C., April 28th, 1808.  Kaslo  South Fork  Sproule's ''���  Whitewater il  Bear Lake "  McGuigan ''  Cody Junction  "  Sandon Leave  CODY   LINE.  ��� Sandon ��� Arrive, 11.15 a.m.  ��� Cody   ���   Leave, 11.25 a.m.  IRVING,  Truffle Mngr.  GE& F. COPELAND,  Superintendent  For cheap railroad and steamship; tickets tc  and from all points, apply to  S.  CAMPBELL,      " Agent, Sandon.  Leave,  Arrive  ROBT,  New Denver,  Has been re-opened under new management. The Dining Room will  always be up to the market, while  the bar will contain liquors and  cigars that cannot be surpassed for  quality and flavor, in the Slocan.  Old and new patrons will find this  hotel just like home.  JACOBSON&CO.  New  Spring  Goods,  Latest novelties  in Dress Goods for  Spring and Summer wear; ready-  made Clothing,  Neck wear, Hats,  and Caps, Boots  and Shoes ��� the  most complete stock in the lake section���at prices as low as it is possible  to make them. We invite your inspection. Look into our show- window.  "We are displaying a fine line of  novelties.  McLachlan & McKay,  New Denver.  AGENTS���Never before has the death of any  man caused such profound sensation throughout  the world as that of Mr. Gladstone. It is tlh re-  lore a real luxury to canvass for Ihe memorial  edition of the "Life and Work of Mr. Gladstone,"  because tlie public is ripe for it, ana the work  will sell on sight. Big book; low pric��,s; liberal  terms; freight paid. Send 75 cents lor Prospectus, which we return with first order.  BRADLEY--G .RRETSON COMPAN V.Limited  Toronto.  Brandon, B. C,  Assay Price List  Gold, Silver, or Lead,each   Gold, Silver and Lead, combined.  Gold and Silver   Silver and Lead   Coi>i>er (by Electrolysis)   Gold, Silver, Copixif and Lead...  Gold and Copier   Silver and Copper ���   Gold, Silver and Cop|>er   Platinum   Mercur'  j Iron or Manganese   , Lime,  Magnesium, Barium, Silica, Sulphur, each   Bismuth,Tin, Cobalt, Nickel, Antimony,  Zinc, and Arsenic, each .*.'.  Coal (Fixed Carbon, Volatile Matter, Ash,  and iiercentage of Coke, if Coking  Coal) .".  Tonus: 'Cash With Sample.  June 20th. 18!)...  .1.50  3 60  2 00  2 00  2 00  4 00  2��6G  2 50-  �����0.  5{0O  2.0��  2;o_  2 00  4 00  FRANK DICK,  Assayer and Analyst  BKICK  FOR   SALE.  JOHN   GOETTSCHE,  NEW DENVER.  Even   in   the   darkest   hour  of   earthly  woman's fond affection glows.���Sand.  ill,  B^ayiTTJs&^&r '^::!^^^^WyW?^Tj��^^Tw^i THE LEDGE, NEW DENVER, B.C., JUNE 16, 1898.  Fifth Year  MINING   RB0ORDS  The following is a complete list, of the  mining transactions recorded during the  week in the several. mining divisions of  the Slocan. Those of 2.e\v Denve- were  as follows:���  LOCATION'S.  -Sampson   Fraction,  Cody,  E   L  Jl'NK 7���Sampson Fraction, Miller Creek. G  Faundrey.  Coin -'raction, Cody, E L Warner and G  Faundrt-y.  Virdcn"!'" ruction,'Cody, John Gray,  Electric Fraction. Bear Lake. Kolit Williams  and W S Dn-wrv.  Raymond B and Richard B, Wilson creek, A K  Bhniienaiir.  Junk (������ Arcade, head Slocan lake, C F Dower.  Alberta. S-aion creek. Duncan McCuaig.  Harris. Three Forks, same.  Chelsia, Four Mile, David Bremner.  Junk IO���Lucky Bob. Carpenter, Robt Langill.  J-NKll���Cassie, Wilson. Robt NCook.  Jum: 13���Mars Fractional, south fork Carpenter, Duncan .. Forbes, Clifton P Srale.  Niat-'aru,Clifton creek, W S Clark.  Buffalo, same, J M M Beiiedum.  Foam. SIochii lake, J E Barrett.  Junk It���Reliance, south fork Carpenter, John  Foster.  Acadian, same. Arther Mullan.  Adelaide, same, B M Walton,  Park Hill, Wilson, il C Toinlinson.  Sigsbee Fraction, Miller creek, Wm Nivcn.  Pearl, llowson creek, Geo Monson.  ASSESSMENTS.  Jume T���Shareholder,,Badger State. ;  June 8���Printer's Boy.  JUNE H���Bostock, Diamond Cross.  Juke lo���Hercules, Bufl'ulo, Jo Jo, Rustler,  Battle Axe, Dower. Chief. Old Man.  June ll���Islington, T G, Apis, Blackbird,  Seattle, Ironsides, Nonpariel.  June 12���Firefly, Emily Edith, J I C, Snowbird, Pembroke, New Park, Western Slope,  Mentor, Tontine, Baby Fraction, ..Silver Tip,  Home Rule, Cromwell, J LP, Bismarck.  June I-l���Convention Fraction, New Spriug-  lield, Sampson.  TRANSFERS.  June 7���Reserve,Geo Lux to John Doeksteader.  June 21  Prospecting agreement, Scott Banderson, Chas  M Brewster, Geo L McNicol and C W Baldwin,  'all of Rossland.  Little Alice I, C W Baldwin to I C Hartman,  Jan 5, ��].0.  Little Alice J, Easterntownship J; same to  .same, May 2:*.  Eastern-township J, same to same, Jan G.  Eastern-township i, Camp Lode 1, T B Anderson to I C Hartman, May 10, ��80. ���  June 8��� Waterloo I/O, Wm Thurburn to FA  Mountain, March 3, ..500.  June io���Ollie Martin ., L C Cook to Chas A  Martin, Oct 7.  June 13���Northern Paciiic, Soho, Lorenzo  Alexander to M R W Rathborne.  SLOCAN    CITV    DIVISION.  May 7���Maple,  LOCATIONS.  Stephen Tripp;  Tyrant Fractional, Ewen 'McFady'en and Martin Lave-11.  May 8��� Renfrew, Win McNee, Manila, Wm  McNee; Psyclie. R Kurtzhals.  May 9���Annie L, C A Young;IBand Union, H  C Thomliuson.  ASSESSMENTS.  June 3���Ottawa, Two Brothers.  Junk l���Tally Ho, No 3, Hortensia, Fariniana.  June 6���Bonanza, Evening Star No 8, Eclipse  So 2, Unknown Group, Derby, Cracker Jack.  June 7���Falls View, Tamarack, Hilda.  June 8���Columbia No 5, Somerset,White Swan,  Sunshine No _, Lucky Boy.  June u���Centre Star, Rainbow, lono, Dayton,  Tin Plate, Scorpion.  .TKANSFEKS.  June 4���Prospect, Peter McNichol to Andrew  Morton.  Klondyke No 2, Peter McNichol to same.  June 7���Rawhidei, E B Dunlop to J G Dewar.  Junk 8���Woodtiek J, l/i_, l/u and I/O interest, D  G McCraig to J M Harris Jno Gable, D J Weir  and Peter Linquist respectively.  Sabbath {. 1/12,1/5 and i interest, D J Weir to  same.  June '.)���Buchera, lono and Allcdi'n. all interest  in the first two  and \ in  the latter. Jas F Arm  strong to Arcangels de Miehcle.  AINSWOI-TII   DIVISION.  LOCATIONS.  June 4���Peacock, AV A Stephenson; Porcupine,  Lancashire, Cymro, W Goodwin, E F Smith, E J  Seovil, Goo Parkinson; Spain, R E McArthur;  Punch, H Roy Stove!; Elba V, same; Lena V.  James Anderson; Hamlet, same; Othello. H Roy  Stovel; Allen, D Tuomey: Lucky Jim, Carlotta,  H Roy Stovel; Bermuda, Dan Tuomey.  June C���COD, C Van Moerkerke; Glasgow,  same.  June 7���Albanv,   K   E  Sloan; Eclipse,  C K  Henry; Lookout. Chris Anderson; Daniel,' Theo  Adams; Toothpick, Incas. Clipper, L<  Sloan; Eclipse,  i.j.--... i. ���   ,  .il'l  ,. . Louis Scholl:  Dewey, J Miller and G Schilling; Silver Queen,  John Clinton; Dowie.P H Walsh; Dessa Fraction,  A C Pearson!  June 8���Veteran. R A McCrea; Manilla, John  Moberg;' Capital Fraction, John Hcndrix and  Christ Krucger; Iron Duke, C Martin.  June 9���Hilda, Jacob Rathyen: E A C, Louis  Scholl; Olympia. Andrew Johnston; Hillside, A  O Mooers.  June IO���Maine,  E   J Seovil; Dazy, Edward  Dedolph; Sun Beam, A Looby, A McLeod, N Me  Leod; Scotch Thistle, Wild R.  same.!  Rose, Three Friends,  ASSESSMENTS.  June _���Viger No 2, A Y, Montoseano, Solo.  June (i���Broken Hill, Ronoke, New Orleans'  Delia, Hopeful, Comstoek, Corona, Montana'  Black Bear Fraction.  June 7���Vancouver. Bob Ingersoll, Robinson,  Hansen.  June 8���Vista, True Lead, Scenic, Lake View  Grass Roots. Lucky Boy. Mable C,. Silver Tip,  Emma. Tamarack, Morning Bell, Hidden  Treasure, Crown Point.  June !�����Cariboo, Island Boy, Silver Plume,  Resurgam, Yankee Kid, Donnegan, Silver Six,  Athol. Lydia A, Moncton. Blizzard.  June io���Mogul, Standard.  TRAKS1--EKS.  June 4���Porcupine, Cymro, Lancashire. W  Goodwin, E J Seovil, E F Smith to Geo Parkinson.  June 8���Truant. Samuel Underbill to Donald  Grant  Bright Hope, Thos Workman to same.  June IO���Gold Bug, Sister Mollie, Rachel, Gor  don, Lizzie Fuller, Eagle Bird. Marsden. Lovell,  1/0, Walsh's Luck, S B. J, Eclipse J, Kitty Burke  1/., Yubadnin, Silver Queen. Susie E, J-. You Bet  Jack Pot, Hoop Up. Slide Out,  Walsh to Normau McLeod.  Stand oil", 1/., M ,J  S.    MINI-HAL    PRODUCT.  We produce  advance sheet  dustiy," some  figures   relating  below  from   tlie editors  of    "Tlie   .Mineral   In-  interesting    facts   and  to the  mineral produc  tion of tlie United States for 1897:  "Tlie total value of the mineral production of the United States in 1S.7 was  $74(',2'W, .S_, against $7 .7,<l5S,7f>l in 18!)..  The values given are generally at tlie  mine or works: but with a few of the  principal metals���such as lead, copper or  zinc���this is not possible, and their  values are taken at tlie leading markets.  "The total value of the output in 189.  exceeeded that of the mineral and metal  production of all Continental Europe,  nearly double that of the United Kingdom/the value of whose mineral output  in 1.S9C was, in round figures, about  $340,000,000, while that of Germany was  about $300,000,000, that of France  $1.10,000,000, and that of Belgium 8100,-  000,000.  "There is necessarily some duplication, quantities and values being given  of Eome of the raw materials which are  used in making other products; thus  bauxite used in making aluminum, iron  ore used in making pig iron, coal used in  coke, and a few other things.   Deducting  these necessary duplications, we find  that the total value of our production in  1S97 reached the sum of $678,966,64-.  "This output is limited entirely to ores  and other substances mined in.the United States and   to   metals reduced  from  those ores.    In  addition there was also  a large quantity  of metals  reduced or  rerined in   this country from  imported  ores or base bullion.    The total production of this class reported was 5S4,983 oz.  gold;   40,218,776  oz.   silver;   26.93S/-54  lbs. copper; 4,099,390 lbs. nickel; 92,117  short tons lead; the total value of these  metals being $47,127,174.   This output of  our   metallurgical   works is   altogether  additional to  that recorded in the total.  "These  metals  were obtained chiefly  from ore, bullion, furnace products and  silver-lead imported from Mexico, Mew-  found . and   Canada.    A  comparatively  small amount of gold and silver ore and  bullion comes  from  Central  and South  America.     Also    we    receive   a   large  amount of pyrites from Spain and Portugal, all of which contains a little copper.  From British  Columbia and "Mexico we  receive  chiefly    lead-bearing   ore   and  silver-lead, from which   a   large part of  our lead supply is obtained.    The nickel  is all from ores or matte produced by the  mines at  Sudbury, Ont.   AVe have not  included in the above quantities the iron  smelted   from   foreign   ores,   which   is  small in actual amount and insignificant  in comparison with the total output; nor  have   we   included   the   manganese  in  foreign ores which  enters into the composition of the spiegeleisen   and ferro-  manganese that is made here.    The lead  industry is the one most affected by the  foreign "material that   is  imported, the  quantity of copper  being comparatively  small. . ,  Following is a summary showing the  course of metal production in detail during the year:  Aluminum.���The prouduction in 1S97  was, 4,000,000 lbs. $1,400,000) against  1,300,000 ($520,000) in the previous year.  The increase was due partly to the reduction in price for the metal ancl partly  to the development of a greatly increased  export trade.  Antimony.���The output increased from  1,226.000 lbs. ($84,717) to 1,500,000 ($107,-  250). This was produced chiefly from  imported ores, although the production  of domestic ores increased from 150 tons  to 500 tons.  Copper.���The increase in production  from 479,806,183 lbs. in 1896, to 510,190,-  719 lbs. in 1S97, came chiefly from the  mines of Arizona and Montana.  Gold.���The production in the United  States increased from 2,558,433 trov ozs.  $52,8S6,209 in 1896) to 2,864,576 ($59,210,-  795) in 1S97. The greater part of the  increase was due to Colorado, which  State is credited with an output of $19,-  579,637 and now leads all the others in  pointof gold proluction. The Cripple  Creek mines furnish upward of 50 per  cent, of the total yield of the State.  South Dakota and Alaska made increased outputs, owing to the extension of  operations at the huge mines at Dead-  wood and on Tread well Island, and the  outlook is for a still further large increase in the yield of gold from these  sources. The large production of the  De Lamar rnine caused a considerable  increase in the figures for Nevada. There  was a small increase in the output of  Arizona and Montana. Contrary to expectations at the beginning of the year  there was a falling off in production both  in California and in Utah. In the former State the camps of Nevada County  Ml far below their record of the previous  year, while in Utah the production of  the Mercur district was only a trifle more  then 1896, the new large mills not having been completed in time to add anything of consequence to the total. Although the increase in gold production of  the United States in 1897 was very large  there is much probability that there will  be a further increase in 1898. American  refiners turned out 584,983 troy ozs.($12,-  091,599) of fine gold from ores and bullion imported chiefly from Canada and  Mexico, making a total addition of'$71,-  302,394 to the domestic supply of gold  during the year.  IrOJi,���.The make of pig iron in the  United States ;increased from 9,623,127  long tons ($91,577,610) in 1896 to 9,652,-  680 ($92,677,312) in 1897. The production of iron ore was 17,000,056 long tons  ($31,200,889) in 1896 and 18,316,967 ($31,-  138,S44) in 1897. Upward of 66 per cent,  of the production of irc-n ore was from  the Lake Superior region. The production of pig iron in 1S97 was the largest  for any single year in the history of the  United States.  Lead.���The production of lead from  ores mined in the United States increased from 174,692 short tons ($10,411,643)  to 197,718 ($11,784,094).. Besides this  there was a large amount of lead ore  and silver-lead imported from British  Columbia and Mexico and sd_ el ted and  refined in the United States, part of it  being re-exported. The increase in the  domestic lead production in 1897 was  due chiefly to southeast and southwest  Missouri and the Cceur d'Alene district  of Idaho. The production of lead in  Colorado was 40,009 in the previous  year. The production of the Cceur  d'Alene mines increased from 37,250  short tons to 55,750. The production in  southeast and southwest Missouri was  45,710 short tons in 1897.  Nickel.���For several years, since the  Lancaster Gap mine was closed, the only  nickel produced by the United States  from domestic ores has been a small  amount derived as a by-product from  lead smelters' matte from southeast Missouri. The output of nickel from this  source was 33,700 lbs. ($11,668) in 1897,  against 17,170 ($4,464) in the previous  year. There is a large production of  nickel oxide and nickel salts in tlie  United States from nickel-copper matte  imported from Sudbury, Ontario.  Platinum.���A small amount of platinum is obtained annually in tlie United  States as a by-product in the refining of  certain gold bullion from California.  We have estimated this at 200 troy ozs.  in 1897, the same amount as in the year  previous. Tlie director of the Mint reports to us also the production of 20.25  troy ozs. of iridium.  Quicksilver.���The output fell off from  decline in the value of silver, which compelled many mines (whose ores contain  their chief value in silver) to close down,  especially such mines as the Ontario and  Daly, of Park City, Utah. The falling  off in the production would have, been  much greater had it not been for the  comparatively high prices for copper and  lead which stimulated the production of  those metals, and, consequently, the  silver carried with them. There was,  therefore, a large increase in silver production from Butte, Mont., and the  Cceur d'Alene. Colorado and Utah  showed a large falling off in production,  while there was an increase from Montana and Idaho. Besides the silver  produced from ores mined in the United  States, American refiners turned out  40,31S,776 troy ozs. of silver derived from  ores, bullion and silver-lead imported  from Canada and Mexico. The average  price of silver in New York was 59.79c.  per fine oz. in 1897, against 67.1c. in  1896.  Zinc.���The production increased from  77,637 short tons ($6,117,796) in 1896, to  100,387 ($8,271,889). This huge increase,  which took place especially in the western districts, was brought about by the,  high price established for the metal by  a combination of part of the producers  and the establishment of several new  works, and enlargement of the capacity  of others, outside of the combination.  The production in 1S97, which was thus  increased so heavily, far outstripped  consumption, and as a result the combination was obliged to market a good i  deal of its spelter abroad at comparatively low prices. The exports for the year  were larger than ever before in the  history of the United States. The final  outcome was the disruption of the combination.  SH-VBlt'S   UPWARD   MOV*;.  FUN    AND    MISCKI.I.ANKY.  The street car struck the rear wheel  of the bicycle. Tlie bicyclist described  | a parabola and fell upon a pile of brick.  ! The bicyclist raised'on one elbow, reach-  led an arm toward a n.u- pork .1 of the  ; knickerbockers, and collapsed, insensi-  | ble. A sergeant of police felt in the  j pocket and drew ont a silver cocktail  j flash labelled, "I. J. Jones, 400 Bonton  I Avenue."  ] "Go to 400 Bonton1 Avenue, said the  j sergeant to a police oiiicer, "and tell  ; Mrs. Jones that Mr.. Jones lias���"  | The sergeant paused and drew a hand  ���i mirror from the other-rear po.ket of the  i knickerbockers.  i     "���Tell  Mrs.  Jones   that  Mr.   Jones  | has���"  The druggist who was assisting tickled  the bicyclist's lip with a leather he was  trying to burn under the nostrils. Then  the bicyclist smiled and faintly murmured:    "Charlie!"  "���Tell Mr. and Mrs. Jones that .Miss  Jones has met with an accident."  Spring stock of Hats, Feathers, Veiling, Chef-on's and other goods for ladies  just received at Mrs. Merkley's.  Provides ample and pleasant accommodation for the traveling' public.  ��� Telegrams' for rooms promptly attended to.  STEGE & AVrSON.  Proprietors.  DO NOT OVER..001  When  in  Silverton,   especially if  you have a thirst with you.  The beer is kept on ice, while the whiskey  lias  that flavor and power so  much appreciated by the traveller when he is weak and weary.  THOMAS CLAIR, Proprietor.  H.'H. Knox,  Iln* removed to tl  Dunn's Review states the condition of  silver.    "In spite of small  buying- for  local consumption thenar silver market  was active and strong* in  the wake of  London.   Brokers here were buyers of  about 1,400,000 ounces for export, and  at the close more was wanted at a shade  above the London parity. The advance  did not have   the   effect of attracting*  more supplies to New York.    Foreign  demand was very .generally explained  by   the. critical' condition   of Spanish  finances, compelling* the Bank of Spain  to purchase silver to increase its cash  reserve.    This operation was probably  a conversion of gold into silver.    India  was not a large buyer,  India Counci  bills   being  allottee, at an advance o  1-locl.   to  1515-lCJd. per rupee.   Since  1st   the   India   Council   has    realized  ��3,684,609    from   its   sales   of   drafts,  against ��1,026,669 a year ago.   -Thus  far this year silver shipments from London to the East have been  valued at  ��3,078.468,  against  ��2,158,855  in   1897  aiid:��2,555,330 in 1896."  Under the war revenue bill just passed  by the United States congress 81,500,000  silver dollars will be coined monthly,  which will probably have a tendency  to enliven the silver'market.  Newmarket  Block and is prepared to repair  every dcseripli,>u of  Port of Nakusp.  THOS. ABRIEL  GUSTOnS BROKER,  Real Kstate, Mines & Insurance.  Nakusp, B. C.  Disabled  Watches.  THK   TRITE    I.L.DJS    I$ONTI)-_I>,  The Hall Mines, through Supt.Davies  and T. G. Proctor, have taken a ��65,000  bond on the True Blue, the copper proposition recently discovered on what  should be called Kaslo mountain,'24  miles southwest of the city, says the  Kootenain. The ore showings were  thoroughly sampled last Tuesday and  assays made at Nelson show an average  value 15 per cent, copper and some  other values, gold and silver. Picked  samples gave values of 33 per cent,  copper, upwards of 86.00 in gold, and 3  ounces silver. Work is to commence  at once. A force of 10 to 15 men will  complete and improve the trail and  houses and outworks are to go up forthwith; a developing* force began operations at the same time, and a thorough  system of exploration is to be carried  on throughout the summer.  J.R.6. B. Gamer��*.  Formerly of Winnipeg.  Furnish Clothing  ���:in the  -   Latest Style  ���: of the : ���  Tailors    -JRtft.  SANDON,  $f ^ f f f f f f f f fff ff f ffff f ff ff fff ^f^l^  HOTE  SILVERTON, B.C.  Is a new three-story hotel situated near the wharf. The  house is plastered and the  rooms are furnished in a  manner calculated to make  travelers call again. Mining  and Commercial men will appreciate the home comforts ot  this hotel.  BRANDON a BARRETT  cl/%< ^/^/%^/^/^-ti^%/%^/^% ^/lb  *  Specials  in new Suits m  >:s  WHOLESALE GROCERS  Agents for 13. (J. Sugar Refinery and Royal  City Planing Mills."  Dealers in  Hardware,   Tin   and   Grraniteware,  .liners' Supplies, Paints, Oils, Glass and Putty, Doors & Windows.  A   10-STAMP   Mtl-T..  A. B. Irwin, the manager of the Canadian Pacific Exploration, limited, announces that his company will proceed  at once with the erection of a 10-stamp  mill and a five-drill compressor at its  property, the Porto r.ico, near Ymir. It  is expected that the new plant will be  erected and in running order within six  months. An a_rial tramway of 2,500  feet will be constructed to carry the ore  from the mine to the mill. The ledge,  which has been opened at three levels  by tunnclls, is producing excellent concentrating- ore, and the mill is expected  to vield fine results.  Bonded by McKenzie &  Mann.  McKenzie & Mann, tlie railroad contractors, recently bonded the Big Patch  group for $45,000 for 30 days.    Darrow  & French, the owners, to retain a one-  fifth interest in the property. The Big  Patch is situated at the head of Porcupine creek, near Nelson. McKenzie  & Mann will put a force of men to work  on the Big Patch at once and develop  the property as rapidly as possible.  Assays have been made on picked  samples that run as high as 83,900 to  tlie ton,       ''  Kioli ItoeK from  Lardcan Country.  I have lately received a stock of  well-selected, handsome suitin.ys  I'or Spring1 make-up, and T earnestly invite your inspection of  them. Some excellent qualities  and patterns, and at -especially  low prices���lower than ever put  upon the market in this section  before.  I guarantee a neat, natty fit,  and satisfaction in every particular. Are you wanting a Spring1  suit?  JI. A. WILSON,  The Reliable Slocan Tailor.  Newmarket Blk, New Denver, B. C.  Wholesale and Retail  A lot of fine looking ore has been  received from the claims of thel_ardc;iu-  Goldsmith Mines, limited, by Smith  Curtis, the secretary of the company.  Tlie ore carries gold, silver and copper.  Assays from one lead gives as high as  �����20 in gold, 1,008 ounces in silver, and  18 per cent, in copper. Another lead  returns values of from 851 to ��11*2. The  claims of the company are located near  Thomson's Landingj neai  end of Arrow Lake.  and  Slocan  ita  NEW  DENVER, B.C.  NI.W DENVER and SILVERTON.  Fresh and Salt Meats  Poultry* Eggs, Etc  SHOPS AT  ALL I-I PORT A XT  KOOTENAV.  I'OINTS  IN  mo  of many  Sizes,  Kinds,  and Prices,  at  T. H. Hoben's  :ar  the   Upper  20,S()3 (iasks ($1,108,997) in 1890 to 2(5,079  $991,002) in 1897. There have been no  new discoveries of late years in the  United States which have come to anything, and tlie entire production continues to come from California. The  decrease in 1897 was chiefly to the permanent closing of the Sulphur Bank  mine, the temporary suspension of operations in the Mirabel, or Standard mine,  and the diminished production of the  Great Western and Abbott.  Silver.���The domestic production decreased from 58,488,810 troy ozs. in 1896  to 50,457,292 troy ozs. in 1897. This  large decrease ie attributed to the heavy  She sing's with a g  sion, doesn't she.  Yes, she does; but  vou must close vour  reat deal of expres-  it's tlie  kind that  eyes to appreciate.  Gents' Furnishings, Ladies' and Children's Boots and Shoes are selling at cost  at Mrs. Merkley's.  F. Pyman has again commenced to  do business in New Denver. Bring  your watches to him when they are out  bf order. Pyman's new building, Sixth  street.  The latest novelties in Millinery and  Dress Goods, etc., just received at Mrs.  Merkley's.  EEB J. SC.U1HE  Nelson, B. C.  Merchant Tailor.  Full Line  of Snitina,'s and  Trouserino's ?Jwavs on hand.  AMOS THOMPSON, W.  D.  MITCHELL  Manager. Secretary.  r. u. Thompson, Notary Public  NEW DENVER,   B.C.  Mines and  Mining Properties for  sale.    Abstracts,    Ac.  Correspondence solicited.  Agents for Phoenix  Insurance Co.  of London, Eng.  OTEL  Dining Room and Bar  class in every respect,  well furnished. Trail  Ten and Twelve Mile  Pack and Saddle Animals to hire.  ALLEN & CORY, Proprietors.  Vevfcv, Slocan Lake, B.C.  DR. MILLOY,  First-  Rooms  open  to  creeks.  STRAYED.  f\S JUNE   7TH,  \J   mane and tail,  applying to-  New Denver. B.  a  bay  Finder  PALMA  C.  saddle  horse,   black  will be rewarded by  ANGRIGNON,  Rooms in Reco Hotel, Sandon.  WANT -D���Hcnest. enertretic yountr men:  farmer..' sons, teachers, students, clerks and  others who are admirers of Mr. Gladstone, and  would like to spend the next three months in  telling the matchless story of hi.s life. We teach  vou how to do the work and guarantee success.  From *2.00 to ; 5.00 a day absolutely sure. There  is no fear of failure and it will be enjoyable work.  Particulars furnished free.  BRADLEY-GARRETSON CO., Limited,  Toronto.  An office of the Slocan Hospital has  been opened at Sandon under the  medical superintendence of DR.  P. H. POWERS. Subscribers on presentation of their orders or tickets at  the Sandon office will receive medical  or surgical treatment and the necessary medicines tree of charge.  All serious cases will be admitted  to the Hospital for treatment.  Miners in regular employ, subscribing through their payroll, can  secure all the privileges of theabove.  For further information apply to���  J. E. Brouse, M.D.,  New Denyer, B.C.  ASLO HOTEL  Family & Commercial.  arge  And  Comfortable  ^     Rooms  Fitted with every modern  convenience. Special protection against fire. Rates $2.50  and $3 per day.  COCKLE & PAPWORTH,  Proprietors.  The  Nakusp,  Is a comfortable hotel for travellers  to stop at.  Mrs. McDougald,

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